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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus 2015 WHO ARE YOU BECOMING?

“THE TEACHERS ARE BRILLIANT. THE LESSONS ARE FREQUENTLY AMAZING. IT’S A WONDERFULLY DIVERSE ATMOSPHERE.” Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus (a team six student.)

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ACADEMIC ASPIRATIONAL ATHLETIC

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus


WHO ARE YOU BECOMING? A

t Copleston we provide the teaching, information, guidance and support to give our students the opportunity to fulfil their potential. Our aim is to maximise our students’ opportunities to achieve academic success and to develop as young adults. We offer a secure learning environment, and our students quickly progress into motivated, independent learners. We develop and foster a growth mindset. Our students become critical thinkers, encouraged to build a balance between the demands of study and outside commitments. As a result they prosper when they progress

into Higher Education or Employment. Time and care is spent on a timetable to suit each individual’s needs. The highest value is placed on your achievements and wellbeing. Each student’s progress is carefully monitored to help them thrive in a friendly, academic and aspirational environment.

VITAL AND ENERGISING We welcome students with a desire to achieve, and our tutors will support you in the exciting challenges that you will encounter. You will find Copleston Sixth Form a vital and energising place to be; full of opportunities both academic and extra-curricular. Tutors and subject staff will encourage you to aim high and assist you in choosing the direction that is right for you. Sixth Formers are the senior students in Copleston. They have privileges as well as responsibilities and we hope that all students will embrace the challenges and opportunities that our Sixth Form offers. Being part of a progressive, energetic and happy Sixth Form is an exciting and rewarding experience, one in which we hope you will choose to get involved.

YOUR PATHWAY We place an emphasis on bespoke individual programmes which allow each student to maximise their potential.

Each chooses a combination of subjects of their choice and our timetable is constructed to accommodate student options. Once you have made your application to Copleston Sixth Form you will have interviews with our

specialist team to ensure that your chosen programme is appropriate for your ability, interests and future career aspirations.

and it is essential that your programme is right for you.

What you study will be crucial to what you go on to do in the future

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SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE Students who attend Copleston Sixth Form receive outstanding academic and pastoral support from a wide range of staff.

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orm tutors, your first port of call, watch over the progress and welfare of their students: you will have a number of one-to-one interviews with them during the year to enable reflection upon your progress and to set targets to help you to improve even further. The responsibility for the pastoral care and monitoring of student performance lies with the

Specialist Director of Sixth Form. Both year groups have the same Head of Sixth Form who oversees the daily care, guidance and support of students. This enhances the stability, continuity, care and excellent relationships that exist between students, parents and the Sixth Form. In addition to the pastoral and academic care of the Sixth Form team, each subject tutor has the responsibility to monitor your

performance and provide you with guidance to progress. At the start of your programme you will agree upon realistic but challenging target grades. Your progress will be monitored against these targets, and acting on the feedback from subject staff will help you to improve your performance.

STUDENT VOICE There will be several opportunities to discuss your progress with your tutors and parents. Alongside Consultation Evenings the Sixth Form team are always available to meet with students and their parents whenever the need may arise to provide an opportunity for further advice and guidance about progress and performance. Once every half term you will be involved in a small group dialogue to discuss your learning and encourage reflection on working practises. You will also be assigned a subject buddy mentor from Year 13 who will share with you their learning from Year 12 and pass on the secrets of Year 13, enriching your understanding of your circumstances and providing you with a further sounding board for your academic development; their monthly dialogue with you will enhance their development as learners and train you for the same role next year.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus


THE 5 R’S AT

COPLESTON Our philosophy towards learning is clear and straightforward.

“FTfX[[VdXSTP]Sbd__^ach^dX]c^QTR^\X]VbcdST]cb who take responsibility for their learning by preparing for lessons, ensuring accountability for performance. “FTfX[[Tg_TRch^dc^QTresourceful in reinforcing your learning by ordering and revising your notes after lessons “C^ST\^]bcaPcTaTb_TRcU^ah^dabdQYTRcQhdbX]Vh^da notes as a springboard to read around, watch footage and engage in research. “C^_aPRcXbTresilience by re-writing, re-drafting and learning from others to develop your understanding of the criteria for success. “C^QTR^\TPreflective student with a growth mindset able to act on feedback and enter a ‘where do I go next to get better’ dialogue with your teachers, parents and your peers. We firmly believe these working practises are the foundations for success, leading to the final R – better results.

CARPE DIEM SEIZE THE DAY

Commitment at this level will ensure the years spent in the Sixth From are rewarding and will stand each student in good stead for the future

Being a Sixth Former is a wonderful chance to achieve your full potential; a moment in time when you can take charge of your future.

As a Sixth Form student you will be expected to take greater responsibility for the way you learn. We will support and guide you about the ways to achieve your best but your passion for, and commitment to, learning will be at the heart of your success. Every day, every lesson and every assignment will be designed to provide challenge and rigour.

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YOUR SCHOOL, YOUR COMMUNITY The Sixth Form and its students are expected to make a significant contribution to the school. There are opportunities for all Sixth Formers to get involved in school life by helping out in main school lessons, mentoring younger students, 6

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

being part of the Sixth Form Forum or the School Council. The School’s Head Boy and Girl are Sixth Form students. There are also a wide range of sporting, music, fundraising and social events that students can get involved in. We are proud to have fantastic sporting facilities and the Sixth Form encourages all students to

follow the sporting ethos of teamwork and getting involved. We are equally proud of our Sports Academy and the opportunity it provides talented athletes to combine their academic studies with high quality training.


PREPARING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION AND LIFE BEYOND SIXTH FORM

"THE STUDY FACILITIES MAKE THE SIXTH FORM LOOK MODERN AND ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO WORK HARD"

Many of our students choose to go on to Higher Education. Our UCAS specialist provides advice and guidance about university and career paths throughout your time at Sixth Form. Last year 98% of our students who wanted a place at University achieved one. In the summer term of Year 12 you will take part in our ‘What Next? Day’: to help you to make decisions about what and where to study at university, and how to prepare for making your UCAS application. For all students there are opportunities to visit universities, attend career and university presentations in and outside of Sixth Form and work on applications and interview techniques. One-to-one

consultations about university and careers are always available from our Careers Advisor, and our Careers Library is well equipped to help you make informed choices about your future pathway. PSHE is used to support Post 18 progression preparation and we hold a successful Higher Education Evening for parents to ensure that they are fully informed about key information. Employment and Apprenticeship information and preparation is also available for students who wish to take a different pathway at the end of their time at Sixth Form.

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Below are the entry requirements for the different programmes that we offer at Copleston Sixth Form. You can use this information as a starting point to decide which pathway is right for you.

You are recommended to study the following, according to your achievement at GCSE: “#0B[TeT[b°Pc[TPbc$VaPST1b^aT`dXeP[T]cX] different GCSEs or other Level 2 courses “"0B[TeT[b°Pc[TPbc$VaPST2b^aT`dXeP[T]cX] different GCSEs or other Level 2 courses “;TeT[!°\PX][h3VaPSTbPc62B4^aT`dXeP[T]c Some courses will also have their own specific entry requirements. In exceptional circumstances, however, we will consider the applications of students who don’t meet the set entry requirements and whose estimated grades indicate that they could cope with the demands of the course. Such requests will be discussed at interview after the application deadline.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

We work hard to accommodate as many subject combinations as possible; however, it may not be possible to cater for all. In these circumstances we will endeavour to put together an alternative programme which best suits each student’s aptitude, interests and career aspirations in consultation with the student, parents and appropriate careers guidance.


COPLESTON

SPORTS ACADEMY We are very proud to have a number of successful sports academies as part of our Sixth Form. Students who wish to combine a high quality academic experience with the opportunity to develop their talents to an elite level will be will catered for at Copleston. Our four academies –

BASKETBALL,DANCE, FOOTBALL (BOYS AND GIRLS) and NETBALL – are all run by

specialist coaches and have had major success in sporting tournaments, both at a regional and national level. As a member of Copleston Sports Academy and Sixth Form you will benefit from: “8]SXeXSdP[PRPST\XR programmes which allow each student to maximise their potential. “0RPST\XRP]S_Pbc^aP[bd__^ac from a wide range of staff.

“B_TRXP[XbcPSeXRTP]S guidance about university and career paths that is readily available throughout your time in Sixth Form. We also have huge experience and success in getting students to university in America; if that is something you aspire to. “FTTZ[hWXVW[TeT[caPX]X]VX]h^da chosen sport. “7XVW[TeT[R^\_TcXcXeTUXgcdaTb “7XVW`dP[Xch_[PhX]VP]ScaPX]X]V kit provided free of charge. “0RRTbbc^P_a^UTbbX^]P[bcaT]VcW and conditioning coach, who will work with you to design a programme tailored to your individual requirements.

“5aTTPRRTbbc^PWXVW[h qualified professional sports physiotherapist when required. “5aTTdbPVT^UcWTbRW^^[b comprehensive fitness suite. Those students who are interested in our Sports Academies can gain more information from our website or from Mr Leach our Head of Sixth Form and Sports Academies Director. dleach@copleston.suffolk sch.uk Students wishing to gain a place in one of our Sports Academies will need to indicate their interest on the application form by ticking the relevant sport’s box.

“07TPS^UBXgcW5^a\fW^ oversees the daily care, guidance and support of students.

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HOW TO APPLY TO COPLESTON SIXTH FORM “CP[ZfXcWh^da_PaT]cbbdQYTRcbcPUUP]SaTPScWTR^dabTVdXSTc^WT[_h^dc^STRXSTfWXRWbdQYTRcbc^cPZTP]SW^f\P]h to put in your programme “ATbTPaRWh^da_^bbXQ[TRPaTTaRW^XRTbc^UX]S^dcfWXRWR^dabTbPaTaT`dXaTS “2^\_[TcTcWTP__[XRPcX^]U^a\T]R[^bTSX]h^daR^dabTVdXSTCWXbfX[[]TTSc^QTWP]STSX]c^cWTHTPa !^UUXRTQhcWTR[^bX]V SPcT^UFTS]TbSPh 3TRT\QTa! # We welcome applications from students from all schools. Please contact the Specialist Director of Sixth Form, Mr.Hall, or Head of Sixth Form Mr Leach to arrange a visit. Whilst we aim to meet each student’s needs, we may be unable to accommodate every single subject request of subject choices. Where applicable, we will endeavour to put together an alternative programme in consultation with the student, their parents and appropriate careers guidance.

KEY DATES Â&#x201C;BXgcW5^a\8]U^a\PcX^]4eT]X]V)FTS]TbSPh'cW>Rc^QTa! # Â&#x201C;BXgcW5^a\CPbcTa3PhP]S?PaT]cb4eT]X]V)CdTbSPh!]S3TRT\QTa! # Â&#x201C;BXgcW5^a\0__[XRPcX^]3TPS[X]T)FTS]TbSPh 3TRT\QTa! # Â&#x201C;BXgcW5^a\8]cTaeXTfb)<^]SPh (9P]dPah°5aXSPh%cW5TQadPah! $ Â&#x201C;8]SdRcX^]3Ph)CdTbSPh&cW9d[h! $ Â&#x201C;AT[TPbT^U62B4aTbd[cb)CWdabSPh!cW0dVdbc! $ Â&#x201C;8]cTaeXTfbfX[[cPZT_[PRTQTcfTT]5aXSPh! bc0dVdbcP]ScWTbcPac^UcWT new term for those students who need or wish to amend their programme.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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Art The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed throughout the course using the four Assessment Objectives. Both Coursework and Exam work are marked together at the end of the course when presented in a final exhibition. It is then all moderated by EDEXCEL at the centre. Coursework = 60% Final Examination = 40%.

In the Future Career options include: Careers in the Visual Arts, Art History, Curating, Museum and Gallery work, Events Management, Graphic Design, Website Design, Games Design, Animation, Set Design, Architecture, Film and Fashion

The Course The two main components of the course are: Coursework and an Externally Set Assignment (Exam).

Copleston Sixth Form PROSPECTUS

THE COURSES

Coursework is taught through a thematic response. This incorporates; drawing from direct observation, recording the development of ideas in both visual and written forms, taking relevant photographs and ultimately producing substantial outcomes. Gallery visits, artist research and analysis are also essential aspects of the course. Technical instruction is given to develop skills and techniques.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

The Externally Set Assignment is set by the exam board. Students are given the paper with one set theme at least eight weeks in advance. Students produce a sketchbook of preparatory work which includes; observational studies, their own photographs, art research and experimentation of materials. This preparatory work is taken into the exam for guidance and submitted as part of the examination work. In the Classroom Teaching is centred on the selected themes. Relevant skills and techniques are introduced to support this and students are encouraged to experiment and explore a range of media. As the course progresses students are encouraged to work more independently and produce very personal responses as they develop their intellectual, aesthetic and creative potential.

Business Studies The Assessment Process The course is split into two qualifications. AS Business Studies is two exams taking place at the end of Year 12 with each carrying 50% of the final grade. Students can opt to study A Level Business Studies which comprises of three exams taking place at the end of Year 13 with each carrying 33% of the final grade. AS – 2 Exams at the end of Year 12 A Level – 3 Exams at the end of Year 13 The Course In Business Studies students will study four key aspects of business. The context in which businesses operate, the external influences that affect businesses, the internal decision making processes that take place in a business and the strategies businesses adopt and why. Through


built on at A2 with in depth study of evolution, photosynthesis, more ecology, human physiology and the nervous system.  In the Classroom The course is taught through practical work, group work, research, discussion and practice questions. All students have two teachers throughout the course. There are a range of formative assessments throughout the course. In the Future   Biology is valued by universities and employers. The wide range of skills you will hone during the course (among them high level literacy, numeracy and practical dexterity) are transferable to most jobs and HE courses. It is ideal preparation for a career in the health professions but equally acceptable for humanities or arts degrees. this students gain an understanding of the Marketing, Operations, Finance and Human Resources areas of a business and how they each play an integral role in ensuring business success and ultimately a large profit. In the Classroom Students will be putting three key skills to the test in lessons. They will analyse real business situations and examples and identifying where problems have arose and where success has been managed. They will apply theories on management, motivation and operations to real business Case Studies (such as John Lewis, Tesco, Jaguar and Land Rover among many others). Finally, students will be able to make and justify business decisions, evaluating how they have reached this outcome. They will be encouraged to do this through discussions and critical thinking is explored. In the Future This course could lead to a degree in: Management, Business Studies, Administration, Finance, Marketing, Events Management, Accountancy. This course could lead to a job in:

Marketing, Finance, Operations, Human Resources departments in any small/medium/ large scale business, Events Planner, Accountant, Investment Banking, Management Consultancy, Retail Executive.

1X^[^Vh4STgRT[ Salterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nuffield Biology specification Centre requirements and, in addition at least two grade Bs in GCSE Science or its equivalent. The Assessment Process Work is examined in two exams at the end of each year. Each year there is a single piece of coursework. This is a research study at AS and a practical investigation at A2. There are also â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;coreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; practical activitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; throughout the course which are assessed as part of the final examination. Coursework = 20% Final Examination = 80%. The Course The course covers all aspects of modern Biology. At AS level you will study the heart and circulation, cell structure, transport, basic biochemistry, genetics and ecology. These are

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2WT\Xbcah>2A Centre requirements and, in addition, two grade Bs in GCSE Science or its equivalent. The Assessment Process The new specification for chemistry is a 2 year linear course, made up of 6 modules. These will be assessed at the end of year 13 in 3 exam papers, which will use a mixture of multiple choice, structured and extended question styles. The exam papers will also cover some practical skills. There will be an additional practical endorsement, covering 12 key practical activities. This is teacher assessed and is reported with, but not part of, the main A Level qualification. The Course We currently follow the OCR A Chemistry course. This is a traditional Chemistry A Level, with a wide range of chemical concepts covered. The course involves roughly equal amounts of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry, and covers such topics as chemical kinetics (rates), equilibria, modern analytical techniques, global warming and ozone depletion, biochemistry and many others. In the Classrom Lessons will be taught using a variety of approaches, including; teacher led activities, practice exam questions, discussions, small group work, presentations, experimental work. In addition there will be regular homework to be completed, focusing on exam technique and key content, as well as work to be completed during non-contact time. In the Future Chemistry is a required A level for students wishing to study medicine, dentistry or veterinary science. It is useful for many other medical field degrees. The chemical/pharmaceutical industries are still large employers and there is a shortage of trained chemists in this country. Chemistry

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

often also leads into degrees and employment in unrelated fields such as law, accountancy and engineering. A Level chemistry is seen by employers as a rigorous course that demonstrates good numeracy, literacy, problem solving and practical skills.

Computing Centre requirements and a grade B in GCSE Mathematics The Assessment Process This course consists of two exam units at AS level and one exam unit and one coursework unit at A2: D]Xc ) AS Exam (June) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25% D]Xc!) AS Exam (June) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25% D]Xc") A2 Coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20% D]Xc#) A2 Exam (June) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30%

The Course Students will develop their programming skills throughout the year using programming languages such as HTML/CSS, JavaScript and Python. They will complete a range of programming projects to develop an understanding of a wide range of programming concepts. Students learn about designing solutions to particular problems, how procedural programs are structured, the types of data and data structures, the common facilities of procedural languages, how to write maintainable programs, and how to test and run solutions. Students will also investigate other computing fundamentals including hardware, software, the presentation, structure and management of data, how data is transmitted and networked,


the life cycle of systems development, the characteristics of information systems, and the implications of computer use. At A2 level students will also investigate the function of operating systems, the function and purpose of translators, how computer architectures are structured, high level language programming paradigms, low level languages and how databases function. Through their A2 coursework, students complete a computing project following the life cycle of systems development: definition, investigation and analysis, system design, software development, testing, documentation, evaluation.

The Course Students who want to pursue a career in the creative and cultural industries can start on the path by developing their creative writing skills. They will also learn to develop critical and analytical skills and gain knowledge of the craft of writing. The course is designed to encourage students to:

In the Classroom Students will work on various computing challenges using different programming languages including Python, and JavaScript. They will plan, implement (code), test and troubleshoot their solutions. Students will also complete some research and produce revision materials to prepare for the summer examination.

Students will study the production of different types of creative and professional writing and different forms. Four distinct forms will be produced for a range of different media. Students will learn to write in: prose fiction, prose non-fiction, poetry or script; for: page, performance, radio, screen or digital media.

In the future An A Level in Computing can lead to a career in Computing, ICT or Telecoms (i.e. Software Development, Website Design/Developement, Network Management, IT Security Consultant, Hardware/Electronics Engineer, Telecoms Engineer, Business Analyst, etc.) or in media (i.e. Animation/Visual Effects Specialist, Graphic Designer, etc.).

2aTPcXeTFaXcX]V0@0 The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed throughout the course and externally moderated by AQA in a terminal exam of 2 papers totalling five hours duration and worth 40% per paper. There are two coursework folders consisting of two original, creative pieces in one and a portfolio of work in the other; both folders involve reflective commentaries. Coursework = 60% Final Examination = 40%.

¡ understand different types of writing ¡ express themselves and their ideas ¡ develop redrafting and editing skills ¡ develop critical and analytical skills.

In the Classroom Teaching is classroom based and will teach students to write regularly in a range of forms and genres in order to explore writing styles and develop technical control . They will use workshop style sessions to read widely and critically, developing their writing skills by widening their experience of reading together. There will be opportunities for students to share work-in-progress with others, respond productively to feedback and develop drafting and editing skills. In the Future Careers in journalism, communications, PR, media, education.It allows aspiring writers to trace a route through school/college on to higher education and beyond into professional practice within the creative industries, just as it is possible for aspiring actors, musicians and artists to do

3P]RT0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in GCSE English and a grade B in a

Dance related qualification and/or demonstrate an ability in the genre.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;IT'S A REAL COMMUNITY EVERYONE WORKS TOGETHER.â&#x20AC;? The Assessment Process AS :D]Xc â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DANC1 - Understanding Dance 40% of AS, 20% of A Level 1 hour 30 minutes examination 60 marks Two sections: A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Structured Questions (20 marks) B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Two Essay Questions (40 marks) AS D]Xc! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DANC2 - Choreography and Performance 60% of AS, 30% of A Level Practical Coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Internally Assessed 90 marks Two sections: A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Solo Choreography and Performance (60 marks), B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Performance in a Duo/Trio (30 marks) A2 Unit 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DANC3 - Dance Appreciation: Content and Context 25% of A Level 1 hour 30 minutes examination 80 marks Two sections: A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; One question on chosen area of study (40 marks), B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; One question on set work studied (40 marks) A2 D]Xc# â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DANC4 - Group Choreography and Solo Performance 25% of A Level Practical examination â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Externally Assessed 75 marks Two sections: A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Group Choreography (45 marks), B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Solo Performance (30 marks) The Course D]Xc Understanding Dance Development of critical skills for the analysis of choreography and performance within their own work and in professional repertoire.

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D]Xc! Choreography & Performance The AS specification focuses on the development and performance of the candidate's own choreography and performance within a duo/trio. Candidates receive training on technique and the health and safety of the dancer. Unit 3 Dance Appreciation At A2, candidates develop skills and develop knowledge and understanding of a specific area of study related to the development of one of the following: modern dance, ballet, jazz dance. D]Xc# Group Choreography & Solo Performance The focus of choreography is shifted towards group dance. Performance skills will be developed in relation to a specific practitioner. Candidates continue to receive instruction on technique and the health and safety of the dancer. In the Classroom The main dance styles studied are contemporary and jazz. The course includes choreography and performance as well as critical dance analysis. There will be a mixture of theory and practical lessons in order to broaden your subject knowledge and develop your creative approach to dance. The course involves both practical and written elements and therefore students should have previous experience in areas such as ballet, jazz, contemporary or modern dance. In the Future This course prepares students for study at a higher level in dance at university or specialist dance schools or to work in a dance profession.

Drama Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade Cs in GCSE English Language and Literature and a grade C in either GCSE Drama, Dance, Music or Performing Arts or a Merit or above from an OCR National in Performing Arts.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed and then externally moderated for the first unit and the second unit is marked by a visiting external Examiner. D]Xc involves exploring two contrasting plays in relation to Theatre Practitioners and includes practical workshops with accompanying coursework. D]Xc! is a Teacher directed performance of a published play text and a monologue or duologue per student. Unit 3 is a devised performance exam that involves written coursework that operates as a written log of the devising process/evaluation of the final piece. The practical exam is internally marked and then externally assessed. Unit 4 is a written exam where students take on the role of a Director studying the play â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Woyzeckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by George Buchner, as well as learning about the historical performance conditions for Elizabethan Theatre. The Course Exploring Theatre Practitioners techniques, studying two contrasting play texts, watching and reviewing live theatre, preparing and performing a monologue, working as part of an ensemble, learning rehearsal techniques through direction, taking part in vocal and physical workshops, working as a Director, devising a piece of theatre in response to a given stimulus, evaluating own and others work, exploring the historical context of theatre by learning and writing about original performance conditions, and completing both practical and written exams. In the Classroom  Te aching is workshop-based and student-centred and each student receives 1 to 1 support throughout the course. By the end of the course students should understand the roles of both Performers and Directors and have worked in both of these capacities on multiple occasions.

In the Future  Careers in the performing arts industry as Performers, Directors, Technicians, Communications, Theatre Administration and Teaching,

3TbXV]CTRW]^[^VhATbXbcP]c <PcTaXP[b4STgRT[ Centre requirements and at least a Grade C in GCSE in either Graphic Products, Resistant Materials or Electronics. The Assessment Process At AS the students are assessed by their DT portfolio which consists of three distinct sections. There is also an exam at the end of the AS unit. The portfolio is worth 60% of the final grade and the exam 40%. The AS grade counts as 50% towards the A2 grade. At A2 the students are assessed on a Design and Make project and an end of course exam. The coursework and exam are rated as 30% and 20% towards the A2 grade, the remaining 50% is from the AS marks. The Course At AS the coursework consists of three distinct units: of a product investigation, a product design and a product manufacturing unit. The theory work covers knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of design and technology. At A2 the coursework consists of design and make project applying and developing the skills at AS, this is a real project working with an a client or user group from outside of the classroom. The A2 exam is based on a range of modern design and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues. In the Classroom Teaching is workshop and classroom based. The projects can be geared to the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; particular interests.


In the Future Careers in the Engineering (mechanical and electrical) at University or entry in to modern apprenticeships, product design, interior design, Graphic Design, Website Design, Architecture, Theatres/Event Technology, Civil Engineering, Design Engineer, Packaging Technology, Analyst/ Researcher, Project Engineer/management, CAD Design, Drafting, Furniture Design. Industrial Design, Manager in the manufacturing industry and product developer.

The Course Students will learn about textual variations (spoken and written mode) and representations such as male and female linguistic differences and how children develop their language. Language analysis and discursive essays will be developed as well as the ability to evaluate and compare texts. Students will also look at how language is diverse and changes over time. Independent work will involve creating an original piece with a commentary and conducting an investigation into a chosen linguistic area. In the Classroom Teaching is classroom-based and studentcentred. It aims to develop each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intellectual, independent analytical and creative potential and will teach appropriate comparative, evaluative and analytical skills as well as essay writing techniques. In the Future Careers in: journalism, communications, PR, media, education. Excellent links to government, politics, law and history related careers and further education courses. Cross curricular links to psychology, sociology, Literature and History.

4]V[XbW;XcTaPcdaT0@01 4]V[XbW;P]VdPVT0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in English Literature and English Language. The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed throughout the course and externally moderated by AQA in a terminal exam of 2 papers each of 2 hours and 30 minutes duration and worth 40% per paper. There is one coursework folder consisting of an original, creative piece and an investigation. Coursework = 20% Final Examination = 80%.

Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in English Literature and English Language. The Assessment Process English Literature is 100% exam at the end  of the first year. There are two exams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one open book and one closed book. Timed practice essays are completed throughout the course as well as mock exams.100% final examination at the end of AS. The Course Candidates will study either aspects of tragedy or comedy. Four texts will be studied in total:

one Shakespeare play, a modern play, a prose text and a compilation of poetry. We will also look at critical opinions on the texts and use media to inform interpretation. When possible, students are offered theatre trips to see plays performed.

In the Classroom Teaching is often discussion-based. Students are encouraged to think critically and analytically. As there is a focus on Drama, sometimes this is used as a teaching tool within the classroom. There will be group work, research and creative tasks. Students are encouraged to read widely and will be expected to read texts outside of classroom time.  In the Future Career options include the media, teaching, marketing, writing, PR, publishing, advertising, library services.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;CHS SIXTH FORM PREPARES YOU FOR UNIVERSITY. EXTRA CURRICULAR REVISION HAS HELPED ME SO MUCH. THE SUPPORT IS BETTER THAN AT PRIVATE SCHOOLS.â&#x20AC;? (a current Year 13 student)

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Universities. It can lead students into both analytical and arts based subjects.

Centre requirements plus at least a C grade in English and Mathematics.

Job opportunities for students of Economics include: Accountancy, Business Analyst, Actuary, Banking, Insurance and Finance, Journalism, Public Sector Management and Human Resource Management.

The Assessment Process The course is split into two qualifications. AS Economics is made up of two exams taking place at the end of Year 12 with each carrying 50% of the final grade. Students can opt to study A Level Economics which comprises of three exams taking place at the end of Year 13 with each carrying 33% of the final grade. AS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 Exams at the end of Year 12 A Level â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 Exams at the end of Year 13 The Course Economics is a very relevant and up-to-date subject, in which we spend time analysing and debating many current national and international issues. Topics covered include: Year 1 (AS) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Microeconomics: price determination, production costs and revenues, market structure. Macroeconomics: measurement of UK economic performance and economic policy. Year 2 (A Level) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Microeconomics: economic de- cision making, poverty and inequality, the labour market and government intervention. Macroeconomics: UK and international economic performance, financial markets and monetary, fiscal and supply side policies. In the Classroom Students will use current data, examples and contexts to develop skills in four areas: Knowledge of economic models and key terms which will then be used to apply to situations in individual markets such as the housing market or to national and international economic controversies such as inflation, unemployment and growth. Students will then evaluate the effect of real-life policies in controlling and improving these situations. In the Future Economics is a widely accepted A Level course and is favoured by many of the Russell Group

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

4]eXa^]\T]cP[BcdSXTb0@0 Minimum entry requirements: CCC in Triple science or BC in Double Science, plus minimum of C in Mathematics in addition you should have a keen interest in environmental issues. This is a localitycourse and cannot be taken with another locality subject. The Assessment Process AS Level comprises two examined units: ENVS1 The Living Environment and ENVS2 The Physical Environment. A Level comprises AS Level plus two further examined units; ENVS3 Energy Resources and Environmental pollution and ENVS4 Biological Resources and Sustainability.  The Course Do you want to understand more about the world around you? Are you interested in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wildlifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Conservationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pollutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Global Climate Changeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sustainabilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;? If so then Environmental Studies is the A level for you. AS Level Environmental Studies A variety of topics are studied including why conditions on Earth support Life; the rationale for wildlife conservation; the impacts of human activities and conflicts over land use and strategies for resolution; composition of the Atmosphere; properties of water; soil structure; the evidence for and causes of climate change; the demand for mineral resources. Students will also develop relevant practical skills. A Level Environmental Studies In addition to the AS level you will study Energy

resources, usage and the environmental impacts; water, land atmospheric and noise pollution; the impact of individuals on the environment; food production systems; the environmental and social impacts of agriculture, Aquatic food production systems; Forestry and Sustainability there will also be further development of ractical skills. In the Classroom Lessons include practical investigations, research activities, extended projects, discussions and field work. Environmental Studies is complementary to A Level Geography, Biology, Physics and Chemistry. In the Future You could progress to Higher education and/or careers in Environmental Science; Conservation; Geography; Science; Climate Change; Geology; Agriculture; Land Management; Planning and Teaching


5X[\BcdSXTbF942 Centre Requirements and a grade C in English Language or in English Literature The Assessment Process AS Level FM1 Exploring Film Form â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Coursework 40% of AS (20% of A Level) One essay analysis of micro aspects found in film and a creative project based on a film sequence or short film. FM2 British and American 60% of AS (30% of A Level) An exam on Producers and Audiences, American Film and British Film. 0!;TeT[ FM3 Film Research and Creative Projects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Coursework 25% of A Level One small-scale research project and one creative practical film artefact. FM4 Varieties of Film Experience: Issues and Debates 25% of A level An exam on World Cinema, Spectatorship and Single Film Critical Study. The Course In Film Studies we explore how the moving image has maintained its position as one of the most significant cultural forms of the last century. In the first year of Film Studies students study British and American cinema and in the second move onto to explore world cinema. We cover a wide range of theories and concepts related to the study of film and its place in society. The course examines the language and structures of film along with its social and industrial contexts. At its heart the syllabus recognises our love of popular film and extends our experience of alternative cinema. Film making is at the centre of that process.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE SIXTH FORM HAS A REALLY FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STAFF AND STUDENTS IS SPECIAL.â&#x20AC;? (a current Year 12 student)

In the Classroom Lessons are a balance of dialogue, debate, analysis, research and practical work. There is an emphasis on building skills and confidence in the induction phase, leading to whole-class discussion, group work and independent study. We personalise all coursework assignments and Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

19


students choose the films and directors they write about. A passion for film is at the centre of all that we do. In the Future Careers in the Film Industry, Journalism, Marketing and the Media, Teaching, Performance, Graphic Design, ICT and other careers where the skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation are in demand all integrate successfully with Film Studies.

5aT]RW0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade B (including entries at Higher level in all skills) in GCSE French. The Assessment Process D]Xc French [FREN1]; 2 hours Listening, Reading and Writing 70% of the total AS marks 35% of the total A-level marks D]Xc! French 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time)Speaking 30% of the total AS marks 15% of the total A-level marks Unit 3 French 2½ hours Listening, Reading and Writing 35% of the total A-level marks D]Xc# French 35 minutes (including 20 minutes preparation time) Speaking 15% of the total A-level marks The Course A level French is the opportunity to further develop linguistic competence in the language including detailed grammatical knowledge and improved accuracy. Students will gain a lasting appreciation of language and learning, the ability to comprehend. French in a wide range of contexts and build fluency of communication for a variety of purposes: In the classroom A diet of dialogues, debate, listening and writing leading to immersion in the language. In the Future Job prospects for linguists are among the best of any graduates with obvious career options in Translating , Interpreting, Teaching , Travel and Business related careers as well the Civil and Diplomatic services.

5^^SCTRW]^[^Vh4STgRT[ Centre requirements, and Grade C or above in 20

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

Additional or Triple Science. (It is not necessary to have studied Food Technology at GCSE, but if studied, Grade C or above is required.) This is a locality course and cannot be taken with another locality subject. The Assessment Process At AS: D]Xc â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Portfolio of Creative Skills (coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; internally assessed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 60% of AS) and D]Xc! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Design & Technology in Practice (Examination â&#x20AC;&#x201C; externally assessed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 40% of AS) and at A2: Unit 3 - Food Products, Nutrition and Product Development (Examination â&#x20AC;&#x201C; externally assessed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 40% of A2) and D]Xc# â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Commercial product design (coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; internally assessed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 60% of AS) The Course The growth in the food industry has been phenomenal over the last 5 years, with approximately 150 new food & drinks products being launched every week! Studying Food Technology at A Level is a way into this dynamic, varied and well paid industry. AS: D]Xc â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Portfolio of Creative Skills (coursework -60% of AS) In this unit you will be given the opportunity to develop your creative, technical and practical skills through a series of food product investigation, design and manufacturing activities. You will produce a portfolio with which will demonstrate your creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making food product(s). AS: D]Xc! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Design & Technology in Practice (Examination - 40% of AS) In this unit you will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of ingredients, additives and processes used in the design and production of food products. You will also learn the basic principles of food preservation and the various techniques involved. Quality of food is of major importance to the manufacturer and


consumer, so you will also study food quality control and good manufacturing practice in the food industry. The macro nutrients will also be studied in depth. A2: Unit 3 - Food Products, Nutrition and Product Development (Examination -40% of A2) In this unit you will develop a knowledge and understanding of commodity groups, nutrition and its influence on the diet. You will also investigate how contemporary lifestyle and sustainability issues affect new food product development. A2: D]Xc# â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Commercial product design (coursework -60% of AS) In this unit you are given the opportunity to apply the skills you have acquired and developed throughout this course of study, to design and make a food product of your choice. You will need to adopt a commercial design approach to your work, reflecting how a professional might deal with a design problem and its resolution.

In the Classroom Lessons are highly practical and creative, with the opportunity to produce original and individual coursework combining flair and Industry focused challenge. In the Future The nature of Design and Technology is so diverse that the Food Technology A level can be used as an entry to a vast range of higher education courses, both science and business based. Examples include: Degree courses in Food Science & Technology, Food Engineering and Microbiology, Consumer Science, Food Journalism and Photography, Nutrition and Dietetics, Catering, Hospitality Management, Health Promotion Studies. This A Level could lead to careers such as new product development â&#x20AC;&#x201C; designing new foods for supermarkets or multi-national companies, dietetics, food journalist / photographer or work in the hospitality industry. 

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE SIXTH FORM HAS A DESERVED REPUTATION FOR THE SUPPORT IT GIVES STUDENTSâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? (Ofsted,2009)

Â&#x201C;<TSXP)CEPSeTacXbX]VP]SR^\\d]XRPcX^] technology Â&#x201C;?^_d[PaRd[cdaT)RX]T\P\dbXRP]S fashion/ trends Â&#x201C;7TP[cWh[XeX]V[XUTbch[T)TgTaRXbTWTP[cWP]S well-being and holidays Â&#x201C;5P\X[haT[PcX^]bWX_b)aT[PcX^]bWX_bfXcWX]cWTfamily, friendships and marriage/partnerships. Â&#x201C;4]eXa^]\T]c)_^[[dcX^]T]TaVhP]S_a^cTRcX]V the planet Â&#x201C;CWT\d[cXRd[cdaP[b^RXTch)X\\XVaPcX^]X]cTVaPtion and racism Â&#x201C;2^]cT\_^aPahb^RXP[XbbdTb)fTP[cWP]S_^eTach law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress Â&#x201C;2d[cdaP[c^_XR)cWTbcdSh^UPcPaVTc[P]VdPVT speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target languagespeaking country/community or the study of a novelist/dramatist/poet from a target languagespeaking country/community or the study of a director/architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/ community.

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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  The Assessment Process Exam board = OCR This course is 100% exam based The AS year consists of one 2 hour exam paper and 1 hour exam paper. The A2 year consists of two 1.5 hour exam papers   The Course OCR General Studies aims to give candidates the opportunity to extend their interests by investigating a variety of different areas of study. Throughout the course students will have the opportunity to study units including political processes and goals, social and economic trends and constraints, media and communication, creativity and innovation, mathematical reasoning, beliefs, values and moral reasoning and the relationship between technology, science and society. The course also aims to encourage students to develop their ability to think logically and critically about subject material, be able to use clear and effective written and verbal communication, as well as developing general skills of study, analysis and evaluation. These are skills that will not only help students achieve in General Studies, but also within their other chosen A-Levels. In the Classroom The delivery of General Studies involves the use of a wide variety of teaching and learning techniques including a large emphasis on group discussions, independent learning tasks such as conducting their own research in the topic areas, the use of different forms of media as well as various forms of assessment and active learning activities to keep the learner engaged. In the Future Due to the wide scope of General Studies the skills and knowledge gained will be useful in all future career paths.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

6T^VaP_Wh4STgRT[ Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in GCSE Geography.

protection and human interaction. Rebranding takes the concepts of urban regeneration but takes it a step further â&#x20AC;&#x201C; how do you re-image a place and change peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perceptions as well?

The Assessment Process D]Xc : Global Challenges 60%: 1-hour-and-30minute examination in two sections. Section A: objective items, data response and short-answer questions. Section B: choice of Going Global or World at Risk longer/guided essay questions. D]Xc!) Geographical Investigations 1 hour 15 minutes examination in two sections. The paper will assess the four optional topics offered. Candidates will answer one physical question from Section A and one human question from Section B. The Course A level Geography is designed to deepen your understanding of the world today and investigates the issues which will shape our future. The course covers a range of themes ranging across the spectrum from Physical to Human Geography but all are based in real-life challenges facing people around the world. The course gives students the chance to apply their skills and knowledge in variety of ways, including problem solving exercises. In Year One students complete two units; the first, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Global Challengesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, looks at a range of global issues and looks at many of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problems are interconnected. It covers issues from Global Warming to Globalisation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; looking at different approaches and viewpoints. We also address UK based issues such as the Immigration debate. The second unit, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Geographical Investigationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, is primarily a fieldwork unit. Students will have the opportunity to carry out real investigative techniques outside the classroom. The two areas covered in this unit are Coasts and Rebranding. The Coasts section investigates both the physical processes at work along our coastlines but also the future of coastal

In Year Two, students complete another two units. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Contested Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; looks at some of the most pressing problems facing our world today from Energy security to Geographical Superpowers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which countries will influence the next 50 years of human development? The second unit â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Geographical Researchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offers students an opportunity to look at one topic in more depth. Currently we study Tectonic Hazards. This unit puts emphasis on independent research skills and encourages an enquiring approach looking at the latest research and theories available. In the Classroom Research, debate and independent study are at the heart of the learning process. In the Future Many of our students have progressed into Geography related university courses, such as Environmental Risk Management, Meteorology, Urban planning and Sustainable Development.


6^eTa]\T]cP]S?^[XcXRb 4STgRT[ Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in GCSE English The Assessment Process A variety of modes of assessment will be used, including short-answer questions, stimulus response, extended writing and essays. Students will have a choice of questions within the examinations for each unit. All units are assessed through examination. The Course A level Government and Politics aims to develop studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; knowledge and understanding of the decision-making processes in the UK and USA. This involves a study of government at all levels in society. It is an ideal course for anyone who is interested in topical issues which affect the lives of everyone in the UK and the course should appeal to students who enjoy discussion and debate of controversial matters. Students will continually assess whether the theories concerning politics in Britain and America match with the reality of how those countries are governed. In Year One students complete two units; the first unit introduces students to the key channels of communication between government and the people. It encourages them to evaluate the adequacy of existing arrangements for ensuring representative democracy and participation and to assess whether Britain is a truly democratic country. In the second unit students are introduced to the major political processes within the UK. It encourages them to develop a critical understanding of the role and effectiveness of key institutions, and of the relationship amongst them in the context of multi-level governance. In Year Two students examine the same debates that they encountered in year one but apply them to the American political system. The first unit assesses the representative processes

of the US political system and considers their adequacy in terms of popular participation and full democracy. The second unit examines the institutional framework of US government and considers the interrelationships between Congress, the Presidency and Supreme Court and the health of US federalism.  In the Classroom Teaching is workshop-based and studentcentred and aims to develop each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intellectual, argument and debating skills whilst developing an understanding of moral, ethical, social and cultural issues

In the Classroom Students are encouraged to solve creative problems with flair and imagination. Course components include: drawing, painting, printing, collage, advertising, digital imaging, packaging, illustration and typography. In The Future Students go onto study a range of subjects at University including marketing, graphic design, architecture and art.

In the Future Several of our students have progressed into Politics or International Relations university courses and others have used Government and Politics as a support course for areas as varied as law, teaching, industry and commerce, finance, banking, leisure and the service sector.

6aP_WXRb4STgRT[ Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a C grade in GCSE Graphics or ICT. This is a locality course and cannot be taken with another locality subject. The Assessment Process For each unit students will be expected to respond to a range of design briefs, exploring a variety of media, drawing inspiration from the work of other artists and designers, considering commercial production and function. The Course Graphics is based on ideas and designs that provoke thought and interest; there is a natural bias towards commercial intent. The course is art-based and it is essential that students have competent drawing skills, although the structure of the course will help students improve their skills with a disciplined approach.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I FEEL VERY SUPPORTED BY MY TEACHERS AND THE SIXTH FORM TEAM.â&#x20AC;? (a current Year 12 student)

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

23


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Henry VII gain control and the paranoia that epitomises Henry VIII rule. The modern element of the course looks at how America developed as a super power and the struggles of the Civil Rights movement. How was change achieved and at what cost? Pupils will then look at Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changing role as the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new superpower in the years following the Second World War and the ideological struggle of the Cold War era with the emerging Soviet Union. The coursework element asks students to examine a historical debate based around Crime and Punishment from 1750 to 1950

Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in English Language. The Assessment Process The OCR course comprises of 3 units, two of which are coursework = 66% and a final examination 33% . Coursework Assessments are internally marked and externally moderated. The Course Students are encouraged to take up a Vocational placement in either a Health, Social Care or Early Years setting, to support the understanding and underpinning of knowledge. The first unit, Communication in Care settings enables students to apply Communication Skills in a setting and relate to theories of communication. The second unit, Promoting Good Health focuses investigating current National Campaigns. This involves designing and delivering a Health Campaign to a selected client group. Finally, the examination element focuses on Promoting Quality Care which involves researching and applying challenging issues related to how of Health, Social Care and Early Years Services apply Quality care in their organizations. In the Classroom Teaching is varied in terms of delivery and outcomes for students. The lessons will be interactive, challenging and will rely on information sharing with and working with professionals in settings, to support the assessment outcomes. These activities will involve group and independent work , allowing accessibility for all learning preferences. In the Future Careers in Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Radiography, Occupational Therapy , Teaching, Social work, Early Years Education. A wide range of career routes that can support clients form a broad service base.

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

In the Classroom Students will be taught in a varied range of teaching and learning styles enabling them to interrogate source material and build arguments based on evidence. There is a focus on independent learning and an expectation for students to undertake a high level of reading around the subject areas and to conduct their own research.

7Xbc^ah4STgRT[ Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in History GCSE. The Assessment History comprises a mixture of internally assessed coursework equating to 20 % of the final course grade. There will be a further two externally assessed examinations, taken in May of Yr 13 equating to 80% of the final grade. Coursework and examinations will test studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to develop an historical argument and the use of source analysis. All assessments will take place in yr 13 although it is likely that students will be entered for the AS course at the end of Yr12 The Course Students will study a mixture of Tudor and Modern History. There is an emphasis of Tudor authority and control, the break with Rome and crisis that enveloped Tudor England. how did

In the Future History is a highly regarded subject and our students have gone on to study the subject at Oxford and Cambridge University. Students develop a number of transferable skills that open doors to university courses in Law, Politics, International Relations, Archaeology, Criminology and Journalism amongst others.


“NOT ONCE HAVE I GONE TO TEACHER FOR EXTRA HELP WITHOUT RECEIVING IT. I COULDN’T FAULT IT.” (a current Year 13 student)

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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82C>2A Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in GCSE English The Assessment Process This course consists of 4 units as follows: D]Xc )AS Coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20% D]Xc!)AS Exam (June) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30% D]Xc")A2 Coursework â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20% D]Xc#)A2 Exam (June) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30% The coursework units are completed throughout the year From September to April. Theory topics are taught throughout the year in preparation for the summer examination. The Course This course enables students to acquire and develop ICT skills using a range of application software to complete a set of tasks in a business context. (AS coursework). Throughout out the A2 course students complete a full ICT system for a small organisation of their choice following all the stages of the system development cycle, from meeting with their customer to define the system requirements, to designing, implementing and evaluating their system. The theory part of the course focuses on developing a good understanding of the different technologies available to businesses and how businesses can use these technologies to become more competitive. Students will investigate how Information & Communication Systems are used to facilitate the day-to-day running of small and large organisations. They will explore the impact of ICT on our society and the legal implications of the misuse of computers, copyright issues and Data Protection Act.  At A2 students will also investigate how some widely used technologies work including the Internet, Mobile Communications and Mobile

26

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

Phones, Satellite Communications, GPS, Digital Broadcasting (DAB radios, Interactive Television), Computer Networks, Phone Systems (Landline, ISDN, Mobile Phones, VoiceOverIP), e-commerce (on-line shopping), etc. In the Classroom Students will use a range of application software to complete the coursework tasks. They will plan, design and produce evidence of the work they have produced. Students will also complete some research and produce revision materials to prepare for the summer examination. In the Future An A Level in ICT can lead to a career in Computing, ICT or Telecoms (i.e. Software Development, Website Design, Network Management, Business Analyst, IT Support Technician, etc.), media (i.e. Animation/Visual Effects Specialist, Graphic Designer, Video Editor etc.), marketing (i.e. Digital Marketing Expert, SEO consultant, Web Author, etc.) or any other sectors where ICT skills can be applied. Mathematics (Edexcel)Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade B at GCSE


differentiation and integration in the first module. This is further explored in the second module where students find stationary points and the nature of these points using differentiation. They also use integration in the second module to find areas under a curve or between a curve and a line. The applied module offered to the students in Year one is Mechanics. Students study the motion of a particle either with no external forces or under the influence of external forces acting on it. Students also study the three laws of Newton and their effect on the motion of an object. They are introduced to the principle of conservation of momentum and moments, the turning effect.

<PcWT\PcXRb Centre Requirements and, in addition, at least a grade B in GCSE Mathematics The Assessment Process The course is externally assessed by Edexcel at the end of the two year course and will consist of 6 papers for hour and a half each. We have interim assessments at the end of each unit throughout the course. The Course The course is divided into six equally weighted modules.In Year one, students study three modules, two core modules and one applied module. Core modules cover areas such as coordinate geometry, arithmetic sequences, series and calculus. Students are introduced to

In Year Two, students study a further three modules, two core and one applied module. The core modules cover areas such as algebraic fractions, exponential and log functions, transformation of graphs and trigonometric identities. Students are expected to carry their knowledge through from the first year into the second. Calculus is further explored where in students are introduced to the chain rule, product rule and quotient rule when differentiating. Integration is further explored with the reverse chain rule and various methods such as integration by parts, or by substitution. Students will also be able to use integration to find the volume of revolution of any solid. The applied module consists of Statistics within which students are introduced to the concept of mathematical modeling in probability and statistics, dispersion, correlation, regression and normal distribution. In the Classroom The course will be taught by way of direct teaching, group work, and investigations where possible. In the Future Mathematics A level is essential for students who wish to read a degree in mathematics, engineering or any branch of engineering such as aeronautical, mechanical, chemical, electrical Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

27


engineering, physical sciences or branch of sciences such as earth sciences or sports science, and it is considered desirable for many other courses including areas of business management and computer science. Mathematics is considered as one of the three sciences for courses such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary science or pharmacy. For students who are unsure which area of study they are interested in but expect it to be scientific, mathematics should be a serious consideration to ensure freedom of choice later. Students intending to study Mathematics or Mathematics related subjects must seriously consider studying Further Mathematics to at least AS level.

5dacWTa<PcWT\PcXRb Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade A at GCSE Mathematics. Only students who have chosen A level Mathematics may study Further Mathematics. The Assessment Process The course is externally assessed by Edexcel at the end of the two year course and will consist of 6 papers for hour and a half each. We have interim assessments at the end of each unit throughout the course. The Course The course is divided into six equally weighted modules. In Year one, students study three modules, one pure mathematics module and two applied modules. The pure module covers areas such as complex numbers with an introduction to imaginary numbers, coordinate geometry of a parabola and a rectangular hyperbola, matrix algebra, numerical methods, series and proof by induction. The applied modules offered to the students in Year one are Decision 1 and Decision 2. Decision 1 explores algorithms and algorithms on graphs. Students are also introduced to the critical path analysis and linear programming.

28

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

Decision 2 looks into solutions to various problems such as the transportation problem, allocation (assignment) problem, and the travelling salesman problem. Students also delve into further linear programming. Students are introduced to game theory and dynamic programming. In Year Two, students study a further three modules, one pure mathematics module and two applied modules. The pure module involves further exploring of complex numbers, dealing with second order differential equations, Maclaurin and Taylor series and polar coordinates. The applied modules offered to students in Year two are Mechanics 2 and Statistics 2. Mechanics 2 consists of kinematics of a particle moving in a plane, work, energy and power, collisions and the centre of mass. In Statistics 2, students look at different techniques of working out the probability distributions such as the Binomial and Poisson distribution.  

In the Classroom  Course will be taught by way of direct teaching, group work, and investigations where possible.   In the Future  Further Mathematics A level is essential for students who wish to read a degree in mathematics. Students intending to study Mathematics related subjects must seriously consider studying Further Mathematics to at least AS level. Further Mathematics AS level is usually considered the minimum requirement for students who wish to read a degree in mathematics. It will also be helpful and enhance UCAS (University) applications for engineering or any branch of engineering such as aeronautical, mechanical, or chemical, electrical, physical sciences or branch of sciences such as earth sciences or sports science.

<TSXPBcdSXTb>2A Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade Cs in GCSE English Language and Literature, a grade C in GCSE Media Studies or a Merit in OCR National in Media Studies.   The Assessment Process The coursework components are assessed internally and externally moderated by OCR; examination component assessed externally. Coursework = 50% Examination = 50%.   The Course  The course is based around four key concepts: audience, institution and representation. Understanding of these developed through analysis and interpretation of a range of media texts, examination of media consumption and media production. Knowledge and understanding of the key concepts is applied to practical tasks and coursework.   In the Classroom  Teaching is a combination of practical and


analysis activities, built around the acquisition and application of skills and knowledge. The activities are student centred and aims to develop each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s analytical, practical and creative skills.   In the Future Journalism, Media Production, Teaching, Marketing, Graphic Design, ICT and any other career where the skills of analysis, interpretation and evaluation are valuable.

<dbXR 1C42=PcX^]P[@25;TeT[" Centre requirements and, in addition, at least a grade C in GSCE Music plus the ability to perform at Grade 5 standard. The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed throughout the course for each of the six units over two years, adhering to strict deadlines. The Course The course is made up of six units. Each unit will expand your skills as a composer. Learners will gain a breadth of knowledge, understanding and skills from studying two areas, for example; arranging music and composing music, as

required by the sector. It provides a basis for progression into a broad range of roles within the sector when supported by relevant qualifications at level 2, such as GCSE English and mathematics, and/or at level 3, such as A levels in English Language/Literature, Drama, History. Learners have some opportunity to study in more depth a range of option areas of their choice, including: Â&#x201C;R^\_^bX]V\dbXR Â&#x201C;\dbXRcWT^ahP]SWPa\^]h Â&#x201C;PaaP]VX]V\dbXR In the Classroom Teaching is workshop-based and studentcentred. It aims to develop each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intellectual and creative potential and to teach appropriate skills and techniques. There will be an opportunity to play instruments in lessons, however you are not assessed on this and it is expected that you will be having instrument lessons and working towards grade 6 plus, in order to earn UCAS points.

In the Future Degree in Performing Arts or Music or a career in working in the following sectors: Â&#x201C;2^\\d]Xch0acb Â&#x201C;2d[cdaP[ET]dT>_TaPcX^]b Â&#x201C;;XeT4eT]cbP]S?a^\^cX^] Â&#x201C;<dbXR1dbX]TbbATR^aS;PQT[b Â&#x201C;CTRW]XRP[CWTPcaT

<dbXRCTRW]^[^Vh4STgRT[ Centre requirements and, in addition, a C grade or above in Music. The Assessment Process A level Music Technology is the perfect course for people who love music and want to explore new and exciting ways to create, record and arrange music. The course focuses on three main areas; recording, sequencing and the study of popular music history. The Course At AS there are three pieces of coursework. The recording task involves students learning the skills needed to work in a professional recording studio. The first of the sequencing tasks will get students to create an arrangement of a given song in a style set by the exam board. The final piece of coursework is a sequenced composition. In this task students are given some audio that they have to incorporate into a musical composition. There is an exam on the history of popular music at the end of the first year. In the Classroom In the second year students will carry on looking at the same strands of learning as in year one. The recording task in the second year is expected to be a more complex song and must contain certain instruments set by the exam board. The sequencing task this year involves recreating a given piece of music and trying to make it sound exactly like the original. The final task is another composition. At the end of year two there is a computer based exam that tests all the

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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skills the students have learnt over the two years. In the Future Many students who study Music Technology progress into live or recorded sound engineering work. Other progressions from this course included study Media, ICT or Music further and can lead to a career in one of these areas.

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS Religious Studies and English GCSE grade C or above. This is a locality course and cannot be taken with another locality subject. The Assessment Process Each module is assessed by an examination of one and a half hours. There is no coursework. The Course AS Level <^Sd[T : Philosophy of Religion. This covers Ancient Greek influences of Plato and Aristotle; Judaeo-Christian ideas of God as creator and scientific views of creation and evolution; arguments for belief in God and the challenge of the problem of evil. Philosophy of Religion will be a new subject as very little of it is covered at GCSE. <^Sd[T!: Ethics. Some of the topics covered in Ethics are new to students; others will have been studied at GCSE level. Examples are abortion and euthanasia, which will now be covered in much more depth. Students will learn about Ethical Theories and will relate these to the practical Ethics topics. A2 Level <^Sd[T": Philosophy of Religion. This covers such big questions such as: What is human being? Is there life after death, and if so, how can we understand that?How can we use language to talk about God? Do miracles happen? What is Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nature? <^Sd[T#: Ethics. This includes in depth explorations of the human conscience, whether we are free or determined,

30

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

how we use language to talk about ethical issues, and practical topics of sexual ethics, environmental and business ethics. The Course The course offers students the opportunity to conscience, whether we are free or determined, how we use language to talk about ethical issues, and practical topics of sexual ethics, environmental and business ethics. In the Classroom The Philosophy and Ethics A level course covers the big questions we all ask, such as, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why is there evil?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How should we live?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Does God exist?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; which are dynamically relevant to real life. Students draw on and respond to the work of the greatest philosophers and Christian theologians, using skills of enquiry, evaluation and empathy. In the Future The study of Philosophy teaches high level thinking skills which is excellent training for future degree courses in any subject. This course combines very well with other Arts subjects and is of particular benefit for students considering Law, History, English, Psychology, Geography and Business. Philosophy and Ethics provides a general preparation in skills suitable for many areas of employment Further information from Mrs Ford.

?WhbXRP[4SdRPcX^]0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade Cs in GCSE English Language or Literature and a grade C in GCSE Mathematics. The Assessment Process At AS, this specification will develop knowledge and skills to help understand the opportunities for and effects of leading a healthy and active lifestyle. Candidates will be given the opportunity to build on their experience and improve their personal skills/techniques across a variety of roles in a sport of their choice to improve performance. At A2, students are given the opportunity to extend their knowledge of developing elite level performance and study issues which affect the modern sporting world at a global level. They are also expected to develop their own performance in specialist role for one activity. The Course The course offers students the opportunity to explore a multi-disciplinary approach to sport and physical education. Students will study a variety of theoretical aspects which when combined with their practical performance as either a performer, coach or official will allow them to analyse and improve their own skills or those of others.


In the Classroom Lessons will involve a lively mixture of practical and theoretical learning. In the Future Sports Science provides an excellent base for the majority of degree courses not only in sport and allied subjects, but in teaching, medicine, physiotherapy, the Armed Forces, administration, sports journalism and the fitness industry. In the Classroom Lessons will involve a lively mixture of practical and theoretical learning. In the Future Sports Science provides an excellent base for the majority of degree courses not only in sport and allied subjects, but in teaching, medicine, physiotherapy, the Armed Forces, administration, sports journalism and the fitness industry. combined with their practical performance as either a performer, coach or official will allow them to analyse and improve their own skills or those of others.

?7HB82B>2A10SeP]RX]V ?WhbXRb Centre requirements and, in addition, at least 2 grade Bs in GCSE Science or its equivalent. The Assessment Process  Work is examined in two exams at the end of each year. Each year there are two pieces of coursework that allow independent work Coursework = 20% Final Examination = 80%. The Course  Advancing Physics is an exciting course that brings you right up to date with modern Physics as well as covering the key elements of any Physics course,  In the first year we cover work on the digital revolution, electronic sensors, materials, mechanics , waves and quantum behaviour.  In the second year we study radioactivity, cosmology and space, gas theory, electromagnetic induction, electric fields and particle physics.  In Y12 you will deliver a presentation on a material and undertake to improve a measuring experiment in your coursework and in Y13 you

will do an open-ended research report and an open-ended investigation on a topic of your choice, In the Classroom Teaching and learning uses discussion, experiments, computer work, groupwork, research and practice questions to develop your understanding of the topics which can then apply to the exams   In the Future Physics is a highly valued qualification.  Your problem solving skills can get you jobs both in science and engineering related jobs, medicine and medical physics as well as more general jobs, working in the city, banking, accountancy, law just to name a few.

?bhRW^[^Vh0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in GCSE English Language and Mathematics.   The Assessment Process Exam board = AQA Both the AS and A-level courses are 100% exam based. Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

31


The AS level consists of two 1.5 hour exams at the end of 1 year of study. The A-Level consists of three 2 hour exams at the end of 2 years of study.   The Course A level Psychology is the study of human mind and behaviour. It explores how we think, act, react and interact with others. Psychologists are concerned with all behaviour and what motivates us to act in particular ways. Psychologists do not simply seek to explain behaviour, but use their understanding to bring about positive change. Whether you opt to do the A-level or the AS-level you will study a variety of topics looking at different aspects of human behaviour. These topics include social influences, human memory, attachment and early social development, psychopathology, psychological research methods, approaches to psychology, biopsychology (A-level only), gender development (A-Level only) schizophrenia (A-Level only) aggression (A-level only) and issues, debates and approaches in psychology (A-level only) In the Classroom The delivery of Psychology involves the use of a wide variety of teaching and learning techniques including group discussions/work, independent learning tasks such as conducting their own pieces of research, the use of different forms of media as well as various forms of assessment and active learning activities to keep the learner engaged. In the Future The subject has particular relevance for careers in social services, education, clinical or therapeutic practice, journalism and many aspects of business.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A LEVEL STUDY IS CHALLENGING BUT REWARDING.â&#x20AC;?

(a current Year 12 student)

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

B^RX^[^Vh0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in GCSE English Language or Literature.

In The Classroom Debate, dialogue and the discussion, exploration and analysis of statistics and research inform the learning.

The Assessment Process In Year One students complete two units: Families and households, which cover the broad range of family structures we live in both in across the globe, nationally and also throughout time. You will then develop our understanding of the implications the family has on society for individuals such as women and children, but also in terms of social policy, education and crime.

In the Future Students in sociology have gone on to a variety of further studies including; History, Law, Social science, Midwifery, Criminology, Social Geography and Youth studies. Sociology is also recognised by employers as a valuable qualification due to is broad skills and knowledge range.

The second unit, education and methods in context, looks at issues in education such as achievement and educational policy whilst investigating the impacts of social influences such as gender, class and ethnicity on your educational experience. You will also learn the methods used to research sociologically and their relative uses within the subject.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE STUDY FACILITIES MAKE THE SIXTH FORM LOOK MODERN AND ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO WORK HARD.â&#x20AC;?

The first A2 unit is beliefs in society, which looks at the changing role of religion; it explores contemporary issues such as the decline of religion, the structure and choice within religion and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;other belief systemsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that exist in society. The final unit is crime and deviance with research methods. The unit explores some of the patterns in crime through statistics, theoretical understanding of why people commit crimes and developing an awareness of the impacts that social factors may have on the levels of crime in society. The Course A level Sociology is a varied and highly relevant subject. The course will introduce you to a range of concepts to encourage you to recognise, understand and evaluate the differing explanations for social phenomena. Throughout the four units the course has a strong theoretical foundation which is the corner stone to the essay based subject.

(a current Year 13 Student)


B_P]XbW0@0 Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade B (including entries at Higher level in all skills) in GCSE Spanish. The Assessment Process AS - Two exams D]Xc ) Listening, reading and writing - 70% of the AS; 35% of the A Level. D]Xc!) Speaking and listening - 30% of the AS; 15% of the A level. A2 - Two exams D]Xc") Listening, Reading and Writing - 35% of the total A-level D]Xc#) Speaking - 15% of the total A-level The Course A level Spanish is the opportunity to further develop linguistic competence in the language including detailed grammatical knowledge and improved accuracy. They will gain useful knowledge of and insight into Spanish speaking cultures, both contemporary and historical. The skills acquired will be valuable for foreign travel, further education and employment. The AS course will cover: Â&#x201C;<TSXP)CEPSeTacXbX]VP]S communication technology Â&#x201C;?^_d[PaRd[cdaT)RX]T\P\dbXRP]S fashion/ trends Â&#x201C;7TP[cWh[XeX]V[XUTbch[T)TgTaRXbTWTP[cWP]S well-being and holidays Â&#x201C;5P\X[haT[PcX^]bWX_b)aT[PcX^]bWX_bfXcWX]cWT family, friendships and marriage/partnerships. The A2 course will cover: Â&#x201C;4]eXa^]\T]c)_^[[dcX^]T]TaVhP]S_a^cTRcX]V the planet Â&#x201C;CWT\d[cXRd[cdaP[b^RXTch)X\\XVaPcX^] integration and racism Â&#x201C;2^]cT\_^aPahb^RXP[XbbdTb)fTP[cWP]S_^eTach law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress Â&#x201C;2d[cdaP[c^_XR)cWTbcdSh^UPcPaVTc[P]VdPVT speaking region/community or the study of a

period of 20th century history from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a novelist/dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country/community or the study of a director/architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/ community. NB. The two areas studied for the cultural topic are chosen in consultation with the students to reflect their interests as far as possible. In the Classroom The course focuses on developing oral fluency and conversation skills and covers a range of stimulating study topics. Students will gain a lasting appreciation of language and learning, the ability to comprehend Spanish in a wide range of contexts and build fluency of communication for a variety of purposes. In the Future Many of our students have progressed into university courses either studying the language alone or in combination with a wide variety of other subjects such as Business, Marketing, Management, Law and Tourism. Job prospects for linguists are among the best of any graduates with obvious career options in Translating , Interpreting, Teaching , Travel and Business related careers as well the Civil and Diplomatic services.

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CaPeT[P]SC^daXb\>2A The Assessment Process Work is internally assessed via two pieces of coursework each marked out of 50- these will be taught in the Autumn and Spring term. This is also a 2 hour examination in the summer term. This is supplemented with a pre-released case study which informs the learning for the spring/ summer term. Coursework = 66% Final Examination = 33% - AS  The Course In the first year students study 3 units: Unit 1Investigating Travel & Tourism, Unit 2 Customer Service and Unit 3Worlwide Destinations. In D]Xc students investigate the nature of tourism, the structure and components of the industry and the factors which have driven its development during the last 100 years. The unit is examined in January through a pre-released case study on a tourist area in the UK. D]Xc! requires students to investigate how an organisation of their choice meets the principles of good customer service and how it provides such service to different types of customers. In addition to studying a local tourist organisation students are assessed on their own customer service skills through role play simulations and producing replies to letters of complaint. The unit is assessed as a coursework portfolio. Unit 3 is similarly coursework-based and requires students to investigate 1 long haul and 1 short haul overseas tourist destination of their choice, assessing the appeal and attractions of each location to UK tourists and researching visitor patterns and numbers. In the second year there are 3 further units: Unit 9 Tourism Development, Unit 10 Organising an Event and Unit11Guided Tours. Unit 8 is an examined unit sat in January where students investigate the principles of tourism development through a series of UK and world-wide case studies. Unit 10 requires students to plan, stage and evaluate a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tourismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

34

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

event such as a sixth form trip to London or to a theme park while Unit 11 requires students to investigate the range of guided tours provided for tourists and plan, stage and evaluate a guided tour of their own. Both units are assessed through coursework portfolios in May.

CTgcX[Tb0@0

In the Classroom The course will include a varied amount of teaching strategies, including student and teacher led activities. As the majority of the course is portfolio based, there will be a lot of independent learning. The course will give the opportunity for the students to plan their own study visit as well as field trips throughout the course to research information about different areas.

The Assessment Process D]Xc In this unit you will select a theme and create work based around that theme.

In the Future There are many higher education courses which you could move onto, from event management to tourism development which would lead to jobs in both the largest and fastest growing job sector in the UK.

Centre requirements and, in addition, at least grade C in GCSE Textiles or CDT. This course is a locality course and cannot be taken with another locality subject.

D]Xc! This involves working from a chosen theme to develop a body of research, experimental developments, pieces of work and outcomes. Unit 3 Personal Investigation Your personal investigation and practical work based upon a theme will be supported by written element of 1000-3000 words. D]Xc# This involves working from a chosen theme to develop a body of research, experimental developments, pieces of work and outcomes. The Course Every good company realises that good design and creativity are important factors in generating new business. Your creativity is not only a way of expressing your artistic side; it can open the door to exciting career opportunities, too. This A level is a practical course that allows you to be as creative as you want to be. In the Classroom Creativity, flair and independence are encouraged through an on-going dialogue around the industry and its outcomes. In the Future Textiles students may progress on to Higher Education taking courses related to Textiles such as: Fashion, Surface pattern, Textiles, Production Management, Product Design, Interior Design. This can also open up opportunities for exciting career paths linked to the Textiles Industry.


ONE YEAR, LEVEL 2 COURSE 1C42;TeT[!CaPeT[P]S C^daXb\4STgRT[

  The Assessment Process The Extended certificate is a 360-guidedlearning-hour qualification (equivalent in teaching time to three GCSEs) It has 162/3 per cent of the qualification that is externally assessed via 2 examinations in the summer term. Coursework = 60% Final Examination =16 2/3 %.   The Course The BTEC Level 2 Travel and Tourism qualification has been developed in the Travel and Tourism sector to: Â&#x201C;?a^eXSTTSdRPcX^]P]ScaPX]X]VU^aT\_[^hTTb in the travel and tourism sector

Â&#x201C;6XeT^__^acd]XcXTbU^acaPeT[P]Sc^daXb\ employees to achieve a nationally recognised Level 2 vocationally specific qualification Â&#x201C;6XeTUd[[cX\T[TPa]TabPQTccTad]STabcP]Sing of the travel and tourism sector which can help them to obtain employment in this sector or to progress to a Level 3 vocational qualification, such as the BTEC Level 3 National Travel and Tourism Â&#x201C;6XeT[TPa]TabcWT^__^acd]Xchc^STeT[^_P range of skills, techniques, personal skills and at tributes essential for successful performance in working life. Travel and Tourism

course is portfolio based, there will be a lot of independent learning. The course will give the opportunity for the students to plan their own study visit as well as field trips throughout the course to research information about different areas. In the Future  Achievement of a merit grade would allow the student to undertake GCE AS courses in any subsequent year (subject to any course-specific entry requirements).

Course Structure Students study modules worth 30 credits from the following modules to make up a total of 360. Two are examination based in the summer term. In the Classroom The course will include a varied amount of teaching strategies, including student and teacher led activities. As the majority of the

UNIT CODE CREDITS UNIT TITLE 1

30

The UK travel and tourism sector (Examination)

2

30

UK travel and tourism destinations

3

30

The development of Travel and Tourism in the UK

4

30

International Travel and Tourism destinations

5

30

Factors affecting worldwide Travel and Tourism

6

30

The Travel and Tourism Customer experience

7

30

Travel and Tourism Business environments (Examination)

8

30

Promotion and Sale in Travel and Tourism

9

30

Travel and Tourism employment opportunities

10

30

Organising a Travel and Tourism Study Visit

18

30

The Cruise Industry

20

30

UK visitor attractions Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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ENRICHMENT 0]cWa^_^[^Vh0@0 Anthropology is the study of what it means to be human in diverse societies around the world today, and how people interact with, and change, their environments. Anthropology gives students a greater awareness and understanding of current debates about citizenship, diversity and multi-culturalism in the UK and beyond. D]Xc>]T) Being Human; Unity and Diversity D]XcCf^) Becoming a Person; Identity and Belonging University graduates of Anthropology have gone on to study and work in various areas. Anthropologists are employed by various organisations such as government agencies, museums, historical sites, universities and laboratories.

A-Level Anthropology is also a good foundation for any university degree or career that requires critical thinking and analysis.

2^d]bT[[X]V0@0 The purpose of the course is to:to give candidates a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;taste of counsellingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, its concepts and methods. The course will provide the candidate with an introduction to basic counselling skills, and the beginnings of an understanding of counselling practices and their ethics. Candidates will learn to identify basic counselling skills defined within this specification.

develop their skills in managing their personal finances. It is a nationally recognised qualification that will enable students to be more aware of economic and business matters.

<T]c^aX]V Students have the opportunity to gain experience of helping another student, either in main school or Sixth Form, with pastoral or academic issues. Students would spend some time developing their mentoring skills before being allocated to a young person which would benefit from some mentoring. Students would gain invaluable interpersonal and leadership skill which are vital for a range of different careers.

;TeT[!?Tab^]P[ 5X]P]RT@dP[XUXRPcX^] This qualification offers students the chance to

â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE SIXTH FORM HAS A REALLY FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STAFF AND STUDENTS IS SPECIAL.â&#x20AC;?

(a current Year 12 student)

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus


62B4<PcWT\PcXRb

Sports Leaderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award

This is a retake course and will be completed in one year. It will normally be available only to students who have already gained a grade D on the intermediate paper.

This award is a recognised level 2 award and as such requires students to undertake a responsibility for the leading of others in a sporting context. It will develop a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to communicate, plan, officiate and coach younger children through a very practical method. In order to gain the award students must attain a first aid certificate which is part of the programme and undertake 10 hours of community sports leadership.

62B44]V[XbW This is a retake course and will be completed in one year. It will normally be available only to students who have already gained a grade D at GCSE.

62B4BRXT]RT The GCSE Science is part of the Twenty First Century Science suite offered by OCR. It is a single Science award covering aspects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The subjects are set in modern contexts and many of the issues of science and society are investigated. The course will be completed over one year. This course is available to students who already gained a D grade at GCSE.

Sport The benefits of regular exercise are well documented. Exercise reduces stress levels, keeps our bodies healthy and helps us to concentrate. If you would like to take part in some form of recreational sport then this option is for you. There are a range of sports offered from badminton to using the fitness suite. The choice of sports will change during the year.

Vocational or Community Placements Relevant work experience or community involvement can assist students in being successful when taking the next step after Sixth Form. Students can nominate non-contact periods in their timetable on a regular basis to either gain work experience or help out in some way in the school or wider community.

FCSE SHORT COURSE Spanish ^a6Ta\P] This is a level 1 MFL Qualification which is suitable for beginners or students with some pre-GCSE experience. Students study 3 topic areas, which include My World, Holidays and Leisure, Lifestyle and My Community. Assessment is in only two skill areas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; spoken language and listening and speaking OR Written language and reading and writing.

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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“I FEEL PROUD TO BE PART OF COPLESTON SIXTH FORM” (A current Year 13 Student)

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Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus


‘There’s a genuinely philanthropic element to the Sixth form; we are encouraged to reach out and help others.’

(current Deputy Head Girl)

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus

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WHO ARE YOU BECOMING?

Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus 2015 40 Copleston Sixth Form Prospectus


Copleston course guide