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Street Art Museum St. Petersburg


Street Art Museum St. Petersburg


Street Art Museum www.streetartmuseum.ru info@streetartmuseum.com 84 Shosse Revolyutsii, St. Petersburg, 195248 Tel.: +7 (812) 448 1593 ext. 415

Content

Curators of the Casus Pacis exhibition: Anna Nistratova Mikhail Astakhov Vladimir Vorotnev Authors: Alina Zorya Daniil Tristan Elizaveta Zinovyeva Dmitry Pilikin

About exhibition

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Curators of the Casus Pacis exhibition

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Anna Nistratova

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Vova Vorotnev

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Mikhail Astakhov

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Editors: Lyudmila Dzerzhinskaya Polina Ej

Artists

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Copy editors: Elena Kuznetsova Viktoria Ignatenko

Kronstadt

278

Index

292

Photographers: Evgeny Belikov Mark Mazin It takes daring to be a street artist. To be at the cutting

Design, layout: Ekaterina Troshikhina

edge of art; to use the city as your canvas; to express yourself in ways hitherto dismissed snobbishly as “graffiti”. Artists can be arrested for it. Or chased by irate building

Printing:

owners. They might fall off ladders. That’s why we at Eclectic Translations sure are glad that it’s not up to us to create the street art. It’s just up to us to

Circulation: 100

ensure that the English speaking world can find out what Russia’s daring, cutting edge street artists are up to. That’s what we do best. Drop us a line. We promise not to

2014

Text and illustrations may not be reprinted without written permission from the Street Art Museum.

chase you away, or to arrest you.


Street Art Museum www.streetartmuseum.ru info@streetartmuseum.com 84 Shosse Revolyutsii, St. Petersburg, 195248 Tel.: +7 (812) 448 1593 ext. 415

Content

Curators of the Casus Pacis exhibition: Anna Nistratova Mikhail Astakhov Vladimir Vorotnev Authors: Alina Zorya Daniil Tristan Elizaveta Zinovyeva Dmitry Pilikin

About exhibition

3

Curators of the Casus Pacis exhibition

5

Anna Nistratova

5

Vova Vorotnev

10

Mikhail Astakhov

12

Editors: Lyudmila Dzerzhinskaya Polina Ej

Artists

14

Copy editors: Elena Kuznetsova Viktoria Ignatenko

Kronstadt

278

Index

292

Photographers: Evgeny Belikov Mark Mazin It takes daring to be a street artist. To be at the cutting

Design, layout: Ekaterina Troshikhina

edge of art; to use the city as your canvas; to express yourself in ways hitherto dismissed snobbishly as “graffiti”. Artists can be arrested for it. Or chased by irate building

Printing:

owners. They might fall off ladders. That’s why we at Eclectic Translations sure are glad that it’s not up to us to create the street art. It’s just up to us to

Circulation: 100

ensure that the English speaking world can find out what Russia’s daring, cutting edge street artists are up to. That’s what we do best. Drop us a line. We promise not to

2014

Text and illustrations may not be reprinted without written permission from the Street Art Museum.

chase you away, or to arrest you.


About the exhibition Casus Pacis was the first exhibition to be held at the Street Art Museum in St. Petersburg. 60 artists from Russia, Ukraine and other countries have presented their artworks. The exhibition was originally dedicated to the centenary of the First World War, but the present day, namely the events taking place in Ukraine, was later intentionally brought to the fore. The exhibition was integrated into the industrial landscape of the working Laminated Plastics Factory (SLOPLAST): the ruins of abandoned workshops, the industrial spaces between them, and even a smokestack, unused since its construction in the 1990s. The redevelopment of the site was carried out by the architectural firm Les. Participants include not just artists who work primarily on the streets, but also painters and graphic artists trying their hand at the medium for the first time.

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3


About the exhibition Casus Pacis was the first exhibition to be held at the Street Art Museum in St. Petersburg. 60 artists from Russia, Ukraine and other countries have presented their artworks. The exhibition was originally dedicated to the centenary of the First World War, but the present day, namely the events taking place in Ukraine, was later intentionally brought to the fore. The exhibition was integrated into the industrial landscape of the working Laminated Plastics Factory (SLOPLAST): the ruins of abandoned workshops, the industrial spaces between them, and even a smokestack, unused since its construction in the 1990s. The redevelopment of the site was carried out by the architectural firm Les. Participants include not just artists who work primarily on the streets, but also painters and graphic artists trying their hand at the medium for the first time.

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3


Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Anna Nistratova Independent curator; street artist; 2011–2013: curator of social and cultural events for the Flacon art collective; previously director of the creative bureau Brand Extension; photo editor for Ogoniok, Rolling Stone, Black Square, and Agency.Photographer.ru. Today, as we approach that tragic anniversary, the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, the world still finds itself unable to guarantee an end to the cycle of armed conflict which has such irreversible and catastrophic consequences. In Russia, the subject of the First World War has almost entirely been pushed out of the public consciousness by the October Revolution. Few people realize that the map of Europe, Russia, and indeed the rest of the world was completely redrawn at the time. The collapse of the great empires gave rise to newly independent states, but also became the cauldron in which the numerous conflicts that have unfolded over the last century (including the Second World War) had their origins. It was at this precise moment in history that Ukraine created an autonomous state for the first time – albeit one that was short-lived – and now, 100 years after the First World War and following 23 years as a recognized sovereign state, history seems to have come full circle, in an almost mystical way, by choosing this particular region as the focal point of global tension for a whole new generation. We can do nothing but look on as the instruments of military confrontation, which we had thought obsolete, continue to be used right under our noses. The politicians in power are once again finding ways to exploit the little man, who is willing to sacrifice himself to the God of War for the sake of intangible, abstract ideas. The consequences of the First World War are well known: 10 million dead, and tens of millions left with lasting physical and psychological damage.

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Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Anna Nistratova Independent curator; street artist; 2011–2013: curator of social and cultural events for the Flacon art collective; previously director of the creative bureau Brand Extension; photo editor for Ogoniok, Rolling Stone, Black Square, and Agency.Photographer.ru. Today, as we approach that tragic anniversary, the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, the world still finds itself unable to guarantee an end to the cycle of armed conflict which has such irreversible and catastrophic consequences. In Russia, the subject of the First World War has almost entirely been pushed out of the public consciousness by the October Revolution. Few people realize that the map of Europe, Russia, and indeed the rest of the world was completely redrawn at the time. The collapse of the great empires gave rise to newly independent states, but also became the cauldron in which the numerous conflicts that have unfolded over the last century (including the Second World War) had their origins. It was at this precise moment in history that Ukraine created an autonomous state for the first time – albeit one that was short-lived – and now, 100 years after the First World War and following 23 years as a recognized sovereign state, history seems to have come full circle, in an almost mystical way, by choosing this particular region as the focal point of global tension for a whole new generation. We can do nothing but look on as the instruments of military confrontation, which we had thought obsolete, continue to be used right under our noses. The politicians in power are once again finding ways to exploit the little man, who is willing to sacrifice himself to the God of War for the sake of intangible, abstract ideas. The consequences of the First World War are well known: 10 million dead, and tens of millions left with lasting physical and psychological damage.

4

5


The First World War also opened up a new chapter in the history of art. The creative biographies of the great artists of the early twentieth century all feature a gap between 1914 and 1918, for they were all caught up in the war, and many were involved in military operations as ordinary soldiers. Fernand Léger declared that the time he spent behind a 75 mm artillery gun in Verdun did more to help him progress as an artist than any of his numerous trips to museums and art galleries. Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele developed their famous sceptical outlook, which was above all a consequence of what they experienced during the war. Many artists made a radical break with the past – moving away from any form of art that contained traces of reality. The war was still in its early days when Malevich set to work on his Black Square and the Dadaist movement began to take shape in Zurich. In the final analysis, Surrealism, too, came about as an artistic reaction to the war. For a symbolic example of war’s destructive power, we need look no further than the fate that befell the most important creative association of expressionists of the early twentieth century: The Blue Rider, a group that was based in Munich and included several Russian artists. When war broke out, the Russian artists, as subjects of an enemy country, had no choice but to leave Munich. The group disintegrated. August Macke and Franz Marc were later killed in action. Moissey Kogan, another member of the group, survived the First World War but was killed in a gas chamber in Auschwitz during World War II.

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The First World War also opened up a new chapter in the history of art. The creative biographies of the great artists of the early twentieth century all feature a gap between 1914 and 1918, for they were all caught up in the war, and many were involved in military operations as ordinary soldiers. Fernand Léger declared that the time he spent behind a 75 mm artillery gun in Verdun did more to help him progress as an artist than any of his numerous trips to museums and art galleries. Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele developed their famous sceptical outlook, which was above all a consequence of what they experienced during the war. Many artists made a radical break with the past – moving away from any form of art that contained traces of reality. The war was still in its early days when Malevich set to work on his Black Square and the Dadaist movement began to take shape in Zurich. In the final analysis, Surrealism, too, came about as an artistic reaction to the war. For a symbolic example of war’s destructive power, we need look no further than the fate that befell the most important creative association of expressionists of the early twentieth century: The Blue Rider, a group that was based in Munich and included several Russian artists. When war broke out, the Russian artists, as subjects of an enemy country, had no choice but to leave Munich. The group disintegrated. August Macke and Franz Marc were later killed in action. Moissey Kogan, another member of the group, survived the First World War but was killed in a gas chamber in Auschwitz during World War II.

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t he pr ocesses ca nno t be br o ugh t t o a h a l t by h o l din g

Now, in 2014, we have reached a point where artists are not being conscripted to serve in battle – for the time being, at any rate. The media and social networks have become the frontline in modern warfare, whilst the most powerful weapons are often the TV stations of every country around the world. Instead of education, enlightenment, and unrestricted communication, we are force-fed and encouraged on a diet of mutual hatred and narrow-mindedness. Just as was the case a hundred years ago, practically the whole of society, artists included, has been drawn if not into military action then into the information war. We are witnessing a scenario in which some parts of society are being mobilized against others, individual and common cultural values are being divided, and new boundaries, both geographical and moral, are by turns being drawn up and destroyed. Against this backdrop, progressive forces – and artistic forces in particular – must consciously assume the burden of responsibility and make their position clear. The anti-war agenda is one of the most important of all in today’s world, because the processes which are still being casually unleashed from within the plush offices in the corridors of power cannot be brought to a halt simply by holding down Ctrl+Z. A hundred years ago, whilst the political elite steered a course towards confrontation, artists joined forces to seek new forms of expression, paying no heed to state borders, in spite of the different languages they spoke, the social conditions in which they lived, and their differing styles – and the same thing is happening today. The Street Art Museum’s ravaged industrial landscape will serve as a space for shared artistic expression by young artists working in various genres. It will bring together the street and the museum in one place. The Casus Pacis project brings together artists from Russia, Ukraine, and other countries. It represents a form of reflection on current reality for independent street artists and media artists, as well as institutionalized artists who have potential as street artists

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down

or wish to experiment in the genre. By choosing the slogan ‘Motive for Peace’, the exhibition’s curators are calling on artists not only to engage in a debate about current social and political issues, but also to turn their attentions to the traditions of artistic reflection on the subject of war and peace. Street art and media art are not part of the art market in either Russia or Ukraine, nor are they part of any serious institutional process. Street artists are therefore often able to get closer than anyone else to the national character, and are often the most direct channels of a certain positive fundamental energy, and of the negative stereotypes and prejudices which the public consciousness tends to fall back on. Communication, experience, and the ability to overcome adversity are equally important components of the project. This once-neglected factory site will provide the setting for Casus Pacis. This kind of spatial recycling is a topical issue at a time when there is a need to save resources, and the space will act as an antidote to the wasteful practices of art, and will draw everything that is normally relegated to the background into an intensive dialogue. Adjusting the hierarchy of public spaces and endeavouring to bring more equality to the way they are used is one of the most important tasks of public art. In association with the Kronstadt History Museum, Kotlin Island will serve as an additional venue for the Casus Pacis exhibition. We will attempt to include the island’s unique history, which is closely bound up with the war and the revolution, within the dialectical scope of the project. The artists will paint some of the abandoned ruins of former warehouses in the city centre, thereby creating a new work of art. The Casus Pacis exhibition will feature over 200 works, some created over the last few years, and others created during the preparations for the exhibition and while it is open. The exhibition will contain works in almost every medium imaginable, from monumental paintings and objects to video installations and performance art. The exhibition will be accompanied by a programme of lectures and discussions, as well as opportunities to meet the artists.

9


t he pr ocesses ca nno t be br o ugh t t o a h a l t by h o l din g

Now, in 2014, we have reached a point where artists are not being conscripted to serve in battle – for the time being, at any rate. The media and social networks have become the frontline in modern warfare, whilst the most powerful weapons are often the TV stations of every country around the world. Instead of education, enlightenment, and unrestricted communication, we are force-fed and encouraged on a diet of mutual hatred and narrow-mindedness. Just as was the case a hundred years ago, practically the whole of society, artists included, has been drawn if not into military action then into the information war. We are witnessing a scenario in which some parts of society are being mobilized against others, individual and common cultural values are being divided, and new boundaries, both geographical and moral, are by turns being drawn up and destroyed. Against this backdrop, progressive forces – and artistic forces in particular – must consciously assume the burden of responsibility and make their position clear. The anti-war agenda is one of the most important of all in today’s world, because the processes which are still being casually unleashed from within the plush offices in the corridors of power cannot be brought to a halt simply by holding down Ctrl+Z. A hundred years ago, whilst the political elite steered a course towards confrontation, artists joined forces to seek new forms of expression, paying no heed to state borders, in spite of the different languages they spoke, the social conditions in which they lived, and their differing styles – and the same thing is happening today. The Street Art Museum’s ravaged industrial landscape will serve as a space for shared artistic expression by young artists working in various genres. It will bring together the street and the museum in one place. The Casus Pacis project brings together artists from Russia, Ukraine, and other countries. It represents a form of reflection on current reality for independent street artists and media artists, as well as institutionalized artists who have potential as street artists

8

down

or wish to experiment in the genre. By choosing the slogan ‘Motive for Peace’, the exhibition’s curators are calling on artists not only to engage in a debate about current social and political issues, but also to turn their attentions to the traditions of artistic reflection on the subject of war and peace. Street art and media art are not part of the art market in either Russia or Ukraine, nor are they part of any serious institutional process. Street artists are therefore often able to get closer than anyone else to the national character, and are often the most direct channels of a certain positive fundamental energy, and of the negative stereotypes and prejudices which the public consciousness tends to fall back on. Communication, experience, and the ability to overcome adversity are equally important components of the project. This once-neglected factory site will provide the setting for Casus Pacis. This kind of spatial recycling is a topical issue at a time when there is a need to save resources, and the space will act as an antidote to the wasteful practices of art, and will draw everything that is normally relegated to the background into an intensive dialogue. Adjusting the hierarchy of public spaces and endeavouring to bring more equality to the way they are used is one of the most important tasks of public art. In association with the Kronstadt History Museum, Kotlin Island will serve as an additional venue for the Casus Pacis exhibition. We will attempt to include the island’s unique history, which is closely bound up with the war and the revolution, within the dialectical scope of the project. The artists will paint some of the abandoned ruins of former warehouses in the city centre, thereby creating a new work of art. The Casus Pacis exhibition will feature over 200 works, some created over the last few years, and others created during the preparations for the exhibition and while it is open. The exhibition will contain works in almost every medium imaginable, from monumental paintings and objects to video installations and performance art. The exhibition will be accompanied by a programme of lectures and discussions, as well as opportunities to meet the artists.

9


Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Vova Vorotnev Street artist; curator; has long worked under the pseudonyms Lodek and Vol.vo; founder of the Abstro style; participant in the Kiev Biennale Arsenale 2012; shortlisted for the 2013 PinchuckArtCentre prize. About 50 artists from Russia, Ukraine, and other countries are coming together for the Casus Pacis project, an attempt to provide a place for street artists to reflect on current events. Street art, graffiti art, and murals are not part of the private sector in these countries, nor are they part of any serious institutional process. As a result, street artists are often in touch with the people. They frequently spread positive grassroots energy, but are also burdened by the negative stereotypes and prejudices that they must face, defenceless, in today’s easily manipulated and cynical world. Communication, experience, and the ability to overcome adversity are equally important components of the project. The Casus Pacis (Motive for Peace) exhibition venue – a dreary industrial site – serves as an example of recycling and conserving resources, which is especially poignant during a time of economic crisis. It is an alternative to many wasteful practices in art, and something that is normally relegated to the background will be drawn into an intensive dialogue. Adjusting the hierarchy of public spaces and endeavouring to bring more equality to the way they are used is one of the most important tasks of public art.

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Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Vova Vorotnev Street artist; curator; has long worked under the pseudonyms Lodek and Vol.vo; founder of the Abstro style; participant in the Kiev Biennale Arsenale 2012; shortlisted for the 2013 PinchuckArtCentre prize. About 50 artists from Russia, Ukraine, and other countries are coming together for the Casus Pacis project, an attempt to provide a place for street artists to reflect on current events. Street art, graffiti art, and murals are not part of the private sector in these countries, nor are they part of any serious institutional process. As a result, street artists are often in touch with the people. They frequently spread positive grassroots energy, but are also burdened by the negative stereotypes and prejudices that they must face, defenceless, in today’s easily manipulated and cynical world. Communication, experience, and the ability to overcome adversity are equally important components of the project. The Casus Pacis (Motive for Peace) exhibition venue – a dreary industrial site – serves as an example of recycling and conserving resources, which is especially poignant during a time of economic crisis. It is an alternative to many wasteful practices in art, and something that is normally relegated to the background will be drawn into an intensive dialogue. Adjusting the hierarchy of public spaces and endeavouring to bring more equality to the way they are used is one of the most important tasks of public art.

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11


Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Mikhail Astakhov First curator of the Street Art Museum; historian; businessman.

In the early days of the Street Art Museum, at the beginning of 2013, we decided to organize an exhibition of works by street artists commemorating the centenary of the beginning of the Great War, the initial name given to the European massacre before the numeric system for such bloodbaths was adopted. Initially, the idea was to exhibit the works of a more “minor scale” – we as curators wanted to prove to viewers that street painters and sculptors, often perceived as amateurs, were capable of easel painting and “gallery-scale” work. We gave the exhibition a title conveying this idea: A Minor Echo of Colossal Events. We thought about how we could use geography and staging to enhance the exhibition’s effect; it was set to begin on 21 April in Kronstadt, the town where decisions were made about joining World War I. The second act was to take place in St. Petersburg, formerly the capital of the Russian Empire, and the final chord was to be played in Moscow, where in August 1918 the Soviet delegates voted at the Congress to withdraw from World War I and sign the Brest-Litovsk Peace Treaty. We chose the specific dates for a reason: 21 April falls between the birthdays of Hitler and Lenin, two entirely different politicians, both of whom in one way or another owe their ascent to power to the drama of World War I and its no less dramatic repercussions. June in Russia is the month of remembrance of World War II, which may not have happened had the lessons of the bloodbath of the 1910s been learned. Finally, August was the month in 1945 when the atomic bombs fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ushering in a new era of global militarization... That was our plan in 2013. But then in 2014, everything changed. War, which had seemed so far away from a distance of 100 years of history, was suddenly very close. I remember being surprised in my youth by the title of Salvador Dali’s famous 1936 painting – Premonition of Civil War. “How could that be?”, I remember thinking. “If you see it coming, then put a stop to it! When it’s about matters of war and death, if you have a premonition, do you have the right to do nothing?” Now that I’m older, I understand that the best thing that artists with such visions of war can do is devote their work to it: create paintings, carve sculptures, shoot films, write songs, or paint compelling murals...

We’ve h a d e n o ugh o f ca s us bel l i.

12

These thoughts, which were born out of the Ukrainian tragedy of recent months, led us to reconsider our intial idea and create a multimedia exhibition Casus Pacis, or “Motive for Peace”. Casus pacis, a seldom used phrase, is the antonym of the better known casus belli, i.e. the basis for starting a war. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo served as the famous casus belli, which set the wheels of World War I in motion. The events in Ukraine could become the casus belli for the next world war. It is a real possibility. As curators, we sense a clear indication of it in the massive polarization of opinion on current political events among the artists we have invited. There were even some who refused to take part in the project, considering it “collaborationist”. There are artists wary of speaking to the press, seeing it as corrupt and prone to putting things in a false light. But despite all difficulties we have faced in our preparations for this project, we believe that it may nonetheless contribute a building block of peace to the cracked edifice of modern civilization. We will keep looking for a casus pacis, however challenging it may be. We want to draw attention to it. As people whose roots spring from the Soviet Union, we know the value of peace better than anyone else, having recently – less than a quarter of a century ago – renounced our socialist past in the name of world peace. Wasn’t it, as we all thought at the time, the militancy of the Soviet government which brought about the downfall of the communist regime and the disintegration of the Soviet state into smaller fragments? The war in Afghanistan, tanks arriving in Czechoslovakia in 1968, participation in military operations in Africa – all of these things weighed heavily on our hearts and minds as we craved peace, in application, not empty promises. Khrushchev, who once governed Ukraine, obliterated Stalin’s rose-tinted myth of the son of Georgia who defeated the Nazis at the cost of millions of fallen soldiers, and yet Khrushchev himself sent troops into Budapest in 1956. His successor Brezhnev, born in Dniprodzerzhynsk, deployed tanks to Prague, dispatched helicopters to Angola, and sent troops to Afghanistan. Under Gorbachev, civil wars flared up all across the outer territories. We all bore witness to too much blood to forget about it now. We’ve had enough of casus belli. We yearn for peace. And we express this the best way we can. Hear us!

We ye a r n f o r p e a c e . He a r u s!

13


Curator of the Casus Pacis exhibition Mikhail Astakhov First curator of the Street Art Museum; historian; businessman.

In the early days of the Street Art Museum, at the beginning of 2013, we decided to organize an exhibition of works by street artists commemorating the centenary of the beginning of the Great War, the initial name given to the European massacre before the numeric system for such bloodbaths was adopted. Initially, the idea was to exhibit the works of a more “minor scale” – we as curators wanted to prove to viewers that street painters and sculptors, often perceived as amateurs, were capable of easel painting and “gallery-scale” work. We gave the exhibition a title conveying this idea: A Minor Echo of Colossal Events. We thought about how we could use geography and staging to enhance the exhibition’s effect; it was set to begin on 21 April in Kronstadt, the town where decisions were made about joining World War I. The second act was to take place in St. Petersburg, formerly the capital of the Russian Empire, and the final chord was to be played in Moscow, where in August 1918 the Soviet delegates voted at the Congress to withdraw from World War I and sign the Brest-Litovsk Peace Treaty. We chose the specific dates for a reason: 21 April falls between the birthdays of Hitler and Lenin, two entirely different politicians, both of whom in one way or another owe their ascent to power to the drama of World War I and its no less dramatic repercussions. June in Russia is the month of remembrance of World War II, which may not have happened had the lessons of the bloodbath of the 1910s been learned. Finally, August was the month in 1945 when the atomic bombs fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, ushering in a new era of global militarization... That was our plan in 2013. But then in 2014, everything changed. War, which had seemed so far away from a distance of 100 years of history, was suddenly very close. I remember being surprised in my youth by the title of Salvador Dali’s famous 1936 painting – Premonition of Civil War. “How could that be?”, I remember thinking. “If you see it coming, then put a stop to it! When it’s about matters of war and death, if you have a premonition, do you have the right to do nothing?” Now that I’m older, I understand that the best thing that artists with such visions of war can do is devote their work to it: create paintings, carve sculptures, shoot films, write songs, or paint compelling murals...

We’ve h a d e n o ugh o f ca s us bel l i.

12

These thoughts, which were born out of the Ukrainian tragedy of recent months, led us to reconsider our intial idea and create a multimedia exhibition Casus Pacis, or “Motive for Peace”. Casus pacis, a seldom used phrase, is the antonym of the better known casus belli, i.e. the basis for starting a war. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo served as the famous casus belli, which set the wheels of World War I in motion. The events in Ukraine could become the casus belli for the next world war. It is a real possibility. As curators, we sense a clear indication of it in the massive polarization of opinion on current political events among the artists we have invited. There were even some who refused to take part in the project, considering it “collaborationist”. There are artists wary of speaking to the press, seeing it as corrupt and prone to putting things in a false light. But despite all difficulties we have faced in our preparations for this project, we believe that it may nonetheless contribute a building block of peace to the cracked edifice of modern civilization. We will keep looking for a casus pacis, however challenging it may be. We want to draw attention to it. As people whose roots spring from the Soviet Union, we know the value of peace better than anyone else, having recently – less than a quarter of a century ago – renounced our socialist past in the name of world peace. Wasn’t it, as we all thought at the time, the militancy of the Soviet government which brought about the downfall of the communist regime and the disintegration of the Soviet state into smaller fragments? The war in Afghanistan, tanks arriving in Czechoslovakia in 1968, participation in military operations in Africa – all of these things weighed heavily on our hearts and minds as we craved peace, in application, not empty promises. Khrushchev, who once governed Ukraine, obliterated Stalin’s rose-tinted myth of the son of Georgia who defeated the Nazis at the cost of millions of fallen soldiers, and yet Khrushchev himself sent troops into Budapest in 1956. His successor Brezhnev, born in Dniprodzerzhynsk, deployed tanks to Prague, dispatched helicopters to Angola, and sent troops to Afghanistan. Under Gorbachev, civil wars flared up all across the outer territories. We all bore witness to too much blood to forget about it now. We’ve had enough of casus belli. We yearn for peace. And we express this the best way we can. Hear us!

We ye a r n f o r p e a c e . He a r u s!

13


Pasha 183 Moscow street artist, famous for his works on hot social topics, and political and protest themes

Moscow, Russia Some works by Pasha 183, also known as Р183, such as Truth to Truth, Alyonka, To the Bridge Burners: A Dedication, and Eyeglasses, have already become classics of Russian street art, although fame came to him rather late. He lived in Moscow, and the region around Preobrazhenskaya Square became the focal point of his work. Over 15 years, his artistic style constantly developed and evolved. In the early 2000s, his favourite genre was portraiture, taking rock stars as his main subjects. It is difficult to overstate the impact of Russian rock music on Pasha 183’s creative persona. It was these songs which largely informed his worldview and his relationship to life and to art. Images from them constantly influenced his work. It seems fitting that one of the artist’s best works was the set for the rock musical Todd. Soon, Pasha 183 would start creating street art in response to pressing social issues. Words were starting to play a defining role and would become as important as visual imagery. After a few years, the artist began to feel confined by two-dimensional images, and he began working with installations. By the start of the 2010s, P183 was concentrating on three-dimensional works (installations, events, and projects using projectors, light, and smoke), which, as the artist himself admitted, resonated more with the public. Pasha won fame in the winter of 2012 when several English newspapers wrote about him, including The Guardian, which described him as the “Russian Banksy” for the unusually audacious and uncompromising nature of his works, and for his laconic and elegant style. The nickname stuck, although it is hard to imagine an artist more distant from European aesthetics and substance. The Russian media soon discovered him, too, and there were interviews and pieces on national television about the artist’s latest activities. In early 2013, Pasha travelled to France, where he shared a joint exhibition with Nebay as part of the RussenKo festival. His only solo exhibition took place after his death, at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art in the spring of 2014.

1983–2013 Photographer: Vitaly Kuzmin

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Pasha 183 Moscow street artist, famous for his works on hot social topics, and political and protest themes

Moscow, Russia Some works by Pasha 183, also known as Р183, such as Truth to Truth, Alyonka, To the Bridge Burners: A Dedication, and Eyeglasses, have already become classics of Russian street art, although fame came to him rather late. He lived in Moscow, and the region around Preobrazhenskaya Square became the focal point of his work. Over 15 years, his artistic style constantly developed and evolved. In the early 2000s, his favourite genre was portraiture, taking rock stars as his main subjects. It is difficult to overstate the impact of Russian rock music on Pasha 183’s creative persona. It was these songs which largely informed his worldview and his relationship to life and to art. Images from them constantly influenced his work. It seems fitting that one of the artist’s best works was the set for the rock musical Todd. Soon, Pasha 183 would start creating street art in response to pressing social issues. Words were starting to play a defining role and would become as important as visual imagery. After a few years, the artist began to feel confined by two-dimensional images, and he began working with installations. By the start of the 2010s, P183 was concentrating on three-dimensional works (installations, events, and projects using projectors, light, and smoke), which, as the artist himself admitted, resonated more with the public. Pasha won fame in the winter of 2012 when several English newspapers wrote about him, including The Guardian, which described him as the “Russian Banksy” for the unusually audacious and uncompromising nature of his works, and for his laconic and elegant style. The nickname stuck, although it is hard to imagine an artist more distant from European aesthetics and substance. The Russian media soon discovered him, too, and there were interviews and pieces on national television about the artist’s latest activities. In early 2013, Pasha travelled to France, where he shared a joint exhibition with Nebay as part of the RussenKo festival. His only solo exhibition took place after his death, at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art in the spring of 2014.

1983–2013 Photographer: Vitaly Kuzmin

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Casus belli 2012 Digital photograph. 100 х 400 cm

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This work was created two years ago on a school sports field in Moscow. The famous Roman phrase (the Latin means “cause of war”), ripped open with a dagger, was executed without authorization in a single day on a wooden wall many metres long. The dagger was made of plywood and wrapped in film, and was supplied by another artist. Pasha 183

planned to create a series of similar works on the theme of war, but only one was ever completed. The work remained in place for a long time, until the wall was torn down. Pasha 183 was photographed, with flares, in front of Casus Belli for the English online journal Don’t Panic.

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Casus belli 2012 Digital photograph. 100 х 400 cm

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This work was created two years ago on a school sports field in Moscow. The famous Roman phrase (the Latin means “cause of war”), ripped open with a dagger, was executed without authorization in a single day on a wooden wall many metres long. The dagger was made of plywood and wrapped in film, and was supplied by another artist. Pasha 183

planned to create a series of similar works on the theme of war, but only one was ever completed. The work remained in place for a long time, until the wall was torn down. Pasha 183 was photographed, with flares, in front of Casus Belli for the English online journal Don’t Panic.

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Tskhinvali 2008 Video. 4;02 min

Pasha 183 on Tskhinvali: “The project was initially conceived as a memorial video installation for the victims in Tskhinvali based on the track Tskhinvali by the groups Zolotoye Dno and D.O.B. Community. In the end, after negotiations with mc24cm (from Zolotoye Dno) and Money Mike (from D.O.B. Community) as part of the VAO group, it

was decided that it would be best to make a proper music video. I had to admit that up till then I’d never made a video, though of course I‘d filmed clips for installations, and once made a film (The Tale of Alyonka, 2005). But this was the first time I’d made a music video with the songwriters.

Basically, I’m not going to say much, just that we showed the events in South Ossetia as Money, mc24cm, I, and many other people saw them. A view of the spilled blood of innocent, defenceless people. And a view of NATO’s wolves den with their stooge, Saakashvili” 1.

A view of the spilled blood of innocent, defenceless people. 1

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http://www.183art.ru/chinval/chinval.htm (Russian only)

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Tskhinvali 2008 Video. 4;02 min

Pasha 183 on Tskhinvali: “The project was initially conceived as a memorial video installation for the victims in Tskhinvali based on the track Tskhinvali by the groups Zolotoye Dno and D.O.B. Community. In the end, after negotiations with mc24cm (from Zolotoye Dno) and Money Mike (from D.O.B. Community) as part of the VAO group, it

was decided that it would be best to make a proper music video. I had to admit that up till then I’d never made a video, though of course I‘d filmed clips for installations, and once made a film (The Tale of Alyonka, 2005). But this was the first time I’d made a music video with the songwriters.

Basically, I’m not going to say much, just that we showed the events in South Ossetia as Money, mc24cm, I, and many other people saw them. A view of the spilled blood of innocent, defenceless people. And a view of NATO’s wolves den with their stooge, Saakashvili” 1.

A view of the spilled blood of innocent, defenceless people. 1

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http://www.183art.ru/chinval/chinval.htm (Russian only)

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665 Zaporozhye, Ukraine

Group of street artists from Zaporozhye

Lyosha pr ef ers cosm ic t h em es – a technocra ti c f u tu r e , a n d s o o n . F o r m e, everythi ng i s mor e l ifel ik e. S o m e o f m y favou r i te su bj ects a r e t h e h o m el es s , t he drunks, the ma rgin a l ized. S in ce ch il dh o o d, s ince my a dolescen ce, s in ce m y yo ut h , I h a ve a lwa ys wa nted socia l j us t ice. F o r w h o m do we ma ke street a r t, f i rs t a n d fo r em o s t ? F o r t h o s e who spend most of t h eir t im e a ct ua l l y on the str eet. So i t h a s a l w a y s s eem ed l o gica l t o pa i nt f or them a nd t o br in g t h o s e im a ge s t o li f e.

The group’s members started painting together in 2007, but it was only three years later that 665 fully took shape as an artistic collective. Many work illegally, leaving their artistic statements anywhere they happen to be. Occasionally, up to five unaffiliated artists join the group, often friends and colleagues from Zaporozhye and other Ukrainian cities. Most team members have higher degrees in technical subjects or the humanities, and some are even schoolteachers. For 665, the comic-book style has proved capable of expressing clear, profound ideas that focus attention on the crisis of consumer culture. Sometimes, their works are accompanied by brief comments, for example, “your fears here” on a rubbish bin, or “shame again” under an advertisement for a “wife for an hour.” 665 works in various genres, including stencils, paper posters, foam objects, and, of course, aerosol. Recently, they have preferred to work with mixed media, bringing together various materials, but also moving outside the framework of walls and barricades – the group has been publishing zines and comic books, creating GIF art, and working with video. From 2012–2013, the 665 team took part in the Synesthesia festival (Montenegro), Gogolfest (Kiev), the Blank Canvas festival (Tula Region), and two exhibitions at the Kvartira Art Centre in Dnepropetrovsk.

— M i ki M i k e

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665 Zaporozhye, Ukraine

Group of street artists from Zaporozhye

Lyosha pr ef ers cosm ic t h em es – a technocra ti c f u tu r e , a n d s o o n . F o r m e, everythi ng i s mor e l ifel ik e. S o m e o f m y favou r i te su bj ects a r e t h e h o m el es s , t he drunks, the ma rgin a l ized. S in ce ch il dh o o d, s ince my a dolescen ce, s in ce m y yo ut h , I h a ve a lwa ys wa nted socia l j us t ice. F o r w h o m do we ma ke street a r t, f i rs t a n d fo r em o s t ? F o r t h o s e who spend most of t h eir t im e a ct ua l l y on the str eet. So i t h a s a l w a y s s eem ed l o gica l t o pa i nt f or them a nd t o br in g t h o s e im a ge s t o li f e.

The group’s members started painting together in 2007, but it was only three years later that 665 fully took shape as an artistic collective. Many work illegally, leaving their artistic statements anywhere they happen to be. Occasionally, up to five unaffiliated artists join the group, often friends and colleagues from Zaporozhye and other Ukrainian cities. Most team members have higher degrees in technical subjects or the humanities, and some are even schoolteachers. For 665, the comic-book style has proved capable of expressing clear, profound ideas that focus attention on the crisis of consumer culture. Sometimes, their works are accompanied by brief comments, for example, “your fears here” on a rubbish bin, or “shame again” under an advertisement for a “wife for an hour.” 665 works in various genres, including stencils, paper posters, foam objects, and, of course, aerosol. Recently, they have preferred to work with mixed media, bringing together various materials, but also moving outside the framework of walls and barricades – the group has been publishing zines and comic books, creating GIF art, and working with video. From 2012–2013, the 665 team took part in the Synesthesia festival (Montenegro), Gogolfest (Kiev), the Blank Canvas festival (Tula Region), and two exhibitions at the Kvartira Art Centre in Dnepropetrovsk.

— M i ki M i k e

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Be Friends Again 2014 Aerosol, emulsion. 300 х 300 cm

The artists take a simple, familiar childhood ritual and endow it with new meaning and contemporary resonance. Addressing the topic of the conflict in their native Ukraine, they try to show that we achieve peace by using little conventions, just like the children’s game Be Friends Again. The important thing is not the action taken to secure a truce, but the obligations each side is forced to take on. The work is drawn in life-affirming colours in 665’s own style, reminiscent of animation.

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Be Friends Again 2014 Aerosol, emulsion. 300 х 300 cm

The artists take a simple, familiar childhood ritual and endow it with new meaning and contemporary resonance. Addressing the topic of the conflict in their native Ukraine, they try to show that we achieve peace by using little conventions, just like the children’s game Be Friends Again. The important thing is not the action taken to secure a truce, but the obligations each side is forced to take on. The work is drawn in life-affirming colours in 665’s own style, reminiscent of animation.

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Hands of Power 2014 Aerosol, emulsion, collage. 500 х 2600 cm

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A laconic and clear work, drawn with nods to primitivism and classical comic-book style, presenting archetypal characters – a police officer, an innocent victim, a priest, and an immigrant from the Caucasus – and conflicts. At the same time, a key role is played here by the ‘faceless warrior’, who blindly follows orders and dies without fail. All

those in whose hands power is concentrated and who are supported by the media are part of a childhood game in which the people are nothing but finger puppets. Next to the work, on the ruins of a concrete structure, is a sign reading “It is shameful being human.”

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Hands of Power 2014 Aerosol, emulsion, collage. 500 х 2600 cm

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A laconic and clear work, drawn with nods to primitivism and classical comic-book style, presenting archetypal characters – a police officer, an innocent victim, a priest, and an immigrant from the Caucasus – and conflicts. At the same time, a key role is played here by the ‘faceless warrior’, who blindly follows orders and dies without fail. All

those in whose hands power is concentrated and who are supported by the media are part of a childhood game in which the people are nothing but finger puppets. Next to the work, on the ruins of a concrete structure, is a sign reading “It is shameful being human.”

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Maidan. Beginning. 2013 Digital print. 30 Ă— 42 cm

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One 665 team member, Miki Mike, prefers to draw events rather than photograph them. A selection of his simple comics and comic strips has been collected in a stand-alone exhibition room in a shipping container.

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Maidan. Beginning. 2013 Digital print. 30 Ă— 42 cm

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One 665 team member, Miki Mike, prefers to draw events rather than photograph them. A selection of his simple comics and comic strips has been collected in a stand-alone exhibition room in a shipping container.

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Volt AgapEyev Street artist, painter, graphic designer

one of the most independent and interesting figures in contemporary Ukrainian art.

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Ternopil, Ukraine Volt Agapeyev was born and raised – and started on his creative path – in the Ukrainian city of Ternopil. Volt got involved in street art in 2003, starting, like many, with bombing and tagging. In 2007, Volt took part in his first major exhibition, Sindrome, after which he began regularly showing his works at exhibitions and graffiti festivals in various cities in Ukraine, including Ternopil, Chernivtsi, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kiev, Kharkiv, and Lviv. In 2011, he graduated from the institute of the arts at the V. Gnatyuk Ternopil National Pedagogical University. Last year, Volt took part in the western Ukrainian modern art exhibition, 50. The project brought together 50 progressive artists with something to say. As a result of that project, Volt Agapeyev was noted as one of the most independent and interesting figures in contemporary Ukrainian art. One of Volt’s latest projects was his solo exhibition Mounds, which he dedicated to environmental issues. The artist is concerned about man’s destruction of the environment, and in his works he casts doubt on the importance of comfort, for the sake of which we are actually destroying the world. In addition to graffiti, Agapeyev also currently works with oils, draws, and is interested in other techniques and stylistic approaches. As he established his own style, which the artist himself has called abstractionism with figurative elements, he was influenced by both Ukrainian and Western European street artists. In particular, Volt draws upon the cut-up techniques of the American writer William S. Burroughs, as well as the work of artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francis Bacon, and Anselm Kiefer. Volt generally finds inspiration for his works in the compositions of abstract artists.

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Volt AgapEyev Street artist, painter, graphic designer

one of the most independent and interesting figures in contemporary Ukrainian art.

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Ternopil, Ukraine Volt Agapeyev was born and raised – and started on his creative path – in the Ukrainian city of Ternopil. Volt got involved in street art in 2003, starting, like many, with bombing and tagging. In 2007, Volt took part in his first major exhibition, Sindrome, after which he began regularly showing his works at exhibitions and graffiti festivals in various cities in Ukraine, including Ternopil, Chernivtsi, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kiev, Kharkiv, and Lviv. In 2011, he graduated from the institute of the arts at the V. Gnatyuk Ternopil National Pedagogical University. Last year, Volt took part in the western Ukrainian modern art exhibition, 50. The project brought together 50 progressive artists with something to say. As a result of that project, Volt Agapeyev was noted as one of the most independent and interesting figures in contemporary Ukrainian art. One of Volt’s latest projects was his solo exhibition Mounds, which he dedicated to environmental issues. The artist is concerned about man’s destruction of the environment, and in his works he casts doubt on the importance of comfort, for the sake of which we are actually destroying the world. In addition to graffiti, Agapeyev also currently works with oils, draws, and is interested in other techniques and stylistic approaches. As he established his own style, which the artist himself has called abstractionism with figurative elements, he was influenced by both Ukrainian and Western European street artists. In particular, Volt draws upon the cut-up techniques of the American writer William S. Burroughs, as well as the work of artists Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francis Bacon, and Anselm Kiefer. Volt generally finds inspiration for his works in the compositions of abstract artists.

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Victims 2011 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 160 Ń… 140 cm

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A series of works created by Volt Agapeyev in collaboration with Kiev artist Valeria Tarasenko in 2012. The series consists of two oil paintings depicting members of an ordinary family. The texture of the canvas is a grid made up of small elements submerged in a layer

of paint. This grid covers the whole face of the painting’s main figure, forming the image of deep scars symbolizing the events that people lived through during the world wars and that they carry with them their whole lives. The artist has said that all the misfortune, unrest,

tragedy, deaths of loved ones, and all the other horrors that war brings are reflected in their faces, leaving an indelible trace. However, that trace can only be seen through close contact with a person, and is perceived only by looking very carefully.

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Victims 2011 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 160 Ń… 140 cm

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A series of works created by Volt Agapeyev in collaboration with Kiev artist Valeria Tarasenko in 2012. The series consists of two oil paintings depicting members of an ordinary family. The texture of the canvas is a grid made up of small elements submerged in a layer

of paint. This grid covers the whole face of the painting’s main figure, forming the image of deep scars symbolizing the events that people lived through during the world wars and that they carry with them their whole lives. The artist has said that all the misfortune, unrest,

tragedy, deaths of loved ones, and all the other horrors that war brings are reflected in their faces, leaving an indelible trace. However, that trace can only be seen through close contact with a person, and is perceived only by looking very carefully.

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Valhallest 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 400 Ń… 400 cm

This mural is Volt’s artistic reflection on the chaos that war inevitably brings to the individual, as well as to society as a whole. The composition consists of contours of different thicknesses, coming together in the centre of the work, where there is a black stain. The stain is the silhouette of a soldier’s helmet, which has become the centre of a bottomless abyss, swallowing up everything around it, and the surrounding background seems to crack and disintegrate; the elements are scrambled, and existing ties are broken. With this work, the artist intends to give a warning to the viewer, and to show the consequences that war brings.

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Valhallest 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 400 Ń… 400 cm

This mural is Volt’s artistic reflection on the chaos that war inevitably brings to the individual, as well as to society as a whole. The composition consists of contours of different thicknesses, coming together in the centre of the work, where there is a black stain. The stain is the silhouette of a soldier’s helmet, which has become the centre of a bottomless abyss, swallowing up everything around it, and the surrounding background seems to crack and disintegrate; the elements are scrambled, and existing ties are broken. With this work, the artist intends to give a warning to the viewer, and to show the consequences that war brings.

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bLuemoloko Creative group, led by architect, artist, designer, and teacher Filipp Pishik

Kiev – Moscow, Ukraine – Russia

I ha ve no love f or co n fo r m is t o r p r o government ‘a rt’. N o n e o f t h e s e p e t t y I n t er n et comments or thi ng s l ik e #kr y m n a s h (Cr im e a is ou r s) … An a rti st m us t n o t s e l l h is im m o r t a l s oul a nd ea t out of a bur ea ucra t ’s h a n d – t h a t is a betra ya l of the Guil d. I h a ve n’t be en t o U kra i ne f or a long tim e, but I ’m fo l l o w in g t he na ti ona l li bera tio n m o ve m en t ca r e ful l y . M a ny f ri ends of mi n e wer e o n t h e M a ida n , a n d s ome of them tu r ne d in t h e ir p a in t br us h e s , computer mi ce, a nd m us ica l in s t r um e n t s fo r K a la shni kovs a nd we n t t o vo l un t eer in t h e Na ti ona l G u a rd. Tha t ’s t h e s it ua t io n – yo u n eed to def end you r l a n d.

Filipp Pishik was born and raised in Moscow. He says that he started drawing, like all children, at an early age, “First with poo, till my parents started pressing chalk, pencils, and watercolours on me.” In 1995, he graduated from the Moscow Architectural Institute. Pishik worked in print design, interior design, and architecture, and led a project for children called Baby’s Babble at the Artplay centre. In 2007, he left Moscow due to problems with the authorities. He lived in Montenegro, then in Ukraine. In 2008, he organized the Bluemoloko Group, a creative collective that carries out different sorts of projects: architectural structures, interiors, a public art action called UkrLinia, the MAkafe vegetarian kiosk, and the Neshkola children’s art studio. Currently, Pishik is enjoying life in Bali, and works remotely on architecture projects for Kiev and Moscow, with some of his concepts being brought to life on the island itself. He is also continuing to develop Neshkola with new sets and new circumstances. Filipp says that he is not currently managing to draw as frequently as he would like, because architecture and side projects do not leave him much free time. He has difficulty defining his style, but when creating his works, he does not emphasize any particular topic, instead taking inspiration from what is around him and within him. Though without a doubt there are many interesting individuals engaged in contemporary Russian street art, he cannot pick out any one of them, as opposed to the ones he does not like.

— Fi l i p p P i sh i k

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bLuemoloko Creative group, led by architect, artist, designer, and teacher Filipp Pishik

Kiev – Moscow, Ukraine – Russia

I ha ve no love f or co n fo r m is t o r p r o government ‘a rt’. N o n e o f t h e s e p e t t y I n t er n et comments or thi ng s l ik e #kr y m n a s h (Cr im e a is ou r s) … An a rti st m us t n o t s e l l h is im m o r t a l s oul a nd ea t out of a bur ea ucra t ’s h a n d – t h a t is a betra ya l of the Guil d. I h a ve n’t be en t o U kra i ne f or a long tim e, but I ’m fo l l o w in g t he na ti ona l li bera tio n m o ve m en t ca r e ful l y . M a ny f ri ends of mi n e wer e o n t h e M a ida n , a n d s ome of them tu r ne d in t h e ir p a in t br us h e s , computer mi ce, a nd m us ica l in s t r um e n t s fo r K a la shni kovs a nd we n t t o vo l un t eer in t h e Na ti ona l G u a rd. Tha t ’s t h e s it ua t io n – yo u n eed to def end you r l a n d.

Filipp Pishik was born and raised in Moscow. He says that he started drawing, like all children, at an early age, “First with poo, till my parents started pressing chalk, pencils, and watercolours on me.” In 1995, he graduated from the Moscow Architectural Institute. Pishik worked in print design, interior design, and architecture, and led a project for children called Baby’s Babble at the Artplay centre. In 2007, he left Moscow due to problems with the authorities. He lived in Montenegro, then in Ukraine. In 2008, he organized the Bluemoloko Group, a creative collective that carries out different sorts of projects: architectural structures, interiors, a public art action called UkrLinia, the MAkafe vegetarian kiosk, and the Neshkola children’s art studio. Currently, Pishik is enjoying life in Bali, and works remotely on architecture projects for Kiev and Moscow, with some of his concepts being brought to life on the island itself. He is also continuing to develop Neshkola with new sets and new circumstances. Filipp says that he is not currently managing to draw as frequently as he would like, because architecture and side projects do not leave him much free time. He has difficulty defining his style, but when creating his works, he does not emphasize any particular topic, instead taking inspiration from what is around him and within him. Though without a doubt there are many interesting individuals engaged in contemporary Russian street art, he cannot pick out any one of them, as opposed to the ones he does not like.

— Fi l i p p P i sh i k

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Our Lady of Moscow 2013 Acrylic. 280 х 390 cm

Photographs of works created by Filipp and his wife Anastasia at the 6 Level art centre in Kiev are on display at the exhibition. They depict the saint, covering her face with her hands, in a style akin to icon painting. This is not the first time the artist has used the image; he explains that it was born out of his impressions of recent events in Russia. At first the image was made as a stencil that Filipp created together with his young daughter Luceria. The first image was placed on a bridge near the Strelka Institute, not far from the Christ the Saviour Cathedral.

I r e memb er t ha t I ha d a temperat ur e o f a l m o s t 39° , a n d i t w a s - 2 5 ° ou tsi de. I wa s ha lf u n co n s cio us , but it w a s wor t h it . T h at wa s la st wi nter, a n d t h er e w a s n o t im e t o w a i t for a t ha w or f or a cur e f or t h e M o s co w do l dr um s . T h e n t here wer e the t-shi rts [wit h t h e s a m e im a ge — E d . ] t hat I gave out to my f ri end s , a n d t h e n a ba n n e r I c arr ied wit h me to the Bolotna y a S q ua r e p r o t es t s . I t w a s on l y lat er t ha t Ana sta si a a nd I m a de t h e fr e s co a t t h e a r t c e n t re in Kiev .

— Fi l i p p P i sh i k

The work has several names, Face Palm and ***king Shame, for example. But the artists prefer the name Our Lady of Moscow. The image of the Virgin Mary, symbolizing maternity, is always topical for an exhibition dedicated to war. The weeping saint embodies the traditional role of women in any war: while the men spill blood, they spill tears.

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Our Lady of Moscow 2013 Acrylic. 280 х 390 cm

Photographs of works created by Filipp and his wife Anastasia at the 6 Level art centre in Kiev are on display at the exhibition. They depict the saint, covering her face with her hands, in a style akin to icon painting. This is not the first time the artist has used the image; he explains that it was born out of his impressions of recent events in Russia. At first the image was made as a stencil that Filipp created together with his young daughter Luceria. The first image was placed on a bridge near the Strelka Institute, not far from the Christ the Saviour Cathedral.

I r e memb er t ha t I ha d a temperat ur e o f a l m o s t 39° , a n d i t w a s - 2 5 ° ou tsi de. I wa s ha lf u n co n s cio us , but it w a s wor t h it . T h at wa s la st wi nter, a n d t h er e w a s n o t im e t o w a i t for a t ha w or f or a cur e f or t h e M o s co w do l dr um s . T h e n t here wer e the t-shi rts [wit h t h e s a m e im a ge — E d . ] t hat I gave out to my f ri end s , a n d t h e n a ba n n e r I c arr ied wit h me to the Bolotna y a S q ua r e p r o t es t s . I t w a s on l y lat er t ha t Ana sta si a a nd I m a de t h e fr e s co a t t h e a r t c e n t re in Kiev .

— Fi l i p p P i sh i k

The work has several names, Face Palm and ***king Shame, for example. But the artists prefer the name Our Lady of Moscow. The image of the Virgin Mary, symbolizing maternity, is always topical for an exhibition dedicated to war. The weeping saint embodies the traditional role of women in any war: while the men spill blood, they spill tears.

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Dmitry Bulnygin Director, street artist

The artist’s archives include staged monologues and video collages which, due to their intensity and dynamism, are often reminiscent of the punk aesthetic.

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Moscow, Russia Dmitry Bulnygin was born in 1965 in Novosibirsk, where he spent his childhood and teenage years. After graduating from the Novosibirsk Institute of Architecture, he became an independent artist. In 1998, Bulnygin took up video art, a genre in which he still works today, and in 1999 he joined the Blue Noses, who were working on projects of “populist contemporary art”, targeted, as the artists themselves say, at “pioneers and pensioners” and made with makeshift tools. Within the art group, Bulnygin filmed the Noses’ performances. Dmitry has also won awards at Russian festivals, including at the 2004 project STYK, and later at Videology and the Media Forum.1 The artist’s archives also include staged monologues; video collages which, due to their intensity and dynamism, are often reminiscent of the punk aesthetic; and videos, in which he himself stars, as he is, with no makeup or affectation. In 2000, Dmitry began work on the Extra Short Film/ESF Festival.2 The main criterion for participation in that project is a time limit of 60 seconds. The festival includes political satire, impressionistic sketches, philosophical discourse, fictional film, and computer animation. Most of Bulnygin’s video works from recent years are either video installations or large-scale projections on an urban scale. The artist is also no stranger to street art. His wall paintings appear in cities in Europe and Asia, as well as in Russia. Most of them are easily recognizable, since all his works come with a signature of a sort – the forbidden symbol of freedom, the cannabis leaf.

1

http://os.colta.ru/future/9239/details/10047/ (Russian only)

2

http://www.esff.ru/rus/index13.shtml (Russian only)

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Dmitry Bulnygin Director, street artist

The artist’s archives include staged monologues and video collages which, due to their intensity and dynamism, are often reminiscent of the punk aesthetic.

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Moscow, Russia Dmitry Bulnygin was born in 1965 in Novosibirsk, where he spent his childhood and teenage years. After graduating from the Novosibirsk Institute of Architecture, he became an independent artist. In 1998, Bulnygin took up video art, a genre in which he still works today, and in 1999 he joined the Blue Noses, who were working on projects of “populist contemporary art”, targeted, as the artists themselves say, at “pioneers and pensioners” and made with makeshift tools. Within the art group, Bulnygin filmed the Noses’ performances. Dmitry has also won awards at Russian festivals, including at the 2004 project STYK, and later at Videology and the Media Forum.1 The artist’s archives also include staged monologues; video collages which, due to their intensity and dynamism, are often reminiscent of the punk aesthetic; and videos, in which he himself stars, as he is, with no makeup or affectation. In 2000, Dmitry began work on the Extra Short Film/ESF Festival.2 The main criterion for participation in that project is a time limit of 60 seconds. The festival includes political satire, impressionistic sketches, philosophical discourse, fictional film, and computer animation. Most of Bulnygin’s video works from recent years are either video installations or large-scale projections on an urban scale. The artist is also no stranger to street art. His wall paintings appear in cities in Europe and Asia, as well as in Russia. Most of them are easily recognizable, since all his works come with a signature of a sort – the forbidden symbol of freedom, the cannabis leaf.

1

http://os.colta.ru/future/9239/details/10047/ (Russian only)

2

http://www.esff.ru/rus/index13.shtml (Russian only)

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150 2014 Video installation. 2:25 min

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The Casus Pacis exhibition features a selection of video documentary works from the past four years.

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150 2014 Video installation. 2:25 min

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The Casus Pacis exhibition features a selection of video documentary works from the past four years.

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Finish 2011 Video installation. 3:37 min

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Finish 2011 Video installation. 3:37 min

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The Final Wall 2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 1800 х 380 cm

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Dmitry Bulnygin initiated the large-scale project The Final Wall, which was completed by the joint efforts of more than a hundred street artists. It is an enormous rectangular space, the upper portion of which resembles the “toothy” crenellation of the Kremlin wall, done in the striking style typical of many graffiti artists. On top of the tags, in

white, untouched by graffiti, one portion of the wall depicts monkeys wearing the official caps of government authorities, armed with rollers and paintbrushes. They are big and portly, looking in all directions, conscientiously defending this remaining “empty space”. The Final Wall is an allegory for freedom, and pokes fun at modern society.

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The Final Wall 2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 1800 х 380 cm

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Dmitry Bulnygin initiated the large-scale project The Final Wall, which was completed by the joint efforts of more than a hundred street artists. It is an enormous rectangular space, the upper portion of which resembles the “toothy” crenellation of the Kremlin wall, done in the striking style typical of many graffiti artists. On top of the tags, in

white, untouched by graffiti, one portion of the wall depicts monkeys wearing the official caps of government authorities, armed with rollers and paintbrushes. They are big and portly, looking in all directions, conscientiously defending this remaining “empty space”. The Final Wall is an allegory for freedom, and pokes fun at modern society.

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The Final Battle 2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 160 Ñ… 140 cm

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The Final Battle 2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic. 160 Ñ… 140 cm

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Pasha Bumazhniy St. Petersburg street artist, illustrator, and sculptor

Artist’s projects are touching, ironic, and very expressive, featuring animals and imaginary creatures. they are all about love.

Earth Born in 1984, lived in China for two years and Mexico for eighteen months, then returned to St. Petersburg. Pasha Bumazhniy got involved in the graffiti movement in 1999. “I tried to make two pictures and I left the game at age twelve, but that doesn’t mean I can’t now say I’m old school...”1 Pavel never finished secondary school and spent what he calls a waste of time at art school. At age twenty, on a friend’s recommendation, he found work as a designer at the MacroVision Records production centre. “My friend sort of set things in motion [he recommended Pasha as a talented designer — Ed.], so I had to become one right away.” In 2010, Pasha met Dima Shadrin, also known as Admiral Laser Beard. They started drawing together on the streets, and soon Pasha Bumazhniy made a full return to street art as an independent artist. He travelled frequently, continuing to work actively. In Mexico, for example, he completed projects under the pseudonym Pincheloco. The artist calls his style “melancholy techno”, similar to naïve art. Usually, he creates graphic works with white contours on a black background, supplemented with red tones. Pasha Bumazhniy’s projects are touching, ironic, and very expressive, featuring animals and imaginary creatures. The artist says they are all about love.

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http://wtf-magazine.com/post/334 (Russian only)

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Pasha Bumazhniy St. Petersburg street artist, illustrator, and sculptor

Artist’s projects are touching, ironic, and very expressive, featuring animals and imaginary creatures. they are all about love.

Earth Born in 1984, lived in China for two years and Mexico for eighteen months, then returned to St. Petersburg. Pasha Bumazhniy got involved in the graffiti movement in 1999. “I tried to make two pictures and I left the game at age twelve, but that doesn’t mean I can’t now say I’m old school...”1 Pavel never finished secondary school and spent what he calls a waste of time at art school. At age twenty, on a friend’s recommendation, he found work as a designer at the MacroVision Records production centre. “My friend sort of set things in motion [he recommended Pasha as a talented designer — Ed.], so I had to become one right away.” In 2010, Pasha met Dima Shadrin, also known as Admiral Laser Beard. They started drawing together on the streets, and soon Pasha Bumazhniy made a full return to street art as an independent artist. He travelled frequently, continuing to work actively. In Mexico, for example, he completed projects under the pseudonym Pincheloco. The artist calls his style “melancholy techno”, similar to naïve art. Usually, he creates graphic works with white contours on a black background, supplemented with red tones. Pasha Bumazhniy’s projects are touching, ironic, and very expressive, featuring animals and imaginary creatures. The artist says they are all about love.

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http://wtf-magazine.com/post/334 (Russian only)

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Death: A Reason for Peace 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 400 х 300 cm

The mural Death: A Reason for Peace is a rethinking of a work by contemporary artist Ericka Lugo from Puerto Rico and was executed in Pasha Bumazhniy’s ‘Russo-Mexican’ style. The artist explains the work this way: “A girl is in a coma, one foot already in the kingdom of the dead. She is frightened and surprised, but the people around her are very glad that they don’t need to fight anymore. They love each other, even though they are former enemies and rivals who used to hate each other. All evil and stupidity has been left behind. She is supposed to come to understand that, and return to our world with this new knowledge.” While preparing for the exhibition, Pavel found a piece of black cardboard at the Laminated Plastics Factory and decided to give it a second life by creating an artwork on it. The result was the work The Only Right Answer, in which an ironic crossword puzzle encodes the only correct response to a proposal to go to war. A replica of the work, executed by the artist in plastic, is on display at the exhibition.

1 ,2

http://wtf-magazine.com/post/334

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Death: A Reason for Peace 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 400 х 300 cm

The mural Death: A Reason for Peace is a rethinking of a work by contemporary artist Ericka Lugo from Puerto Rico and was executed in Pasha Bumazhniy’s ‘Russo-Mexican’ style. The artist explains the work this way: “A girl is in a coma, one foot already in the kingdom of the dead. She is frightened and surprised, but the people around her are very glad that they don’t need to fight anymore. They love each other, even though they are former enemies and rivals who used to hate each other. All evil and stupidity has been left behind. She is supposed to come to understand that, and return to our world with this new knowledge.” While preparing for the exhibition, Pavel found a piece of black cardboard at the Laminated Plastics Factory and decided to give it a second life by creating an artwork on it. The result was the work The Only Right Answer, in which an ironic crossword puzzle encodes the only correct response to a proposal to go to war. A replica of the work, executed by the artist in plastic, is on display at the exhibition.

1 ,2

http://wtf-magazine.com/post/334

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The Only Right Answer 2014 Plastic, acrylic, aerosol. 129 Ñ… 41 cm

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The Only Right Answer 2014 Plastic, acrylic, aerosol. 129 Ñ… 41 cm

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Потапов Владимир Vladimir Chernyshev Художник, куратор и искусствовед Street and video artist

Москва, Россия Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

The artist is drawn to decay, which he transforms with his work, trying to capture the particular atmosphere and individual soul of each abandoned dwelling. 54

Chernyshev was born in Nizhny Novgorod in 1992 and now lives and works in St. Petersburg. He is an engineer by education. He got into street art seven years ago. Since that time, the scope of his interests has expanded dramatically: from tagging and traditional style writing to street and video art. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on video art, shooting street art videos and making animated films and photo projects. The artist is currently working on a project titled Deserted Village. Vladimir travels around the sparsely populated villages of Nizhny Novgorod Region, using abandoned homes as a canvas to create works that alter the context of the setting and the ways of perceiving it. For the most part, these are concise images that are painted with acrylic or spray paint, for example rainbows, butterflies, or mystical shadows. The artist is drawn to decay, which he transforms with his work, trying to capture the particular atmosphere and individual soul of each abandoned dwelling. Chernyshev presented photographic documentation of this project at his first solo exhibition, which took place in Nizhny Novgorod in 2013. Formally speaking, Chernyshev makes street art. However, because of the physical inaccessibility of the works themselves, the Deserted Village project was presented in the form of photographs displayed in light boxes. Another important milestone in this project was the Empty House installation, presented at the 4th International Biennale for Young Art in Moscow in the summer of 2014.

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Потапов Владимир Vladimir Chernyshev Художник, куратор и искусствовед Street and video artist

Москва, Россия Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

The artist is drawn to decay, which he transforms with his work, trying to capture the particular atmosphere and individual soul of each abandoned dwelling. 54

Chernyshev was born in Nizhny Novgorod in 1992 and now lives and works in St. Petersburg. He is an engineer by education. He got into street art seven years ago. Since that time, the scope of his interests has expanded dramatically: from tagging and traditional style writing to street and video art. In recent years, he has focused increasingly on video art, shooting street art videos and making animated films and photo projects. The artist is currently working on a project titled Deserted Village. Vladimir travels around the sparsely populated villages of Nizhny Novgorod Region, using abandoned homes as a canvas to create works that alter the context of the setting and the ways of perceiving it. For the most part, these are concise images that are painted with acrylic or spray paint, for example rainbows, butterflies, or mystical shadows. The artist is drawn to decay, which he transforms with his work, trying to capture the particular atmosphere and individual soul of each abandoned dwelling. Chernyshev presented photographic documentation of this project at his first solo exhibition, which took place in Nizhny Novgorod in 2013. Formally speaking, Chernyshev makes street art. However, because of the physical inaccessibility of the works themselves, the Deserted Village project was presented in the form of photographs displayed in light boxes. Another important milestone in this project was the Empty House installation, presented at the 4th International Biennale for Young Art in Moscow in the summer of 2014.

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A Fisherman’s Story 2013 Video. 5:17 min

Like the Empty House installation, the animated short film titled A Fisherman’s Story is an outcome of the Deserted Village project. The film is comprised of hand-traced frames and tells the story of one man’s disappearance. The creative process of making the film involved the artist placing wax candles inside a wooden box covered

with a glass screen that provides an opening for the light to expose carbon paper. The image was then created by erasing its top layer with a metal rod. A strip of film with an image, roughly 12 metres long, was set in motion using a simple rotation mechanism.

Th e i d e a o f t h e f i l m st e m s f r o m a l e g e n d t h a t o r i g i n a t e d i n the g a rd e n w h e r e I sp e n t m y c h i l d h o o d a n d m y d e si r e t o r e v i ve thos e f e e l i n g s. Th e t e c h n i q u e o f wo r ki n g w i t h f i r e c a m e f r o m m y i nte re s t i n He ra c l i t u s a n d h i s o n t o l o g y .

— Vlad imir Chernyshev

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A Fisherman’s Story 2013 Video. 5:17 min

Like the Empty House installation, the animated short film titled A Fisherman’s Story is an outcome of the Deserted Village project. The film is comprised of hand-traced frames and tells the story of one man’s disappearance. The creative process of making the film involved the artist placing wax candles inside a wooden box covered

with a glass screen that provides an opening for the light to expose carbon paper. The image was then created by erasing its top layer with a metal rod. A strip of film with an image, roughly 12 metres long, was set in motion using a simple rotation mechanism.

Th e i d e a o f t h e f i l m st e m s f r o m a l e g e n d t h a t o r i g i n a t e d i n the g a rd e n w h e r e I sp e n t m y c h i l d h o o d a n d m y d e si r e t o r e v i ve thos e f e e l i n g s. Th e t e c h n i q u e o f wo r ki n g w i t h f i r e c a m e f r o m m y i nte re s t i n He ra c l i t u s a n d h i s o n t o l o g y .

— Vlad imir Chernyshev

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Потапов Владимир ChZhNS Художник, куратор и искусствовед Group of Samara street artists

Москва, Samara, Россия Russia

ChZhN 58

The members graduated in painting from Samara’s K.S. Petrov-Vodkin Art School. They formed the collective eight years ago, and have been involved in street art for about fifteen years. One theory has it that the group’s name is an acronym for a jocular Russian phrase meaning something like “where’s the grub?” ChZhNS executes paintings on canvas and accepts private commissions for interior design, but its members still prefer clandestine painting in the urban environment. They have past experience of working with the city administration, which consented to their use of a particular wall, but they found both the process and the results unsatisfactory. ChZhNS’s style is sometimes called “street expressionism”, but the artists themselves would rather not limit themselves with stylistic boundaries. They try to avoid labels. They prefer working with no preliminary sketches, transforming the creative process into improvisation and experimentation. The artists strive to provoke an emotional response from the public, without much caring whether that response is positive or negative.

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Потапов Владимир ChZhNS Художник, куратор и искусствовед Group of Samara street artists

Москва, Samara, Россия Russia

ChZhN 58

The members graduated in painting from Samara’s K.S. Petrov-Vodkin Art School. They formed the collective eight years ago, and have been involved in street art for about fifteen years. One theory has it that the group’s name is an acronym for a jocular Russian phrase meaning something like “where’s the grub?” ChZhNS executes paintings on canvas and accepts private commissions for interior design, but its members still prefer clandestine painting in the urban environment. They have past experience of working with the city administration, which consented to their use of a particular wall, but they found both the process and the results unsatisfactory. ChZhNS’s style is sometimes called “street expressionism”, but the artists themselves would rather not limit themselves with stylistic boundaries. They try to avoid labels. They prefer working with no preliminary sketches, transforming the creative process into improvisation and experimentation. The artists strive to provoke an emotional response from the public, without much caring whether that response is positive or negative.

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Requiem 2014 Aerosol, bitumen paint, emulsion. 600 х 600 cm The mural Requiem consists of three interrelated parts. Surreal female figures with televisions instead of heads symbolize the victims of information wars, and above them is a dead dove, once a symbol of peace. The portrait composition to the right is a collective image of all the innocents who have perished during military operations, victims whose names are unknown. The project was completed in the recognizably expressionistic style characteristic of many works by ChZhNS, such as the male portrait on canvas, Quiet.

A l w a y s, i n a n y w a r, i n a n y c o n f l i c t , w h e t h e r Wo r l d Wa r I o r w h a t i s h a p p e n i n g r i g h t n o w i n U kra i n e , t h e r e a r e v i c t i m s, a n d t h e y a r e a l w a y s p e r c e i ve d t h r o u g h a p r i sm . In o u r t i m e , t h i s p r i sm i s a c o m p u t e r m o n i t o r o r t e l e v i si o n sc r e e n , f u l l o f p u b l i c i t y . Bu t t h e v i c t i m s a r e a l w a y s p e o p l e , w h e t h e r i t i s G e r m a n y , A u st r i a , Ru ssi a , o r U kra i n e . It i s a l w a y s t h e p e o p l e t h a t su f f e r – t h e u n kn o w n p e o p l e , n o t t h o se w h o g e t t h e m e d a l s. Th e b i g g e st a n d m o st t ra g i c t h i n g i s t h e “ n u m b e r o f v i c t i m s” ... Th a t ’s w h a t o u r wo r k f o r t h i s exhibition is about. — C hZhNS

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Requiem 2014 Aerosol, bitumen paint, emulsion. 600 х 600 cm The mural Requiem consists of three interrelated parts. Surreal female figures with televisions instead of heads symbolize the victims of information wars, and above them is a dead dove, once a symbol of peace. The portrait composition to the right is a collective image of all the innocents who have perished during military operations, victims whose names are unknown. The project was completed in the recognizably expressionistic style characteristic of many works by ChZhNS, such as the male portrait on canvas, Quiet.

A l w a y s, i n a n y w a r, i n a n y c o n f l i c t , w h e t h e r Wo r l d Wa r I o r w h a t i s h a p p e n i n g r i g h t n o w i n U kra i n e , t h e r e a r e v i c t i m s, a n d t h e y a r e a l w a y s p e r c e i ve d t h r o u g h a p r i sm . In o u r t i m e , t h i s p r i sm i s a c o m p u t e r m o n i t o r o r t e l e v i si o n sc r e e n , f u l l o f p u b l i c i t y . Bu t t h e v i c t i m s a r e a l w a y s p e o p l e , w h e t h e r i t i s G e r m a n y , A u st r i a , Ru ssi a , o r U kra i n e . It i s a l w a y s t h e p e o p l e t h a t su f f e r – t h e u n kn o w n p e o p l e , n o t t h o se w h o g e t t h e m e d a l s. Th e b i g g e st a n d m o st t ra g i c t h i n g i s t h e “ n u m b e r o f v i c t i m s” ... Th a t ’s w h a t o u r wo r k f o r t h i s exhibition is about. — C hZhNS

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Quiet 2014 Canvas, aerosol, bitumen paint. 150 Ń… 150 cm

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Quiet 2014 Canvas, aerosol, bitumen paint. 150 Ń… 150 cm

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Isaac Cordal Street artist, sculptor

tiny human figures wait for people at bus stops, drown in puddles, dwell in abandoned construction sites, and always huddle together.

International The artist, originally from Galicia, is famous for his miniature sculptures on topical themes. Isaac now lives and works in Brussels. He creates tiny human figures out of concrete, accentuating the tragedy of their fate and organically inserting them into their environment. These little people – businessmen, clerks, and civil servants – are usually cast as an allegory of the archetypal member of the middle classes, complete with a white collar and briefcase. Isaac’s characters wait for people at bus stops, drown in puddles, dwell in abandoned construction sites, and always huddle together, as if yearning to blend into a single mass. From time to time, the sculptor will put them in the most unexpected places.1 With the help of his little people, he is attempting to bring attention to the important issues in the world today. For example, his work Waiting for Climate Change depicts a group of men in miniature, submerged in a puddle. Here, Isaac is showing the consequences of inaction when it comes to tackling climate change. In The Death of Distance, the sculptor considers how global news is becoming a part of life for people everywhere, and how an artist might express urgent issues in art. Isaac makes the viewer empathize with his characters, seeking to express the misery of the whole world in his art. He makes his figures very small on purpose: passers-by often do not notice them, they tread on them, and even break them. The life of these little people is ephemeral, offering a sense of the absurdity of the human condition and the tragedy of being in general. The conceptual artist has participated in numerous exhibitions around the world, including in Italy, Spain, Belgium, and China. One of the most recent was an exhibition at the JM Art Gallery in Malaga. Prior to this, he took part in the International Festival of the Arts in Santiago de Compostela, as well as the ZEMOS98 Festival in Seville back in 2005–6. His little figures turn up unannounced in different places all over the world, from Barcelona to San Jose.

1

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http://indada.ru/topics/isaak-kordal-i-ego-malenkie-lyudi (Russian only)

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Isaac Cordal Street artist, sculptor

tiny human figures wait for people at bus stops, drown in puddles, dwell in abandoned construction sites, and always huddle together.

International The artist, originally from Galicia, is famous for his miniature sculptures on topical themes. Isaac now lives and works in Brussels. He creates tiny human figures out of concrete, accentuating the tragedy of their fate and organically inserting them into their environment. These little people – businessmen, clerks, and civil servants – are usually cast as an allegory of the archetypal member of the middle classes, complete with a white collar and briefcase. Isaac’s characters wait for people at bus stops, drown in puddles, dwell in abandoned construction sites, and always huddle together, as if yearning to blend into a single mass. From time to time, the sculptor will put them in the most unexpected places.1 With the help of his little people, he is attempting to bring attention to the important issues in the world today. For example, his work Waiting for Climate Change depicts a group of men in miniature, submerged in a puddle. Here, Isaac is showing the consequences of inaction when it comes to tackling climate change. In The Death of Distance, the sculptor considers how global news is becoming a part of life for people everywhere, and how an artist might express urgent issues in art. Isaac makes the viewer empathize with his characters, seeking to express the misery of the whole world in his art. He makes his figures very small on purpose: passers-by often do not notice them, they tread on them, and even break them. The life of these little people is ephemeral, offering a sense of the absurdity of the human condition and the tragedy of being in general. The conceptual artist has participated in numerous exhibitions around the world, including in Italy, Spain, Belgium, and China. One of the most recent was an exhibition at the JM Art Gallery in Malaga. Prior to this, he took part in the International Festival of the Arts in Santiago de Compostela, as well as the ZEMOS98 Festival in Seville back in 2005–6. His little figures turn up unannounced in different places all over the world, from Barcelona to San Jose.

1

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http://indada.ru/topics/isaak-kordal-i-ego-malenkie-lyudi (Russian only)

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Follow the Leaders 2014 Installation, mixed media

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Isaac’s large-scale work in the exhibition’s main gallery space is made from a variety of small human figures. The artist has depicted a world in ruins using objects and building waste found at the factory, and has set up his miniature people on these ruins, putting his characters in white collars and business suits in the middle of the wreckage. These are the businessmen, civil servants, and those in power, only now they stand on the ruins of society, surrounded by people in military uniform

and gas masks. Isaac believes that it is these people, the businessmen and the civil servants, who are bringing the world to ruin with their lust for consumption and comfort. He has called it a metaphor for the collapse of the idea of capitalism and the collateral effects of progress, primarily technological excess, leading in turn to an ever-greater reliance on it. The installation has come to signify for Isaac an attempt to think critically about our inertia and immobility as a social mass.

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Follow the Leaders 2014 Installation, mixed media

66

Isaac’s large-scale work in the exhibition’s main gallery space is made from a variety of small human figures. The artist has depicted a world in ruins using objects and building waste found at the factory, and has set up his miniature people on these ruins, putting his characters in white collars and business suits in the middle of the wreckage. These are the businessmen, civil servants, and those in power, only now they stand on the ruins of society, surrounded by people in military uniform

and gas masks. Isaac believes that it is these people, the businessmen and the civil servants, who are bringing the world to ruin with their lust for consumption and comfort. He has called it a metaphor for the collapse of the idea of capitalism and the collateral effects of progress, primarily technological excess, leading in turn to an ever-greater reliance on it. The installation has come to signify for Isaac an attempt to think critically about our inertia and immobility as a social mass.

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Follow the leaders

Pacem

No title

Survivor

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

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Follow the leaders

Pacem

No title

Survivor

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

2014 Digital print. 100 х 67 cm

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Stas Dobry Street artist, animator

drawing on walls is like using a tool. And sometimes it can be a brush, sometimes a hammer, and sometimes a sledgehammer.

Moscow, Russia Stas Dobry was born in Moscow in 1985. He has been drawing for over a decade now and admits that it was his father, also an artist by profession, who gave him his first can of spray paint. In spite of this, Stas himself initially trained as an engineer, but he has been studying animation for the past two years and works in this capacity at a Moscow studio. Stas began his career as a street artist in 2002, initially painting characters. Moving closer to graffiti culture, he then began to work with type, but the artist confesses that he is still drawn to characters and how they can be used to convey meaning and ideas. In 2009, Stas set off on a trip around Europe, where he was struck by how graffiti blended with the urban landscape. Stas has said that it was only then that he began to develop the style in which he works today. Stas’ street art creations are, by their nature, graphical, that is, they are made from a combination of brush strokes and lines. However, he always considers the texture of the surface in order to organically blend his works with the urban environment. As a rule, he depicts simple anthropomorphic figures, stylistically reminiscent of the early twentieth century avant-garde. In this way Stas conveys his own perceptions of the atmosphere of a city which is transitory and constantly evolving. “For me, drawing on walls is like using a tool. And sometimes it can be a brush, sometimes a hammer, and sometimes a sledgehammer”, Stas explains.1 Considering the fleeting nature of the works street artists create, Stas tries to make his pieces modest and inconspicuous so that they can stay on the streets for as long as possible. After his first trip to Europe, Stas worked in several different cities, from Berlin to Istanbul. His sources of inspiration are the drawings of Matisse, Diego Rivera’s illustrations, the works of Picasso and Gauguin and, of course, whatever city he’s currently residing in. “I think that an Artist with a capital letter is like an arrowhead. The arrow’s shaft is the will of the people, and the Artist is able to depict that with the utmost accuracy, shrewdness, and authority”, Stas remarks. Dobry is now aiming to reach a professional level in animation. “It’s a very cool job”, Stas says, “but if you want to draw cartoons for a living you have to be a real nerd about it because it requires enormous patience and perseverance. You might come out after a whole day’s work with just a couple of seconds of footage for your future animation.” 1

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http://www.codered.ru/mag/streetart/interview/1761 (Russian only)

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Stas Dobry Street artist, animator

drawing on walls is like using a tool. And sometimes it can be a brush, sometimes a hammer, and sometimes a sledgehammer.

Moscow, Russia Stas Dobry was born in Moscow in 1985. He has been drawing for over a decade now and admits that it was his father, also an artist by profession, who gave him his first can of spray paint. In spite of this, Stas himself initially trained as an engineer, but he has been studying animation for the past two years and works in this capacity at a Moscow studio. Stas began his career as a street artist in 2002, initially painting characters. Moving closer to graffiti culture, he then began to work with type, but the artist confesses that he is still drawn to characters and how they can be used to convey meaning and ideas. In 2009, Stas set off on a trip around Europe, where he was struck by how graffiti blended with the urban landscape. Stas has said that it was only then that he began to develop the style in which he works today. Stas’ street art creations are, by their nature, graphical, that is, they are made from a combination of brush strokes and lines. However, he always considers the texture of the surface in order to organically blend his works with the urban environment. As a rule, he depicts simple anthropomorphic figures, stylistically reminiscent of the early twentieth century avant-garde. In this way Stas conveys his own perceptions of the atmosphere of a city which is transitory and constantly evolving. “For me, drawing on walls is like using a tool. And sometimes it can be a brush, sometimes a hammer, and sometimes a sledgehammer”, Stas explains.1 Considering the fleeting nature of the works street artists create, Stas tries to make his pieces modest and inconspicuous so that they can stay on the streets for as long as possible. After his first trip to Europe, Stas worked in several different cities, from Berlin to Istanbul. His sources of inspiration are the drawings of Matisse, Diego Rivera’s illustrations, the works of Picasso and Gauguin and, of course, whatever city he’s currently residing in. “I think that an Artist with a capital letter is like an arrowhead. The arrow’s shaft is the will of the people, and the Artist is able to depict that with the utmost accuracy, shrewdness, and authority”, Stas remarks. Dobry is now aiming to reach a professional level in animation. “It’s a very cool job”, Stas says, “but if you want to draw cartoons for a living you have to be a real nerd about it because it requires enormous patience and perseverance. You might come out after a whole day’s work with just a couple of seconds of footage for your future animation.” 1

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http://www.codered.ru/mag/streetart/interview/1761 (Russian only)

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The Engine of Revolution 2014 Video. 2:13 min

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An animated short in which the artist touches on the different levels of understanding the world, from everyday problems to global changes in culture. An everyday caricature sketch of a trip on the most ordinary metro carriage full of distinctive characters, such as an old lady with her cat or a common thug, might come to represent themes of global change in society. According to the artist, the film explores the causes and consequences of revolution.

“When I drew this film, I thought about the situation in Russia from 2011–2012, about the protests, about the social unrest; however, in the end the action took place in Kiev.” In 2014, Stas added a new ending especially for the exhibition. In his opinion, the prospect of a world war with nuclear weapons is reason enough to maintain peace.

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The Engine of Revolution 2014 Video. 2:13 min

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An animated short in which the artist touches on the different levels of understanding the world, from everyday problems to global changes in culture. An everyday caricature sketch of a trip on the most ordinary metro carriage full of distinctive characters, such as an old lady with her cat or a common thug, might come to represent themes of global change in society. According to the artist, the film explores the causes and consequences of revolution.

“When I drew this film, I thought about the situation in Russia from 2011–2012, about the protests, about the social unrest; however, in the end the action took place in Kiev.” In 2014, Stas added a new ending especially for the exhibition. In his opinion, the prospect of a world war with nuclear weapons is reason enough to maintain peace.

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Brad Downey Artist, sculptor

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Igor Ponosov Berlin, Germany

Street artist, curator, writer, and cofounder of the Partizaning project

American artist Brad Downey was born in 1980 in Louisville, Kentucky. He has been drawing since childhood, when he also fell in love with skateboarding.1 It was skateboarding, the artist says, that expanded his consciousness and forced him to think differently about the objects around him and their intended use. In 2005, he graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art in London, after studying art at the Pratt Institute in New York City. Brad gained fame in large part thanks to a five-year collaboration with street artist Leon Reid IV, also known as VERBS. Together, they worked on the so-called “switcharoo”, putting up paintings where they should not be. In 2004, the artists parted ways in search of new paths to fulfilling their ambitions. Today, the main theme of Brad’s artwork is altering public spaces from the inside. The artist tries to engage viewers in a dialogue about what is around them, and he tries to get across the idea that you can change public space with your own hands. The artist often breaks pavement slabs and sets them up like houses of cards, or bends road signs. Brad believes that cities are full of signs and symbols that not only determine the direction of traffic, but also dictate general human behaviour, and so the artist tries to introduce a bit of chaos into urban stereotypes.2 Brad’s works are absurd, sometimes surreal, collages that are always provocative and ironic. He makes what he calls “spontaneous sculptures”. In 2011, his book of the same name came out, in which he collated the best examples of his street art pieces. Brad has taken part in dozens of exhibitions, both solo and group, and he is particularly highly regarded in Germany, where his latest sculpture exhibition was held. Last year he delivered a series of lectures and workshops at the fifth Delai Sam (Do-it-Yourself) marathon in Moscow.

Igor Ponosov was born in Nizhnevartovsk in 1980. After finishing school, he moved to Krasnodar Territory and then to Kiev, where he started his activities as a graffiti artist. He has lived and worked in Moscow since 2003. Igor is a radio electronics engineer by training. Like most street artists, Igor started off with lettering, but he moved on fairly quickly to other forms of artistic expression. At first the artist was attracted to eight-bit painting and performance art, but later he moved on to three-dimensional suprematist installations and street conceptualism.3 Currently, much of his creative work is devoted to interpreting urban space and countering the canons of consumer culture. The artist also ponders graffiti culture, specifically its de facto death and transition to the commercial realm. Over the past ten years, Igor has initiated and curated many projects, including the retrospective Street Art Chronology: 2005–2008, which took place at the M’ARS gallery, and the Walls project, which Igor launched in cooperation with Kirill KTO in 2010 at Winzavod. A year later, Igor Ponosov and some like-minded colleagues launched the Partizaning website, dedicated to projects altering the urban space and breaking up everyday reality and social communications. Between 2005 and 2009, Igor published his book series Objects: three books about the development of street art in Russia, which ended with a symbolic declaration by the author: “Russian street art is dead.”

1

http://partizaning.org/?p=374 (interview in Russian)

3

http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Поносов,_Игорь_Геннадьевич (Russian only)

2

http://foxback.com/kreativ/ulichnye-revolyutsii-s-elementami-ulits-ot-breda-dauni (Russian only)

4

http://eng.partizaning.org/?page_id=2

Moscow, Russia

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Brad Downey Artist, sculptor

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Igor Ponosov Berlin, Germany

Street artist, curator, writer, and cofounder of the Partizaning project

American artist Brad Downey was born in 1980 in Louisville, Kentucky. He has been drawing since childhood, when he also fell in love with skateboarding.1 It was skateboarding, the artist says, that expanded his consciousness and forced him to think differently about the objects around him and their intended use. In 2005, he graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art in London, after studying art at the Pratt Institute in New York City. Brad gained fame in large part thanks to a five-year collaboration with street artist Leon Reid IV, also known as VERBS. Together, they worked on the so-called “switcharoo”, putting up paintings where they should not be. In 2004, the artists parted ways in search of new paths to fulfilling their ambitions. Today, the main theme of Brad’s artwork is altering public spaces from the inside. The artist tries to engage viewers in a dialogue about what is around them, and he tries to get across the idea that you can change public space with your own hands. The artist often breaks pavement slabs and sets them up like houses of cards, or bends road signs. Brad believes that cities are full of signs and symbols that not only determine the direction of traffic, but also dictate general human behaviour, and so the artist tries to introduce a bit of chaos into urban stereotypes.2 Brad’s works are absurd, sometimes surreal, collages that are always provocative and ironic. He makes what he calls “spontaneous sculptures”. In 2011, his book of the same name came out, in which he collated the best examples of his street art pieces. Brad has taken part in dozens of exhibitions, both solo and group, and he is particularly highly regarded in Germany, where his latest sculpture exhibition was held. Last year he delivered a series of lectures and workshops at the fifth Delai Sam (Do-it-Yourself) marathon in Moscow.

Igor Ponosov was born in Nizhnevartovsk in 1980. After finishing school, he moved to Krasnodar Territory and then to Kiev, where he started his activities as a graffiti artist. He has lived and worked in Moscow since 2003. Igor is a radio electronics engineer by training. Like most street artists, Igor started off with lettering, but he moved on fairly quickly to other forms of artistic expression. At first the artist was attracted to eight-bit painting and performance art, but later he moved on to three-dimensional suprematist installations and street conceptualism.3 Currently, much of his creative work is devoted to interpreting urban space and countering the canons of consumer culture. The artist also ponders graffiti culture, specifically its de facto death and transition to the commercial realm. Over the past ten years, Igor has initiated and curated many projects, including the retrospective Street Art Chronology: 2005–2008, which took place at the M’ARS gallery, and the Walls project, which Igor launched in cooperation with Kirill KTO in 2010 at Winzavod. A year later, Igor Ponosov and some like-minded colleagues launched the Partizaning website, dedicated to projects altering the urban space and breaking up everyday reality and social communications. Between 2005 and 2009, Igor published his book series Objects: three books about the development of street art in Russia, which ended with a symbolic declaration by the author: “Russian street art is dead.”

1

http://partizaning.org/?p=374 (interview in Russian)

3

http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Поносов,_Игорь_Геннадьевич (Russian only)

2

http://foxback.com/kreativ/ulichnye-revolyutsii-s-elementami-ulits-ot-breda-dauni (Russian only)

4

http://eng.partizaning.org/?page_id=2

Moscow, Russia

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Mobile Workshop 2014 Installation, mixed media

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American artist Brad Downing and Russian artist Igor Ponosov met two years ago. They decided to create their Mobile Workshop for travelling when Igor showed Brad photographs of the Ukrainian Carpathians. The tent is made from advertising banners that they cut down from streets in Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and Russia. This convenient artist’s workplace is easily assembled and, when disassembled, takes up no more space than two backpacks. In the future, the artists plan to work in a studio like this as they travel the world. The first stop on their journey is St. Peterburg’s Palace Square, after which they plan to head towards the Carpathian Mountains, part of which are located in Ukraine, where the artists, as representatives of two “land-grabbing” empires, will enjoy the beauty of the country, which today lies hidden beneath the ceaseless media maelstrom surrounding the military and political conflicts there.

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Mobile Workshop 2014 Installation, mixed media

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American artist Brad Downing and Russian artist Igor Ponosov met two years ago. They decided to create their Mobile Workshop for travelling when Igor showed Brad photographs of the Ukrainian Carpathians. The tent is made from advertising banners that they cut down from streets in Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Germany, and Russia. This convenient artist’s workplace is easily assembled and, when disassembled, takes up no more space than two backpacks. In the future, the artists plan to work in a studio like this as they travel the world. The first stop on their journey is St. Peterburg’s Palace Square, after which they plan to head towards the Carpathian Mountains, part of which are located in Ukraine, where the artists, as representatives of two “land-grabbing” empires, will enjoy the beauty of the country, which today lies hidden beneath the ceaseless media maelstrom surrounding the military and political conflicts there.

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Escif World-famous Spanish street artist

it doesn’t matter whether he has light or dark hair, or whether Escif is the project of a single artist, a group of artists, or your mother’s hairdresser. 78

Valencia, Spain Escif first made his mark as a street artist in 1997. His works, featuring bright, graphic characters, are often encountered on the streets of Spanish cities. Escif keeps his identity secret, declaring on his official website that “it doesn’t matter whether he has light or dark hair, or whether Escif is the project of a single artist, a group of artists, or your mother’s hairdresser.” The only important thing is that he works on the street. Escif’s compositions merge primitivist influences with symbolist ones. He calls Pablo Picasso his favourite artist and his ideational inspiration. A recognizably minimalist method of execution and dark humour are characteristic of Escif’s graffiti. His works are distinguished by the simplicity of the images and the use of colours that blend in with the surrounding environment. The images are accompanied by one line of text. All of these features have become the calling card of this artist, who is now known the world over. As a rule, Escif’s works address topical themes. The artist says that the market, advertising, and politics have monopolized street space and turned it against the people. He considers it his goal to resist this, and to do things to make public spaces serve the people. Nevertheless, Escif is not fond of manifestos and has no intention of imposing his ideas on anyone. Still, all of his works demand attention and make you think. Escif has to his credit participation in many well-known street art festivals, including Open Walls Baltimore 2 (USA), Katowice Street Art Festival (Poland), Festival LGZ (Moscow), Fame Festival (Italy), and Montreal’s First Mural Festival (Canada), as well as several solo exhibitions (Barcelona, London, and San Francisco).

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Escif World-famous Spanish street artist

it doesn’t matter whether he has light or dark hair, or whether Escif is the project of a single artist, a group of artists, or your mother’s hairdresser. 78

Valencia, Spain Escif first made his mark as a street artist in 1997. His works, featuring bright, graphic characters, are often encountered on the streets of Spanish cities. Escif keeps his identity secret, declaring on his official website that “it doesn’t matter whether he has light or dark hair, or whether Escif is the project of a single artist, a group of artists, or your mother’s hairdresser.” The only important thing is that he works on the street. Escif’s compositions merge primitivist influences with symbolist ones. He calls Pablo Picasso his favourite artist and his ideational inspiration. A recognizably minimalist method of execution and dark humour are characteristic of Escif’s graffiti. His works are distinguished by the simplicity of the images and the use of colours that blend in with the surrounding environment. The images are accompanied by one line of text. All of these features have become the calling card of this artist, who is now known the world over. As a rule, Escif’s works address topical themes. The artist says that the market, advertising, and politics have monopolized street space and turned it against the people. He considers it his goal to resist this, and to do things to make public spaces serve the people. Nevertheless, Escif is not fond of manifestos and has no intention of imposing his ideas on anyone. Still, all of his works demand attention and make you think. Escif has to his credit participation in many well-known street art festivals, including Open Walls Baltimore 2 (USA), Katowice Street Art Festival (Poland), Festival LGZ (Moscow), Fame Festival (Italy), and Montreal’s First Mural Festival (Canada), as well as several solo exhibitions (Barcelona, London, and San Francisco).

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War 2014 Acrylic. 3500 Ń… 1200 cm

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For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist has created a massive mural entitled War, which depicts hands holding champagne glasses. The artist intends for this image to prod the viewer to think about the methods by which any war is waged and who actually benefits. The work is open-ended, and the viewer can decide himself whose hands these are – allies or enemies – and what they are celebrating. The

artist says that the glasses actually contain not wine, but the blood of innocent people who have perished in war. At the Casus Pacis exhibition, Escif was very impressed with the performance group Tajiks-art, who distilled alcohol from the blood of Russians and Ukrainians. The Spanish artist recognized that the name of the piece, My Blood is Your Wine, also reflects the meaning of his work.

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War 2014 Acrylic. 3500 Ń… 1200 cm

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For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist has created a massive mural entitled War, which depicts hands holding champagne glasses. The artist intends for this image to prod the viewer to think about the methods by which any war is waged and who actually benefits. The work is open-ended, and the viewer can decide himself whose hands these are – allies or enemies – and what they are celebrating. The

artist says that the glasses actually contain not wine, but the blood of innocent people who have perished in war. At the Casus Pacis exhibition, Escif was very impressed with the performance group Tajiks-art, who distilled alcohol from the blood of Russians and Ukrainians. The Spanish artist recognized that the name of the piece, My Blood is Your Wine, also reflects the meaning of his work.

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Black Belt

Economical Measures

MĐ°n with Tank

2014 Watercolor on paper. 23 x 32.5 cm

2014 Watercolor on paper. 32.5 Ń… 46 cm

2014 Watercolor on paper. 32.5 x 46 cm

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Black Belt

Economical Measures

MĐ°n with Tank

2014 Watercolor on paper. 23 x 32.5 cm

2014 Watercolor on paper. 32.5 Ń… 46 cm

2014 Watercolor on paper. 32.5 x 46 cm

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Dima Fatum Street artist

pure expression, splashed over the surface with no confusion, doubts, or prolonged reflection.

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Kiev, Ukraine Dima Fatum was born and raised in Kiev, where he completed his secondary education at a specialist art school. He tired of painting on canvas before he even finished his studies. His internal conflict was resolved when his art moved out onto the city streets. Whether it was to test fate or to find himself, Dima moved to Italy and, without a kopeck to his name, went to live where his work was – on the streets. In the finest tradition of the poor intellectual émigré, he scraped a living in Europe as he could, unloading trucks, doing construction work, painting portraits on the beach, and painting church walls. He was lucky enough to meet some gallery owners, earn a bit of money, and return to his homeland. A year with a spray can in his hands brought him a multitude of new impressions, so he did not want to stay long in the familiarity of Kiev. Dima therefore left for the Russian Far East, where he worked as a lumberjack and studied urban design. After returning to Kiev, Dima became actively involved in exhibitions and projects. One of Fatum’s latest exhibitions took place in Odessa and was called Fried Kittens. It was an attempt to attract attention to the issue of food culture and the stranglehold of fast food. In 2014, Dima participated in the Out of Wall project, curated by Volt Agapeyev, who is also taking part in the Casus Pacis exhibition in St. Petersburg. “This is pure expression, splashed over the surface with no confusion, doubts, or prolonged reflection. These are wild, impulsive, careless paintings based on serious subjects with combinations of colours and textures”, Volt says, describing Out of Wall. Together with his Enjoy the City crew, Fatum is squatting in a garage-based cooperative, where they conduct workshops, open-air events, and exhibitions. He is also a member of the Kievbased F315 graffiti crew.

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Dima Fatum Street artist

pure expression, splashed over the surface with no confusion, doubts, or prolonged reflection.

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Kiev, Ukraine Dima Fatum was born and raised in Kiev, where he completed his secondary education at a specialist art school. He tired of painting on canvas before he even finished his studies. His internal conflict was resolved when his art moved out onto the city streets. Whether it was to test fate or to find himself, Dima moved to Italy and, without a kopeck to his name, went to live where his work was – on the streets. In the finest tradition of the poor intellectual émigré, he scraped a living in Europe as he could, unloading trucks, doing construction work, painting portraits on the beach, and painting church walls. He was lucky enough to meet some gallery owners, earn a bit of money, and return to his homeland. A year with a spray can in his hands brought him a multitude of new impressions, so he did not want to stay long in the familiarity of Kiev. Dima therefore left for the Russian Far East, where he worked as a lumberjack and studied urban design. After returning to Kiev, Dima became actively involved in exhibitions and projects. One of Fatum’s latest exhibitions took place in Odessa and was called Fried Kittens. It was an attempt to attract attention to the issue of food culture and the stranglehold of fast food. In 2014, Dima participated in the Out of Wall project, curated by Volt Agapeyev, who is also taking part in the Casus Pacis exhibition in St. Petersburg. “This is pure expression, splashed over the surface with no confusion, doubts, or prolonged reflection. These are wild, impulsive, careless paintings based on serious subjects with combinations of colours and textures”, Volt says, describing Out of Wall. Together with his Enjoy the City crew, Fatum is squatting in a garage-based cooperative, where they conduct workshops, open-air events, and exhibitions. He is also a member of the Kievbased F315 graffiti crew.

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13.06, 18.02, 25.05, 2008 (from left to right)

2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 300 Ń… 600 cm (each one)

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For the exhibition, Fatum provided several small drawings and several murals, named after dates – the first is 13.06, the second 18.02, the third is 25.05, the fourth is 2008, the fifth is 2009, the sixth is 14.7, and the seventh is 2017. The artist depicts a dark blue abstraction with vaguely recognizable outlines, leaving the viewer with the opportunity

to ponder their own thoughts. Visible here are brick walls and hills of barricades, and in the barbed wire is the word REVOLUTION, people, and roofs of buildings. According to the artist, the works are dedicated to recent events in Ukraine, including the joining of Crimea to Russia. Fatum calls it an annexation, and believes that it was unlawful.

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13.06, 18.02, 25.05, 2008 (from left to right)

2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 300 Ń… 600 cm (each one)

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For the exhibition, Fatum provided several small drawings and several murals, named after dates – the first is 13.06, the second 18.02, the third is 25.05, the fourth is 2008, the fifth is 2009, the sixth is 14.7, and the seventh is 2017. The artist depicts a dark blue abstraction with vaguely recognizable outlines, leaving the viewer with the opportunity

to ponder their own thoughts. Visible here are brick walls and hills of barricades, and in the barbed wire is the word REVOLUTION, people, and roofs of buildings. According to the artist, the works are dedicated to recent events in Ukraine, including the joining of Crimea to Russia. Fatum calls it an annexation, and believes that it was unlawful.

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2009, 14, 2017 (from left to right)

2014 Acrilic, aerosol. 300 Ń… 600 cm (each one)

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2009, 14, 2017 (from left to right)

2014 Acrilic, aerosol. 300 Ń… 600 cm (each one)

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untitled 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 21 х 29 cm

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Untitled 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 21 х 29 cm

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untitled 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 21 х 29 cm

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Untitled 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 21 х 29 cm

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Gandhi A primarily female group of anonymous artists, famous for its socially-oriented works

most people unthinkingly trust words written in black in a plain, clear font.

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St. Petersburg, Russia The Gandhi group first appeared in Omsk, and its composition changes from project to project. Among the group’s members are teachers and students, designers and architects, directors and lawyers. Mostly, they are people who grew up in provincial cities “on chewing gum and television”, people who did art, and in the autumn of 2011, they came out on the streets. Noting that most people unthinkingly trust words written in black in a plain, clear font, Gandhi decided to take advantage of that. Their first stencil project was a subtle criticism of the Omsk Region governor, rumoured to be thoroughly corrupt: the city centre was covered with signs reading “Polezhayev is sexual.” Six months later, a new, better-known project was born, with a Buddhist tinge, declaring “Putin is an illusion.” A bit later, the founders of the team moved to different cities, some to St. Petersburg, some to Krasnoyarsk. As time goes on, the team’s work is being talked about more frequently. That was the case with the Migrants series, which demonstrated the simplicity, restraint, and diligent work ethic of Tajik women. It was also the case with the project entitled The Lights Stay On in This House, in which the artists placed memorial plaques to ordinary people on several apartment buildings, describing their daily lives. And it was the case with the work Vova, I’m Leaving You, a laconic depiction of Ukraine in the flames of crisis. Team members admit that street art is violence, but it is much less harmful and free from pain, compared with contemporary politics. Meanwhile, Gandhi is even trying to minimize the existing damage done by their street art, which they are now happy to admit was vandalism. They are organically blending their compositions into the surrounding space, planning a way for them to coexist with the urban environment. The team occasionally participates in exhibitions and festivals. Some recent examples have included the Signal project at the Contour Loft in St. Petersburg and the exhibition Feminist Pencil – 2.

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Gandhi A primarily female group of anonymous artists, famous for its socially-oriented works

most people unthinkingly trust words written in black in a plain, clear font.

92

St. Petersburg, Russia The Gandhi group first appeared in Omsk, and its composition changes from project to project. Among the group’s members are teachers and students, designers and architects, directors and lawyers. Mostly, they are people who grew up in provincial cities “on chewing gum and television”, people who did art, and in the autumn of 2011, they came out on the streets. Noting that most people unthinkingly trust words written in black in a plain, clear font, Gandhi decided to take advantage of that. Their first stencil project was a subtle criticism of the Omsk Region governor, rumoured to be thoroughly corrupt: the city centre was covered with signs reading “Polezhayev is sexual.” Six months later, a new, better-known project was born, with a Buddhist tinge, declaring “Putin is an illusion.” A bit later, the founders of the team moved to different cities, some to St. Petersburg, some to Krasnoyarsk. As time goes on, the team’s work is being talked about more frequently. That was the case with the Migrants series, which demonstrated the simplicity, restraint, and diligent work ethic of Tajik women. It was also the case with the project entitled The Lights Stay On in This House, in which the artists placed memorial plaques to ordinary people on several apartment buildings, describing their daily lives. And it was the case with the work Vova, I’m Leaving You, a laconic depiction of Ukraine in the flames of crisis. Team members admit that street art is violence, but it is much less harmful and free from pain, compared with contemporary politics. Meanwhile, Gandhi is even trying to minimize the existing damage done by their street art, which they are now happy to admit was vandalism. They are organically blending their compositions into the surrounding space, planning a way for them to coexist with the urban environment. The team occasionally participates in exhibitions and festivals. Some recent examples have included the Signal project at the Contour Loft in St. Petersburg and the exhibition Feminist Pencil – 2.

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The Women will Give Birth to New Ones 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 300 Ń… 700 cm In creating their work for the Casus Pacis exhibition, the girls on the Gandhi team were inspired by one of the slogans from the feminist group at the 1 May demonstrations. This is a story inspired by an undeclared war that is being permanently waged on the foreign and domestic fronts, the story of women who bear children so that they, once grown, can march off to the next war. This is the story of a choice that a woman has and that her potential child does not.

W h a t c h o i c e d o wo m e n h a ve w h e n t he y s e e t h a t t h e i r c h i l d r e n a r e b e i n g d e n i e d a choi ce ? E i t h e r t h e y st o p h a v i n g c h i l d r e n o r the y wag e b a t t l e . O u r h e r o i n e i s a wo m a n w i t h a Mol otov c o c k t a i l , i n si d e o f w h o m a b a b y so l di e r i s g l o w i n g , f a t e d t o f i g h t f o r t h e sa k e of the m o n e y a n d p o we r o f p e o p l e h e d o e s not know. S h e c h o se r e b e l l i o n , u n d e r st a n d i n g that i f s he f a i l s, h e r c h i l d w i l l g o a f t e r h e r h i m s e l f wi th we a p o n s o n e d a y .

— G and hi

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The Women will Give Birth to New Ones 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 300 Ń… 700 cm In creating their work for the Casus Pacis exhibition, the girls on the Gandhi team were inspired by one of the slogans from the feminist group at the 1 May demonstrations. This is a story inspired by an undeclared war that is being permanently waged on the foreign and domestic fronts, the story of women who bear children so that they, once grown, can march off to the next war. This is the story of a choice that a woman has and that her potential child does not.

W h a t c h o i c e d o wo m e n h a ve w h e n t he y s e e t h a t t h e i r c h i l d r e n a r e b e i n g d e n i e d a choi ce ? E i t h e r t h e y st o p h a v i n g c h i l d r e n o r the y wag e b a t t l e . O u r h e r o i n e i s a wo m a n w i t h a Mol otov c o c k t a i l , i n si d e o f w h o m a b a b y so l di e r i s g l o w i n g , f a t e d t o f i g h t f o r t h e sa k e of the m o n e y a n d p o we r o f p e o p l e h e d o e s not know. S h e c h o se r e b e l l i o n , u n d e r st a n d i n g that i f s he f a i l s, h e r c h i l d w i l l g o a f t e r h e r h i m s e l f wi th we a p o n s o n e d a y .

— G and hi

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Ilya Gaponov Artist and easel painter

T he i mporta nt thi ng fo r m e is in t e r n a l e n er gy and ha rmony. I spen t a l a r ge p a r t o f m y l ife in a r eg i on wher e the wo r k o f a m in e r t o o k on some of the cha ra ct e r is t ics o f a r el igio us cu lt. My whole envi r o n m e n t – m in e r s , bo il er s , a ha r sh cli ma te – le d m e t o cr e a t e a kin d o f inter na l mytholog y o f Kuzba s s R e gio n a n d t h e ima g e of a person c o m in g fr o m t h e co a l fa ce.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Ilya was born in 1981 in Kemerovo, in the north of Kuzbass Region. He completed his studies at school and at art college there. Ilya says that he first began to paint consciously just after completing secondary school, when he enrolled in college and fell in with a group of likeminded people. At the age of 19, he began painting churches and mosaics and after finishing college, planned to study icon painting. In the end, though, he moved to St. Petersburg and entered the Department of Monumental Art at the Alexander von Stieglitz St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy. Having won a scholarship, he set off to study in France, and in 2004 successfully graduated from the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, completing his studies at the St. Petersburg Academy in 2007. After his studies, monumental art began to play a significant role in his life and work. He later returned to religious themes. Together with Kirill Koteshov, the artist created a series of works devoted to the last days of Christ. Ilya has repeatedly turned to gospel themes, and his work with Koteshov, Iconostasis, is considered by many as the culmination of this theme, and featured in the Icons exhibition at the Marat Guelman Gallery. The second important cycle in the artist’s work is largely a reinterpretation of the legacy of socialist realism. In 2007, Ilya organized an open art workshop together with friends. They called it “Unconquered” after the street on which their studios were based, though this was not the only reason behind the name. Ilya has maintained that working together with his colleagues is an extremely useful exercise, and that “interaction always enriches the result.” He was recently able to carry out a joint project with the French artist Sebastien Thomazo. Street art in the strictest sense of the word is something that Gaponov engages in less frequently. He does often work on special projects such as Summer in New Holland in St. Petersburg and the White Nights festival in Perm. He is first and foremost an easel painter. He uses bitumen and coal in his art, preferring to work in sweeping brush strokes on large canvases, creating dramatic paintings.

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Ilya Gaponov Artist and easel painter

T he i mporta nt thi ng fo r m e is in t e r n a l e n er gy and ha rmony. I spen t a l a r ge p a r t o f m y l ife in a r eg i on wher e the wo r k o f a m in e r t o o k on some of the cha ra ct e r is t ics o f a r el igio us cu lt. My whole envi r o n m e n t – m in e r s , bo il er s , a ha r sh cli ma te – le d m e t o cr e a t e a kin d o f inter na l mytholog y o f Kuzba s s R e gio n a n d t h e ima g e of a person c o m in g fr o m t h e co a l fa ce.

96

St. Petersburg, Russia Ilya was born in 1981 in Kemerovo, in the north of Kuzbass Region. He completed his studies at school and at art college there. Ilya says that he first began to paint consciously just after completing secondary school, when he enrolled in college and fell in with a group of likeminded people. At the age of 19, he began painting churches and mosaics and after finishing college, planned to study icon painting. In the end, though, he moved to St. Petersburg and entered the Department of Monumental Art at the Alexander von Stieglitz St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy. Having won a scholarship, he set off to study in France, and in 2004 successfully graduated from the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, completing his studies at the St. Petersburg Academy in 2007. After his studies, monumental art began to play a significant role in his life and work. He later returned to religious themes. Together with Kirill Koteshov, the artist created a series of works devoted to the last days of Christ. Ilya has repeatedly turned to gospel themes, and his work with Koteshov, Iconostasis, is considered by many as the culmination of this theme, and featured in the Icons exhibition at the Marat Guelman Gallery. The second important cycle in the artist’s work is largely a reinterpretation of the legacy of socialist realism. In 2007, Ilya organized an open art workshop together with friends. They called it “Unconquered” after the street on which their studios were based, though this was not the only reason behind the name. Ilya has maintained that working together with his colleagues is an extremely useful exercise, and that “interaction always enriches the result.” He was recently able to carry out a joint project with the French artist Sebastien Thomazo. Street art in the strictest sense of the word is something that Gaponov engages in less frequently. He does often work on special projects such as Summer in New Holland in St. Petersburg and the White Nights festival in Perm. He is first and foremost an easel painter. He uses bitumen and coal in his art, preferring to work in sweeping brush strokes on large canvases, creating dramatic paintings.

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Category 5 2014 Canvas, acrylic, mixed media. 300 х 300 cm

“No political, religious, or other kind of dispute can be solved by violence – this can be understood by seeing things through the clear eyes of a child.” The artist uses this idea in the heading of his work, trying to explain succinctly why the murder of one person by another is unacceptable. A child’s portrait is executed on waffle towels, traditionally used during funeral rites. The work was made with bituminous varnish, produced from oil – one of the biggest factors in modern wars. Already the portrait looks faded. Leading up to it is a long, charred ladder, which nobody would be able to use to climb anywhere. The name of the work relates to the classification system for fires. Category five is applied to the most serious fires which cover the largest area. The artist appears to bring his viewers through the ashes, forcing them to look at once towards a world built among the debris, a world without morality or ethics, only profit and pragmatism. Underpinning this view is the understanding of a child – the bearer of purity and sincerity.

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Category 5 2014 Canvas, acrylic, mixed media. 300 х 300 cm

“No political, religious, or other kind of dispute can be solved by violence – this can be understood by seeing things through the clear eyes of a child.” The artist uses this idea in the heading of his work, trying to explain succinctly why the murder of one person by another is unacceptable. A child’s portrait is executed on waffle towels, traditionally used during funeral rites. The work was made with bituminous varnish, produced from oil – one of the biggest factors in modern wars. Already the portrait looks faded. Leading up to it is a long, charred ladder, which nobody would be able to use to climb anywhere. The name of the work relates to the classification system for fires. Category five is applied to the most serious fires which cover the largest area. The artist appears to bring his viewers through the ashes, forcing them to look at once towards a world built among the debris, a world without morality or ethics, only profit and pragmatism. Underpinning this view is the understanding of a child – the bearer of purity and sincerity.

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Egor Give Street artist

If there is a way to find peace and harmony within the self, then there can also be a motive for world peace.

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Moscow, Russia

Egor Give was born in 1986 in Moscow. He began to draw seriously at the age of 24, while also taking an interest in photography. He has been a member of various groups during his career, including MOW (an anonymous collective of graffiti artists from different crews, who have taken their place at the forefront of the creative process), RNG (famous for large-scale tags and highly detailed video journals) and Zachem (“For What”), one of the first and best known graffiti collectives. However, he does not speak publicly about his involvement in these legendary crews. The artist defines his style as post-street art, or neograffiti, and describes the theme of his work as contemporary human behaviour. Egor draws simple fonts and characters, and claims that his work is always filled with irony and sarcasm. He draws his inspiration from naïve art, primitivism, and minimalism. He took part in the Eyes of Moscow exhibition at the Lebenson Gallery in Paris (2014), and Format One: Changes at Moscow’s ARTPLAY Design Centre (2014). Egor works primarily in Moscow, but his solo works as well as those by the crews he is involved with can be found on the streets of London, Odessa, Tel Aviv, Stockholm, and other cities. Egor’s photography has never been exhibited before, but the first collection to be published appeared in a 2013 edition of The Village as part of a project devoted to photographs of Moscow by unknown artists.

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Egor Give Street artist

If there is a way to find peace and harmony within the self, then there can also be a motive for world peace.

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Moscow, Russia

Egor Give was born in 1986 in Moscow. He began to draw seriously at the age of 24, while also taking an interest in photography. He has been a member of various groups during his career, including MOW (an anonymous collective of graffiti artists from different crews, who have taken their place at the forefront of the creative process), RNG (famous for large-scale tags and highly detailed video journals) and Zachem (“For What”), one of the first and best known graffiti collectives. However, he does not speak publicly about his involvement in these legendary crews. The artist defines his style as post-street art, or neograffiti, and describes the theme of his work as contemporary human behaviour. Egor draws simple fonts and characters, and claims that his work is always filled with irony and sarcasm. He draws his inspiration from naïve art, primitivism, and minimalism. He took part in the Eyes of Moscow exhibition at the Lebenson Gallery in Paris (2014), and Format One: Changes at Moscow’s ARTPLAY Design Centre (2014). Egor works primarily in Moscow, but his solo works as well as those by the crews he is involved with can be found on the streets of London, Odessa, Tel Aviv, Stockholm, and other cities. Egor’s photography has never been exhibited before, but the first collection to be published appeared in a 2013 edition of The Village as part of a project devoted to photographs of Moscow by unknown artists.

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World Map 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. Wall 300 х 600 cm. Canvas 120 х 100 cm

The work consists of two interrelated parts, produced using various techniques. On one of the walls, the artist has drawn two fighting doves, with several of their fellow creatures flying around them. Next to the wall is a canvas depicting a raven, gazing on in wonder at the doves. The concept comes from this year’s January meeting at the Vatican, where doves released by the Pope in the name of peace in Ukraine were attacked by a crow, an event interpreted by the public as a highly foreboding sign. “The fighting peace doves symbolize the fact that there is no such thing as world peace, however absurd the contradiction may at first appear. Even if there are no shells exploding and no specific military actions taking place, this does not necessarily mean that there is no war. If you take a look at all the events occurring around any one person you can pick out many negative information and psychological effects (of wars), and it can be concluded from this that the situation in the world today is far from peaceful. There is another confrontation – war with oneself. In my opinion, it is the lack of inner peace which in part contributes to wars between people. If it turns out that there is a way to find peace and harmony within the self, then there can also be a motive for world peace”, the artist says.

the lack of inner peace contributes to wars between people. 102

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World Map 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. Wall 300 х 600 cm. Canvas 120 х 100 cm

The work consists of two interrelated parts, produced using various techniques. On one of the walls, the artist has drawn two fighting doves, with several of their fellow creatures flying around them. Next to the wall is a canvas depicting a raven, gazing on in wonder at the doves. The concept comes from this year’s January meeting at the Vatican, where doves released by the Pope in the name of peace in Ukraine were attacked by a crow, an event interpreted by the public as a highly foreboding sign. “The fighting peace doves symbolize the fact that there is no such thing as world peace, however absurd the contradiction may at first appear. Even if there are no shells exploding and no specific military actions taking place, this does not necessarily mean that there is no war. If you take a look at all the events occurring around any one person you can pick out many negative information and psychological effects (of wars), and it can be concluded from this that the situation in the world today is far from peaceful. There is another confrontation – war with oneself. In my opinion, it is the lack of inner peace which in part contributes to wars between people. If it turns out that there is a way to find peace and harmony within the self, then there can also be a motive for world peace”, the artist says.

the lack of inner peace contributes to wars between people. 102

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Donatas Grudovich Actor, director, and performance artist, ideologue of the Partisan Theatre anonymity commune and the partisan art movement

Peace may only exist in your mind, if you are capable of that. But as it is, it is a daily war with reality, with your own self, and with those around you.

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Moscow, Russia Born in 1983, graduated from the Directing Faculty of the Russian University of Theatre Arts (GITIS) in 2004. Lives and works in Moscow. Grudovich has appeared in films under the screen name Artyom Spichkin, and performed in contemporary topical stage productions at theatres such as Praktika, Teatr.doc, and Fabrika. He has directed at Kirill Serebrennikov’s Gogol Centre and the Meyerhold Centre. However, Grudovich says he has “always been disdainful of theatre and cinematography, because it is all lies and doesn’t match reality.” In 2010, Grudovich organized an art commune in the deserted Narkomfin building. All the residents work on creating performance art and unauthorized public demonstrations. The commune promotes new principles of futurism and relevant art in society. Donatas believes that “performance art lends a sense of genuine reality which can be twisted, modulating the angle of perception”, and for this reason the artist is currently focusing on this type of art. The Partisan Theatre project is popular not just in Russia, but in Europe too, with frequent performances in Germany.

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Donatas Grudovich Actor, director, and performance artist, ideologue of the Partisan Theatre anonymity commune and the partisan art movement

Peace may only exist in your mind, if you are capable of that. But as it is, it is a daily war with reality, with your own self, and with those around you.

104

Moscow, Russia Born in 1983, graduated from the Directing Faculty of the Russian University of Theatre Arts (GITIS) in 2004. Lives and works in Moscow. Grudovich has appeared in films under the screen name Artyom Spichkin, and performed in contemporary topical stage productions at theatres such as Praktika, Teatr.doc, and Fabrika. He has directed at Kirill Serebrennikov’s Gogol Centre and the Meyerhold Centre. However, Grudovich says he has “always been disdainful of theatre and cinematography, because it is all lies and doesn’t match reality.” In 2010, Grudovich organized an art commune in the deserted Narkomfin building. All the residents work on creating performance art and unauthorized public demonstrations. The commune promotes new principles of futurism and relevant art in society. Donatas believes that “performance art lends a sense of genuine reality which can be twisted, modulating the angle of perception”, and for this reason the artist is currently focusing on this type of art. The Partisan Theatre project is popular not just in Russia, but in Europe too, with frequent performances in Germany.

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Mirror Demonstration 2014 Performance

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At the opening of the Casus Pacis exhibition, Donatas Grudovich presented three performance pieces. Mirror Demonstration was first performed on the opening day of Occupy Abai in May 2012. Participants marched through the grounds of the Street Art Museum holding mirrors instead of political posters and slogans.

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Mirror Demonstration 2014 Performance

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At the opening of the Casus Pacis exhibition, Donatas Grudovich presented three performance pieces. Mirror Demonstration was first performed on the opening day of Occupy Abai in May 2012. Participants marched through the grounds of the Street Art Museum holding mirrors instead of political posters and slogans.

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Make Salo Not War 2014 Performance

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The Make Salo Not War project is based on YouTube videos and Dostoyevsky’s Demons, and marks the start of military action in Ukraine and a possible World War III. Participants in the performance made unusual masks out of several kilos of salo (pork fat) and cows’ hooves.

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Make Salo Not War 2014 Performance

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The Make Salo Not War project is based on YouTube videos and Dostoyevsky’s Demons, and marks the start of military action in Ukraine and a possible World War III. Participants in the performance made unusual masks out of several kilos of salo (pork fat) and cows’ hooves.

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Sweet Police 2014 Performance

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Sweet Police is based on the renaming of the militia as the police. During this performance, at the opening of the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist wore police uniform and sold ice cream from a cooler labelled “Police� to all-comers.

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Sweet Police 2014 Performance

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Sweet Police is based on the renaming of the militia as the police. During this performance, at the opening of the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist wore police uniform and sold ice cream from a cooler labelled “Police� to all-comers.

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Maxim Ima Street artist, painter, curator

What pushes me towards creativity is the mediocrity and mindlessness of others.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Maxim Ima was born in Leningrad in 1987 and became interested in graffiti in 2003, when hiphop culture was riding a wave of popularity. In 2007, Maxim graduated from the Department of Journalism at the St. Petersburg Institute of Business and Policy. It was then that the artist produced his first painting on canvas. He only moonlights as a writer, generating pieces such as reviews of exhibitions. A year after graduating, he held his first solo exhibition, Wholetrain. In 2009, he began working as the assistant curator at the Protvor exhibition space in St. Petersburg, working with street artists from Russia and Europe. His work there prompted the artist to create the series Dialogues on Art and Street Art,1 which he himself regards as one of his most interesting projects. It is a compendium of the humorous and absurd statements made about contemporary art, its meaninglessness and commercialization by artists, curators, and random people which Maxim overheard while working at Protvor. “Street art is, for me, a reaction to the surrounding world”, says Maxim. He likens his style to automatic writing, as did the surrealists in their day. As the artist himself admits, this means that once a work is started, he has no knowledge of what the end result will be.2 Maxim’s pieces are filled with symbolism. Many of his subjects, for example, have closed eyes – nowadays people are permanently tired: work, school, life, interacting with each other, the Internet... Quite often Maxim, feeling that his drawings are somehow connected with his personal life, works his year of birth – the number 87 – into his pieces, thereby creating a kind of anecdotal, abstract self-portrait. Maxim has taken part in exhibitions at Loft Project ETAGI, the Protvor exhibition space, the PERMM Museum and the Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art; the 2013 Art-Stena Street Art Festival at the Sergey Kuryokhin Contemporary Arts Centre; and the Cultural Capital Festival in Izhevsk. “What pushes me towards creativity is the mediocrity and mindlessness of others”, says Maxim. “I generally prefer the classical forms of art over all these ‘performances’, ‘installations’, and the like.”

1

http://partizaning.org/?p=8732(Russian only)

2

http://hopeforfreedom.ru/ru/blog/post/12(Russian only)

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Maxim Ima Street artist, painter, curator

What pushes me towards creativity is the mediocrity and mindlessness of others.

112

St. Petersburg, Russia Maxim Ima was born in Leningrad in 1987 and became interested in graffiti in 2003, when hiphop culture was riding a wave of popularity. In 2007, Maxim graduated from the Department of Journalism at the St. Petersburg Institute of Business and Policy. It was then that the artist produced his first painting on canvas. He only moonlights as a writer, generating pieces such as reviews of exhibitions. A year after graduating, he held his first solo exhibition, Wholetrain. In 2009, he began working as the assistant curator at the Protvor exhibition space in St. Petersburg, working with street artists from Russia and Europe. His work there prompted the artist to create the series Dialogues on Art and Street Art,1 which he himself regards as one of his most interesting projects. It is a compendium of the humorous and absurd statements made about contemporary art, its meaninglessness and commercialization by artists, curators, and random people which Maxim overheard while working at Protvor. “Street art is, for me, a reaction to the surrounding world”, says Maxim. He likens his style to automatic writing, as did the surrealists in their day. As the artist himself admits, this means that once a work is started, he has no knowledge of what the end result will be.2 Maxim’s pieces are filled with symbolism. Many of his subjects, for example, have closed eyes – nowadays people are permanently tired: work, school, life, interacting with each other, the Internet... Quite often Maxim, feeling that his drawings are somehow connected with his personal life, works his year of birth – the number 87 – into his pieces, thereby creating a kind of anecdotal, abstract self-portrait. Maxim has taken part in exhibitions at Loft Project ETAGI, the Protvor exhibition space, the PERMM Museum and the Erarta Museum of Contemporary Art; the 2013 Art-Stena Street Art Festival at the Sergey Kuryokhin Contemporary Arts Centre; and the Cultural Capital Festival in Izhevsk. “What pushes me towards creativity is the mediocrity and mindlessness of others”, says Maxim. “I generally prefer the classical forms of art over all these ‘performances’, ‘installations’, and the like.”

1

http://partizaning.org/?p=8732(Russian only)

2

http://hopeforfreedom.ru/ru/blog/post/12(Russian only)

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A Time to Scatter Stones. A Time to Gather Stones Together 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 300 х 800 cm On the brick wall of a former factory shop, the artist has created an abstract image of a man in the desert, replete with stones; the work is monochrome, and a bright red sun stands alone in stark contrast with the grey background. The name of the piece is taken from the Old Testament. Legend has it that the phrase originated in the tale of the conqueror Tamerlane, who, before setting off on his campaign in Central Asia, ordered his soldiers to each throw one stone onto the ground. Upon returning, each collected his own stone. In this way, they ascertained the number who had fallen. For the artist, the stone, on the one hand, symbolizes stability and inviolability, while on the other hand, it is the epitome of the cold and soulless – its hard form, immune to the passage of time, signifies something universal and unattainable. With this work, he wanted to show that in war, the value of a human life is no greater than that of a small stone in an enormous pile of rubble. However, according to the artist, human life is not something to be scattered. As he puts it, “People are not stones that can be scattered.”

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A Time to Scatter Stones. A Time to Gather Stones Together 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 300 х 800 cm On the brick wall of a former factory shop, the artist has created an abstract image of a man in the desert, replete with stones; the work is monochrome, and a bright red sun stands alone in stark contrast with the grey background. The name of the piece is taken from the Old Testament. Legend has it that the phrase originated in the tale of the conqueror Tamerlane, who, before setting off on his campaign in Central Asia, ordered his soldiers to each throw one stone onto the ground. Upon returning, each collected his own stone. In this way, they ascertained the number who had fallen. For the artist, the stone, on the one hand, symbolizes stability and inviolability, while on the other hand, it is the epitome of the cold and soulless – its hard form, immune to the passage of time, signifies something universal and unattainable. With this work, he wanted to show that in war, the value of a human life is no greater than that of a small stone in an enormous pile of rubble. However, according to the artist, human life is not something to be scattered. As he puts it, “People are not stones that can be scattered.”

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Ilya Kamar (Rus Crew) Street artist, one of the founders of the artistic collective RUS crew

Moscow, Russia

RUS crew is one of the oldest and most legendary graffiti teams still in operation today. The group’s achievements include a huge number of festivals and exhibitions in Russia and abroad.

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Ilya Kamar first tried his hand at street art in 1997 and in 1999, together with Anton Make, Alexei SE, and Philip Teko, he created the RUS crew artistic collective. They were almost immediately joined by Daniel Worm, Andrey 4ub, and Oleg Basket. RUS crew is one of the oldest and most legendary graffiti teams still in operation today. The group’s achievements include a huge number of festivals and exhibitions in Russia and abroad. The collective has collaborated with such companies as Coca-Cola, Mars Food, Samsung Electronics, and Adidas, as well as popular publications including Rider, Doski, Mozg, Jalouse, Brain Damage (Poland), Sprayit, and Ulitsa. A street artist for over 15 years, Ilya has never received formal artistic training. His current achievements are thanks to years of independently honing his style and technique through trial and error. In addition to graffiti, he is involved in illustration, print design, photography, and sculpture. He also takes on private commissions to decorate building exteriors. Graffiti favours abstract and non-narrative compositions, however Ilya’s output is full of expressive narrative and decorative works, executed in a street art style. Ilya has never pursued photorealism. Over the course of many years, he has honed his stylistic techniques in order to attain a clear and concise visual style. The One Love show, which took place at Winzavod in 2009, remains a signature event for both Ilya and the whole RUS crew team. For the exhibition, the group was given their own space, enabling them to impart their views on Russian street art to celebrate the collective’s tenth anniversary. The exhibition included not only brand new works, but also photographs documenting the entire period of RUS crew’s existence.

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Ilya Kamar (Rus Crew) Street artist, one of the founders of the artistic collective RUS crew

Moscow, Russia

RUS crew is one of the oldest and most legendary graffiti teams still in operation today. The group’s achievements include a huge number of festivals and exhibitions in Russia and abroad.

116

Ilya Kamar first tried his hand at street art in 1997 and in 1999, together with Anton Make, Alexei SE, and Philip Teko, he created the RUS crew artistic collective. They were almost immediately joined by Daniel Worm, Andrey 4ub, and Oleg Basket. RUS crew is one of the oldest and most legendary graffiti teams still in operation today. The group’s achievements include a huge number of festivals and exhibitions in Russia and abroad. The collective has collaborated with such companies as Coca-Cola, Mars Food, Samsung Electronics, and Adidas, as well as popular publications including Rider, Doski, Mozg, Jalouse, Brain Damage (Poland), Sprayit, and Ulitsa. A street artist for over 15 years, Ilya has never received formal artistic training. His current achievements are thanks to years of independently honing his style and technique through trial and error. In addition to graffiti, he is involved in illustration, print design, photography, and sculpture. He also takes on private commissions to decorate building exteriors. Graffiti favours abstract and non-narrative compositions, however Ilya’s output is full of expressive narrative and decorative works, executed in a street art style. Ilya has never pursued photorealism. Over the course of many years, he has honed his stylistic techniques in order to attain a clear and concise visual style. The One Love show, which took place at Winzavod in 2009, remains a signature event for both Ilya and the whole RUS crew team. For the exhibition, the group was given their own space, enabling them to impart their views on Russian street art to celebrate the collective’s tenth anniversary. The exhibition included not only brand new works, but also photographs documenting the entire period of RUS crew’s existence.

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Untitled 2014 Plywood, acrylic, spray paint. 200 х 100 cm From the Street Kit Gallery collection At the Casus Pacis exhibition, Kamar presents a painting that takes the wars of recent decades as its theme. The artist draws our attention to the methods by which wars have been fought in the second half of the twentieth century. Ilya Kamar’s cartoonish style adds a note of irony, somewhat lightening the seriousness and pathos of the statement, while encouraging the viewer to reflect on it.

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Untitled 2014 Plywood, acrylic, spray paint. 200 х 100 cm From the Street Kit Gallery collection At the Casus Pacis exhibition, Kamar presents a painting that takes the wars of recent decades as its theme. The artist draws our attention to the methods by which wars have been fought in the second half of the twentieth century. Ilya Kamar’s cartoonish style adds a note of irony, somewhat lightening the seriousness and pathos of the statement, while encouraging the viewer to reflect on it.

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Aleksey Kislow Sevastopol, Crimea

Monumental artist

I don’t sha re the eu p h o r ic s t a t e o f m o s t people i n Seva stopo l o ve r w h a t is h a p p en in g in C r i mea . Bu t I woul d n o t l a y t h e bl a m e fo r w ha t i s ha ppeni ng o n o n l y o n e s ide o f t h e conf li ct. I ’ve li ved i n Ukra in e fo r m o s t o f m y consci ous li f e, a nd I ’ve co n s ider ed m y s e l f a U kra i ni a n, bu t some o f m y r e l a t ive s a n d cl o s e fri ends ha ve a lwa ys fel t R us s ia n . . . I ca nnot suppor t ei t h er s ide . I a m fo r un it y , b u t not a t a ny pri ce. 1

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Aleksey Kislow was born in 1983 in the city of Murmansk-60. He grew up, studied, and lives and works to this day in Sevastopol. He graduated from Sevastopol National Technical University in 2005 with a specialization in physical and biomedical electronics, but after deciding to dedicate himself to art, he entered the N. S. Samokish Crimea School for the Arts, where he is currently studying design. Aleksey started painting on walls when he finished primary school. Like many street artists, he began with simple graffiti, but then became fascinated with characters and more complex narrative compositions. Finally, he made a complete break with graffiti fonts and dedicated himself to murals. Kislow’s work is metaphorical, but the artist defines his style as “symbolism with elements of surrealism.” In his art, Aleksey ponders the problems and stereotypes of life today. Using symbols from various cultures, he gives familiar images new meaning and significance, forcing the viewer to look at things in a new way, ridding himself of former impressions and labels. “My paintings are not a protest, they’re not summoning you to anything; they are a dialogue with the viewer, a suggestion that you give some thought to the idea that, just possibly, things are not what they seem at first glance”, the artist explains. During his graffiti period, Aleksey worked on the BADY team. He later collaborated with the Ukrainian duo Interesni Kazki, and with the French artists Seth, Roti, and others. Besides Sevastopol, Kislow’s work can be found in many other cities in Ukraine, Europe, the US, and Russia. Kislow himself prefers large-scale murals, and he has never stopped experimenting with different techniques and materials, while at the same time testing himself in different forms of art. He has taken part in around ten international exhibitions and festivals, including Kultur Im Quartier in Berlin, Histoire d’un mur in Nantes, and French Spring in Kiev. When he is not creating art, Kislow does design work and interior design.

http://www.theinsider.ua/lifestyle/art-interventsiya-kak-khudozhnik-aleksei-kislov-menyaet-gorod/ (Russian only)

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Aleksey Kislow Sevastopol, Crimea

Monumental artist

I don’t sha re the eu p h o r ic s t a t e o f m o s t people i n Seva stopo l o ve r w h a t is h a p p en in g in C r i mea . Bu t I woul d n o t l a y t h e bl a m e fo r w ha t i s ha ppeni ng o n o n l y o n e s ide o f t h e conf li ct. I ’ve li ved i n Ukra in e fo r m o s t o f m y consci ous li f e, a nd I ’ve co n s ider ed m y s e l f a U kra i ni a n, bu t some o f m y r e l a t ive s a n d cl o s e fri ends ha ve a lwa ys fel t R us s ia n . . . I ca nnot suppor t ei t h er s ide . I a m fo r un it y , b u t not a t a ny pri ce. 1

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Aleksey Kislow was born in 1983 in the city of Murmansk-60. He grew up, studied, and lives and works to this day in Sevastopol. He graduated from Sevastopol National Technical University in 2005 with a specialization in physical and biomedical electronics, but after deciding to dedicate himself to art, he entered the N. S. Samokish Crimea School for the Arts, where he is currently studying design. Aleksey started painting on walls when he finished primary school. Like many street artists, he began with simple graffiti, but then became fascinated with characters and more complex narrative compositions. Finally, he made a complete break with graffiti fonts and dedicated himself to murals. Kislow’s work is metaphorical, but the artist defines his style as “symbolism with elements of surrealism.” In his art, Aleksey ponders the problems and stereotypes of life today. Using symbols from various cultures, he gives familiar images new meaning and significance, forcing the viewer to look at things in a new way, ridding himself of former impressions and labels. “My paintings are not a protest, they’re not summoning you to anything; they are a dialogue with the viewer, a suggestion that you give some thought to the idea that, just possibly, things are not what they seem at first glance”, the artist explains. During his graffiti period, Aleksey worked on the BADY team. He later collaborated with the Ukrainian duo Interesni Kazki, and with the French artists Seth, Roti, and others. Besides Sevastopol, Kislow’s work can be found in many other cities in Ukraine, Europe, the US, and Russia. Kislow himself prefers large-scale murals, and he has never stopped experimenting with different techniques and materials, while at the same time testing himself in different forms of art. He has taken part in around ten international exhibitions and festivals, including Kultur Im Quartier in Berlin, Histoire d’un mur in Nantes, and French Spring in Kiev. When he is not creating art, Kislow does design work and interior design.

http://www.theinsider.ua/lifestyle/art-interventsiya-kak-khudozhnik-aleksei-kislov-menyaet-gorod/ (Russian only)

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Indifferent equilibrium 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 1000 Ń… 1200 cm

A grey concrete structure with cells, from which grey, amorphous, frightened inhabitants peer out at the viewer. The construction is supported on a scale on ten flimsy wooden supports, deliberately drawn to be thin and asymmetrical but elegant. A bearded sphinx lies at the foot of the construction. Indifferent equilibrium is the term used for one of the three types of equilibrium in physics, along with stable and unstable equilibrium. If a ball set rolling stops at any point, it is then in a state of indifferent equilibrium, as opposed to a balancing construction or a motionless state. The building is an allegory for the system of all life in the post-Soviet space. People sit at the edges of their cells, while a lion simultaneously guards their peace like a protector and becomes an attacking force if they should fall. The building looks ready to collapse, but its equilibrium is still preserved, thanks to the thin wooden props and the ephemeral protection of the sphinx.

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Indifferent equilibrium 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 1000 Ń… 1200 cm

A grey concrete structure with cells, from which grey, amorphous, frightened inhabitants peer out at the viewer. The construction is supported on a scale on ten flimsy wooden supports, deliberately drawn to be thin and asymmetrical but elegant. A bearded sphinx lies at the foot of the construction. Indifferent equilibrium is the term used for one of the three types of equilibrium in physics, along with stable and unstable equilibrium. If a ball set rolling stops at any point, it is then in a state of indifferent equilibrium, as opposed to a balancing construction or a motionless state. The building is an allegory for the system of all life in the post-Soviet space. People sit at the edges of their cells, while a lion simultaneously guards their peace like a protector and becomes an attacking force if they should fall. The building looks ready to collapse, but its equilibrium is still preserved, thanks to the thin wooden props and the ephemeral protection of the sphinx.

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Dana Kosmina Media artist and architect

an ideal time to create pure art and architecture is during revolutions and periods of instability.

Kiev, Ukraine

Bogdana Kosmina was born in Kiev on 31 October 1990. She grew up in a picturesque residential area built in the 1980s and known for its colourful tiled patterns on the exteriors of the concrete apartment buildings. After finishing school where she studied French extensively, she enrolled at the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture in Kiev and earned her master’s degree from the faculty of architecture. She is currently studying architecture at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Nantes in France and works with Le Voyage à Nantes. Bogdana undertakes practical design work and says that for her, building small structures is the best possible thing to work on. The desire to understand and record the reality of urban life and its stories inspired her to create her first works, and continues to inspire her today. As an architect, Bogdana pays particular attention to things which have become commonplace to many of us, including piles of construction waste on the streets, the pattern of bars on windows, and the worn-out, asymmetrical exteriors of buildings. Bogdana is attracted to current urban aesthetics, and in the process of creating her “exhibits”, she partly documents, and partly supplements them. She prefers to work with styrofoam and wood. Bogdana says that the materials are easy to work with. Wood looks great outside and can be easily set up. She is convinced that street art will gain influence in the future, drawing inspiration from the rationalists and constructivists of the 1920s and 1930s.

A s a n a r c h i t e c t , I wo r k o n u r b a n p l a n n i n g p r o je c t s a n d c r e a ti ng n e i g h b o u r h o o d s. I a ssu r e yo u t h a t we a r e n o t ye t r e a d y f o r Ge org y K r u t i k o v ’s Fl y i n g C i t y o r E l L i ssi t z k y ’s Ho r i z o n t a l S k y sc ra p e rs . Stre e ts – ju st l i k e m e t r o t u n n e l s a n d b u i l d i n g e x t e r i o r s – w i l l r e m a i n an i n t e g ra l p a r t o f t h e u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e , r e fl e cti ng t h e m o o d o f so c i e t y .

— Dana K osmina

Most of Bogdana’s work is reminiscent of the thoughts and dreams of the avant-garde school of visionary architecture from the 1920s. She is currently working with French architect Michel Bertre on drafting plans for a summer cinema. She is increasingly involved in Le Voyage à Nantes, and is developing urban planning projects for the French agencies TGT et Associés and Disanium. One of her latest exhibitions (The ABCs of Revolution) was displayed in Kiev’s M17 Contemporary Art Centre. “I try to identify those social problems that are exposed during times when society seems to fall apart. In my opinion, an ideal time to create pure art and architecture is during revolutions and periods of instability because the artist is not restricted by government ambitions”, Bogdana says.

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Dana Kosmina Media artist and architect

an ideal time to create pure art and architecture is during revolutions and periods of instability.

Kiev, Ukraine

Bogdana Kosmina was born in Kiev on 31 October 1990. She grew up in a picturesque residential area built in the 1980s and known for its colourful tiled patterns on the exteriors of the concrete apartment buildings. After finishing school where she studied French extensively, she enrolled at the National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture in Kiev and earned her master’s degree from the faculty of architecture. She is currently studying architecture at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Nantes in France and works with Le Voyage à Nantes. Bogdana undertakes practical design work and says that for her, building small structures is the best possible thing to work on. The desire to understand and record the reality of urban life and its stories inspired her to create her first works, and continues to inspire her today. As an architect, Bogdana pays particular attention to things which have become commonplace to many of us, including piles of construction waste on the streets, the pattern of bars on windows, and the worn-out, asymmetrical exteriors of buildings. Bogdana is attracted to current urban aesthetics, and in the process of creating her “exhibits”, she partly documents, and partly supplements them. She prefers to work with styrofoam and wood. Bogdana says that the materials are easy to work with. Wood looks great outside and can be easily set up. She is convinced that street art will gain influence in the future, drawing inspiration from the rationalists and constructivists of the 1920s and 1930s.

A s a n a r c h i t e c t , I wo r k o n u r b a n p l a n n i n g p r o je c t s a n d c r e a ti ng n e i g h b o u r h o o d s. I a ssu r e yo u t h a t we a r e n o t ye t r e a d y f o r Ge org y K r u t i k o v ’s Fl y i n g C i t y o r E l L i ssi t z k y ’s Ho r i z o n t a l S k y sc ra p e rs . Stre e ts – ju st l i k e m e t r o t u n n e l s a n d b u i l d i n g e x t e r i o r s – w i l l r e m a i n an i n t e g ra l p a r t o f t h e u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e , r e fl e cti ng t h e m o o d o f so c i e t y .

— Dana K osmina

Most of Bogdana’s work is reminiscent of the thoughts and dreams of the avant-garde school of visionary architecture from the 1920s. She is currently working with French architect Michel Bertre on drafting plans for a summer cinema. She is increasingly involved in Le Voyage à Nantes, and is developing urban planning projects for the French agencies TGT et Associés and Disanium. One of her latest exhibitions (The ABCs of Revolution) was displayed in Kiev’s M17 Contemporary Art Centre. “I try to identify those social problems that are exposed during times when society seems to fall apart. In my opinion, an ideal time to create pure art and architecture is during revolutions and periods of instability because the artist is not restricted by government ambitions”, Bogdana says.

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Modelling Reality 2014 Video. 4:51 min

The videos the artist has brought are part of the Modelling Reality cycle. The project is a reaction to the events that transpired in Kiev during the winter of 2013–2014, when the Ukrainian government tried to suppress the popular uprising by force. However, Bogdana did not watch the news reports, rather she listened to them one after another while visualizing what was happening and creating her work in a 3-D editor on another screen. The program, designed for architecture, engineering, and urban planning, allowed her to use objects already in its library. She combined and changed them to create her own reality. She then used that reality to create her own broadcast by adding her own video to what she heard. Every work at the Street Art Museum which is part of the Casus Pasis exhibition is based on a single theme – demonstrating the absurdity of war. Bogdana’s hatred of the brutality of armed conflict is reflected in the ironic perception of reality she has created that includes flying concrete walls, pink assault rifles, and pineapples sharing a cell with armed citizens.

A s a n a r c h i t e c t , t h e f i r st thi ng I sa w w a s a n o p p o r t u n i ty to d e st r o y t h e p se u d o - e c l ecti c c o n sc i o u sn e ss i m p o se d by ye ars o f i n d i f f e r e n c e a n d l a c k of wi l l , by sp a r ki n g t h e p e o p l e’s i m ag i nati on u si n g 3 - D m o d e l s. M o d e l l ing R e al it y o p e n e d o n 3 0 N o ve m be r a t 4 a m . O n l i n e b r o a d c a s ts from t h e m o st t r o u b l e d a r e a s du ri ng t h e e ve n t s i n U kra i n e b ecam e a t o o l w h i c h c o u l d b e u se d to m ove f r e e l y a r o u n d d i f f e r e n t are as of the country.

— Dana K osmina

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Modelling Reality 2014 Video. 4:51 min

The videos the artist has brought are part of the Modelling Reality cycle. The project is a reaction to the events that transpired in Kiev during the winter of 2013–2014, when the Ukrainian government tried to suppress the popular uprising by force. However, Bogdana did not watch the news reports, rather she listened to them one after another while visualizing what was happening and creating her work in a 3-D editor on another screen. The program, designed for architecture, engineering, and urban planning, allowed her to use objects already in its library. She combined and changed them to create her own reality. She then used that reality to create her own broadcast by adding her own video to what she heard. Every work at the Street Art Museum which is part of the Casus Pasis exhibition is based on a single theme – demonstrating the absurdity of war. Bogdana’s hatred of the brutality of armed conflict is reflected in the ironic perception of reality she has created that includes flying concrete walls, pink assault rifles, and pineapples sharing a cell with armed citizens.

A s a n a r c h i t e c t , t h e f i r st thi ng I sa w w a s a n o p p o r t u n i ty to d e st r o y t h e p se u d o - e c l ecti c c o n sc i o u sn e ss i m p o se d by ye ars o f i n d i f f e r e n c e a n d l a c k of wi l l , by sp a r ki n g t h e p e o p l e’s i m ag i nati on u si n g 3 - D m o d e l s. M o d e l l ing R e al it y o p e n e d o n 3 0 N o ve m be r a t 4 a m . O n l i n e b r o a d c a s ts from t h e m o st t r o u b l e d a r e a s du ri ng t h e e ve n t s i n U kra i n e b ecam e a t o o l w h i c h c o u l d b e u se d to m ove f r e e l y a r o u n d d i f f e r e n t are as of the country.

— Dana K osmina

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Roma Kreemos Artist and graphic designer

a modern person should think with his mind and be guided by principles of humanism.

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Moscow, Russia Roman Salomatin, better known by his pseudonym Kreemos, was born in Podolsk, Russia in 1990. Although he has been drawing since childhood, he did not plan to dedicate his life to this pursuit, still engrossed in skateboarding as a teenager. In fact, it was the vibrant, unconventional graphics and interesting logos of the skateboarding world that drew him into graffiti culture. Roman himself admits that his work rarely appears on walls, but says graffiti has nonetheless heavily influenced his visual language, the most striking detail of which is his signature three-dimensional script. Street art shaped the young Roman’s relationship with the arts and inspired him to earn his diploma from the Department of Graphic Arts at the Stroganov Moscow State University of Arts and Industry. In 2013, Kreemos created a piece for the Street Art Museum. God at Work, exhibited in one of the existing workshops at the Laminated Plastics Factory (SLOPLAST), was the second mural to be added to the museum’s main collection. In his street works, Kreemos always considers the history and atmosphere of his chosen locations. In God at Work, he dressed his Apollo in pink overalls and protective glasses. The piece is marked with the phrase “Art meets industry” in his signature font. His painting in the Petrovsky Arsenal space, on the property of a former weapons factory in Sestroretsk, depicts a Mosin rifle with sprouting oak leaves and the inscription, “Art can revive”. Roman has taken part in several major street art events and already has joint projects with other artists, museums, and galleries under his belt. He has collaborated with the Russian editions of Esquire and Fiction and his work has been published in magazines and blogs abroad, including Juxtapoz, Supersonic Electronic, FFFFound, and Lamono. In April 2014, Roman Kreemos and Yulia Yefimova organized a joint exhibit in Moscow entitled Holy Ghost, at which the artist presented a new series of two works, a large polyptych of canvases and skateboards, and three graphic projects. The exhibit also featured a wall piece which Kreemos and Yulia painted together. Roman also took part in this year’s Museum Night at Moscow’s Central House of Artists and the Do It Moscow art project in Gorky Park. Roman draws his inspiration from the beautiful, though short-lived Art Nouveau period, which was defined by the ornamentation of its stylized natural forms and symbolic subject matter. Apart from Art Nouveau, Kreemos admires the work of Aaron Horkey and James Jean, whose pieces are characterized by their attention to detail, interesting compositions, and fine, expressive technique. 129


Roma Kreemos Artist and graphic designer

a modern person should think with his mind and be guided by principles of humanism.

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Moscow, Russia Roman Salomatin, better known by his pseudonym Kreemos, was born in Podolsk, Russia in 1990. Although he has been drawing since childhood, he did not plan to dedicate his life to this pursuit, still engrossed in skateboarding as a teenager. In fact, it was the vibrant, unconventional graphics and interesting logos of the skateboarding world that drew him into graffiti culture. Roman himself admits that his work rarely appears on walls, but says graffiti has nonetheless heavily influenced his visual language, the most striking detail of which is his signature three-dimensional script. Street art shaped the young Roman’s relationship with the arts and inspired him to earn his diploma from the Department of Graphic Arts at the Stroganov Moscow State University of Arts and Industry. In 2013, Kreemos created a piece for the Street Art Museum. God at Work, exhibited in one of the existing workshops at the Laminated Plastics Factory (SLOPLAST), was the second mural to be added to the museum’s main collection. In his street works, Kreemos always considers the history and atmosphere of his chosen locations. In God at Work, he dressed his Apollo in pink overalls and protective glasses. The piece is marked with the phrase “Art meets industry” in his signature font. His painting in the Petrovsky Arsenal space, on the property of a former weapons factory in Sestroretsk, depicts a Mosin rifle with sprouting oak leaves and the inscription, “Art can revive”. Roman has taken part in several major street art events and already has joint projects with other artists, museums, and galleries under his belt. He has collaborated with the Russian editions of Esquire and Fiction and his work has been published in magazines and blogs abroad, including Juxtapoz, Supersonic Electronic, FFFFound, and Lamono. In April 2014, Roman Kreemos and Yulia Yefimova organized a joint exhibit in Moscow entitled Holy Ghost, at which the artist presented a new series of two works, a large polyptych of canvases and skateboards, and three graphic projects. The exhibit also featured a wall piece which Kreemos and Yulia painted together. Roman also took part in this year’s Museum Night at Moscow’s Central House of Artists and the Do It Moscow art project in Gorky Park. Roman draws his inspiration from the beautiful, though short-lived Art Nouveau period, which was defined by the ornamentation of its stylized natural forms and symbolic subject matter. Apart from Art Nouveau, Kreemos admires the work of Aaron Horkey and James Jean, whose pieces are characterized by their attention to detail, interesting compositions, and fine, expressive technique. 129


Ideology 2014 Acrylic, 300 х 600 cm

As the location for his large-scale piece, Roman chose a smokestack that had never been used to emit smoke. Gigantic threedimensional letters come together to form the word “ideology”, which stands on three Galapagos tortoises and the skeleton of a tortoise. This is a reference to ancient myths about the creation of the universe, which, according to the artist, benefitted those in power, but did not give a true account of reality. “Modern ideology should not be based on ancient myths depicting the world as hostile, and people should not perish in the name of a nation’s special destiny”, says Roman of his work. He hopes that reason and beauty will bring people together, not narrow-mindedness and blindness. He urges people not to believe the information spread by the authorities and not to succumb to provocation and manipulation. “The Middle Ages ended a long time ago, and a modern person should think with his mind and be guided by principles of humanism”, the artist states.

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Ideology 2014 Acrylic, 300 х 600 cm

As the location for his large-scale piece, Roman chose a smokestack that had never been used to emit smoke. Gigantic threedimensional letters come together to form the word “ideology”, which stands on three Galapagos tortoises and the skeleton of a tortoise. This is a reference to ancient myths about the creation of the universe, which, according to the artist, benefitted those in power, but did not give a true account of reality. “Modern ideology should not be based on ancient myths depicting the world as hostile, and people should not perish in the name of a nation’s special destiny”, says Roman of his work. He hopes that reason and beauty will bring people together, not narrow-mindedness and blindness. He urges people not to believe the information spread by the authorities and not to succumb to provocation and manipulation. “The Middle Ages ended a long time ago, and a modern person should think with his mind and be guided by principles of humanism”, the artist states.

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Sasha Kurmaz Contemporary artist and photographer

Visual continuity is reduced to formal decision making, which is often banal and turns “art” into a product, and the “artist” into a slave.

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Kiev, Ukraine Sasha Kurmaz is a contemporary Ukrainian artist and photographer born in Kiev in 1986. He graduated from the Ukrainian State Academy of Art, with a degree in design, and lives and works in Kiev. Sasha started painting at the turn of the 2000s, and was part of the graffiti subculture for nearly eight years. “I was too young to think about anything else. I wanted to change the world, and I believed graffiti could be more than just a tag on a wall”, he said. Throughout this time, he also worked in photography because by and large, photographs would eventually be all that was left of his street art. He stopped painting graffiti in 2009 to devote more time to photography. His current work can be divided into two elements – conceptual street art and photography. Kurmaz does not want his work to be “identifiable”, claiming that he does not have a distinct style. Rather, he prefers to take an experimental approach, not limiting himself to any particular technique. The naked body is often the subject of his photographs. For Kurmaz, nudity is a way to create meaning, not the goal in and of itself. Kurmaz explains that Ukrainian society is by and large very conservative. The nude human body therefore quickly becomes politicized and used as a weapon against conservatism, conformism, and religious fanaticism. Kurmaz is a street artist who above all is interested in changing his urban environment; by using advertising media, outdoor light boxes, minimalistic graffiti, and concise slogans, he creates a new reality and relays information that he believes today’s society needs to know. He draws inspiration from Soviet architecture from the 1950s to the 1990s, and good literature. He feels that graffiti art is very much underdeveloped in Ukraine and Russia. Nevertheless, the countries have produced several good artists in the medium.

Ri g h t n o w , I t h i n k t h a t u si n g t h e wo rd “ st y l e” i n g ra f f i t i i s a s tu m bl i ng b l o c k f o r a d h e r e n t s o f t h e su b c u l t u r e . — Sasha K urmaz

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Sasha Kurmaz Contemporary artist and photographer

Visual continuity is reduced to formal decision making, which is often banal and turns “art” into a product, and the “artist” into a slave.

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Kiev, Ukraine Sasha Kurmaz is a contemporary Ukrainian artist and photographer born in Kiev in 1986. He graduated from the Ukrainian State Academy of Art, with a degree in design, and lives and works in Kiev. Sasha started painting at the turn of the 2000s, and was part of the graffiti subculture for nearly eight years. “I was too young to think about anything else. I wanted to change the world, and I believed graffiti could be more than just a tag on a wall”, he said. Throughout this time, he also worked in photography because by and large, photographs would eventually be all that was left of his street art. He stopped painting graffiti in 2009 to devote more time to photography. His current work can be divided into two elements – conceptual street art and photography. Kurmaz does not want his work to be “identifiable”, claiming that he does not have a distinct style. Rather, he prefers to take an experimental approach, not limiting himself to any particular technique. The naked body is often the subject of his photographs. For Kurmaz, nudity is a way to create meaning, not the goal in and of itself. Kurmaz explains that Ukrainian society is by and large very conservative. The nude human body therefore quickly becomes politicized and used as a weapon against conservatism, conformism, and religious fanaticism. Kurmaz is a street artist who above all is interested in changing his urban environment; by using advertising media, outdoor light boxes, minimalistic graffiti, and concise slogans, he creates a new reality and relays information that he believes today’s society needs to know. He draws inspiration from Soviet architecture from the 1950s to the 1990s, and good literature. He feels that graffiti art is very much underdeveloped in Ukraine and Russia. Nevertheless, the countries have produced several good artists in the medium.

Ri g h t n o w , I t h i n k t h a t u si n g t h e wo rd “ st y l e” i n g ra f f i t i i s a s tu m bl i ng b l o c k f o r a d h e r e n t s o f t h e su b c u l t u r e . — Sasha K urmaz

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Ukraine: A Space of Possibilities 2013-2014 Digital print. 40 х 60 cm Most of the artist’s photographs from 2013 and 2014 are part of a single series focusing on the events in Kiev’s central Independence Square. The cycle was later titled Maidan. The photo series Shacks: An Environment for Living is a collection of pictures portraying makeshift buildings constructed by protestors on Independence Square. Often small in size, these strange structures – built with whatever could be found to keep out snow and rain – were made to store belongings and shelter people. Many of these “shacks” later turned into large tents and small houses. Some of them are still standing in Kiev’s main square, a constant reminder of the events that happened six months ago. His second photo series, Ukraine: A Space of Possibilities depicts small areas and parts of Kiev that have been affected by the conflict. The scarred trees, bent fastenings on posts, shattered mouldings, and burnt billboards are not just the consequences of the latest revolution. Like the structures on the square, for Sasha they represent the city’s dynamic transformation, a subject of study for the artist who is interested in applied urban studies.

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Ukraine: A Space of Possibilities 2013-2014 Digital print. 40 х 60 cm Most of the artist’s photographs from 2013 and 2014 are part of a single series focusing on the events in Kiev’s central Independence Square. The cycle was later titled Maidan. The photo series Shacks: An Environment for Living is a collection of pictures portraying makeshift buildings constructed by protestors on Independence Square. Often small in size, these strange structures – built with whatever could be found to keep out snow and rain – were made to store belongings and shelter people. Many of these “shacks” later turned into large tents and small houses. Some of them are still standing in Kiev’s main square, a constant reminder of the events that happened six months ago. His second photo series, Ukraine: A Space of Possibilities depicts small areas and parts of Kiev that have been affected by the conflict. The scarred trees, bent fastenings on posts, shattered mouldings, and burnt billboards are not just the consequences of the latest revolution. Like the structures on the square, for Sasha they represent the city’s dynamic transformation, a subject of study for the artist who is interested in applied urban studies.

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Shacks: An Environment for Living 2013-2014 Digital print. 10 Ń… 15 cm

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Shacks: An Environment for Living 2013-2014 Digital print. 10 Ń… 15 cm

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Andrey Lyublinsky Artist and designer

St. Petersburg is a city afflicted with inertia, and scandals are the only way to stir things up.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Andrey was born in Leningrad and began painting as a child. He completed his secondary education at a school specializing in art, and in 1998 he graduated from the St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy with a degree in design. He continued his studies at the Berlin Weissensee School of Art, and currently works as a designer. Lyublinsky and a university friend, Maria Zaborovskaya1 , created Pprofessors Group in 2002. Pprofessors Group undertakes projects in the fields of modern art, design, and education. They also work with graphics, product design, and public art. Red People is the group’s most striking and oft-cited project. Red anthropomorphic sculptures – sometimes several metres tall – first appeared in Perm, Russia thanks to Marat Gelman’s Public Art Programme. Gelman believes that the local population’s opposition to the red people is what has made them so popular.2 Red People generated a huge public reaction; not all Perm residents wanted to share their public space with the giant statues. The negative public response turned the red people into the unofficial symbol of the city’s cultural revolution and drew Russian and international media attention to Lyublinsky. Andrey’s work includes dozens of solo exhibitions in Russia and abroad. He has also participated in art festivals and curated projects. In 2011, he organized a provocative art project entitled “Govno” (“Shit”) 3, which, according to Lyublinsky, was intended to draw attention to the city’s problems and reveal the decadent state of its culture. “St. Petersburg is a city afflicted with inertia, and scandals are the only way to stir things up”, says Andrey. To take part in the project, an artist needed to create something depicting “shit” or something directly related to it. 3 Andrey has received grants for his exhibitions in Stockholm and Helsinki several years in a row. His exhibition entitled Sleipnir was shown at the Compost Gallery in Helsinki in 2000 and at the Färgfabriken Centre of Modern Art and Architecture in Stockholm in 2006. In 2003, thanks to an award from the Institute of Contemporary Art of Nordic Countries (NIFCA), Lyublinsky’s Punkt exhibition was held at an artists’ residency in Suomenlinna, Finland. His latest solo exhibition, Cubism and Spherism, took place in June 2014. Andrey made 10 zoomorphic figures from cubes. Spherism is the next logical step where the same animal figures are made from small spheres. 1

http://www.lookatme.ru/flow/posts/design-radar/62620-pprofessors-andrey-lyublinskiy-i-mariya-zaborovskaya (Russian only)

2

http://www.newsperm.ru/novosti/culture/2014/04/17/avtor_krasnyh_chelovechkov_ne_perezhivaet_iz-za_ih_demontazha/ (Russian only)

3

http://www.timeout.ru/spb/feature/25425 (Russian only)

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Andrey Lyublinsky Artist and designer

St. Petersburg is a city afflicted with inertia, and scandals are the only way to stir things up.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Andrey was born in Leningrad and began painting as a child. He completed his secondary education at a school specializing in art, and in 1998 he graduated from the St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy with a degree in design. He continued his studies at the Berlin Weissensee School of Art, and currently works as a designer. Lyublinsky and a university friend, Maria Zaborovskaya1 , created Pprofessors Group in 2002. Pprofessors Group undertakes projects in the fields of modern art, design, and education. They also work with graphics, product design, and public art. Red People is the group’s most striking and oft-cited project. Red anthropomorphic sculptures – sometimes several metres tall – first appeared in Perm, Russia thanks to Marat Gelman’s Public Art Programme. Gelman believes that the local population’s opposition to the red people is what has made them so popular.2 Red People generated a huge public reaction; not all Perm residents wanted to share their public space with the giant statues. The negative public response turned the red people into the unofficial symbol of the city’s cultural revolution and drew Russian and international media attention to Lyublinsky. Andrey’s work includes dozens of solo exhibitions in Russia and abroad. He has also participated in art festivals and curated projects. In 2011, he organized a provocative art project entitled “Govno” (“Shit”) 3, which, according to Lyublinsky, was intended to draw attention to the city’s problems and reveal the decadent state of its culture. “St. Petersburg is a city afflicted with inertia, and scandals are the only way to stir things up”, says Andrey. To take part in the project, an artist needed to create something depicting “shit” or something directly related to it. 3 Andrey has received grants for his exhibitions in Stockholm and Helsinki several years in a row. His exhibition entitled Sleipnir was shown at the Compost Gallery in Helsinki in 2000 and at the Färgfabriken Centre of Modern Art and Architecture in Stockholm in 2006. In 2003, thanks to an award from the Institute of Contemporary Art of Nordic Countries (NIFCA), Lyublinsky’s Punkt exhibition was held at an artists’ residency in Suomenlinna, Finland. His latest solo exhibition, Cubism and Spherism, took place in June 2014. Andrey made 10 zoomorphic figures from cubes. Spherism is the next logical step where the same animal figures are made from small spheres. 1

http://www.lookatme.ru/flow/posts/design-radar/62620-pprofessors-andrey-lyublinskiy-i-mariya-zaborovskaya (Russian only)

2

http://www.newsperm.ru/novosti/culture/2014/04/17/avtor_krasnyh_chelovechkov_ne_perezhivaet_iz-za_ih_demontazha/ (Russian only)

3

http://www.timeout.ru/spb/feature/25425 (Russian only)

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Equilibrium 2014 Wood, metal, stone, styrofoam

we don’t agree with Lenin’s ideas, but the events

140

“We took as the starting point for our project the well-known events which occurred in Ukraine in February 2014, when dozens of statues of Lenin were destroyed all over the country in a single night”, Lyublinsky says, referring to the project he is working on with Konstantin Novikov. “We’re not trying to judge what’s going on there, especially since we

don’t particularly agree with Lenin’s ideas, but the events that transpired concerned us. We’re not trying to turn back the clock. Rather, for the sake of our own inner equilibrium, we decided to use contemporary art to recreate those statues of Lenin that were destroyed in Ukraine.”

that transpired concerned us.

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Equilibrium 2014 Wood, metal, stone, styrofoam

we don’t agree with Lenin’s ideas, but the events

140

“We took as the starting point for our project the well-known events which occurred in Ukraine in February 2014, when dozens of statues of Lenin were destroyed all over the country in a single night”, Lyublinsky says, referring to the project he is working on with Konstantin Novikov. “We’re not trying to judge what’s going on there, especially since we

don’t particularly agree with Lenin’s ideas, but the events that transpired concerned us. We’re not trying to turn back the clock. Rather, for the sake of our own inner equilibrium, we decided to use contemporary art to recreate those statues of Lenin that were destroyed in Ukraine.”

that transpired concerned us.

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Viktoria Mavi Street artist, illustrator, designer

Kaliningrad, Russia

MAVI 142

Mavi was born in Potsdam, Germany in 1987, to a soldier’s family. As is often the case with military families, she moved frequently throughout her childhood. She lived in Riga for five years, and then the family moved to Apatity, where Viktoria completed her secondary education at a school specializing in the arts. After that, the artist and her parents moved to Kaliningrad, where she went to college and trained as a wood-painting artist. Viktoria is currently finishing her studies in design at Kaliningrad University. Viktoria first got involved in street art at the age of 18, when she met the MEME graffiti crew. At first she only made sketches, but soon she moved onto street walls, trains, and abandoned buildings, working with various materials: chalk, brushes, spray paint, and enamel – trying everything, she says, from which the maximum result could be squeezed. For a while, Viktoria worked as a photo editor at Komsomolskaya Pravda in Kaliningrad and as an illustrator for magazines published by the same company. Later she took up outdoor advertising design. However, Viktoria says all of that was “not quite her thing”. Currently Viktoria paints, and confesses that she loves oil painting best of all. She creates reproductions of famous pictures to order and for herself. Among the interesting exhibitions in which she has participated are the annual Forest event, which takes place on the shore of the Baltic Sea, the street art exhibition at the Alternative art club, and the street art festival held on Kaliningrad’s City Day. Viktoria has also participated in Voice of the Streets, where she delivered a lecture on the topic of “Folk Craft Images and Motifs in Street Art”. Voice of the Streets is a Russian national project for socially aware artists who are seeking to rethink urban space. The criteria by which participants are selected include demonstrable civic-mindedness and the ability to leave a powerful message for the viewer. Viktoria Mavi also works on her own smaller projects, including using posters and installation pieces to design spaces in the city environment. She also makes ceramics, toys, and other charming small craft items by hand.

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Viktoria Mavi Street artist, illustrator, designer

Kaliningrad, Russia

MAVI 142

Mavi was born in Potsdam, Germany in 1987, to a soldier’s family. As is often the case with military families, she moved frequently throughout her childhood. She lived in Riga for five years, and then the family moved to Apatity, where Viktoria completed her secondary education at a school specializing in the arts. After that, the artist and her parents moved to Kaliningrad, where she went to college and trained as a wood-painting artist. Viktoria is currently finishing her studies in design at Kaliningrad University. Viktoria first got involved in street art at the age of 18, when she met the MEME graffiti crew. At first she only made sketches, but soon she moved onto street walls, trains, and abandoned buildings, working with various materials: chalk, brushes, spray paint, and enamel – trying everything, she says, from which the maximum result could be squeezed. For a while, Viktoria worked as a photo editor at Komsomolskaya Pravda in Kaliningrad and as an illustrator for magazines published by the same company. Later she took up outdoor advertising design. However, Viktoria says all of that was “not quite her thing”. Currently Viktoria paints, and confesses that she loves oil painting best of all. She creates reproductions of famous pictures to order and for herself. Among the interesting exhibitions in which she has participated are the annual Forest event, which takes place on the shore of the Baltic Sea, the street art exhibition at the Alternative art club, and the street art festival held on Kaliningrad’s City Day. Viktoria has also participated in Voice of the Streets, where she delivered a lecture on the topic of “Folk Craft Images and Motifs in Street Art”. Voice of the Streets is a Russian national project for socially aware artists who are seeking to rethink urban space. The criteria by which participants are selected include demonstrable civic-mindedness and the ability to leave a powerful message for the viewer. Viktoria Mavi also works on her own smaller projects, including using posters and installation pieces to design spaces in the city environment. She also makes ceramics, toys, and other charming small craft items by hand.

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Peace Through Love and Self-Development matryoshka doll 2014 Emulsion. 250 х 500 cm

Inside the matryoshka which Viktoria has made for the exhibition are happy people in harmony with their natural environment. Next to the doll are uncoloured outlines of the same matryoshka. The artist believes that the path to peace should be laid not through suffering and destruction, but through love and development of the best spiritual qualities within oneself. “Love is the true key to all the world’s treasures”, Mavi believes, “and people ought to live in peace and love others as they love themselves.” The second matryoshka on the wall symbolizes incomplete personal development. “This is what happens with people who pronounce the words of philosophers they’ve read on the Internet and heard in the movies, when the outlines of their individuality are just starting to appear, and that development halts and remains incomplete”, the artist says.

144

Love is the true key to all the world’s treasures.

145


Peace Through Love and Self-Development matryoshka doll 2014 Emulsion. 250 х 500 cm

Inside the matryoshka which Viktoria has made for the exhibition are happy people in harmony with their natural environment. Next to the doll are uncoloured outlines of the same matryoshka. The artist believes that the path to peace should be laid not through suffering and destruction, but through love and development of the best spiritual qualities within oneself. “Love is the true key to all the world’s treasures”, Mavi believes, “and people ought to live in peace and love others as they love themselves.” The second matryoshka on the wall symbolizes incomplete personal development. “This is what happens with people who pronounce the words of philosophers they’ve read on the Internet and heard in the movies, when the outlines of their individuality are just starting to appear, and that development halts and remains incomplete”, the artist says.

144

Love is the true key to all the world’s treasures.

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Roman Minin Artist, photographer, poet

Kharkiv, Ukraine

In Ukra i ne, i n a scen a r io t h a t h a s be en in t h e wor ks f or some ti me, ‘s uit s’ a r e figh t in g o ve r s h a l e ga s. In the D onetsk a n d Luga n s k r e gio n s , w h a t ’s h a ppeni ng i s g enocide un der t h e co ve r t p a t r o n a ge of the ‘ci vi li zed cou n t r ies’. B l in de d by p r o p a ga n da , ordi na ry people a re s uffer in g o n a l l s ides o f t he conf li ct. Control l e d ch a o s , l ie s , a n d t o t a l corr upti on. They a r e t ra ffickin g in h um a n bein gs , t hei r f lesh a nd or g an s . T h e y a r e us in g p r o h ibit e d wea pons. Tha t’s the s t r eet a r t t h a t ’s p o p ul a r in U kra i ne. I look a t th e D o n e t s B a s in , a t Cr im e a , t hen a t Moscow a nd Eur o p e; I l o o k a n d I s e e t h a t everythi ng i s tra nsi t o r y . Gl o ba l iza t io n is co m in g, and a s a lwa ys, when we l e a s t ex p ect it .

146

Roman Minin was born in 1981 in a mining town in the Donets Basin. He began to paint in earnest at the age of 14. He graduated from art college and the Kharkiv State Academy of Design and Arts. In becoming an artist, he broke free of a family tradition – his father, a miner like his predecessors, took him to work with him from an early age, probably priming him for a future in the mines. Roman chose another path, but the miner’s existence and day-to-day working life has remained a subject close to his heart. After completing his studies at the Academy, he was attracted to monumental art. Later, he was hailed by journalists as one of the primary masters of the fast-developing genre of monumental painting in Ukraine. In addition to this, he works in art photography and writes songs and poetry. He is a “multi-tasking machinist”, like Yegor Letov, whose work at one time served as a source of inspiration for Roman. He also points to folk wisdom, the works of unknown wall painters of the past, and the famous Mexican trio of Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros as sources of inspiration. Roman always uses his real name when signing his work, regardless of whether a piece has been created for an exhibition, or on the wall of a neighbouring building. He believes that generating intrigue around a nickname is nothing more than fooling around with elitist inaccessibility, and has nothing to do with the dangers inherent in underground activism. He himself, then, remains an open propagandist of street art. He has participated in and organized festivals of street art numerous times in Kharkiv. Currently, the psychology of those who labour in mines is a primary motif in his work. From project to project, and series to series, we see the evolution of the artist’s image of the miner. In his compositions under the title Symbol of Faith, Roman moves from stories about the life and routine of the miner to a sacralization of the image of the miner. The next project in this cycle is the Plan of Escape from Donetsk Region. While maintaining the technique and artistic devices employed thus far in the series, Roman moves away from the image of the miner as the central figure. Instead, the focus is more on trends applicable to the whole of Ukraine. The series itself was created in 2012, before the start of the events in the eastern regions of the country.

147


Roman Minin Artist, photographer, poet

Kharkiv, Ukraine

In Ukra i ne, i n a scen a r io t h a t h a s be en in t h e wor ks f or some ti me, ‘s uit s’ a r e figh t in g o ve r s h a l e ga s. In the D onetsk a n d Luga n s k r e gio n s , w h a t ’s h a ppeni ng i s g enocide un der t h e co ve r t p a t r o n a ge of the ‘ci vi li zed cou n t r ies’. B l in de d by p r o p a ga n da , ordi na ry people a re s uffer in g o n a l l s ides o f t he conf li ct. Control l e d ch a o s , l ie s , a n d t o t a l corr upti on. They a r e t ra ffickin g in h um a n bein gs , t hei r f lesh a nd or g an s . T h e y a r e us in g p r o h ibit e d wea pons. Tha t’s the s t r eet a r t t h a t ’s p o p ul a r in U kra i ne. I look a t th e D o n e t s B a s in , a t Cr im e a , t hen a t Moscow a nd Eur o p e; I l o o k a n d I s e e t h a t everythi ng i s tra nsi t o r y . Gl o ba l iza t io n is co m in g, and a s a lwa ys, when we l e a s t ex p ect it .

146

Roman Minin was born in 1981 in a mining town in the Donets Basin. He began to paint in earnest at the age of 14. He graduated from art college and the Kharkiv State Academy of Design and Arts. In becoming an artist, he broke free of a family tradition – his father, a miner like his predecessors, took him to work with him from an early age, probably priming him for a future in the mines. Roman chose another path, but the miner’s existence and day-to-day working life has remained a subject close to his heart. After completing his studies at the Academy, he was attracted to monumental art. Later, he was hailed by journalists as one of the primary masters of the fast-developing genre of monumental painting in Ukraine. In addition to this, he works in art photography and writes songs and poetry. He is a “multi-tasking machinist”, like Yegor Letov, whose work at one time served as a source of inspiration for Roman. He also points to folk wisdom, the works of unknown wall painters of the past, and the famous Mexican trio of Rivera, Orozco, and Siqueiros as sources of inspiration. Roman always uses his real name when signing his work, regardless of whether a piece has been created for an exhibition, or on the wall of a neighbouring building. He believes that generating intrigue around a nickname is nothing more than fooling around with elitist inaccessibility, and has nothing to do with the dangers inherent in underground activism. He himself, then, remains an open propagandist of street art. He has participated in and organized festivals of street art numerous times in Kharkiv. Currently, the psychology of those who labour in mines is a primary motif in his work. From project to project, and series to series, we see the evolution of the artist’s image of the miner. In his compositions under the title Symbol of Faith, Roman moves from stories about the life and routine of the miner to a sacralization of the image of the miner. The next project in this cycle is the Plan of Escape from Donetsk Region. While maintaining the technique and artistic devices employed thus far in the series, Roman moves away from the image of the miner as the central figure. Instead, the focus is more on trends applicable to the whole of Ukraine. The series itself was created in 2012, before the start of the events in the eastern regions of the country.

147


Four Corners of the World VETRazhi 2014 Vinyl, 2 pcs. 144.5 х 544 cm

“Vetrazh” is the artist’s neologism, formed from the Russian words for “stained glass” and “wind”. The lightweight, translucent canvases simultaneously resemble flags waving in the wind, and the windows of an invisible church. The artist chose to express himself in this way because he wanted to convey and pinpoint that rare human feeling which combines a state of lightness with a sense of eternity and beauty. Roman Minin depicts miners in various guises and occupied in different activities in his rippling “vetrazh” pieces. These works are a continuation and development of the series Plan of Escape from Donetsk Region and intersect with the sacralization of images and life stories of ordinary workers.

148

149


Four Corners of the World VETRazhi 2014 Vinyl, 2 pcs. 144.5 х 544 cm

“Vetrazh” is the artist’s neologism, formed from the Russian words for “stained glass” and “wind”. The lightweight, translucent canvases simultaneously resemble flags waving in the wind, and the windows of an invisible church. The artist chose to express himself in this way because he wanted to convey and pinpoint that rare human feeling which combines a state of lightness with a sense of eternity and beauty. Roman Minin depicts miners in various guises and occupied in different activities in his rippling “vetrazh” pieces. These works are a continuation and development of the series Plan of Escape from Donetsk Region and intersect with the sacralization of images and life stories of ordinary workers.

148

149


Marat Morik Siberian street artist, one of the organizers of the Paint Methods Festival and the FGA Graffiti Agency

The mission of The Paint Methods Festival is to correct the distorted public view of graffiti as a destructive current in youth subculture.

150

Novosibirsk, Russia Marat Danilyan was born in Novosibirsk in 1982. When he was still a child, he loved flicking through his mother’s books about classical artists. At school, he tried to copy fragments of famous paintings. He became acquainted with graffiti in 1998, committing his first work to a wall that same year. His involvement with graffiti turned into a serious passion two years later, on the wave of the popularization of graffiti culture in Russia. Having received his formal education in economics and philology, Marat taught himself artistic skills and honed his spray painting technique. After initially being fascinated with lettering styles, Marat transitioned to abstract and figurative compositions. On the one hand, he wanted to create more serious and resonant art; on the other, he was eager to experiment not only with style, but with techniques and materials. He began to integrate acrylic paint, oil pastels, ballpoint pens, pencils, and ink into his work. Marat Morik’s style features complex nuances of colour and a refined use of colour. In figurative compositions, he favours a method of layering several colour planes on top of one other. Marat’s oeuvre is thematically very diverse. It includes abstract, decorative, and landscape compositions, as well as pieces that deal with social and political issues. Some of Marat’s projects are created in partnership with Andrey Aber, with whom he has often collaborated over the past few years. Among their most famous collaborative efforts is a mural called Cellist that was created specifically for the Like it. Art. festival and occupied one side of a building in Kazan. Together, Aber and Morik created Russia’s first graffiti agency, known as FGA, where a whole team of talented artists now work. The agency undertakes a broad range of activities: from graffiti and street art to creating scenery and installations and putting on exhibitions and festivals. The Paint Methods Festival in Krasnoyarsk is yet another project which Marat has helped to launch and organize. Held since 2007, its mission, according to its organizers, is to “correct the distorted public view of graffiti as a destructive current in youth subculture.” A feature that sets this project apart from others is that participants create one collective mural.

151


Marat Morik Siberian street artist, one of the organizers of the Paint Methods Festival and the FGA Graffiti Agency

The mission of The Paint Methods Festival is to correct the distorted public view of graffiti as a destructive current in youth subculture.

150

Novosibirsk, Russia Marat Danilyan was born in Novosibirsk in 1982. When he was still a child, he loved flicking through his mother’s books about classical artists. At school, he tried to copy fragments of famous paintings. He became acquainted with graffiti in 1998, committing his first work to a wall that same year. His involvement with graffiti turned into a serious passion two years later, on the wave of the popularization of graffiti culture in Russia. Having received his formal education in economics and philology, Marat taught himself artistic skills and honed his spray painting technique. After initially being fascinated with lettering styles, Marat transitioned to abstract and figurative compositions. On the one hand, he wanted to create more serious and resonant art; on the other, he was eager to experiment not only with style, but with techniques and materials. He began to integrate acrylic paint, oil pastels, ballpoint pens, pencils, and ink into his work. Marat Morik’s style features complex nuances of colour and a refined use of colour. In figurative compositions, he favours a method of layering several colour planes on top of one other. Marat’s oeuvre is thematically very diverse. It includes abstract, decorative, and landscape compositions, as well as pieces that deal with social and political issues. Some of Marat’s projects are created in partnership with Andrey Aber, with whom he has often collaborated over the past few years. Among their most famous collaborative efforts is a mural called Cellist that was created specifically for the Like it. Art. festival and occupied one side of a building in Kazan. Together, Aber and Morik created Russia’s first graffiti agency, known as FGA, where a whole team of talented artists now work. The agency undertakes a broad range of activities: from graffiti and street art to creating scenery and installations and putting on exhibitions and festivals. The Paint Methods Festival in Krasnoyarsk is yet another project which Marat has helped to launch and organize. Held since 2007, its mission, according to its organizers, is to “correct the distorted public view of graffiti as a destructive current in youth subculture.” A feature that sets this project apart from others is that participants create one collective mural.

151


Opposition 2014 Acrylic on canvas, spray paint, watercolour pencils. 138 х 199 cm

Opposition, a canvas painting by Marat Morik created especially for the Casus Pacis exhibition, is on display in the main gallery of the Street Art Museum. The painting, complex in its composition and colour range, depicts the moment when a boy and his dog meet a robot with artificial intelligence (Bog Dog Robot). According to the artist, the boy symbolizes a somewhat naïve common people who are nonetheless strong in spirit and pure of thought. The adolescent has with him his faithful dog, but, as the artist sees it, they cannot compete with the robot dog – a personification of passionless intransigence, a collective image of progress and modern technology, controlled by some kind of power broker. A hero in a top hat is a secretive leader, whose presence is felt in any war. He is the epitome of the calculating and avaricious political elite, which is ready to sacrifice millions to further its own interests. According to the author, the masks of martyrdom and tragedy in the background symbolize the great spectrum of suffering and sacrifice. “The boy is not looking at the adversary: he is ready to fight the high-tech army that far exceeds him in its might, not realizing that he is doomed from the start. His dog, on the other hand, just like any animal, senses the one whom he should really be fighting against”, explains Marat.

152

153


Opposition 2014 Acrylic on canvas, spray paint, watercolour pencils. 138 х 199 cm

Opposition, a canvas painting by Marat Morik created especially for the Casus Pacis exhibition, is on display in the main gallery of the Street Art Museum. The painting, complex in its composition and colour range, depicts the moment when a boy and his dog meet a robot with artificial intelligence (Bog Dog Robot). According to the artist, the boy symbolizes a somewhat naïve common people who are nonetheless strong in spirit and pure of thought. The adolescent has with him his faithful dog, but, as the artist sees it, they cannot compete with the robot dog – a personification of passionless intransigence, a collective image of progress and modern technology, controlled by some kind of power broker. A hero in a top hat is a secretive leader, whose presence is felt in any war. He is the epitome of the calculating and avaricious political elite, which is ready to sacrifice millions to further its own interests. According to the author, the masks of martyrdom and tragedy in the background symbolize the great spectrum of suffering and sacrifice. “The boy is not looking at the adversary: he is ready to fight the high-tech army that far exceeds him in its might, not realizing that he is doomed from the start. His dog, on the other hand, just like any animal, senses the one whom he should really be fighting against”, explains Marat.

152

153


Misha Most Street artist

real graffiti does not need any fine tuning – it’s underground, spontaneous, and self-contained.

154

Moscow, Russia Misha Most was born and raised in Moscow. Like many children, he loved to draw on the last pages of his exercise books at school. At sixteen, he decided to make the leap to walls. “In those days I was listening to rap, and it, along with graffiti, was part of hip-hop culture, so I decided to imitate what I was seeing in videos and magazines”, explains Misha. Moscow itself also had a strong effect on the artist – back then it was very dark, grim, and bleak. There were many who wanted to brighten up the city. The higher education he received had no impact on his life as an artist. Four years after his first foray into wall painting, Misha began to exhibit his work in galleries and museum spaces. In these exhibitions, he, on principle, refused to transfer graffiti from the streets into the museums, regarding it as stupid. His exhibitions showcase other types of work, even if they are similar in spirit. The artist is convinced that street art is effective only on the street. Misha appraises the quality of a work of art by the number of thoughts it provokes, and the conclusions it leads to. He describes his style as simple and straightforward, devoid of subcultural codes and fashionable stylistic gimmicks that overburden a piece. He says that real graffiti does not need any fine tuning – it’s underground, spontaneous, and self-contained. Misha calls graffiti a collaborative form, a team sport. He has participated in collective projects, both with Russian artists, and also with colleagues from abroad. He has been a part of three artistic groups: NoFutureForever, Parazit, and Zachem. Currently he is involved in just two collectives. His solo works have been shown in various contemporary art exhibitions in Russia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, and the USA. In 2008, he was nominated for the Kandinsky Prize, and in 2011 and 2012 he took part in the Youth Biennial and the Biennial of Contemporary Art. He is a practising advocate of underground graffiti. And for all that he’s done, he remains a proponent of street art and underground graffiti. Written language plays an important role, both in his work on the streets, and in his museum pieces. He attaches special meaning to words and phrases, or, conversely, he deliberately strips them of their significance. He believes that the exploits and heroism of ordinary people should command more notice in today’s press and on TV, and should be used as material by artists and performers.

155


Misha Most Street artist

real graffiti does not need any fine tuning – it’s underground, spontaneous, and self-contained.

154

Moscow, Russia Misha Most was born and raised in Moscow. Like many children, he loved to draw on the last pages of his exercise books at school. At sixteen, he decided to make the leap to walls. “In those days I was listening to rap, and it, along with graffiti, was part of hip-hop culture, so I decided to imitate what I was seeing in videos and magazines”, explains Misha. Moscow itself also had a strong effect on the artist – back then it was very dark, grim, and bleak. There were many who wanted to brighten up the city. The higher education he received had no impact on his life as an artist. Four years after his first foray into wall painting, Misha began to exhibit his work in galleries and museum spaces. In these exhibitions, he, on principle, refused to transfer graffiti from the streets into the museums, regarding it as stupid. His exhibitions showcase other types of work, even if they are similar in spirit. The artist is convinced that street art is effective only on the street. Misha appraises the quality of a work of art by the number of thoughts it provokes, and the conclusions it leads to. He describes his style as simple and straightforward, devoid of subcultural codes and fashionable stylistic gimmicks that overburden a piece. He says that real graffiti does not need any fine tuning – it’s underground, spontaneous, and self-contained. Misha calls graffiti a collaborative form, a team sport. He has participated in collective projects, both with Russian artists, and also with colleagues from abroad. He has been a part of three artistic groups: NoFutureForever, Parazit, and Zachem. Currently he is involved in just two collectives. His solo works have been shown in various contemporary art exhibitions in Russia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, and the USA. In 2008, he was nominated for the Kandinsky Prize, and in 2011 and 2012 he took part in the Youth Biennial and the Biennial of Contemporary Art. He is a practising advocate of underground graffiti. And for all that he’s done, he remains a proponent of street art and underground graffiti. Written language plays an important role, both in his work on the streets, and in his museum pieces. He attaches special meaning to words and phrases, or, conversely, he deliberately strips them of their significance. He believes that the exploits and heroism of ordinary people should command more notice in today’s press and on TV, and should be used as material by artists and performers.

155


Spider Web 2014 Installation, mixed media

The Spider Web installation is located on the ceiling of the main gallery. The work connects the flags of various global powers. In the artist’s conception, a spider web is a trap that countries around the world have fallen into today while trying to act in their own interests. What they do not realize is that in actuality, they have long since become completely interdependent. This work addresses the interaction of governments in the world today. The artist seeks to depict the attempts made by different countries to push away from each other even as they are increasingly immersed in a single globalist society existing in one domain, with shared consequences that impact everyone.

156

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Spider Web 2014 Installation, mixed media

The Spider Web installation is located on the ceiling of the main gallery. The work connects the flags of various global powers. In the artist’s conception, a spider web is a trap that countries around the world have fallen into today while trying to act in their own interests. What they do not realize is that in actuality, they have long since become completely interdependent. This work addresses the interaction of governments in the world today. The artist seeks to depict the attempts made by different countries to push away from each other even as they are increasingly immersed in a single globalist society existing in one domain, with shared consequences that impact everyone.

156

157


Vova Nootk Artist, graphic designer, and illustrator

Artist has been bringing strange but cute animated characters to life, creating them either as individual images or in the form of large patterns.

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Moscow, Russia For more than 12 years, Nootk has been bringing strange but cute animated characters to life, creating them either as individual images or in the form of large patterns. These patterns are not simply spaces filled with eyes and noses; rather, each is its own territory with a unique universe, history, and theme. The artist was born in 1981. He claims to have always loved to draw, and has done so since childhood, preferring it to toy cars or video games. In school and at university, he would draw caricatures of classmates and teachers on the backs of his desks. In many ways, these images and motifs have formed the basis for his current work. After studying architecture for six years at Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography, he realized that, on the whole, submitting drafts and pictures interested him more than the actual subject of architecture, so he decided to devote himself to doing what he truly enjoyed. In 2005, after finishing his studies and participating in the Kontrast group exhibition in Antwerp, Nootk began to throw himself into street art. Around this time, he created a number of well-known pieces on the streets of Moscow and other large cities. Later, with a co-artist from the Paint Breakers crew, he set up a creative duo known as Mainstreamers. His fellow artist Alexey Luka (also widely known as 16:59) is a fan of abstraction and collage, an interest he likely passed on to Nootk as the two worked together. Their collaborations deviate somewhat from street art, focusing more on interior design, illustration, prints for clothing, and exhibitions. Later, Nootk increasingly returned to graffiti as a genre. In both his museum and commercial pieces, his characteristic clean lines and distinctive style are easily discernible, as well as his love for large canvases and self-branding. His current work might more accurately be described as post-graffiti. Still, genre aside, the artist remains true to his use of tightly-packed-together images, vivid patterns, and childlike motifs.

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Vova Nootk Artist, graphic designer, and illustrator

Artist has been bringing strange but cute animated characters to life, creating them either as individual images or in the form of large patterns.

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Moscow, Russia For more than 12 years, Nootk has been bringing strange but cute animated characters to life, creating them either as individual images or in the form of large patterns. These patterns are not simply spaces filled with eyes and noses; rather, each is its own territory with a unique universe, history, and theme. The artist was born in 1981. He claims to have always loved to draw, and has done so since childhood, preferring it to toy cars or video games. In school and at university, he would draw caricatures of classmates and teachers on the backs of his desks. In many ways, these images and motifs have formed the basis for his current work. After studying architecture for six years at Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography, he realized that, on the whole, submitting drafts and pictures interested him more than the actual subject of architecture, so he decided to devote himself to doing what he truly enjoyed. In 2005, after finishing his studies and participating in the Kontrast group exhibition in Antwerp, Nootk began to throw himself into street art. Around this time, he created a number of well-known pieces on the streets of Moscow and other large cities. Later, with a co-artist from the Paint Breakers crew, he set up a creative duo known as Mainstreamers. His fellow artist Alexey Luka (also widely known as 16:59) is a fan of abstraction and collage, an interest he likely passed on to Nootk as the two worked together. Their collaborations deviate somewhat from street art, focusing more on interior design, illustration, prints for clothing, and exhibitions. Later, Nootk increasingly returned to graffiti as a genre. In both his museum and commercial pieces, his characteristic clean lines and distinctive style are easily discernible, as well as his love for large canvases and self-branding. His current work might more accurately be described as post-graffiti. Still, genre aside, the artist remains true to his use of tightly-packed-together images, vivid patterns, and childlike motifs.

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Time Pattern 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic, aerosol. 2900 х 600 cm

Th e even t s of the ti mes determin e t h e n a t ur e o f t h e co m m un ica t io n – t h e lin e t akes sha pe a nd a s te ch n o l o gy e m er ges , it dis in t e gra t es i n t h e c en t re, ma r ki ng the per i od o f t h e wo r l d w a r s .

Nootk has created a wall piece illustrating the chronology of the development of humanity, and covered it, like a canvas, with a striking monochrome pattern. Using only black and white, he places emphasis on the content of the piece, rather than elaborate visual elegance. Because of the sheer length of the narrative, the viewer can literally walk along this history and follow the evolution from primeval,

prehistoric times to the lustrous present. Imagine taking a full history course in a single day and being asked to summarize it on one page – with this piece, the artist has pretty much done just that. The events and images are tightly interwoven and organized in such a way that they supplement and alter one another. This feature appears regularly in Nootk’s work.

Th e sh a p e s we se e i n t h e f u t u r e w i l l n e ve r b e t h e sa m e . Th e fi e l d sh o w i n g t h e m o d e r n a g e c o m b i n e s e c h o e s o f t h e l o st st r u c tu re wi th a r e f l e c t i o n o n t h e se a r c h f o r b a l a n c e i n t h e p r e se n t a n d t h e fu tu re . — Nootk

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Time Pattern 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic, aerosol. 2900 х 600 cm

Th e even t s of the ti mes determin e t h e n a t ur e o f t h e co m m un ica t io n – t h e lin e t akes sha pe a nd a s te ch n o l o gy e m er ges , it dis in t e gra t es i n t h e c en t re, ma r ki ng the per i od o f t h e wo r l d w a r s .

Nootk has created a wall piece illustrating the chronology of the development of humanity, and covered it, like a canvas, with a striking monochrome pattern. Using only black and white, he places emphasis on the content of the piece, rather than elaborate visual elegance. Because of the sheer length of the narrative, the viewer can literally walk along this history and follow the evolution from primeval,

prehistoric times to the lustrous present. Imagine taking a full history course in a single day and being asked to summarize it on one page – with this piece, the artist has pretty much done just that. The events and images are tightly interwoven and organized in such a way that they supplement and alter one another. This feature appears regularly in Nootk’s work.

Th e sh a p e s we se e i n t h e f u t u r e w i l l n e ve r b e t h e sa m e . Th e fi e l d sh o w i n g t h e m o d e r n a g e c o m b i n e s e c h o e s o f t h e l o st st r u c tu re wi th a r e f l e c t i o n o n t h e se a r c h f o r b a l a n c e i n t h e p r e se n t a n d t h e fu tu re . — Nootk

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Konstantin Novikov Artist and sculptor, creator of monumental sculptures and installations

Not limiting himself to traditional sculpture, the artist also creates public artworks.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Born in 1981. Novikov was educated in art at the N.K. Roerich Art School, and graduated from the Faculty of Monumental Art at the A.L. Stieglitz Academy in 2007. He first exhibited in the Young Art Session at the Museum of Urban Sculpture in 2007. Later, his projects were displayed at Moscow’s 3rd International Biennale for Young Art, the Between Heaven and Earth exhibition at the Rizzordi Art Foundation, the Elastic Art exhibition at Erarta, and others. Currently, Novikov is a member of the Russian Artists’ Trade Union, and he participates in major exhibitions in Russia and abroad. He works with a wide variety of materials – wood, stone, rubber, cement, and plastics – and he is not afraid to experiment. His best-known works include the installation Nabat, which imitates an Orthodox bell tower with rubber bells, and the sculpture series Fat, presented in 2012 at the Moscow International Biennale for Young Art. Not limiting himself to traditional sculpture, Konstantin also creates public artworks. For the parallel programme Manifesta-10, for example, Konstantin prepared a personal project to grace the area around the entrances of buildings in St. Petersburg: the artist suggested replacing message boards with decorative classical frames made of concrete. The frames were later installed in the city’s residential areas.

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Konstantin Novikov Artist and sculptor, creator of monumental sculptures and installations

Not limiting himself to traditional sculpture, the artist also creates public artworks.

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St. Petersburg, Russia Born in 1981. Novikov was educated in art at the N.K. Roerich Art School, and graduated from the Faculty of Monumental Art at the A.L. Stieglitz Academy in 2007. He first exhibited in the Young Art Session at the Museum of Urban Sculpture in 2007. Later, his projects were displayed at Moscow’s 3rd International Biennale for Young Art, the Between Heaven and Earth exhibition at the Rizzordi Art Foundation, the Elastic Art exhibition at Erarta, and others. Currently, Novikov is a member of the Russian Artists’ Trade Union, and he participates in major exhibitions in Russia and abroad. He works with a wide variety of materials – wood, stone, rubber, cement, and plastics – and he is not afraid to experiment. His best-known works include the installation Nabat, which imitates an Orthodox bell tower with rubber bells, and the sculpture series Fat, presented in 2012 at the Moscow International Biennale for Young Art. Not limiting himself to traditional sculpture, Konstantin also creates public artworks. For the parallel programme Manifesta-10, for example, Konstantin prepared a personal project to grace the area around the entrances of buildings in St. Petersburg: the artist suggested replacing message boards with decorative classical frames made of concrete. The frames were later installed in the city’s residential areas.

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Library 2014 Object, fibre-reinforced concrete, mixed media. 500 х 120 х 120 cm

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the sculptor created Library, a five-metre-tall installation. The sculpture comprises a column on a classical foundation, the upper portion of which is made of moulds of books the artist acquired from one of St. Petersburg’s closed libraries. The form and proportions are reminiscent of a factory chimney. The artist believes that this project may come to serve not just as a symbol, but also as a direct medium of information, if it is fitted with a Wi-Fi transmitter.

With each passing year, the book as an object occupies less and less space. It is turning digital. New technologies are changing the recognizable form of the book; it is steadily dissolving into an enormous stream of information. I have often come across situations where many books of all different genres and types are being tossed out as obsolete or given away free. In this project, I want to capture the classical form of the book by making a mould out of it and casting it in something solid. 1

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http://www.konstantinnovikov.com/?p=288 (Russian only)

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Library 2014 Object, fibre-reinforced concrete, mixed media. 500 х 120 х 120 cm

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the sculptor created Library, a five-metre-tall installation. The sculpture comprises a column on a classical foundation, the upper portion of which is made of moulds of books the artist acquired from one of St. Petersburg’s closed libraries. The form and proportions are reminiscent of a factory chimney. The artist believes that this project may come to serve not just as a symbol, but also as a direct medium of information, if it is fitted with a Wi-Fi transmitter.

With each passing year, the book as an object occupies less and less space. It is turning digital. New technologies are changing the recognizable form of the book; it is steadily dissolving into an enormous stream of information. I have often come across situations where many books of all different genres and types are being tossed out as obsolete or given away free. In this project, I want to capture the classical form of the book by making a mould out of it and casting it in something solid. 1

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http://www.konstantinnovikov.com/?p=288 (Russian only)

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Vova Pavlov Artist, photographer, graphic artist

Artist’s work has been strongly influenced by his love of Norse mythology and subcultures taking their cue from it.

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Yalta, Crimea Vova Pavlov, the young Ukrainian artist and graphic designer, was born in Yalta two weeks before the collapse of the Soviet Union. He began to draw when he was still quite young, inspired by his father’s drawings. After school, he enrolled at the local university, where he studied fine arts. He came face to face with street art in secondary school after meeting young artists from the area. Classic graffiti writing exerted a major influence on his art, although Vova now prefers graphic art. His influences are wildly diverse, ranging from Romantic era compositions, to natural phenomena, to playful conceptual art and random objects found on the street. His work has been strongly influenced by his love of Norse mythology and subcultures taking their cue from it, like fantasy and black metal, which have their own aesthetic and vibe. He is very enthusiastic about what is going on in the gaming industry. “I like the fact that contemporary artists working on game design are imitating classical methods and techniques.” Currently, he belongs to two crews. He founded the first, E.P.S., with his friends in Yalta, graffiti writers with whom he has been painting since his school days. The second group formed from his association with artists from Kiev and Ternopil: Lodek (Vova Vorotnеv), Ura (Yura Kanevsky), and Nek (Stepan Ganja). The name of this artistic collective is Сhildren’s Сruzade, and Vova, along with the others in the collective, participated in the POOR but COOL exhibition of young Ukrainian artists, which was a part of the 2012 I Love Kiev festival. Vova is currently working in graphic design. He regards the annexation of his native Crimea to Russia as unlawful and inappropriate in these trying times for his country.

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Vova Pavlov Artist, photographer, graphic artist

Artist’s work has been strongly influenced by his love of Norse mythology and subcultures taking their cue from it.

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Yalta, Crimea Vova Pavlov, the young Ukrainian artist and graphic designer, was born in Yalta two weeks before the collapse of the Soviet Union. He began to draw when he was still quite young, inspired by his father’s drawings. After school, he enrolled at the local university, where he studied fine arts. He came face to face with street art in secondary school after meeting young artists from the area. Classic graffiti writing exerted a major influence on his art, although Vova now prefers graphic art. His influences are wildly diverse, ranging from Romantic era compositions, to natural phenomena, to playful conceptual art and random objects found on the street. His work has been strongly influenced by his love of Norse mythology and subcultures taking their cue from it, like fantasy and black metal, which have their own aesthetic and vibe. He is very enthusiastic about what is going on in the gaming industry. “I like the fact that contemporary artists working on game design are imitating classical methods and techniques.” Currently, he belongs to two crews. He founded the first, E.P.S., with his friends in Yalta, graffiti writers with whom he has been painting since his school days. The second group formed from his association with artists from Kiev and Ternopil: Lodek (Vova Vorotnеv), Ura (Yura Kanevsky), and Nek (Stepan Ganja). The name of this artistic collective is Сhildren’s Сruzade, and Vova, along with the others in the collective, participated in the POOR but COOL exhibition of young Ukrainian artists, which was a part of the 2012 I Love Kiev festival. Vova is currently working in graphic design. He regards the annexation of his native Crimea to Russia as unlawful and inappropriate in these trying times for his country.

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HalvdaN 2014 Vinyl. 90 х 203,83 cm

The installation comprises a flag on which the word “halvdan” is depicted in the style of a logo for a black metal band. Halvdan is part of a phrase that a Viking in the ninth century carved on a marble parapet in the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (now Istanbul). The installation is a representation of this event and an illustration of the act of unilaterally seizing territory. In his work, the artist alludes at one and the same time to the role of the flag in human history, and also to the theme of barbarism.

I n fact , graffiti i s self -promoti o n t h r o ugh t h e at t ribut es of one’s per sona l s t y l e ; t h e maj o r emp h asi s i n i t i s on crea tin g a n a m e. I r e aliz ed t h at the g ra f f i ti crea ted by a S c a n din avian i n the ea r ly Mi ddle Age s w a s t o t ally in k eepi ng wi th the a esth et ics o f t h is e xh i bit ion .

— Vo v a Pa v l o v

As an epigraph to his work, the artist selected two quotes from the Spanish philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset’s The Revolt of the Masses: “The traveller who arrives in a barbarous country knows that in that territory there are no ruling principles to which it is possible to appeal. Barbarism is the absence of standards to which appeal can be made. Barbarians simply do not have them and have no recourse to anything.”

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HalvdaN 2014 Vinyl. 90 х 203,83 cm

The installation comprises a flag on which the word “halvdan” is depicted in the style of a logo for a black metal band. Halvdan is part of a phrase that a Viking in the ninth century carved on a marble parapet in the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (now Istanbul). The installation is a representation of this event and an illustration of the act of unilaterally seizing territory. In his work, the artist alludes at one and the same time to the role of the flag in human history, and also to the theme of barbarism.

I n fact , graffiti i s self -promoti o n t h r o ugh t h e at t ribut es of one’s per sona l s t y l e ; t h e maj o r emp h asi s i n i t i s on crea tin g a n a m e. I r e aliz ed t h at the g ra f f i ti crea ted by a S c a n din avian i n the ea r ly Mi ddle Age s w a s t o t ally in k eepi ng wi th the a esth et ics o f t h is e xh i bit ion .

— Vo v a Pa v l o v

As an epigraph to his work, the artist selected two quotes from the Spanish philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset’s The Revolt of the Masses: “The traveller who arrives in a barbarous country knows that in that territory there are no ruling principles to which it is possible to appeal. Barbarism is the absence of standards to which appeal can be made. Barbarians simply do not have them and have no recourse to anything.”

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Viktor Puzo (PVKh) Artist, musician, a member of the Just Great Artists association

T he more I delve i nto t h e s t udy o f a r t , t h e m ore I u nder sta nd t h a t I do n’t kn o w a da m n t hi ng a bou t i t. So ou r a p p r o a ch t o a r t is fa ir l y t ong ue-i n-cheek. The s it ua t io n is t h a t s o-ca lled moder n a r t , co n t e m p o ra r y a r t , is rather bori ng , di smal s h it . An d co n t em p o ra r y ar ti sts en ma sse a re a n in co h e r en t gr o up . As thi ng s sta nd, i t’s cy n ica l t h e w a y we h a ve ava i led our selves of t h e deficit o f s im p l e t hi ng s, si mple emotio n s . Ap p a r e n t l y , a ga in s t t he ba ckdr op of thi s deficit , it didn’t a l l t ur n out so ba d. 1

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Moscow, Russia Notorious Moscow artist, musician, and blogger; creator of the famous triptych about the peculiarities of the Russian soul and the videos Experiencing the World with Victor Puzo. A founding member of the group Just Great Artists (PVKh), part of the Wizard Artists (KOLKHUI) association, and a member of the musical collective The Inquisitorum and the duet Prokhor and Puzo. Formerly an employee of an antique gallery, Viktor Puzo managed, over time, to turn his entire life into a work of art. Even his age is a mystery: some sources have it that he was born in 1966, while others say it was 1974. Puzo’s alter ego is a professional alcoholic, an adolescent lowlife with marked signs of moronism. The artist achieved fame thanks to his critical and satirical stance towards the present government, the world of glamour, and folk wisdom. The foul-mouthed, self-taught artist uses humour to shock his audiences, but has long since endeared himself to the public. His manner of expressing himself is insolent, rude, and straightforward, and in terms of style his work is close to the popular prints, or so-called multrealizm. Puzo loves dishing out advice on various everyday matters. He became interested in painting in 2005, shortly before the formation of PVKh. “It all started when I called Boris Trevozhniy and suggested we take a peek at the Jack of Diamonds exhibition... We went to the exhibition, and Boris says ‘Let’s start painting too!’ It just so happens that back then I was a real boozer and I decided that painting would be a good alternative to getting drunk, and so I agreed.” Collaboration with the artist Nikolai Kopeikin was the next important step, along with the first exhibition in Geneva, which opened some six months after the conversation at the Jack of Diamonds show. Subsequent projects that have added to the artist’s reputation in Moscow have been shown at the Zverev Centre, the Semyon Peterson Gallery and the Tretyakov Gallery. Puzo works primarily with oil on canvas, selecting subjects from the political and social realms, as well as from popular culture. Simultaneously gloomy, social, ironic, and vibrant, his paintings definitely generate public interest. For Casus Pacis, the artist selected two series of paintings. The Adventures of Old Women is the story of three cheerful old women with crutches and shopping trolleys, named Isolde, Brunnhilde, and Iolanta. In this series, the old women battle for justice, punish villains, and fight for a happy life. At one point, they spread shit over the doorknob to the State Duma, next they refuse to recognize Mizulina as an old woman, another time they begin to toss bricks from the roof, and then they beat up Milonov. Cheerful, active, and righteous grannies. The second series features labels for non-existent vodkas with funereal themes such as Tomb, Remembrance, and so on.

http://thekitchentalks.blogspot.ru/2010/07/blog-post.html (Russian only)

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Viktor Puzo (PVKh) Artist, musician, a member of the Just Great Artists association

T he more I delve i nto t h e s t udy o f a r t , t h e m ore I u nder sta nd t h a t I do n’t kn o w a da m n t hi ng a bou t i t. So ou r a p p r o a ch t o a r t is fa ir l y t ong ue-i n-cheek. The s it ua t io n is t h a t s o-ca lled moder n a r t , co n t e m p o ra r y a r t , is rather bori ng , di smal s h it . An d co n t em p o ra r y ar ti sts en ma sse a re a n in co h e r en t gr o up . As thi ng s sta nd, i t’s cy n ica l t h e w a y we h a ve ava i led our selves of t h e deficit o f s im p l e t hi ng s, si mple emotio n s . Ap p a r e n t l y , a ga in s t t he ba ckdr op of thi s deficit , it didn’t a l l t ur n out so ba d. 1

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Moscow, Russia Notorious Moscow artist, musician, and blogger; creator of the famous triptych about the peculiarities of the Russian soul and the videos Experiencing the World with Victor Puzo. A founding member of the group Just Great Artists (PVKh), part of the Wizard Artists (KOLKHUI) association, and a member of the musical collective The Inquisitorum and the duet Prokhor and Puzo. Formerly an employee of an antique gallery, Viktor Puzo managed, over time, to turn his entire life into a work of art. Even his age is a mystery: some sources have it that he was born in 1966, while others say it was 1974. Puzo’s alter ego is a professional alcoholic, an adolescent lowlife with marked signs of moronism. The artist achieved fame thanks to his critical and satirical stance towards the present government, the world of glamour, and folk wisdom. The foul-mouthed, self-taught artist uses humour to shock his audiences, but has long since endeared himself to the public. His manner of expressing himself is insolent, rude, and straightforward, and in terms of style his work is close to the popular prints, or so-called multrealizm. Puzo loves dishing out advice on various everyday matters. He became interested in painting in 2005, shortly before the formation of PVKh. “It all started when I called Boris Trevozhniy and suggested we take a peek at the Jack of Diamonds exhibition... We went to the exhibition, and Boris says ‘Let’s start painting too!’ It just so happens that back then I was a real boozer and I decided that painting would be a good alternative to getting drunk, and so I agreed.” Collaboration with the artist Nikolai Kopeikin was the next important step, along with the first exhibition in Geneva, which opened some six months after the conversation at the Jack of Diamonds show. Subsequent projects that have added to the artist’s reputation in Moscow have been shown at the Zverev Centre, the Semyon Peterson Gallery and the Tretyakov Gallery. Puzo works primarily with oil on canvas, selecting subjects from the political and social realms, as well as from popular culture. Simultaneously gloomy, social, ironic, and vibrant, his paintings definitely generate public interest. For Casus Pacis, the artist selected two series of paintings. The Adventures of Old Women is the story of three cheerful old women with crutches and shopping trolleys, named Isolde, Brunnhilde, and Iolanta. In this series, the old women battle for justice, punish villains, and fight for a happy life. At one point, they spread shit over the doorknob to the State Duma, next they refuse to recognize Mizulina as an old woman, another time they begin to toss bricks from the roof, and then they beat up Milonov. Cheerful, active, and righteous grannies. The second series features labels for non-existent vodkas with funereal themes such as Tomb, Remembrance, and so on.

http://thekitchentalks.blogspot.ru/2010/07/blog-post.html (Russian only)

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For the Repose 2014 Fibreboard, acrylic. 60 х 40 cm

Red Churchyard Confectionary Factory Showcases New Product: Alyonka Chocolate – An Event After the Death 2014 Corrugated fibreboard, acrylic. 35 х 20 сm

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For the Repose 2014 Fibreboard, acrylic. 60 х 40 cm

Red Churchyard Confectionary Factory Showcases New Product: Alyonka Chocolate – An Event After the Death 2014 Corrugated fibreboard, acrylic. 35 х 20 сm

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The Way the Old Women Went to the Tretyakov Gallery 2014 Corrugated fibreboard, acrylic. 30 Ń… 40 cm

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The Way the Old Women Went to the Tretyakov Gallery 2014 Corrugated fibreboard, acrylic. 30 Ń… 40 cm

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Aleksey Sergeev (PVKh) Moscow artist, a member of the Just Great Artists association Sergeev was born in Moscow in 1978, and studied at the D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Having received no formal artistic training, it was some time before he even considered a career as an artist. Aleksey began his involvement with painting in 2005– 2006, and soon founded the association Just Great Artists (PVKh), along with his friends. For him at that time, painting became the best, most straightforward means of expressing himself, and according to his friends, “Sergeich” immediately showed artistic talent and his work soon began to appear on display at various exhibitions and festivals, and was snapped up by private collectors. Aleksey recalls the history of the creation of PVKh as follows: “One day, in May 2006, Boris, Viktor, and I were hanging out, and instead of another mug of tea, we decided to start painting. To fortify ourselves, we visited the Tretyakov Gallery at Krymsky Val, and a couple of days after that we came up with a name – PVKh (Just Great Artists). On 6 June, we held our first group exhibition at Moscow’s Gogol Club. We dedicated it to the birthday of Alexander Pushkin, who, if not for d’Anthès, might have been celebrating his 207th year.” The artist’s style is close to naïve art and folk prints. As Aleksey says, in his work he seeks to convey love and wants to make the world a better place. He has a soft spot for surrounding reality, which is where he finds the majority of his themes. Many domestic and European collections now contain works by Aleksey Sergeev, including the collection of the Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art in St. Petersburg.

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Moscow, Russia Eight paintings by the artist, created between 2010 and the present, are on display as part of the Casus Pacis exhibition. The paintings Soil Samples and Broad Maslenitsa on Mercury from the Russian Cosmos series stem from the artist’s reflections on the metaphysics of the Russian soul. From his Postcards series, Aleksey Sergeev opted to contribute his works Gay Parade in Moscow and Peace to the World to the exhibition. This series centres around a general storyline featuring a fictional character, a man abandoned as a child by his parents in India. He returns to his native land after many years and relays his impressions of everything he sees around him on postcards. The series of portraits entitled Olympic Team was created in 2013 for his solo exhibition Eternal Sochi, and tells the story of a perfect team consisting only of the great figures of Russian history, strong in spirit, body, and mind. The captain of this team is Leo Tolstoy, and hockey is represented by the artist Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin and Doctor Paracelsus. Sofia Kovalevskaya and Mikhail Lomonosov are both figure skaters, and Nikolai Lobachevsky is a bobsledder. These figures are depicted on small wooden boards with indentations, similar in appearance to icons. The pieces Oprichniks and Festivities-Disorder depict present day reality, while Black Carat is an ironic reinterpretation of the well-known work of art from the last century. As Aleksey Sergeev says, all these paintings express the history of our country, its past, present, and future.

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Aleksey Sergeev (PVKh) Moscow artist, a member of the Just Great Artists association Sergeev was born in Moscow in 1978, and studied at the D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Having received no formal artistic training, it was some time before he even considered a career as an artist. Aleksey began his involvement with painting in 2005– 2006, and soon founded the association Just Great Artists (PVKh), along with his friends. For him at that time, painting became the best, most straightforward means of expressing himself, and according to his friends, “Sergeich” immediately showed artistic talent and his work soon began to appear on display at various exhibitions and festivals, and was snapped up by private collectors. Aleksey recalls the history of the creation of PVKh as follows: “One day, in May 2006, Boris, Viktor, and I were hanging out, and instead of another mug of tea, we decided to start painting. To fortify ourselves, we visited the Tretyakov Gallery at Krymsky Val, and a couple of days after that we came up with a name – PVKh (Just Great Artists). On 6 June, we held our first group exhibition at Moscow’s Gogol Club. We dedicated it to the birthday of Alexander Pushkin, who, if not for d’Anthès, might have been celebrating his 207th year.” The artist’s style is close to naïve art and folk prints. As Aleksey says, in his work he seeks to convey love and wants to make the world a better place. He has a soft spot for surrounding reality, which is where he finds the majority of his themes. Many domestic and European collections now contain works by Aleksey Sergeev, including the collection of the Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art in St. Petersburg.

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Moscow, Russia Eight paintings by the artist, created between 2010 and the present, are on display as part of the Casus Pacis exhibition. The paintings Soil Samples and Broad Maslenitsa on Mercury from the Russian Cosmos series stem from the artist’s reflections on the metaphysics of the Russian soul. From his Postcards series, Aleksey Sergeev opted to contribute his works Gay Parade in Moscow and Peace to the World to the exhibition. This series centres around a general storyline featuring a fictional character, a man abandoned as a child by his parents in India. He returns to his native land after many years and relays his impressions of everything he sees around him on postcards. The series of portraits entitled Olympic Team was created in 2013 for his solo exhibition Eternal Sochi, and tells the story of a perfect team consisting only of the great figures of Russian history, strong in spirit, body, and mind. The captain of this team is Leo Tolstoy, and hockey is represented by the artist Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin and Doctor Paracelsus. Sofia Kovalevskaya and Mikhail Lomonosov are both figure skaters, and Nikolai Lobachevsky is a bobsledder. These figures are depicted on small wooden boards with indentations, similar in appearance to icons. The pieces Oprichniks and Festivities-Disorder depict present day reality, while Black Carat is an ironic reinterpretation of the well-known work of art from the last century. As Aleksey Sergeev says, all these paintings express the history of our country, its past, present, and future.

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Festivities-Disorder 2014 Oil on canvas. 45 Ń… 110 cm

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Festivities-Disorder 2014 Oil on canvas. 45 Ń… 110 cm

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Oprichniks 2009 Oil on orgalite. 80 Ń… 120 cm

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Oprichniks 2009 Oil on orgalite. 80 Ń… 120 cm

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Porfirii Fedorin (PVKh) Artist and member of the artistic collectives Just Great Artists and Wizard Artists (known as KOLKHUI)

Artist’s compositions and their characteristic subjects are reminiscent of icon images .

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St. Petersburg, Russia Born in 1986 in Moscow, he lives and works in St. Petersburg. Fedorin’s interest in art began in early childhood, and he was trained in icon painting in 2002. Later, Fedorin gave up icon painting for portraiture, and since 2004 he has dedicated himself solely to this field. In 2007, soon after the artist joined PVKh and later KOLKHUI, he began to actively exhibit his work. Porfirii has come closer than anyone else in PVKh to naïve art, Russian popular prints, and the style developed by the Jack of Diamonds group in the early twentieth century. His compositions and their characteristic subjects are reminiscent of icon images. This style is generally adhered to by all the members of PVKh (Porfirii Fedorin, Viktor Puzo, Boris Trevozhniy and Aleksey Sergeev), and it also served as the team’s focal point, in the sense that it was at the Jack of Diamonds exhibition at the Tretyakov Gallery that Viktor Puzo and Boris Trevozhniy came up with the idea to form Just Great Artists. The artist himself defines his style as “cosmogenic surrealism and visionariness.” In his art, Porfirii Fedorin strives to “convey goodness and breadth of consciousness”, urging us to think about complex subjects such as love and death. Porfirii’s works have been shown at exhibitions such as Russian Space at the Zverev Centre of Contemporary Art (2008), Sanatorium of Arts (2010) and Triumph of Caïssa: Dedication to Marcel Duchamp (2013), both at the Tretyakov on Krymsky Val, and they have been part of many major Russian and European exhibition projects. His solo exhibitions Prokhor’s Plate (2011) and Cosmogenics (2013) were shown in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

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Porfirii Fedorin (PVKh) Artist and member of the artistic collectives Just Great Artists and Wizard Artists (known as KOLKHUI)

Artist’s compositions and their characteristic subjects are reminiscent of icon images .

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St. Petersburg, Russia Born in 1986 in Moscow, he lives and works in St. Petersburg. Fedorin’s interest in art began in early childhood, and he was trained in icon painting in 2002. Later, Fedorin gave up icon painting for portraiture, and since 2004 he has dedicated himself solely to this field. In 2007, soon after the artist joined PVKh and later KOLKHUI, he began to actively exhibit his work. Porfirii has come closer than anyone else in PVKh to naïve art, Russian popular prints, and the style developed by the Jack of Diamonds group in the early twentieth century. His compositions and their characteristic subjects are reminiscent of icon images. This style is generally adhered to by all the members of PVKh (Porfirii Fedorin, Viktor Puzo, Boris Trevozhniy and Aleksey Sergeev), and it also served as the team’s focal point, in the sense that it was at the Jack of Diamonds exhibition at the Tretyakov Gallery that Viktor Puzo and Boris Trevozhniy came up with the idea to form Just Great Artists. The artist himself defines his style as “cosmogenic surrealism and visionariness.” In his art, Porfirii Fedorin strives to “convey goodness and breadth of consciousness”, urging us to think about complex subjects such as love and death. Porfirii’s works have been shown at exhibitions such as Russian Space at the Zverev Centre of Contemporary Art (2008), Sanatorium of Arts (2010) and Triumph of Caïssa: Dedication to Marcel Duchamp (2013), both at the Tretyakov on Krymsky Val, and they have been part of many major Russian and European exhibition projects. His solo exhibitions Prokhor’s Plate (2011) and Cosmogenics (2013) were shown in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

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Martial Law 2014 Acrylic on plaster. 300 Ń… 600 cm

As in all of Porfirii’s art, the monumental painting Martial Law tends towards the traditions of icon painting and folk prints. It depicts a stylized male portrait from the shoulders up. The protruding tongue is an ancient symbol with multiple meanings, encountered in practically all cultures. This artist uses it as an element of Gnosticism. According to Porfirii, the mural conveys a message about the peaceful solution of all problems with the help of higher powers. The artist believes that only a narrow circle of interested parties ever benefit from war, and that they use war to solve their own financial, and other, problems. The ordinary people, meanwhile, can only be victims of this war.

I r e ally love both Ru ssi a ns a nd Ukra in ia n s , ve r y s t ron gly a nd pa ssi ona tely, but l a t e l y p e o ple are genera ti ng so much a ggr es s io n t h a t I am left to f ocu s ma i nly on m y fr ie n ds . — Po r f i r i i Fe d o r i n In addition, Porfirii has provided more than 15 panel works created between 2010 and 2014, which cover the themes of war and religion.

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Martial Law 2014 Acrylic on plaster. 300 Ń… 600 cm

As in all of Porfirii’s art, the monumental painting Martial Law tends towards the traditions of icon painting and folk prints. It depicts a stylized male portrait from the shoulders up. The protruding tongue is an ancient symbol with multiple meanings, encountered in practically all cultures. This artist uses it as an element of Gnosticism. According to Porfirii, the mural conveys a message about the peaceful solution of all problems with the help of higher powers. The artist believes that only a narrow circle of interested parties ever benefit from war, and that they use war to solve their own financial, and other, problems. The ordinary people, meanwhile, can only be victims of this war.

I r e ally love both Ru ssi a ns a nd Ukra in ia n s , ve r y s t ron gly a nd pa ssi ona tely, but l a t e l y p e o ple are genera ti ng so much a ggr es s io n t h a t I am left to f ocu s ma i nly on m y fr ie n ds . — Po r f i r i i Fe d o r i n In addition, Porfirii has provided more than 15 panel works created between 2010 and 2014, which cover the themes of war and religion.

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Conscience Calling 2012 Oil on canvas. 55 Ñ… 85 cm

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Conscience Calling 2012 Oil on canvas. 55 Ñ… 85 cm

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Vladimir Potapov Moscow, Russia

Artist, curator, and art historian

We ha ve the su bsta n t ia l ba ck gr o un d o f o ur S ovi et heri ta g e, which in s t il l e d in us a l o ve o f rea li sti c, a nd very lit e ra r y , p a in t in g. S o w it h t ha t ki nd of ba g g a g e , o r p er h a p s I s h o ul d s a y alpha bet, the vi ewer co m es t o a m o de r n a r t ex hi bi ti on a nd tri es t o us e it t o r ea d w h a t h e s ees. Between the o l d ide a l s a n d w h a t h e s ees at modern exhi bi ti o n s , t h er e is a n en o r m o us ri f t tha t tra nsf or ms in t o a r ift in h is bra in . 1

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Vladimir was born and raised in Volgograd. At age 20, he entered the local Serebryakov Institute of Art, but he abandoned his studies after a year. Until 2008, he studied and worked in the studio of Volgograd artist Boris Makhov. A desire to research modern, topical art then drew him to Moscow, where he entered the Institute of Contemporary Art, and a year later he continued his education at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art Free Workshops. In 2013, Vladimir enrolled as a student at the MediaArtLab Open School. Vladimir has twice experimented with street art. The first time was with his Pseudograffiti series, in which he used photographs instead of streets, and the paintbrush in a graphics editor instead of a spray can. The second time was his project Light on the “Wall” at Winzavod. As the first “non-street” artist to come in contact with that canvas, Vladimir created something more like an installation: his wall displayed two street lamps made of white envelopes and outlined in oil. With this approach, he stressed the differences between street art and traditional forms, in the sense that depicting a source of light is usually avoided in classical painting, whereas Vladimir Potapov’s Light boldly does just that. The artist had previously made use of the same contrast in another project of the same name. Also in 2013, before his project at Winzavod, Vladimir used oils on large sheets of plywood to paint a series of chandeliers and table lamps. These works were a rare case in which the artist chose only a taboo object from a wide variety of means of expression. Vladimir believes that painting today is not expressive enough and does not satisfy the artist’s needs, so his pictures and canvases try in various ways to move beyond artificial borders made of frames and canvas. He considers contemporary arts education imperfect and archaic, and he remembers the phrase “thick as a painter” being bandied about in discussions about the masters that Russian higher educational institutions are training today. He chalks up our lack of understanding of modern art to multiple radical departures from our past artistic heritage at various stages of history, and to repeated attempts to rebuild this world from a blank piece of paper. In 2009, Potapov won awards at the Russian Art Week festival in both the Realistic Painting and Surrealistic Painting categories, with his pictures Vopreki and Kokon.

http://aroundart.ru/2014/03/13/vladimir-potapov-horoshaya-zhivopis-e-to-vsegda-izby-tochnoe-soobshhenie/ (Russian only)

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Vladimir Potapov Moscow, Russia

Artist, curator, and art historian

We ha ve the su bsta n t ia l ba ck gr o un d o f o ur S ovi et heri ta g e, which in s t il l e d in us a l o ve o f rea li sti c, a nd very lit e ra r y , p a in t in g. S o w it h t ha t ki nd of ba g g a g e , o r p er h a p s I s h o ul d s a y alpha bet, the vi ewer co m es t o a m o de r n a r t ex hi bi ti on a nd tri es t o us e it t o r ea d w h a t h e s ees. Between the o l d ide a l s a n d w h a t h e s ees at modern exhi bi ti o n s , t h er e is a n en o r m o us ri f t tha t tra nsf or ms in t o a r ift in h is bra in . 1

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Vladimir was born and raised in Volgograd. At age 20, he entered the local Serebryakov Institute of Art, but he abandoned his studies after a year. Until 2008, he studied and worked in the studio of Volgograd artist Boris Makhov. A desire to research modern, topical art then drew him to Moscow, where he entered the Institute of Contemporary Art, and a year later he continued his education at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art Free Workshops. In 2013, Vladimir enrolled as a student at the MediaArtLab Open School. Vladimir has twice experimented with street art. The first time was with his Pseudograffiti series, in which he used photographs instead of streets, and the paintbrush in a graphics editor instead of a spray can. The second time was his project Light on the “Wall” at Winzavod. As the first “non-street” artist to come in contact with that canvas, Vladimir created something more like an installation: his wall displayed two street lamps made of white envelopes and outlined in oil. With this approach, he stressed the differences between street art and traditional forms, in the sense that depicting a source of light is usually avoided in classical painting, whereas Vladimir Potapov’s Light boldly does just that. The artist had previously made use of the same contrast in another project of the same name. Also in 2013, before his project at Winzavod, Vladimir used oils on large sheets of plywood to paint a series of chandeliers and table lamps. These works were a rare case in which the artist chose only a taboo object from a wide variety of means of expression. Vladimir believes that painting today is not expressive enough and does not satisfy the artist’s needs, so his pictures and canvases try in various ways to move beyond artificial borders made of frames and canvas. He considers contemporary arts education imperfect and archaic, and he remembers the phrase “thick as a painter” being bandied about in discussions about the masters that Russian higher educational institutions are training today. He chalks up our lack of understanding of modern art to multiple radical departures from our past artistic heritage at various stages of history, and to repeated attempts to rebuild this world from a blank piece of paper. In 2009, Potapov won awards at the Russian Art Week festival in both the Realistic Painting and Surrealistic Painting categories, with his pictures Vopreki and Kokon.

http://aroundart.ru/2014/03/13/vladimir-potapov-horoshaya-zhivopis-e-to-vsegda-izby-tochnoe-soobshhenie/ (Russian only)

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Barmaley 2014 Plexiglass, oil. 205 х 305 cm

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Potapov has created a work based on a famous photograph by Emmanuel Yevzerikhin which depicts the Barmaley Fountain in Stalingrad (now Volgograd) immediately after an airstrike. With this picture, the artist brings together two tragic dates in the history of his home town: the bombing of Stalingrad on 23 August 1942 and the terrorist attack in Volgograd on 29 December 2013. The Barmaley Fountain, which became a symbol of the horrors of the Battle of Stalingrad, was destroyed and rebuilt after the war, only to be torn down again six years later during the redevelopment of the city. In 2013, a replica was erected on Privokzalnaya Square in memory of the old fountain, and just a few months later there was an explosion nearby, at Volgograd’s train station. The work was executed using the author’s own spatial painting technique, which he used previously in his series Moment of Collapse and Transparent Relationships. In an attempt to rehabilitate painting as such, Vladimir fragments an image, relaying it step by step onto several sheets of plexiglass, and then installing them one behind the other. The finished work can only be seen by looking through all the layers from a certain angle. Otherwise, the characters and images dissolve chaotically into individual elements.

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Barmaley 2014 Plexiglass, oil. 205 х 305 cm

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Potapov has created a work based on a famous photograph by Emmanuel Yevzerikhin which depicts the Barmaley Fountain in Stalingrad (now Volgograd) immediately after an airstrike. With this picture, the artist brings together two tragic dates in the history of his home town: the bombing of Stalingrad on 23 August 1942 and the terrorist attack in Volgograd on 29 December 2013. The Barmaley Fountain, which became a symbol of the horrors of the Battle of Stalingrad, was destroyed and rebuilt after the war, only to be torn down again six years later during the redevelopment of the city. In 2013, a replica was erected on Privokzalnaya Square in memory of the old fountain, and just a few months later there was an explosion nearby, at Volgograd’s train station. The work was executed using the author’s own spatial painting technique, which he used previously in his series Moment of Collapse and Transparent Relationships. In an attempt to rehabilitate painting as such, Vladimir fragments an image, relaying it step by step onto several sheets of plexiglass, and then installing them one behind the other. The finished work can only be seen by looking through all the layers from a certain angle. Otherwise, the characters and images dissolve chaotically into individual elements.

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Rustam QBic Street artist, illustrator, and graphic designer

The artist’s style borders on surrealism, with features of this school appearing in his large-scale street pieces, painted canvases, graphic designs, and illustrations. 192

Kazan, Russia Rustam was born in 1985 in the village of Kamskie Polyany. He began drawing when he moved to Kazan, a year after starting art school in 2007. His first pieces were simple figures and fonts. In 2011, Rustam QBic and graffiti artist Igor IGOU created the art collective BLAM! and undertook their first joint project the same year on a dilapidated nuclear power station in Rustam’s hometown of Kamskie Polyany. In 2012, QBic, along with Amir Haski and Igor IGOU, took part in the Off the Wall group exhibition at the Territory loft space in Kazan. Rustam’s first solo exhibition of canvases and graphic designs, Art, Love, & Life, appeared at Moscow’s Faces & Laces festival in 2013. In the same year, he also created a monumental work depicting a huge duck on the side of a building, for the Art-Ovrag festival held in Vyksa, Russia. The artist’s style borders on surrealism, with features of this school appearing in his large-scale street pieces, painted canvases, graphic designs, and illustrations. Rustam QBic’s work covers a wide range of themes; he dedicates his works to characters from subcultures which are close to his heart, but often prefers surreal and mythical motifs. His body of work focuses entirely on themes of spirituality and wisdom, antiquity and nature. According to the artist, a pivotal moment in his work came with the canvas The Unhurried Journey, which defined the direction Rustam later took in developing his identity as an artist. The figures appearing against the background of his natural scenes serve as a generalized image of the urban dweller. The artist’s graphics are characterized by soft lines and pastel tones, which produce an atmosphere of calm.

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Rustam QBic Street artist, illustrator, and graphic designer

The artist’s style borders on surrealism, with features of this school appearing in his large-scale street pieces, painted canvases, graphic designs, and illustrations. 192

Kazan, Russia Rustam was born in 1985 in the village of Kamskie Polyany. He began drawing when he moved to Kazan, a year after starting art school in 2007. His first pieces were simple figures and fonts. In 2011, Rustam QBic and graffiti artist Igor IGOU created the art collective BLAM! and undertook their first joint project the same year on a dilapidated nuclear power station in Rustam’s hometown of Kamskie Polyany. In 2012, QBic, along with Amir Haski and Igor IGOU, took part in the Off the Wall group exhibition at the Territory loft space in Kazan. Rustam’s first solo exhibition of canvases and graphic designs, Art, Love, & Life, appeared at Moscow’s Faces & Laces festival in 2013. In the same year, he also created a monumental work depicting a huge duck on the side of a building, for the Art-Ovrag festival held in Vyksa, Russia. The artist’s style borders on surrealism, with features of this school appearing in his large-scale street pieces, painted canvases, graphic designs, and illustrations. Rustam QBic’s work covers a wide range of themes; he dedicates his works to characters from subcultures which are close to his heart, but often prefers surreal and mythical motifs. His body of work focuses entirely on themes of spirituality and wisdom, antiquity and nature. According to the artist, a pivotal moment in his work came with the canvas The Unhurried Journey, which defined the direction Rustam later took in developing his identity as an artist. The figures appearing against the background of his natural scenes serve as a generalized image of the urban dweller. The artist’s graphics are characterized by soft lines and pastel tones, which produce an atmosphere of calm.

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Meeting 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 2400 x 1300 cm QBic’s mural Meeting is one of the largest in the Casus Pacis exhibition. Rustam has depicted two surrealist figures separated by a stream. One of the figures is wearing a backpack, the other is holding a bird-key in his hands. According to the artist, this work is about the idea that within every person something as yet unidentified remains hidden. All that remains is to uncover and study it. In the corner of the painting, the word “meeting” is written in Arabic. This piece was inspired by the following lines from Ali-Shir Nava’i’s poem, The Language of the Birds:

It was Man then he made, of all making the peak, Without peer on the earth, a Creation unique. In Man’s heart he set flowing a wisdom-filled well, At whose source the Creator’s own essence did well. And a wonderful secret this treasure contained, Through the charm of Creation its power was gained. Thine the charm, thine the secret sublime and within, O, my soul! Songs of praise to how Thou didst begin!

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Meeting 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 2400 x 1300 cm QBic’s mural Meeting is one of the largest in the Casus Pacis exhibition. Rustam has depicted two surrealist figures separated by a stream. One of the figures is wearing a backpack, the other is holding a bird-key in his hands. According to the artist, this work is about the idea that within every person something as yet unidentified remains hidden. All that remains is to uncover and study it. In the corner of the painting, the word “meeting” is written in Arabic. This piece was inspired by the following lines from Ali-Shir Nava’i’s poem, The Language of the Birds:

It was Man then he made, of all making the peak, Without peer on the earth, a Creation unique. In Man’s heart he set flowing a wisdom-filled well, At whose source the Creator’s own essence did well. And a wonderful secret this treasure contained, Through the charm of Creation its power was gained. Thine the charm, thine the secret sublime and within, O, my soul! Songs of praise to how Thou didst begin!

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The Spring

Little Island

The Return

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 70 cm

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 70 cm

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 100 cm The exhibition also features three of Rustam’s canvases: Little Island, The Spring, and The Return. These pieces form a series with the common themes of inspiration and the connection between humans and nature.

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The Spring

Little Island

The Return

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 70 cm

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 70 cm

2014, Canvas, acrylic. 120 х 100 cm The exhibition also features three of Rustam’s canvases: Little Island, The Spring, and The Return. These pieces form a series with the common themes of inspiration and the connection between humans and nature.

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Потапов Владимир Sergiy Radkevich Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Religious motifs form the main theme of artist’s work.

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Москва, Россия Lviv, Ukraine Sergiy Radkevich, also known by his pseudonym Tek, is a street artist from Lviv. Religious motifs form the main theme of his work. Born in Lutsk in 1987, he later moved to Lviv to study at the Academy of Arts as a monumental artist. At age 16, Sergiy became interested in graffiti. At the very beginning of his creative journey, he often worked in tandem with other artists, mainly Grob and York. After a while, Sergiy left traditional graffiti behind and since then has been working alone. Radkevich’s main theme revolves around questions of spirituality, so he often works in a style reminiscent of religious art or icon painting. The artist believes that a breakthrough moment for his art was his participation in the creation of paintings and mosaics in a church in Lviv. While working there, Sergiy recognized that the graffiti he had been working with previously was nothing more than a eulogy to himself on the walls of city streets, while the important thing in creative artwork is not the mastery with which it is executed, but the content. Sergiy naturally draws the viewer into a dialogue about spirituality, and he tries to force his audience to change for the better. He classifies his work as public art, and considers helping people turn to spirituality to be his duty as an artist. To do this, he makes use of street space, but also works with painting, graphic design, and icon painting. Sergiy is also one of the organizers of the independent street art festival Black Circle, which has a strong DIY ethic. The festival is usually held in neglected places. “Those spaces”, Sergiy opines, “already have a certain image, and as an artist, you have to complete that image with the right work.” In 2011, Sergiy won the PinchukArtCentre’s second Special Prize for his work Eucharist, and one year later he took part in Arsenale, the Ukrainian biennale of contemporary art. That year he also starred in a film about Ukrainian street art.

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Потапов Владимир Sergiy Radkevich Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Religious motifs form the main theme of artist’s work.

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Москва, Россия Lviv, Ukraine Sergiy Radkevich, also known by his pseudonym Tek, is a street artist from Lviv. Religious motifs form the main theme of his work. Born in Lutsk in 1987, he later moved to Lviv to study at the Academy of Arts as a monumental artist. At age 16, Sergiy became interested in graffiti. At the very beginning of his creative journey, he often worked in tandem with other artists, mainly Grob and York. After a while, Sergiy left traditional graffiti behind and since then has been working alone. Radkevich’s main theme revolves around questions of spirituality, so he often works in a style reminiscent of religious art or icon painting. The artist believes that a breakthrough moment for his art was his participation in the creation of paintings and mosaics in a church in Lviv. While working there, Sergiy recognized that the graffiti he had been working with previously was nothing more than a eulogy to himself on the walls of city streets, while the important thing in creative artwork is not the mastery with which it is executed, but the content. Sergiy naturally draws the viewer into a dialogue about spirituality, and he tries to force his audience to change for the better. He classifies his work as public art, and considers helping people turn to spirituality to be his duty as an artist. To do this, he makes use of street space, but also works with painting, graphic design, and icon painting. Sergiy is also one of the organizers of the independent street art festival Black Circle, which has a strong DIY ethic. The festival is usually held in neglected places. “Those spaces”, Sergiy opines, “already have a certain image, and as an artist, you have to complete that image with the right work.” In 2011, Sergiy won the PinchukArtCentre’s second Special Prize for his work Eucharist, and one year later he took part in Arsenale, the Ukrainian biennale of contemporary art. That year he also starred in a film about Ukrainian street art.

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Seven Deadly Sins. Greed (avarice) 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic, aerosol, 300 x 600 cm

This work is part of a series of seven murals collectively called Seven Deadly Sins, which should soon include works on the themes of pride, envy, anger, lust, and gluttony. The first composition, Sloth, was completed this year for the Street Art Festival in the Polish city of Katowice. The second, titled Greed (Avarice), was made in the central gallery of the Casus Pacis exhibition. In this series, Radkevich shows the faults that are destroying contemporary society from within.

The cent ra l figur e in t h e wo r k is t h e per sonifica t io n o f t h e m a j o r it y l iv in g in o n e countr y o r a n o t h e r. An d if t h e yea r n in g fo r wea lth, o r a rr o ga n ce , o r j ea l o us y do m in a t e s i n thi s s o ciet y , t h e n t h o s e ve r y q ua l it ie s a r e r ef lected in h e igh t en ed fo r m in t h e p e r s o n who g ove r n s t h o s e p e o p l e . T h is is a ca s e in whi ch a q ua n t it y o f in div idua l p eo p l e cr e a t e the qu a l it ies o f o n e figur e , in w h o m a r e concentra t e d a l l t h e p r o bl e m s o f t h a t s o cie t y . — S e r g i y Ra d ke vi ch

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Seven Deadly Sins. Greed (avarice) 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic, aerosol, 300 x 600 cm

This work is part of a series of seven murals collectively called Seven Deadly Sins, which should soon include works on the themes of pride, envy, anger, lust, and gluttony. The first composition, Sloth, was completed this year for the Street Art Festival in the Polish city of Katowice. The second, titled Greed (Avarice), was made in the central gallery of the Casus Pacis exhibition. In this series, Radkevich shows the faults that are destroying contemporary society from within.

The cent ra l figur e in t h e wo r k is t h e per sonifica t io n o f t h e m a j o r it y l iv in g in o n e countr y o r a n o t h e r. An d if t h e yea r n in g fo r wea lth, o r a rr o ga n ce , o r j ea l o us y do m in a t e s i n thi s s o ciet y , t h e n t h o s e ve r y q ua l it ie s a r e r ef lected in h e igh t en ed fo r m in t h e p e r s o n who g ove r n s t h o s e p e o p l e . T h is is a ca s e in whi ch a q ua n t it y o f in div idua l p eo p l e cr e a t e the qu a l it ies o f o n e figur e , in w h o m a r e concentra t e d a l l t h e p r o bl e m s o f t h a t s o cie t y . — S e r g i y Ra d ke vi ch

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Потапов Radya Владимир Timothy Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Москва, Россия Yekaterinburg, Russia

Wall painting is an ancient, eternal form. It seems to me that there is one common mood that unites all paintings, from all times... and that is the desire to make something new.

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Born and raised in Yekaterinburg, Timothy Radya graduated with a degree in philosophy from Ural State University. Radya says with a smile that, in one sense, he is now doing the work he was educated for. Timothy first got involved in street art about a decade ago, when he and some friends were making small stencil paintings and drawing on walls. Over time, those stencil paintings grew more complicated. Now Timothy Radya is one of the most widely recognized street artists, and his work is held in high esteem both within the street-art milieu and in the artistic world as a whole. Radya has won several prizes for modern art: he was nominated for the Innovation Prize and he won the Sergey Kuryokhin Award. Radya’s first major work was a series of posters hung up on the streets of Yekaterinburg in 2010, made from front-page stories in Soviet and European newspapers on Gagarin’s flight into space. The lead headlines appeared to shout in all languages about this unprecedented achievement. In that work, the artist expressed his personal joy and admiration at the launch of a human being into space, using laconic quotations and photos known the world over. He gained recognition after his project Eternal Flame, created for Victory Day 2011. Technically speaking, the project was very complex: portraits were drawn on large canvases, which the artist set on fire with a toss of a Molotov cocktail. The necessary shading and accents on the canvases were created by varying thicknesses of bandages. The burned portraits were hung on the wall of an abandoned Yekaterinburg hospital, which had served as a military hospital during the war. Timothy openly admits that he does not know how to draw, and the tool he makes the most use of is a universal key to apartment building intercom systems. Lately, Timothy Radya almost never works alone: most often friends help him, because the technical complexity of the projects he dreams up make them impossible to execute on his own. Sometimes, too big an area needs to be covered with paint, as was the case with Your Move, which transformed Yekaterinburg’s main bridge into a set of dominoes. Other times, it may be simply complex and dangerous work on a rooftop, as in the textual projects Without Wasting Words and You Are Better than the Universe. The artist’s statements are sometimes provocative, and he touches on burning political and social issues, but those statements are invariably distinguished by their clarity and honesty, and they are concise and well thought out.

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Потапов Radya Владимир Timothy Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Москва, Россия Yekaterinburg, Russia

Wall painting is an ancient, eternal form. It seems to me that there is one common mood that unites all paintings, from all times... and that is the desire to make something new.

202

Born and raised in Yekaterinburg, Timothy Radya graduated with a degree in philosophy from Ural State University. Radya says with a smile that, in one sense, he is now doing the work he was educated for. Timothy first got involved in street art about a decade ago, when he and some friends were making small stencil paintings and drawing on walls. Over time, those stencil paintings grew more complicated. Now Timothy Radya is one of the most widely recognized street artists, and his work is held in high esteem both within the street-art milieu and in the artistic world as a whole. Radya has won several prizes for modern art: he was nominated for the Innovation Prize and he won the Sergey Kuryokhin Award. Radya’s first major work was a series of posters hung up on the streets of Yekaterinburg in 2010, made from front-page stories in Soviet and European newspapers on Gagarin’s flight into space. The lead headlines appeared to shout in all languages about this unprecedented achievement. In that work, the artist expressed his personal joy and admiration at the launch of a human being into space, using laconic quotations and photos known the world over. He gained recognition after his project Eternal Flame, created for Victory Day 2011. Technically speaking, the project was very complex: portraits were drawn on large canvases, which the artist set on fire with a toss of a Molotov cocktail. The necessary shading and accents on the canvases were created by varying thicknesses of bandages. The burned portraits were hung on the wall of an abandoned Yekaterinburg hospital, which had served as a military hospital during the war. Timothy openly admits that he does not know how to draw, and the tool he makes the most use of is a universal key to apartment building intercom systems. Lately, Timothy Radya almost never works alone: most often friends help him, because the technical complexity of the projects he dreams up make them impossible to execute on his own. Sometimes, too big an area needs to be covered with paint, as was the case with Your Move, which transformed Yekaterinburg’s main bridge into a set of dominoes. Other times, it may be simply complex and dangerous work on a rooftop, as in the textual projects Without Wasting Words and You Are Better than the Universe. The artist’s statements are sometimes provocative, and he touches on burning political and social issues, but those statements are invariably distinguished by their clarity and honesty, and they are concise and well thought out.

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Untitled

Tim Radya’s work for the exhibition at the Street Art Museum once again uses the technique that the artist tried out in Eternal Flame (2011). On a metallic sheet, he created a thin relief out of bandages, reproducing a military photograph of four soldiers. The relief was laid out in bandages, and then burned with a Molotov cocktail. The theme of male friendship emerges especially poetically in this project, which is very laconic, precise, and powerful.

2014 Steel, bandage, mixed media. 500 х 270 cm

Th e foun d at io n of my work i s a p h o t o gra p h by Al e x a n de r Us t in o v. Th e p ic t ure wa s ta ken i n 1943 an d, a s I l a t er dis co ve r ed, in Cr im ea . Th e s old iers ar e f orci ng thei r wa y a cr o s s t h e Gul f o f S iva s h , a l s o known as t h e Rotten Sea . The ph o t o gra p h s t uck in m y m em o r y . I t ’s a d o cumen t ar y shot, bu t i t seem s m uch m o r e co m p l ex t o m e – it ’s not jus t an im a g e, bu t a symbol . I t s ve r y n a t ur e a p p r o a ch es et er n it y . I t would t ak e dozens of f i lms a n d bo o k s t o t el l t h e s t o r y o f t h is p h ot ograp h . It remi nds me of Ta r k o v s k y ’s I v a n’s Ch i l d h o od , w h er e t h e r e is a lot of wa ter, a nd a sto r y a bo ut t h e r ive r we a r e a l l fa t ed t o c r o ss . I c an’ t sa y I beli eve tha t s t o r y , but t h e fe el in g o f br o t h e r h o o d a n d un it y in t he f a ce of tha t endl es s w a t e r, t h e l in e o f t h e h o r izo n , a n d t h e app roachi ng la nd i s someth in g I un der s t a n d. I be l ieve in t h a t , a nd I c an clearly i ma g i ne myself i n t h e p l a ce o f e a ch p e r s o n w h o wen t u p i n fl ames , n ever to retur n home . — Ti m o t h y Radya

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Untitled

Tim Radya’s work for the exhibition at the Street Art Museum once again uses the technique that the artist tried out in Eternal Flame (2011). On a metallic sheet, he created a thin relief out of bandages, reproducing a military photograph of four soldiers. The relief was laid out in bandages, and then burned with a Molotov cocktail. The theme of male friendship emerges especially poetically in this project, which is very laconic, precise, and powerful.

2014 Steel, bandage, mixed media. 500 х 270 cm

Th e foun d at io n of my work i s a p h o t o gra p h by Al e x a n de r Us t in o v. Th e p ic t ure wa s ta ken i n 1943 an d, a s I l a t er dis co ve r ed, in Cr im ea . Th e s old iers ar e f orci ng thei r wa y a cr o s s t h e Gul f o f S iva s h , a l s o known as t h e Rotten Sea . The ph o t o gra p h s t uck in m y m em o r y . I t ’s a d o cumen t ar y shot, bu t i t seem s m uch m o r e co m p l ex t o m e – it ’s not jus t an im a g e, bu t a symbol . I t s ve r y n a t ur e a p p r o a ch es et er n it y . I t would t ak e dozens of f i lms a n d bo o k s t o t el l t h e s t o r y o f t h is p h ot ograp h . It remi nds me of Ta r k o v s k y ’s I v a n’s Ch i l d h o od , w h er e t h e r e is a lot of wa ter, a nd a sto r y a bo ut t h e r ive r we a r e a l l fa t ed t o c r o ss . I c an’ t sa y I beli eve tha t s t o r y , but t h e fe el in g o f br o t h e r h o o d a n d un it y in t he f a ce of tha t endl es s w a t e r, t h e l in e o f t h e h o r izo n , a n d t h e app roachi ng la nd i s someth in g I un der s t a n d. I be l ieve in t h a t , a nd I c an clearly i ma g i ne myself i n t h e p l a ce o f e a ch p e r s o n w h o wen t u p i n fl ames , n ever to retur n home . — Ti m o t h y Radya

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Потапов Владимир Dima Rebus Художник, куратор Watercolour painter и искусствовед

Any sane person realizes that there exist two distinct wars – that of the state and that of man. They should not be confused. The situation is such that it calls for a motive for peace. 206

Москва, Россия Moscow, Russia Born in 1988 in the city of Naberezhnye Chelny, where he attended a school that specialized in training young artists. At the age of 16, he moved to Moscow, where he studied graphic design at the Moscow Art and Industrial Institute. This is where he began working with oil paints, mostly painting portraits of acquaintances, friends, and relatives. He also moonlighted as a magazine illustrator, which led him to work increasingly in watercolours. The general public knows Rebus for his work as an illustrator for major magazines such as Total Football, Snob, Esquire, and GQ. However, his work goes well beyond this. As a student, Rebus regularly published his work online and on social networking sites, where it was first noticed by fans of contemporary art and soon thereafter by art galleries who became interested in his work. After graduation, Rebus signed a contract with the Artwin Gallery in Moscow, with which he continues to work to this day. His first solo exhibition at the MSK Eastside Gallery called The Trick is in Idiocy (2012) and The End exhibition at the Artwin Gallery a year later served as important milestones. Aside from his illustration work, Dima is working on a separate body of easel works. The properties inherent in watercolours fill the artist’s works with airiness, giving an impression of lightness and dynamism. A sophisticated colour palette and composition make his work elegant and virtuosic, but this is not “art for art’s sake.” Rebus regards thematic content as equally important. The themes of his work are contemporary and sometimes even topical. His work revolves around modern life, conveyed realistically and at times harshly, but always honestly and sincerely. A wide variety of subject matter is placed in a peculiar mystical and sometimes surreal atmosphere. However, the seriousness and pathos of these ideas is softened by the exquisite watercolour technique and an unfailing note of irony. “I draw about life – just about our life, yours and mine – and the themes vary widely... I don’t like politics, though it’s true there is no escaping it. In most of my work, I show my angle on this or that situation from an ironic point of view”, the artist explains.

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Потапов Владимир Dima Rebus Художник, куратор Watercolour painter и искусствовед

Any sane person realizes that there exist two distinct wars – that of the state and that of man. They should not be confused. The situation is such that it calls for a motive for peace. 206

Москва, Россия Moscow, Russia Born in 1988 in the city of Naberezhnye Chelny, where he attended a school that specialized in training young artists. At the age of 16, he moved to Moscow, where he studied graphic design at the Moscow Art and Industrial Institute. This is where he began working with oil paints, mostly painting portraits of acquaintances, friends, and relatives. He also moonlighted as a magazine illustrator, which led him to work increasingly in watercolours. The general public knows Rebus for his work as an illustrator for major magazines such as Total Football, Snob, Esquire, and GQ. However, his work goes well beyond this. As a student, Rebus regularly published his work online and on social networking sites, where it was first noticed by fans of contemporary art and soon thereafter by art galleries who became interested in his work. After graduation, Rebus signed a contract with the Artwin Gallery in Moscow, with which he continues to work to this day. His first solo exhibition at the MSK Eastside Gallery called The Trick is in Idiocy (2012) and The End exhibition at the Artwin Gallery a year later served as important milestones. Aside from his illustration work, Dima is working on a separate body of easel works. The properties inherent in watercolours fill the artist’s works with airiness, giving an impression of lightness and dynamism. A sophisticated colour palette and composition make his work elegant and virtuosic, but this is not “art for art’s sake.” Rebus regards thematic content as equally important. The themes of his work are contemporary and sometimes even topical. His work revolves around modern life, conveyed realistically and at times harshly, but always honestly and sincerely. A wide variety of subject matter is placed in a peculiar mystical and sometimes surreal atmosphere. However, the seriousness and pathos of these ideas is softened by the exquisite watercolour technique and an unfailing note of irony. “I draw about life – just about our life, yours and mine – and the themes vary widely... I don’t like politics, though it’s true there is no escaping it. In most of my work, I show my angle on this or that situation from an ironic point of view”, the artist explains.

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SMILE 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic. 200 x 700 cm

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For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist created a work titled Smile, where for the first time he departed from his usual technique to work instead on factory walls. This composition is essentially a reproduction of the artist’s 2009 watercolour of the same name on a monumental scale. “The idea caught my interest. And the theme is very relevant today”, he said about his participation in the project. According to Anna Nistratova, the exhibition’s curator, Rebus’ first venture into this brand

new medium was no small challenge, causing the artist a good deal of anxiety. Perhaps this is why an inscription appeared at the bottom of the mural a few hours before the opening of the exhibition that read, “Gruelling and ungainly is the life of a simple street artist. When I get back home, I’ll embrace my watercolours.” Rebus’ watercolours are also on display at the exhibition, in the hall of graphics. Created between 2009 and 2014, they deal with various aspects of modern life.

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SMILE 2014 Plasterboard, acrylic. 200 x 700 cm

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For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist created a work titled Smile, where for the first time he departed from his usual technique to work instead on factory walls. This composition is essentially a reproduction of the artist’s 2009 watercolour of the same name on a monumental scale. “The idea caught my interest. And the theme is very relevant today”, he said about his participation in the project. According to Anna Nistratova, the exhibition’s curator, Rebus’ first venture into this brand

new medium was no small challenge, causing the artist a good deal of anxiety. Perhaps this is why an inscription appeared at the bottom of the mural a few hours before the opening of the exhibition that read, “Gruelling and ungainly is the life of a simple street artist. When I get back home, I’ll embrace my watercolours.” Rebus’ watercolours are also on display at the exhibition, in the hall of graphics. Created between 2009 and 2014, they deal with various aspects of modern life.

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election

home

Football fan

2011 Watercolour on paper. 30 х 24 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

2012 Watercolour on paper. 38 х 39 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

2009 Watercolour on paper. 30 х 40 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

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election

home

Football fan

2011 Watercolour on paper. 30 х 24 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

2012 Watercolour on paper. 38 х 39 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

2009 Watercolour on paper. 30 х 40 cm From the Artwin Gallery Collection

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Pavel Rtue Street artist

I pr ef er to wor k a lon e, a s m y dra w in g s t y l e d oes not ha ve mu ch in co m m o n w it h t h e cla ssi ca l f or ms of gra ffit i a r t . B ut t h e r e a r e ar ti sts wi th whom I wo ul d l ik e t o co l l a bo ra t e – mostly f r i ends of m in e o r o t h er s w h o s h a r e m y vi ews on a rt. At t h e m o m en t I a m t r y in g n ot to become i nvol ve d w it h p r o j e ct s t h a t ar en’t connected to t h e wo r k I a m do in g. But thi s i s di f f i cult, s in ce e a r n in g a l iv in g as a n a r ti st i n our c o un t r ies ca n be q uit e t oug h. In Russi a r i g h t n o w , t h e r e a r e l o t s o f ar ti sts produci ng to p -q ua l it y wo r k , but t h e d evelopment of mod er n a r t in t h e co un t r y h a s b een sta lled by g ove r n m en t o fficia l s un w il l in g t o a dopt r ef or ms. 212

Sevastopol, Crimea Pavel Rtue was born in Sevastopol, Crimea in 1989. He claims he has been drawing for as long as he can remember, starting out by copying the logos and names of popular brands onto paper. Later, these logos gave way to graffiti. Pavel copied drawings from street walls into his notebook, studying new styles alongside artistic devices. He was 12 years old when he first used a wall as a canvas for his work. Brands and other elements of pop culture persist in Rtue’s work. The young artist has experimented with typography and famous logos in the creation of increasingly abstract paintings. After completing art school and studying composition at artist Igor Veligin’s studio, Pavel began to take a more conscious look at street art. Soon after, he departed from his habitual tagging, while sticking with his typographic experiments. Now the words he depicts, depending on the idea, may appear as an ambiguous message, a graphic image, or simply a set of letters. Lately, Pavel has increasingly moved away from the use of letters in his work. He is currently experimenting with new forms and different materials, trying to blend sprays, acrylics, chalk, markers, and oil paints. He incorporates motor oil, banner paper, plaster, and the items he finds near walls. He still lives and works in his home town of Sevastopol, and has said he’s glad that the situation in Crimea is calm now. In his opinion, the ability to live peacefully in your home town is more important than the coming and going of presidents or changes in flag colours.

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Pavel Rtue Street artist

I pr ef er to wor k a lon e, a s m y dra w in g s t y l e d oes not ha ve mu ch in co m m o n w it h t h e cla ssi ca l f or ms of gra ffit i a r t . B ut t h e r e a r e ar ti sts wi th whom I wo ul d l ik e t o co l l a bo ra t e – mostly f r i ends of m in e o r o t h er s w h o s h a r e m y vi ews on a rt. At t h e m o m en t I a m t r y in g n ot to become i nvol ve d w it h p r o j e ct s t h a t ar en’t connected to t h e wo r k I a m do in g. But thi s i s di f f i cult, s in ce e a r n in g a l iv in g as a n a r ti st i n our c o un t r ies ca n be q uit e t oug h. In Russi a r i g h t n o w , t h e r e a r e l o t s o f ar ti sts produci ng to p -q ua l it y wo r k , but t h e d evelopment of mod er n a r t in t h e co un t r y h a s b een sta lled by g ove r n m en t o fficia l s un w il l in g t o a dopt r ef or ms. 212

Sevastopol, Crimea Pavel Rtue was born in Sevastopol, Crimea in 1989. He claims he has been drawing for as long as he can remember, starting out by copying the logos and names of popular brands onto paper. Later, these logos gave way to graffiti. Pavel copied drawings from street walls into his notebook, studying new styles alongside artistic devices. He was 12 years old when he first used a wall as a canvas for his work. Brands and other elements of pop culture persist in Rtue’s work. The young artist has experimented with typography and famous logos in the creation of increasingly abstract paintings. After completing art school and studying composition at artist Igor Veligin’s studio, Pavel began to take a more conscious look at street art. Soon after, he departed from his habitual tagging, while sticking with his typographic experiments. Now the words he depicts, depending on the idea, may appear as an ambiguous message, a graphic image, or simply a set of letters. Lately, Pavel has increasingly moved away from the use of letters in his work. He is currently experimenting with new forms and different materials, trying to blend sprays, acrylics, chalk, markers, and oil paints. He incorporates motor oil, banner paper, plaster, and the items he finds near walls. He still lives and works in his home town of Sevastopol, and has said he’s glad that the situation in Crimea is calm now. In his opinion, the ability to live peacefully in your home town is more important than the coming and going of presidents or changes in flag colours.

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Regress

Two skulls

2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic, mixed media. 52.5 х 16.5 cm

2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic, mixed media. 30 х 50 cm

Two pieces from the untitled series have been composed in oil on a wooden canvas. The word “Regress” appears on each of them, a distinct and laconic outline filled in with abstract figures and forms. The fonts are smeared, the colours run over, and in places the inscriptions are difficult to read. This technique underscores the recursiveness of the work.

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The artist notes that the word “Regress” has always been a signature symbol of his. On the one hand, it can be used to describe modern interpersonal relationships, while on the other, Pavel believes, adherents to the classical school of graffiti might consider his own work to be a regression.

Pavel has created a small canvas with images of skulls as a sort of side project, brought to life on the walls of his home town, Sevastopol. The artist has taken up this theme more than once: for example, in his pieces Slavery of Genre and Four Unknown Skulls, Pavel depicted the skulls using a signature glitch effect that has become characteristic of his more recent style.

The skulls are deliberately given much less attention than their surroundings. They are less contrasted, less saturated, located outside the centre of the composition, and the most loosely executed part of the piece. The artist draws a parallel with the human victims during wartime, when human lives are devalued, with only context remaining important.

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Regress

Two skulls

2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic, mixed media. 52.5 х 16.5 cm

2014 Canvas, oil, acrylic, mixed media. 30 х 50 cm

Two pieces from the untitled series have been composed in oil on a wooden canvas. The word “Regress” appears on each of them, a distinct and laconic outline filled in with abstract figures and forms. The fonts are smeared, the colours run over, and in places the inscriptions are difficult to read. This technique underscores the recursiveness of the work.

214

The artist notes that the word “Regress” has always been a signature symbol of his. On the one hand, it can be used to describe modern interpersonal relationships, while on the other, Pavel believes, adherents to the classical school of graffiti might consider his own work to be a regression.

Pavel has created a small canvas with images of skulls as a sort of side project, brought to life on the walls of his home town, Sevastopol. The artist has taken up this theme more than once: for example, in his pieces Slavery of Genre and Four Unknown Skulls, Pavel depicted the skulls using a signature glitch effect that has become characteristic of his more recent style.

The skulls are deliberately given much less attention than their surroundings. They are less contrasted, less saturated, located outside the centre of the composition, and the most loosely executed part of the piece. The artist draws a parallel with the human victims during wartime, when human lives are devalued, with only context remaining important.

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She comes without demand 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 1700 х 700 cm

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The artist’s composition comprises the phrase “She comes without demand” written on a large wall in the artist’s classic torn frame style. The work appears as though it was created by gathering together fragments from completely different spaces, bringing together a variety of colours, textures, and planes to convey its message. The viewer is left to wonder whether the piece is about war or whether

the artist has inserted a deeper, more personal premise into his work. However, this question does not alter the piece’s main thrust. Its atmosphere fully conveys the meaning laid out in its inscription. Pavel does not violate the integrity of the text or distort any of its typographic elements. Rather, he simply pushes them to the background, choosing to place greater focus on the surrounding details.

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She comes without demand 2014 Acrylic, mixed media. 1700 х 700 cm

216

The artist’s composition comprises the phrase “She comes without demand” written on a large wall in the artist’s classic torn frame style. The work appears as though it was created by gathering together fragments from completely different spaces, bringing together a variety of colours, textures, and planes to convey its message. The viewer is left to wonder whether the piece is about war or whether

the artist has inserted a deeper, more personal premise into his work. However, this question does not alter the piece’s main thrust. Its atmosphere fully conveys the meaning laid out in its inscription. Pavel does not violate the integrity of the text or distort any of its typographic elements. Rather, he simply pushes them to the background, choosing to place greater focus on the surrounding details.

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ПотаповSergeyev Владимир Arseny Художник, куратор и искусствовед Artist, curator

Stopping a war is impossible, but it is possible not to start one.

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Москва, Россия Moscow – Yekaterinburg, Russia Arseny Sergeyev was born in Sverdlovsk in 1966 and was educated as a monumental artist. In 1986, he graduated from the Shadr Sverdlovsk School for the Arts, where he qualified as a painter. He then taught painting, and ten years later (in 1995) graduated from the Ural State Academy of Architecture and Arts. He has worked as an artist and designer in both Yekaterinburg and Moscow. In the early 2000s, Sergeyev became art director of the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Yekaterinburg, and in 2005 he founded the ArtPolitika School of Modern Art, which he now manages. One noted work by the students of the School was a temporary installation entitled A Pine on All Four Sides, which was set up in Yekaterinburg in 2009 as part of the Long Histories of Yekaterinburg festival. With this project, the art group transformed an ordinary courtyard in front of the city’s tourist information bureau into a space for contemplating the past and future of Yekaterinburg, which became a new attraction in the city. In 2008, Arseny received the Innovation Prize for Best Regional Project for Long Histories of Yekaterinburg, which gained a spot in the city’s book of records. Arseny is the author of a great many publications about modern art and the book Artistic Culture of the Urals. The Keyboard Monument project brought worldwide renown to the artist and curator. The QWERTY-themed monument received more attention in the global media than any other art project in the entire history of Yekaterinburg. The OUTVIDEO festival that he organized was the world’s only annual video art festival on advertising media in 2004. With his direct involvement, Yekaterinburg has hosted lectures, workshops, and projects by street artists from abroad. One such course was attended by the artist Timothy Radya, who has won numerous modern art awards. In December 2013, Arseny Sergeyev made the work Vortex for the Street Art Museum in St. Petersburg, depicting the artist’s body in various dimensions and spaces.

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ПотаповSergeyev Владимир Arseny Художник, куратор и искусствовед Artist, curator

Stopping a war is impossible, but it is possible not to start one.

218

Москва, Россия Moscow – Yekaterinburg, Russia Arseny Sergeyev was born in Sverdlovsk in 1966 and was educated as a monumental artist. In 1986, he graduated from the Shadr Sverdlovsk School for the Arts, where he qualified as a painter. He then taught painting, and ten years later (in 1995) graduated from the Ural State Academy of Architecture and Arts. He has worked as an artist and designer in both Yekaterinburg and Moscow. In the early 2000s, Sergeyev became art director of the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Yekaterinburg, and in 2005 he founded the ArtPolitika School of Modern Art, which he now manages. One noted work by the students of the School was a temporary installation entitled A Pine on All Four Sides, which was set up in Yekaterinburg in 2009 as part of the Long Histories of Yekaterinburg festival. With this project, the art group transformed an ordinary courtyard in front of the city’s tourist information bureau into a space for contemplating the past and future of Yekaterinburg, which became a new attraction in the city. In 2008, Arseny received the Innovation Prize for Best Regional Project for Long Histories of Yekaterinburg, which gained a spot in the city’s book of records. Arseny is the author of a great many publications about modern art and the book Artistic Culture of the Urals. The Keyboard Monument project brought worldwide renown to the artist and curator. The QWERTY-themed monument received more attention in the global media than any other art project in the entire history of Yekaterinburg. The OUTVIDEO festival that he organized was the world’s only annual video art festival on advertising media in 2004. With his direct involvement, Yekaterinburg has hosted lectures, workshops, and projects by street artists from abroad. One such course was attended by the artist Timothy Radya, who has won numerous modern art awards. In December 2013, Arseny Sergeyev made the work Vortex for the Street Art Museum in St. Petersburg, depicting the artist’s body in various dimensions and spaces.

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You Can’t Hold onto Smoke 2014 Newspaper, marker pen. 58 х 75 cm

Arseny’s poster depicts a hand trying to grab hold of smoke. The artist used an open newspaper instead of a canvas, since a newspaper is, after all, a terrible weapon of informational warfare. The artist believes that the war in Ukraine is a Pandora’s box, torn open by fanatics and psychopaths. Starting such a war is simple, but now it is impossible to end military action through simple negotiations – the evil and aggression instantly devour individuals. Terror provokes people into crossing far over the line, and it takes away their ability to back down, to return to their initial state. With this work, Arseny Sergeyev is warning the next generation: war changes the world, it cannot be what it was before, and war changes individuals, it destroys them. Stopping a war is impossible, but it is possible not to start one.

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фото???

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You Can’t Hold onto Smoke 2014 Newspaper, marker pen. 58 х 75 cm

Arseny’s poster depicts a hand trying to grab hold of smoke. The artist used an open newspaper instead of a canvas, since a newspaper is, after all, a terrible weapon of informational warfare. The artist believes that the war in Ukraine is a Pandora’s box, torn open by fanatics and psychopaths. Starting such a war is simple, but now it is impossible to end military action through simple negotiations – the evil and aggression instantly devour individuals. Terror provokes people into crossing far over the line, and it takes away their ability to back down, to return to their initial state. With this work, Arseny Sergeyev is warning the next generation: war changes the world, it cannot be what it was before, and war changes individuals, it destroys them. Stopping a war is impossible, but it is possible not to start one.

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фото???

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Потапов Владимир Kirill Shamanov Художник, искусствовед Media artist,куратор curator,и and art critic

I a lwa ys wa nted to co l o ur – o r rather pa i nt over – t h e gr e y wo r l d of the Sovi et Uni on a n d a l l t h o s e pi ctur es, the bla ckb o a rd, t h e cla ssroom, desks, a n d t e x t bo o k s . I wa nted to dr own th em in co l o ur and spa ce, a nd set th e m fr e e from the bonds of f o r m in t o abstra cti on.

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Москва, Россия St. Petersburg, Russia Shamanov was first attracted to art in his childhood. He recalls, “I always wanted to colour – or rather paint over – the grey world of the Soviet Union and all those pictures, the blackboard, the classroom, desks, and textbooks. I wanted to drown them in colour and space, and set them free from the bonds of form into abstraction.” In 1999, he enrolled at the PRO ARTE Institute in St. Petersburg where he attended several supplementary lectures and workshops taught by leading media artists and curators, including Afrika (Sergei Bugaev), Barbara London, and Timur Novikov. After completing his studies, Shamanov taught at St. Petersburg State University, the PRO ARTE Institute, the National Centre for Contemporary Arts (Moscow), and other art institutions. He has participated in dozens of exhibitions, and has been the recipient of several grants and awards. In 2005, he won a grant from the Nordic Council of Ministers for his project Contact in Time. In 2007, he was nominated for the Art Moscow Workshops Black Square award for his project Monetization. In 2011, he took part in Kirill Serebrennikov’s theatrical performance of Close to Zero at the Moscow Art Theatre. Among his most notable exhibitions was Not Toys?! at the State Tretyakov Gallery in 2009, which took a fresh look at a children’s toy made during the Soviet period. The toy was used for erotic purposes at a time when there were no sex toys in Russia. Shamanov does not limit himself to exhibitions; he also creates large touring projects such as Monetization, where he prints made-up currency (e.g. Zero Roubles, the Uniform Currency of the CIS, and Ghosts of European Currencies); GOP-ART (a philosophical discourse involving youths from the rough outskirts of town and highbrow intellectuals), and Tajiks-Art (a project focused on oppressed and exploited nations where the artists get Tajiks to repeat well-known performance art pieces and repaint pictures. They also distil alcohol from their blood).

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Потапов Владимир Kirill Shamanov Художник, искусствовед Media artist,куратор curator,и and art critic

I a lwa ys wa nted to co l o ur – o r rather pa i nt over – t h e gr e y wo r l d of the Sovi et Uni on a n d a l l t h o s e pi ctur es, the bla ckb o a rd, t h e cla ssroom, desks, a n d t e x t bo o k s . I wa nted to dr own th em in co l o ur and spa ce, a nd set th e m fr e e from the bonds of f o r m in t o abstra cti on.

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Москва, Россия St. Petersburg, Russia Shamanov was first attracted to art in his childhood. He recalls, “I always wanted to colour – or rather paint over – the grey world of the Soviet Union and all those pictures, the blackboard, the classroom, desks, and textbooks. I wanted to drown them in colour and space, and set them free from the bonds of form into abstraction.” In 1999, he enrolled at the PRO ARTE Institute in St. Petersburg where he attended several supplementary lectures and workshops taught by leading media artists and curators, including Afrika (Sergei Bugaev), Barbara London, and Timur Novikov. After completing his studies, Shamanov taught at St. Petersburg State University, the PRO ARTE Institute, the National Centre for Contemporary Arts (Moscow), and other art institutions. He has participated in dozens of exhibitions, and has been the recipient of several grants and awards. In 2005, he won a grant from the Nordic Council of Ministers for his project Contact in Time. In 2007, he was nominated for the Art Moscow Workshops Black Square award for his project Monetization. In 2011, he took part in Kirill Serebrennikov’s theatrical performance of Close to Zero at the Moscow Art Theatre. Among his most notable exhibitions was Not Toys?! at the State Tretyakov Gallery in 2009, which took a fresh look at a children’s toy made during the Soviet period. The toy was used for erotic purposes at a time when there were no sex toys in Russia. Shamanov does not limit himself to exhibitions; he also creates large touring projects such as Monetization, where he prints made-up currency (e.g. Zero Roubles, the Uniform Currency of the CIS, and Ghosts of European Currencies); GOP-ART (a philosophical discourse involving youths from the rough outskirts of town and highbrow intellectuals), and Tajiks-Art (a project focused on oppressed and exploited nations where the artists get Tajiks to repeat well-known performance art pieces and repaint pictures. They also distil alcohol from their blood).

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One Second before the Onset of Peace 2014 Metal

For the exhibition, Kirill Shamanov presented an installation depicting a missile suspended in a special frame. “Like Damien Hirst’s legendary shark, the aerial bomb appears to hover in the air one second before it hits the ground”, Shamanov explains. He found the bomb on a World War II site, neutralized it, and restored it to look like ready-made. Before it became a part of the installation, the bomb was used in films, including Stalingrad. “Using the bomb led us to research the work of Joseph Beuys, a German artist who, during World War II, flew in the Luftwaffe and bombed Crimea – where he was shot down. After that, he changed his worldview and became a guru of modern art.”

According to Shamanov, the installation is meant to criticize how “humanistic values”, “new world orders”, and “democracy” are spread, as well as to commemorate the many attempts to forcibly instil values of one kind or another throughout the world. “Democratic values are supposed to be the most humane, since they make an appeal for universal tolerance and interethnic, international consensus. But thousands of high explosives have been dropped on peaceful cities in Vietnam, Serbia, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine, and Russia during the last few decades – all in the name of ‘freedom’...”

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One Second before the Onset of Peace 2014 Metal

For the exhibition, Kirill Shamanov presented an installation depicting a missile suspended in a special frame. “Like Damien Hirst’s legendary shark, the aerial bomb appears to hover in the air one second before it hits the ground”, Shamanov explains. He found the bomb on a World War II site, neutralized it, and restored it to look like ready-made. Before it became a part of the installation, the bomb was used in films, including Stalingrad. “Using the bomb led us to research the work of Joseph Beuys, a German artist who, during World War II, flew in the Luftwaffe and bombed Crimea – where he was shot down. After that, he changed his worldview and became a guru of modern art.”

According to Shamanov, the installation is meant to criticize how “humanistic values”, “new world orders”, and “democracy” are spread, as well as to commemorate the many attempts to forcibly instil values of one kind or another throughout the world. “Democratic values are supposed to be the most humane, since they make an appeal for universal tolerance and interethnic, international consensus. But thousands of high explosives have been dropped on peaceful cities in Vietnam, Serbia, Iraq, Libya, Syria, Afghanistan, Ukraine, and Russia during the last few decades – all in the name of ‘freedom’...”

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Pavel Shugurov Muralist, head of the Urban Design Department at Vladivostok City Hall

creating a thinking, involved society through the transformation of the urban environment.

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Vladivostok, Russia Born in 1978 in Vladivostok. Shugurov graduated from Vladivostok Art College and studied for three years at the Far Eastern State Academy of Art. He moved to St. Petersburg in 2001, where he studied mural painting at the A.L. Stieglitz Academy and then joined the media arts programme at the PRO ARTE Institute. He later completed an apprenticeship in the United States. For his academy graduation project, Pavel wanted to paint a mural on the wall of a city building. Only after this was firmly rejected by city officials did he start thinking about how to achieve not only consent to paint on walls, but also government financing for his projects. In 2006, he set up the 33+1 team as an alternative to the Artists’ Trade Union. Together with this group of young, talented artists, Shugurov resolved to alter St. Petersburg’s urban environment. The group chose the Petrograd Side for their project, and over several years created a series of murals on Barmaleyev, Zverinskaya, and Vvedenskaya streets. This was where the city did grant permission, and the wall paintings were completed. They are still considered, informally, as one of the northern capital’s tourist attractions. In 2010, Pavel returned to Vladivostok. At first, he painted outdoor walls with a group of artists known as 33+1 Vladivostok, just as he had in St. Petersburg, but soon he was asked to take charge of the local authority’s efforts to transform Vladivostok’s urban environment. Currently, Pavel is busy developing and implementing the city’s colour plan, its concept for outdoor advertising space, the Improving Vladivostok’s Artistic Appearance programme, and a concept for architectural illumination. Pavel says that he sees Vladivostok as a city of dreams, one he wants to revive by making it modern and attractive. He considers it one of his main tasks to create a thinking, involved society through the transformation of the urban environment. Shugurov believes that an important challenge in his artistic quest is identifying the simplest, longest-lasting, and most monumentally expressive artistic media that can blend organically into the cityscape and change the city for the better.

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Pavel Shugurov Muralist, head of the Urban Design Department at Vladivostok City Hall

creating a thinking, involved society through the transformation of the urban environment.

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Vladivostok, Russia Born in 1978 in Vladivostok. Shugurov graduated from Vladivostok Art College and studied for three years at the Far Eastern State Academy of Art. He moved to St. Petersburg in 2001, where he studied mural painting at the A.L. Stieglitz Academy and then joined the media arts programme at the PRO ARTE Institute. He later completed an apprenticeship in the United States. For his academy graduation project, Pavel wanted to paint a mural on the wall of a city building. Only after this was firmly rejected by city officials did he start thinking about how to achieve not only consent to paint on walls, but also government financing for his projects. In 2006, he set up the 33+1 team as an alternative to the Artists’ Trade Union. Together with this group of young, talented artists, Shugurov resolved to alter St. Petersburg’s urban environment. The group chose the Petrograd Side for their project, and over several years created a series of murals on Barmaleyev, Zverinskaya, and Vvedenskaya streets. This was where the city did grant permission, and the wall paintings were completed. They are still considered, informally, as one of the northern capital’s tourist attractions. In 2010, Pavel returned to Vladivostok. At first, he painted outdoor walls with a group of artists known as 33+1 Vladivostok, just as he had in St. Petersburg, but soon he was asked to take charge of the local authority’s efforts to transform Vladivostok’s urban environment. Currently, Pavel is busy developing and implementing the city’s colour plan, its concept for outdoor advertising space, the Improving Vladivostok’s Artistic Appearance programme, and a concept for architectural illumination. Pavel says that he sees Vladivostok as a city of dreams, one he wants to revive by making it modern and attractive. He considers it one of his main tasks to create a thinking, involved society through the transformation of the urban environment. Shugurov believes that an important challenge in his artistic quest is identifying the simplest, longest-lasting, and most monumentally expressive artistic media that can blend organically into the cityscape and change the city for the better.

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Pillars

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Pavel chose an unusual surface for his project: the pillars supporting a factory gas pipe. Using only black and white paint, the artist created the illusion of a three-dimensional

sculpture on the pillars. The grey concrete pillars were transformed into anthropomorphic figures symbolizing fathers and mothers carrying the war dead in their outstretched arms.

2014 Acrylic

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Pillars

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Pavel chose an unusual surface for his project: the pillars supporting a factory gas pipe. Using only black and white paint, the artist created the illusion of a three-dimensional

sculpture on the pillars. The grey concrete pillars were transformed into anthropomorphic figures symbolizing fathers and mothers carrying the war dead in their outstretched arms.

2014 Acrylic

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Sixty artists from Russia and Ukraine have gathered here, and we all know the news and what’s happening right now. What’s happening is hard, I would say it cuts us to the quick, because our countries have always been so close. We realize that what’s going on is essentially wrong, but we don’t know how we can stop it. We are not politicians or diplomats. But we are prepared to express how we feel through our association and through our works.

— Pavel Shugurov

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Sixty artists from Russia and Ukraine have gathered here, and we all know the news and what’s happening right now. What’s happening is hard, I would say it cuts us to the quick, because our countries have always been so close. We realize that what’s going on is essentially wrong, but we don’t know how we can stop it. We are not politicians or diplomats. But we are prepared to express how we feel through our association and through our works.

— Pavel Shugurov

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Потапов Владимир Pavel Suslov Художник, куратор и искусствовед Painter

I tr y to keep to the cl a s s ica l s ch o o l o f pa i nti ng , whi ch wa s p r e s e r ve d h er e in o ur cou ntr y tha nks to the S o viet e ra . I l ik e t o ref lect the pr esent us in g m e t h o ds t h a t wer e accessi ble a nd unde r s t a n da bl e 500 ye a r s ag o. Thi s bri ng s di f f er en t e ra s a n d co un t r ie s t og ether i nto a si ng l e s ubs t a n ce o ut s ide o f t i me a nd spa ce, makin g it p o s s ibl e t o co m p a r e wor ks of a rt f rom va r io us t im es fo r a m o r e pr of ou nd knowledg e o f t h e wo r l d. T h r o ugh it all, I tr y to br i ng ele m en t s o f m o der n a r t in t o m y wor k.

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Москва, Россия Zhukovsky, Russia Pavel was born in 1984 just outside Moscow. The artist cites, as the start of his artistic journey, the moment when his parents gave him markers, pencils, and paper. He first studied artistic animation at the Animation Cinematography Lyceum, then studied special effects design for film and television. He graduated from the Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography (VGIK), qualifying as an animation artist and director. Today, Pavel is a classical, realist artist. He immersed himself in traditional painting techniques at the Nemensky studio. By the time he completed his education, Pavel was already working on the streets of his city. The artist is best known for his project Homeless Man’s House, which was a type of symbiosis of traditional art and trends in performance art. The art project has already gone through several reincarnations. With this and other works, Pavel has taken part in dozens of group and solo exhibitions, five of which took place just this year. The most recent was the Last Day of the Mesozoic Era exhibition, at the forest lake in the village of Kratovo. Contemporary street art in Russia, Pavel believes, is largely imitative. He cites the reasons for this as a lack of broad publicity for, understanding of, and government support for genuine innovators. Pavel himself is inspired by the work ethic of his colleagues and idols, and he speaks with equal enthusiasm of the work of the sculptors of ancient Greece and that of the activists in the art group Voina (War) on Liteyny Bridge. He dedicates all of his free time to creating or studying art. He successfully worked for a while as an artist’s model, but he soon quit when he realized that it was affecting his creative work.

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Потапов Владимир Pavel Suslov Художник, куратор и искусствовед Painter

I tr y to keep to the cl a s s ica l s ch o o l o f pa i nti ng , whi ch wa s p r e s e r ve d h er e in o ur cou ntr y tha nks to the S o viet e ra . I l ik e t o ref lect the pr esent us in g m e t h o ds t h a t wer e accessi ble a nd unde r s t a n da bl e 500 ye a r s ag o. Thi s bri ng s di f f er en t e ra s a n d co un t r ie s t og ether i nto a si ng l e s ubs t a n ce o ut s ide o f t i me a nd spa ce, makin g it p o s s ibl e t o co m p a r e wor ks of a rt f rom va r io us t im es fo r a m o r e pr of ou nd knowledg e o f t h e wo r l d. T h r o ugh it all, I tr y to br i ng ele m en t s o f m o der n a r t in t o m y wor k.

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Москва, Россия Zhukovsky, Russia Pavel was born in 1984 just outside Moscow. The artist cites, as the start of his artistic journey, the moment when his parents gave him markers, pencils, and paper. He first studied artistic animation at the Animation Cinematography Lyceum, then studied special effects design for film and television. He graduated from the Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography (VGIK), qualifying as an animation artist and director. Today, Pavel is a classical, realist artist. He immersed himself in traditional painting techniques at the Nemensky studio. By the time he completed his education, Pavel was already working on the streets of his city. The artist is best known for his project Homeless Man’s House, which was a type of symbiosis of traditional art and trends in performance art. The art project has already gone through several reincarnations. With this and other works, Pavel has taken part in dozens of group and solo exhibitions, five of which took place just this year. The most recent was the Last Day of the Mesozoic Era exhibition, at the forest lake in the village of Kratovo. Contemporary street art in Russia, Pavel believes, is largely imitative. He cites the reasons for this as a lack of broad publicity for, understanding of, and government support for genuine innovators. Pavel himself is inspired by the work ethic of his colleagues and idols, and he speaks with equal enthusiasm of the work of the sculptors of ancient Greece and that of the activists in the art group Voina (War) on Liteyny Bridge. He dedicates all of his free time to creating or studying art. He successfully worked for a while as an artist’s model, but he soon quit when he realized that it was affecting his creative work.

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Homeless Man’s House 2014 Object

Homeless Man’s House is a series of large canvases connected to form a single voluminous structure, inside which the artist lives. The idea for the work came from an assignment at university: students were supposed to spend a month in an unknown town and paint dozens of pictures, combining them into a complete project. As they decided how to work on site, the question came up of where to store the finished paintings. To solve that problem, the artist created his first House, an imposing rectangular block structure with five work surfaces by the seaside. Viewers who came across it were interested not so much in the canvases that formed the shell of the little house as in what was happening there: the artist was living inside his paintings. That had an impact on the further conceptualization of the project. With every subsequent trip, the shape of the house changed – from a rectangular prism to a cube, then to a polygon, to an egg shape, and finally to a complex polyhedron: an asymmetric figure with multiple, differently sized work surfaces.

I fi n d pain t in g i nteresti ng , but j us t a s in t er es t in g is it s p r e s en t at ion i n the spa ce of the co n t e m p o ra r y a r t t o p o s , an d in t he everyda y rea li ty of Ru s s ia n ba ck w a t e r t o w n s , c i t i es , an d Cauca su s mounta i n v il l a ge s . Ex h ibit io n s p a ce , i n t hat s en s e, a ppea rs i n pla ces w h er e it h a s n eve r been p r e v ious ly, and never wi ll be a ga in . M o s t p e o p l e , w h e n t h e y c aught s i g ht of Homeless Ma n’s H ous e , h a d n e ve r h e a rd of perfor ma nce a rt a nd i ns t a l l a t io n s , but t h e y l ook ed wit h g r ea t i nterest upon w h a t t h ey s a w .

— Pa ve l S u sl o v

For the exhibition, a house shaped like a truncated octahedron was selected – seven hexagonal canvases on frames are connected by four square ones measuring over a metre on each side. The works that form the house’s foundation were painted in the year leading up to the exhibition, outside Balaklava in Crimea.

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Homeless Man’s House 2014 Object

Homeless Man’s House is a series of large canvases connected to form a single voluminous structure, inside which the artist lives. The idea for the work came from an assignment at university: students were supposed to spend a month in an unknown town and paint dozens of pictures, combining them into a complete project. As they decided how to work on site, the question came up of where to store the finished paintings. To solve that problem, the artist created his first House, an imposing rectangular block structure with five work surfaces by the seaside. Viewers who came across it were interested not so much in the canvases that formed the shell of the little house as in what was happening there: the artist was living inside his paintings. That had an impact on the further conceptualization of the project. With every subsequent trip, the shape of the house changed – from a rectangular prism to a cube, then to a polygon, to an egg shape, and finally to a complex polyhedron: an asymmetric figure with multiple, differently sized work surfaces.

I fi n d pain t in g i nteresti ng , but j us t a s in t er es t in g is it s p r e s en t at ion i n the spa ce of the co n t e m p o ra r y a r t t o p o s , an d in t he everyda y rea li ty of Ru s s ia n ba ck w a t e r t o w n s , c i t i es , an d Cauca su s mounta i n v il l a ge s . Ex h ibit io n s p a ce , i n t hat s en s e, a ppea rs i n pla ces w h er e it h a s n eve r been p r e v ious ly, and never wi ll be a ga in . M o s t p e o p l e , w h e n t h e y c aught s i g ht of Homeless Ma n’s H ous e , h a d n e ve r h e a rd of perfor ma nce a rt a nd i ns t a l l a t io n s , but t h e y l ook ed wit h g r ea t i nterest upon w h a t t h ey s a w .

— Pa ve l S u sl o v

For the exhibition, a house shaped like a truncated octahedron was selected – seven hexagonal canvases on frames are connected by four square ones measuring over a metre on each side. The works that form the house’s foundation were painted in the year leading up to the exhibition, outside Balaklava in Crimea.

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Tajiks-Art Art Group

St. Petersburg, Russia

The art group is critical of the lack of originality in contemporary art and the exploitation of man by man in capitalist society.

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The group first appeared around 2008 or 2009. Its founders were artist, curator, and art historian Kirill Shamanov and “science artist” and biology Ph.D. Alexander Efremov. The art group, according to kirshamanov.com, is critical of the lack of originality in contemporary Russian art and the exploitation of man by man that is so ubiquitous and widespread in capitalist society. The group made its presence known by posting on a LiveJournal blog a price list for the services of migrant-worker performers, who will repeat any piece of performance art to order “for a much, much lower price”, thereby ironically re-conceptualizing the very uniqueness of works in that genre. Since April 2009, Tajiks-Art has performed at Solyanka State Gallery, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Winzavod, and Art Moscow, repeating performances by Marina Abramović, Jonathan Meese, Santiago Sierra, Yves Klein, and other contemporary artists. The group has used hired workers to paint buildings and repaint portraits of Putin, Medvedev, and Matviyenko. Perhaps the project that created the biggest stir was Extractum Hominus, in which the artists distilled alcohol from the blood of oppressed peoples.

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Tajiks-Art Art Group

St. Petersburg, Russia

The art group is critical of the lack of originality in contemporary art and the exploitation of man by man in capitalist society.

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The group first appeared around 2008 or 2009. Its founders were artist, curator, and art historian Kirill Shamanov and “science artist” and biology Ph.D. Alexander Efremov. The art group, according to kirshamanov.com, is critical of the lack of originality in contemporary Russian art and the exploitation of man by man that is so ubiquitous and widespread in capitalist society. The group made its presence known by posting on a LiveJournal blog a price list for the services of migrant-worker performers, who will repeat any piece of performance art to order “for a much, much lower price”, thereby ironically re-conceptualizing the very uniqueness of works in that genre. Since April 2009, Tajiks-Art has performed at Solyanka State Gallery, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Winzavod, and Art Moscow, repeating performances by Marina Abramović, Jonathan Meese, Santiago Sierra, Yves Klein, and other contemporary artists. The group has used hired workers to paint buildings and repaint portraits of Putin, Medvedev, and Matviyenko. Perhaps the project that created the biggest stir was Extractum Hominus, in which the artists distilled alcohol from the blood of oppressed peoples.

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My Blood Is Your Wine – A Russian-Ukrainian Cocktail 2014 Object

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This time, Tajiks-Art made several litres of Extractum Hominus out of Russian and Ukrainian blood they collected from volunteer donors for money. In this, the year marking the centenary of the start of World War I, the artists reflect on the topic of war as a bloody tool for the de facto theft of resources and exploitation of people. With this project,

the Tajiks-Art group is demonstrating to all of us that war is waged over spheres of influence, and the movement of capital is of much greater significance than actual conflicts between peoples. Today, Russia and Ukraine are losing their citizens, and blood is spilling, so that the political elite, having sent that blood flowing through their intercontinental pipelines, can make a few more billion dollars.

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My Blood Is Your Wine – A Russian-Ukrainian Cocktail 2014 Object

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This time, Tajiks-Art made several litres of Extractum Hominus out of Russian and Ukrainian blood they collected from volunteer donors for money. In this, the year marking the centenary of the start of World War I, the artists reflect on the topic of war as a bloody tool for the de facto theft of resources and exploitation of people. With this project,

the Tajiks-Art group is demonstrating to all of us that war is waged over spheres of influence, and the movement of capital is of much greater significance than actual conflicts between peoples. Today, Russia and Ukraine are losing their citizens, and blood is spilling, so that the political elite, having sent that blood flowing through their intercontinental pipelines, can make a few more billion dollars.

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Потапов Владимир Komanda Toy Художник, куратор и искусствовед Street artists

Москва, Россия Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

Ni zhny Novg orod i sn’t a s gra n dio s e a s S t . Pe t er s bur g. I n our ci ty centr e, ever y t h in g is s m a l l , co m p a ct . T h e r e’s a l o t of old a rchi tectu r e, t wo -o r t h r e e-s t o r ey h o us e s , w h ich ar e n ow, u nf or tu na tely, bein g bur n ed do w n by deve l o p e r s s o t ha t they ca n be dem o l is h e d. Peo p l e a r e bein g fo r ced o u t , and new developmen t s a r e a p p e a r in g in t h eir p l a ce . F o r us, thi s mea ns f ewe r in t e r es t in g, be a ut iful e x t er io r s . Yo u ca n’t pa i nt on these n e w buil din gs , m uch l es s t a g t h em . O n the other ha nd, w h a t ’s s a d is t h a t p e o p l e do n’t s ee t ha t behi nd these tags a n d “s t r e et bo m bin gs” t h a t a n n o y everybody, there’s g e n uin e s t r eet a r t t h a t r e m a in s in t h e b a ckg round, i n the ba ck s t r e et s a n d co ur t y a rds . H o we ve r, t he second i s i mpos s ibl e a n d un n e ces s a r y w it h o ut t h e fi r st. Just the sa me, t h e n e w s k y s cra p e r s a n d bus in es s centr es need ta g g i ng.

Seva and Yegor of Komanda Toy were born shortly after the collapse of the USSR. During their childhoods, they both moved to Nizhny Novgorod, where they grew up in residential neighbourhoods typical of the post-Soviet city. They both began drawing and painting while at secondary school. In 2010, Yegor dropped out of art school and continued his artistic activity on the street where he became acquainted with the second member of the collective, Seva. A year later, the young artists took part in the Subway street art exhibition, which was held in the basement of the Arsenal exhibition hall in the Nizhny Novgorod Kremlin. Since then, they have spent an increasing amount of time on collaborative projects. In early 2012, the collective, then numbering three young artists, adopted the name Komanda Toy. Before long, however, the membership again reverted back to the original duo – Yegor and Seva. Komanda Toy achieved recognition in Nizhny Novgorod almost immediately. Tags and “nonsense drawings” by the artists appeared on every corner. Works like Chainik (Teapot) on Bolshaya Pokrovskaya Street, a pedestrian street in the city centre, came to be regarded as local attractions. The group’s first solo exhibition, B/U, was held in May 2014. It featured canvases, posters, sketches, and various objects. Today, Komanda Toy’s work is primarily centred on simple monochrome images that appear deliberately dirty and rough. A minimum of colours helps to sidestep differences of opinion in the collective, and the “dirty” style lends the work clarity and a certain soulful quality.

— Ye g o r, K o m a n da Toy

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Потапов Владимир Komanda Toy Художник, куратор и искусствовед Street artists

Москва, Россия Nizhny Novgorod, Russia

Ni zhny Novg orod i sn’t a s gra n dio s e a s S t . Pe t er s bur g. I n our ci ty centr e, ever y t h in g is s m a l l , co m p a ct . T h e r e’s a l o t of old a rchi tectu r e, t wo -o r t h r e e-s t o r ey h o us e s , w h ich ar e n ow, u nf or tu na tely, bein g bur n ed do w n by deve l o p e r s s o t ha t they ca n be dem o l is h e d. Peo p l e a r e bein g fo r ced o u t , and new developmen t s a r e a p p e a r in g in t h eir p l a ce . F o r us, thi s mea ns f ewe r in t e r es t in g, be a ut iful e x t er io r s . Yo u ca n’t pa i nt on these n e w buil din gs , m uch l es s t a g t h em . O n the other ha nd, w h a t ’s s a d is t h a t p e o p l e do n’t s ee t ha t behi nd these tags a n d “s t r e et bo m bin gs” t h a t a n n o y everybody, there’s g e n uin e s t r eet a r t t h a t r e m a in s in t h e b a ckg round, i n the ba ck s t r e et s a n d co ur t y a rds . H o we ve r, t he second i s i mpos s ibl e a n d un n e ces s a r y w it h o ut t h e fi r st. Just the sa me, t h e n e w s k y s cra p e r s a n d bus in es s centr es need ta g g i ng.

Seva and Yegor of Komanda Toy were born shortly after the collapse of the USSR. During their childhoods, they both moved to Nizhny Novgorod, where they grew up in residential neighbourhoods typical of the post-Soviet city. They both began drawing and painting while at secondary school. In 2010, Yegor dropped out of art school and continued his artistic activity on the street where he became acquainted with the second member of the collective, Seva. A year later, the young artists took part in the Subway street art exhibition, which was held in the basement of the Arsenal exhibition hall in the Nizhny Novgorod Kremlin. Since then, they have spent an increasing amount of time on collaborative projects. In early 2012, the collective, then numbering three young artists, adopted the name Komanda Toy. Before long, however, the membership again reverted back to the original duo – Yegor and Seva. Komanda Toy achieved recognition in Nizhny Novgorod almost immediately. Tags and “nonsense drawings” by the artists appeared on every corner. Works like Chainik (Teapot) on Bolshaya Pokrovskaya Street, a pedestrian street in the city centre, came to be regarded as local attractions. The group’s first solo exhibition, B/U, was held in May 2014. It featured canvases, posters, sketches, and various objects. Today, Komanda Toy’s work is primarily centred on simple monochrome images that appear deliberately dirty and rough. A minimum of colours helps to sidestep differences of opinion in the collective, and the “dirty” style lends the work clarity and a certain soulful quality.

— Ye g o r, K o m a n da Toy

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Man with Dog, Woman with Cat 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 150 х 200 cm

As is their way, the guys have opted to create diptychs of ordinary, everyday pictures. On the largest canvas, the artists reflect the parallels between classic conflicts: men and women, cats and dogs. The subjects of the piece, like two opposing forces, cannot avoid confrontation, and are drawn together face to face, again and again. The second diptych depicts white doves, an international symbol of peace, while warning us that, “Every dove, sooner or later, will reveal its inner sparrow.” Two more small paintings are devoted to the issue of escapism. The people depicted are attempting to hide from their problems by any means possible, ranging from running away to simply trying to hide from them in the grass.

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Man with Dog, Woman with Cat 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 150 х 200 cm

As is their way, the guys have opted to create diptychs of ordinary, everyday pictures. On the largest canvas, the artists reflect the parallels between classic conflicts: men and women, cats and dogs. The subjects of the piece, like two opposing forces, cannot avoid confrontation, and are drawn together face to face, again and again. The second diptych depicts white doves, an international symbol of peace, while warning us that, “Every dove, sooner or later, will reveal its inner sparrow.” Two more small paintings are devoted to the issue of escapism. The people depicted are attempting to hide from their problems by any means possible, ranging from running away to simply trying to hide from them in the grass.

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Doves 2014 Canvas, acrylic 100 х 100 cm (each one)

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Doves 2014 Canvas, acrylic 100 х 100 cm (each one)

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People on the Grass 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 100 Ń… 80 cm

Our aim is to produce works that are imbued with the elements of life experienced by a person living in the CIS. Everyone who sees any one of these pieces can totally, or, perhaps partially, feel for themselves what it’s like for us here.

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People on the Grass 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 100 Ń… 80 cm

Our aim is to produce works that are imbued with the elements of life experienced by a person living in the CIS. Everyone who sees any one of these pieces can totally, or, perhaps partially, feel for themselves what it’s like for us here.

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Miami 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 100 Ñ… 80 cm

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Miami 2014 Canvas, acrylic. 100 Ñ… 80 cm

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Skull 2014 Acrylic on canvas. 103 х 103 сm

The artist, in his trademark pixel style, has created the image of a black skull on a white background using 49 small ceramic tiles. He has said that the work is a reference to the pithy phrase “memento mori” (remember that you will die).

Потапов Владимир Ivan Tuzov Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Москва, Россия St. Petersburg, Russia

Ivan Tuzov was born in 1984. After art school, he studied cabinetmaking and furniture restoration, then went on to study at the Faculty of Fine Arts at Herzen State Pedagogical University, St. Petersburg. Last year he completed his studies in the School For Young Artists programme at the Pro Arte Foundation. In 2008, he worked alongside the art group Internal Garden, and is a long-standing member of the St. Petersburg art collective Parazit. Ivan creates installations and works with tiles. The Art Newspaper Russia rated him among the top 110 young artists. Ivan’s art stems from the tradition of cartoon – “high caricature” without captions, where the minimalism possesses a wit all of its own. His own style is pixel art, creating mosaics based on pixel images. In his pixel works, Ivan depicts only well-known personalities, such as Marx and Engels, Hitler and Stalin, icons of modern art (Warhol, Malevich, Piero Manzoni), and figures from pop culture: Mickey Mouse, Marilyn Monroe, ninjas, and the Russian cartoon character Cheburashka. In 2007, Ivan gave his first solo exhibition, In Search of the Self, at St. Petersburg’s Dom Kino, and took part in two more exhibitions the following year: Autumn Aggravation and Materialism. In 2012, his solo exhibition Devirtualization was presented at the Marat Guelman Gallery. The artist exhibited mosaic canvases made from modern stucco bearing depictions of his pixel characters. After the exhibition, the work was presented to Winzavod. Ivan was nominated for the Sergey Kuryokhin Modern Art Award in 2013 for his Cremation of the Social Networks piece. 1

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http://www.winzavod.ru/galleries/guelman/?id=1329 (Russian only)

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Skull 2014 Acrylic on canvas. 103 х 103 сm

The artist, in his trademark pixel style, has created the image of a black skull on a white background using 49 small ceramic tiles. He has said that the work is a reference to the pithy phrase “memento mori” (remember that you will die).

Потапов Владимир Ivan Tuzov Художник, Street artistкуратор и искусствовед

Москва, Россия St. Petersburg, Russia

Ivan Tuzov was born in 1984. After art school, he studied cabinetmaking and furniture restoration, then went on to study at the Faculty of Fine Arts at Herzen State Pedagogical University, St. Petersburg. Last year he completed his studies in the School For Young Artists programme at the Pro Arte Foundation. In 2008, he worked alongside the art group Internal Garden, and is a long-standing member of the St. Petersburg art collective Parazit. Ivan creates installations and works with tiles. The Art Newspaper Russia rated him among the top 110 young artists. Ivan’s art stems from the tradition of cartoon – “high caricature” without captions, where the minimalism possesses a wit all of its own. His own style is pixel art, creating mosaics based on pixel images. In his pixel works, Ivan depicts only well-known personalities, such as Marx and Engels, Hitler and Stalin, icons of modern art (Warhol, Malevich, Piero Manzoni), and figures from pop culture: Mickey Mouse, Marilyn Monroe, ninjas, and the Russian cartoon character Cheburashka. In 2007, Ivan gave his first solo exhibition, In Search of the Self, at St. Petersburg’s Dom Kino, and took part in two more exhibitions the following year: Autumn Aggravation and Materialism. In 2012, his solo exhibition Devirtualization was presented at the Marat Guelman Gallery. The artist exhibited mosaic canvases made from modern stucco bearing depictions of his pixel characters. After the exhibition, the work was presented to Winzavod. Ivan was nominated for the Sergey Kuryokhin Modern Art Award in 2013 for his Cremation of the Social Networks piece. 1

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http://www.winzavod.ru/galleries/guelman/?id=1329 (Russian only)

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Vladimir Vorotnev Street artist and curator of Casus Pacis

Artist’s works are increasingly symbolic and conceptual in their nature.

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Kiev, Ukraine Vladimir Vorotnev, who is also known by the pseudonyms of Lodek and Vol.vo, was born in Chervonohrad (Ukraine) in 1979 and now lives and works in Kiev. Vladimir did not go to art school but, like many artists, he studied philosophy. It was at that time that he became interested in graffiti culture. He began by exploring traditional forms of graffiti, regarding them as a grassroots, yet very powerful information channel through which the artist can transmit his innermost thoughts to the public. Vorotnev underwent a long transformation from tagging, to becoming a flâneur who attempts to “tap into the urban subconscious.” Nowadays, he defines himself as “an artist with a background in graffiti.” Vorotnev has not worked in the street art genre for a long time and consciously opposes the street art community. He considers the movement itself defunct, a “speculative and tawdry update of the ideological phenomenon known as graffiti. ‘Street Art’ is a stereotyped set of techniques, formal approaches, and conventions.” In his work, he tries to find the fine line between street and gallery (mainstream) art. According to the artist, this boundary has been invented by the media and merely brands art that does not fit a prescribed “format”. In 2008–2009, Vorotnev developed the so-called Abstro style that employs conventional graffiti aesthetics in order to create abstract rather than textual compositions. His 2010 mural in the Polish city of Wrocław was executed in this style. Later, he worked on so-called Indexical Art, inspired by the theoretical writings of American critic Rosalind Krauss (mural in Warsaw, 2011). According to the artist, the image neither “imitates nature, nor carries a symbolic component.” Presently, the artist is moving in the direction of conceptual art and street Arte Povera (“poor art”). His works are becoming increasingly symbolic and conceptual in their nature. Vorotnev actively exhibits his work in galleries in Ukraine, Russia, the Netherlands, and Poland. In 2012, he participated in Kiev’s Arsenale 2012 Biennial of Contemporary Art, and in 2013 he was nominated for the PinchukArtCentre Award for Contemporary Art.

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Vladimir Vorotnev Street artist and curator of Casus Pacis

Artist’s works are increasingly symbolic and conceptual in their nature.

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Kiev, Ukraine Vladimir Vorotnev, who is also known by the pseudonyms of Lodek and Vol.vo, was born in Chervonohrad (Ukraine) in 1979 and now lives and works in Kiev. Vladimir did not go to art school but, like many artists, he studied philosophy. It was at that time that he became interested in graffiti culture. He began by exploring traditional forms of graffiti, regarding them as a grassroots, yet very powerful information channel through which the artist can transmit his innermost thoughts to the public. Vorotnev underwent a long transformation from tagging, to becoming a flâneur who attempts to “tap into the urban subconscious.” Nowadays, he defines himself as “an artist with a background in graffiti.” Vorotnev has not worked in the street art genre for a long time and consciously opposes the street art community. He considers the movement itself defunct, a “speculative and tawdry update of the ideological phenomenon known as graffiti. ‘Street Art’ is a stereotyped set of techniques, formal approaches, and conventions.” In his work, he tries to find the fine line between street and gallery (mainstream) art. According to the artist, this boundary has been invented by the media and merely brands art that does not fit a prescribed “format”. In 2008–2009, Vorotnev developed the so-called Abstro style that employs conventional graffiti aesthetics in order to create abstract rather than textual compositions. His 2010 mural in the Polish city of Wrocław was executed in this style. Later, he worked on so-called Indexical Art, inspired by the theoretical writings of American critic Rosalind Krauss (mural in Warsaw, 2011). According to the artist, the image neither “imitates nature, nor carries a symbolic component.” Presently, the artist is moving in the direction of conceptual art and street Arte Povera (“poor art”). His works are becoming increasingly symbolic and conceptual in their nature. Vorotnev actively exhibits his work in galleries in Ukraine, Russia, the Netherlands, and Poland. In 2012, he participated in Kiev’s Arsenale 2012 Biennial of Contemporary Art, and in 2013 he was nominated for the PinchukArtCentre Award for Contemporary Art.

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Houyhnhnms 2014 Reproduction, acrylic. 152 х 106 cm

A series of reproductions of classic equestrian portraits of famous generals and emperors from which the rider has been gruffly erased with a black marker. Vorotnev subverts the well-known works, playing with familiar images and ironically reinterpreting them. Instead of the celebrated military commanders, it is the horses who become the central characters of these works. In Jonathan Swift’s famous novel Gulliver’s Travels, Houyhnhnms are a race of intelligent horses. In this series, Vorotnev questions the intelligence of modern people, presenting them, “much as Swift did, as stupid and unworthy to ride upon and conceive of themselves as superior to other animals.”

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Houyhnhnms 2014 Reproduction, acrylic. 152 х 106 cm

A series of reproductions of classic equestrian portraits of famous generals and emperors from which the rider has been gruffly erased with a black marker. Vorotnev subverts the well-known works, playing with familiar images and ironically reinterpreting them. Instead of the celebrated military commanders, it is the horses who become the central characters of these works. In Jonathan Swift’s famous novel Gulliver’s Travels, Houyhnhnms are a race of intelligent horses. In this series, Vorotnev questions the intelligence of modern people, presenting them, “much as Swift did, as stupid and unworthy to ride upon and conceive of themselves as superior to other animals.”

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Humanism 2014 Vinyl. 300 Ń… 400 cm

The second work is also based on a reinterpretation of classical art: Vorotnev has turned Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man into the symbol of peace and the antiwar movement and placed it on a white flag. The artist reflects on the Renaissance ideas of humanism, harmony and peace, man’s role in history, and more.

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Casus Pacis is what ordinary people should demand for themselves, because it is they who become pawns in war, while the privileged few at the top enjoy security.

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Humanism 2014 Vinyl. 300 Ń… 400 cm

The second work is also based on a reinterpretation of classical art: Vorotnev has turned Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man into the symbol of peace and the antiwar movement and placed it on a white flag. The artist reflects on the Renaissance ideas of humanism, harmony and peace, man’s role in history, and more.

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Casus Pacis is what ordinary people should demand for themselves, because it is they who become pawns in war, while the privileged few at the top enjoy security.

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Pasha Wais Street artist, leader of the TAD graffiti crew, founder of the Sevn Layers clothing brand

St. Petersburg, Russia

THE ARTIST PARTICIPATES IN GRAFFITI FESTIVALS AND EXHIBITIONS AROUND THE WORLD, AND IS A JUDGE AT GRAFFITI BATTLES. HE HAS ALSO COLLABORATED WITH MANY BRANDS AND COMPANIES, INCLUDING NIKE, ADIDAS, SEAT, VOLKSWAGEN, AND PEPSI. 258

Pavel Chervyakov was born in 1987 in Gatchina and loved drawing from early childhood. “There was a great moment when I came across my mum’s very 1980s set of paints and that gave me new impetus – I started to decorate my cars.” 1 He later went to a school which specialized in art. By the age of 13, Pasha was already seriously interested in graffiti, and then he fell under the influence of the work of the FX crew and one of the first St. Petersburg SPP crews. Later, Pasha attended the Alexander von Stieglitz St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy, and although he did not graduate from there or from school, he says that he was able to take from them everything that he needed. At the beginning of the new millennium, Wais was spray painting photorealistic portraits onto walls, as well as large bionic forms. But eventually he arrived at classic graffiti. He tried not to dwell on lettering in his development, and continued to work with the dynamics of the letters, along with visual effects and the distortion of space. In 2008, he and Sasha Trun, whom he had previously collaborated with in Funk Fanatix, formed the TOP AND DOPE crew, otherwise known as TAD. Pasha acknowledges that they came together in a team at that point “with the aim of creating more powerful productions and applying a more serious approach to our activities.” They have already made a name for themselves at street art festivals, including Street Summit, FF Anniversary, and the Danish Roskilde Festival, and were selected as winners of the international Write4Gold contest. TAD are the first Russian graffiti writers to be sponsored by MTN, one of the largest European manufactures of spray paint. Pasha Wais participates in graffiti festivals and exhibitions around the world, and is a judge at graffiti battles. He has also collaborated with many brands and companies, including Nike, Adidas, Seat, Volkswagen, and Pepsi.2 He occasionally paints sets for films and designs facades and interiors. He also is the founder of Moscow’s Sevn Layers clothing brand. Wais created the very first work in the museum’s main exhibition.

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http://ilovegraffiti.ru/2461 (Russian only)

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http://streetkit.ru/artists/pavel-wais (Russian only)

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Pasha Wais Street artist, leader of the TAD graffiti crew, founder of the Sevn Layers clothing brand

St. Petersburg, Russia

THE ARTIST PARTICIPATES IN GRAFFITI FESTIVALS AND EXHIBITIONS AROUND THE WORLD, AND IS A JUDGE AT GRAFFITI BATTLES. HE HAS ALSO COLLABORATED WITH MANY BRANDS AND COMPANIES, INCLUDING NIKE, ADIDAS, SEAT, VOLKSWAGEN, AND PEPSI. 258

Pavel Chervyakov was born in 1987 in Gatchina and loved drawing from early childhood. “There was a great moment when I came across my mum’s very 1980s set of paints and that gave me new impetus – I started to decorate my cars.” 1 He later went to a school which specialized in art. By the age of 13, Pasha was already seriously interested in graffiti, and then he fell under the influence of the work of the FX crew and one of the first St. Petersburg SPP crews. Later, Pasha attended the Alexander von Stieglitz St. Petersburg Art and Industry Academy, and although he did not graduate from there or from school, he says that he was able to take from them everything that he needed. At the beginning of the new millennium, Wais was spray painting photorealistic portraits onto walls, as well as large bionic forms. But eventually he arrived at classic graffiti. He tried not to dwell on lettering in his development, and continued to work with the dynamics of the letters, along with visual effects and the distortion of space. In 2008, he and Sasha Trun, whom he had previously collaborated with in Funk Fanatix, formed the TOP AND DOPE crew, otherwise known as TAD. Pasha acknowledges that they came together in a team at that point “with the aim of creating more powerful productions and applying a more serious approach to our activities.” They have already made a name for themselves at street art festivals, including Street Summit, FF Anniversary, and the Danish Roskilde Festival, and were selected as winners of the international Write4Gold contest. TAD are the first Russian graffiti writers to be sponsored by MTN, one of the largest European manufactures of spray paint. Pasha Wais participates in graffiti festivals and exhibitions around the world, and is a judge at graffiti battles. He has also collaborated with many brands and companies, including Nike, Adidas, Seat, Volkswagen, and Pepsi.2 He occasionally paints sets for films and designs facades and interiors. He also is the founder of Moscow’s Sevn Layers clothing brand. Wais created the very first work in the museum’s main exhibition.

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http://ilovegraffiti.ru/2461 (Russian only)

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http://streetkit.ru/artists/pavel-wais (Russian only)

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Razzle Dazzle 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 2900 х 600 cm

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Pasha has created a piece based on the motif of dazzle camouflage, which was used by the British Admiralty in the early twentieth century. The pattern was designed to mask the size, shape, and direction of moving ships from the enemy. It is also known as “razzle dazzle”,

which clearly describes the intended effect. It is thought that when Norman Wilkinson invented dazzle camouflage, he was inspired by the early works of the Cubists, who used chopped, contrasting geometric shapes to produce a volumetric effect on the canvas.

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Razzle Dazzle 2014 Acrylic, aerosol. 2900 х 600 cm

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Pasha has created a piece based on the motif of dazzle camouflage, which was used by the British Admiralty in the early twentieth century. The pattern was designed to mask the size, shape, and direction of moving ships from the enemy. It is also known as “razzle dazzle”,

which clearly describes the intended effect. It is thought that when Norman Wilkinson invented dazzle camouflage, he was inspired by the early works of the Cubists, who used chopped, contrasting geometric shapes to produce a volumetric effect on the canvas.

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Zbiok Street artist, illustrator, curator

The artist describes his work as a “post-collage of images from contemporary culture.”

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Wrocław, Poland Slawomir Czajkowski, known by his pseudonym, Zbiok, was born in 1982 in the Polish city of Zielona Góra. He graduated from the Faculty of Arts and Culture at Zielona Góra University in 2006 with a master’s degree. He now lives and works in the Polish city of Wrocław. Zbiok began his career as a street artist in the mid-1990s under the influence of the New York school of graffiti and hip-hop culture. Later, inspired by the art of the early twentieth century, especially the avant-garde movement and Picasso’s legacy, he began to study the style of the Mexican Muralists. As a student, Zbiok went far beyond traditional graffiti, experimenting with new techniques in his murals. In addition to spray-painting, he has tried his hand at illustration, design, and explored other areas. He has continued to expand his sphere of interests over the course of many years, actively participating in exhibitions and collaborating with government agencies. He is now well-known in Wrocław and beyond, but he still remains true to graffiti culture, continuing to work under a pseudonym. In his work, Zbiok challenges the monopolization of urban spaces and excessive control over people’s lives. He depicts the world around him with characteristic humour and irony, and grapples with the dominance of advertising in public places. At the same time, his work is devoid of activist overtones. The artist describes his work as a “post-collage of images from contemporary culture.” Zbiok is one of Poland’s most active and influential street artists and the winner of several prestigious awards, including the 2010 WARTO National Award and the grand prize in the 2009 Geppert competition, which showcases young Polish artists. He has also received a scholarship from the Polish Minister of Culture. Zbiok has held several major solo exhibitions in Poland and abroad. In addition, he has participated in many collective projects in Poland, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Russia, and the United States, is co-curator of the Polish street art festival OUT OF STH in Wrocław, and is the author of Street Sketchbook.

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Zbiok Street artist, illustrator, curator

The artist describes his work as a “post-collage of images from contemporary culture.”

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Wrocław, Poland Slawomir Czajkowski, known by his pseudonym, Zbiok, was born in 1982 in the Polish city of Zielona Góra. He graduated from the Faculty of Arts and Culture at Zielona Góra University in 2006 with a master’s degree. He now lives and works in the Polish city of Wrocław. Zbiok began his career as a street artist in the mid-1990s under the influence of the New York school of graffiti and hip-hop culture. Later, inspired by the art of the early twentieth century, especially the avant-garde movement and Picasso’s legacy, he began to study the style of the Mexican Muralists. As a student, Zbiok went far beyond traditional graffiti, experimenting with new techniques in his murals. In addition to spray-painting, he has tried his hand at illustration, design, and explored other areas. He has continued to expand his sphere of interests over the course of many years, actively participating in exhibitions and collaborating with government agencies. He is now well-known in Wrocław and beyond, but he still remains true to graffiti culture, continuing to work under a pseudonym. In his work, Zbiok challenges the monopolization of urban spaces and excessive control over people’s lives. He depicts the world around him with characteristic humour and irony, and grapples with the dominance of advertising in public places. At the same time, his work is devoid of activist overtones. The artist describes his work as a “post-collage of images from contemporary culture.” Zbiok is one of Poland’s most active and influential street artists and the winner of several prestigious awards, including the 2010 WARTO National Award and the grand prize in the 2009 Geppert competition, which showcases young Polish artists. He has also received a scholarship from the Polish Minister of Culture. Zbiok has held several major solo exhibitions in Poland and abroad. In addition, he has participated in many collective projects in Poland, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Russia, and the United States, is co-curator of the Polish street art festival OUT OF STH in Wrocław, and is the author of Street Sketchbook.

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Vova 2014 Spray-paint, emulsion, acrylic. 3000 х 800 cm

I want to change reality without punching it in the nose. 1

— Zbiok 264

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Zbiok has created a massive mural in his trademark style. The composition is constructed as a collage with a surreal, fragmentary depiction of people and understated pastel tones. All of these features can be found in many of the artist’s works. The complex composition takes up part of the Street Art Museum’s enormous factory floor and has been divided into three parts. A fragment of a male profile styled in the spirit of a primitivist portrait of a woman and a human figure descending a dilapidated staircase exist

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alongside one another paradoxically, creating a complex, fantastical collage. The centre of the composition is occupied by the portrait of a man, in which can be glimpsed the image of one of the curators of Casus Pacis, Vova Vorotnev, himself an artist, and a friend of Zbiok’s. The idea for this work came to the artist at the start of the Maidan protests. It was then that Zbiok decided to create a very personal piece, dedicated to his friend and the events in Ukraine. The composition is based on photographs taken by one of the artist’s friends.

http://wroclaw.gazeta.pl/wroclaw/1,97381,9123186,Slawomir_ZBIOK_Czajkowski__Streetarter_zostawia_slad.html (Polish only)

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Vova 2014 Spray-paint, emulsion, acrylic. 3000 х 800 cm

I want to change reality without punching it in the nose. 1

— Zbiok 264

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, Zbiok has created a massive mural in his trademark style. The composition is constructed as a collage with a surreal, fragmentary depiction of people and understated pastel tones. All of these features can be found in many of the artist’s works. The complex composition takes up part of the Street Art Museum’s enormous factory floor and has been divided into three parts. A fragment of a male profile styled in the spirit of a primitivist portrait of a woman and a human figure descending a dilapidated staircase exist

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alongside one another paradoxically, creating a complex, fantastical collage. The centre of the composition is occupied by the portrait of a man, in which can be glimpsed the image of one of the curators of Casus Pacis, Vova Vorotnev, himself an artist, and a friend of Zbiok’s. The idea for this work came to the artist at the start of the Maidan protests. It was then that Zbiok decided to create a very personal piece, dedicated to his friend and the events in Ukraine. The composition is based on photographs taken by one of the artist’s friends.

http://wroclaw.gazeta.pl/wroclaw/1,97381,9123186,Slawomir_ZBIOK_Czajkowski__Streetarter_zostawia_slad.html (Polish only)

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Alexander Zhunev Street artist and organizer of the Ecology of Space festival

scale and monumentality, an affinity with three-dimensional spatial solutions, and a close relationship with architecture and the environment. 266

Perm, Russia Alexander Zhunev was born in Perm in 1984. He graduated from Perm State University with degrees in geology and economics. Zhunev did not come to street art the usual way: “I was doing screen printing onto T-shirts... Then, my attention turned to graffiti as a low-cost advertising tool. Graffiti artists use settings in the city centre which a lot of people walk past, and they don’t pay any rent. My studio could not afford outdoor advertising, so I decided to find graffiti artists willing to paint graffiti ads for my Creative T-shirts studio. I rode around with them at night and they painted the logo. Then, I wanted to find out if I could do graffiti myself… and soon I learned more about street art and started trying out stencils and other techniques.” Alexander Zhunev’s first major work was a portrait of the poet Esenin on the facade of a half-finished multi-storey building in Perm. Right away, a number of key traits typical of his work manifested themselves: scale and monumentality, an affinity with three-dimensional spatial solutions, and a close relationship with architecture and the environment. Another famous work by Zhunev is a 3D project titled The Legend of Kudym-Osh in Kudymkar (2011). Kudym-Osh is a major hero of Permian Komi epic folklore, the legendary founder of the city, who taught people to forge iron and grow corn. Exploring the intimate connection with the place where the work is created and its history is the artist’s favoured approach. For example, in his joint project with the Street Art Museum in Salavat (2013), Alexander depicted the famous Salavat waterfall. Similarly, his work Don’t Get in Your Own Way, made for the Street Art Museum collection, is the artist’s direct appeal to his uncle, with whom he was staying during his sojourn in St. Petersburg. In Perm, Zhunev organized the Ecology of Space festival, which has been held since 2012. In the first year, 100 electrical cabinets and payphones were painted in Perm as part of the festival. The next year, street artists gave artistic makeovers to building façades and transformer substations. In 2014, Alexander plans to expand the geographic scope of the project to encompass all of Perm Territory, including small towns.

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Alexander Zhunev Street artist and organizer of the Ecology of Space festival

scale and monumentality, an affinity with three-dimensional spatial solutions, and a close relationship with architecture and the environment. 266

Perm, Russia Alexander Zhunev was born in Perm in 1984. He graduated from Perm State University with degrees in geology and economics. Zhunev did not come to street art the usual way: “I was doing screen printing onto T-shirts... Then, my attention turned to graffiti as a low-cost advertising tool. Graffiti artists use settings in the city centre which a lot of people walk past, and they don’t pay any rent. My studio could not afford outdoor advertising, so I decided to find graffiti artists willing to paint graffiti ads for my Creative T-shirts studio. I rode around with them at night and they painted the logo. Then, I wanted to find out if I could do graffiti myself… and soon I learned more about street art and started trying out stencils and other techniques.” Alexander Zhunev’s first major work was a portrait of the poet Esenin on the facade of a half-finished multi-storey building in Perm. Right away, a number of key traits typical of his work manifested themselves: scale and monumentality, an affinity with three-dimensional spatial solutions, and a close relationship with architecture and the environment. Another famous work by Zhunev is a 3D project titled The Legend of Kudym-Osh in Kudymkar (2011). Kudym-Osh is a major hero of Permian Komi epic folklore, the legendary founder of the city, who taught people to forge iron and grow corn. Exploring the intimate connection with the place where the work is created and its history is the artist’s favoured approach. For example, in his joint project with the Street Art Museum in Salavat (2013), Alexander depicted the famous Salavat waterfall. Similarly, his work Don’t Get in Your Own Way, made for the Street Art Museum collection, is the artist’s direct appeal to his uncle, with whom he was staying during his sojourn in St. Petersburg. In Perm, Zhunev organized the Ecology of Space festival, which has been held since 2012. In the first year, 100 electrical cabinets and payphones were painted in Perm as part of the festival. The next year, street artists gave artistic makeovers to building façades and transformer substations. In 2014, Alexander plans to expand the geographic scope of the project to encompass all of Perm Territory, including small towns.

267


Dove of Peace 2014 Object, mixed media

A globe made of barbed wire containing a stuffed dove symbolizes the cage imprisoning the world on the eve of war. Marked on the globe in different colours are the borders of various countries in 1914, on the eve of the World War One. According to the artist, political philosophies and a desire to refashion the world map made further peace impossible, and everything changed – the war began. The dollar-shaped hook from which the globe is suspended alludes to the dependence of war and peace on the financial system. The work of art is suspended in space. Everyone is welcome to touch it, and turn it into a pendulum.

268

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Dove of Peace 2014 Object, mixed media

A globe made of barbed wire containing a stuffed dove symbolizes the cage imprisoning the world on the eve of war. Marked on the globe in different colours are the borders of various countries in 1914, on the eve of the World War One. According to the artist, political philosophies and a desire to refashion the world map made further peace impossible, and everything changed – the war began. The dollar-shaped hook from which the globe is suspended alludes to the dependence of war and peace on the financial system. The work of art is suspended in space. Everyone is welcome to touch it, and turn it into a pendulum.

268

269


Zigendemonic Ukrainian street and video artist

a tiny fragment of the rich spectrum of feelings we experience on a daily basis on the surface of the information abyss.

270

Kiev – Lviv, Ukraine Born in Kiev in 1988, she is a graduate of the M. Boichuk Kiev State Institute of Decorative and Applied Art and Design. She has been working under a pseudonym since 2002. Like many contemporary artists, she started out with a passion for graffiti, but after much experimentation with styles and techniques, she found her own distinctive style. It is characterized by dramatic colour, surreal and dark images, and ornamentation. Her work is populated by war-like and aggressive beings. Zigendemonic says that in her work, she is striving to convey the spirit of the times, while her mystical, surreal characters come to her in her dreams. The artist acknowledges that each time she creates an image, she does not know what the result will be. Intuition and subconscious play a major role in her work. That is why she calls her art experimental, immersed in an atmosphere of the “consciously absurd”. In her art, Zigendemonic seeks to convey “just a tiny fragment of the rich spectrum of feelings we experience on a daily basis on the surface of the information abyss.” The artist has participated in numerous exhibitions, not only in Ukraine and Russia, but also in European countries including France, Italy, and Spain. Her work has been shown in galleries in the US and Mexico. In addition to being featured in Casus Pacis, Zigendemonic’s 2014 activity includes a project for the Moscow Biennale for Young Art.

271


Zigendemonic Ukrainian street and video artist

a tiny fragment of the rich spectrum of feelings we experience on a daily basis on the surface of the information abyss.

270

Kiev – Lviv, Ukraine Born in Kiev in 1988, she is a graduate of the M. Boichuk Kiev State Institute of Decorative and Applied Art and Design. She has been working under a pseudonym since 2002. Like many contemporary artists, she started out with a passion for graffiti, but after much experimentation with styles and techniques, she found her own distinctive style. It is characterized by dramatic colour, surreal and dark images, and ornamentation. Her work is populated by war-like and aggressive beings. Zigendemonic says that in her work, she is striving to convey the spirit of the times, while her mystical, surreal characters come to her in her dreams. The artist acknowledges that each time she creates an image, she does not know what the result will be. Intuition and subconscious play a major role in her work. That is why she calls her art experimental, immersed in an atmosphere of the “consciously absurd”. In her art, Zigendemonic seeks to convey “just a tiny fragment of the rich spectrum of feelings we experience on a daily basis on the surface of the information abyss.” The artist has participated in numerous exhibitions, not only in Ukraine and Russia, but also in European countries including France, Italy, and Spain. Her work has been shown in galleries in the US and Mexico. In addition to being featured in Casus Pacis, Zigendemonic’s 2014 activity includes a project for the Moscow Biennale for Young Art.

271


Flames and Ashes 2014 Installation, acrylic, mixed media, video

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist has painted a small room with a sinister ornament comprising human figures. The terrible events that have engulfed her homeland this year are depicted on the walls of the room: people are dying, blood is spilt, exploded bodies are everywhere, flames and ashes. Multi-colour, changing lights add a dynamic, mystical quality to the installation. In the same room, several of the artist’s earlier video works play on screens. Hundreds of collages appear one after the other in rapid succession. According to the artist, these create within the viewer a sensation of exhaustion from visual overload, resulting from spending too much time online.

I u se d p l a n t m o t i f s i n m y wo r k ; t h i s i s a t y p i c a l fe atu re i n U kra i n i a n f o l k a r t , a n d I t h i n k i t i s ve r y i m p o r tant to p r e se r ve a n d r e i n ve n t t h i s r e c o g n i z a b l e e l e m e n t”, s ays t h e a r t i st . “ C o n t i n u i n g m y e x p e r i m e n t s w i t h st y l i zati on a n d o ve r - sa t u ra t e d sp a c e s, i n t h i s c o m p o si t i o n I s pe ak p r e t t y d i r e c t l y a b o u t m y i m p r e ssi o n s f r o m v i e w ing the b r o a d c a st s o f t h e e ve n t s t h a t t o o k p l a c e i n K i e v l as t w i n t e r o n t h e In t e r n e t – t h i s w a s, t o m e , a t e rr i bl e thi ng t o b e h o l d . E ve n a s I a g o n i z e o ve r m y n a t i ve c i t y , wi thi n m e , so m e h o w , a r e h o p e s f o r a sw i f t c o n c l u si o n to the u n r e st a n d a r e t u r n t o a p e a c e f u l e x i st e n c e .

— Zigend emonic

272

273


Flames and Ashes 2014 Installation, acrylic, mixed media, video

For the Casus Pacis exhibition, the artist has painted a small room with a sinister ornament comprising human figures. The terrible events that have engulfed her homeland this year are depicted on the walls of the room: people are dying, blood is spilt, exploded bodies are everywhere, flames and ashes. Multi-colour, changing lights add a dynamic, mystical quality to the installation. In the same room, several of the artist’s earlier video works play on screens. Hundreds of collages appear one after the other in rapid succession. According to the artist, these create within the viewer a sensation of exhaustion from visual overload, resulting from spending too much time online.

I u se d p l a n t m o t i f s i n m y wo r k ; t h i s i s a t y p i c a l fe atu re i n U kra i n i a n f o l k a r t , a n d I t h i n k i t i s ve r y i m p o r tant to p r e se r ve a n d r e i n ve n t t h i s r e c o g n i z a b l e e l e m e n t”, s ays t h e a r t i st . “ C o n t i n u i n g m y e x p e r i m e n t s w i t h st y l i zati on a n d o ve r - sa t u ra t e d sp a c e s, i n t h i s c o m p o si t i o n I s pe ak p r e t t y d i r e c t l y a b o u t m y i m p r e ssi o n s f r o m v i e w ing the b r o a d c a st s o f t h e e ve n t s t h a t t o o k p l a c e i n K i e v l as t w i n t e r o n t h e In t e r n e t – t h i s w a s, t o m e , a t e rr i bl e thi ng t o b e h o l d . E ve n a s I a g o n i z e o ve r m y n a t i ve c i t y , wi thi n m e , so m e h o w , a r e h o p e s f o r a sw i f t c o n c l u si o n to the u n r e st a n d a r e t u r n t o a p e a c e f u l e x i st e n c e .

— Zigend emonic

272

273


Pavel Zyumkin Artist, designer

Having reached a certain level in design, the artist decided to free up his creative energy.

274

Moscow, Russia Pavel was born in Moscow in spring 1985, and grew up in Zelenograd. He completed his secondary education at Moscow Art Lyceum No. 303 and attended Moscow Art Industrial Institute, but did not graduate. He has been working for over 10 years on corporate identity development, branding, furniture, advertising concepts, and industrial facilities. However, despite this wide range of activities, he worked alongside other people and frequently dealt with other people’s business, and so claimed to be unable to insert his own values. Talking about his direction, the artist said, “Having reached a certain level in design, I decided to limit the number of commissions I took on, freeing up my own creative energy. I undertook some reflection on a theme which is vital for all thinking people: ‘Who am I and what am I doing here?’ and I found myself crossing that invisible but certainly real boundary between designer and artist.” In contrast to the majority of modern artists, Pavel did not totally abandon the notion of “working artist”, leaving behind his previous experience. His work continues to be based largely on the principles and techniques which he followed during his 10 years as a designer. Where street art is concerned, Pavel differs from many of his counterparts in that he has not come from the graffiti school. In making public art, he prefers installations and large-scale interventions. He attempts to bring average urbanites face to face in their daily lives with objects which are familiar from childhood, but are taken out of their ordinary context. Flags bearing images of carpets, bridges wrapped in patchwork quilts, bricks made of birch and steles made from cabinets – the point of all this is not simply to carefully preserve the legacy of an era, but also to blend it organically into a reality fixated on consumption. In addition, there are more direct and immediately understandable projects, such as a series of partisan bus maps of Zelenograd.

275


Pavel Zyumkin Artist, designer

Having reached a certain level in design, the artist decided to free up his creative energy.

274

Moscow, Russia Pavel was born in Moscow in spring 1985, and grew up in Zelenograd. He completed his secondary education at Moscow Art Lyceum No. 303 and attended Moscow Art Industrial Institute, but did not graduate. He has been working for over 10 years on corporate identity development, branding, furniture, advertising concepts, and industrial facilities. However, despite this wide range of activities, he worked alongside other people and frequently dealt with other people’s business, and so claimed to be unable to insert his own values. Talking about his direction, the artist said, “Having reached a certain level in design, I decided to limit the number of commissions I took on, freeing up my own creative energy. I undertook some reflection on a theme which is vital for all thinking people: ‘Who am I and what am I doing here?’ and I found myself crossing that invisible but certainly real boundary between designer and artist.” In contrast to the majority of modern artists, Pavel did not totally abandon the notion of “working artist”, leaving behind his previous experience. His work continues to be based largely on the principles and techniques which he followed during his 10 years as a designer. Where street art is concerned, Pavel differs from many of his counterparts in that he has not come from the graffiti school. In making public art, he prefers installations and large-scale interventions. He attempts to bring average urbanites face to face in their daily lives with objects which are familiar from childhood, but are taken out of their ordinary context. Flags bearing images of carpets, bridges wrapped in patchwork quilts, bricks made of birch and steles made from cabinets – the point of all this is not simply to carefully preserve the legacy of an era, but also to blend it organically into a reality fixated on consumption. In addition, there are more direct and immediately understandable projects, such as a series of partisan bus maps of Zelenograd.

275


Lingering Comfort 2013 Object, fabric, mixed media

With several flags of carpet mounted in Moscow and Kiev, the artist attempts to show city residents that the street is a home, and not simply a place to dwell for a certain period, or an obstacle course to negotiate on the way from bed to work. The city streets are not some kind of foreign or abstract space “out there” but have in fact been made “for someone”. One of the flag-carpets is on display in the Street Art Museum.

L o o kin g at t h e exper i ence o f t he older genera ti on, o u r gran dfat hers a nd g ra n dmot h ers, I ref lected on t h e t en dern ess, cour tesy, a nd r e sp on s ib ilit y wi th whi ch they t r e at ed t h eir streets, thei r c o u rt yard s , and ea ch other. — Pa ve l Zy um kin The pleasantly tactile, historically rooted, understandable, functional, and direct image of a carpet becomes an honorary banner for comfort. Taking the form of a flag, appearing in houses, on pillars and fences, the work reminds us that comfort can be found in the open air too. And comfort lingers.

276

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Lingering Comfort 2013 Object, fabric, mixed media

With several flags of carpet mounted in Moscow and Kiev, the artist attempts to show city residents that the street is a home, and not simply a place to dwell for a certain period, or an obstacle course to negotiate on the way from bed to work. The city streets are not some kind of foreign or abstract space “out there” but have in fact been made “for someone”. One of the flag-carpets is on display in the Street Art Museum.

L o o kin g at t h e exper i ence o f t he older genera ti on, o u r gran dfat hers a nd g ra n dmot h ers, I ref lected on t h e t en dern ess, cour tesy, a nd r e sp on s ib ilit y wi th whi ch they t r e at ed t h eir streets, thei r c o u rt yard s , and ea ch other. — Pa ve l Zy um kin The pleasantly tactile, historically rooted, understandable, functional, and direct image of a carpet becomes an honorary banner for comfort. Taking the form of a flag, appearing in houses, on pillars and fences, the work reminds us that comfort can be found in the open air too. And comfort lingers.

276

277


Kronstadt

665 /Zaporozhe, Ukraine/

The outer walls of old ruined warehouses located at 11 Ulitsa Komsomola, Kronstadt, serve as the exhibition space. The curators will make connections to the past using Pasha Wais’ work inspired by dazzle camouflage on the building exteriors. Dazzle camouflage was used in the early twentieth century to paint British warships. The dazzle patterns were developed by Norman Wilkinson, an English artist and illustrator who served on a Royal Navy submarine during World War I. Dazzle camouflage is also known as “razzle dazzle”, which clearly describes the intended effect. It made it difficult for enemies to determine a moving ship’s size, shape, direction, and speed. Wilkinson concluded that it was impossible to hide large ships from a submarine’s periscope, so he came up with the idea of confusing the enemy as they prepared to strike. The ocean liner HMS Alsatian was the culmination of his work. In August 1917, it was painted in dazzle camouflage following testing of the technique on prototypes. The internal walls were painted by nine artists from the main exhibition.

Casus Pacis. June 2014 278

279


Kronstadt

665 /Zaporozhe, Ukraine/

The outer walls of old ruined warehouses located at 11 Ulitsa Komsomola, Kronstadt, serve as the exhibition space. The curators will make connections to the past using Pasha Wais’ work inspired by dazzle camouflage on the building exteriors. Dazzle camouflage was used in the early twentieth century to paint British warships. The dazzle patterns were developed by Norman Wilkinson, an English artist and illustrator who served on a Royal Navy submarine during World War I. Dazzle camouflage is also known as “razzle dazzle”, which clearly describes the intended effect. It made it difficult for enemies to determine a moving ship’s size, shape, direction, and speed. Wilkinson concluded that it was impossible to hide large ships from a submarine’s periscope, so he came up with the idea of confusing the enemy as they prepared to strike. The ocean liner HMS Alsatian was the culmination of his work. In August 1917, it was painted in dazzle camouflage following testing of the technique on prototypes. The internal walls were painted by nine artists from the main exhibition.

Casus Pacis. June 2014 278

279


Escif /Valencia, Spain/

280

The explicit casus belli was the assassination of the heir to the Austrian throne in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. Gavrilo Princip was a 19 yearold Serbian student who was a member of the Mlada Bosna terrorist organization, which was fighting for the unification of all South Slavic peoples into a single country. Princip shot and killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

281


Escif /Valencia, Spain/

280

The explicit casus belli was the assassination of the heir to the Austrian throne in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. Gavrilo Princip was a 19 yearold Serbian student who was a member of the Mlada Bosna terrorist organization, which was fighting for the unification of all South Slavic peoples into a single country. Princip shot and killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

281


Fatum /Kiev, Ukraine/

282

Kislow /Sevastopol, Crimea/

283


Fatum /Kiev, Ukraine/

282

Kislow /Sevastopol, Crimea/

283


The war gradually turned from a battle between armies into a battle between economies. The development of new military equipment took off, with the armies becoming increasingly mechanized. Aircraft, machine guns, mortars, submarines, and torpedo boats became widespread. The firepower of the troops increased dramatically as new types of artillery came into play. 284

Rtue /Sevastopol, Crimea/

285


The war gradually turned from a battle between armies into a battle between economies. The development of new military equipment took off, with the armies becoming increasingly mechanized. Aircraft, machine guns, mortars, submarines, and torpedo boats became widespread. The firepower of the troops increased dramatically as new types of artillery came into play. 284

Rtue /Sevastopol, Crimea/

285


Volt Agapeyev /Ternopil, Ukraine/

286

Wais /Hong Kong – Russia/

287


Volt Agapeyev /Ternopil, Ukraine/

286

Wais /Hong Kong – Russia/

287


Pavel Bumazhniy /Earth/

In N o ve m b e r –De c e m b e r 1 9 1 6 , G e r m a n y a n d h e r a l l i e s p r o p o s e d p e a c e , b u t t h e E n t e n t e r e je c t e d t h e p r o p o sa l , st a t i n g t h a t “ no pe ace i s p o ssi b l e so l o n g a s t h e y [ t h e E n t e n t e a l l i e s] h a ve n o t se c ure d r e p a ra t i o n o f v i o l a t e d r i g h t s a n d l i b e r t i e s, r e c o g n i t i o n o f t h e pri nci pl e o f n a t i o n a l i t i e s, a n d o f t h e f r e e e x i st e n c e o f sm a l l st a t e s.” T he c e n t ra l p o we r s’ si t u a t i o n i n 1 9 1 7 w a s c a t a st r o p h i c : a r m y r e se rve s h a d b e e n e x h a u st e d , h u n g e r w a s ra m p a n t , t ra n sp o r t n e t wo r ks we re ra p i d l y c o l l a p si n g , a n d t h e f u e l c r i si s w a s g a t h e r i n g p a c e . T he E n t e n t e c o u n t r i e s st a r t e d t o r e c e i ve su b st a n t i a l a i d f r o m t h e US (food, m a n u f a c t u r e d g o o d s, a n d l a t e r r e i n f o r c e m e n t s) , a n d a t t h e sam e ti m e we r e st r e n g t h e n i n g t h e i r e c o n o m i c b l o c k a d e o f G e r m a n y . By the e nd o f 1 9 1 6 , t h e t wo si d e s c o m b i n e d h a d l o st 6 m i l l i o n p e o p l e , and abou t 1 0 m i l l i o n h a d b e e n wo u n d e d .

288

289


Pavel Bumazhniy /Earth/

In N o ve m b e r –De c e m b e r 1 9 1 6 , G e r m a n y a n d h e r a l l i e s p r o p o s e d p e a c e , b u t t h e E n t e n t e r e je c t e d t h e p r o p o sa l , st a t i n g t h a t “ no pe ace i s p o ssi b l e so l o n g a s t h e y [ t h e E n t e n t e a l l i e s] h a ve n o t se c ure d r e p a ra t i o n o f v i o l a t e d r i g h t s a n d l i b e r t i e s, r e c o g n i t i o n o f t h e pri nci pl e o f n a t i o n a l i t i e s, a n d o f t h e f r e e e x i st e n c e o f sm a l l st a t e s.” T he c e n t ra l p o we r s’ si t u a t i o n i n 1 9 1 7 w a s c a t a st r o p h i c : a r m y r e se rve s h a d b e e n e x h a u st e d , h u n g e r w a s ra m p a n t , t ra n sp o r t n e t wo r ks we re ra p i d l y c o l l a p si n g , a n d t h e f u e l c r i si s w a s g a t h e r i n g p a c e . T he E n t e n t e c o u n t r i e s st a r t e d t o r e c e i ve su b st a n t i a l a i d f r o m t h e US (food, m a n u f a c t u r e d g o o d s, a n d l a t e r r e i n f o r c e m e n t s) , a n d a t t h e sam e ti m e we r e st r e n g t h e n i n g t h e i r e c o n o m i c b l o c k a d e o f G e r m a n y . By the e nd o f 1 9 1 6 , t h e t wo si d e s c o m b i n e d h a d l o st 6 m i l l i o n p e o p l e , and abou t 1 0 m i l l i o n h a d b e e n wo u n d e d .

288

289


Ilya Gaponov /St. Petersburg, Russia/

290

komanda Toy /Nizhny Novgorod, Russia/

291


Ilya Gaponov /St. Petersburg, Russia/

290

komanda Toy /Nizhny Novgorod, Russia/

291


Index

183 Pasha (1983–2013. Moscow, Russia) 665 (Zaporozhye, Ukraine) Agapayev Volt (Ternopil, Ukraine) Bluemoloko / Pishik Filipp (Kiev — Moscow, Ukraine — Russia) Bulnygin Dmitry (Moscow, Russia) Bumazhniy Pasha (Earth) Chernyshev Vladimir (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) ChZhNS (Samara, Russia) Cordal Isaaс (International) Dobry Stas (Moscow, Russia) Downey Brad (Berlin, Germany) + Ponosov Igor (Moscow, Russia) Escif (Valencia, Spain) Fatum Dima (Кiev, Ukraine) Gandhi (St. Petersburg, Russia) Gaponov Ilya (St. Petersburg Russia) Give Egor (Moscow, Russia) Grudovich Dontas (Moscow, Russia) Ima Maxim (St. Petersburg, Russia) Kamar Ilya / Rus Crew (Moscow, Russia) Kislow (Sevastopol, Crimea) Kosmina Dana (Kiev, Ukraine) Kreemos Roma (Moscow, Russia) Kurmaz Sasha (Kiev, Ukraine) Lyublinsky Andrey (St. Petersburg, Russia) Mavi Viktoria (Kaliningrad, Russia) Minin Roman (Kharkiv, Ukraine) Morik Marat (Novosibirsk, Russia)

292

14 20 28 34 38 48 54 58 64 70 74 78 84 92 96 100 104 112 116 120 124 128 132 138 142 146 150

Most Misha (Moscow, Russia) Nootk Vova (Moscow, Russia) Novikov Konstantin (St. Petersburg, Russia) Pavlov Vova (Yalta, Crimea) PVKh Puzo Viktor (Moscow, Russia) PVKh Sergeev Alexey (Moscow, Russia) PVKh Fedorin Porfirii (St. Petersburg, Russia) Potapov Vladimir (Moscow, Russia) QBic Rustam (Kazan, Russia) Radkevich Sergiy (Lviv, Ukraine) Radya Timothy (Yekaterinburg, Russia) Rebus Dima (Moscow, Russia) Rtue Pavel (Sevastopol, Crimea) Sergeyev Arseny (Moscow — Yekaterinburg, Russia) Shamanov Kirill (St. Petersburg, Russia) Shugurov Pavel (Vladivostok, Russia) Suslov Pavel (Zhukovsky, Russia) Tajiks-Art (St. Petersburg, Russia) Komanda Toy (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) Tuzov Ivan (St. Petersburg, Russia) Vorotnev Vova (Kiev, Ukraine) Wais Pasha (St. Petersburg, Russia) Zbiok (Wrocław, Poland) Zhunev Alexander (Perm, Russia) Zigendemonic (Kiev — Lviv, Ukraine) Zyumkin Pavel (Moscow, Russia)

154 158 162 166 170 176 182 188 192 198 202 206 212 218 222 226 232 236 240 250 252 258 262 266 270 274

293


Index

183 Pasha (1983–2013. Moscow, Russia) 665 (Zaporozhye, Ukraine) Agapayev Volt (Ternopil, Ukraine) Bluemoloko / Pishik Filipp (Kiev — Moscow, Ukraine — Russia) Bulnygin Dmitry (Moscow, Russia) Bumazhniy Pasha (Earth) Chernyshev Vladimir (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) ChZhNS (Samara, Russia) Cordal Isaaс (International) Dobry Stas (Moscow, Russia) Downey Brad (Berlin, Germany) + Ponosov Igor (Moscow, Russia) Escif (Valencia, Spain) Fatum Dima (Кiev, Ukraine) Gandhi (St. Petersburg, Russia) Gaponov Ilya (St. Petersburg Russia) Give Egor (Moscow, Russia) Grudovich Dontas (Moscow, Russia) Ima Maxim (St. Petersburg, Russia) Kamar Ilya / Rus Crew (Moscow, Russia) Kislow (Sevastopol, Crimea) Kosmina Dana (Kiev, Ukraine) Kreemos Roma (Moscow, Russia) Kurmaz Sasha (Kiev, Ukraine) Lyublinsky Andrey (St. Petersburg, Russia) Mavi Viktoria (Kaliningrad, Russia) Minin Roman (Kharkiv, Ukraine) Morik Marat (Novosibirsk, Russia)

292

14 20 28 34 38 48 54 58 64 70 74 78 84 92 96 100 104 112 116 120 124 128 132 138 142 146 150

Most Misha (Moscow, Russia) Nootk Vova (Moscow, Russia) Novikov Konstantin (St. Petersburg, Russia) Pavlov Vova (Yalta, Crimea) PVKh Puzo Viktor (Moscow, Russia) PVKh Sergeev Alexey (Moscow, Russia) PVKh Fedorin Porfirii (St. Petersburg, Russia) Potapov Vladimir (Moscow, Russia) QBic Rustam (Kazan, Russia) Radkevich Sergiy (Lviv, Ukraine) Radya Timothy (Yekaterinburg, Russia) Rebus Dima (Moscow, Russia) Rtue Pavel (Sevastopol, Crimea) Sergeyev Arseny (Moscow — Yekaterinburg, Russia) Shamanov Kirill (St. Petersburg, Russia) Shugurov Pavel (Vladivostok, Russia) Suslov Pavel (Zhukovsky, Russia) Tajiks-Art (St. Petersburg, Russia) Komanda Toy (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) Tuzov Ivan (St. Petersburg, Russia) Vorotnev Vova (Kiev, Ukraine) Wais Pasha (St. Petersburg, Russia) Zbiok (Wrocław, Poland) Zhunev Alexander (Perm, Russia) Zigendemonic (Kiev — Lviv, Ukraine) Zyumkin Pavel (Moscow, Russia)

154 158 162 166 170 176 182 188 192 198 202 206 212 218 222 226 232 236 240 250 252 258 262 266 270 274

293


Casus Pacis / Повод к миру  

exhibition catalog, 2014

Casus Pacis / Повод к миру  

exhibition catalog, 2014

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