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THE D’DECOR STORE AHMEDABAD - Mondeal Retail Park S. G. Road: 69000105 BANGALORE - Kannan Building M. G. Road: 41236677 CHANDIGARH - Madhya Marg SCO 54, Sector 26: 5077736 CHENNAI - Nungambakkam Khader Nawaz Khan Road: 28332355 DELHI - Lajpatnagar 3 Near Haldirams: 41436677 KOCHI - Edapally Nr. Oberon Mall: 2809109 MUMBAI - Andheri (W) Nr. Kokilaben Hospital: 65976677 MUMBAI - Bandra (W) Station Rd., Notan Heights: 61152530 MUMBAI - Ghatkopar (E) M.G. Road: 61152510 MUMBAI - Malad (W) Inorbit Mall: 9321616677 NAGPUR - Ajni Square Wardha Road: 9168652091


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D'DECOR Galleries - DELHI - Kirti Nagar: Nirmals: 9810393010. GURGAON - M.G. Road: Mo: 4777888. LUDHIANA Pakhowal Road: Naveen Bharat Furnishings: 2432901. JALANDHAR - Opp. Lovely Street: Mansaram Mahajan: 5015805. HYDERABAD - Ameerpet: Jaydurga Furnishing: 9391049852. BANGALORE - Domlur Ring Road: Drapes Avenue: 25351550 / 40977040. Jayanagar 5th Blk: Floating Walls: 22441034. SURAT - Bhaga Talao: Drape Shoppe: 9825425526. CHENNAI - Park Town: Vishvesh Textiles: 25359999. MEERUT - Begum Bridge Road: G.S. Furnishings: 9997098439. PUNE - Laxmi Road: Girisons Bed Bath & Furnishings: 24458132/33. Pimpri: Kukreja Handloom & Furnishings: 27410199. AGRA - Jain Furnishing: 9319103503. Modi Enterprises: 9897961850. AHMEBABAD - S.G. Road: Raiff: 8866004222. Bharat Furnishing: 26872027. Drape Shoppe: 2686 0009. Navrangpura: Neptune House: 26565624. C.G Road: Arrow Drape: 26404648. Ashram Road: Kaypee Corporation: 26577441. Dynamic House: 40035444. AMRITSAR - Lawrence Road: Ganpati Exclusive: 9872989159. AURANGABAD Sajawat Handloom: 2340340. Sheetal Furnishing: 2486777. BANGALORE - Domlur Ring Road: Drapes Avenue: 25351550 / 40977040. Dickenson Road: Skipper Furnishings: 41134356/41134357. Indira Nagar: Petals: 40914782. Floating Walls: 25200313. Jayanagar 4th Blk: Floating Walls: 41510419. Koramangala: Floating Walls: 41313117. Shivaji Nagar: Drapes Avenue: 25596506. Race Course Road: Petals: 22372244. St. Marks Road: Tulips: 22211113/4. Chickpet: Shah Surajmal Magraj: 22208270/22871376. Whitefield: Floating Walls: 41272961. Hebbal: Floating Walls: 40937951. Banshankari: Floating Walls: 42146747. BARODA - R.C. Dutt Road: Aavaran: 2313236. CHANDIGARH Manimajra: Krishna Carpet Co.: 2733275. Sector 17/B: Krishna Carpet Co.: 2703001. CHENNAI - Neelangarai: Ode Interior: 24491455. COIMBATORE - R.S. Puram: Kwality :2551626. DELHI - Lajpatnagar: Jagdish Stores: 25710462. Harisons Furnishings: 45222700. HomeSaaz: 29845100. Nirmals: 29848888. Sita Fabrics: 29837562. Leela Furnishings: 29835566. Jail Road: Nirmals: 25620587. Karol Bagh: Jagdish Stores: 43056000. Pitampura: Surprise Furnishings: 27019977. Shalimar Bagh: Harisons Furnishings: 47555000. DHULIA - Seema Handloom: 233287. GOA - Panjim: Boa Casa: 2225923. Porvorim: Adore: 6655891. GUWAHATI - Fancy Bazar: Ashoka Furnishing: 2514118. G.S. Road: Ashoka Furnishing: 2457801. Vinayak Furnishing: 9085077707. HYDERABAD - Abid's Off Santosh Sapna Talkies: Drapes N More: 66787100. Banjara Hills: Mayaas Furnishings: 9246260884. Darpan Furnishings: 9866587165. Jubilee Hills: Studio Orion: 65344444. Panjagutta Near Nagarjuna Circle: Skipper Furnishings: 30621171. INDORE - MT Cloth Market: Lalchand Hassanand: 9826077553. New Grah Shobha: 2574913. Ushanagar: D'Decor Factory Outlet: 9827451510. JAIPUR - Mirza Ismail Road: Ashoka Furnishing: 5119059. Near Panchvati Circle: Goldendrape: 2604093. Vaishali Nagar: Casa Aaurum:4068333/34. KANPUR - 80 Feet Road: High Street: 3072333. KOCHI - Odds & Ends: 9846048215. Royal Furnishing - 9447665845. Panampilly Nagar: Luxrays: 9447065401. Diwaniya Furnishings: 2345672/73. KOTTAYAM - Elba : 9447179064. KOLKATA - Park Street: Times Furnishings: 30285858/59. Russell Street: Skipper: 40065353. AJC Bose Road: Stellar Furnishings: 22902294/93. Homeland Mall: Mobel D'ffine: 9051027777. KOLHAPUR - Riddhi Curtain Handloom House:9890803230. KOZHIKODE - Kannur Road: In-Style Creation: 4021166. Puthiyara Road: Solid: 9846095599. LUCKNOW Huzzainganj: Monarch-The Furnishings Gallery: 4159999. MUMBAI - Bandra: Novelty Furnishing: 67896900. Foam Palace: 26428146. Borivali: Osaka Furnishings: 28612945. Dadar T.T.: A To Z Furnishings: 9833066415. Kemps Corner: Bharat Furnishing: 61456050. Gamdevi The Home Fabric: 23823448/47. Malad: Novelty Furnishing: 28807331. Kings: 9833458044. Thane: Bharat Furnishing: 25806050. Vashi: Novelty Furnishing: 67891700. Vile Parle: Bharat Furnishing: 66804545. CHEMBUR: Daffodils: 9821226204. NAGPUR - Sita Burdi: Malik Déco House: 2526787. Residency Road: Jayshree Traders: 2525911. NASHIK - Sharanpur Road: Daffodils: 9823023245. NOIDA - Noida Handloom: 9810019728. PANIPAT - S.D. College Road: Prince Home Fashion: 2635392/2644837. D'Decor Factory Outlet: 9416019493. PANCHKULA - Sector No. 11: Gagan Handloom: 3918361. PATNA - New Dak Bunglow Road: Rama: 9431015695. PUNE - Off Laxmi Road: Kejals Furnishings: 24453776. M.G. Road: Themes Furnishing & Linen: 41405200. Karve Road: Premchand Furnishing: 25456969. Nana peth: Orchid Furnishing: 26056070. Ganesh peth: Softzone: 9822092629. Baner Road: Bharat Furnishing: 25657705/06. Aundh: Tulips: 25899784. Kharadi Road: The Home Fabric: 9049148369. RAIPUR - Pandri : Lifestyle Furnishing: 2582776. Sohan Sales: 522193. SURAT Ghod Dod Road: The Decora: 2654234. Sanskriti Furnishing: 2232099. Thrissur - Paliyam Road: Chikkus curtains & Furnishing: 9847046911. TRIVANDRUM - CFC: 9895245566. Available at HOME TOWN and other leading home furnishing stores.


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D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.


CONTENTS July-August 2016

32 34

EDITOR’S LETTER CONTRIBUTORS

DISCOVER

43

OPINION The editor of Condé Nast Traveller India picks the best features from the top hotels around the world to create the perfect hotel room. ON THE COVER THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

The double-height balcony at AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara’s home in Sri Lanka. The 17-foot-tall windows were designed by Kannangara. (‘Space, Volume & Intuition’, pg 160).

ASHISH SAHI

Photographer: Björn Wallander

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44

FOCUS Packing well for a holiday is part talent, part survival tactic. In this story on packing for a glamorous holiday, AD combines the two and elevates it into an art form.

56

SHOPS From a rustic forest lodge to a barefoot chic beach shack—recreate these travel destinations in your home with these products.

62

AGENDA A round-up of people, ideas, innovations and events in the news.

70

COLUMN AD’s editor-at-large makes a case for changing how we build with glass— and speaks to the Indian architects helping us do so.

76

INDULGE Take note of trends from the world’s biggest watch fairs, and explore Bulgari’s Serpenti collection in our annual watch report.

90

DESIGN Iconic Japanese design brand Muji is finally on its way to India—with not one, but two stores opening in the country this year. AD examines the brand’s design philosophy.

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BJÖRN WALLANDER

contents


contents Pg 90

PERSPECTIVE

95

SPOTLIGHT In our annual coverage of Milan Design Week, AD discovers the brands and products piquing the interests of Indian and international designers; reveals the latest trends from the biggest design fair of the year; and captures snapshots from the annual celebrations at Milan Design Week—at the party co-hosted by AD and SICIS India.

138

ARCHITECTURE AD50 firm Studio Lotus overhauled the cafe at Jaipur’s City Palace from a run-of-the-mill restaurant into a fine dining experience called Baradari—a shiny, new addition to the ongoing Rajasthani renaissance.

144

PROJECT The JDH Urban Regeneration Project is a plan to transform Jodhpur’s old walled city into a vibrant hub that celebrates the region’s history, culture, art and commerce. ACCESS Since 2012, Nilufar Gallery owner Nina Yashar has created temporary living spaces appointed with iconic pieces of furniture and art—in design capitals Milan, Paris and Beirut— under the moniker Squat. This year, the exhibition shifted to London, with architect and designer Shalini Misra and curator Mehves Ariburnu.

SPACES

153

SHIPSHAPE Aboard her personal yacht—a traditional wooden gulet—London-based designer Anouska Hempel has designed a space imbibed with her trademark style.

160

SPACE, VOLUME & INTUITION At his home and office in Colombo, AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara has created a space that showcases his particular brand of tropical modernism.

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TAKUMI OTA

148

Pg 56


contents 170

ROCK THE BOAT Paris-based design duo Patrick Gilles and Dorothée Boissier designed the ultimate megayacht, complete with interiors decked in marble and parquet flooring.

180

THE OTHER SIDE OF GOA Hotelier and designer Isla Van Damme created a relaxed home in the interiors of Goa, away from the hustle and bustle of the tourist-filled state.

188

GREEK REVIVAL Stylist Charlotte Stockdale and product designer Marc Newson moved into a small cottage while their dream home was being built. What was meant as a temporary fix soon became a cherished home.

196

WORKBOOK Samir Wadekar adapts the international styles in our pages for your home.

ADVICE The search for vintage furniture is like a treasure hunt—best done with precise directions. We offer you insiders’ secrets in our round-up of the best antique stores around India.

212

SCOUTS A low-down on the hottest products and newest launches to hit the market this season.

220 222

STOCKISTS An A to Z of the stores in our pages. AD 10 Stefano Core, CEO of Valcucine and DRIADE, is an ardent traveller—and this list of his 10 favourite things and places attests to that.

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SURBHI SETHI

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JÉRÔME GALLAND

INSIDE


EDITOR greg Foster EDITOR-AT-LARGE Manju Sara Rajan MANAGING EDITOR Sanhita Sinha Chowdhury ART DIRECTOR Ashish Sahi PHOTO EDITOR Kim Sidhu STyLE EDITOR Sonali Thakur ASSOCIATE EDITOR Leena Desai COPy EDITOR Tyrel Rodricks WATCH EDITOR Rishna Shah ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Almas Jani STyLIST Samir Wadekar PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Shreya Basu MANAGER SyNDICATION Michelle Pereira SyNDICATION COORDINATOR Giselle D’Mello DIGITAL EDITOR Ela Das DIGITAL WRITER Tora Agarwala

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Amit Navarange SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER Sunil Nayak COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER Sudeep Pawar PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Vijay Salunkhe, Mangesh Pawar

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Pete Bermejo Sunil Sethi Nonie Niesewand Divia Patel Neha Prasada Namita A Shrivastav Michael Snyder Divya Mishra Gauri Kelkar Arati Menon

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ricardo Labougle Antonio Martinelli Tom Parker

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR ArJuN MehrA PUBLISHER Deepa Bhatia ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING DIRECTORS Malvika Narayan, Taruna Banerjee SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGER Kapil Tolani ACCOUNT MANAGER Poonam Satiya AD SALES COORDINATOR Varun Sama ITALy SALES REPRESENTATIVE Angelo Carredu MIDDLE EAST SALES REPRESENTATIVE IAS Media US ADVERTISING MANAGER Alessandro Cremona ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Amrita Singh SENIOR MANAGER - DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Anitha Ramabhadran (Bengaluru) SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGER - DIGITAL Kritika Sharma (New Delhi) DIGITAL SALES MANAGER Akshat Saxena (New Delhi) MANAGING EDITOR - DIGITAL BRANDED CONTENT Nisha Samson SENIOR EXECUTIVE - AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Tanishta Singh COMMERCIAL MANAGER - DIGITAL Ishani Roychoudhary ASSISTANT MANAGER- DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Rukmini Guha MARKETING DIRECTOR Oona Dhabhar MARKETING MANAGER Komal Puri ASSISTANT MARKETING MANAGER Aditi Sharma ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR - SUBSCRIPTIONS Bindu Nambiar AGM - ADMIN & SUBSCRIPTION OPS Boniface Dsouza ASSISTANT MANAGER - SUBSCRIPTIONS Radhika Dani ASSISTANT MANAGER-PR Amrita Hom Ray HEAD - EVENTS Neha Mishra ASSISTANT MANAGER - EVENTS Mansi Harkisandas CREATIVE DIRECTOR - PRINT Dipti Soonderji Mongia ASSOCIATE PROMOTIONS EDITOR Sherrie A Marker SENIOR PROMOTIONS WRITER Kinjal Vora SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Malavika Jadhav, Karishma Gupta COPy EDITOR AND WRITER - PROMOTIONS Karishma Mehrotra GRAPHIC DESIGNER Varun Patil ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-CIRCULATION Anindita Ghosh ALLIANCES MANAGER Kosha Gala CIRCULATION COORDINATOR Jeeson Kollannur FINANCE DIRECTOR Vishandas Hardasani FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Rakesh Shetty SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Dattaprasanna Bhagwat ACCOUNTANTS Nitin Chavan, Anthony Paulose ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-BRAND SOLUTIONS Poonam Tharar PLANNING MANAGER Alisha Goriawala HEAD - HUMAN RESOURCES Arundhati Kumar ASSOCIATE MANAGER - HUMAN RESOURCES Disha Makharia DIGITAL DIRECTOR Gaurav Mishra DIGITAL TECHNOLOGy DIRECTOR Kiran Suryanarayana SOLUTIONS ARCHITECT Santosh Bhagat PRODUCT ARCHITECT Vishal Modh UX DESIGNER Anurag Jain TECHNOLOGy PROJECT MANAGERS Amrita Sudheendran, Dipak Raghuwanshi AD TECH MANAGER Saket Sinha AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Saurabh Garg MANAGER - DATA ANALyTICS Udit Jain ASSISTANT MANAGER - AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Neha Mathew SENIOR EXECUTIVE - VIDEO MARKETING Shruti Sen HEAD - ENTERPRISE IT Prem Kumar Tiwari DIRECTOR - VIDEO Anita Horam CREATIVE PRODUCER Ishita Bahadur ASSISTANT CREATIVE PRODUCER Mehek Azmathulla CONDÉ NAST FACTORy EDITOR Sukanya A Shah FASHION EDITOR Kushal Parmanand EA TO MANAGING DIRECTOR Andrea Dsouza Alex KuruvillA MANAGING DIRECTOR Condé Nast india Pvt. ltd.

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3rd Floor, Dubash House, 15 JN Heredia Marg, ballard Estate, Mumbai 400 001, india. Tel: +91 22 6600 9000 Fax: +91 22 6611 9001 Albert reAD DEPUTy MANAGING DIRECTOR, CONDÉ NAST UK NiCholAs ColeriDge PRESIDENT, CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL LTD RNi. No.: MaHENG/2012/43454. Printed and published by Deepa bhatia on behalf of Condé Nast india Pvt. ltd. Printed at Manipal Press ltd., Plot No. 2/a, Shivalli Village, industrial area, Manipal 576 104 and published at 2nd Floor, Darabshaw House, Shoorji Vallabhdas Marg, ballard Estate, Mumbai 400 001. Editor: Manju Sara Rajan. Processed at Commercial Reprographers. Distributed by living Media ltd. all rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. all prices are correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change. Manuscripts, drawings and other materials must be accompanied by a stamped addressed envelope. However, architectural Digest india cannot be responsible for unsolicited material. JoNAthAN Newhouse CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE, CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL LTD


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GREG FOSTER

adeditorial@condenast.in NB: AD India is online! For the latest in design, architecture and style, log on to www.architecturaldigest.in. Follow us on Instagram @ArchDigestIndia.

PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP): R BURMAN, GERMANO BORRELLI, BJÖRN WALLANDER.

(Clockwise from above) Konstantin Grcic’s ‘Mingx’ armchair for Driade. Vincent Van Duysen’s ‘Casting’ lamp for Flos. A perforated concrete boundary wall on AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara’s property.

t was suggested recently that this letter only ever gets written while I’m on a plane. ‘That’s ridiculous’, I thought, as I was told that the production schedule of AD is apparently dictated by my travel plans. But true to form, I’m writing this from seat 19A of BA138, on my way from Mumbai to London. It’s a cabin I know well, but I’m looking forward to its redesign by aircraft-interiors experts PriestmanGoode, which should roll out at the end of this year. Condé Nast India’s production department had hoped I would write it last week on an Indigo flight to New Delhi (Indigo’s president Aditya Ghosh is a better friend of this magazine than I’m allowed to tell you), but the two-hour hop didn’t suffice. Travel, it seems, is an inspiration and my last editor’s letter was also written on a flight—then, to Milan where I was headed for Salone del Mobile. The world’s biggest design fair is one of the most important events on my calendar, and our 23-page Milan Report (on page 95) makes up a chunk of this, the Travel Issue. From Nipa Doshi persuading Philippe Starck to pose for AD India (he had no choice!) to the dinner for 70 Indian designers that AD co-hosted with Kekin Shah of Sicis, Salone was a whirlwind of appointments and parties. Design, of course, was the star of the show and of the thousands of new products we saw that week, my personal picks were Konstantin Grcic’s ‘Mingx’ armchair for Driade (a minimalist take on Ming dynasty furniture) and Vincent Van Duysen’s ‘Casting’ lamp for Flos (a clever nod to a Le Corbusier classic). For a full-blown account of my time in Italy, see architecturaldigest.in, where I wrote a daily blog. It was in Milan that this issue changed direction. Gautam Singhania was at the fair with his interior designer Kaif Faquih, sourcing furniture for the mammoth skyscraper he is constructing in Mumbai as his personal residence. He and I got talking about AD’s travel issue, and he immediately suggested we shoot the interiors of his private jet. Although that never materialized (he moves way too fast!), the conversation helped focus our travel issue on the journey, rather than the destination. All the world’s leading architects and interior designers have turned their hands to yachts but few as successfully as the ones we showcase here. I remember the first time I spotted the chic black sails of the Beluga, Anouska Hempel’s traditional Turkish gulet, as it cruised into the Bay of Kotor in Montenegro (see page 153). I had recently written an article about Anouska’s floating home, and, tipsy on the local rosé, I called her London office in an attempt to snag an invitation on-board. It very nearly worked, but alas, that was as close as I got! Another yacht I wouldn’t mind an invite to is the Atlante, a cutting edge megayacht designed by my Parisian friends Dorothée Boissier and Patrick Gilles, for a well-known fashion tycoon, whose name we’re not allowed to mention (page 170). It’s spectacular, filled with blue-chip art, and AD India is the first interiors publication in the world to feature it. This issue is meant to stir a sense of wanderlust, and no story has me calling my travel agent faster than the Sri Lankan house on our cover, the personal home of architect-of-the-moment Palinda Kannangara (on page 160). When Palinda travelled to Mumbai especially for our AD50 party, bringing with him a bottle of coconut arrack, I knew we would be friends. Though I wasn’t able to go on the shoot myself, photographer Björn Wallander told me that Palinda was the ultimate host, inviting him and his assistant to dinner that night, where they drank more of that arrack, and listened to Palinda’s collection of vintage vinyls. Apparently I have an open invitation to visit, no tipsy phone call required. Next stop: Sri Lanka.


HERMÈS BY NATURE


contributors

BjöRN WAllANdER

phoTogRaphER Björn Wallander is a Sweden-born photographer, now based in New York. His work features in some of the most widely read magazines in the world, including many Condé Nast titles. In This Issue: In ‘Space, Volume & Intuition’ (pg 160), Wallander photographed the home of architect Palinda Kannangara. “Shooting Palinda’s house was very inspiring. He is such a genius architect. And so in tune with the environment and the surroundings. The house really felt like it belonged there. The way he uses materials and how he designed the house for sunlight made it very comfortable to be there—even in a very hot period.”

ARATI MENON

WRITER Arati Menon is a writer, editor and documentary filmmaker. With one foot in Mumbai, and another in New York, her work straddles multiple platforms. In This Issue: In ‘Enough is Enough’ (pg 90), Menon writes about Japanese brand Muji, set to be launched in India in August. “After first capturing my wallet a few years ago with a roll of air-freshening toilet paper and a set of mini colour pencils, this non-brand brand continues to woo me with products that prepare me for anything life throws at me.” 34|

AshIsh sAhI

phoTogRaphER Ashish Sahi has worked as an art director for over 15 years, and has been with AD since the magazine’s inception. Sahi has increased his portfolio of pictures with regular contributions to the magazine. In This Issue: Sahi shot the world’s biggest design fair in ‘The Milan Report’ (pg 95). “It doesn’t matter what design discipline you practise, this is a must-visit fair. I had the best time exchanging design notes with Tom Dixon in the experimental kitchens he designed at a deconsecrated 17th-century church.”

ArchitecturAl Digest|JulY-August 2016

sURBhI sEThI

phoTogRaphER Surbhi Sethi is a photographer, who also runs a fashion and lifestyle blog. In This Issue: Sethi photographed some of the antique furniture stores and markets in New Delhi for ‘Antiques Roadshow’ (pg 201). “It has been an absolute privilege to discover some of New Delhi’s hidden treasures through working on this feature. While the Amar Colony furniture market catered to my love of bizarre, weird and wonderful oddities, my visit to The Carpet Cellar was a lesson in the skill of carpet weaving.”

AshOk fERREy

WRITER Sri Lanka-based Ashok Ferrey is a best-selling author. His new book The Ceaseless Chatter of Demons will be released by Penguin Random House later this year. Ferrey was a builder in London long before he became a writer. In This Issue: In ‘Space, Volume & Intuition’ (pg 160), Ferrey discusses the tropical modernism of new Sri Lankan architecture when he visits one of its prime exemplars, AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara, at his Colombo home.


contributors

DIVIA THANI

WRITER Divia Thani is the editor of Condé Nast Traveller India. In This Issue: Thani designed her ideal hotel room in ‘The Suite Spot’ (pg 43). “I love travelling, but I’m no backpacker. And I believe that where you stay is a big part of your complete travel experience and how you process, absorb and enjoy a destination. It can make—or break—your trip. Beautifully designed, perfectly functioning hotels with excellent service are such a joy! Luckily, my work takes me to many of them, and this piece took me all of 15 minutes to put together—it was like the ‘Greatest Hits’ of my hotel stays!”

SHWETA MALHOTRA

ILLUSTRATOR Shweta Malhotra is a graphic artist and designer currently based in New Delhi. Her design aesthetic is minimal, bold and graphic—a response to the maximalist visual language prevalent in India. In This Issue: Malhotra visualized the perfect hotel room—according to Condé Nast Traveller India editor Divia Thani—in ‘The Suite Spot’ (pg 43). “It was quite exciting to be able to pick [elements] from the best hotel rooms from the world over, and then design and illustrate the perfect room!” 36|

RONNY SEN

PHOTOGRAPHER Ronny Sen is a photographer based in Salt Lake City, Kolkata. His 2013 artist book Khmer Din has been exhibited during the 2014 Paris Photo festival and at the National Museum of Singapore. He has also won a number of awards for his work. In This Issue: Sen shot antique furniture and stores selling it for ‘Antiques Roadshow’ (pg 201). “I did this, and after I finished, I wished I had done more—if I could go back and just sit there, spend some more time. There is a strange smell there; I don’t know what it is. Maybe it’s time.”

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

ALMAS JANI

DESIGNER Almas Jani has worked as an art director for a number of magazines. She has been with AD since its inception. In This Issue: Jani designed ‘The Milan Report’ (pg 95). “I ended up visiting Salone del Mobile vicariously, through the pictures (and had just as much fun looking through them!), but it was the fair’s serious commitment to pathbreaking design that inspired me to bring my best to the pages and attempt something new, something different from the tried and tested.”

NONIE NIESEWAND

WRITER Nonie Niesewand is a contributing editor at AD India. In This Issue: Niesewand wrote about London-based designer and architect Shalini Misra’s collaboration with Mehves Ariburnu, the creative advisor of her studio, and Nina Yashar of Nilufar Gallery in ‘Ladies who Launch’ (pg 148) for the fifth edition of Squat in London. “These three powerful women in architecture, contemporary art and design have launched a well-heeled Squat in Mayfair, London.”


OPEN CENTRE The city has a new centre. VR Bengaluru now open. Discover more at vrbengaluru.com

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OPEN WAVERLY Urban living and hospitality redeďŹ ned. The Waverly Hotel and Residences now open. Discover more at vrbengaluru.com

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O PEN H IVE Welcome to the collaborative community. Co-working spaces now open. Discover more at vrbengaluru.com

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OPEN SKY DECK Soak up the view. Alt Bar & Lounge, yoga deck and rooftop pool now open. Discover more at vrbengaluru.com

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OUR ROUND-UP FROM THE FRONT LINES OF DESIGN: TRENDS, PRODUCTS, STYLES, BOOKS AND EVENTS

OPINION

THE SUITE SPOT

What makes the perfect hotel room? We asked DIVIA THANI—editor of Condé Nast Traveller India—to design it. checks into the penthouse of Devi Divia Rimowa suitcases for travel. I always carry a Longchamp bag to bring back any shopping. Enough space to turn cartwheels if you want, à la The Leela Palace New Delhi

A large, walk-in wardrobe (and a butler who can unpack for you), à la The Oberoi, Gurgaon

Automated lights, airconditioning, blinds, toilets—all at the touch of a button—by your bed, near your desk and at other easy-to-access places, à la Park Hyatt New York

ILLUSTRATOR: SHWETA MALHOTRA

A fully-loaded iPod with curated playlists, à la Sofitel Legend Metropole Hanoi

Personalized art (like Bharti Kher’s Journeys + Steps), books and magazines, because there’s no better way to show you really know your guest, à la Saffire Freycinet, Tasmania

An unbeatable view, à la Six Senses Yao Noi, Thailand

A seamless flow into the most perfect bathroom, à la One&Only The Palm, Dubai

A lush, soft, white carpet—because you’d never be able to have that at home, à la The Ritz-Carlton, Millenia Singapore

A heated balcony floor, à la Four Seasons Hotel Lion Palace St Petersburg

A gloriously high bed, exquisite linen, super-fast Wi-Fi (even when you’re in the middle of the jungle), à la Royal Malewane, South Africa

A vestibule entrance—so you can leave your empty trays and laundry outside your room, and never have to suffer an awkward housekeeping encounter again, à la Armani Hotel Milano

A telescope—because it’s cool, à la The Peninsula Hong Kong


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What to pack for holidays and weekend getaways in Goa, New York City, Beijing, Miami and London StyliSt Sonali Thakur PhotograPher JigneSh Jhaveri

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1. ‘Jemima’ cream hat; Melissa Odabash. 2. ‘MARC12’ sunglasses; Marc Jacobs. 3. Necklace from the 5 Pillars collection; En Inde. 4. ‘Nerieda Nectarine 100’ sandals; Sophia Webster. 5. ‘Allegra Jade’ necklace; Furla. 6. ‘Soir de Lune’ perfume by Sisley; Parcos. 7. ‘Bel Air’ red bikini top; Melissa Odabash. 8. ‘FF0152S’ sunglasses; Fendi. 9. ‘Dragonfly’ key chain; Dior. 10. ‘Neverfull MM’ tote; Louis Vuitton. 11. ‘Dolce’ perfume by Dolce&Gabbana; Parcos. 12. Notebook by Nathalie Du Pasquier; rubberbandproducts.com. 13. ‘Kalanera’ flip-flops in rouge; Hermès. 14. ‘Passion & Léger’ printed trikini; Shivan & Narresh. 15. ‘Anthem’ novel by Ayn Rand; ikkadukka.com. 16. ‘Madison’ wristlet; Burberry. 17. ‘UV Protector Wet Force SPF-50+’ by Shiseido; Parcos. 18. ‘Sellier’ engraved enamel bangle; Hermès. 19. ‘Dior Wave’ metal bracelet in gold finish; Dior. 20. ‘Eye Shadow X 4: Call of the Canyon’ from the Vibe Tribe collection; MAC.

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ArchitecturAl Digest|July-August 2016


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ArchitecturAl Digest|July-August 2016


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1. ‘Wave’ handbag in calfskin; Tod’s. 2. ‘Maxi Mitzah Paper Flowers’ in silk twill scarf; Dior. 3. ‘Insolence’ bag charm; Louis Vuitton. 4. ‘Oliban’ (blue), ‘Liquidambar’ (red) and ‘Sapin’ (green) fragrant candles by Diptyque; Moonriver. 5. Black coin case; Burberry. 6. Cabin-size travel trolley; Trunks Company. 7. ‘Mimi 100’ black pumps; Salvatore Ferragamo. 8. ‘Jasmine’ hoop earrings; Nirav Modi. 9. ‘Knot’ (Nero Intreccio Impero) clutch; Bottega Veneta. 10. ‘Emmeline’ dress; Burberry. 11. ‘Constellation’ necklace; Nirav Modi. 12. ‘Sphere’ bag charm and keyholder; Louis Vuitton. 13. ‘Perfection Lumière Velvet’ SPF-15 sunscreen; Chanel. 14. ‘Orchestra’ gold cuff; Nirav Modi. 15. ‘Pure Color Envy’ lip gloss; Estée Lauder. 16. Crumpled city map; rubberbandproducts.com. 17. ‘Ribbon’ ring; Nirav Modi. 18. ‘Erogenius’ diary; Design Temple. 19. ‘Envelope’ (natural) bag; Cord. 20. Beijing city guide; Louis Vuitton. 21. ‘Dioressence’ red suede pumps; Dior. 22. ‘Gancino’ reversible belt; Salvatore Ferragamo. 23. Silk shirt with rhombus print; Gucci. 24. Red wool and silk skirt; Dior. 25. ‘GG 3818’ spectacles; Gucci. 26. ‘Olympea’ perfume by Paco Rabanne; Parcos. 27. ‘CI41399S’ sunglasses; Celine. 28. ‘Les Beiges’ healthy glow foundation; Chanel. 29. Blush by Elizabeth Arden; Parcos. 30. ‘L’extase’ perfume by Nina Ricci; Parcos. 31. ‘Diorissimo’ iPhone 6S case in opaline wild garden embroidered calfskin; Dior. 32. Notebook by Nathalie Du Pasquier; rubberbandproducts.com. 33. ‘Hexagonal Twin’ red pen; Muji. 34. ‘Pure Color Envy’ sculpting blush; Estée Lauder. 35. ‘Happy Sport Medium Automatic’ two-tone watch; Chopard.

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ArchitecturAl Digest|July-August 2016


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1. ‘Spectra 2.0’ dual-access global carry-on suitcase; Victorinox. 2. ‘JBL Flip 3’ portable Bluetooth speaker; JBL. 3. ‘My Colors’ bracelets; Tod’s. 4. ‘Bleu Jean’ coin case; Hermès. 5. ‘0PS 53RS’ sunglasses by Prada Linea Rossa; Sunglass Hut. 6. ‘Z Zegna’ long-sleeved striped dress shirt; Ermenegildo Zegna. 7. ‘U Kios-Ivory/Popcorn’ card holder; Christian Louboutin. 8. Miami city guide; Louis Vuitton. 9. ‘Aya’ green pouch; Tumi. 10. T-shirt by MSGM; The Collective. 11. ‘Bleu Noir’ men’s perfume Narcisco Rodriguez; Parcos. 12. Calfskin lace-up sneakers; Tod’s. 13. Shorts by MSGM; The Collective. 14. ‘GG’ canvas black cap with web detail; Gucci. 15. ‘Rorschach’ travel pouch; Lacquer Embassy. 16. Toothbrush; Paul Smith. 17. ‘Balsam’ bottle-green slim tie; Lacquer Embassy. 18. ‘X’ sandals; Ermenegildo Zegna. 19. Socks; themojaclub.in. 20. ‘Costa Azzura’ perfume; Tom Ford. 21. Wallet (Bluette Intrecciato VN); Bottega Veneta. 22. ‘Octo Velocissimo’ special edition 41mm watch; Bulgari. 23. Hemp hand cream; The Body Shop. 24. Key ring (Vesuvio Intrecciato Nappa); Bottega Veneta. 25. 10ml fragrance refill case in orange leather; Hermès. 26. ‘Classic Lollipop’ seven-function multi-utility Swiss knife; Victorinox. 27. ‘Cilantro & Orange Extract Pollutant Defending Masque’; Kiehls.

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ArchitecturAl Digest|July-August 2016


D'Decor Blinds Galleries : Mumbai - Bharat Furnishing, S.J. Enterprise, S Shades, Pravin Kumar & Sons, Red Skin, The Window Seat, JC Furnishing, Furniture Zone; Pune - Themes Furnishing, Kejals, Alankar Mangal Decor; Anand - Fabric Ville; Kolhapur - Riddhi Curtains; Ahmedabad - Dynamic House, Selections, Raiff, Comfy; Aurangabad - Palette; Baroda - Aavaran; Bhavnagar - Amsons Furnishing; Nagpur - Malik Deco House, Jayshree Traders, Furnishing World; Rajkot - Worlds House; Surat - The Decora Incorporation, Saheb Krupa Home Decor; Gurgaon - M.O.; Lucknow - Monarch; Kanpur - High Street; Bhopal - Gharana; Amritsar - Ganpati Exclusive; New Delhi – Nirmals Furnishing, DWINDO, Panipat Handloom, HomeSaaz, Leela Furnishing,


Kapas Furnishings, Surprise Furnishing, Rajwada Decor; Noida - Studio Home; Jammu - Bansal Trading; Mohali - Home Square; Ludhiana - Naveen Bharat Furnishing Pvt Ltd; Jalandhar - Mansaram Mahajan Furnishing Pvt Ltd; Panipat - Prince The Designer Studio; Panchkula – High Street Gagan Handloom; Indore - Tana Bana, Grah Shobha; Dehradun - Virendra & Co. Interiors; Agra - Modi Enterprises, Meerut - G S Furnishing; Sharanpur - Janata Home Furnishing; Hissar - Madras Handloom Pvt Ltd; Haldwani - Internationals The Furnishing Mall; Bareli - Ashoka Foam; Bengaluru - Petals, Skipper Furnishings, Drapes Avenue, London Line, Vistar, Symphony; Hyderabad - Jay Durga Furnishings, Drapes & More; Calicut & Kochi - Kenz Furnishing; Coimbatore - Peacock Decor; Kolkatta - Times Furnishing; Raipur - Lifestyle Furnishing; Siliguri - Kuber Furnishing


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11 12 Photo Editor: Kim Sidhu Assistant Stylist: Samir Wadekar Production Assistant: Shreya Basu Production: Temple Road Productions

For details, see Stockists 1. Beige hardcase trolley (60L); Muji. 2. ‘Jungle’ sunglasses; Fendi. 3. ‘Strappy smash motif’ fitted dress by Christopher Kane; Le Mill. 4. ‘Twist MM’ handbag; Louis Vuitton. 5. ‘Carrefour’ sweatshirt in chalk and navy neoprene; Anya Hindmarch. 6. ‘Allegra’ bangle in ruby, ‘Viva’ bracelet in magnolia; Furla. 7. Silver ring; Amrapali Jewels. 8. ‘Bakelite’ bracelet with diamonds and sapphire; Gem Palace. 9. ‘Tomboy’ denims by Stella McCartney; Le Mill. 10. ‘Le Parfum’ perfume from the Resort collection by Elie Saab; Parcos. 11. ‘Allegra’ necklace in carminio; Furla. 12. ‘Constellation Co-Axial 35MM’ watch; Omega. 13. ‘Dior Tribales’ metal earrings in gold finish with cream resin pearls, ‘Dior classic’ metal bracelet with palladium finish and yellow lacquer; Dior. 14. Manicure kit; The Body Shop. 15. ‘Stripes’ half boots; Anya Hindmarch. 16. ‘Hexagonal Twin’ red and blue pens; Muji. 17. ‘Lady Dior’ bag in black calfskin; Dior. 18. ‘Le Vernis’ nailpaints; Chanel. 19. ‘Fox’ bag charm; Tod’s. 20. ‘Doodler’ (red) and ‘Animania’ (blue) planners; Design Temple. 21. ‘Hexagonal Twin’ yellow pen; Muji. 22. ‘Nourishing Lip Color’ (Bright Raspberry); Bobbi Brown. 23. ‘Sportivo Frangia’ sneakers; Tod’s. 24. ‘Stardust’ iPhone 6S Plus case in blue embellished mesh; Dior. 25. ‘Serpenti’ cat-eye sunglasses; Bulgari.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016


discover ‘BLUE IVORY STRIPES’ FLATWEAVE RUG, `10,500, IMPERIALKNOTS.COM

SHOPS

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curates products that help you recreate three experiential destinations STYLIST SONALI THAKUR

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‘BLAU’ OUTDOOR FLOOR LAMP BY FRAN SILVESTRE ARQUITECTOS FOR GANDIABLASCO, `41,210 ONWARDS, VIS À VIS

‘BELLA’ COFFEE TABLES BY HAY, `35,100 ONWARDS EACH, LE MILL; (ON TABLE) ‘ANJUNA’ TUMBLERS (SET OF 4), `1,500, NICOBAR

‘GHOST' SOFA BY PAOLA NAVONE FOR GERVASONI, `3,78,000, LE MILL

‘CULTURED HORN’ CANDLEHOLDER, `23,900, SIMONE; ‘WAVES’ VASE, `2,950, BOCONCEPT

‘MIMOSA’ ROUND STOOL, `9,975, IQRUP+RITZ; (ON STOOL) ‘TRIBAL COWRIE SHELL NECKLACE’ ON STAND (SET OF 2), `27,000, MAISON 15

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WOODEN CANDLEHOLDER, `3,450, RAIN TREE

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘BUTTERFLY’ COFFEE TABLE BY PATRICIA URQUIOLA, `1,43,222, B&B ITALIA

PHOTOGRAPHER: SHAMANTH PATIL J. ASSISTANT STYLIST: LEANNE ALCASOAS.

Comfortable, well-appointed rooms with pristine white sand for floors, Casas na Areia—near the fishing village of Carrasqueira, in Comporta, Portugal—is barefoot luxury at its finest.


discover ‘EQUILIBRE D’HERMÈS’ MAGNIFYING GLASS WITH BRASS CONE IN CALFSKIN, PRICE ON REQUEST, HERMÈS

RED HANDWOVEN TURKISH KILIM, `16,000, IMPERIALKNOTS.COM

‘BECKER’ LEATHER SIDEBOARD, `90,000, INV HOME

IRON DEER HEAD, `6,450, CINNAMON

TUTC

‘PIPPA’ SCREEN, PRICE ON REQUEST, HERMÈS

These seasonal luxury tents at Kohima Camp in Nagaland—set up by The Ultimate Travelling Camp (TUTC), a mobile luxury camping service—transport you back to the colonial era.

‘HAT’ BRASS TABLE LAMP, `11,500, THE PURPLE TURTLES

‘COCO’ TRUNKS IN CREAM, BLACK AND BROWN LEATHER BY MADHEKE, `85,000 ONWARDS EACH, LOCO DESIGN

‘TABLE 02’ FROM THE CAROUSEL SERIES, `1,10,000, PORTSIDE CAFE

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GLASS BOTTLE, `5,600, THE PURPLE TURTLES

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘RIMINI’ CHAIR BY PAOLA NAVONE, PRICE ON REQUEST, BAXTER

PHOTOGRAPHERS: SHAMANTH PATIL J, ANSHUMAN SEN. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: LEANNE ALCASOAS, NITYA DHINGRA.

‘MANDARIN’ KING-SIZE BED, `1,12,975, IQRUP+RITZ


discover ‘DAWN’ ROCKING CHAIR, `21,000, CANE BOUTIQUE

EARTHEN JARS, `12,000 AND `15,000 (WITH HANDLE), SAJAAVAT

ANDBEYOND.COM

‘BRICK’ TABLES (NATURAL BARKED HORNBEAM TRUNK SECTION) BY GERVASONI, `17,000 ONWARDS EACH, LE MILL

Reminiscent of traditional lodges, and yet completely modern, the andBeyond Sandibe Okavango Safari Lodge—adjacent to the Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana—blends seamlessly with its lush surroundings. HURRICANE LAMP, `2,500, ABACA; ‘K3’ BRASS TEA-LIGHT HOLDER, `3,860, DEVI DESIGN

‘TOKYO TRIBAL’ STOOLS BY NENDO, `39,722 ONWARDS EACH, INDUSTRY+

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘CALA’ CHAIR BY DOSHI LEVIEN FOR KETTAL, `1,76,006, VIS À VIS; (ON CHAIR) HIDE CUSHION, PRICE ON REQUEST, SIMONE

‘FAYLAND’ DINING TABLE BY DAVID CHIPPERFIELD, PRICE ON REQUEST, E15

‘DAKOTA’ FIREPIT (LARGE), `12,500, THE FURNITURE REPUBLIC

For details, see Stockists

PHOTOGRAPHERS: ANSHUMAN SEN, INDRAJIT SATHE, AKIHIRO YOSHIDA. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: KRITI VIJ, SAMIR WADEKAR.

‘ALLEGORY’ DESK BY GAMFRATESI, PRICE ON REQUEST, WIENER GTV DESIGN; (ON DESK) ‘LOVERS: ALWAYS TOGETHER’ BY CLAYMEN; `12,000, INDELUST.COM


Home at last.

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SOFT DREAM SECTIONAL SOFA design by Antonio Citterio

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discover

NEWSFLASH AGENDA

es to know right now A round-up of events, ideas, innovations and nam COMPILED BY DIVYA MISHRA & LEENA DESAI

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© KAZUYO SEJIMA AND ASSOCIATES

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

THE JOURNEY AS THE DESTINATION Passenger trains rarely serve a purpose other than transporting people from one place to another. But what if one were to board a commuter train that was a destination in itself? When Japanese railway company Seibu Railway approached Kazuyo Sejima to design a train the likes of which had not been seen before, the Pritzker Prize-winning architect thought of the various landscapes through which the train would traverse. She came up with a design for a train that is sheathed in a reflective surface that helps it gently blend into the scenery. Seven limited express trains, consisting of eight cars each, will be rolled out by Seibu in 2018, and renew people’s love of train travel.


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discover A collection of the various entries submitted to the Instagram initiative #GucciGram, and Gucci products bearing the Tian pattern. Clockwise from top right: Artworks by Cao Fei, Fajar P Domingo, Chen Tianzhou, Cheng Ran, and Jaesuk Kim.

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Recognizing digital media as both an inspiration and medium of visual expression, Gucci’s creative director Alessandro Michele has launched an Instagram initiative, #GucciGram. The idea was to have online artists reimagine the brand’s iconic motifs with a range of artworks, and in the process create stories by mixing the old and the new. #GucciGram’s first edition, revealed with the Spring/Summer 2016 collection, used the GG Blooms and geometric Caleido pattern as its starting point. In its second edition, launched in March, the brand’s Tian pattern is the keystone of the exercise. ‘Tian’, which means sky, or heaven, in Chinese, is represented by paintings from the bird-and-flower genre, which originated in 10th-century China. Featuring delicate brushwork, the artworks were believed to create harmony between man and nature. The Gucci Tian hummingbirds, butterflies and flowers can now be seen in a series of artworks across mediums. In artist Cao Fei’s entry, a pair of Tian-inspired slippers leans against a crumbling wall, throwing into relief the difference between China’s past and its rapidly industrialized present. In multimedia artist Cheng Ran’s entry, a pensive black kitten sits in the foreground, as the Tian pattern swirls in the background. Indonesian artist Fajar P Domingo juxtaposes a black-and-white image of a woman with a colourful Tian print giving it a new context. Australia-based Jaesuk Kim dresses up a Tian vine almost like a Christmas tree, using as decoration, fruits, flowers and the Gucci Tian Padlock shoulder bag, on which, if you look carefully, a woman lounges, her colourful skirt echoing the wings of a butterfly. Interestingly, the Tian-inspired art has all been produced by Asian artists as a nod to the design’s roots. The artworks are all housed at Gucci’s microsite, at gucci.com/guccigram-tian, and can be seen on Gucci’s social media channels. 64|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

IMAGES COURTESY GUCCI

ARTISTS’ PARADISE


discover From left: Sār: The Essence of Indian Design. Bhiksha patra (bowls for alms). Tennis shoes from Bata. A shaved-ice machine.

COURTESY EXPERIMENTER

Priyanka Raja, co-director of Experimenter, speaking at ECH 2015.

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WHERE CURATORS CONVENE The sixth edition of the Experimenter Curators’ Hub will take place from 28–30 July at the Experimenter gallery space in Gariahat, Kolkata. Like the previous editions, this year’s hub will include presentations and panel discussions. The participating curators for the 2016 Curators’ Hub are Hans-Ulrich Obrist, Naman Ahuja, Rahaab Allana, Giorgio Galleani, Maud Page, Ariana Pradal, Marta Smolinska, and Natasha Ginwala. experimenter.in

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DESIGN IN SUMMARY

Published by Phaidon, Sar: The Essence of Indian Design is a coffee table book exploring the ideas and the evolution of Indian design through 200 objects and textiles alongside a selection of contemporary pieces inspired by them. Authors Swapnaa Tamhane (an artist and a curator) and Rashmi Varma (a costume and fashion designer) track the development of Indian design through the ages, and establish links between historical and modern interpretations of it. At 304 pages, with 200 colour illustrations, the book provides a concise summation of Indian design through the ages. phaidon.com

FIRST AMONG

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EQUALS

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

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HEARS

THE GOOD JUDGE

The 2016 World Architecture Festival (WAF), to be held from 16–18 November, has announced AD50 architect Sanjay Puri as one of its judges. Puri’s firm, Sanjay Puri Architects, has won, and been nominated for WAF awards in 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Puri shares the panel with architects like David Chipperfield and Louisa Hutton, and will be choosing winners from a pool of approximately 350 shortlisted projects. The WAF was first held in 2008 in Barcelona, shifted to Singapore in 2012, and will be held in Berlin, Germany this year. A journalist, an author, a curator and a designer—Ilse Crawford has assumed many roles in her life. As an interior designer, through her practice Studioilse, Crawford has designed hotels, restaurants, residences, clubs, and airline lounges, as well as a line of home accessories and furniture for IKEA. Over the course of her long career, Crawford has won many honours, including an MBE in 2014. In September, she’ll add another feather to her cap, when Maison&Objet Paris confers upon her the title of ‘Designer of the Year’. Her new role will see her in charge of designing the Designers’ Studio—a work and networking space located in Hall 8 at the Parc des expositions de Paris-Nord Villepinte, the convention centre where the design fair is held.


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T The Glass column

DiviDe

’s Manju Sara rajan examines the reasons why building with glass has become so popular in India

The wooden louvres on the facade of this building—by Romi Khosla Design Studio—moderate how much heat and light the glass is exposed to.

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ArchitecturAl Digest|July-August 2016

he KSRTC Bus Terminal complex in Thiruvalla sits like an overdressed Goliath on a crowded road. It is 10 storeys of glass—the biggest bus depot in this prosperous central Kerala district—with 9 floors for a shopping complex, restaurants and other commercial enterprises. Since it was commissioned six years ago, news reports about the project predicted this “modern building” will “uplift” and “make over” Thiruvalla, a town that is said to have the largest concentration of ATMs in the country, feeding a ‘withdrawal economy’ fuelled by vast armies of nonresidents living largely in the Middle East and America. But since its inauguration in June 2015, the presumptive messiah hasn’t been very popular. The entire commercial heart of the 250,000-square-foot building sits empty. Reports have attributed the pitiful response to the fact that the building isn’t centrally air-conditioned. It seems the commissioning authorities expected its tenants, largely small traders, to install air conditioning—a very expensive amenity. The escalators are dead still, there are ‘For Rent’ signs everywhere, and the only movement is at the bus ticket counters. It’s possible the administrators had hoped it would turn into a ‘Port Authority Bus Terminal, New York’-style building, even though they clearly didn’t have the resources, or ability to ensure such a bright future. Alejandro Aravena, curator of the ongoing Venice Architecture Biennale and 2016 Pritzker Prize-winner, once said, “Architecture is an expression of needs and desires and forces that are outside yourself, be it a government, a private person or a community.” By that measure, this public building—located in a place where temperatures hit 38 degrees Celsius this April, and power cuts are commonplace—is a merciless piece of design. To add injury to insult, even though the building is empty, there are signs of wear, on the vitrified floor tiles, on the glass panels, on the walls. Not to mention the colour clash of blue-tint against the bustling landscape around it.

LOOKING IN Still, there are quizzical, out-of-place buildings such as this one all over the country. Since the late 1990s and early 2000s, glass-fronted structures have risen across corporate parks, and newly minted satellite townships. Where socialistic, resolutely ugly concrete buildings came to symbolize design in 1970s’ and 1980s’ India, glass buildings are totems of the post-liberalization era. “Glass is a capitalist material,” says architect Martand Khosla, of New Delhi-based Romi Khosla Design Studio. “It is transparent, and yet it forms a barrier. Its use in retail for shop windows and such has given it a relationship with desire, and the depiction of glass in capitalist architecture is everything India desires to be.” The first documented large-scale use of glass for building was the Crystal Palace, a glass-and-cast-iron structure designed by Sir Joseph Paxton, for the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London’s Hyde Park. In 21st-century parlance, it was a “pop-up” structure erected just for the >


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DARIA SCAGLIOLA & STIJN BRAKKEE/MVRDV

Dutch studio MVRDV constructed the innovative facade of the Chanel store in Amsterdam.

< exhibition, but the majestic glasshouse-style building was 1,848 feet long, 456 feet wide, 135 feet tall at its highest point, and offered 772,784 square feet of ground floor area. Starting from that point in Hyde Park, glass signified innovation—on the highly-stylized art deco buildings of New York, in the works of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Norman Foster, maybe even the fictional Enright House, spreading as far and wide as small-town Kerala. To appreciate just how fantastically innovation-friendly glass is, study the new face of the Chanel store in Amsterdam. MVRDV, a Rotterdam-based design studio, fused glass bricks with super-strength glue, melding them into the original structure so that the storefront maintains the traditional terracotta brickwork design. It is a smallscale intervention, but one that’s probably never been done before. The practical assumptions propagating the use of glass in large structures are that glass does not age; it is easy to install; and using glass keeps masonry costs down, and speeds up the construction process. Many of these notions are completely true, and glass technologies have evolved to compensate for its chief drawbacks, which are negotiating heat and light. There are now innumerable hyper-hyphenated variants of glass: tinted, solar control, thermally insulated, triple-glazed, mirrored, self-cleaning, lacquered and so on. Only, in India, the use of glass in unsuitable environments ignores the post-construction life of the building. What aesthetic relationship will the building have with its unbuilt environment? Can the inhabitants afford to keep the place air-conditioned? Will it be maintained as it has to be? Between owners who want the sheen without the expenditure of thought or cost, and architects who underestimate their impact on the look and feel of a place, there are far too many examples of injudicious designs, leaving behind structures that scream out our insecurities and aesthetic confusion. 72|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

BREAKING THROUGH Imported design sensibilities began taking hold of architecture in Kerala from the time traditional wooden architectural construction began to stall almost a century ago. British-born Indian architect Laurie Baker, who lived and worked here from the late 1940s till his death in 2007, introduced a home-grown perspective with his brickwork homes and buildings. While deemed forcibly rustic by some people, Baker’s designs allowed for living in communion with this climate rather than against it. There are plenty of contemporary architects in Kerala today who could have created something that fit better into its environmental context instead of that glass structure that looks like a peacock who landed in the wrong party. But context doesn’t appear to have been the goal. “Nari Gandhi and Laurie Baker were very aggressive in their stance for natural materials and language, and now as a society, there’s a rejection of the old-style lectured way of doing things, and disdain for anything that recollects an older way of design,” says architect Madhav Raman, one of the principal architects at Anagram Architects. A constantly innovating studio, the AD50 firm was first noticed for its design of the South Asian Human Rights Documentation Centre in New Delhi, which is an elegant descendant of the Laurie Baker style in that it is dominated by a complex repeating pattern of brick that shapes the light beautifully—both at day and night. In contrast, at the moment the firm is working on a residence they call ‘House of Shards’. The building is without a single fenestration on its facade, but at the centre it has a wide jagged rent bringing in sunlight, much like a courtyard does. “The internal courtyard is linear like a street, and we are planning full glazing of the walls of the street,” says Raman. The idea is the glass on the lower floors will always be shaded, so there’s light without the heat, and the upper floors will be good for the winter sun. “We did this because we wanted to create a sundeck on all the floors,” he says. Khosla and Raman are really theorists and philosophers. As practitioners, they consider the philosophical instincts behind our aesthetic choices, why we build the way we do, what that says about us, the state of Indian design and its clientele and so on. Khosla’s place in the 2014 AD50 list was secured by RKDS’s design for the corporate headquarters of Volvo Eicher Commercial Vehicles in Gurgaon. If there’s a place in India that has become synonymous with the term ‘glass and steel’, it is Gurgaon. The soil here is sandy, and the water comes out of tankers. To build an environmentally sensitive, innovative, and dominant-looking corporate building that symbolizes innovation and technology can sound oxymoronic but those were the lofty goals that led the project. The firm proposed an exposed-steel, span-free, engineered building with an all-glass facade. The glass skin of the building is protected by wooden louvres fashioned out of recycled railway sleepers, and hand-fixed to predetermined spots. The louvres moderate the light and heat the building is subjected to, and doing that means workspaces inside don’t require any artificial lighting during the day, and the air conditioning works optimally. In its design note for the project, the firm noted: ‘…given our present water and energy crisis, with this building we hope to explore one possible way forward for a modern architecture, built with a mix of traditional and new global technologies, for a new India of the 21st century— with all its contradictions.’ Indeed, design that is an expression of the needs and desires of a community, not just conceited glass behemoths for their own sake.


discover INDULGE

THE WATCH REPORT The smartwatch buzz of last year hasn’t been enough to dampen spirits in the Swiss watch industry. Another strong set of products was released at two key trade fairs: Geneva’s Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie and the Baselworld Watch and Jewellery Show. gives you the low-down on what everyone’s talking about in 2016 WATCH EDITOR RISHNA SHAH

THE AVIATION ANGLE VICTORINOX

BREITLING

Made by the company that brought you the Swiss Army knife, this pilotoriented watch comes with an easily accessible chronograph toggle button at 8 o’clock. A red circle on the dial provides military time, and the rotating bezel boasts a rotary slide rule that converts metric to imperial—a tool to calculate speed, distance and fuel consumption at your fingertips.

Definitely an area of expertise for Breitling (they supplied watches to the Royal Air Force), at every Baselworld you can expect them to have a sky-focused novelty up their sleeves. The ‘Avenger Hurricane’ is all about legibility with luminescent, stencil-style numerals on an expansive 50mm dial. Probably a requirement—the unusual 24-hour display may catch you off guard.

ROLEX

‘OYSTER PERPETUAL AIR-KING’

Rolex has aeronautical associations dating back to the 1930s; English record-breaking aviator Charles Douglas Barnard famously claimed his Rolex would accompany him on all long distance flights. Resembling a model made in the 1950s, this 40mm version in black comes with large 3, 6 and 9 o’clock markers and Rolex’s calibre 3131 movement inside.

‘AVENGER HURRICANE’

BREGUET ‘TYPE XXI 3817’

Breguet developed their very own airplane back in 1916 and ran an aeronautical firm alongside their horology business till 1971. In the early days, they were mostly making chronograph mechanisms for the cockpit. By 1935, they brought these chronographs to the wrist, and by the late 1950s the ‘Type XX’ model was aiding the French armed forces. Other than a few upgrades, such as a sapphire crystal case back, much of the vintage appeal remains the same.

ILLUSTRATIONS: SHUTTERSTOCK

‘AIRBOSS MACH 9 BLACK EDITION’


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WATTHE REP CH ORT CARTIER

‘ROTONDE DE CARTIER DAY AND NIGHT RETROGRADE MOON PHASES’

Track every phase of the moon with this bejewelled timepiece, from diamond crescents to full circles in sapphires, with a retrograde display. Using 18-carat white gold with a rhodium polish, the upper half of the dial marks the change from dawn to dusk, and consolidates the hour markers in half the typical space.

MOONPHASES CHOPARD ‘L.U.C PERPETUAL CHRONO’

OMEGA

Chopard states that the orbital moon phase display at 6 o’clock is such an accurate lunar representation that it will only have a one-day deviation in 122 years. Not too shabby, especially when there are other great functions on the table— like a hand-wound chronograph movement, a perpetual calendar that takes the leap year into account, and the use of ethically sourced Fairmined gold, a movement the company is advocating.

‘SPEEDMASTER MOONPHASE COAXIAL MASTER CHRONOMETER CHRONOGRAPH’

How many watchmakers can say they’ve sent a watch of theirs to the moon? One of the original Speedmasters did make the epic journey through space back in 1969. Today’s tribute comes with a highly detailed depiction of the moon—so much so that Omega claims you can use a microscope to spot an astronaut’s footprint on the moon’s surface.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

BREGUET

‘CLASSIQUE PHASE DE LUNE DAME’

A mother-of-pearl dial makes for a delicate self-winding ornament on the wrist, especially when it’s encircled with 66 brilliant-cut diamonds in a white-gold case with a fluted band. Founded in 1775, Breguet gained a loyal clientele amongst Parisian aristocrats, noble patrons of the French court, and avid collector Marie Antoinette.


masierogroup.com argine

Orgogliosamente Luce Made in Italy


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WATTHE REP CH ORT TAG HEUER

‘CARRERA HEUER-02T’

Composed of titanium and carbon elements, this openwork dial fuses two horologic marvels: the chronograph and the tourbillon. With both under one roof, you can point out a flying tourbillon, column wheel, and the minute and hour counters. Touting a competitive price at release, CEO Jean-Claude Biver knows how to get his audience interested.

SKELETON VISION HUBLOT

‘BIG BANG MECA-10 TITANIUM’

With a new in-house movement to its name— the HUB1201—and an impressive 10-day power reserve, this mechanical delight brings together, in full view, a visual cacophony of crown gears, plates, axes, and ratchet wheels. The matt black, grey and white dial is finished with touches of red, a titanium bezel and a ribbed rubber strap.

‘ROYAL OAK CONCEPT SUPERSONNERIE’

The team over at Le Brassus, the brand’s headquarters, had their hands full with this acoustic marvel. The white-gold hands in the foreground make a striking contrast to the movement below, which includes a minute repeater with two gongs. The triumphant sound it produces is amplified to its fullest, thanks to its titanium case.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

CORUM

‘GOLDEN BRIDGE ROUND’

Inspired by San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, the ‘Golden Bridge Round’ is available in rose or white gold—the latter adorned with 84 diamonds. Known for its linear movements and sapphire crystal visibility from all sides, this is the first time Corum has opted for a circular dial in this line. Thankfully, the view is still just as good.

ILLUSTRATIONS: SHUTTERSTOCK

AUDEMARS PIGUET


Because there’s no place like home

As part of its ‘Upload & Transform’ engagement program, Godrej Interio gave actor, director and choreographer Prabhu Deva’s family home a complete makeover


A house is not just where you live; it’s a place that makes you feel alive. It’s where every corner has a memory tucked away. It’s where the air wraps around you in a secure embrace. Even the walls and furniture seem to understand your myriad moods. And in some cases, it’s a space that generations have called home. Godrej Interio, India’s largest furniture-solutions brand, was quick to pick up on the emotions people attach to their homes and launched its biggest consumer campaign: ‘Upload & Transform’. Now in its fifth season, it took the country by storm. People were asked to upload pictures of their living spaces and share their aspirations and ideas on what they’d like to do with their homes. A few lucky ones won a home makeover from Godrej Interio. The response was tremendous and grew season after season. The fifth season of this country-wide campaign began with the makeover of actor, director and choreographer Prabhu Deva’s family home in Mysuru. The superstar

wanted to fulfil his parents’ dream of living in a luxurious yet cosy home. “I wanted to transform their lives with colour and happiness. This is when I came across Godrej Interio’s ‘Upload & Transform’ campaign. The team turned my dream into reality,” said the multifaceted actor. This campaign has given Godrej Interio a unique platform to interact with its consumers on a personal level, giving the brand an in-depth insight into the dreams and design sensibilities of the participants. Not only has it changed people’s living spaces but has also reinvented the brand, from being a furniture manufacturer to a home creator.

For more information, visit http://www.godrejinterio.com/transform


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WATTHE REP CH ORT

SHADES OF GREY RADO

‘HYPERCHROME ULTRA LIGHT’

A. LANGE & SÖHNE

When you think of Rado, you think of a lightweight watch crafted in ceramic. On a constant quest to streamline the weight of its watches with innovative designs, Rado has considered a new combination of materials this time around: silicon nitride ceramic, anodized aluminium, and hardened titanium. The dial couldn’t be cleaner—albeit with touches of concentric etchings—the weight couldn’t be lighter, and the NATO strap couldn’t be more utilitarian.

Loaded with features, this ashen dial plays the stage for showing off the date, day, month, moonphase, and, of course, the time. There’s also a tourbillon on the back and a power reserve of 50 hours. Using a design first revealed in 2013, the watchmaker updated the model for 2016 with a white gold and grey dial combination.

BVLGARI

ZENITH

The Italian jeweller yet again impresses in the horology department. This eight-sided titanium watch comes with ultrathin dimensions, and a slim 3.12mm movement inside. In keeping with the meticulous nature of their bijouterie roots, this unassuming novelty is crafted with 362 components and produced as a limited edition of 50.

Bikers will love the retro feel of this powerful watch named after the British motorcycle cult from the 1960s. This 45mm watch is based on Zenith’s El Primero 4069 movement, which delivers its 50-hour power reserve. Luminescent Arabic numerals on a slate-grey dial, an oversized crown, and an aged steel case add to the nostalgic character of this line.

‘OCTO FINISSIMO MINUTE REPEATER’

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‘LANGE 1 TOURBILLON PERPETUAL CALENDAR’

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘HERITAGE PILOT TON-UP’


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WATTHE REP CH ORT

THE YEAR OF THE MONKEY PANERAI

VACHERON CONSTANTIN

‘LUMINOR 1950 SEALAND 3 DAYS AUTOMATIC ACCIAIO’

‘PETITE HEURE MINUTE RELIEF MONKEY’

For the last eight years, Panerai has been embracing this cultural tradition with a series of numbered watches themed to the Chinese zodiac. This year, a steel case engraved with the subject in question is lifted to reveal a mirror and a hidden dial. The unique motif was carved out with a special tool by Italian craftsmen, after which gold threads were inlaid and hammered to fill the indented spaces.

Limited to eight pieces, this series comes in two sizes—35mm and 39mm—and two monochrome styles depicting day and night. In the latter (pictured), the dial is in black lacquer, onyx, gold and motherof-pearl. This scene has the curious primate perched on a peach tree; the case back features a matching hand-engraved monkey holding peaches. This is depicted as per the Chinese legend of Sun Wukong, the mythical Monkey King that watched over the Garden of Celestial Peaches.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

This dial features a miniature monkey handengraved in pink gold and placed above a layer of gilded foliage motifs taken from Chinese iconography. Four windows around the artwork display the hours, minutes, date and day of the week, without taking away from the main attraction. The model is a limited run of 12 pieces each in rose gold and platinum versions.

PIAGET

‘ALTIPLANO CLOISONNÉ ENAMEL’

Acclaimed enameller Anita Porchet used the Altiplano as a canvas for her take on the annual zodiac. The furry mammal is sketched using the ancient technique of grand feu cloisonné enamelling, a painstaking method where little pockets of enamel are separated with gold wires before being baked in a kiln. The enamelled monkey on this special edition Altiplano holds a peach, a symbol of immortality.

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ILLUSTRATIONS: SHUTTERSTOCK

JAQUET DROZ

‘MÉTIERS D’ART THE LEGEND OF THE CHINESE ZODIAC – 2016, YEAR OF THE MONKEY’


PURE ART The Museum of Modern Art, NEW YORK The Corning Museum of Glass, NEW YORK Victoria and Albert Museum, LONDON Die Neue Sammlung, Staatliches Museum für angewandte Kunst, MÜNCHEN Kunstgewerbe Museum, KÖLN Kestner Museum, HANNOVER Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf, DÜSSELDORF Stedelijk Museum, AMSTERDAM Suomen Lasimuseo, HELSINKI SHMOG Shanghai Museum of Glass, SHANGHAI Foundation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, PARIS Musée des Art Dècoratifs, PARIS Museo Vetraio, MURANO - Ve Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Le Stanze del Vetro VENEZIA EDI, Alberto Biagetti

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WATTHE REP CH ORT

THE SNAKE CHARMER Roman jewellers and watchmakers Bulgari turned to a familiar motif for a new range of watches at Baselworld—The Watch and Jewellery Show WATCH EDITOR RISHNA SHAH

S

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

Left, from top: Bulgari made the bracelet of the 1955 ‘Serpenti Tubogas’, while Jaeger-LeCoultre made the watch component; ‘Serpenti Tubogas’ (1967) in gold with white and turquoise enamel and sapphires; ‘Serpenti Tubogas’ (1972). Below left: The late Zaha Hadid’s sculpture at the Bulgari hotel. Below: The 2016 ‘Serpenti Jewellery’. Above: Two of the 2016 ‘Serpenti Tubogas’ models. Top: ‘Serpenti Incantati Tourbillon Lumiere’.

PHOTOS COURTESY BVLGARI

ince the 1940s, Bulgari has always held on to one prominent symbol through all its creative endeavours: a beloved snake motif called ‘Serpenti’. “Since ancient times, the snake has been a symbol of wisdom and rebirth so it has always featured in [jewellery], amulets, talismans and regal ornaments,” explains Paolo Bulgari, chairman of the Bulgari Group, and grandson of founder Sotirio Bulgari. Reviving the sinuous form for several decades, the brand has depicted it in many avatars, experimenting with new materials and deconstructing the original moulds. “The first time we introduced the snake form was in the Tubogas watch line, back in 1949,” explains Lucia Boscaini, the brand and heritage curator. “Italy was [still] recovering from the Second World War, so we had to take a positive, innovative attitude and create affordable luxury,” she adds. From enamelled scales to diamond studs, to mother-of-pearl dials—every decade since has seen an enhancement in the totem. Last year, for Milan Design Week, the late Zaha Hadid took a stab at reinterpreting the motif with a 20-metre-long polygonal structure in the Bulgari hotel gardens. This spring, artists participated in the curve movement, in ‘Serpentiform: Snake through Art, Jewellery and Design’, an exhibit held at the Museum of Rome between March and April. Also in March, at Baselworld, Bulgari added new extensions to the line. There’s the ‘Serpenti Spiga’—a single-coil timepiece available in black or white ceramic, with hints of rose gold. The ‘Serpenti Jewellery’ is adorned with scales in combinations of precious stones, reminding us that gemstones are a part of the Bulgari DNA. Among this year’s ‘Serpenti Tubogas’ models is a five-coil statement piece with an opalescent dial. The brand also introduced the ‘Serpenti Incantati Tourbillon Lumiere’, a handwound masterpiece with an openwork dial—an unexpected foray into complication-adorned watches. The Incantati line—among which are the tourbillon and bejewelled versions—offers a never-before-seen coiling of the snake around a circular dial. Jean-Christophe Babin, CEO, says of the new design: “‘Serpenti Incantati’ gives a new lease of life to this animal symbol. After wrapping around the wrist, the snake is now reinvented by coiling itself—for the very first time—around the case of a round watch. The new, expressive, and very symbolic territory opened up by ‘Serpenti Incantati’ is literally boundless.”


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ENOUGH IS ENOUGH Muji has arrived! The cult-status Japanese brand is bringing its minimal aesthetic to India. Our lives may never be the same again

I

WRITER ARATI MENON

t was 1996, and the poster was an ad for a Japanese brand by the name of ‘Muji’. If the Japanese script on the desaturated print were translated, it would read “Muji is in love with India”. The accompanying image was of a pile of woven dhurries stacked on a wheelbarrow, as four Indian men and three children stood by, looking both pleased and shy. Nobody in India ever saw it; few knew of the brand. Twenty years to the event, the Japanese home goods and personal products brand, with a near-cult following for its fuss-free design and absence of branding, is arriving in India. From electric kettles to cotton pyjamas, CD players to stationery, and even a Muji hotel, it seems like there is nothing Muji won’t design. Founded in 1980 as a reaction to the consumerism of 1970s’ Japan, with 40 food and household products, Muji now has approximately 7,000 products in its portfolio. SIMPLE & MEANINGFUL Behind these thousands of tidily designed, economically produced and thoughtfully packaged objects are its designers, led by design gurus like Kenya Hara and Naoto Fukasawa, both long-time advisors to the brand. But there are also several designers working anonymously from around the world. They are said to be given carte blanche to create a product, yet every product bears the tenets of the brand, and is designed as a solution to an actual life problem, not just created for the sake of design. Muji even dispatches its designers on surprise visits to the homes of ordinary people to examine quotidian needs yet unmet. Both Hara and Fukasawa (the latter, responsible for several iconic Muji products, including its wall-mounted CD player) speak

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and write often of their work being led by the simplest form of design. Fukasawa, one of modern Japan’s most famous industrial designers, coined—in 2006, along with product designer Jasper Morrison—the term “super normal design”, described as “less concerned with designing beauty than seemingly homely, but memorable elements of everyday life”. Part of that design philosophy for Muji, even as it has morphed into a global retail force, has been retaining a distinct Japanese-ness— the kind of cultural essence you find in design classics like Isamu Noguchi’s light sculpture, or Sori Yanagi’s kettle. And though that isn’t about to change, recent campaigns like “Found Muji” suggest increased cross-cultural engagement, emerging from an exploration of everyday objects from countries around the world that can be made by partnering with local artisans, or leaving in original form. It has looked to India for material inspiration before; Indian woven textiles have found their way into Muji products. Now that the brand will have a foot firmly placed here, other synergies might well emerge.

Muji opens its first store at Palladium mall, Mumbai in August, followed by its second in September at VR Bengaluru mall. MUJI ICONS (clockwise from top left): Organic cotton jinbei pyjamas for summer wear. The wall-mounted CD player was designed by Naoto Fukasawa in 1999. The LED hook light comes on when its central section is pressed. On top of a hand-carved plate—made from 100 per cent acacia wood—is a porcelain toothbrush stand. Muji’s iconic right-angled socks were inspired by a design made by a Czech grandmother, who knit the heels at a 90-degree angle instead of the standard 120 degrees; Muji reinvented its entire manufacturing process and now only makes right-angled socks. The rice cooker was designed by Fukasawa in 2014.


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perspective

NEWSMAKERS, OPINIONS THAT MATTER, PLUS THE LATEST IN ART, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN Nipa Doshi and Jonathan Levien at Fondazione Prada.

SPOTLIGHT

THE

MILAN REPORT This power-packed report brings to you all the news, launches and buzz that defined Salone del Mobile in 2016. Four of the biggest names in Indian design give us an insight into the places, products, people and food that made the week memorable for them. Five international designers making waves tell us about their latest launches. We also give you the low-down on the top five trends that will inform interiors this year, present a showcase of the top offerings by Italian brands, and introduce you to state-of-the-art kitchens and bathrooms WRITER SANHITA SINHA CHOWDHURY . PHOTOGRAPHER ASHISH SAHI


MILAN/DIARY

NIPA DOSHI & Jonathan Levien

Clockwise from above: Nipa Doshi, Jonathan Levien and Philippe Starck at the B&B Italia showroom. A chair from the Armada collection by Doshi Levien for Moroso. The Bolon By You display. Pirelli’s HangarBicocca museum. Doshi and Levien at the Fondazione Prada. The all-day cafe by HAY. The HAY display at La Pelota. The Birrificio Milano brewery.

We launched eight new collections this year—for Moroso, Bolon By You, B&B Italia, Kettal, and HAY—and before we got caught up with these launches, we decided to head to the Fondazione Prada, which we were both very eager to visit. We had heard that Miuccia Prada and Patrizio Bertelli had left no stone unturned in designing the space. Enormous slabs of marble were flown in just to avoid too many joints in the floor! The aluminium foam panels on the ceiling fascinated us. Although the materials used by Rem Koolhaas, and his firm OMA, through the space are industrial materials, they look refined and are beautifully detailed. Among the art on display, we really liked the ‘To the Son of Man Who Ate the Scroll’ project by Goshka Macuga. We also wanted to visit Pirelli’s HangarBicocca museum, but had to head back to the city. Our first stop was the B&B Italia showroom on Via Durini. While shooting with AD, we spotted Philippe Starck looking at the window display. Since the store officially opened its doors to the public only on 12 April, he was denied entry. A quick word with the brand’s owner Giorgio Busnelli, and five minutes later Mr Starck was posing with us! From there we went to La Pelota; HAY had taken over the 2,000-square-metre space with high ceilings—this was an absolute favourite. The brand brought over chef Frederik Bille Brahe from Copenhagen to set up a cafe on site and serve a healthy and delicious all-day menu. The best part of the Milan Design Week is meeting our friends, clients and collaborators, and in that regard the Kvadrat dinner was great! They invited a small gathering of designers, writers and artists to this improvised location—the Birrificio Milano brewery—for supper. This happens every year and it is always at a surprise location. We met fashion designer Raf Simons; Karim Habib and Martina Starke from BMW; Anders Byriel, the CEO and owner of Kvadrat; Patrizia Moroso; Patricia Urquiola; architects Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu; and David Chipperfield—all in one evening!

HANGARBICOCCA: LORENZO PALMIERI. COURTESY HAY. COURTESY BIRRIFICIO MILANO

This design duo first visited the fair in 1996, as students of The Royal College of Art. They haven’t missed a year since


MILAN/DIARY

Rajiv Saini

Clockwise from top left: Rajiv Saini at the De Padova showroom. The T’a restaurant and chocolate shop. Saini at Fragile. Shelves and stools by Karakter, Copenhagen. The Yard hotel, Milan. The new collection by BassamFellows. The ‘Targa Sofa 200’, a sofa and footstool by GamFratesi for Wiener GTV Design.

I had an early breakfast at The Yard—the stylish boutique hotel on Naviglio Grande canal where I was staying—and headed to the heart of the city to visit Fragile, a design gallery dressed in pistachio green and pale pink by the legendary Alessandro Mendini. Committed to historical design, it typically showcases vintage pieces by the likes of Giò Ponti, Carlo Scarpa and Franco Albini. However, during the Milan Design Week, the gallery favours a contemporary aesthetic. In this year’s exhibit, the lamps and sculptures from the Liquida collection by Marzio Rusconi Clerici particularly impressed me. These pieces were handmade—without using any tools or moulds—with thermoformed plastics. Across the street from Fragile is De Padova— one of my favourite stores in Milan. In October 2015, after Boffi acquired it, the brand relocated to Via Santa Cecilia, off Corso Monforte—where Dolce&Gabbana had been hosting their fashion shows for over a decade. While I am quite familiar with De Padova’s merchandise, this was the first time I was visiting the new space, which has been designed by Piero Lissoni, who acts as the creative director of both brands. I love the way he has reinterpreted some of the pieces, adding new flavour without diluting value. My next stop was Spazio Rossana Orlandi. I quite liked the pieces by Karakter, a brand from Copenhagen; I might be sourcing from them soon. After grabbing a bite at the gallery’s outdoor cafe, I was off to see the new collection by BassamFellows, which is run by Connecticut-based furniture designers Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows. Their products— with perfect proportions and exquisite craftsmanship—are destined to become timeless classics. I spent the late afternoon roaming around the Brera district and then dropped in at the Bulgari Hotel for drinks with friends. For dinner, I headed to T’a—a restaurant and chocolatier designed by Vincenzo de Cotiis—where I met friends from across Europe. My favourite find this year is the ‘Targa’ sofa by GamFratesi. I love the way this Danish-Italian duo has reinterpreted the cane and bentwood palette that Wiener GTV Design is famous for; we’ll certainly be using a few of their pieces in our upcoming projects.

T’A: COURTESY STUDIO CONTATTO. KARAKTER BOOKCASE: ACHILLE CASTIGLIONI/PIER GIACOMO CASTIGLIONI. STOOL: COURTESY JOE COLOMBO. COURTESY THE YARD HOTEL. BASSAMFELLOWS: MAX ROMMEL. ‘TARGA SOFA 200’: SINARI IMAGES

The AD50 designer believes that for anyone vaguely interested in design, this is the best time to visit Milan


MILAN/DIARY

ASHIESH SHAH

A regular since 2009, the AD50 architect compares attending the week-long fair to doing a year’s worth of design research You know you’re going to have a good day when you start your morning at Nilufar Depot; it’s definitely on top of my list of things to do during Milan Design Week. I can say without a shred of doubt that this space is every architect’s dream—with pieces ranging from antique Moroccan carpets to designs by the likes of Giò Ponti and Gaetano Sciolari to contemporary designers like Lindsey Adelman, Massimiliano Locatelli and Federico Peri. My next stop was Via Santa Marta, which, in addition to a few boutique design galleries, is home to two of my favourite showrooms in Milan. BDDW is a mustvisit for its exquisitely handcrafted furniture; I often use their pieces for my projects. I also like Apparatus Studio for their chic, innovative lights. I broke for lunch with New York-based architects George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg at 10 Corso Como, where we discussed the new collection of furniture they were showcasing for the design week. 100|

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I then made a quick pit stop at Galleria Carla Sozzani to see the Iittala X Issey Miyake collection of textiles, ceramics and glasses, one of my favourite presentations. Next on my list was an exhibition organized by the gallerist Rossana Orlandi at the Palazzo Ferré. Titled Diversity, it showcased the works of Spanish designer Nacho Carbonell and was perhaps one of the most interesting projects I saw this year. I made sure to pick up pieces for my clients and my personal collection. Dimore Studio is my Milan staple—whether during the fair or otherwise. This year it was converted into a dark yet dramatic space, with the focus on a range of retro modern furniture and lighting pieces. I also had the opportunity to spend some quality time with Britt Moran and Emiliano Salci, the studio’s founders. Next up was The Restaurant, an installation of four kitchens designed by Tom Dixon for Caesarstone, which I thought was fantastic. From there, I headed for dinner at Carlo e Camilla—a restaurant and cocktail bar run under the direction of Michelin-starred chef Carlo Cracco. The space used to be a defunct sawmill, and has managed to retain its industrial look; it now features two long wooden community tables under antique chandeliers. A perfect way to end the day.

IITTALA X ISSEY MIYAKE: COURTESY CARLA SOZZANI. THE RESTAURANT: PIER LINDGREEN. NILUFAR DEPOT: MATTIA IOTTI. CARLO E CAMILLA: ENRICO DE LUIGI. COURTESY BDDW

Clockwise from top left: George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg with Ashiesh Shah and a friend. The Iittala X Issey Miyake collection. The Restaurant installation. The Diversity collection by Nacho Carbonell. Lindsey Adelman’s lighting at Nilufar Depot. Shah with the founders of Dimore Studio. Carlo e Camilla. The BDDW showroom.


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MILAN/DIARY

AKANkSHA Himatsingka The managing director of soft furnishings brand Atmosphere attended Milan Design Week for the first time this year

My day started with a 45-minute drive out of Milan to Fagnano Olona, an industrial zone between Milan and Varese, which used to be the Italian textile district. There, I visited Bellora, an Italian brand that was founded in 1883 and is now a subsidiary of the Himatsingka Group. Specializing in home linens, it is amongst the most recognized luxury bedding brands in the country. I was there to curate the home linen collection that is now on display in Atmosphere’s New Delhi and Mumbai stores, which have recently been renovated by Rajiv Saini. From Fagnano Olona, I headed to Spazio Rossana Orlandi where I met Pavlo Schtakleff, director and founder of Sé, a London-based furniture brand. They presented a line of delicate pieces of furniture with a hint of fantasy, upholstered in pastel shades. A project that stood out for me was PAN 999, which is in line with the traditional practice of eating in silverware and capitalizes on the bactericidal, fungicidal and antiviral properties of silver. Designed by Tobia Scarpa, the pans have a

galvanic coating of silver on iron and don’t contain other materials like chromium, cadmium, or PFOA non-stick coating found in most cooking utensils, which can have negative health effects. I then stopped by the Kinnasand store, where architect Jo Nagasaka had created a luminous installation of different sizes and forms with textiles and optical fibre. I had just enough time to browse through Alaïa’s collection at 10 Corso Como while I waited for a table at the cafe. After a quick lunch, I headed to the Salvatori showroom to see the new Marble Faces collection that stems from research of archetypal forms, and has been translated into pure geometry and reinterpreted with a contemporary twist by Elisa Ossino. This collection— accompanied by elegant faucets by Fantini and Silvia Fanticelli’s collection of home and bathroom accessories—was an interesting find. Next up was Teatro Vetra where Mexican architect Mauricio Rocha designed a stunning display for the Hermès home collection launch. Rocha’s raw stacked-brick columns contrasted the softness and warmth of the Hermès leather furniture and accessories, and the rich colours of their textiles. I ended my day with a sumptuous meal at Il Salumaio di Montenapoleone with my aunt Jayshree Poddar, and Alberto Pezzato, the creative director at Rubelli.

COURTESY SÉ. PAN 999: MIRO ZAGNOLI. MAURICIO ROCHA INSTALLATION: FRANÇOIS LACOUR. JO NAGASAKA INSTALLATION: PATRICIA PARINEJAD

Clockwise from above: The Stay collection by Sé, London. Pans from the PAN 999 project. Il Salumaio di Montenapoleone restaurant. Mauricio Rocha’s installation for Hermès. Jo Nagasaka’s installation for Kinnasand. Akanksha Himatsingka at Bellora. The new Marble Faces collection at the Salvatori showroom.


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MILAN/POWERHOUSE

L E EB R O O M The British designer decided to do things differently this year, with an entertaining mobile display

Lee Broom inside his mobile display. The pendant, table and floor lamps are from Broom’s Optical collection.

Why did you choose to create a mobile installation this year? Each year, Milan Design Week increases in size with more and more exhibitions and installations to see. People always tell me, “I loved your show, but I didn’t have time to see it.” So I thought, instead of getting people to come to us, why don’t we bring the show to them? And that’s what we did. We were able to capture a much more varied audience because of the mobile nature of the show. Tell us about the Optical collection. The Optical collection’s sense of drama comes from both the bold monochrome colour combination and the crisp graphic linear pattern. I wanted to create something that—when viewed from all sides—changes at every angle, and this in turn creates a lot of visual drama.

Does your training in theatre and your work in fashion influence your process? I started my career as a child actor and I worked in film and television till I was 17. I was a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company and that’s the career I thought I would take. What I loved about acting, and what I certainly try to incorporate into my work is a sense of theatre and creating a real “show”. In my installations I think of every detail; from the product down to the uniforms of staff, everything is considered in order to create an authentic immersive-ness. We are staging experiences for people. I won a fashion competition at the age of 17 and that’s when I moved away from theatre and started with fashion. I was privileged to have worked with Vivienne Westwood for almost a year, and what I learnt from her was how we can learn from techniques of the past and

bring them to the modern day rather than being influenced by the modern day. This has definitely filtered into my approach as a product and interior designer. I like to look at traditional manufacturing techniques and materials and reimagine them. I also try to change the collections every season [by experimenting] with new materials—crystal, marble, brass, and wood—but I maintain an overarching look. Tell us about your brand logo—of a crown and a broom. When I started my own brand, I was inspired by heritage brands with very British emblems and royal warrants. I guess this was my starting point to create the logo. Incorporating the broom was a little theatrical nod to my name. The crest is on all of my products and it’s something I’m very proud of.


MILAN/POWERHOUSE

V I N C E N TV A DN U Y S E N The Antwerpbased designer—with a penchant for all things balanced, serene and tactile— has added an architectural lighting collection to his repertoire

What makes a lighting collection “architectural”? The Infra-Structure collection is derived from engineering, from Bauhaus. It has this typical Bauhaus design language with its tubular structure and industrial aesthetic. It has a very architectural, graphical expression through its rhythm and sequences, and is functional and decorative at the same time. How did your past experiences as an architect inform this collection? Piero Gandini of Flos requested me to develop an architectural lighting concept. Normally, architectural light installations 106|

Left to right: Vincent Van Duysen with the Infra-Structure tubular lighting system, and the Casting collection of LED bollard lights for outdoor installations—both for Flos.

always tend to be as invisible as possible. But my experience and previous interior projects [that I had worked on]—using more expressive customized lighting—led me to develop a visible structure that becomes part of and interacts with the interior. With Le Corbusier and Louis Kahn as key influences, have you ever visited India? I’ve been to India a couple of times, but unfortunately never had the chance to visit Chandigarh. But it’s on my wish list and I would like to combine it with visiting Studio Mumbai and meeting Bijoy Jain. I appreciate

ArchitecturAl Digest|JulY-August 2016

their work a lot. They have a very poetic approach, very much related to nature. You feel their deep research and use of materials in each of their projects. What projects are you working on right now? In America, a yacht, and a South Hampton summer residence; the interiors of a penthouse in Beirut; our first hotel project and a home for the elderly in my hometown [Antwerp]; the interior design of an office building in Beirut; the redesign of part of the Molteni&C store in Tokyo; and the renovation of a part of La Rinascente in Rome.


MILAN/POWERHOUSE

O K IS A T O

photos: takumi ota

The Japanese designer is working on 400 projects right now, all designed to “give people a small smile in the end”. caught up with him at the 50 Manga Chairs exhibit for Friedman Benda

What importance does the Milan Design Week hold for you? I graduated in 2002 with an MA in Architecture from Waseda University, Tokyo. When I went to Salone Internazionale del Mobile for the first time in 2002, it was a big impact for me to see the designers playfully design both products and installations. In Japan, people who have studied architecture usually only design architecture, interior designers design interiors, and product designers design products. But I wanted to design more flexibly—[to] transcend genres. That is why I started Nendo.

When I was a child, I liked reading manga books all day, and my mother would be angry with me. But if I went to the museums, my mother would be happy. So I started questioning what the difference is between going to museums and reading manga. When I really didn’t understand the difference, and the fact that this remained in my head for quite a long time, I did a little bit of research about manga and learnt that it’s deeply rooted in Japanese culture. I started thinking [about whether] we could use the techniques used in manga for furniture and objects. It’s a way of expressing feelings and emotions and movements.

Why did you choose manga as a theme for the 50 Manga Chairs exhibit?

Nendo launched 13 projects at the Milan Design Week. How do you manage to

Clockwise from top left: Oki Sato at the 50 Manga Chairs exhibit at Chiostro Minore di San Simpliciano. A sketch for the exhibit. Sato created the Light and Shadow installation for Marsotto Edizioni, using the brand’s Carrara and Marquina marble.

produce such a massive body of work? If I focus on only one or two projects, I can only think about one or two projects. When I start thinking about working on close to 400 projects, it relaxes me. The more ideas I think of, the more ideas I come up with. It is like breathing or eating. Do you have any of your own products in your home? No; actually, I have nothing in my house. It’s almost empty. There is a bed, desk, chair, and some magazines. I’m sure that there are designers in the world who work while constantly staring at prototypes and samples, but in my case I want to “forget” about a project as much as possible, so that my head is clear, like the space of an empty gallery.


MILAN/POWERHOUSE

H E R V ÉV A DN E RS T R A E T E N The French designer pushes the envelope on sculptural design with an art-filled exhibition

Tell us about your exhibition at the Robilant+Voena gallery. The idea of this exhibition is to stretch the dialogue between periods and mediums—to show how my work could [intersect] with a classical painting by Bernardino Licinio or works from a more modern period like [those of] Andy Warhol and Lucio Fontana. The curating was done in partnership with the gallery. We worked closely on the lights and the layout; the walls were entirely repainted, which transformed the setting. What is your design process like? Everything starts with a sketch. I start drawing, precisely, the structure of a piece; then I look for the material that will best express what I intend to create. Sometimes, I 110|

Hervé Van der Straeten poses with the ‘Stool Capsule’ in lacquered aluminium and the ‘Armoire Partition’ in blue lacquered wood.

start with a material that inspires me and that leads me to a form. I have my own workshops in Paris—one for bronze and one for cabinetmaking—where 30 craftsmen work. I work with a large range of materials; some of them are traditional, like antique parchment, ebony and marble. I also love challenges and new materials, and use Plexiglas and anodized aluminium, as [seen] in the ‘Propagation’ and ‘Origami’ consoles at Robilant+Voena gallery. From concept to realization, how much time do you spend working on a piece? I have the luxury of time. I want to develop my pieces. I do a new show every two years, when I feel it is ready. One piece can take up

ArchitecturAl Digest|JulY-August 2016

to one year to develop. You also design jewellery. Is there a common design language that links the jewellery and the furniture? Creating jewels is a great way of researching new shapes for furniture and objects. Jewellery allows me to grasp, at a small scale, what I will create on a bigger scale. On the other hand, a structure studied for furniture can be brought to a piece of jewellery. There is a continuous dialogue between my furniture and my jewellery. How would you define rarity? Rarity is not about the price. It is the combination of a great idea with a very high quality of execution.


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MILAN/POWERHOUSE

T O R DB O O N T J E

Tell us about your Lux Orbit collection. For a long time, I wanted to design tabletop objects with Swarovski. I love how the sparkling crystal adds something festive and glamorous to the table. The theme came from enjoying sci-fi stories—Battlestar Galactica, Neuromancer, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Alien—and depictions of the future and otherworldly landscapes and space. It’s also influenced by space photography—[from the] Hubble telescope—and imagery. I chose to work with smaller crystals that are normally used for fashion accessories and jewellery because of their refined elegance and large colour range. What is your design process? I used to believe that as a designer you always had to be very precise with drawings, computer-rendered models [and so on]. But I have come to see that actually it is more

photos: mark cocksedge

Part of the nine-designer team for the debut collection by Atelier Swarovski Home, the Dutch designer spoke to about collaborative designing

important to be open to collaborations and inputs from others. With industrially produced objects, I try to be quite precise in my drawings to show what my intentions are and what the important aspects of the design are. Then by working with the engineers and product developers, the design always changes, and depending on the team, it becomes better! With craft-driven or handmade objects, it is sometimes better to not be very precise and to leave room for the artisan to add their own skill and knowledge. Do you often produce your own pieces? There are a few things here in the shop, which are studio-produced: the Lightweight collection of lamps made with bamboo, copper, stone, and paper; the Shipwrecked collection of dinner plates; and the ‘Botanical’ chandelier made of laser-cut COR-TEN [weathering] steel. It is fun to make some

Left to right: Tord Boontje with a wine cooler, bottle stoppers and lanterns from the Lux Orbit collection. Sketches by Boontje for the collection.

things in self-production; sometimes it’s the only way to be creative and independent. On the other hand, it can also be very timeconsuming, risky and sometimes limiting in reach. I also enjoy working with other people or companies who are skilled and specialists in what they do. A camping tent, laptop skins and even stamps—what’s next for you? Floral balconies for town houses in London; a galactic chandelier in a hotel entrance in Macau; a new botanical textile collection with Christopher Farr; street furniture along the Thames; a bar for Sarabande (the Lee Alexander McQueen foundation) based on snakes; Yamaha audio speakers transformed with horsehair; and an exhibition in September in the studio, for which we have invited 28 other designers to show their work under the title Electro Craft.


MILAN/TRENDS

‘NODE’ LAMP BY ELS WOLDHEK AND GEORGI MANASSIEV, ODD MATTER ‘STENO’ DESK BY CAIMI LAB, CAIMI BREVETTI

‘FRAME BY YOU’ ROOM DIVIDER BY SARA HELD GOTFREDSEN, VIA DESIGN

‘GRID’ MODULAR DAYBED BY POOL, PETITE FRITURE

shortlists six trends from Milan Design Week

HAUS RULES Bauhaus expanded its hold on furniture to linear perfection

‘LITH’ TABLE BY MAURO LIPPARINI, ARKETIPO ‘MINI BARCELONA’ CLOCK BY JOSÉ MARÍA REINA, NOMON

BOWLS FROM THE TABLE COLLECTION BY JAIME HAYON, BOSA ‘PARENTESIT’ FREESTANDING AND WALL PANELS, ‘DIZZIE’ TABLES AND ‘CATIFA 53’ CHAIRS, ALL BY LIEVORE ALTHERR MOLINA, ARPER

‘ROLLINGIN’ BAR TROLLEY BY GIO TIROTTO, MINGARDO

‘STENO’: ROUL LACOMETTI; ‘ROLLINGIN’: DARIO BREGGIÉ; ‘PARENTESIT’, ‘DIZZIE’, ‘CATIFA 53’: MARCO COVI; ‘GRID’: PETITE FRITURE; ‘MINI BARCELONA’: NOMON

‘GRAN TURISMO’ LAMP BY DAVIDE G AQUINI, ADG DESIGN


MILAN/TRENDS

‘EMMA’ DAYBED BY MÜLLER & WULFF, SOFT LINE

‘ANKARA’ SUSPENDED LIGHTS BY CONSTANCE GUISSET, MATIÈRE GRISE

SOFT SERVE Pastel shades ruled the colour charts with these candy-coloured pieces

‘RAW’ CUSHION BY BORJA GARCÍA, GAN

‘FUGATO’ SPEAKER, KÄHLER DESIGN

‘PRO’ SWIVEL ARMCHAIR BY KONSTANTIN GRCIC, FLÖTOTTO

‘GIUDECCA’ HANDMADE RUG BY ZANELLATO/ BORTOTTO, CC-TAPIS ‘ELISABETH’ LAMP BY JULIEN PHEDYAEFF, HARTÔ DESIGN

‘JOIN’ SERVING BOWL BY MARK BRAUN, PETITE FRITURE

‘EYES’ ARMCHAIR BY FOERSOM & HIORT-LORENZEN, ERIK JØRGENSEN

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‘TOY’ SIDE TABLE, ATELIER BIAGETTI

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘GENDER’ ARMCHAIR BY PATRICIA URQUIOLA FOR CASSINA, POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER

‘ANKARA’: CONSTANCE GUISSET; ‘PRO’: FLÖTOTTO; ‘FUGATO’: PR PHOTO; ‘RAW’ & ‘GRAPY’: PINHOLE STUDIO

‘GRAPY’ EASY CHAIR BY KENSAKU OSHIRO, GAN


MILAN/TRENDS ‘TIGMI’ DEEP SOFA WITH DETACHABLE ROOF BY JEANMARIE MASSAUD, DEDON

‘CHIEMI OGURA #1’ FROM THE KYOTO COLLECTION, PET LAMP

‘GIARDINO’ OUTDOOR PENDANT LAMP, SERVOMUTO

‘AYAKO HOSOGAKI #2’ FROM THE KYOTO COLLECTION, PET LAMP

CANE & ABLE

‘RIO’ CHAISE LONGUE BY OSCAR NIEMEYER, NILUFAR GALLERY

Cane, wicker and woven materials emerged as hot new favourites this year

‘LIALA STRAW’ CHAIR BY U ASNAGO, PORADA ROCKING CHAIR FROM THE MARNI BALLHAUS COLLECTION, MARNI

‘MAJORDOMO’ COAT HANGER & FOOTWEAR STAND BY NATHAN YONG, WIENER GTV DESIGN ‘LIBELLE’ BOOKCASE BY PIETRO RUSSO, BAXTER

‘SOFA SELLIER’ BY NOÈ DUCHAUFOURLAWRANCE, HERMÈS

‘RIO’: MATTIA IOTTI ; ‘SOFA SELLIER’: STUDIO DES FLEURS; ROCKING CHAIR: MARNI; ‘JOSEPHINE’: SIKA-DESIGN; ‘GIARDINO’: GUIDO BARBAGELATA

‘JOSEPHINE’ SUNBED, SIKA-DESIGN


MILAN / TRENDS ‘FANTASY AIR BALLOON’ BED BY ANDRÉ OLIVEIRA, CIRCU

VASES FROM THE HOT SPOTS COLLECTION BY CHRISTINE RATHMANN, ROSENTHAL

‘AIRWAY’ SWING BY PHILIPPE STARCK, KARTELL

‘PLI’ SIDE TABLE BY VICTORIA WILMOTTE, CLASSICON ‘CLOUD’ CEILING LAMP BY ORIANO FAVARETTO, CATTELAN ITALIA

PRISM BREAK

‘CARTOOLS’ TOY CARS BY FLORIS HOVERS, MAGIS

Multi-coloured surfaces injected life into crisp forms

‘RAINBOW’ TRAYS, HAY

PLAY HOUSe ‘PRISMANIA’ CHAIR BY ELISE LUTTIK, NOON FURNITURE ‘CLOUD’ LAMP BY ANDRÉ OLIVEIRA, CIRCU

‘FURIA’ ROCKING HORSE BY FRONT, WIENER GTV DESIGN

‘ABCD’ SIDE TABLE BY RONA MEYUCHASKOBLENZ, KUKKA STUDIO

VASE AND BOWL FROM THE PRINTED COLLECTION BY RAW EDGES, ATELIER SWAROVSKI

‘TESTACALDA’ TRACTOR BY PIERO LISSONI, KARTELL

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‘CHROMA’ TABLE LAMP BY ARTURO ERBSMAN, ROCHE BOBOIS

‘RAINBOW’: HAY; ‘PRISMANIA’: LISA KLAPPE; HOT SPOTS VASES: ROSENTHAL

Children got a solid dose of design attention with these playful new entrants


218-222 DLF Grand Mall Second Floor MG Road Gurgaon 91.124.410 88 00/ 99 00 . info@ravishvohrahome.com www.ravishvohrahome.com

“Redefining the aesthetics of bespoke living”


MILAN/TRENDS

SHAPE UP

Curvy or edgy—these pieces blurred the lines between furniture and sculpture ‘KEYSTONE’ CHAIR BY SOPHIE MENSEN AND OSKAR PEET (STUDIO OS Δ OOS), PLEASE WAIT TO BE SEATED

‘VALLE’ SHELVES BY ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS, CITCO

‘LUCID LIGHTS’, DAVID DERKSEN DESIGN

‘DO-MARU’ ARMCHAIR BY DOSHI LEVIEN, B&B ITALIA

‘CURVED’ HOTEL RECEPTION DESK, WONMIN PARK

‘ERMES’ VASE BY GIORGIO SORESSI, GIORGIO COLLECTION

‘AERON’ COFFEE TABLES BY RODOLFO DORDONI, MINOTTI

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

‘KALEIDOS’ MIRRORS BY CAMPANA BROTHERS, GHIDINI 1961

‘COMPRESSION’ SOFA BY PAUL COCKSEDGE, MOOOI

‘CURVED’: WONMIN PARK; ‘VALLE’: FRANCO CHIMENTI; ‘KEYSTONE’: HENRIK JAUERT; ‘ORACLE’: ARKETIPO FIRENZE

‘KARESANSUI’ (GRAVEL) RUG BY MATTEO CIBIC, SCARLET SPLENDOUR

‘ORACLE’ DINING TABLE BY GINO CAROLLO, ARKETIPO


The Carpet Cellar

Rare Persian Carpets, Modern Carpets, Kilims, Textiles and Pashmina Shawls

1, Anand Lok, August Kranti Marg, Siri Fort Road, New Delhi – 110049, Tel: +91 11 41641777 Email: info@carpetcellar.com • Website: www.carpetcellar.com 348 D, Sultanpur, MG Road, Adjacent to the Sultanpur Metro Station, New Delhi - 110030, Tel: +91 11 26808777 (Herbal Washing & Restoration also undertaken) OPEN ON ALL DAYS: 10:30 AM TO 6:30 PM


MILAN /CLASSICS

Thousands of crystals tumbling down from curly brass castings plated in 24-carat gold make the ‘Cascade’ chandelier by Masiero a treat for maximalists. The glittering effect is further enhanced by the teardrop pieces in Venetian glass.

The ‘Wallace’ chest of drawers by Jumbo Collection is inspired by the rococo chiffonier that was added to the bedchambers of Louis XV’s private apartment in Versailles in 1739. The ‘Wallace’ is the result of 200 hours of work by 10 craftsmen.

This Russian neoclassical armchair from Rho has been upholstered in an extraordinary silk velvet. Made with beechwood, this piece stands out because of its gilded trompe l’oeil and ebonized detail.

The elaborate baroque ‘Valery’ bed from the La Boutique L4 collection by Asnaghi Interiors is an absolute showstopper. Eight a k on carving, artisans worked d g lacquering, gold-leafing a painting the piece.. and

handpicks furniture fu e pieces from the fair that th t showcased the bestt of Italian a expertise and craftsmanship ft n p

Bring in a touch of 17th-century European glamour with the‘Valery’ vanity desk from the La Boutique L4 collection by Asnaghi Interiors. The exquisitely crafted piece has been finished with 24-carat gold trim.


MILAN /CLASSICS

Turri’s all-white ‘Blanche’ sofa set from the Orion collection designed by Andrea Bonini is upholstered in leather. The centre table is from the brand’ s Noir collection, and the 3.5-metretall chandelier carries a Vetro Artistico Murano r certificate. f .

The special feature of the ‘Olympia.13400/B’ storage unit by Cornelio Cappellini is its set of Murano glass-and-metal elliptical legs. The unit is outfitted with a Calacatta gold marble slab on top.

Flexform’s ‘Elisabeth’ bergère by Roberto Lazzeroni pairs firm padding with armrests and a high back to create a cocoon of comfort. It is complemented by the ‘Eaton’ ottoman and a detachable headrest cushion.

The ‘Visconti’ console from the Next Art collection by Sicis seeks inspiration from the art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance. Its mosaicsheathed front drawers are evocative of the fine craftsmanship of that era.

Flexform’s ‘Icaro’ bookshelf has been designed by Roberto Lazzeroni. Its solid-wood shelves can be upholstered in either cowhide or suede. The metal tips at the base add to the sturdiness of the piece.

‘BLANCHE’: TURRI. ‘MANTA’: RIMADESIO

The ‘Manta’ dining table from Rimadesio by Giuseppe Bavuso is characterized by a light and modular aluminium structure. A lazy Susan can be added on request.


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MILAN /CLASSICS The ‘Edge (Two)’ o)’ door bby Marco Piva for Lualdii is a meeting eting ppoint of geometry ry and functionality. This matt, iron-grey lacquered uered version has an angular cut on one side which creates a volumetric etric effect.

The ‘Ops’ mirror designed by Umberto Asnago for Porada has an unusual asymmetric shape. It can be created in one day, and undergoes eight different stages of production.

The ‘Bijou’ cocktail table designed by Fabrice Berrux for Roche Bobois features a bubbled-glass top—available in transparent and coloured variants—and rests on a structure of thin steel piping.

The ‘Wind (Brushed Rame)’ bookshelf designed by Giuseppe Bavuso for Rimadesio is made entirely in aluminium. This large, free-standing composition, combines aesthetic lightness and structural strength with minimal thickness.

Visionnaire showcased its new launches in two separate spaces for the first time this year. The ‘Hemingway’ armchair, designed by Samuele Mazza, is part of its contemporary collection.

Minotti’s ‘Freeman Duvet’ seating system features sumptuous seat cushions— each wrapped in a layer of memory foam padding and topped with soft down.

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‘OPS’: DAVID CERATI. ‘HEMINGWAY’: VISIONNAIRE HOME. ‘WIND’: RIMADESIO. ‘BIJOU’: ROCHE BOBOIS

The back of the ‘Indy’ chair—by Italian design firm Archirivolto for Cattelan Italia—has a subtle, streamlined design. It has two variants, a fixed base and a swivelling one, and is ideal for the office.


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MILAN /CLASSICS Named after a popular 1970s’ New Yorkk night club, the ‘Xenon’ sswing lamp mp was designed by Paolo Vasi forr Venini. Venini The suspended lamps have ve been designed to look like k luminous nous sponges.

The frame of the ‘Diamond’ sofa by Sicis is made of solid timber and plywood. It is upholstered in the ‘Elios Gold’ fabric from the brand’s Tessere collection, which looks like it is made up of tiny mosaic pieces.

The round wenge veneer top of the ‘Elvira’ dining table by Formitalia is contrasted by the base, which is upholstered in quilted leather, and embossed with the oval horse logo.

The ‘Elvira’ upholstered leather chair by Formitalia has lacquered wooden legs; the sides and back have been quilted, while the front of the backrest has been embossed with the horse logo.

The shape of the ‘Adelaide.3100’ chaise longue by Cornelio Cappellini is inspired by a sleigh. The backrest can be adjusted, making it comfortable for reading and relaxing.

The slim Calacatta marble top and the slender iron structure—in a light bronze satin finish—of the ‘ ‘Calder (Bronze)’ consolee by Minottii highlights thee b d contemporary style.. brand’s

The ‘Niky’ sofa was designed by Daniele Lo Scalzo Moscheri for i 4 Mariani. It can be upholstered in fabric or leather.


MILAN /CLASSICS

Jean-Marie Massaud has designed the ‘Lloyd’ bookshelf and storage system for Poltrona Frau Group Design Center. It comprises grids of thin vertical wooden rods that can be moved to create varied playful sequences.

Claudio Bellini designed the ‘Piuma’ bed for Natuzzi. The headboard is shaped like two pillows joined together. The perimeter of the bed has been created in leather and fabric.

The structure of the ‘Outline’ coffee table designed by Alessandro La Spada for Visionnaire is made of golden polished steel. It is fitted with rose gold and grey glass.

The ‘Micol’ multifunctional dressing table by Giovanna Azzarello for Porada lends itself to both classic and modern styles because of its elegant yet formal structure.

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A ARCHITECTURAL A DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST A 20166

The gold Calacatta marble top of the ‘Schubert’ dining table by Longhi rests on tubular metal rods encased in a wood base. It is accompanied by the ‘Frances’ chair from the brand’s Vanity collection, which is upholstered in suede leather.

‘BUTTERFLY’: GIORGIO COLLECTION. ‘LLYOD’: POLTRONA FRAU. ‘OUTLINE’: VISIONNAIRE HOME. ‘MICOL’: DAVID CERATI

The ‘Butterfly’ chandelier from the Alchemy series of the Coliseum range by Giorgio Collection was designed by Giorgio Soressi. It takes two hours to make each of the Murano glass bulbs.


MILAN /KITCHENS

2 1

LA CUCINA

This new breed of kitchens will raise the technological ante of your home 1. ‘Genius Loci’ kitchen system by Gabriele Centazzo for Valcucine. 2. ‘Legno (Nova Lack)’ kitchen by Nolte Küchen. 3. ‘WTes

5872 Vinidor’ wine cabinet by Liebherr.

4. ‘Panama (Nero Marquina)’ wall covering by Enzo Berti for Kreoo. 5. ‘Tulér’

interactive kitchen by Tipic for Offmat.

6. ‘Pearl’ hood by Miele. 7. ‘Dots’ modular shelf system by POLARISlife. 8. ‘FAB 28’

4

3

5 7 8

6

2. NOLTE KÜCHEN. 3. LIEBHERR APPLIANCES INDIA. 5. MAX ROMMEL. 6. MIELE. 7. POLARISLIFE. 8. SMEG

refrigerator by Dolce&Gabbana and Smeg.


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MILAN /BATHROOMS 2

THAT'S AMORE showcases the most well-designed bathrooms spotted at the fair

1. The Arcadia bath collection designed by Studio APG for Cielo. 2. ‘Diesel Open

4

5 9 10 8 7

6 Style Editor: Sonali Thakur Stylist: Samir Wadekar Production Assistant: Shreya Basu Interns: Vidhi Shah, Satvik Gupta & Soumya

For details, see Stockists

3. ULI MAIER FOR AXOR/HANSGROHE. 4. BIANCO ESTREMOZ. 7. DEVON&DEVON. 9. MAURIZO MARCATO. 10. VITRA BATHROOM CULTURE

1

3

Workshop’ bathroom by Diesel Living for Scavolini. 3. ‘Water Steps’ from the Axor WaterDream collection by Front for Hansgrohe. 4. Freestanding towel holder from the Twig collection by Boffi. 5. ‘Rainshower SmartControl’ shower system by Grohe. 6. ‘Kora’ bathtub by Enzo Berti for Kreoo. 7. ‘Harry Junior’ washbasin cabinet and mirror by Paola Tanini for Devon&Devon. 8. ‘Technic Dark’ ceramic tiles by Porcelanosa. 9. The metal edition of the Edge bath collection by Falper. 10. ‘Time and Moment’ bathtub by VitrA.


MILAN / RSVP

The party was hosted at the Bulgari Hotel.

Zarir Mullan, Shernavaz Bharucha, AD publisher Deepa Bhatia, Seema Puri Mullan

Kaif Faquih, AD editor Greg Foster, Kekin Shah

A TOAST TO

DESIGN

Snapshots from the annual party hosted by and Sicis India celebrating the Milan Design Week

Matteo Cibic

Suman Kanodia, Ashish Bajoria

Akanksha Himatsingka

Ravish Vohra

Rupesh Baid

Sangeeta Mansharamani and Sunil Jasani

Satyendra PakhalĂŠ

Kanhai Gandhi, Chandrashekhar Kanetkar

Prashaant and Natasha Kochhar

Sandeep Taluja

Leila Erfan

Sejal Shah

Mann Singh

Richa Bahl

Enrico Monti, Kekin Shah

Gunjan Gupta, Greg Foster

Jayshree Poddar

Ravi Vazirani

JULY-AUGUST 2016|

Vinita Chaitanya

Rajiv Saini

Annkur Khosla

Abdul Hameed Khan

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|137


RESTORATION

DESERT ROSE Using age-old artisanal techniques, architecture firm Studio Lotus renovated the cafe at Jaipurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Palace into Baradari, a restaurant where traditional craftsmanship meets contemporary design Writer AbhilAshA OjhA PhotograPher edmund sumner


A

l fresco dining in a courtyard that’s several centuries old, relishing laal maas (mutton curry) with scalloped potatoes and brie kachori (a savoury snack)—it makes for an impeccable scene. While the former is a twist on a traditional favourite from Rajasthan, the latter is a popular street food in India. In Baradari at the City Palace, Jaipur, however, both dishes are redefining the gastronomic vocabulary. It’s not just the food that’s getting reinvented; the building of this fine-dining restaurant—which opened earlier this year—is a fitting tribute to the rich heritage and craftsmanship of several anonymous yet talented artisans. This is a place with a strong personality, an example of how design brings inherent value to a place when conventions on conservation and adaptive reuse are looked at through a fresh lens. “What we have done in Baradari is not bring back the old,” says Ambrish Arora, founder and principal architect of AD50 firm Studio Lotus, who, along with his team, transformed the 14,000-square-foot space. We are sitting in his office in New Delhi when Arora explains his point: “It is adaptive reuse. If the role of buildings is to be adapted for use in contemporary times, the role of history is to become a window that connects the past to today.”

perspective A decidedly modern, glass-enclosed seating area blends seamlessly with the old palace structures. Below: What is an exquisite fine dining experience today was earlier the palace cafe. Facing page: The revamped space showcases the age-old stone masonry work.

Historic overHaul Step on Baradari’s intricately inlaid, black and white patterned floor—a modern take on traditional Rajasthani leheriya (a hand-dyed striped pattern from the state) created in local marble—to know what Arora means. The ceiling, walls and niches feature contemporary design patterns in traditional thikri (mirror) work. An exquisite fluted marble water cascade forms a sculptural end to the courtyard. The designs and upholstery material of the furniture reflect the hybrid influences. The pavilion (baradari is Urdu for a pavilion with 12 doors) constructed in backlit translucent marble and glass provides a contemporary counterpoint to the historic vocabulary of the existing buildings, >

JULY-AUGUST 2016|

ArchiTecTUrAL DiGeST|139


It has taken Studio Lotus and the on-site team nearly 18 months to revamp and reinvent the palace cafe as Baradari.


perspective < with mild steel and brass used for designing the lighting and doors.

Two years ago, when Arora visited the place, it was different. Before the renovation, painted embellishments adorned the plastered walls. Compared to other buildings and structures of the City Palace, this was a seriously neglected area even though it served as a nondescript cafe for visitors to the Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II Museum at the palace. The brief to Studio Lotus was simple: redevelop this space into a fine-dining destination. What followed was an intensive study by Arora and his team. Plaster was stripped off the walls to expose centuries-old masonry, and then restored and repainted using traditional techniques. According to Arora, this enabled them to study what “lay beneath these walls. History had to speak in a voice of its own. Baradari would become the anchor between the city and the museum”. So the team created two entrances—to extend the museum and open up another entrance to the palace. IronIng out the creases A temporary setback, however, ensued when Arora wanted to dismantle a decades-old constructed structure that was, according to him, “hampering our opportunity to reinvent the palace cafe”. Arora eventually got the go-ahead and the resultant expanse offered the overall space a more dynamic appeal. To be sure, nothing else was torn down. As Chris Miller, special advisor to the royal family of Jaipur, reiterates: “We maintained all of the original structures, removing recent layers of paint and cement plaster to reveal the original stone masonry. We restored the lime mortar and plastering of the walls with the original ancient recipe of cured slaked lime with various ingredients, including fermented

fenugreek, guggal resin, jaggery, and crushed sandstone and brick to give the natural Jaipur pink colour to the plaster.” There were some other changes in Baradari: the administrative block, now the bar with its rugged, distressed columns couldn’t hold glass as per the earlier plan, a reason why glass doors have been placed separately. There were, however, other issues. Though the building boasted of rich stone work, there was a problem of design continuity. None of the columns were identical. On the face of it, it looked, well, “imperfect”—a concern for the Jaipur royalty known for their impeccable taste. After a while, however, the design team and the royal family agreed that the beauty was precisely in expressing the organic nature of this centuries-old structure. Walk into Baradari and the columns do emerge as a flawless design construct simply because the material palette (stone) and the colour unify them. What matters to Arora is how he worked on a contemporary design and architectural language within the framework of the age-old structure. “With every layer we stripped off, we found newer conversations, newer ways to explore luxury and aspiration while making the journey more exciting,” he says. Princess Diya Kumari of Jaipur sums it up well: “The City Palace is an integral part of the rich legacy of Jaipur. While one takes immense pride in the history of these grand structures, one also understands how important it is to move with the times. I wanted Baradari to be an impressive space boasting of the rich lineage of Jaipur with a visual language that was both contemporary and traditional. For us, it was important to retain the original structures and work within that framework to make it relevant in the present day.”

Layers of plaster were stripped off to reveal the rich work that existed centuries ago. Right: Baradari is an ode to rich Indian craftsmanship; seen here is a computer-generated contemporary pattern executed by an artisan specializing in the thikri (mirror) work technique.

JULY-AUGUST 2016|

ArchiTecTUrAL DiGeST|141


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perspective PROJECT

BLUEPRINT Inspired by the High Line in New York, the streets of Morocco and Istanbul, the heritage-rich Aix-en-Provence, and London’s Borough Market, the old walled city of Jodhpur is set to get a facelift

Marked out on a map of the old walled city of Jodhpur are the landmarks key to the JDH Urban Regeneration Project. 1. Mehrangarh Fort; 2. Toorji ka Jhalra and the step-well square; 3. The Raas hotel; 4. Umaid Chowk; 5. The Clock Tower; 6. The Maharaja Sumer Grain Market

B

uilt on an unused rail track, the High Line, a 1.45-mile-long elevated park in Manhattan, is dotted with restaurants, boutiques, public sculptures, art galleries, entertainment and recreational zones, a produce market, taverns, and even a carefully laid out waterfront, that make it the city’s most sought-after tourist destination. Come September 2016, and you won’t have to travel to Manhattan to experience this. Three experts, in their endeavour to create ‘Brand Jodhpur’, will bring a similar experience to this enigmatic city of Rajasthan through the JDH Urban Regeneration Project. (JDH is the IATA code for Jodhpur’s airport.) The JDH Project was initiated roughly three years ago by three individuals: Kanwar Dhananajaya Singh, whose family has historical links with Jodhpur; V Sunil, the creative director of the Make in India initiative, and the director and co-founder of Motherland

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

Joint Ventures; and Mohit Dhar Jayal, co-founder of Motherland Joint Ventures. Together, the three plan to restore the walled city of Jodhpur to its former glory, but with a new spin, by infusing into it new ideas and influences from all over the world. Experts from a number of countries have spoken about the social and economic benefits of such projects. From improving infrastructure to creating employment, witnessing an increase in real estate prices, and increasing revenue through tourism, retail, entertainment and other avenues, the benefits of such urban regeneration programmes, if done systematically, are immense. PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE But before we proceed to what Jodhpur’s walled city is set to become over the next three years—considered the critical first

ILLUSTRATION: MARWAR JODHPUR: GATEWAY TO THE THAR BY DHANANAJAYA SINGH (MEHRANGARH PUBLISHERS)

WRITER ABHILASHA OJHA


JONAS UNGER

The city as seen from atop the Raas hotel

phase—let’s pause to understand what makes it compelling even today. Jodhpur is the second largest city in Rajasthan; it has Asia’s largest air base; and its old walled city circles around the Mehrangarh Fort, from where you can see the city sprawl out beneath, smearing its blue tint into the horizon. Chaotic and buzzing with activity, a walk through its narrow lanes—created to shield people from the harsh sun—seems to take you back in time, to when Jodhpur was a city of royals. The JDH Project wants that sense of royalty and rich legacy to return to the city. “Think Aix-en-Provence in France, where 18th-century architecture and modern elements are beautifully intermixed. Jodhpur—as a place that truly represents India, with all its havelis culture and heritage—fits this model perfectly,” says Jayal. Given the vision, by September this year, a significant part of Jodhpur will be protected, conserved, restored and revealed to people. “Restoration isn’t a new concept for Jodhpur. It has been happening since the 1980s because Bapji [the titular Maharaja Gaj Singh II of Jodhpur] is sensitive to the need for urban planning and restoration. While the Mehrangarh Fort has been continuously restored and maintained, the walled city is being restored for the first time,” says Singh, who is an art historian, conservation expert and an author. PILOT STUDY Singh and his brother saw the potential of the project when they took an 18th-century haveli in the north-eastern part of the walled city and transformed it into Raas, the city’s first luxury boutique hotel. But while Raas was a good example of how Jodhpur’s urban regeneration should be done, it was a lone pocket. Outside it was an unused step-well filled with muck. Further ahead, the clock tower—from where roads and lanes spider-webbed outwards— groaned under the weight of unsystematic expansion. It was Jayal and Singh who first spoke of this—of extending the

idea behind Raas to the entire walled city area. The initial meeting between the two boarding-school friends lasted 20 minutes, after which, Jayal says, “I called Sunil, whom I’ve known since my advertising days, and told him there was an opportunity for us to transform this part of Jodhpur.” On his part, Sunil remembers, “Unlike Mohit and Dhananajaya who have lived in Jodhpur, I was exposed to the city through advertising shoots. I must say, the city left me with an impression like no other.” Jodhpur, for each of them, was meaningful. Most importantly, they all understood that it was this city that would understand the restoration of legacy. “We also wanted to create a formula wherein revenues could be earned and ploughed back to benefit the city in the long run. It has to be efficient urban planning, not merely beautification,” Sunil adds.

STEPPING UP This is what the JDH Project attempts to do. After acquiring some old havelis and other structures close to the ramparts of the Mehrangarh Fort, a dedicated restoration team came on board, whose pilot project was the aforementioned step-well. Before they could start though, they had to clear out the industrial waste, debris and household trash that had accumulated over the years. Thirty-four truckloads of garbage (and “even an old motorcycle”, quips Sunil) later, under the advice of the restoration experts, the stone was sandblasted, and the water, re-oxygenated. Now, people sit on the red-sandstone steps, as children and fish swim happily in its waters. The step-well square—the public area around the evacuated structure—too got a facelift, with the nearby havelis being restored to something of their old grandeur. The narrow lanes, which till now captured only chaos, will be a breezy boulevard, with a high-street commercial feel. “Commerce, for want of a better word, is critical to any urban regeneration programme,” explains Sunil. The opening of the square will be followed by the renovated grain market, which was originally established in the 19th century. The project aims to have a seasonal restaurant running atop the main structure, on the lines of London’s Borough Market. “In the next three years, there will be three islands of activity and the focus will be on providing excellence that will benefit not just the business, but also the local community,” says Singh. The step-well square launch will be followed by Umaid Chowk, which will see the construction of a boutique hotel. The third island, comprising the clock tower and the grain market, will be restored simultaneously. The areas around these “islands” will be beautified and businesses will be conducted with the revenues earned, then ploughed back for bigger-picture urban planning, which will include waste disposal and recycling, water harvesting, solar and wind energy generation, and even rooftop agriculture. What would the JDH Project want to achieve eventually? Singh remarks confidently: “Jodhpur needs to become… Jodhpur. It has to rediscover what it always had in its roots.”


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Three women—among them UK-based Indian architect Shalini Misra—come together to kick-start the fifth edition of ‘Squat’, an experimental residential design installation in London’s Mayfair WRITER NONIE NIESEWAND . PHOTOGRAPHER MEL YATES

TTY-CLARKE © SIM CANE

Two 1950s armchairs by Swedish designer Folke Jansson are accompanied by a table by Osanna Visconti di Modrone; the graphic rug by Martino Gamper, made in Nepal, is called ‘Expected to be or happen at a time still to come’. Below left: At the entrance, in the background, is a 1970s ceiling lamp by Hans Agne Jakobsson. Left: (left to right) Nina Yashar, Mehves Ariburnu and Shalini Misra. Centre: Behind the bed is a Gamper screen in metallic finishes; the bedside tables are from the Tracce collection by di Modrone; the ceiling light in brass is ‘Catch’ by Lindsey Adelman.

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chic Mayfair apartment, powerdressed like its designers, is where three female fame-brokers are showcasing contemporary art, architecture and collectible design in an exhibition called ‘Squat’. Nilufar Gallery owner, Milan-based Nina Yashar, in collaboration with London-based architect Shalini Misra and art curator Mehves Ariburnu, set up Squat in the heart of London’s West End. Everything in the apartment is for sale—

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from the curvaceous ‘Living’ chairs by Augusto Bozzi (1950) landing on Sputnikspiked legs, for £12,300, at the entrance, to Andy Warhol’s silkscreen of fellow artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (1984) for $1.75 million. And when the exhibition closes in November, the apartment is estimated to fetch just under £11 million. MEETING OF MINDS Squat began humbly, in 1999, in Paris, when artists took over an empty building at 59

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

Rivoli. Yashar first ran with her own concept of the project in Paris in 2012 during the FIAC contemporary art fair. “I’ve always been keen on creating new and unexpected associations between furniture and space,” she says. “I like change and challenges. So I decided to bring the idea of Squat to different cities. Twice in Paris, then Beirut in 2013 and Milan the year after.” Now it’s London’s turn. The name was embraced by the trio not because they gave a diddly-squat about squatters, but because they wanted to launch, to a well-heeled market,


perspective The ceiling light is by Giò Ponti. The centre tables are by Osanna Visconti di Modrone and the 1950s curved sofa is by Federico Munari. The screen behind the sofa is by Martino Gamper. The artwork above the fireplace is by Enrico Castellani.

the artists and designers they support. And for Misra to launch, with Ekta Varma, her new real estate company, Genessia. Misra used her formidable architectural skills to uplift the staid Victorian interiors. Dramatic flooring—a white marble floor inlaid with black bands inspired by Giò Ponti, wooden floors laid in chevron or herringbone patterns—anchors her scheme. Chunky cornices and tall skirting boards delineate rooms as widened entrances and taller doors enhance the height. Paint and paper in smoky shades of grey and white conceal air conditioning and sound systems on the walls. Leather, linen, velvet, stone and marble in the background are the fashionable naturals to which sparkle is added with bronze, gold, steel and glass details like door handles and inlays. Yashar furnished the space from her Milan gallery and her warehouse, Nilufar Depot— which could be described as La Scala on an industrial scale—to house her collections, which are as eclectic as she is. When I met her at Salone del Mobile in April, she was dressed in a 1970s’ vintage Giabetti e Isola with a striped silk apron hand-woven in Vietnam, a fur turban she’s “had for years”, Prada earrings, and flat, flowered moccasins. “On a platform

where you have such different disciplines as art, architecture and design, the mixture of pieces and people can be super-difficult. I choose people for their synergy as I give more value to teamwork—and for me to realize my real passion,” says Yashar. GALLERY SPACE Yashar chose to introduce the swooshing lines and opulent shapes of mid-20th-century modernists like Federico Munari, whose curvaceous satin and velvet sofa ups the luxury ante of the drawing room. She teams these classics with contemporary pieces like Roberto Giulio Rida’s jukebox-shaped cupboards decorated with glass baubles like vinyl records, and Massimiliano Locatelli’s jigsaw dining table that, pushed together, creates big sinuous pieces, or smaller clusters. Lights by cult American contemporary designer Lindsey Adelman, along with Alvar Aalto’s cubed pendants of the 1950s, similarly mix modernism with contemporary classics. Ariburnu curated the contemporary art for Squat with the Robilant+Voena Gallery, based in London, Milan and St Moritz, and the Milanese Giò Marconi gallery. Founder of Galeri Manâ, a contemporary art gallery in

Istanbul, and a member of the acquisitions committee at Tate Modern, she now lives in London, where Subodh Gupta’s sculpture of everyday utensils is stacked in her garden, Marina Abramovic’s angelic piece floats above her kitchen, and sculptor Antony Gormley’s androgynous figure greets visitors. The focal point for Squat, in the living room, is Enrico Castellani’s Superficie Bianca, (1930) an acrylic on canvas above the fireplace. Julian Schnabel’s dreamy Untitled (Chinese) painting (2008) illuminates the dining room, and Lucio Fontana’s gold porcelain Concetto Spaziale Cratere (1968), ruptured by a bullet hole—a camera lens, perhaps?—intrigues. David LaChapelle’s Statue, depicting two classical statues canoodling, hangs provocatively in the hall, while dominating the terracotta-painted walls in the study is a rare drawing by Henri Matisse, Lady with a Guitar (1939). Just how three strong minded women achieved harmony in this project to create an oasis of calm in the heart of London’s West End is all about their understanding of contemporary art and design. Squat is on at Flat 1, 70 South Audley Street, Mayfair, London W1K 2RA until November 2016.


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The men who have a new vision for India that will change the way we think, work, live and play

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TAKE A JOURNEY THROUGH SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD The view from the bow of the Beluga 1, owned by London-based designer Anouska Hempel.

SHIPSHAPE Legendary designer Anouska Hempel holidays in grand fashionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;on her personal sailing boat, a traditional gulet with black sails

PHOTO COURTESY ANOUSKA HEMPEL DESIGN

WRITER KARL TREACY


photo courtesy anouska hempel Design

Hempelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who runs her eponymous design studioâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; bought the gulet in Turkey.


PHOTO: WILL PRYCE

The lights, cushions, and runners on the seats in this salon by the bridge are all by Anouska Hempel Design. The tan leather plates are by Ralph Lauren. The baskets and trunks are antiques.

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photo courtesy anouska hempel Design

In this dining area on the aft deck, the chairs are from a gentlemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s club in Mumbai. The cushions are by Anouska Hempel Design.

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photo: will pryce

The lights and lamp in the study are from the Anouska Hempel Design couture collection. The baskets are in leather.

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nouska Hempel—or Lady Weinberg, as she is known in her private life—is dealing with a downpour. Or rather her crew is. This is the downside of having a boat, even if it is in the Mediterranean, off the coast of Mallorca in May. Men far more dashing than your typical deckhand hurry below with cushions and mattresses, as the boat’s owner and designer takes refuge beneath the expansive awning to chat. If the unexpectedly inclement weather is the downside, the upside is the 28-metre-long boat itself. A traditional wooden gulet, the purchase of the Beluga 1, as it was named, took place in Bodrum, Turkey, some 15 years ago. Out of the water and perched on stilts at the end of the season, even in its poorly state it was a case of love at first sight. The decisive Hempel went into the nearest bar and “chatted up” two trusty sailors (“one’s name was Genghis”) willing to navigate it to Mallorca “by the stars and the moon”, a journey that took three weeks. SLOW, STEADY The restoration and renovation job took well over a year. And it’s an ongoing project, “because you have to look after a wooden boat very, very well”. Stretching wide in the water, with its distinctive black sails, the Beluga 1 has become an enviable and instantly identifiable classic— spotted around the Mediterranean from Seville to Istanbul and the Amalfi Coast. It’s available to hire throughout the summer months, hand-picked crew included, and Hempel says she manages to snag only about two weeks on it each year. Much has been made of her desire to buck the trend for the type of slick yacht favoured by her peers. For her, the reason is simple. “I didn’t want a speedboat,” she explains. “I didn’t want anything that goes fast around the Mediterranean. I’m a gypsy and a slow one, so I needed to be on my own ground and be in an environment that I liked, and it’s easier to do that in a beautiful, big, wooden [boat] than it is on a very lovely, compact, white shiny thing.” Encroachments from the modern world such as lights and switches are hidden as much as they can be, and the exquisite interior has a focus on the functional. In the kitchen, sinks have a wooden rim to avoid chipping plates, drawers are without handles, and heavy baskets are on tracks for easy sliding. CONDUCIVE TO CHANGE For Hempel, working on a boat as opposed to a hotel was “common sense”. She says, “All you have to do is make sure everything is in its place, [that] there’s a place for everything, and make sure things are secure. You need [an innate] common sense at the end of the day.” An innate sense of style doesn’t hurt, either. In the space below

deck—transformed from a warren of small cabins into three-to-four exquisite ones—wood, unsurprisingly, dominates. The charming interiors have strong competition, however, in the aft deck—with its awning stretching the width of the boat, and its surfeit of divans and cushions that encourage worry-free lounging in the place with the best view. At the time of this interview, Hempel was getting ready to work her magic on the boat once more, in what would be its fifth makeover. The overhaul was going to be entirely cosmetic: “You never change everything on a boat this age,” she pointed out. What’s changing is the colour scheme: “Going from ginger to saffron, if you want to go down the spice route with me,” Hempel smiles. “Saffron and turmeric and mustard and black. The chef will be doing food to match— basically Asian with an Italian twist.” Given the designer’s eye for the subtly special detail, that seems a given. Any yacht-spotters out there shouldn’t get too used to the new incarnation. Creative urges and itchy fingers indicate the scheme has perhaps a two-year lifespan. After that, “Mustard will be out and wasabi will be in!” she suggests with a laugh. And the menu adjusted accordingly, of course. THINGS TO COME A famous beauty with impeccable style, her razor-sharp intellect is also coupled with a tireless work ethic. She is the first to admit that she doesn’t suffer fools gladly, nor, when it comes to her exacting vision, any tedious attempts to water it down. “‘I will not be value-engineered’—it will say that on my tombstone,” she states enigmatically, her disarming sense of humour laced with something a tad spikier. The clientele of her eponymous design firm might be at the high end of the market, but she’s not afraid of spreading her talent around—if the project makes sense. “Give me an old tanker and I’ll turn it into a student hotel. It has to be wild and wonderful.” But not just her name slapped on any old thing. “It’s got to be something amusing. It can’t just be a rubber mat for the bath that you don’t slip on.” While luxurious black-sailed gulets have yet to be dumbed down for the masses, she’s rather Zen-like about the re-appropriation of her ideas in general. “Everyone copies everything you do anyway. The moment you open a hotel you’ve had it. You’re exposing yourself to the riff-raff and the gentry of the world—all with the same turn of the key.” Anouska Hempel Design, and its team of 30, is currently working on apartment blocks, hotels, restaurants, palaces, and several big gardens, from Dubai to Istanbul and Manchester. The late-July to early-August period will witness the opening of two hotels: Blakes Singapore (carrying forward the legacy of the boutique hotel that started it all) and the Franklin, in Knightsbridge, London. “Bored? I’m too busy to be bored. I think that’s a terrible word!” she replies incredulously when asked about the impetus behind her unceasing workload. “You can’t be bored. Life’s too busy and wonderful and there’s always something around the corner.” Navigated, undoubtedly, with grace and a steady hand—just like she sails.


PHOTOS COURTESY ANOUSKA HEMPEL DESIGN

The quilt on the bed in the stateroom is from Japan and the cushions are from France; the blind is made from an opium mat from Thailand, and is held up by Syrian horse straps. Below: The tables in the foreground are by Anouska Hempel Design; in the background a Riva motor boat is in tow.

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SPACE,Volum

The facade comprises a two-walled screen, with a pierced brick wall on the outside. The parking area is paved with reused stones from demolished tea factories, and opens out to the marsh and the riparian buffer beyond.


E & INTUITION

With a building philosophy that embraces the elements instead of resisting them, Sri Lankan architect Palinda Kannangara is creating a new architecture in his island country— best showcased in his Colombo home WRITER ASHOK FERREY . PHOTOGRAPHER BJÖRN WALLANDER


The living and entertainment pavilion on the third floor overlooks the rooftop garden, featuring a rice patch, a lily pond with a water runnel, and a reed garden, designed by AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara—the homeowner—and landscape architect Varna Shashidhar. The painting is by Sri Lankan artist JC Rathnayake, from his ‘Buddha’ series. The sofa is by Lee Furniture, the single-seater chairs from Gandhara, and the lamp from Paradise Road—all in Colombo. The coffee table was designed by the architect himself.


The kitchen and dining area in the living pavilion overlooks the rooftop garden, offering views of the marsh landscape and the other side the city. The paintings of Kannangaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dogs on the pillar are by Sri Lankan artist Vikum Bandara. The crockery is from Paradise Road. The bar stools are from Barefoot, in Colombo.

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In the meeting and formal dining area, the dining table designed by Kannangara has vintage â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pantonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chairs around it. Hanging by the balcony are cormorant figurines by Sri Lankan artist Prageeth Manohansa. On the right is the library and a space for listening to music. The sofa is by Lee Furniture. The library shelves were designed by Kannangara. The pyramidal lamps on the floor are from Paradise Road.


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Above left: The model-making and storage room overlooks a courtyard filled with large philodendrons; the antique wooden cupboard on the left displays architectural models, while the chest of drawers is used for storing stationeryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; both are from Rizlan, an antiques store in Malabe; the wooden louvred window shutters were specially designed by Kannangara. Above right: The master bath is open to the sky; the fittings are from VitrA, Turkey. Below right: A collection of art and architecture memorabilia decorates the prayer niche; Kannangara designed the six-foot-tall glass louvres. Below left: The living and entertainment pavilion opens out to the green roof; the chairs are by Swiss designer Rico Taravella, from The Workshop Training Centre, Bentota.


The bed in the master bedroomâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a view overlooking the marshâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is by Lee Furniture.

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or a man vaunted as the vanguard of new architecture in Sri Lanka, AD50 architect Palinda Kannangara is a soft-spoken, unassuming, monk of a man. When I show up at his home, the security grille rolls up, clanking and whirring like the modern-day equivalent of a medieval portcullis. As I step in, the first thing that strikes me is the view—an ocean of thickly wooded green, stretching as far as the eye can see. It’s hard to believe I’m just 20 minutes away from the centre of Colombo—the bustling, frenetic, commercial capital of Sri Lanka.

SEEING SENSE “I built this house to frame the view,” says Kannangara, pointing to the blank wall that makes up the front of the house. It comprises three layers: an interior wall of soft concrete, separated from an outer skin of pierced brickwork, by a four-inch air gap in which the services are hidden. “The brickwork prevents the concrete from heating up,” he adds, “an important factor in the tropics where noonday temperatures can soar.” Once inside, you are confronted by a neem tree standing guard over a staircase paved with recycled granite cobblestones. It is reminiscent of ancient Sri Lankan temple architecture, where often, devotees have to climb flights of stairs—an act of penance as much as devotion—to the stupa, usually at the top of a mountain. The house is brand new, but Kannangara has carefully chosen his materials—brick, timber and stone—for their weathered look. Their softness creates what is most pleasing about the structure. Often, the rawness of bare brickwork and concrete can contribute to a hard-edged, clinical appearance. But here, the cement has been carefully poured into timber formwork, and the marks of the planks still remain, as if this were not actually concrete, but some organic material, ossified and calciferous, dug up from a prehistoric swamp. “People describe me as a minimalist,” Kannangara says, “but it is what you do with your materials that defines you. It is important that you own your style, rather than let the style own you.” So the house has none of the preciousness all too often associated with the all-white sterility of many minimalist buildings in the West. Constructed though it is to exacting and exact standards, the scuff marks on the timber floors (there are three dogs in the house), the lack of a mirror polish on the black terrazzo, the uneven edge of the cobbles, all contribute to this very special brand of tropical minimalism, where what could have been empty perfection is tempered by the presence of the jungle just outside the window. NURTURED IN NATURE Indeed, this coming to terms with the fierceness of the elements, the fecundity of nature, and the sheer embarrassment of tropical riches is what seems to define Sri Lankan architecture. There is no getting away from it; when the wind howls and the rain pours down during the monsoon, there isn’t a house on the island that is not wet. In Sri Lanka, modern buildings of steel and glass begin to look like shipwrecks after six months, and maintenance is all too often prohibitive. You have to be very rich indeed to keep your minimalism up to the mark in the tropics. How then can we deal with this? Our only defence must be to face these factors, not shy

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away from them. Our modernity, our minimalism has to have a built-in obsolescence about it. And the new Sri Lankan architecture, with Kannangara at the forefront, seems to have an understanding of this. Kannangara was a mathematician before he became an architect, so there is a pragmatism to him, missing in more academic practitioners of the art. From the way he has installed screens of glass louvres vertically rather than horizontally (making them easier to clean), to the immense 17-foot-tall iron-framed windows, which can all be pushed to one side to better enjoy the view. “They told me these would be impossible to construct and install. I proved them wrong,” he says with a wry smile. The first floor houses his modest office of six to eight people. “I don’t take a [project] until and unless I get to know the client well,” he says, “and I personally visit every site—to observe where the sun rises and sets, to be inspired by the land. Every site is unique, and its context hugely important.” Kannangara believes that anyone can design a building, “but true architecture,” he says, “is something you have to discover by yourself—an inner understanding, an intuition almost, of how to handle your volumes and spaces”. At the very top of the house are the living quarters—a long room and open-plan kitchen, with wide views on either side. Beyond are two broad terraces planted with various types of grasses. There is a constant breeze blowing through, so you could actually be living in a modern-day version of the ancient granite caves that used to house monks in pre-Christian Sri Lanka. It is perfectly suited to its occupant—an architect changing the Sri Lankan skyline. Kannangara with the 17-foottall windows and seating that he designed for his home.


A view of the boundary wall, marsh and stream behind the house.


Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot you expect from a megayacht, but where the Atlante triumphs over others of its kind is in all the ways you do not expect Writer Leena Desai

photo: maurizio parisi/crn

ROCK THE BOAT


photo: jÉrÔme galland

In keeping with the Atlante’s colour scheme, even the corridors are painted in dark metallic shades. Facing page: The owner of the yacht wanted a strong masculine look for his boat—hence the metallic grey and jet-black exterior.

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PHOTO: JÉRÔME GALLAND

In the aft salon on the upper deck, a solid-wood low table divides the almost symmetric room. All the furniture and lamps in the room were custom-made by Paris-based duo Patrick Gilles and Dorothée Boissier, who designed the interiors. The rug is made of natural abaca fibre and was sourced from the Philippines. The ceiling and wall panels are made of larch wood. The painting in the centre is from the owner’s private collection.


M

ore battleship than luxury boat; more black than white; more clean-lined than curvy—when the megayacht Atlante was unveiled at the Monaco Yacht Show last year, it was very much the ‘antiyacht’. At an event where every gleaming liner is a standout, the Atlante—with all its gunmetal edginess— seemed more shark than ship, as it silently sliced through the inky waters of the Monégasque marina. If ships were people, the Atlante would be a renegade James Bond, with state secrets casually tucked into the pocket of his razor sharp suit; or a pirate in Prada. What strikes you about the Atlante—besides its unexpected colours—is its appearance. This is because the yacht’s owner, a European business magnate, wanted his liner to have the stylistic identity of military ships. To fulfil this rather unusual need, he partnered with three separate think tanks: the engineers and builders from Italian shipyard CRN to construct the yacht; naval architects Nuvolari Lenard to design the exterior of the yacht; and interior designer firm Gilles & Boissier to custom-make everything inside the yacht. CRN and Nuvolari Lenard are old hands (and what better ones to place your life in?) at building boats; it is the core of their business.

photo: patrick swirc

For Paris-based Patrick Gilles and Dorothée Boissier, whose studio specializes in designing homes, restaurants and boutiques, watercraft were somewhat virgin territory. “This was our first motorboat. We had designed two boats before—the Blackwood 1 and Blackwood 2— for the Atlante’s owner, but they were sailboats and did not have this level of detail,” says Gilles. Having known his client for nearly 15 years meant that Gilles wasn’t particularly surprised at his request. “He wasn’t looking for a real military boat, but he wanted something extremely military. He liked this duality between water, which is extremely smooth, and the boat, which is almost aggressive.” Gilles and Boissier worked closely with CRN from the very beginning on the yacht’s drawings, 3D renderings and elevations. And Gilles is nothing if not thankful for the fruitful partnership. “We designed it like we would a house, but in the end, it’s a boat. There were a lot of practical considerations. Our design was going to involve significant use of marble and wood, and we discussed that with CRN. And they never told us that would be a problem. They helped us execute what we had imagined.” RICH HAUL Fifty-five metres long and eleven metres wide, the Atlante is similar in size to other megayachts, but that’s where the similarity ends. Unlike most yachts—which you enter via a flight of stairs at the stern leading to the main deck—here the ‘beach club’, the area on >


photoS: jÉrÔme galland

Towards the aft of the main deck is usually where the tenders are kept, but it’s cleared when entertaining guests, and replaced with wide couches. Facing page, top: The tables in the aft salon on the upper deck have eucalyptus and rosewood tops and metal legs. Facing page, centre: Interior designers Patrick Gilles and Dorothée Boissier. Facing page, bottom: The view of the entrance from inside the Atlante.

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All the mooring and safety equipment is either hidden or discreetly integrated into the overall design. Below: The large windows on the Atlante ensure that its interiors are always awash with abundant natural light.

photo: jÉrÔme galland

photo: maurizio parisi/crn

< the lower deck, acts as the craft’s entrance. This unconventional

entry was at the behest of the owner. “Usually the beach club isn’t used much on yachts, except when the guests want to go for a swim. But on the Atlante, it is their introduction to the yacht,” says Gilles. To make the first impression of the Atlante a lasting one, the beach club is equipped with a solarium, a sunbathing area, a Turkish bath, a gym, and lounging tables and chairs for the ultimate R & R. It helps that this area is just a few steps away from the four guest cabins on board. The rooms all have a different layout, but a common design thread of smoked oak and brushed silver fir interiors, custom-made furniture by Gilles & Boissier, and lavish bathrooms in Calacatta Vagli and Carnico marble. All the marble was sourced from different parts of Italy, and a colossal 20 tonnes—approximately the weight of a 17-metre-long yacht—were used for the interiors. A white Carrara marble staircase in the lobby rises up to the main deck: the pièce de résistance of the Atlante. Towards the bow of the ship is the owner’s suite, a full-beam stateroom (spanning the greatest width of the boat) that includes a spacious bed, a sofa, a desk, and a huge bathroom. Brushed black oak and eucalyptus, leather and marble, and linen specially designed by the owner’s wife come together to create a sense of quiet, understated, and indisputably masculine luxury. The stern of the main deck is the Atlante’s party central. When guests are on board, the tenders are lowered, the space cleared, the side hatches opened and the area transformed into a discotheque, a bar, or a home theatre. Wide sink-in couches give guests the feeling of being almost on level with the water. “You ‘feel’ the water on the Atlante,” says Gilles. “That is typically a sensation you have if you’re in a sailboat; not so much on a motorboat. On a yacht you are at a considerable height, but on the Atlante, you can feel the sea.” And if “feeling” the sea makes the guests too hot or too cold, they can retreat into the yacht’s main salon—an enclosed living and dining room with dark parquet floors, an abaca rug, sofas upholstered in a Loro Piana fabric, Christian Liaigre lamps and a leather ceiling.

THE CALM AFTER THE STORM In contrast with the electric vibe on the main deck, the upper deck is all about coffee and conversations. Sectioned into intimate seating areas, many overlooking the water, the deck is meant to inspire long tête-à-têtes, or at least long siestas. The copper tones of the deck’s aft salon are offset with J-shaped cream sofas. Dark parquet floors, larch wood wall panels and ceiling, and large side windows with leather seating lend the space a log-cabin-like vibe. A short corridor leads guests to the bow of the ship where they can enjoy sundowners around a hydraulic table that becomes flush with the deck when not in use. For guests arriving on the Atlante by air (because of course, sometimes, one has to make an entrance), the stanchions lining the bow are removed and the loungers stowed to clear the area for choppers to land. Still in its first year, the Atlante has been sailing mainly on the Mediterranean. For someone who had seen the yacht when it was just sheets of aluminium and steel, Gilles is a satisfied man. “For us designing the Atlante was a continuity of our long collaboration with the owner. Our main concern was to be sure we understood what he wanted, and our main challenge was to make something he would love.” To that end, he knows his studio has aced the test. The Atlante is the cynosure of its owner’s eyes, and as he takes it out for a spin around Greece, the French Riviera, and, of course, Italy (where it was made), it continues its game of smoke-and-mirrors with the sea.


PHOTOS: MAURIZIO PARISI/CRN

Since the owner of the Atlante likes entertaining, Gilles & Boissier ensured there were seating areas spread across all four decks of the yacht. Below: On the upper deck, guests can enjoy al fresco dining around a hydraulically operated table; it sits flush with the deck when not in use; the fabric â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;chairsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; are also removable.

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PHOTOS: JÉRÔME GALLAND

The linen—designed by the owner’s wife— helps offset the dark tones of the brushed silver, brown fir and black oak wood used inside the owner’s suite. Below right: One of the washrooms on the Atlante, done up in Calacatta Vagli marble and afrormosia teak. Below left: The owner’s suite has a sofa placed along an entire wall; running parallel to it is a rectangular leather table that slides on rails.


The unusual entrance to the Atlante is through the beach club on the lower deck; the main deck has a closed stern, which is also unconventional. Below right: A “Land Rover on water” was how CRN chairman and CEO Lamberto Tacoli described the Atlante; one of the references the owner had given CRN was the British automotive icon. Below left: One of the nine-metrelong tenders designed by Nuvolari Lenard.

PHOTOS: MAURIZIO PARISI/CRN

All the marble [on the Atlante] was sourced from different parts of Italy, and a colossal 20 tonnes—approximately the weight of a 17-metre-long yacht— were used for the interiors.

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The view from the veranda faces north to allow for cooler air. Beyond sits a planterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chair with a rattan seat and back.

180


THE

OTHER

SIDE OF

GOA Designer and hotelier Isla Maria ‘Loulou’ van Damme’s serene home in Bardez, Goa was inspired by Geoffrey Bawa’s architectural aesthetic and is as laidback and welcoming as its bohemian owner WRITER MARIE-FRANCE BOYER PHOTOGRAPHER ROLAND BEAUFRE


This 19th-century four-poster bed is draped with muslin, and its mattress covered with a cotton kalamkari spread. The bed, furniture and shutters are all in mahogany.


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The kitchen accommodates two islands; one houses two sinks, while the other is for cooking; it supports a rack for spices and oils, and has shelves on runners that can be pulled out. Facing page: The shower in the bathroom is shielded from the garden by a screen, which, like the floor and walls, is made of waterproof plaster.


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Far left: A 19th-century Anglo-Indian chandelier hangs above the table, which is covered with a traditional block-printed cloth. Left: However busy, Isla Maria van Dammeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;better known as Loulouâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is always the model of balletic elegance and hospitality. Below: From the leafy garden, the colonnaded veranda can be seen through areca palms, cordylines and ficus.


A

fter living in Mumbai, Brussels and London, Isla Maria van Damme—known as ‘Loulou’—moved to an island in the far north of Goa and built her house, Panchavatti (meaning ‘five trees’), atop a hill that looks down over the Mapusa river. In the evenings, on the dusty roads, women in multicoloured saris would return home chattering, bundles of wood on their heads. Their palmroofed mud houses had not changed in 500 years.

Homecoming Belgian by nationality, Loulou was born in India, where her father once held the post of honorary vice consul. “At the age of seven, I went to school with the chauffeur in an Oldsmobile. In Bombay, we had 25 staff for the three of us. It was the high life.” At the age of 16, Loulou returned to Europe to study in Belgium and later went to work at a chic Indian shop in Chelsea. By the age of 21, she had opened a shop, Santosh, in Brussels, selling fashion, jewellery, antiques and Indian textiles. It was an immediate success and lasted 35 years. Loulou never lost touch with her roots, however, coming to India four or five times a year to have designs made up and to print fabrics. As she entered her 50s, she realized that she was happiest here, and decided “to go home” with her husband. In Goa, they opened their first restaurant, with a few B&B rooms, on a then-empty beach that is now the most fashionable in the state. The cooking was exquisite, and Loulou had an easy way with people. But after a few heavenly years, others had copied the restaurant and the beach was beginning to lose its innocence. Loulou separated from her husband and withdrew inland. In the Bardez region of Goa, she bought a large virgin plot overlooking tropical forests and a tracery of still, mangrove-fringed waters. Teaming up with a local builder, she decided to create the house of her dreams. She is no architect, and it was her builder who introduced her to the work of Geoffrey Bawa. Born in 1919 and educated at Cambridge, the late Sri Lankan architect is celebrated for his ability to ally vernacular architecture with contemporary forms, technology and sensibilities. Loulou took a trip to see some of Bawa’s work in situ and take inspiration from his “unimposing serenity”. Though Loulou has relocated since these pictures were taken, the house on the hill remains a large square built around an inner courtyard. Its four raised, covered walkways have columns running around them, recalling traditional Indo-Portuguese houses. In Loulou’s time, two living rooms and five bedrooms, for paying guests, and an immense kitchen shared the property. Each room opens on to both courtyard and garden. Outdoors and indoors merge on the colonnaded veranda that extends from the north-facing living rooms. Furnished in a mixture of Victorian, Portuguese, colonial and Keralan styles, this cool and

comfortable space, bathed in the fragrance of the frangipani trees, allows everyone to find a private space to read, play cards, drink tea, have a chat, or simply doze after a swim in the pool, hidden farther down the garden by a jackfruit tree. The bedrooms—and the IndoPortuguese beds, covered with mosquito nets beneath the fans—are huge. All the old furniture is dark, as are the varnished openwork mahogany shutters that extend from the lunettes and are used in place of glass. “I tend towards emptiness,” says Loulou, with a sigh. “In warm climates, it is space that is the luxury.” Nevertheless, in her own room she allowed herself a painting by Léon Spilliaert that reminds her of Belgium, while a piece of red furniture from Gujarat rubbed shoulders with a small 1970s iron desk, made by Godrej. Loulou is a great friend of the Belgian interior designer Christophe Decarpentrie, and his melange of styles inspired her decoration. “I love his sense of colour, his liking of variety and the fact that he knows when to stop and listen to his clients.” comfort zone It is the kitchen, however, that was Loulou’s masterpiece. The L-shaped room, with its tall ceiling (a local feature that helps to keep the room cool), opens on to the garden and the courtyard and was divided into two areas, with the technical part organized around two professional islands. “You could cook and wash on either side, and on the walls you had all the ingredients and utensils you needed within easy reach,” she explains. For this purpose, two sets of plaster shelves were fitted into the walls like columns, while saucepans, baking tins and casseroles were stored beneath the sink and the burners, which were protected with mesh because of the humidity. The big table was used mainly for discussing recipes every day with Maria the cook, or with friends, chefs or aficionados who would come for a chat, to work or try out dishes with Loulou. In a bookcase built by her grandfather, “who made strong safes as a hobby”, she has more than 400 cookery books. Her fish stews with coconut milk, her Indian tapenade and her red Goan rice are just the ABC of an infinitely more creative alphabet. Much of the furniture in the kitchen, walkways, verandas and bedrooms was modelled in tadelakt (a waterproof lime plaster). The Indian version of this traditional plaster is composed of white cement mixed with lime and marble powder, coloured with pigment (often ochre or green), hand-polished and waxed with coconut oil or beeswax. But Loulou wanted to go even further away. These days you can find her in Kodaikanal, in the mountains of Tamil Nadu (featured in AD’s September-October 2014 issue). She was born there, at a time when it was fashionable for mothers and newborns to take up temporary residence at hill stations. The move to Kodaikanal “is a return to my origins, as well as a new adventure”, she says. “Less noise, fewer people, more wilderness.” She has a little guest house there and works for the interiors and fashion store Bungalow 8 in Mumbai as the stylist she has always been. 187


greek revival

Stylist Charlotte Stockdale and product designer Marc Newson, one of the masterminds behind the Apple Watch, find solitude at their custom-designed home on one of Greeceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ionian islands Writer Celia ellenberg . PhotograPher Magnus Marding


The living room in the Ithaca cottage—owned by Marc Newson and his wife Charlotte Stockdale— features brightly coloured handcrafted ‘Taki’ lounge cushions by Greek furniture design company Coco-Mat, and pieces gathered from the couple’s travels. Facing page: Newson and Stockdale take time out on 1930s rattan garden furniture designed by Josef Frank for Svenskt Tenn.

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Newson’s modular ‘Bunky’ bed for Italian company Magis riffs on the cerulean colour scheme of the cottages.

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Dark wood plays a gentle counterpoint to the kitchenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bright plastered walls, Carrara marble benchtop and Newson-designed Smeg appliances. Above: The cottageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patio table set for lunch.


Stockdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much-used outdoor wood-burning stove.


W

hen the British-born stylist Charlotte Stockdale married Australian product designer Marc Newson in 2008, they already had a shared geographical history in the Ionian Islands. “We used to drive there,” Stockdale says of their courtship, which involved several trips to the archipelago off the west coast of mainland Greece. The route started in London, where they are based, and went to the French port city of Calais, where they’d stay overnight before driving through France, over the Alps and down into Italy, and eventually to the ferry in Venice. Finally, they’d dock on the island of Corfu, where Stockdale spent every Easter and summer as a child at her family’s hilltop house, surrounded by olive groves and night-blooming jasmine. Newson also had a family connection to the rugged islands of the Ionian. His grandfather migrated to Australia from Ithaca, the fabled home of Odysseus. Early in their marriage, Newson took Stockdale there to see a pristine piece of land he’d first spotted 15 years prior. “It was really love at first sight,” says Newson. “I saw the plot from the sea and decided I must have it. But it was not on the market—in fact, no one even knew who owned it.” He befriended a local who helped him purchase the property. A year later, Newson, who has designed everything from furniture, lighting and fashion to kitchen appliances, jetpacks and the occasional private airplane, began work on a small stone cottage that Stockdale affectionately refers to as “the little house.” It was supposed to be a temporary fix, something to keep their growing family contained while Newson started construction on “the big house,” as he calls it—a cliff-side behemoth situated down a windy walkway of recently terraced land. But the modest three-room abode was the family’s home on Ithaca for six years. “I’m sure we’ll have endless nostalgia when we move,” Stockdale says.

STYLE AND SUBSTANCE Stockdale is sipping coffee on a lush portico dotted with fresh herbs and climbing flowers. It’s warm enough for the 45-year-old to be comfortable in a bathrobe, her recently shorn hair still damp from a shower. Stockdale is indulging in a fall ritual with her daughters, Imogen, 8, and Lucienne, 4. “Mentally, we’re able to cut off here,” she says of the family’s travels to Ithaca each year. “One year, we spent three straight days planting the most extraordinary amount of bushes and trees,” she says, flipping on her iPhone to find “before” pictures of the once-dusty landscape. Newson and Stockdale work hard for their vacations. Between her creative consultancy at the Italian fashion house Fendi, her regular styling gigs and her two other titles—style editor at fragrance brand Jo Malone London and fashion director at the biannual art/fashion glossy Garage— Stockdale has her hands full. Newson, who settled in the UK in 1997, is equally busy: On top of the revolving cast of boldfaced collaborations he fields out of his London studio, such as the backpack he designed for Louis Vuitton’s buzzy Monogram series, or the at-home “kegerator” with Heineken and Krups, the 51-year-old joined Jony Ive’s creative team as Apple’s designer of special products in 2015, to create the Apple Watch. In Ithaca, though, they have distinctly different roles: gardener, landscape designer, frozen-pizza-lunch preparer. It’s also where the duo’s individual tastes collide. While Stockdale insists that she doesn’t have Newson’s knack for design, their Ithaca home bears the imprint of both of their signature aesthetics.

The family dog, Zoe (right), and a neighbour’s dog outside the children’s bedroom. Above: Newson spotted his island idyll while on a sailing trip near this white-stone beach.

“Marc is more rooted in historical, artisanal craftsmanship that is then translated in some ‘Beam me up, Scotty’ way,” says Vanity Fair fashion director Jessica Diehl, a close friend of the Stockdale-Newsons, who visited four years ago. “Charlotte, on the other hand, is what I would describe as an elegant, cosy, globetrotting explorer rooted in English country style.” (Stockdale was raised in a Georgian house in Cambridgeshire and in her family’s 18th-century country estate in Hampshire.) French fashion designer Roland Mouret, who first visited three years ago, describes it as “when quirky meets pure lines.” Take, for example, the smooth edges of the Carrara marble kitchen countertop that sits between an icy, cornflower-blue refrigerator and a similarly coloured range top—a part of Newson’s home collection for the Italian appliance company Smeg. Then there’s lived-in appeal courtesy of brightly coloured Coco-Mat couch cushions and a smattering of dark wood details that balance out the bright white plaster walls. “They’re woven grass pods from Sri Lanka—or Thailand,” says Stockdale of the delicate strands of organic brown beads that dangle from the house’s entryway. She found them on Etsy; Newson helped her string them together. “The house is the perfect little jewel,” continues Diehl. “So many times you find extraordinary landscape overshadowed by ill-conceived, overdesigned structures alien to their surroundings. The humility of the home is what is ultimately most inviting.” The property is cut through with low walls of stone that Newson stacked and mortared himself. “Building stone walls is some sort of release for Marc,” says Stockdale. “He inducted himself into a self-taught stone-wall mastership class, and he’s now a master stone-wall builder,” she says, proudly pointing to a retaining wall that holds the property’s rainwater > 193


< collection and purification system. (Newson wants to redo it because of a perceived inaccuracy with his plaster proportions.) But perhaps the most impressive feat of design lies in the gardens Stockdale and Newson have created around the house. Radicchio, cos, frisée and a classic ‘rapunzel’ leaf lettuce grow alongside chives, spring onions, carrots, potatoes, onions and parsley. There’s “every sort of mint you can imagine,” says Stockdale, and “peppers of all sorts”. One garden’s white and red eggplants, vine-ripe tomatoes and watermelons aren’t even a part of the “big” vegetable garden at the far end of the land, where runner beans and okra abound and the hillside descends into a pool of clear water around which two local donkeys—called Tommy and Lavender—graze. Then there are the orchards, which yield enough plums, quinces, apples, pears and apricots for eating and jam making. “These trees here we thought were goners,” Stockdale says, pointing out a few leafy olive branches obstructing her view on the portico. “They were small and dead. You used to be able to see the sea! Now you can hardly see it at all.” “My grandfather, the Ithacan one, was actually a gardener, so somehow it feels like a rite of passage,” Newson says, admitting that he knew absolutely nothing about landscaping (or stone-wall building) seven years ago. “The fact is, I’m surrounded by modernity, and frankly I look at this project as a kind of respite from that.” THE OLD WAY Unlike many neighbouring islands, Ithaca is stubbornly resistant to change. That’s helped by the fact that it’s extremely difficult to get to—there is no airport on the island, which is accessible only by boat. “The people here have a sophisticated understanding of what is precious,” says Stockdale, “not only for the tourists but for themselves.” Still, its remoteness doesn’t stop people from coming; Stockdale estimates that the local population of about 3,000 swells to just over 20,000 in the summer months, when an international coterie of heat seekers and seaworthy influencers—the Italian designers Roberto Cavalli, Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana; Madonna; and Simon and Yasmin Le Bon among them—descend upon its sun-drenched shores. But serenity is a primary draw for the Stockdale-Newsons. “Ithaca has retained the beautiful, elegant, simple aspects of Greek life that I’ve seen disappear elsewhere,” says Stockdale. “It reminds me of Corfu when I was young.” Her father, Sir Thomas Stockdale—the baronet, barrister and classics scholar—bought property on Corfu in 1974, before the summer tourism industry had arrived on its shores. “There was no one there at all,” says Stockdale, who recalls running barefoot through her mother’s garden at twilight, crushing wild oregano beneath her feet. “There was no tarmac to our house. Everybody was on donkeys.” Inside the Stockdale-Newsons’ house, a bowl of freshly picked olives—a small portion of the recent harvest—sits on the dining room table waiting to go to the village press. It’s a considered but cosy detail, of which there are many: A peek into their daughters’ bedroom reveals one of Newson’s blue, modular ‘Bunky’ bunk beds for the Italian furniture brand Magis, made homey by a collection of well-loved stuffed animals. The bed frame’s cerulean hue runs as a constant theme throughout the house—on shutters, in the old taverna chairs’ cushions, in the place mats on the outdoor dining table, which was given a waterproof finish to protect it from impromptu children’s art projects. “The blue and white just happened,” says Stockdale, explaining that the colour scheme is not a reference to Greece’s national colours. A slightly darker version of the same hue coats the heavy glass bottle of Stockdale’s ‘Linen Spray’ for Jo Malone London. Perched on the table next to the olives, it’s an impressive match for the scent that wafts around the house and its grounds. “We have night-blooming jasmine, but there’s also the osmanthus,” she says, identifying a cluster of tiny white aromatic flowers that mimic jasmine’s sweet smell during the day. Stockdale mined her own scent memories when creating the perfumed mist, part of her second collection of home fragrances for the British brand. “I think that smells are like music in that they can take you instantly to a place,” she says. As dusk falls, the Stockdale-Newsons head into Frikes, the harbour village on the island’s east coast, for dinner at Rementzo, a family favourite. Stockdale pauses to fill her lungs with a gulp of the sea-spiked breeze, and to make another scent memory. “Take a deep breath,” she says, turning to her daughter Imogen. “It smells like fried seafood, salty air and herbs. It smells like my childhood, and now it will smell like yours, too.” REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, COPYRIGHT © 2016 DOW JONES & COMPANY, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WORLDWIDE.


A view of the neighbouring island of Kefalonia at sunrise.

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workbook

DECONSTRUCT SAMIR WADEKAR helps you adapt the ‘looks’ of the international

homes in our pages with products that are available in local stores RUG FROM THE HAVANA COLLECTION (5x8 FEET), `30,000, IMPERIAL KNOTS

JÉRÔME GALLAND

JAR, `11,000, FENNEL

MAHOGANY ROLL-TOP DESK, `2,02,500, THE GREAT EASTERN HOME

‘ARTHUR’ VASE, `5,100, THE FURNITURE REPUBLIC

GLASS TUMBLER, `450, NICOBAR

‘QUIL’ SIDE TABLE, PRICE ON REQUEST, SOULSCAPE

SOFA FROM THE SONG SERIES, PRICE ON REQUEST, ESSENTIA ENVIRONMENTS

‘DOVE’ CHAIR, `15,000, CANE BOUTIQUE

‘SUNSEEKER YACHT’ MODEL, `34,900, THE FURNITURE REPUBLIC

‘STAIRCASE’ TRAY, `2,100, STUDIO OBJECTRY

GREEK HEAD, `7,500, MOONRIVER

SHIPSHAPE

PG 153-159 ‘GREY CHIANTE’ STONE, `450 PER SQUARE FOOT, A CLASS MARBLE

TABLE LAMP, `30,400, MARINA HOME

HORN WOOD TABLE LAMP, PRICE ON REQUEST, SIMONE OCTAGON DINING CHAIR, `38,000, ALCHEMY

WINE COOLER, `4,730, CINNAMON

WILL PRYCE

‘ZIA’ SIDE TABLE, `25,700, KREA

LEATHER TRUNK, `28,000, SAJAVAT

For details, see Stockists

PHOTOGRAPHERS: SHAMANTH PATIL J, ANSHUMAN SEN, INDRAJIT SATHE. ASSISTANT STYLISTS: LEANNE ALCASOAS, NITYA DHINGRA, KRITI VIJ

ROCK THE BOAT

PG 170-179


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2016


inside

expert advice, decor tips, and style essentials for the contemporary indian home

ADVICE

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW With inputs from architects, designers, antique dealers and tastemakers, compiles a list of 25 stores and dealers across India for rare and one-of-a-kind pieces

ronny sen

Compiled By Samir Wadekar and Shreya BaSu

a room in schiraaz m tanksalwallaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warehouse in Kolkata, which houses european furniture, marble sculptures and majolica earthenware.


RONNY SEN

The Russell Exchange on Russel Street, Kolkata.


inside Royale TReasuRes AlibAg

The owners of Royale Treasures have acquired their collection over many years of travel; it ranges from Italian marble statues, Flemish furniture, and French Sèvres porcelain vases to chandeliers, Asian earthenware, garden furniture and figurines. The store caters to interior designers, art lovers and home decorators. Its Alibag branch opened in 2000, in a 4,000-square-foot villa. It has a second branch in Mumbai. Royale Treasures, Kankeshwar Phata, Bombay Road, Near Sai Inn Holiday Resort, Kihim; 09820802122 Danny MehRa’s CaRpeTs bengAluru

Danny Mehra is an avid collector of antique carpets, which he has been sourcing for over 30 years from Iran, Anatolia, the Caucasus and central Asia. In his house on Brunton Cross road, one can find a rare pile of carpets dating from the early 19th to mid 20th century. A trip to see these beauties is an exciting opportunity to learn the history behind every motif on the carpets displayed. Spring Leaf Apartments, Flat H, 3rd Floor, 6 Brunton Cross Road; 09880752554 aCCuRaTe DeMolisheR bengAluru

This 25-year-old store is located in the Frazer Town area of Bengaluru and is packed to the rafters with colonial era furniture, artefacts and lamps. The rarities on display include intricate, hand-carved wooden doors from Mysore, storage trunks, architectural columns from south Indian homes, Mughal-era artefacts, Victorian pendant lamps, gilded French mirrors, and

crystal chandeliers. Owner M Liyagath even acquired some pieces for the store from old Indian palaces. No 54, St John’s Church Road, Bharati Nagar; 080-25522254 Balaji’s anTiQues anD ColleCTiBles bengAluru

Established in 1924, Balaji’s Antiques and Collectibles is a family-owned business that supplies and retails a mix of vintage and antique pieces. Old film and advertising posters, fans, records, sculptures, ceramics, mechanical gramophones, collectible watches and tin toys can be found among their colonial and ethnic furniture. They specialize in south Indian works of art and this is reflected in their collection of Ravi Varma lithographs, bronze artefacts, Mysore and Tanjore paintings, and antique maps of India. With thorough research and by travelling extensively, they have acquired rare objects and historically important works of art for the Omega Museum in Geneva as well as private collections. They even supplied period artefacts for A Passage to India—David Lean’s 1984 film. balajiantiques.com RaManik k shah bhuj

A restorer and retailer of fine antique furniture and artefacts, Ramanik K Shah has been a strong force in the antiques field for over 45 years. Till date, Shah refrains from using modern methods and tools, steadfastly holding on to old and original techniques of restoration. His multiple warehouses are filled with four-poster beds, trunks, antique doors, and Victorian, art deco and Gothic furniture. An exceptional 15th-century Jain manuscript serves as the highlight of his collection.

A majolica earthenware bust of an Arab man from Alibag’s Royale Treasures.

Apart from the furniture, Shah also has nearly 300 antique money boxes, 70 art deco chandeliers, Chinese glass paintings, African artefacts and Jain iconography. International collectors and museums have acquired many of his pieces. Mirzapur; 09925680850 MuseuM QualiTy TexTiles bhuj

The Wazir family has been amassing rare collections of textiles for over 50 years. Antique embroideries, block prints, and even readymade clothing and costumes have been sourced from Punjab, the Sindh province in Pakistan, Bangladesh and even South East Asia. AA Wazir, the family patriarch, prides himself on supplying pieces to international museums, Indian collectors and fashion designers. A 150-year-old,

hand-embroidered Jain toran (a garland hung above a door) is one of the unique pieces from the collection. Wazir’s knowledge of the materials, techniques and their history is encyclopaedic. It is one of the reasons his clients keep going back to him, not just to buy materials, but also to be further educated about them. Plot No 107/B, Lotus Colony (Old), Opposite General Hospital; 0283-2224187/09427439671 Deewan BRoTheRs DehrADun

Since 1929, the Deewan family has dealt in fine antiques, mostly acquired from English estates and homes from the Dehradun region. Jaidev Deewan has a covetable collection of over 30 Japanese Satsuma earthenware pieces. A 170-year-old Satsuma vase, with a multicoloured enamel glaze and gold detailing, is the >

July-August 2016|

ArchitecturAl Digest|203


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SURBHI SETHI RONNY SEN

SHREYA BASU SURBHI SETHI

Above left: A collection of wall-mounted plates in Mumbai’s International Antiques. Above right: A Persian handknotted Joshagan carpet from the 1920s at The Carpet Cellar store on New Delhi’s MG Road. Below right: A porcelain sculpture of a lady holding a mask at Schiraaz M Tanksalwalla’s warehouse in Kolkata. Below left: Furniture displayed in one of the alleys of New Delhi’s Amar Chand furniture market.


inside < highlight of Jaidev’s

collection. Eighty-year-old Mintons and Wedgwood ceramics can be found, along with 125-year-old Bohemian crystal and French glassware. The Deewans also have a selection of old statues, landscape paintings, porcelain and glassware. 6H, Astley Hall, Rajpur Road; 0135-2653592, 09897385326

SAUDADES GOA

Saudades is housed in a beautifully restored IndoPortuguese manor in the hamlet of Sangolda, in north Goa. The numerous rooms of the manor home—with its 34-foot-high ceilings—are filled with Indian artefacts and furniture from the British, Portuguese and Dutch colonial periods. The highlight of the collection is an antique Dutch moneylender’s cabinet from the late 1700s made of rosewood and ebony. Both the furniture and the artefacts are affordable and, importantly, great investments. House No 83, Chogm Road, Opposite Mae de Deus Chapel, Sangolda, Bardez; 08322409873

RAMCHANDER MOHANLAL LADDA

14-7-27/2 and 3, Begum Bazaar; 040-24577170

Located in the busy lanes of Laad Bazaar, this is an exclusive store specializing in the famous kota border, used commonly on saris. You will find everything here, from filament work as well as rare, authentic kota work. It’s a store that’s a hit with both locals and fashion designers like Anamika Khanna and Rohit Bal, who come here to source borders for their creations. Shop No 1151, Laad Bazaar Road, Mitti Ka Sher, Laad Bazaar; 040-24577170

CRAFTERS

HYDERABAD

BALAJI TEXTILES HYDERABAD

This is one of Hyderabad’s best-kept secrets—a store that reputedly retails a wide selection of extensively sourced saris. It houses some of the most unique and rare collections of saris—ranging from old Benaras originals to newer ones with intricate brocade work. Some of the shop’s saris feature original goldwork and date back 60 years. The Saami Ralli (snake charmer’s quilt) from Sindh is available at Museum Quality Textile, Bhuj. A Dutch colonial ebony specimen table showing seven types of wood from Saudades, Goa.

KOCHI

Established in 1989, by brothers Sunny and Johny Malayil, Crafters is an exquisite antiques shop housed in a 12,000-squarefoot warehouse, which was once used for storing spices. Located in the quaint old quarter of Mattancherry, the shop has an alluring collection of Chinese jars, religious artefacts, sculptures, furniture and ancient memorabilia from across the Indian subcontinent. So famous is this Kochi institution that Charles, the Prince of Wales, and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, dropped in when they visited the city. crafters.in HERITAGE ARTS ANTIQUE STORE KOCHI

From vintage metal toys and back-painted glass paintings to colonial-era furniture and ceramics, Heritage Arts Antique Store is one of those rare shops where you are bound to be spoilt for choice. Established in 1989, this exquisite antiques shop has a tempting collection of paintings, Indian handicrafts, sculptures, tribal furniture and Christian iconography. Spread across 100,000 square feet, in Kochi’s Jew Town area, the store’s collection is so vast, you never know what you will find there. heritageartscochin.com MADONNA EXPORTS KOCHI

A third-generation familyrun business since 1968, Madonna Exports is a treasure trove of rich art and artefacts showcasing the heritage of Kerala. The 10,000-square-foot space has a stunning collection

of tribal art, architectural columns, wooden carvings, and a collection of over 500 antique masks. Apart from antiques, the family promotes the tribal art of Theyyam with reproductions of figurines and brightly illustrated masks, rendered in their traditional style. Vi/182, Jew Street, Mattancherry; 0484-2228932 THE ETHNIC PASSAGE KOCHI

Since 1977, The Ethnic Passage has been operating from a tastefully restored, 200-year-old Portuguese building. The 15,000-squarefoot store is filled with furniture, sculptures and vintage objects sourced from all over India. Fine teak and rosewood furniture is displayed alongside Christian artefacts from old churches, and an assortment of small items such as antique spice boxes, wooden plates and spoons, copper scrapers and salt boxes. Antique bronze masks—registered with the Archaeological Survey of India—are the feature pieces of this strong collection. ethnicpassage.com THE RUSSELL EXCHANGE KOLKATA

Located on the renowned Russel Street, the Russell Exchange is the oldest running auction house in India. Now in its seventh decade—the auction house was founded in 1940—if it were up to owners Anwer Saleem and Arshad Salim, they would ensure it stays in business for another 100 years. Apart from curating rare pieces of colonial furniture, chandeliers and gramophones, they also auction children’s books and vintage clothes on weekdays. 12 C, Russel Street; 033-22298974 >

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|207


MARKETPLACE

You can also scour for antiques in these markets and streets around the country The Puducherry market on the East Coast Road is known for colonial furniture, antique vessels and more. Muneeswaran Koli Street in Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu is where antique dealers ply their goods, ranging from furniture to artefacts. Chowk Market in Lucknow is known for chikankari (embroidered) garments, ittars, ornaments and crafts. The 200-year-old Nakhas market in Lucknow has Spode china, rare antiques and vintage electronics. The Jama Masjid area in New Delhi has interesting antiquities for sale. Kolkata’s Alipore neighbourhood—with rows of shops with warehouses tucked behind—is a treasure trove of colonial furniture, collectibles and timepieces. The Sunday flea markets in Gurjari, Ahmedabad feature an assortment of vintage and antique artefacts for sale. Hyderabad’s Laad Bazaar is the perfect place to find quaint stools, colourful baskets, silver and pearl jewellery, and Nizamera curios.

A corner of the Kohli Furnitures store in New Delhi features an assortment of wall-mounted plates, and metal sculptures on a display unit.

Mumbai’s Mutton Street has a multitude of shops selling vintage movie posters, cameras, stone sculptures, ceramics, furniture, art deco lights and more.

SURBHI SETHI

The Jogeshwari furniture market in Mumbai has colonial, art deco, Scandinavian furniture and lighting.


inside Suman’S ExchangE kolkata

Ever since it was established in 1972, Suman’s Exchange has held auctions every Sunday at noon. They bring out their collection of artefacts, antiques and furniture from the warehouses the day before to prep for a sale that attracts art lovers, historians, students, and many hopeful flea-market regulars. It is one of the two auction houses that are still running on Russel Street. 2/1, Russel Street, Kolkata, Near Park Street Crossing; 03322267572/09831142848 Schiraaz m TankSalwalla kolkata

In 2002, collector Schiraaz M Tanksalwalla broke away from tradition by holding an auction of rare collectibles from his family’s collection, not in an auction house in his native Kolkata, but at a five-star hotel in Mumbai. Tanksalwalla’s warehouse is next to his museum-like home on Park Street, and is used to display a wide collection, specializing in priceless European and Oriental decorative artefacts and antiques, some dating back to 1775. 87/G, Park Street; 09830766818 mD khaliD FariD khan MuMbai

Compared to the more famous Chor Bazaar in south Mumbai, the Jogeshwari furniture market is far more organized, with a series of stores selling antique and reproduced furniture. With a stunning collection of mid-century, art deco and Scandinavian furniture, the MD Khalid Farid Khan store is a striking contrast to the adjacent competing dealers who tend to retail ethnic and colonial pieces. This small, narrow store features two rows of an assortment of

furniture stacked over 15 feet high. If you are lucky, you can even find an entire art deco suite in the back. 8 & 9, Chaturvedi Compound, Opposite Oshiwara Petrol Pump, SV Road; 09870239952 chanDEliEr & FurniTurE houSE MuMbai

The Mansuri family has been dealing in antiques for over 40 years. The collection at their store in Chor Bazaar comprises over 50 antique chandeliers in 4- and 16-light variants. Some of the more popular brands include F&C Osler and Baccarat. The store also showcases a diverse collection of Chinese pottery, celadon plates, crystal decanters and glassware. Their three warehouses in Mumbai are worth a visit as well. 18, Mutton Street, Mandvi, Chor Bazaar; 022-23412378 inTErnaTional anTiquES MuMbai

The 40-year-old store run by the Mitha family is located right around the corner from the Taj Mahal Palace hotel, in Colaba, Mumbai. The store’s ceiling is densely packed with colourful lights in art deco, colonial, European and industrial styles. Ceramic wall plates, crystal decanters, earthenware, African sculptures and French figurines are displayed in a series of glass cabinets and colonial-era display units. You can even scour through dozens of paintings and prints lining the length of the store. 7, Vaswani House, Near Taj Mahal Palace Hotel, BEST Marg, Apollo Bandar Colaba; 09820536095 kohli FurniTurES New Delhi

Hidden in the bylanes of the Amar Chand market in the capital, this large store—

divided into three sections— displays decor accessories by Lladró, Wedgwood and Lalique, Raj-era colonial furniture, carpets and paintings. The Kohli family, who own the store, have been collecting these rare finds for over 40 years. German beer steins, African plates carved in bone, and rosewood chairs are some of the more interesting pieces available. Locals take pleasure in the fact that each visit results in a new discovery. Shop 22, Amar Chand Furniture Market, Lajpat Nagar-IV; 09911952534 ThE carpET cEllar New Delhi

This MG Road fixture boasts of one of the largest collections of museum-quality and certified antique rugs. Apart from antique tribal rugs, kilims and dhurries, they have an incredible collection of handwoven textiles and wall hangings. The range covers all four corners of the carpet-weaving map, with pieces representing Iran, Turkey, the Caucasus, central Asia, parts of western China, and India. carpetcellar.com gEEThanjali PuDucherry

Geethanjali is a thirdgeneration business housed in a 19th-century villa in the town’s famous French quarter. They have an ethically sourced and carefully curated collection of south Indian art and artefacts that includes authentic Tanjore paintings, antique silver objets d’art, four-poster beds, Ravi Varma oleographs and massive wooden doors carved with intricate designs. geethanjaliartifacts.com

in 1930 as a little art shop in the erstwhile Kingdom of Travancore. It began with manufacturing ivory buttons and gifts, apart from dealing in antiques. Eight decades later, the business shows no sign of slowing down. Different divisions of the company manage their own prized possessions. While the handicrafts division deals with fine pieces made of wood, bronze and stone, their ancient arts division deals in the finest Indian antiquities— comprising bronzes, miniature paintings and sculptures. The company is a governmentlicensed antiques dealer and plays a crucial role in the organized antique trade of the country. natesansantiqarts.com mayur arTS uDaiPur

Established in 1978, Mayur Arts is a treasure trove of antiques—and silver, wood, stone and brass artefacts— which have been carefully curated by owner Hemant Periwal. Of particular note is his collection of Mughal miniature paintings and pichhwais (intricate Rajasthani paintings) collected over a period of time from several royal heirlooms across India. 1, Moti Magri Scheme; 09829042552

naTESan’S anTiqarTS

thiruvaNaNthaPuraM

AD ThankS ThESE anTiquariES For ThEir valuablE inpuTS: SaNDeeP khoSla, NielS SchoeNfelDer, abiN chauDhury, aShiSh bajoria, SuMaN kaNoDia, roMaN SayeD, chiki DoShi, viNita Pittie, farooq aND MubiNa iSSa, NiliSha kohli, eNDa NooNe, aMrita Guha, MaNju Sara rajaN, SoNaM Gala aND Payal baGzai.

Natesan’s was established July-August 2016|

ArchitecturAl Digest|209


Amrita Gandhi & Mukund Venkatesh Shweta & Samir Mappillai

Vellayan Subbiah, Arun Murugappan, Arun Vasu & Aditya Patel

Shruti Haasan

Almona Bhatia Mithun Sacheti

The Gentlemen’s Club – an editorial initiative to bring together India’s finest gentlemen who share a common passion - was hosted at The Leela Palace, Chennai on the 29th of April with partners Ermenegildo Zegna and Audi.

Che Kurrien & Armaan Ebrahim Ramesh Venkataraman

Mario Felisari

The evening saw some of the city’s most discerning gather for a session of engaging discussions over drinks and a gourmet Italian meal.

Sriranjani & Surabhi Negi & Kanika Subbiah Amit Bhargav with Rehane The Ermenegil do

Zegna showca se

Siddharth Trivellore


Chaitanya Rau

The delectable fare by The Leela Palace

Manav Goyal

Kshitij Saxena

oom eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal Ballr The Leela Palac

Mariam Haroon Sangani & Osman Abdul Razak

Unaiz Ahmed

KM Chengappa & Ranjith Reddy

Audi Q7 The powerful

Farah Danani Suhail Sattar

Dushyant Thakkar

Lalita Venkataraman Omar & Heeba Sait Dave Besseling & Suhail Chandhok Ashwin Rajagopalan & Rosella Stephen

Sridhar Venkatesh & Deepa Madhavan

Atul Malhotra

Vivek Karunakaran & Shreya Kamalia


scouts

NEWSREEL From the hottest products to the coolest launches, here’s a low-down on the latest in the market this season

SAFETY FIRST

The aptly named ‘A8 L Security’ is Audi’s most secure car ever. Engineered in aramid fabric—used in aerospace and military applications—special aluminium alloys, and hot-formed steel armour, resulting in a lightweight construction, the all-wheel-drive car is as agile as it is tough. Emergency exit and fire extinguisher systems are available as optional features. Manufactured in a partnership between their Neckarsulm, Germany plant and a secure, top-secret factory, each car’s production is supervised by the German automaker. (audi.in)

LUXE ESSENTIALS

Located in one of Mumbai’s leading design hubs Raghuvanshi Mills, And More Stories is a luxury furniture store with a selection of international furniture brands—such as Ligne Roset from France, Himolla from Germany, Cattelan Italia and Arketipo from Italy. Designed by Michel Ducaroy, the ‘Togo’ sectionals (pictured) are a Ligne Roset classic that have been the ultimate in comfort and style for over 40 years. The store’s in-house brand And More features a collection of hand-picked lighting fixtures, paintings, rugs and artefacts. (andmorestories.com)

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

BUCKET LIST

On the banks of Udaipur’s Pichola lake, The Oberoi Udaivilas commands expansive views of the City Palace, and the 17th-century Jag Mandir and Jag Nivas island palaces. Spread across 30 acres, the hotel—with its numerous domes, arches, pavilions, balconies, turrets and jalis—is a reflection of the area’s history and the Mewar traditions. From the Kohinoor suite to the premier rooms, the interiors are elegantly appointed with handcrafted furniture. An adjoining 20-acre conservatory houses spotted deer, wild boars and peacocks. (oberoihotels.com)


KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL

Grandeur has launched the Gibilterra kitchen collection by Italian brand Del Tongo. Gibilterra represents the perfect combination of quality and design, and is available in a variety of colours and finishes to suit individual tastes and preferences. These handleless kitchen storage units are ideal for an open-plan home, where living spaces are seamlessly integrated with each other. Through their showrooms in New Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru, Grandeur brings a vast range of fully customizable Italian and German modular kitchens, and a collection of built-in kitchen appliances. The retailer also collaborates with some of Italy’s finest furniture brands to bring world-class wardrobes, wall compositions (shelf set-ups), and living, dining and bedroom solutions. (grandeurinteriors.com)

SOUND & LIGHT

Grohe—one of the global leaders in sanitaryware products— recently launched the ‘F-Series 40 Aquasymphony’ rainshower. This shower, from the Grohe Spa range, delivers a whole new showering experience with elements that create mood lighting and musical entertainment. Personalize your shower experience through the digital interface, and create different experiences each time you shower. The bathroom takes on a whole new avatar, becoming a space where you’re wrapped in a curtain of water, bathed in softly coloured light, and accompanied by relaxing music. The system—which includes head, ceiling-mounted and side showers—is sure to create a relaxing showering experience. (grohe.com)

CURTAIN RAISERS

Atmosphere, a leading furnishings brand, relaunched its Mumbai store in a colonial-era building in Colaba. Located behind the Taj Mahal Palace hotel, the store was designed by AD50 designer Rajiv Saini, who used a warm colour palette of wood, bronze details and marble accents to create a retail space that mimics a contemporary home. The entrance level showcases draperies and upholstery, and the upper level is dedicated to decorative pillows, luxury linens, throws and bedspreads. The store’s refined aesthetic perfectly fits in with the brand’s impeccable quality and designs. (atmospheredirect.com)


scouts

Luxury’s new address

In the month of May, Pune saw the launch of Spazio, a luxury furniture store and art space showcasing exquisite collections of renowned Italian brands such as Poltrona Frau, B&B Italia, Medea, and Lema. The furniture collections at this expansive store stand out for their contemporary international aesthetic and, above all, the excellent craftsmanship, high-quality materials, and attention to detail. Spazio is the new retail division of Panchshil Realty, Pune’s leading luxury real estate group. The 20,000-square-foot store is located in Trump Towers Pune in Kalyani Nagar. (panchshil.com)

stow away

The Indian Kitchen Congress 2016 recently bestowed Hettich’s CargoFlexi system an award for being the most innovative product for kitchens. It is a unique system that takes the concept of modularity and functionality to the next level. Conceived with Indian kitchens in mind, the adjustability and flexibility of units—with different widths and heights—facilitates better utilization of space. The system is quite adaptable with a complete range of CargoTech inlets for crockery and cutlery. Variations of the system can be used in wardrobes as well. (hettich.com)

Pick uP steam

Available through Bulthaup, the convection steam oven (pictured) by Wolf Appliances couples the power of steam and convection in one appliance to help consumers prepare delicious, healthful meals with ease. Because the steam process assists in maintaining natural juices and flavours, the use of butter and oil can be eliminated in most instances. From rice dishes to pizzas and fine cuts of meat, the oven detects the best combination of steam and convection, senses the moisture content of the food, and adjusts for ideal results. With a 50.9 litre capacity–the largest available in a steam oven–it is more than 25 per cent larger than similar units, allowing for preparation of large or multiple dishes at once. (india.bulthaup.com) 214|

ArchitecturAl Digest|JulY-August 2016

Power shower

Designed by Barber & Osgerby, Hansgrohe’s ‘Axor One’ interactive shower control is characterized by its minimalistic form and refined proportions. With a variety of special finishes, ranging from a subdued chrome to a bolder brass, the ‘Axor One’ becomes as visible as you would like it to be. By unifying the outlet, volume and temperature controls, the system contains its many functions within a sleek form. The temperature is set via the central dial, while a small lever directly below regulates water volume; its eco mode feature reduces water consumption by upto 50 per cent. (hansgrohe.com)


scouts RIGHT AS RAIN

Jaquar—one of India’s most rapidly growing bathing solutions companies—has launched the revolutionary ‘Showertronics iV6’ system under its luxury brand Artize. It is an intelligent water mixer system that maintains the water temperature and flow rate during showers. The waterproof touchpad, allows you to choose the shower mode, control the temperature and manage water flow. The pre-selected water temperature remains constant whenever you enter the shower, ensuring no risk of scalding from sudden temperature increases or surprising shocks when the temperature drops. (artize.com)

NEW CLASSIC

New Delhi’s IDUS is a one-stop design destination with exclusively curated pieces of furniture, lighting and accessories from around the world. At 40,000 square feet, the store is equipped with furniture that caters to every modern aesthetic— like the ‘Smart’ stools (pictured) from the Dandy collection by Giuseppe Viganò for Italian furniture brand Gamma. With a hidden container and sleeve, the stool can serve as a storage unit and magazine rack as well. (idus.com)

SHOW AND TELL

The wallcovering collections from Nilaya by Asian Paints are sure to add a touch of glamour to your home with a quick and easy update. The Moods of Monsoon collection—as its name indicates, inspired by the rains—is interpreted in traditional techniques like watercolouring and tie-dye processes. The ‘Soak (Madder on Beige)’ wallpaper (pictured) reflects the theme in an urban space by using a striking pattern. The wallpaper—available in two additional colours—works perfectly as an accent wall to set off the rest of the interiors. (nilaya.asianpaints.com) 216|

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

DREAMSCAPE

Sarita Handa, a trusted name in home decor for the last 25 years, introduced their Spring-Summer collection, with a range of new home textiles, furniture and wall decorations. Their signature style of handcrafted products and hand-embroidered textiles with exquisite detailing can be seen throughout this collection. The home furnishing and fabric collection introduces a 100 per cent cotton and linen range inspired by the wall art of London and Mediterranean lifestyles of Capri and Sardinia. The ‘Arrazio Coral’ bedding set (pictured) is sure to brighten up your space. (saritahanda.com)


MEET THE SEMI-FINALISTS They’ve applied and showcased their creations. Now it’s time to reveal who have moved on to the next round of the Vogue India Fashion Fund. Presenting your top 24! ACCESSORIES

Aditi Dhar

VITASTA

Manreet and Samraat Deol

Manifest Design

Olivia Dar

Olivia Dar

Ridhima Sekhri

POEM Bags

Vasundhara Mantri

Vasundhara Jewellery

SARIS

Gaurang Shah

Gaurang

Gunjan Jain

Vriksh

Medhavini Yadav

Resha by Medhavini

Swati Sharma

Brahma Karma


FASHION

Aartivijay Gupta

AARTIVIJAY GUPTA

Natasha Davda

Natasha J

Rina Singh

EKA

Amrita Khanna and Gursi Singh Baani Sachdev and Nikita Jain

Lovebirds

Padmaja Krishnan

Padmaja

Sonal Verma

RARA AVIS

EZRA

Ishita Mangal

QUO

Pranav Mishra and Shyma Shetty Priyanka Ella Lorena Lama

Kanika Goyal

Kanika Goyal Label

Reby Kumar

HUEMN

P.E.L.L.A.

GUAPA Inc

Sonam and Paras Modi

Sreejith Jeevan

Ujjawal Dubey

SVA

Rouka

Antar-Agni


stockists

The merchandise featured in the magazine has been sourced from the following stores. Some shops may carry a selection only. Prices and availability were checked at the time of going to press, but we cannot guarantee that prices will not change or that specific items will be in stock when the magazine is published. ABACA: Mumbai 022-24933522 (abacaindia.com) ADG DESIGN: (ad-g.it) AMRAPALI JEWELS: Bengaluru 080-22221622; Jaipur 141-5191100; Mumbai 022-26125001; New Delhi 011-41752024 (amrapalijewels.com) ANYA HINDMARCH: (anyahindmarch.com) ARKETIPO: Italy 0039-55-8873429 (arketipo.com) ARPER: Italy 0039-04-227918 (arper.com) ASNAGHI INTERIORS: Italy 003903-627714 (asnaghi.com) ATELIER BIAGETTI: Italy 0039-283241694 (atelierbiagetti.com) ATELIER SWAROVSKI: (atelierswarovski.com) B&B ITALIA: Italy 0039-03-1795111; Mumbai 09833130815 (bebitalia.com) BANG & OLUFSEN: New Delhi 09312393123 (bang-olufsen.com) BAXTER: Italy 0039-03-135999 (baxter.it) BOBBI BROWN: (bobbibrowncosmetics.com) BOCONCEPT: Ahmedabad 09409631000 (boconcept.com) BOFFI: (boffi.com) BOSA: Italy 0039-42-3561483 (bosatrade.com) BOTTEGA VENETA: Mumbai 02266152291; New Delhi 011-46098262

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(bottegaveneta.com) BVLGARI: New Delhi 011-40538623 (bulgari.com) BURBERRY: Bengaluru 08041738826; Mumbai 022-40801994; New Delhi 011-46529850 (burberry.com) CAIMI BREVETTI: Italy 0039-36249101 (caimi.com) CANE BOUTIQUE: Bengaluru 08041152093 (caneboutique.com) CASSINA: (cassina.com); see POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER CATTELAN ITALIA: Italy 0039-445318711 (cattelanitalia.com) CC-TAPIS: Italy 0039-28-9093884 (cc-tapis.com) CELINE: (celine.com) CHANEL: New Delhi 011-41116840 (chanel.com) CHOPARD: England 0044-2074093140; Mumbai 022-22884757; New Delhi 011-46662834 CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN: Mumbai 022-43471787; New Delhi 011-41017111 (christianlouboutin.com) CIELO: Italy 0039-76-156701 (ceramicacielo.com) CINNAMON: Bengaluru 08041634220 (cinnamonthestore.com) CIRCU: Portugal 0035-19-14929073 (circu.net) CITCO: Italy 0039-45-6269118 (citco.it) CLASSICON: Germany 0049-897481330 (classicon.com) CORD: India 09899943664 (cordstudio.in) CORNELIO CAPPELLINI: Italy 003903-1751505 (corneliocappellini.com) DAVID DERKSEN DESIGN: (davidderksen.nl) DEDON: Hong Kong 0085-225297233 (dedon.de)

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

DESIGN TEMPLE: Mumbai 02222821001 (designtemple.com) DEVI DESIGN: Gurgaon 1244388430 (devidesign.in) DEVON&DEVON: (devon-devon.com); at FCML BATHROOMS Mumbai 02249261200; New Delhi 011-26800482 (fcmlindia.com) DIOR: India 09999940122 (dior.com) DOLCE&GABBANA: (dolcegabbana.com) E15: Germany 0049-69-94549180 (e15.com) EN INDE: New Delhi 011-49050832 (eninde.com) ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA: Mumbai 022-43471261; New Delhi 011-46060999 (zegna.com) ERIK JØRGENSEN: Denmark 004562-215300 (erik-joergensen.com) ESTÉE LAUDER: Bengaluru 08040982000; Mumbai 022-43473773; New Delhi 011-41517381 (esteelauder.in) FALPER: Italy 0039-51-796495 (falper.it) FENDI: New Delhi 011-46040777 (fendi.com) FLEXFORM: Italy 0039-03-623991 (flexform.it) FLÖTOTTO: Germany 0049-52449305490 (floetotto.de) FORMITALIA: Italy 0039-0573790066 (formitalia.it) FURLA: Mumbai 022-43472820; New Delhi 011-41321483 (furla.com) GAN: Spain 0034-96-2911320 (gan-rugs.com) GEM PALACE: Jaipur 141-2373586; Mumbai 022-22881852; New Delhi 011-46609072 (gempalacejaipur.com) GHIDINI 1961: (ghidini1961.com)

GIORGIO COLLECTION: Italy 003903-62243471 (giorgiocollection.it) GROHE: (grohe.com) GUCCI: Kolkata 033-22870888; Mumbai 022-30277060; New Delhi 011-46471111 (gucci.com) HANSGROHE: Pune 020-66259500 (hansgrohe.in) HARTÔ DESIGN: France 0033-183564547 (hartodesign.fr) HAY: Denmark 0045-42-820282 (hay.dk) HERMÈS: Mumbai 022-22717404; New Delhi 011-43421126; Pune 020-41418848 (hermes.com) I 4 MARIANI: Italy 0039-03-1746204 (i4mariani.com) IKKADUKKA.COM: Gurgaon 124-4363187 IMPERIALKNOTS.COM: Gurgaon 09650427850 INDUSTRY+: Singapore 0065-81577556 (industryplus.com.sg) INV HOME: Mumbai 022-40020402; New Delhi 011-29233122 (invhome.in) IQRUP+RITZ: Gurgaon 09599110672 (iqrupandritz.com) JBL: (jbl.com); at HARMAN Bengaluru 09591797577; Mumbai 022-30080765; New Delhi 01146075601 (harman.in) JUMBO COLLECTION: Italy 0039-03-170757 (jumbo.it) KÄHLER DESIGN: Denmark 004571-200099 (kahlerdesign.com) KARTELL: (kartell.com) KIEHLS: Mumbai 022-66712837; New Delhi 011-40870067 (kiehlsindia.com) KREOO: (kreoo.com) KUKKA STUDIO: England 0044-7870367563 (kukka.co.uk) LACQUER EMBASSY: New Delhi 011-


PHOTOS: SURBHI SETHI, ANSHUMAN SEN, JÉRÔME GALLAND, MARCO COVI

26564777 (lacquerembassy.com) LE MILL: Mumbai 022-22041926 (lemillindia.com) LIEBHERR: (liebherr.com) LOCO DESIGN: Gurgaon 07838139945 (locodesign.in) LONGHI: Italy 0039-03-62341074 (longhi.it) LOUIS VUITTON: Bengaluru 080-42460000; New Delhi 01146690000; Mumbai 022-66644134 (louisvuitton.com) LUALDI: Italy 0039-28-052445 (lualdiporte.com) MAC: Bengaluru 080-41126844; Mumbai 022-61801535; New Delhi 011-46696060 (maccosmetics.in) MAGIS: Italy 0039-04-21319600 (magisdesign.com) MARC JACOBS: (marcjacobs.com) MARNI: (marni.com) MASIERO: Italy 0039-04-227861 (masierogroup.com) MATIÈRE GRISE: France 0033-04-78349528 (matieregrise-decoration.fr) MELISSA ODABASH: England 0044-20-72294299 (odabash.com) MIELE: (miele.in) MINGARDO: Italy 0039-42-973736 (mingardo.com) MINOTTI: Ahmedabad 07965556660 (minotti.com) MOONRIVER: New Delhi 01141617103 (moonriverstore.com) MOOOI: The Netherlands 0031-765784444 (moooi.com) MUJI: (muji.com) NAPPA DORI: New Delhi 01141090510 (nappadori.com) NATUZZI: Bengaluru 09844639887; Mumbai 022-24999099; New Delhi 09910086595 (natuzzi.in) NICOBAR: Mumbai 08588000151 (nicobar.com)

NILUFAR GALLERY: Italy 0039-02780193 (nilufar.com) NIRAV MODI: Mumbai 02230106000 (niravmodi.com) NOLTE HOME STUDIO: Bengaluru 080-40280280; Mumbai 02224932305; New Delhi 09999990069 (homestudioindia.com) NOMON: Spain 0034-93-3186585 (nomon.es) NOON FURNITURE: (noonfurniture.squarespace.com) ODD MATTER: (oddmatterstudio.com) OFFMAT: Italy 0039-49-9475015 (offmat.marmoarredo.com) OMEGA: Bengaluru 080-40982106; Chennai 044-28464092; Mumbai 0223060200; New Delhi 011-41513255 PARCOS: Mumbai 022-2343685, No 143, White Hall, August Kranti Marg, Kemps Corner PAUL SMITH: Mumbai 022-66589961 (paulsmith.co.uk) PET LAMP: (petlamp.org) PETITE FRITURE: France 0033-144541395 (petitefriture.com) PLEASE WAIT TO BE SEATED: Denmark 0045-40-861178 (pleasewaittobeseated.dk) POLARISLIFE: Italy 0039-35795002 (polarislife.it) POLTRONA FRAU GROUP DESIGN CENTER: Mumbai 02222614848; New Delhi 011-40817357 (poltronafrauindia.in) PORADA: Milan 0039-03-1766215 (porada.it) PORCELANOSA: (porcelanosa.com); at MARMO HOME New Delhi 01147128800 (marmohome.com) PORTSIDE CAFE: Bengaluru 080-40962612; Mumbai 02222821143; New Delhi 011-46054371 (portsidecafe.com)

RAINTREE: Bengaluru 080-22354396, No 4, Sankeys Road, High Grounds RHO: Italy 0039-31-745146 (rhofurniture.it) RIMADESIO: Italy 0039-03-623171 (rimadesio.com) ROCHE BOBOIS: Mumbai 02261062233 (roche-bobois.com) ROSENTHAL: Gurgaon 124-4665485 (rosenthal.de) RUBBERBANDPRODUCTS.COM: (rubberbandproducts.com) SAJAVAT: New Delhi 011-41000888 (sajavatgroup.com) SALVATORE FERRAGAMO: Mumbai 022-30277087; New Delhi 01146609084 (ferragamo.com) SCARLET SPLENDOUR: Kolkata 033-40501000 (scarletsplendour.com) SCAVOLINI: India 09833509146 (scavolini.us) SERVOMUTO: Italy 0039-291668674 (servomuto.com) SHIVAN & NARRESH: Bengaluru 080-40981875; New Delhi 01126536072 (shivanandnarresh.com) SICIS: New Delhi 011-46114811 (sicis.com) SIKA-DESIGN: Denmark 0045-66-154224 (sika-design.com) SIMONE: Mumbai 022-71117700 (simone.com) SMEG: Italy 0039-52-2232238 (smeg.com) SOFT LINE: Denmark 0045-54160680 (softline.dk) SOPHIA WEBSTER: (sophiawebster.com) SUNGLASS HUT: Mumbai 022-40048554 (sunglasshut.com) THE BODY SHOP: Bengaluru 080-22086512; Mumbai 02222874114; New Delhi 011-41735189

(thebodyshop.in) THE COLLECTIVE: Bengaluru 080-41207331; Mumbai 02243438888; New Delhi 011-40878888 (thecollective.in) THE FURNITURE REPUBLIC: Noida 120-4345278 (tfrhome.com) THEMOJACLUB.IN: Mumbai 022-61210390 THE PURPLE TURTLES: Bengaluru 080-41528039 (thepurpleturtles.com) TIME AVENUE: Mumbai 02226515757 (timeavenue.com) TOD’S: Mumbai 022-42421818; New Delhi 011-46662700 (tods.com) TOM FORD: New Delhi 011-41033059 (tomford.com) TRUEFITT & HILL: Mumbai 07710900096 (truefittandhill.in) TRUNKS COMPANY: Jaipur 1414064999 (trunkscompany.com) TUMI: Mumbai 022-66152295 (tumi.com) TURRI: Italy 0039-03-1760111 (turri.it) VALCUCINE: Italy 0039-43-4517911 (valcucine.com) VENINI: Italy 0039-04-12737211; Mumbai 09819010708 (venini.com) VIA DESIGN: (via.dk) VICTORINOX: Mumbai 022-22836330 (victorinox.com) VIS À VIS: Mumbai 022-26612501; New Delhi 011-26809377 (visavisindia.com) VISIONNAIRE: Italy 0039-0516186322 (visionnaire-home.com) VITRA: India 09746473680 (vitraglobal.com) WIENER GTV DESIGN: Italy 0039-01-10133330 (gebruederthonetvienna.com) WONMIN PARK: (wonminpark.com)


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STEFANO The CEO of Valcucine and DRIADE, and a travel enthusiast, Stefano Core talks to about ab t his favourite things and places

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1. COVETED ARTWORK I’d like to own any a y off Roy Lichtenstein’s artworks. 2. WATCH I am a collector and I use many watches, but my favourite is the ‘Nautilus Annual Calendar’ by Patek Philippe. 3. BOOK I’m currently reading The Power of Kabbalah by Yehuda Berg. 4. MUSIC FOR THE ROAD My ideal song is Hannibal by Marcus Miller. 5. AUTOMOBILE My new favourite is the Ferrari ‘458 Speciale’. 6. PERFUME I love ‘Straight To Heaven’ from By Kilian. 7. RESTAURANT I really like Dolce&Gabbana’s Bar Martini and Martini Bistrot in Milan. 8. MOVIE Titanic is my all-time favourite. 9. TRAVEL ACCESSORY I carry my Leica ‘M9’ camera everywhere I travel. 10. HOLIDAY DESTINATION I’d love to visit Palma de Mallorca Mallorca, Spain next. — SHREYA BASU

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST|JULY-AUGUST 2016

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STEFANO CORE PORTRAIT: EFREM RAIMONDI. PHOTOS: 1. WOMAN WITH FLOWERED HAT, CHRISTIE’S IMAGES LIMITED. 2. PATEK PHILIPPE. 3. THE KABBALAH CENTRE. 5. FERRARI. 6. BYKILIAN.COM. 7. COURTESY DOLCE&GABBANA. 8. PARAMOUNT PICTURES. 9. ANDREW XU/FLICKR. 10. FRIEDRICH HAAG.

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