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ST. PETERSBURG HEALTHY START FEDERAL PROJECT

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2

CATCH UP WITH CREED

“Communities Creating Racial Equality and Ending Disparities”

*APRIL 2013

2013 S.W.A.N.S. WOMEN’S CONFERENCE By Kimberly Brown-Williams, Community Services Supervisor

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: WOMEN’S CONFERENCE

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CREED ARTICLE

1

2013 SEQUESTER

2

MINORITY HEALTH MONTH

2

HEALTH SEGMENT

3

MEMBER OF THE MONTH

3

COMMUNITY CLASSES & EVENTS

4

EVENT CALENDARS

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Next CREED Meeting: May 13, 2013 Monday @ 6:00 pm All Children’s Education & Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St.Petersburg, FL 33701

The St.Petersburg Healthy Start Federal Project will host their Fourth Annual S.W.A.N.S. (Sisters Working to Achieve Inner Self-Awareness) Women’s Conference. This year’s theme is ’Celebrating the Health of Women: Physical, Emotional, and Financial’. The conference is an opportunity to impact and encourage women to celebrate themselves. The conference will feature speakers and interactive activities for attendees. Everyone is welcomed to join us for the exciting half day of rejuvenation. In addition, there will be several community vendors on hand to share their information and products. We hope to see you there!

When: Saturday, May 18th at 8:30AM Where: All Children’s Education & Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Why: To Celebrate Women!

Click link for Event flyer (PDF) http://tinyurl.com/cb5bu6c

IF NOT US, THEN WHO? C.R.E.E.D. Reshaping our environments... Everyone wants to live in a nice and safe environment. Individuals who are dedicated, willing to work hard and think outside the box can make an impact in their community. Inclusion of all people regardless of the different cultures, race, sex, ethnicity is the first step. Instead of reacting we need to become pro-active about our environment. “Our differences should be our greatest asset, not our biggest weakness.” ~ From the Desk of Amber Tellis *NEWSLETTERS ARE PUBLISHED QUARTERLY. (January, April, July, and October)

“No One can do Everything, But Everyone can do Something.” -Anonymous


S E Q U E S T R A T I O N 2 0 1 3 : WHAT FLORIDIANS SHOULD KNOW By Amber Tellis, Consortium Coordinator

‘Sequestration’ is a group of automatic, across-the-board spending cuts totaling $1.2 trillion scheduled to begin March 1st, 2013 and end in 2021. These national budget cuts are an end result of Republicans not wanting to raise taxes and Democrats who are reluctant to make dramatic cuts. As a result, these automatic cuts will threaten thousands of middle class jobs, and cut vital program that provide services for children, seniors, and families. Many agencies, including airports, schools, hospitals, and county health departments are scrambling to deal with sequesters cutback. Some social programs will also face cuts: subsidized child care, Head Start and Healthy Start and Meals on Wheels to name a few. In response to these national budget cuts, social programs and agencies can only try to maintain services to existing clients, while waiting lists continue to grow. These cuts will affect the country’s ability to invest in education, research and innovation, public safety, and military readiness. It is up to Congress to take action by replacing large budget cuts with a more balanced approach. One bright note in the face of sequestration, Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security are exempt.

The chart below shows some examples of budget cuts for Florida. Teachers and Schools $54.5 million for primary and secondary schools, plus another $31.1 million for children with disabilities. This represents 1,130 fewer teachers and aids. Higher Education 6,250 students will lose direct aid for college tuition and 1,700 will lose work study jobs. Senior Nutrition Florida will lose approximately $3.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors. Head Start Head Start and Early Head Start would be eliminated for about 2,700 children in Florida. Subsidized Childcare Up to 1,600 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to childcare. Environment Florida will lose about $5.2 million for clean air and water programs, plus $1.1 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection. Law Enforcement and Crime Prevention Florida will lose about $970,000 in Justice Assistance Grants that support law enforcement, prosecution and courts, crime prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim and witness initiatives.

Public Health Florida will lose about $1.8 million to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats, plus $5 million in grants to prevent and treat substance abuse. The Florida State Department of Health will lose about $1.4 million resulting about 35,900 fewer HIV tests. Violence Against Women Programs Florida could lose up to $404,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,500 fewer victims being served. Job Search Assistance Florida will lose about $2.3 million in funding for job search assistance, referral, and placement, meaning around 78, 960 fewer people will get the help and skills they need to find employment.

Chart Information from The White House (www.whitehouse.gov)

NATIONAL MINORITY HEALTH & HEALTH DISPARITIES MONTH The term health disparities refers to population-specific differences in the presence of disease, health outcomes, quality of health care and access to health care services that exist across racial and ethnic groups. Disparities represent a lack of efficiency within the health care system and therefore account for unnecessary costs. Many factors contribute to racial, Infants born to black women ethnic, and socioeconomic health disparities, including inadequate access to care, poor qualiare 1.5 to 3 times more likely ty of care, community features (such as poverty and violence) and personal behaviors. These factors are often associated with underserved racial and ethnic minority groups, individuals to die than those born to who have experienced economic obstacles, those with disabilities and individuals living within women of other races/ medically underserved communities. Consequently, individuals living in both urban and rural ethnicities and American areas may experience health disparities. Despite ongoing efforts to reduce health disparities Indian and Alaska Native infants die from SIDS at near- in the United States, racial and ethnic disparities in both health and health care persist. Even when income, health insurance and access to care are accounted for, disparities rely 2.5 times the rate of main. Low performance on a range of health indicators—such as infant mortality, life expecwhite infants. tancy, prevalence of chronic disease, and insurance coverage—reveal differences between racial and ethnic minority populations and their white counterparts.

DISPARITIES IN HEALTH 

Information from NCSL (www.ncsl.org) National Conference of State Legislatures

To view full article, please visit http://www.ncsl.org/issues-research/health/health-disparities-overview.aspx


VOLUME 2, ISSUE 2

For more information, please visit http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fitness/SM00085_D

HEALTH SEGMENT

GET UP & MOVE!!

By Teresa Przetocki, Community Health Educator April is National African-American Women’s Fitness Month created to promote physical activity and healthy behaviors for African-American women. In observance of the national event, we look at the top five common barriers to becoming physically active along with alternatives for overcoming these obstacles. Barrier #1: Not Enough Time Alternative #1: Exercise for 10 minutes a day 3 times a day for a total of 30 minutes – walking is an easy exercise to obtain this interval goal. Barrier #2: Better Things to Do – Exercise is Boring Alternative #2: Choose an activity you enjoy and vary your routine – dancing is a fun and entertaining way to stay physically active. Barrier #3: Conscious of the Way You Look Alternative #3: Grab a workout video to do at home or purchase a few pieces of home exercise equipment to start – focus on the future and you will build your self-confidence. Barrier #4: Too Tired to Exercise Alternative #4: Get more sleep and exercise in the morning or at lunch – bring workout clothes to work with you or put them on first thing in the morning…the hardest step is the first one. Barrier #5: No Motivation Alternative #5: Schedule exercises as you would any other appointment – start out with just a walk around the block and add a loop each week. We have many barriers in life, but we also have many choices. Make the choice to Get Up and Move this April – it’s never too late to start moving. Register for our upcoming ‘Wellness & Healthy Habits’ class beginning this month (see Upcoming Information from Mayo Clinic (www.mayoclinic.com) Community Classes & Events page for more information).

Scan code with Smartphone! Interests:

Are you interested in Volunteering with C.R.E.E.D.? C.R.E.E.D. is a Community Action Group where volunteers can gain experience with great opportunities! Volunteers may also gain a sense of community service within a positive group and share the spirit of generosity with others. For more information, please contact Amber @ 727.767.4731.

MEMBER OF THE MONTH C . R. E. E. D. wou ld like to acknowledge Dawne Bowen as April’s member of the month. Dawne, a Social worker at Bayfront hospital has been an active member of C.R.E.E.D. for more than 5 years. She is always willing to share her time, suggestions and talents. C.R.E.E.D. is thankful for your participation. Thank you for your efforts Dawne!

Outreach

Advocacy

Fundraising

Training

And More!

Did YOU KNOW?... INFANT MORTALITY REFERS TO THE DEATH OF AN INFANT BEFORE THEY REACH THEIR FIRST BIRTHDAY.

Mrs. Dawne Bowen receiving a member recognition plaque.


U P C O M I N G C L A S S E S

Please visit us on the web @ www.allkids.org/healthystart

C O M M U N I T Y & E V E N T S

Class/Description

Creed Community Consortium @CreedConsortium

ST. PETERSBURG HEALTHY START FEDERAL PROJECT

For more information about C.R.E.E.D. or how to get involved, contactAmber Tellis, Consortium Coordinator

Date/Time/Location

Positive Approaches to Parenting

Series begin Thursday, April 4th @ 6pm

* Join our 4-week series to learn modern approaches to parenting from birth up to age 6.

All Children’s Education and Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Raising your MENTALITY Men’s Group

April 27th, 2013 @ 11am

*Come out and gain support, community resources and network with like-minded men.

All Children’s Education and Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Self-Defense Workshop

Monday, April 22nd @ 6pm

*This workshop is for both men and women to learn effective self-defense techniques.

All Children’s Education and Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (Auditorium)

Phone: 727-767-4731

MUST RSVP TO PARTICIPATE.

All events are free and open to the public!

Wellness & Healthy Habits

Series begin Tuesday, April 30th @ 6pm

* Come out and join us in a four-part series to get a kick start on a healthy lifestyle.

All Children’s Education and Conference Center, 701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

For more class information, please visit website or call 727.767.6780.

APRIL

2013

COMMUNITY EVENTS 

SUN

7

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

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2

3

4

5

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Wednesday, April 3rd ~Located at Westminster Suncoast Quak Center (1095 Pinellas Point Dr. S., St. Petersburg, FL 33712 ) FMI call 727-244-9018 

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~Located at the Pinellas County Job Corps Gymnasium (500 22nd Street S., St.Petersburg, FL ) , open to young males ages 11-17, See website for event details FMI: www.stpetedeltas.org

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Administrative Professionals Day

Earth Day

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1st Annual EMBODI Summit,

Saturday, April 6th

World Health Day

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The New Jim Crow Event,

Stand Against Racism (SAR) Event,

Friday, April 26th ~Located at Eckerd College- Wireman Chapel (4200 54th Street South, St.Petersburg, FL 33711), event begins at 6:30pm FMI: www.ywcaoftampabay.org 

St. Anthony’s Triathlon,

Friday, April 26th thru April 28th

*Creed Meeting: May 13th, 2013 @ 6pm , Location: All Children’s Education & Conference Center (701 4th Street South, St. Petersburg, FL 33701), Remember to bring a friend!

~Located at Straub Park/North Shore Pool (Straub Park 401 Beach Dr NE, St. Petersburg, FL 33705 ) See website for event details FMI: www.satriathlon.com


MAY

2013

UPCOMING EVENTS 

SUN

5

MON

6

TUE

7

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

1

2

3

4

8

9

10

11

17th Annual Family Fun Day,

Wednesday, May 4th ~Located at the Sanderlin Center (2335 22nd Ave South, St.Petersburg, FL 33712), event begins at 10am FMI call 727-321-9444 

C.R.E.E.D. Quarterly Meeting,

Monday, May 13th National Teacher’s Day

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~Located at All Children’s Education & Conference Center (701 4th Street S., St.Petersburg, FL 33701 , meeting begins at 6pm FMI call 727-767-4731

Mother’s Day

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S.W.A.N.S. Women’s Conference,

Saturday, May 18th

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27

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~Located at All Children’s Education & Conference Center (701 4th Street S., St.Petersburg, FL 33701) , event begins at 8:30am FMI call 727-767-6780

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Memorial Day

JUNE SUN

2013

MON

TUE

WED

UPCOMING EVENTS THU

FRI

SAT

1

3rd Annual Father’s Day Event,

Saturday, June 8th ~Location and time will be announced FMI call 727-767-6780

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World Environment Day

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Flag Day

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Father’s Day

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C.R.E.E.D. is a Community Action group committed to improving the health and wellbeing of the St.Petersburg area through outreach, education, and advocacy.

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Published April 2013 by Amber Tellis, Consortium Coordinator & Kimberly Brown-Williams, Community Services Supervisor.

April Issue  

C.R.E.E.D. Newsletter April Issue

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