Page 1

3.5 3a) Identifying cultural aspects of a text. Clothing

Technology

Language

Religion

Customs

Beliefs

Food


1f) Themes in Texts. What is a theme? Theme = A life lesson, meaning, moral, or message about life or human nature that is communicated by a literary work (text). In other words – THEME IS WHAT THE STORY TEACHES READERS. Themes – A theme is not a word, it is a sentence. You don’t have to agree with the theme to identify it. Examples – Money can’t buy you happiness. Family and friends are more important than things. Don’t judge people based on the surface. It is better to die free than live under tyranny. Truth will out in the end. Fill in the following table to identify the theme in you text. Date Title of text Theme/s Quotes to support my choice of theme/s


3.5 - Historical Fiction. Where is the text set? Provide evidence of this with quotes from the book. (Setting may be fictional place). •

Setting – a period of history can be identified in the setting eg. Story set in gold rush days in Australia.

What time period is the text set in? Provide quotes to back up your statements. Time/dates of events can be stated in the story. What characters, if any, have actually existed? Name them and provide quotes as evidence and research that proves their existence.

May have characters that actually existed. Construct a table with the following headings; write in quotes as you find them for that category.

Shows the way of life – events, dress, people, behaviour, technology, speech/sayings, games.


3.5 - Historical Fiction. Where is the text set? Provide evidence of this with quotes from the book. (Setting may be fictional place). •

Setting – a period of history can be identified in the setting eg. Story set in gold rush days in Australia.

What time period is the text set in? Provide quotes to back up your statements. Time/dates of events can be stated in the story. What characters, if any, have actually existed? Name them and provide quotes as evidence and research that proves their existence.

May have characters that actually existed. Construct a table with the following headings; write in quotes as you find them for that category.

Shows the way of life – events, dress, people, behaviour, technology, speech/sayings, games.


Fantasy Checklist Title: Date: / / 3.5 – 4c) Use quotes and retells from your text to fill in the following table. You may not be able to fill in every section as it may not be applicable to your book. Story is told from one person’s perspective. Story contains conflict between the characters. Eg Good Vs Evil. Good wins over evil. Characters have special powers or can wield magic. Characters may change physical form. Eg Human turns into wolf. Animals have human qualities or features. Eg Cats that can talk.


Setting is not a ‘normal’ world. Eg Medieval times, parallel universe, far away lands. Mythical creatures are present in the story. Eg Dragons, Unicorns, Centaurs. Plot follows a narrative structure. Eg Beginning, Events, Complication, Resolution, Ending. Plot is somewhat believable. Characters are placed in believable settings. Rating

Comments


3.25 - 2a) Reading Story Wheels Story Wheel is a reading activity designed to help practise sequencing skills, summarizing a novel, visualizing story elements, and recognizing story structure.

Directions: A. Trace a LARGE (3 feet in diameter) circle with chalk and a chalkboard compass onto coloured butcher paper. Cut it out and fold it to make eight segments (pie pieces). Also cut a small circle (6 inches in diameter) from some of the scrap. B. Trace another circle (2.5 feet in diameter) with chalk and a chalkboard compass onto white butcher paper. Cut it out and fold it into eight segments. Cut apart the segments. C. Choose the story/book you are going to do the story wheel on. D. List the important events in the story. Events should be chosen from the beginning, middle, and end of the selection.


E. Next narrow the list of events to the eight MOST important. You may want to combine some events so they can properly summarize the plot. You must proofread and edit, the events be written in complete sentences. F. Write the events on the white paper segments, across the widest portion. Make sure you place a number in front of each sentence, indicating the order of the events. G. Draw an illustration to accompany the event on the white piece below your sentences. H. Glue the white pieces onto the large colored circle, centering the white piece on the colored segment. I. Write the title and author on the small 6 inch circle and glue in onto the centre of the wheel, over the white pieces' points. J. Your story wheel is complete. .

3.25 - 2a) Reading Story Wheels Story Wheel is a reading activity designed to help practise sequencing skills, summarizing a novel, visualizing story elements, and recognizing story structure.

Directions: A. Trace a LARGE (3 feet in diameter) circle with chalk and a chalkboard compass onto coloured butcher paper. Cut it out and fold it to make eight segments (pie pieces). Also cut a small circle (6 inches in diameter) from some of the scrap.


B. Trace another circle (2.5 feet in diameter) with chalk and a chalkboard compass onto white butcher paper. Cut it out and fold it into eight segments. Cut apart the segments. C. Choose the story/book you are going to do the story wheel on. D. List the important events in the story. Events should be chosen from the beginning, middle, and end of the selection. E. Next narrow the list of events to the eight MOST important. You may want to combine some events so they can properly summarize the plot. You must proofread and edit, the events be written in complete sentences. F. Write the events on the white paper segments, across the widest portion. Make sure you place a number in front of each sentence, indicating the order of the events. G. Draw an illustration to accompany the event on the white piece below your sentences. H. Glue the white pieces onto the large colored circle, centering the white piece on the colored segment. I. Write the title and author on the small 6 inch circle and glue in onto the centre of the wheel, over the white pieces' points. J. Your story wheel is complete. .


3.25 – 2c) Interpret the main idea of a text. Who, What, When, Where, Why Select an article to read. On a piece of paper list the five W's. Next to each write the information from the article that pertains to each. Write their answers in sentence form.


3.25 – 2c) Interpret the main idea of a text. Who, What, When, Where, Why Select an article to read. On a piece of paper list the five W's. Next to each write the information from the article that pertains to each. Write their answers in sentence form.


3.25 – 3b) Finding the main idea of a text.

Main Idea Select several stories from the papers, on-line or hard copy, to read. Number the stories. As you read each article write down the main points or highlight them. Write the questions each part answers as you go. Do this with at least three different articles.


E.g.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/more-news/man-suffers-critical-injuries-after-van-explodes-in-mulgrave/story-fn7x8me21226219559868

UPDATE 11.47am: A MAN who was badly injured when a refrigerator mechanic's van exploded in a street in Melbourne's east has died in hospital.

Who is the article about? Who was hurt?

Police said the man, believed to be aged 25, died some time before 10am after the van was blown apart in Stadium Circuit in Mulgrave about 6.50am. The man, who is understood to be the van's owner, was treated for massive injuries at the scene of the explosion before being taken to hospital.The man suffered extensive blast-type injuries to his head, chest and abdomen and suffered severe cuts and internal injuries.Paramedic Robert Jaske said the man had to be revived several times before he was taken to hospital and his injuries were extensive.He said the van was still smoking when ambulance crews arrived."A Victoria Police officer and two firemen were by the patient, who was unconscious and critically injured. His injuries were quite extensive and quite severe," he said."From the waist up there were various penetrating and lacerating injuries to his torso and head from the blast and flying debris as well as flash burns."The burns themselves were not too severe because of the nature of the explosion as we understand it, but the internal injuries were quite significant."He was breathing by himself, but soon after ambulances arrived his heart stopped beating and it was re-started several times prior to being transported by road to the Alfred hospital."Mr Jaske said it was lucky no one else was injured."Actually if it happened more around school time or people leaving for work there actually would've been many more people in the street. The results would've been catastrophic," he said.


3.25 – 2d) Literal Comprehension Locating Specific Information Turn to the sports section of a newspaper and select three articles. On a sheet of paper list the following information: • • • • •

TITLE OF ARTICLE NAME OF SPORT TEAM NAMES FINAL SCORES SOMETHING INTERESTING OR UNUSUAL ABOUT THE GAME OR EVENT


3.25 – 2f) Interpreting the text. Sequencing, Story structure Ask a learning friend to select an article to read which clearly demonstrates an introduction, a body containing several paragraphs, and a conclusion. Get them to cut out the article or cut and paste, ask a friend to cut it into paragraphs or jumble the paragraphs on a word document. You are then to arrange the paragraphs in proper order. Write your reasons for the choice of order, back up with evidence of your reasoning. Once the article is in order, check the article for proper order. Present it to your teacher at the next conference as evidence of goal achievement.


Making links between directly stated ideas in a text. (Making predictions and inferences about possible consequences of actions and events during reading ).

A cause is something that makes something else happen. Out of two events, it is the event that happens first. To determine the cause, ask the question "Why Did it Happen?" An effect is what happens as a result of the cause. Of two related events, it’s the one that happens second or last. To determine the effect, ask the question "What Happened?"


1. Complete a story map for the story you are reading. 2. You must include only the most important happenings that are essential to the story.

Example – The Three Little Pigs. • The three little pigs leave home. • They obtain material to build their houses. • The first builds out of straw. • The second builds from sticks. • The third builds from bricks. • The wolf blows down the first. • The pig runs to the second house. • The wolf blows it down. • The two run to the third house. • The wolf tries to blow it down. • The wolf fails and comes down the chimney.


• The pigs put a pot of water on the stove and the wolf ends up in it. • The end.

Making links between directly stated ideas in a text. (Making predictions and inferences about possible consequences of actions and events during reading ).

1. Fold a piece of paper in half. 2. On one side write down an action done by the protagonist (main character) or the protagonist (if it is a character). 3. On the other side try to predict some of the things that may happen in the story as a result of the action. 4. Predict the possibility of this happening and give your reasons as to why. 5. When you read on after filling in the first two columns, fill in the third. For example:Character’s Action

Possible Consequence

What actually happened as a result of the action.


The queen has the huntsman take Snow White into the woods to kill her.

The huntsman could actually kill her and bring her heart to the queen. I don’t think this will happen though because the main character usually makes it through alive.

The huntsman is attacked by a wolf or bear and is killed so that Snow White can escape him. I think that there is a small chance of this happening because it is a fairy tale and they usually don’t have people getting killed in them.

The hunter could be stopped by a handsome prince who then falls in love with Snow White and they live happily ever after. I don’t think this is very likely either as it is too early in the story or there hasn’t

The huntsman did let her go and killed a rabbit to give its heart to the queen.


been a problem and resolution yet. It would make the story too short. •

The hunter feels sorry for Snow White and lets her go and doesn’t tell the Queen. I think this is the most likely outcome because then the story can continue with Snow White alive and lost in the forest.


3.25 – 1j) Garden of the Purple Dragon by Carole Wilkinson Use the description to draw the setting from the beginning of Garden of the Purple Dragon by Carole Wilkinson. Highlight the words you used as clues for your picture. The chatter of cascading water was the only sound that could be heard. It tumbled down a cliff and collected in a wide, dark pool. Beneath the surface, darker shadows circled – slender, darting bodies of fish and larger oval shapes. Clumps of reeds grew among black rocks in the shallows. Further along the bank, delicate ferns pushed through a scatter of smooth black pebbles. One of the dark oval shapes drifted slowly to the surface. It was a turtle. A swirling current caught it and tugged it towards the rim of the pool. The turtle paddled its webbed feet to keep from being carried over the edge where water spilt out of the calm pool and hurried on its journey down the side of the mountain. A dragonfly balanced on the surface of the pool. Its slender legs were blood-red. Its long thin body was a startling blue, like a splinter of sunlit sky that had fallen to earth. The insect had two pairs of delicate wings crisscrossed with black veins. Each wing was marked with an eyespot. It could have been a precious jewel dropped by a careless princess. The dragonfly’s wings whirred and it took off. It buzzed to a reed, and from reed to rock.


3.25 – 1a) Picture of main character. 1. Draw a picture of the main character. 2. Surround it with quotes from the text that provides evidence for why you have drawn them the way you have.


3.25 – 1a) Character table. http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=30&title= 1. Use a computer and go to the web address above. 2. Choose one of the main characters from your book you are reading. 3. Fill in the table with information about this character. 4. Print or save the table when you have finished. The first part of the table will be actions the character performs in the book. E.g. Snow White cooks and cleans for the seven dwarves. The second section will be describing words that this action tells us about her personality. E.g. Snow White is a caring and kind person. Appreciative – she repays the dwarves for giving her a place to stay by looking after them.


3.25 1a) Make inferences about characters’ actions. Round or Flat Learning focus – I will learn to identify whether a character is round/dynamic or flat/static. Why – To better understand what I read Success Criteria – I have listed qualities that I think applies to the character by his actions and words. I have supported this with evidence from the text. I have made a decision about a character and backed my decision up with evidence from the text in the form of quotes. Choose one of the characters from the text you are reading and give your opinion as to whether they are round or flat. Back this up with evidence from the book in the form of retells with quotes. You need to prove that the character has changed and grown as a person or has ended up the same as they started.


Ocean Grove Primary Senior Learning Community

Reading Goal - Makes inferences about characters’ actions. (Analyses characterisation).

1. From the story you are reading identify the main character. 2.Using a ‘Y’ chart build a list of words and phrases to describe your character’s personality, appearance and important pivotal actions. 3.You must back up all of your words and phrases with quotes and retells from the story.


Ocean Grove Primary Senior Learning Community

Reading Goal - Makes inferences about characters’ actions. (Analyses characterisation).

1.Make a list of words to describe the main character in the story you are reading. 2.Create a Wordle of these words and print it.


3.Use examples from the text to back up and provide evidence for the words you have chosen to put in your Wordle.


Ocean Grove Primary Senior Learning Community

Reading Goal - Makes inferences about characters’ actions. (Analyses characterisation).

1.Draw a picture of the main character. 2.Surround it with quotes from the text that provide evidence for why you have drawn them the way you have.


Goal: Identifying the Socio Cultural aspects of the text Title of book: _________________________________________________ date:_____________________________

Publishing

Author: ______________________________________________________ Where is the story set? How do you know this?

Who are the characters? How are they described?

What are the behaviours of the characters? Why do they behave in this way?


What opinion or values do you think the author has?

Are the values in the text the same as the ones we have today?

What knowledge do you need to make sense of the text?

How does the author portray characters in the story differently from one and other?

How does gender, age or culture impact on the story?

If all you knew about the world was from this text, what would you think it was like?


READ GOALS  

ACTIVITIES READ