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the CHANIA POST

August 2015, Issue No. 26

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IT’S EASY TO MISS HOW THINGS COULD ALSO GO RIGHT!!!

The Optimist’s Guide to Greece

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“MEET... CHANIA” in 20 pages

by Chania Post in collaboration with Chania Prefecture

Welcome! Bienvenue! Willkommen! Добро пожало вать! Velkommen! Välkommen Välkomna! Tervetuloa! 文化的天空, 人类的天堂

There are so many ways things could go wrong in Greece that it’s easy to miss how things could also go right. The best-case scenario involves the European Central Bank including Greek bonds in its quantitative easing programme, the lifting of capital controls and a deal on debt relief – all by the end of the year. > p. 3

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www.gelamou.gr... only the good news !!!

...creating something in a time of destruction, as Maxine Hong by Elpida “Hope” Katsarakis said. NEA TV Journalist So much truth when Greece struggles to cope with everyday ordeals. Here are some quotes that are food for thought in difficult times. • “Resistance is the protest of those who hope, and hope is the feast of the people who resist.” - Jurgen Moltmann • “Listen to the mustn’ts, child. Listen to the don’ts. Listen to the shouldn’ts, the impossibles, the won’ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me... Anything

Hope is...

• •

can happen, child. Anything can be.” - Shel Silverstein “One dream, will suffice a thousand nightmares.” - Anthony Liccione “You cannot swim for new horizons until you have courage to lose sight of the shore.” - William Faulkner “We dream to give ourselves hope. To stop dreaming - well, that’s like saying you can never change your fate.” - Amy Tan, The Hundred Secret Senses “For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start over again.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

CHANIA POST •

• • • •

“In order to welcome redemption, one must first embrace the utter hopelessness of failure. For how can a man look for rescue unless he knows he is truly lost?” - Stephen R. Lawhead, Pendragon “Everyday can be extraordinary And ripe, Like a flower burst, If the will is there.” - Scott Hastie “You can’t band together to fight without trust. And without trust, there was no hope.” - Rick Yancey “When you think your life is falling apart, it’s usually falling together in disguise.” - Charlotte Eriksson “This isn’t the end, and a beginning looks different. This is the moment in between, when everything still looks possible.” - Zoran Drvenkar

Your local free paper by FTP Publications 73, El. Venizelou str., Chania, 73100 Tel. +30 6977 295075 Owner/Publisher: FTP Publlications Web: http://www.chaniapost.eu E-mail: info@chaniapost.eu FB: http://www.facebook.com/chaniapost Twitter: @chaniapost Editors: Pandelis Giaitsis, Elpida “Hope” Katsarakis, Pandelis Spiridakis, Petros Chatzistavros, Giannis Kriaras, Nicos Lazakis, Miltiades Markatos, Giannis Venetakis, Giannis Xamonakis, Petros Marinakis, Antonia Tsakirakis., Giorgos Atsalakis, Stavros Tsihlis, Manolis Karpadakis, Katerina Polizou. Advertising: Chania Post, 73, El. Venizelou str., Chania Tel. +30 6977295075 DTP: FTP Publications Printed in:

CHANIA POST... on the go Android Mac OS ECO friendly paper - Please recycle When you finish reading... give it to a friend Find CHANIA POST at the following points: CHANIA Municipal Market, Airport, Public Bus Central Station, Old Harbour, Municipal Tourist Information Desk PLATANIAS Central Square Infokiosk, Botanical Park KISSAMOS Gramvousa and Balos boats, Elafonissi, Falassarna KANDANOS-SELINO Paleochora Info Desk, Sougia, Kandanos SFAKIA Hora Sfakion Infokiosk, Loutro, Agia Roumeli, ANENDYK boats APOKORONAS Georgioupoli, Kavros, Vamos, Kalyves, Vrysses Also in Chania taxis, Limnoupolis Water Park and in selected cafes, businesses and shops throughout Chania Prefecture.

Hey

p. 2

editorial

Plachouristas where are you guys? It’s now the time, by Pandelis Spiridakis of getting a splish gelamou.gr splash dive! …what a brilliant month, with the biggest smiles and plans of the total 12 months! Vacations, stop working, and excursions… Yes that’s a different summer, with difficult changes but brave people live in the end brave summers. Turning up the radio I crashed on the most Julish summer words ΄΄When I woke up the sun was shining in my eyes My silver spurs were gone my head felt

Live @ Love @ Laugh

twice its size She took my silver spurs a dollar and a dime And left me cravin’ for more summer wine΄΄ Τhe song that was made famous by Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazlewood in 1967 It was the first of Sinatra and Hazlewood’s string of popular duets That immediately brought in my mind that crazy guy , Stefanos Kassotakis, from Kavousi somewhere at Agios Nikolaos. He really did his madness. After 17 years of chef career , he dropped everything and returned to agriculture. He decided to do the only thing he ever loved most since he was a child. So he produced natural raw materials from

the vineyard. Grape - juice syrup, must – jelly, zogies, halva, stafidota (currant biscuits), raisin - almond package, retseli, pasteli, sweet grape are some of his products and he is really proud of them. That explains a lot things about the Cretan soul…brave people, brave stories, brave ideas! He admits ΄΄Since I remember myself, I was always stuck in the vineyard smelling molasses΄΄. All the products of “Evotry” are compounded of natural raw materials and they do not contain chemicals additives. Grape - juice syrup The mature taste and singular aroma of the ancient variety of Liatiko grape

meet in a grape-juice syrup like a neat poem which supplements our nutrition, soothes inconveniences, flavours the cuisine and participates in our everyday life as an invaluable ally. He really turned his life upside down and now he lives his dream…reviving a traditional culture of the island from the vineyard of his village. Simplicity and open mind gives always a tough answer! You brave people out there …do it with all your heart Live – Love – Laugh …but do it brave! It’s just July challenge …relax and discover your own AKUNA MATATA! Salu,tPantelis


The Optimist’s Guide to Greece

go wrong in Greece that it’s easy to miss how things could also go right. The best-case scenario involves the European Central Bank including Greek bonds in its quantitative easing programme, the lifting of capital controls and a deal on debt relief – all by the end of the year. This is not a prediction. Trust between Greece and the other euro zone countries has been all but destroyed. Hardline creditors, led by Germany, will only help Alexis Tsipras, the prime minister, if he implements diligently what he has agreed. That is far from given, now that his radical-left Syriza party is splintering, even though that also gives him opportunities. However, if Tsipras can rebuild trust and follow through on his commitments, there is a clear path out of misery. The first step is to finalise a new deal –

in particular, nailing down Greece’s fiscal targets for the next few years. Given the havoc of the past month, in which banks were closed for three weeks, Athens is not going to be able to hit the targets the creditors were previously demanding without yet more debilitating austerity. If Tsipras can persuade the euro zone creditors that he is going to implement the reforms he signs up to, they may not insist on any more measures than were previously on the table either this year or next. Otherwise, he will need to find yet more tax hikes and spending cuts. The sooner a new deal can be agreed, ideally by the end of August, the sooner the second step can be taken: including Greek bonds in the ECB’s quantitative easing programme. When the central bank kicked off this bond-buying operation in January, it excluded Greece on the grounds that

it was not implementing its previous bailout plan. But the ECB’s vice president, Vitor Constancio, said on July 16 that, once the country was in a new programme and credibly implementing it, the central bank could start buying Athens’ debt. This is a potential boon for the country. If the ECB hoovers up Greek bonds, their yield will plummet. This will boost confidence. In the best-case scenario, this will occur in September, soon after a new bailout deal is clinched. The third step is recapitalisation of Greece’s banks. They need more capital because the country’s economic prospects have deteriorated sharply over the past month meaning, among other things, that more of the banks’ loans will go bad. The European Commission is now predicting GDP will shrink 2 percent to 4 percent this year. Athens and its creditors have pencilled in an extra 10 to 25 billion euros for the

banks. The ECB, which supervises the lenders, will need to conduct a detailed assessment before coming to a precise figure. Once the supervisors have picked the magic number, they will then have to decide who will provide the capital. The key question is whether there will be a “bail-in” of uninsured depositors, mainly companies with more than 100,000 euros in their accounts – forcibly converting a proportion of their money into new bank shares. Such a bail-in would pulverise confidence. If Tsipras is delivering his side of the bargain, the creditors won’t insist on it. Otherwise, there for more news click on is a risk that the hardliners http ://cretepost.gr might. Recapitalising the banks is necessary to move onto the next step: lifting capital controls. Greek lenders are now open, after a three-week bank holiday. But there are still limits – in

particular, on the ability of companies to import goods. This is gumming up the economy. If all the restrictions were removed tomorrow, depositors would rush to take their cash out. The ECB will not be willing to provide unlimited liquidity until the banks have been recapitalised, as it does not want to lend money to bust lenders. But once their balance sheets have been reinforced, it may be prepared to risk a bank run – and, if they have been recapitalised without a bail-in, depositors will be less keen to

grab their money anyway. The final step is debt relief. Germany’s Angela Merkel said on July 19 that this could involve giving Athens longer to pay back its borrowings and lower interest rates. Although the headline value of Greece’s debt wouldn’t change, better terms would make the country’s borrowings more sustainable. In time, it would be able to fund itself by issuing bonds on the market rather than relying on bailouts. The catch is that debt relief will be considered only after the new deal’s first

review which, in the best-case scenario, would be in October. What’s more, it will be conditional upon full implementation of the programme, three years later. Just imagine that Greece got all these things – quantitative easing, lifting of capital controls and a deal on debt relief – by the end of this year. The boost to confidence would go a long way to counteracting the austerity measures. Of course, imagining this scenario is not the same as predicting it. Greece and its creditors have disappointed too

often in the past for that. Nevertheless, Tsipras’ incentives have shifted in a helpful direction. His previous confrontational approach to the country’s creditors was partly explained by his reluctance to admit to his voters that he was making a U-turn and his fear of splitting his party. Now he has eaten his words and there’s no hope of keeping Syriza united. Given that he has crossed that Rubicon, Tsipras has a strong interest in making the new bailout plan succeed. Reuters

Greece Keeps 87% of the Revenue from Inbound Tourism

percent of the revenue generated by Greece’s inbound tourism remains in the country, according to a study of the Centre of Planning and Economic Research (KEPE) that was released on Tuesday. The study was carried out on behalf of the SETE Institute (InSETE) and confirms the major importance of Greek tourism to the national and local economy. KEPE’s study, which was conducted from November 2014 until July 2015, focused on how much money spent by tourists remains in Greece and how much is

“leaked” to the economies of other countries. According to the data obtained for 2014, only 13.2 percent of the total revenue from inbound tourism (excluding income from cruise passengers) is estimated to have “leaked” abroad (1.92 billion euros of 14.5 billion euros). When the expenditure of cruise passengers is included, the overall amount estimated to have ended up leaving Greece is 12.9 percent (1.96 billion euros of 15.2 billion euros). The “leakage” of tourism revenue from Greece’s accommodation sector last year

amounted to 13.3 percent (978 million euros of 7.4 billion euros). The “leaks” abroad included money for imported technological equipment products and the salaries of non-residents that were employed in Greece. According to the study, tourism is one of the most central sectors of the Greek economy (8th out of a total of 64) and has a strong correlation with the agricultural sector, particularly in high-class hotels. The Greek Tourism Confederation (SETE) believes that the findings of the study are very positive and underlined in

an announcement that the percentage of the total inbound tourism revenue that remains in Greece can significantly be strengthened further through initiatives and concrete measures under a national strategic plan for tourism development. According to SETE, these measures would include the establishment and usage of certified “Made in Greece” products and the creation of all-inclusive packages that would mainly be based on the consumption of local products. KEPE is the largest economics research institute in Greece.

p. 3

Eighty-seven

news & articles

There are so many ways things could


Imputed income (Deemed or notional income) due to the cost of living

P2) Cost of living. Using certain assets and goods, and receiving the certain services: The tax office assesses a minimum imputed income per family, per year that corresponds to the minimum cost of living. This minimum cost of living must be covered by equal income. The cost of living is not applied to individuals that spend less than 183 days in Greece (non tax resident in Greece) if they have earned no income from Greece. An individual can have imputed income using the on ck follow assets and items: cli ws for more ne r t.g Only those that be apply os ep http://cret to each person must be summarised in order, the overall cost of living, to be calculated.

1) Imputed income of the use of a house (regardless of owning or renting the house): Example: owning of a holiday house 120 sq.m. Imputed income due to the cost of living is 2,900 (80x20=1,600 + 40x32.5=1,300€). If the holiday house is a detached house, the imputed income is

2,200+20%=2,640€ If the house is a detached house the above figures have to be increased by 20% 2) Imputed income of owning or using (in case that you are tenant) a private or shared swimming pool: In case of the shared swimming pool the above figures are split according the percentage of the ownership. If the individual has set up in business to let his house, the swimming pool is considered for business use. In this case it does not count in the calculation of the imputed income. If renting the home permanently to someone, the swimming pool accounts for tenant imputed income calculation. Example: owning or using a swimming pool of 40 sq.m. 100%. Imputed income 40x160=6,400€

4,000+6x600=7,600€

9) Imputed income from amounts do-

4) Imputed income of owning a recreation boat for recreation:

nated to non-state institutions or to any person including monetary dona-

tions from parents to their children. 3) Imputed income owning of a car: Example: owning of a car 1800 cc 5 years old. Imputed income

5) Imputed income of the Greek loan repayments of any type (mortgage)

10) Minimum imputed income in case that a person has no any of the above imputed income

6) Imputed income of the use of more than one servant in your house 7) Imputed income for the school fees to private schools for your children

news & articles

8) Imputed income owning an aeroplane or a helicopter

by Stavros Tsihlis Insurance & Investment Advisor

Planning to get Health insurance? Read this first! Sometimes it can be tempting to go without health insurance coverage due to affordability concerns, but consider how you will fare should unforeseen circum-

stances arise. Few, if any, of us expect to have an accident or illness and this situation doesn’t wait for a more convenient time when we have health insurance plan to help pay the resulting medical bills. This is even more appropriate when you reside in a foreign country with the language barriers and the extremely bureaucratic and slow public health system (IKA – EOPYY).So if you are planning to examine your options in Greece, below are 5 points you need to consider: 1) The insurance company We mentioned this point in a earlier

p. 4

(end of part 2 to be continued in September’s issue)

article and it is still a very important decision you need to make. What is the company’s financial record? What is the agreed timeframe for a claim to be handled? What is the solvency margin of the firm you are about to sign up to? Your insurance advisor should be able to answer the above questions. 2) Emergency service Is your advisor / company accessible at all times? Is there a 24-hour help line when your advisor is not able to pick up the phone or answer your emails? Do they offer global air ambulance and coordination? 3) Network or no network? Some insurers offer a specific network of doctors and clinics that they use and you have to use this network should you need medical help. Truth be told, in most cases we are not

able to evaluate the quality of a doctor or clinic and we base our decision solely on word of mouth. Using a specific network has the advantage that the insurer has already checked the quality of the network for you! In addition they usually settle the medical bill directly with them so you will not need to withdraw large sums of money and then claim back. On the other hand, the absence of a specific network has an obvious advantage that you can pick your own doctor or clinic. 4) Read the fine print (terms and conditions) A health insurance policy has a number of clauses – what could be called the ‘’small print’’. Reading them well is very important. And if you do not understand them, do ask questions. For ex-

ample: if you have a pre-existing disease (e.g. Thyroid), policies can be used only after a stipulated time period decided by the company. 5) Ask, ask ask! A health insurance plan is an important financial and personal commitment. If you do not understand the process ask questions! Insurance Advisors are obliged to answer all your queries truthfully and in a timely manner. You can distinguish a professional advisor by the amount of knowledge he/she has on the subject and the time he/she takes to respond to you. Referrals by friends who had a good experience and service is a good first step to start talking about your health insurance needs. Sources: http://www.healthedeals.com http://www.thehealthsite.com


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A dog called Aris and the holiday cats

Success and failure in promoting the civilized values of animal welfare

by Giannis Xamonakis apokoronasnews.gr

A few weeks ago, I received an email from

an animal rescue volunteer in Heraklion, wanting to highlight the plight of stray animals and the damage the cruel treatment of animals does to the tourist industry in this country. The letter also pointed out that animal rescue centres get no help from the local authorities. But even when the local council, such as the one here in Apokoronas, has an enlightened view of animal welfare and takes its legal responsibilities seriously, it is not enough to stop cruelty to animals, mass poisonings or the dumping of unwanted pets. Something more is needed.

p. 6

news & articles

Stray cats and dogs survived in Crete in the wild or as working animals for centuries before people started seeing dogs and cats as companion animals. In more recent years, when people started to differentiate between homed and stray animals, the municipal dustbin and the increase in tourism has provided an additional source of food and has allowed more animals to survive in the wild and multiply. And to the popuon lation that lives in the wild, for more news click r t.g os a large number of animals, ep et cr :// http adult dogs and cats that were once homed but have been abandoned by their owners, is added every year. And every few months, an even greater number of kittens and puppies are abandoned in the wild, by (or in) the dustbins, where they are left to die. Some of them are rescued in time and become pets; a few survive against the odds and join the numbers of strays. The long and honoured tradition of controlling the population of stray animals involves mass poisonings that exterminate most of the strays; this is usually carried out each year before the bulk of the tourists have arrived. Because tourists, as everyone knows, like the stray cats and dogs they meet on holiday, and they buy the Cute Cats of Crete calendars and Kitten Picture postcards and go home. Many without a second thought of what happens to these animals for the rest of the year. In the last ten years or so, however, a number of animal welfare organisations - both local and international who work here in Crete - have had some success in their efforts to change attitudes. Central government brought in legislation that criminalised animal abuse. And the idea was introduced that the stray population could be controlled

through a programme of sterilisation then released back into the wild. This programme operated unofficially in many parts of Crete for a number of years and demonstrated to the local authorities that there are ways, other than poisoning, of controlling the stray populations. That was not enough though, to stop the mass seasonal poisonings and the brutal treatment of animals. There seems to have been a significant increase in cases of the worst sort of gratuitous brutality to animals recently. Cases are reported daily in the local media, which I want to neither read about nor reproduce here. On the positive side however, the efforts of the welfare associations and the volunteers, the pressure from European visitors who consistently complain about animal abuse and neglect every year, and the introduction of new legislation has started to make some tangible difference. Here in Crete, the first legal animal clinics, staffed by European vets, have started to implement a neutering programme which, in a few years, should have a significant impact on the numbers of stray animals and consequently, it is hoped, the number of cases of animal abuse. In Apokoronas, the council has gone further. It has facilitated a Greek- German partnership between the European vets from Arche Noah and local vet Giorgos Mousourakis in Kalyves. The arrangement allows volunteer vets to operate and treat stray animals at a fully equipped surgery in Kalyves one Sunday every month. The project, which would not have been possible without the commitment and support of mayor Charalambos Koukianakis and the relentless efforts and dedication of deputy mayor Rena Terezaki, is now on its third month; more than 90 stray animals have been sterilised and treated for injuries inflicted through accident or brutality. It attracted enough media interest for a German TV channel to send a crew to cover the opening session at the Kalyves surgery. In a statement directed at the German audience, mayor Koukianakis said that Apokoronas takes animal welfare seriously, and that apart from its natural beauty, Apokoronas is to become known for its caring attitude to animals. An attitude that, in the words of Mr Koukianakis, would show the world that Apokoronas can transform the negative image Europe has of Crete regarding animal welfare into a positive one.

The TV crew stayed for a couple of days longer to make a feature documentary starring one of the treated dogs, a lovely, friendly Labrador cross-breed named Aris, who was found tied to a tree with no food or water by some visitors and was taken in by Mrs Terezaki. Aris became a TV star and the film crew thought the audience would love him and he would find a loving home as soon as the film was screened in Germany. A story without a happy end Nine of the treated stray dogs, together with Aris, were temporarily kept at the enclosed yard of a dilapidated, disused council building, well away from any housing, until the paperwork required for rehoming them in northern Europe was finalised. But, about three weeks after the TV crew had gone, the gate of the enclosure was found open and six of the dogs, including Aris were missing. They have not been seen since. Mrs Terezaki, who visited them twice a day to feed and water them, was distraught. It was feared that the dogs had met with the same fate as the 15 missing cats of Vamos, all neutered and looked after by European volunteers, which had disappeared the month before, with only three bodies found. A couple of days later, there was another sad twist to the dog story. I happened to be driving towards Vamos when I saw Mrs Terezaki with a dog in her arms. She waved me down for a lift to the local vet in Kalyves. On the road to Kalyves she explained, from the back seat of the car where she sat with the dog on her lap, that she had found the dog after receiving a call from a passing driver reporting an injured animal, lying in the undergrowth at the side of the road, dying. In the vet’s opinion, after an examination requiring an x-ray at another vet’s surgery in Chania, the unlucky little dog had been hit on the back and the head with a blunt instrument, possibly a heavy shepherd’s crook. The injuries left her with a damaged spine – compressed vertebrae, they said – that left her paralysed and requiring long-term care for her injuries from which she may never recover. A complaint was made to the police by the deputy mayor, but no progress has yet been made towards identifying a suspect. The two surviving dogs were moved to a different location. The lesson that can be learnt from this incident is that it is not enough for the council to have a good policy and dedicate time and

resources to promoting the civilized values of animal welfare. Something more is needed. And not just another piece of legislation. The law, as it stands, sets very severe penalties, including custodial sentences for offenders. The number of recent well-publicised convictions should be enough to act as a significant deterrent. Yet in this case, as in many others, nobody saw or heard anything. Imaginative rumours regarding the fate of the missing dogs, fuelled by tsikoudia, spread through the village. Some had them being released and shot for sport. Others talked of the dogs being stolen for resale. And as far-fetched as these explanations may sound, they are based on real past events. The locals also talked about the damage that dogs cause to livestock, adding that nobody would like a dog pound in their backyard. And while I understand the reasons why nobody wants a badly administered dog ‘pound’ on their doorstep - not even the most dedicated animal lovers – neither reason is a justification for such cruelty. It is also worth noting that no livestock was reported injured or dead and that no other complaints were ever made about the dogs in the disused council building. But what could be a better way to protect the livestock and the livelihood of local people than having a neutering programme that will humanely reduce the stray dog and cat population and at the same time promote the area as an enlightened and civilised holiday destination? And it should help sell lots more cute cat postcards to visitors who return home safe in the knowledge that their holiday cat will be there waiting for them next year. A case of costs and benefits for the local community needs to be made, with some additional sensible practical advice on how tavernas can manage and minimise the inconvenience of having strays competing for attention with the customers. And as a parting thought, and one for the police to consider: research in the USA has shown that there is a startling propensity for offenders charged with crimes against animals to commit other violent offences towards human victims: serious, violent crimes such as grievous bodily harm, rape, murder, domestic violence and child abuse. So taking the time to investigate cases of reported animal abuse more thoroughly could make a contribution to solving or preventing other crimes, rather than detracting from other forms of ‘real’ police work.


Greek tourism under attack by CNN

The Cretan answer... “It is the time to enjoy Greece”

CNN published a provocative arti-

cle titled: “Is it time to cancel your Greek vacation?”. The article is published amind critical negotiations for the future of Greece in the euro in Brussels. CNN warns, implicitly, tourists to be careful if they chose to visit Greece for their summer vacation. “Greece may be on the brink of striking a deal to avert short-term financial catastrophe, but with economic problems unlikely to go away, is now the time to start rethinkon ing Greek travel plans?” ck for more news cli CNN says. r http://cretepost.g

“The looming threat of a “Grexit” scenario, in which Greece drops out of the Eurozone and reverts to its old currency, the drachma, raises questions about how millions of vacationers will be affected” CNN adds. CNN asks and tries to answer questions tourists may be considering before travelling to Greece: “Is there any danger that credit cards will no longer work?”, “If Greece drops out of the euro, will places still accept euros?”, “What if capital controls are enforced?”, “Are there any safety issues? Any danger of unrest, increased crime?”, “Will the ferries still

be running? Is there any risk of getting stranded?”, “Are there likely to be any power cuts or food shortages?” CNN also included SETE president Andreadis’s opinion: “There’s no reason to cancel”. The Cretan answer The general manager of Minos Imperial Luxury Resort, Mr. Yorgos Geniatakis gives his own answer to the provocative article of CNN. The editor of the article asked him… “Given the situation, will Greek people be happy to see tourists?” “We Greeks are famous for our hospi-

tality and we’re proud of that,” said Mr. Geniatakis. “Of course Greek people will be happy to see tourists”. “First and foremost because it’s our culture dating back to ancient times and no political situation could affect that. “Secondly, Greece depends on tourism, so tourists will be welcome.” Geniatakis says visitors shouldn’t worry about packing extra euros, but should be worrying about packing media-driven anxieties. “If tourists arrive positive they will leave positive,” he adds. “It is the time to enjoy Greece.”

Crete’s Hersonissos’ Reach Grows Thanks to Social Media, Bloggers

The diverse offerings of Crete’s Her-

sonissos Municipality took the Net by storm when images of the region hit everything from Flickr and twitter to Facebook and Instagram. In its ongoing efforts to boost its image abroad and attract visitors, the local authorities are tapping into the far-reaching potential of the social media by organizing a three-day fam trip last month for a team of Greek travel bloggers. “Our goal is to increase awareness of our municipality as a brand and in this direction we organized a fam trip for guest blogger-travelersfocusing on the promotion and reputation of the re-

gion,” said Deputy Hersonissos Mayor Efthimis Mountrakis.

Using it as an effective marketing tool which also paves the way for new con-

nections, the local authorities presented the positive results of the initiative. Of the “Press Trip with Greek Bloggers” initiative held in May, which included everything from horseback riding and food sampling to aquarium visits and cooking lessons, bloggers Maria Kalymnos of “Maryhop”, Christos Loukas of “Blogtravels”, Maria Kofou of “Travelstoriesfromyworld”, Costas Fylaktos of “Runvel” and Maria Petropoulou of “Mylandingrunway”all wrote extensively about their experiences promoting their blog posts across the social media spectrum. news.gtp.gr

Apokoronas council takes action to ensure safe and clean drinking water

Apokoronas council has carried out

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news & articles

€1.4 million works to clean and upgrade and extend the drinking water network in January of this year. Water storage tanks and pumping stations were serviced, new ones were added and the water mains network was extended. Some of these storage tanks according to a council source had never been

cleaned or serviced before and did not meet ‘even the basic hygiene standards’. Apokoronas council has now signed a contract with the Water Control Lab of the Technological Educational Institute of Crete to monitor the quality of the drinking water in Apokoronas. In the past two years, there have been a number of reported cases of drinking water contamination affecting several

villages in Apokoronas, that became the subject of political wrangle in the council chamber. The deal with the TEI will help monitor and maintain the quality of the drinking water of Apokoronas, by regularly testing the quality of the water so that the councils water services can take quick and effective action to deal with any contamination problems and guar-

antee the quality of drinking water. The contractors will test samples of water monthly, from 52 sampling points throughout the Apokoronas water network and another six samples a month will be tested at the water sources, springs and wells. The annual cost of the 696 water sample tests is € 25000, or just under €36 per test.


Researchers Explore Role of Olive Oil Phenols in Prevention of Neurodegenerative Diseases

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news & articles

Several studies have reported that the Mediterranean diet slows cognitive decline and lowers risk of neurodegenerative diseases. While most of the research has been conducted in Mediterranean countries, consumption of the Mediterranean diet by other population groups have provided similar results. A study on 2,000 New Yorkers who consumed the Mediterranean diet reported lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease; and another study on 1,410 elderly French individuals found slower cognitive decline with higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Last year, a review artion ck for more news cli cle called the Mediterrar http://cretepost.g nean diet a “model” diet for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. While high intakes of cereals, vegetables, legumes, fruits and olive oil that make up the typical Mediterranean diet are recognized to be beneficial, a recent study found that long-term consumption of a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil or nuts had a positive impact on cognitive function in an older Spanish population. Phenolic compounds present in extra virgin olive oil and nuts may be the components responsible for this positive effect on cognition, according to the investigators of the study. In an article published in the March, 2015 issue of the journal Molecules, researchers specifically reviewed literature to explain how phenols present in extra virgin olive oil prevent neurodegenerative diseases. According to the paper, olive oil contains about 230 chemical compounds of which carotenes and phenolic com-

pounds are the main antioxidants. Of the phenols, hydroxytyrosol is the key phenolic compound present mainly in olives and olive products that are, in turn, the chief source of hydroxytyrosol in the Mediterranean diet. Scientific evidence suggests that, as a potent antioxidant, hydroxytyrosol is not only effective in removing reactive oxygen species produced during oxidative stress, but it may also improve an organism’s defense against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, which produces more reactive oxygen species than the body can detoxify, may cause damage to the DNA and body proteins, and may be the origin of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Extensive research has identified hydroxytyrosol from olive oil to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic abilities. Additionally, hydroxy-

The 4 senses restaurant... Follow the Path of an absolute gastronomic delight...

tyrosol may provide protection against heart diseases and play a role in preventing or slowing the growth of tumors. Research carried out in vitro and ex vivo to determine hydroxytyrosol’s role as a neuroprotective agent shows that hydroxytyrosol from olive oil protects cells from oxidative stress, improves resistance to oxidative stress, lowers incidence of brain cell death, and reduces neurotoxicity and DNA damage. Furthermore, in some in vitro studies, hydroxytyrosol has been associated with the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and Antioxidant Responsive Elements (ARE) neuroprotective pathways. The Nrf2 plays a positive role in regulating antioxidant response elements, which in turn regulate gene expression of several phase II detoxifying enzymes. Supplementing the diet of mice with extra virgin olive oil and hydroxytyrosol enhanced cognitive function, and re-

versed oxidation, learning and memory damage. In another study, EVOO and hydroxtyrosol acted as brain antioxidants and provided protection against oxidative damage in mice with Huntington disease. While in vitro and in vivo studies on animal models have linked hydroxytyrosol to improved health and cognition, there are very few studies on the effect of hydroxytyrosol in humans. So far, only three clinical trials on the role of hydroxytyrosol on breast cancer prevention; the effect of hydroxytyrosol supplements on multiple sclerosis; and its influence on phase II enzymes are underway. Although more research is needed to establish the role of EVOO hydroxytyrosol in preventing neurodegenerative diseases, there is ample evidence that suggests that consuming a Mediterranean diet is beneficial for cognitive health.

We use and promote local, quality products in combination with the revival of traditional flavours and new gastronomic proposals from 12:00 pm to 00:00 at midnight.

Platanias, Chania Tel. +30 6976 860573 www.olive-tree.gr

Olive Oil Times


Preventing the Mediterranean diet from vanishing into the sea

The Mediterranean region is under-

A model diet, a changing landscape The Mediterranean diet’s focus on vegetable oil, cereals, vegetables and pulses, and moderate intake of fish and meat, has long been associated with long

and healthy living. Because it is largely plant-based, the diet is comparatively light on the environment, requiring fewer natural resources than animal production. “The Mediterranean diet is nutritious, integrated in local cultures, environmentally sustainable and it supports local economies,” said Alexandre Meybeck, Coordinator of FAO’s Sustainable Food Systems Program. “This is why it’s essential that we continue to promote and support it.” But with products being increasingly sourced from outside the region and diverse local landscapes being transformed by monoculture production, traditional food systems are affected by these shifting dietary habits. Estimates suggest that today only 10 percent of traditional local crop varieties are still being cultivated across the region, with a wide variety of traditional crops having been replaced by a limited number of improved non-native crops.

Tourism, urban development, depletion of natural resources and a loss of traditional knowledge all contribute to a rapid diminishing of genetic diversity in crops and animal breeds across the Mediterranean, the report warns. Action needed Policy makers, researchers and the food industry need to increase collaboration to better understand food systems and trends, the report says. More attention needs to be paid to increasing food consumption and production in ways that preserve local resources and knowledge. And awareness campaigns are needed to drive up consumer demand for traditional Mediterranean products, with an eye on better integrating current food trends and consumer habits with the use of local products across the region. In support of such goals, CIHEAM today issued the Med Diet EXPO Call to action, calling for efforts to preserve

Mediterranean agro-ecosystems, make the region’s food systems more sustainable, and ensure food security and nutrition for a for more news click on http://cretepost.gr growing population. Together towards more sustainable food systems FAO and CIHEAM – a group of 13 countries cooperating in the fields of agriculture, food, fisheries and rural territories in the Mediterranean — are jointly working to increase international understanding of how to make Mediterranean diets more sustainable. The collaboration aims to develop local case studies on ways to increase production sustainably and promote adherence to traditional diet patterns. Today’s report also calls for a three-year pilot project in CIHEAM countries, to be developed together with FAO, along with special guidelines for improving the sustainability of diets in the Mediterranean. fao.org

“CHANIOTIKA RUSKS... tradition meets flavour...”

news & articles

going a “nutrition transition” away from an ancient diet long considered a model for healthy living and sustainable food systems, that preserve the environment and empower local producers. A new report by FAO and the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) presented at EXPO Milano today traces the negative effects of shifting diet patterns across the Mediterranean and calls for an action program to support more sustainable diets across the region Globalization, food marketing and changing lifestyles – including changes in the roles women play in society – are altering consumption patterns in the Mediterranean, away from fruits and legumes towards more meat and dairy products, according to the report. While Southern Mediterranean countries continue to struggle with undernutrition, countries throughout the region increasingly struggle with obesity and overweight. At the same time, the region as a whole is seeing a rise in chronic diet-based diseases that increasingly lead to disability and death. Undernutrition is still a significant problem in the southern Mediterranean, as is stunting — low height for age — among children under five years of age in both southern and eastern Mediterranean countries. Today’s report presentation was part of Feeding Knowledge, the EXPO program for cooperation on research and innovation on food security.

Traditional Cretan Rusks

A plurality of rusks in shapes and sizes located in Crete, with spices, herbs and various fragrances and other materials The main types are defined but the main material, the raw material used for their preparation. The whole grain rusks, the rusks and barley rye rusks. All types of nut available in derived wholemeal, that most plant materials. The rusks are made with whole grain wheat flour, one of the main ingredients of the Cretan diet.

You may find a variety of our products ONLY to all local markets and cooperative

supermarkets

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You can also try something different. Taste our rusks, made from: Carob Oaten Wheat Rye Barley


A green roof on the City Hall of Hersonissos The roof of the City Hall in Hersonis-

sos is different… it is green and environmentally friendly. Why? It has been transformed to a mediterranean garden, due to E2STORMED program. The project faces the challenge of reducing energy consumption to make our cities more sustainable. E²STORMED aims to improve energy efficiency in the urban water cycle and in buildings by promoting the use of innovative storm water solutions such as Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) in MED cities. Existing integrated management tools will be improved, adapted to, and tested by MED cities, allowing a proper incorporaon for more news click tion of energy reduction http://cretepost.gr estimates in planning and decision making processes. Municipality of Hersonissos is the only Greek partner of the program. The partnership, composed by local authorities and research organizations, has been selected on the basis of competences and implementation capacity.

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news & articles

The Project We face the challenge of reducing energy consumption to make our cities more sustainable, and water and wastewater facilities are often the largest and most energy-intensive loads owned and operated by local governments, representing up to 35% of municipal energy use. Capturing and reusing stormwater runoff on before it flows into surface waters allows its use onsite either to replenish groundwater supplies through infiltration or for graywater uses, like landscape irrigation and toilet flushing. These techniques are known as Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS), the central objective of which is to maintain individual sites’ pre-development hydrology. SuDS are common sense and simple technology, such

as strategically placed beds of native plants, rain barrels, green roofs and porous surfaces for parking lots and roads. In addition to reducing energy and potable water use, the result is less water pollution from contaminated runoff, less flooding, replenished water supplies, and often more natural-looking, aesthetically pleasing cityscapes. In summary, the use of SuDS reduces energy consumption in cities by: • Reducing use of potable water, hence, energy consumed by acquisition -frequently by pumpingand treatment of drinking water, even higher where desalination is used and/or water imported • Reducing stormwater inflow into

sewer systems, hence, energy consumed by treatment of wastewater and pumping of surface and foul water Reducing local temperatures and shading building surfaces, hence lessen the cooling and heating demand for buildings, reducing energy needs and decreasing emissions from power plants

Improve Energy Efficiency However, knowledge is very weak in MED cities where stormwater has been seen as a problem of waste and damage control. Additionally, data on energy consumption in the urban water cycle is rarely available and hard to find, so it is very

difficult for local administrations and decision makers to account for energy efficiency aspects when deciding on different alternatives/solutions, especially water related. Responding to these challenges, E²STORMED will promote the use of SuDS to improve energy efficiency in the urban water cycle and in buildings in MED cities, capitalizing outputs and results from previous projects and experiences of E²STORMED partnership (AQUAVAL and SWITCH EU projects, amongst others). In order to address the critical issue of rolling out improved technologies, E²STORMED will improve, adapt, and test in MED cities, existing integrated management tools.

  Samonas Traditional Villas Samonas - Apokoronas - Chania - Crete - GR 73003  mob: +30 698 678 3030   -   fax: +30 2821 055 213 website: www.samonas.gr   -   email: info@samonas.gr facebook: /SamonasTraditionalVillas online availability: https://samonas.reserve-online.net                                    Samonas traditional villas is a completed renovated neighborhood in the small village of Samonas, at an altitude of 400m and a distance of 20km from Chania. Our homes are built in a hill slope and have such an orientation that they offer an impressive mountain, valley and sea view.

Samonas is a peacefull picturesque village which still preserves

its authentic character. Here you will experience unique moments of relaxation and complete tranquillity in an authentically traditional area,

without missing any of the comforts of the today way of living, which we have quietly incorporated in all our dwellings.


Chania Times... From Liverpool to Chania

When I was 18 years of age I had the

opportunity to visit my sister in Chania, Crete. I travelled by air for the first time in my life and when I arrived in Crete I came across a culture that I was curious to discover. I had the good fortune to teach English in several schools and I loved all

many others. But, I wanted to share with the reader how teaching in Chania affected my life. One of the students was in the army – he was older than some of the other students. One day he came to class with a prospectus from Sussex University UK. He gave this book to me and told me his

course that caught my eye was a course in American Studies; one year compulsory in America!! As a desire to travel was prevalent I voted there and then to pursue that course. Some years later I went onto study in Santa Barbara California and that experience then sent me into a career in

and what that means, interaction with other people who view life differently, a sense of independence, a perusal of the culture in which I came from, political history of the area; the food. language and much much more. Should any of the children – now adults – see the feature please feel free to con-

the kids that were in my classes. I often wonder where they all are and what happened to them. Attached are just some of the photos of the children I taught but there are many

cousin attended this establishment. I wondered why he was giving this book to myself; I had not attended university at this stage. However, I opened the prospectus and the first university

Radio Journalism. I continue to draw upon my experiences of visiting what was then an alien culture for me; it game me an opportunity to look at cultures, nationalism, identity

tact me on healthyspaces@hotmail. co.uk. for more news click on http://cretepost.gr Thank You, Catherine Hargaden

The pink sand beaches of Elafonissi and Balos. A brief explanation… very few to be found on Earth. You can even count it in your fingers.

What causes pink sand? Pink sand is a result of tiny red organisms that grow on the dead coral reefs and pieces of shells which fall to the ocean floor and is washed onto shore. It is also made of natural formulation of calcium carbonate from very small marine invertebrates that mixed to corals and shells and other marine things which has Foraminifera, microscopic

OFF

amoeba that has a red or bright pink body shell. All of these are what causes the sand to have a pink hue.

Elafonissi The beach of Elafonisi sits on the south east side of Crete and is well known for its pure white sands. In certain light, you can see the pink sand of Elafonisi, said to be caused by the coral that over time has been broken down by Mother Nature. The beach is mainly sandy with small rocky outcrops and it’ss perfect

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Brirtish Market Store, Kokino Chorio, Chania. 282 503 1185

@ info@britishmarket.gr

for a relaxing family day.

Balos Pink Beach Balos, Crete, is a special beach. It has white and pink sand and many-many seashells – actually, the pink colour of the sand comes from old seashells that have been transformed by the power of the sea. The waters are shallow, crystal-clear and warm. As Balos is a lagoon, swimming there is like swimming in a vast, very picturesque pool!

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common similarity when it comes to sand color, texture and water quality. In fact, there are countless of beaches in different part of the world. You know that sand comes in colors of yellow, white, or gray. Sometimes, if it’s volcanic, also black. But what about a pink sand beach, such as Elafonissi or Balos? That’s right! Beaches where the sand is coloured pink! As incredible as it may seem, they do exist, but there are

news & articles

Most of the beaches in the world have


“MEET... CHANIA” in 20 pages

by Chania Post in collaboration with Chania Prefecture

Welcome! Bienvenue! Willkommen! Добро пожал овать! Velkommen! Välkommen Välkomna! Tervetuloa! 文化的天空, 人类的天堂

www.chania.eu www.incrediblecrete.gr


GMT +2 Welcome! Bienvenue! Willkommen! Добро пожаловать! Velkommen! Välkommen Välkomna! Tervetuloa! 文化的天空, 人类的天堂

A few things you have to know about Crete

Crete, the 5th biggest Med Island, lies in the southern frontier of Europe. Crete combines mountains and sea, the new alongside with the old and ancient with contemporary history. It is a cultural crossroad due to its strategic geographical position. English, German, French, Russian and other languages are widely spoken in tourist resorts. The climate is a factor that greatly contributes to its attractiveness. It is mild Mediterranean – dry and warm, which means high sunshine all year round, very small seasonal changes in temperatures and no extreme weather phenomena. Tap water is safe for consumption, the consumption of bottled water is recommended. The international call code for Greece is +30.

www.chania.eu www.incrediblecrete.gr heavenly and tiful Chania, a au be to e m co Wel ral beauty, hisming with natu pure land brim is a land whose d and culture. It all its glory an tory, memory re rience natu in pe ex ill w rs to visi ghts. breathtaking si othy will encounter bordered in fr re ho as se of s he tc re d st auty an sanEndless nds of exotic be forbidding la is d an ts le in lace, foot of ed away at the dy beaches tuck gorges, holy mountains. t such majestic ye t bu e bl ns thickly tra Impene sh, green plai lu d an s er riv caves, blessed es. ive and citrus tre covered with ol

Остров Крит, колыбель европейской цивилизации, и его гостеприимные жители рады приветствовать вас! Мы обещаем вам незабываемые впечатления, независимо от того, в первый ли раз вы сюда приехали или посещаете Крит регулярно. Это место идеально подходит, чтобы отдохнуть или исследовать горы, море, города и деревни. Живите в ритме этого чудесного острова с утра до вечера. Откройте для себя Крит!

Välkommen til l vackra Chani a, ett himmel och äkta land skt fullt med natu rlig skönhet, toria, minnen hisoch kultur. Det är en plat s där besökare n kom turen i all dess majestätiska sk mer att få uppleva naönhet och möt enastående va ckra platser. as av Ändlösa sträck or av fasciner ande kust bild gränser i norr ar dess , söder och vä ster. In i mellan m öts man av ex otiska stränder i vissa fall gö och öar, mda bakom st ora imponera Likaså finns nde berg. här fantastiska raviner som genom bergen skär sig ut mot haven, liksom heliga spännande stal grottor med agmiter och al agmiter.

Velkommen til smukke Chania, en paradisisk og ægte egn fyldt med naturlig skønhed, historie, minder og kultur.Her vil den besøgende opleve naturen i dens fulde pragt, og komme til at stå overfor steder der tager vejret fra en. Endeløse bugtede kyster, eksotiske småøer og gemte sandstrande ved foden af de vilde bjerge. Ufremkommelige men fortryllende kløfter, hellige grotter, velsignede floder, og fredlige dybtgrønne sletter, beplantet med oliven træer og citrusfrugter. En egn selvforsynende med alt og rig på sjældne dyr og planter. I Chania vil den besøgende blive imponeret over de menneskelige værker. Velkommen til vakre Hania, et paradisisk og rent land full av naturskjønnheter, historie, minner og kultur. Det er et land der de besøkende vil oppleve naturen i all dens prakt og se steder som gjør en stum av begeistring. Endeløse kyststrekninger med skummende hav, små bukter og øyer av eksotisk skjønnhet og skjulte sandstrender ved foten av avskrekkende fjell. Vanskelig tilgjengelige, men majestetiske fjellkløfter, hellige huler, velsignede elver og rolige grønne sletter dekket med oliven- og sitrus trær. Et land som er selvnærende på alle måter, rikt på dyreliv og planter, endemiske (stedegne) og sjeldne.

Museums | Musée | Museen | Mузеи | Museer | Μuseot | 博物馆 Archaeological Museum of Chania 25 Halidon str. - Tel. 28210 90334. Open: 8.30-15.00 (except Mondays) Maritime Museum of Crete Akti Koundourioti, Venetian Harbour. Tel. 28210 91875/74484. Open: 9.00-16.00 (1/4-31/10), 9.00-14.00 (1/11-31/3) Μinoan Ship Moro dock, Venetian Harbour. Τel. 28210 91875. Open: Μay-Οct. Mon.-Fri. 10.00-15.00 & 19.00-22.30 (except public holidays) Historical Archives of Crete 20 I. Sfakianaki str., Tel. 28210 52606. Open: 9.00-14.00 (except Sat. & Sun.) Folklore Museum Gavalochori, Apokoronas. Tel. 28250 23222. Open: 9.00-20.00, Sat. 9.00-19.00, Sun. 10.00-13.00 Folklore Museum “Cretan House” 46b Halidon str. Tel. 28210 90816. Open: 9.00-15.00 & 18.00-21.00 Byzantine collection Theotokopoulou str. Tel. 28210 96046. Open: 8.30-15.00 (except Mondays)

Willkommen. Gleichzeitig is t Chania der Hauptort des gl eichnamigen R egionalbezirks, der ehemaligen Präfektur Chani a, der den gesamten Westen K retas umfasst. C hania war von bis 1971 die H 1841 auptstadt der In sel Kreta. Chania hat seit dem Ende der Fremdherrschaf in Schüben ve t ein rlaufendes star kes Bevölkeru swachstum zu ngverzeichnen. Die Markthalle von Chania stam mt aus den Jahr 1911 bis 1913 en . Der Bau aus Gusseisen mit em Dachstuhl offenwurde nach de m Vorbild der in Marseille ko Markthalle nzipiert.

Bienvenue. Bien qu’elle ait été bombardée pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, La Canée est considérée comme une des plus jolies villes de Crète, particulièrement le vieux port vénitien avec son phare du XVe siècle et la mosquée des Janissaires. La Canée bénéficie d’un climat typiquement méditerranéen caractérisé par des hivers frais et humides et des étés chauds et secs. Le marché couvert datant de 1913, basé sur les plans de celui de Marseille, est aux abords de la vieille ville et est populaire aussi bien auprès des touristes que des habitants locaux.

欢迎到美丽的哈尼亚, 一片天堂般的处女地; 到处洋溢着自然的美, 写满了历史 、美丽的 回忆和文化。 到访者都会感受大自然的伟大,这里的景色令 人惊叹。波光粼粼的大海一望无际。海湾,美 丽的岛屿,巍峨的山边海滩构成了一副绝妙的 风景画。百思不得其解的神 秘峡谷,天然溶 洞,天赐的河流充满着一派生机。美丽的原野 到处是橄榄树和柑橘类树种。这是自给自足的 沃土,分布着特有的动植物种群。 reikassa. Se on nia on kunta K ha C ! na m ko äl V kaupunki Irak toiseksi suurin imis nt lä n, Kreetan saaren kö si yk ja Hanian alue punki. Kunlionin jälkeen siköstä, pääkau yk ue al ä st ljä ennan mukaan män Kreetan ne 2011 väestölask en od vu muun ui as nassa ovat kotoisin ta. Chaniasta as uk ri El as la 0 aa 31 im 8 on 10 ikuttanut ik va sa as nj pa al ja kreikk ainmuassa Es a Mouskouri an N a aj a on ul la Greco, nizélos. Chani Elefthérios Ve s hania ie C om a. lti ss va io en joiden suos ili ka at m s yö anian kansainnykyään m ella sijaitsee H ol pu is ill ko n entojen lähtö- ja kaupungi on tärkeä lomal ka jo a, m se oa nt välinen le . saapumispaikka

Sights | Spectacles | Sehenswürdigkeiten | Достопримечательности Att göra | Nähtävyydet | Seværdigheder | Attraksjoner | 景点

Ekklesiastic Museums - Monastery of Holy Trinity of Tzagarolon, Αkrotiri. Tel. 28210 63310. Open: 8:00-20:00 - Gouverneto Monastery, Αkrotiri. Tel. 28210 63319 - Monastery of Chrissopigi, Chania. Tel. 28210 91125 - Monastery of Gonia, Kissamos . Tel. 28240 22313

Centre of Mediterranean Architecture Chania, 31 Αkti Tombazi, Venetian Harbour. Tel. 28210 40101/40201

War Museum Tzobanaki Cassern. Tel. 28210 44156. Open: 9:00-13:00 (except Sat. & Sun.)

Villa Koundourou (Youth Centre and Municipal Cultural Workshop) Chania, 2 Iroon Politechniou str. Tel. 28210 53730/40896. Open: 9:00-14:00 and 18:00-21:00

Chemistry Museum 34c Eleftherios Venizelos str. Tel. 28210 42504. Open: 9:00-13:00 (except Sat. & Sun.) Byzantine and Folklore Museum of Spilia, Kissamos Tel. 28240 22080/22357. Open: 17:00-18:00, Sat. 11:00-12:00

Institute of Cretan Justice Nearchou str., Chania. Open: 10:00-14:00

“Chrissostomos” Literary Association Chania, 83 Halidon str. Tel. 28210 53879 Municipal Art Gallery Chania, 98 Halidon str. Tel. 28210 92294/92419

Typography Museum, VIOPA, Souda Tel. 28210 51003. Open: 10:00-18:00

Venizelion School of Music 5 N. Foka str. Tel. 28210 43067/52582. Open: 8:00-14:00 and 17:00-21:00

Museum of National Resistance, Therisso Open all year round

Lyceum for Greek Girls 1 K. Mitsotaki str. Tel. 28210 42465/59444

House of Eleftherios Venizelos a. Mournies, Kydonia. Tel. 28210 93132/95250. Open: 18:00-21:00. b. Elena Venizelou sqr., Halepa, Chania (Eleftherios K. Venizelos Foundation). Tel. 28210 56008

Cultural Centre of the Metropolis 2 Ant. Giannari str. Tel. 28210 27807-9 Intellectual Centre of Chania 70 A.Papandreou str. Tel. 28210 40525

Mosque of Kioutsouk Hasan (Yali-Tzamisi) Venetian Harbour. Tel. 28210 83235/83232 Park for the Preservation of Flora and Fauna Technical University of Crete, Akrotiri. Τel. 28210 55988. Open: Mon.-Sat. Arts & Crafts Village, VIOPA, Souda Τel. 28210 80132/81410. Open: 10.00-14.30 School Life Museum, Νerokourou Τel. 28210 74764. Open: Mon.-Fri. 9.00-13.30, Mon. & Wed. 18.00-20.30, Sat. 10.00-13.00 Archaeological Museum of Kissamos Τel. 28220 83308. Open: 8.30-15.00 (except Mondays) Olive Museum-Institute of Olive & Subtropicals Τel. 28210 83476/83428. Open: 8.00-14.00 via phone arrangement Sea Life & Fishery Museum, Kolimbari Τel. 28240 23299. Open: 10.00-18.00 (exc. Sat.-Sun.) An. Skalidis Museum, Perivolia, Kissamos Τel. 28220 61052. Frontier Museum of Europe, Paleochora Τel. 28230 42265.Open: Οct.-Μay Mon.-Fri. 10.00-13.00, June-Sept. Wed.-Sun. 10.00-13.00 & 18.00-21.00


24 Hour Guarded Parking

Car Wash

A. ENTRANCE & EXIT 9-11, Grigoriou 5th str. (Kolokotroni Square) B. ENTRANCE & EXIT Markou Botsari str.(opp. old cinema “Apollon”) Tel:+3028210 86066 - Fax:+3028210 86076


Beaches | Plages | Strände | пляжи | Strande | Strender | Stränder | Rannat | 海滩 Numerous beautiful beaches with soft sand or coloured pebbles are found in the prefecture of Chania. All beaches have crystalline waters and look like paradise. Afrata: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 28km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, parking, cafe, snack Agia Marina: Type: Sand - Distance: 9km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafés, snack, beach bars, tavernas, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, all Inclusive Hotels, pharmacies, doctors, ATM cashpoint machines, super markets, shops, car rentals Agia Roumeli: Village on the south coast of Chania prefecture, between Chora Sfakion and Sougia. Type: Pebbles - Facilities: Showers, umbrellas and sunbeds, cafe, snack, tavernas, accommodation, mini market, ferry boat trips Agioi Apostoli: Type: Sand - Distance: 3km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, lifeguard, free parking area, cafes, snack, beach bars, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation, taxi station, bus stop, mini markets, super markets, tourist offices and car rental offices Almirida: Type: Sand - Distance: 23km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, windsurfing school, cafes, beach bars, restaurants, accommodation, mini markets, ATM cashpoint machines Balos Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 55km west of Chania town Facilities: Canteens, umbrellas and sunbeds Chora Sfakion: Type: Pebbles - Facilities: Restaurants, cafes, shops Crissi Akti Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 2.5km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, volley ball courts, children’s playground, parking, cafes, snack, beach bars, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation, super markets, taxi station Drapanias: Type: Sand - Distance: 33km west of Chania town Facilities: Showers, umbrellas and sunbeds, cafe, snack, restaurants, tavernas, accommodation, campsite, bakery, mini market Elafonissi: Type: Sand - Distance: 75 km from Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, canteen, cafe, taverns, accommodation, mini market Falasarna: Type: Sand - Distance: 59km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, volley ball court, lifeguard, parking, cafes, snack, beach bars, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation Frangokastello: Type: Sand - Distance: 80km southeast of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, cafes, restaurants, fish taverns, shops, mini market, accommodation Georgioupoli: Type: Sand - Distance: 38km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguards, water sports, cafes, beach bars, restaurants, accommodation, mini markets, super markets, shops, ATM cashpoint machines Gerani: Type: Sand - Distance: 15km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, lifeguard, parking, cafés, snack, bars, beach bars, restaurants, accommodation, all Inclusive hotels, shops, pharmacy, super markets Gialiskari/Anidri Beach: Type: Sand/Pebbles - Distance: 74km south of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, two canteens

Elafonissi

Kalathas Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 13km north east of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafes, snack, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, mini markets, souvenir shops Kalives: Type: Sand - Distance: 19km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, windsurfing school, cafes, beach bars, restaurants, accommodation, mini markets, ATM cashpoint machines Kedrodassos: Type: Sand - Distance: 74km south west of Chania town Kisamos (Mavros Molos): Type: Sand - Distance: 36km west of Chania Facilities: Showers, umbrellas and sunbeds, cafes, snack, restaurants, tavernas, accommodation, shops, mini markets, super markets, ATM’s, doctor’s offices

Agii Apostoli

Kolymvari (Kolymbari): Type: Sand/Pebbles - Distance: 23km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, parking, cafe, snack, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation, mini markets Koundoura/Krios Beach: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 80km south of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas, sunbeds, parking, canteen Kyani Akti Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 18km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, parking, canteens, restaurants, tavernas Loutraki Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 16km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, parking, cafes, snack, restaurant, accommodation Loutro: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 71km south of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, cafe, snack bars, restaurants, fish taverns, accommodation, mini markets, souvenir shops Maleme: Type: Sand - Distance: 17km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafés, snack, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, mini markets, souvenir shops, pharmacies Marathi Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 16km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, parking, cafes, snack, restaurants, accommodation

Falassarna

Marmara Beach: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 85km south of Chania town Facilities: Pachia Ammos: Type: Sand - Distance: 71km south of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas, sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, beach bar, cafes, restaurants, taverns, accommodation Platanias: Type: Sand - Distance: 10km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafe, snack, beach bars, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, all inclusive hotels, pharmacies, doctors, ATM cashpoint machines, super markets, shops, car rentals, playgrounds, mini golf courts Sougia: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 60km south of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, parking, cafes, bars, restaurants, taverns, fish taverns, mini markets, bakery, accommodation

Balos

Stalos Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 7km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafés, snack, beach bars, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, all inclusive hotels, pharmacies, doctors, ATM cashpoint machines, super markets, shops, car rentals

Glyka Nera Beach: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 75km south of Chania Facilities: Canteen, umbrellas

Stavros Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 17km east of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, parking, cafe, beach bars, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation, mini markets

Grammeno Beach: Type: Sand/Pebbles - Distance: 75km south of Chania Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, parking, beach bars, restaurants, accommodation

Tavronitis: Type: Pebbles - Distance: 18km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, parking, cafés, snack, beach bars, restaurants, water sports, accommodation, all inclusive hotels, mini market

Kalamaki: Type: Sand - Distance: 4km west of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, water sports, lifeguard, parking, cafes, snack, beach bar, tavernas, restaurants, accommodation

Tersanas Beach: Type: Sand - Distance: 13km nort east of Chania town Facilities: Umbrellas and sunbeds, showers, lifeguard, water sports, parking, cafe, snack, restaurant, accommodation, mini markets, souvenir shops, pharmacies

Georgioupolis


Gorges/Caves | Gorges/Grottes | Schluchten/ Höhlen | ущелья/ пещеры | Kløfter/Huler | Klyfta/ Grottor | Rotkoja/Luolia | 峡谷/洞穴 The area enables the individual hiker to explore the nature and the beauty of the county via routes that are unparalleled beauty. The most appropriate to inform the interested visitor is the Mountaineering Club of Chania. The E4 Path begins in the Pyrenees mountains across Greece, arrives at Kissamos, across Crete to Kato Zakros and finally arrives in Cyprus. As far as the track is part of the prefecture of Chania, it passes from coastal areas and the White Mountains. The main routes of the European path are the following : Kasteli Kissamou – Sfinari (Length: 22,5 km, Best season: Spring – Autumn) Sfinari – Chrysoskalitisa Monastery (Length: 32 km, Best season: Spring – Autumn) Chrysoskalitisa - Palaiochora (Length: 22 km, Best season: Spring – Autumn) Sougia – Agia Roumeli (Length: 13 km, Best Season: All year) Loutro - Fragokastelo (Length : 19,5 km, Best Season: All year) Sougia - Koustogerako-Omalos (Length: 24,5 km, Best season: Spring – Autumn) Agia Triada - Gouverneto – Katholiko (Route Difficulty: Very Easy, Route Duration: 2 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) Gorge of St Irene – Sfakia (Route Duration: 3 Hours, Route Length: 8 km Visit Period : All Year , Route Difficulty: Normal) Paleochora - Sougia (Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Length: 14,5 m Route Duration: 6 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) National Park of Samaria (Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 6 Hours Route Length: 16 km, Visit Period : May-October) Gavdos (Route Difficulty: Very Easy, Visit Period : May-October) Douliana – Gavalohori (Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 1 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) On the Summit of Kigilos (Route Difficulty: Normal, Route Duration: 7 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) Agia Roumeli - Agios Ioannis (Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 5 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) Gorge of Polyrrenia (Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 3 Hours, Visit Period : All Year) Sasalos-Makronas (Halase gorge) (Route Difficulty: Normal, Route Duration: 4 Hours )

The Gorge of Imbros in Sfakia Route Duration: 2 Hours, Route Length: 8 km The Gorge of Agia Irini in Selino Route Duration: 3 Hours, Route Length: 7.5 km The Gorge of Aradena in Sfakia Route Duration: 2.5 Hours, Route Length: 5.5 km The Gorge of Elygia The Gorge of Trypitis Route Duration: 8.5 Hours The Gorge of Diktamou Route Duration: 3.5 Hours The Gorge of Therisso or Eleutheriou Venizelou Route Length: 6 km The Gorge of Chalase or Sasalou Route Duration: 4 Hours The Gorge of Prasse Route Duration: 2 Hours The Gorge of Kavi or Iligga Route Duration: 3 Hours The Gorge of Asfendou Route Duration: 3 Hours The Gorge of Kalikrati Route Duration: 3 Hours The Gorge of Katholikou Route Duration: 0.5 Hours Mountain Shelters Kallergi Capacity: 45, Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 1 Hours Visit Period : April-October Svourikti - Holiopoulos Capacity: 20, Route Difficulty: Easy, Route Duration: 3 Hours Tavri Capacity: 40, Route Difficulty: Very Easy, Route Duration: 1.5 Hour, Route Length: 7.7 km Volikas Capacity: 30, Route Duration: 3 Hour Caves Cave of Panos or Lera The cave “Panos or Lera” is developed in Mount Vardies, at an altitude of 70m., in the settlement Stavros Kydonias. It consists of an “antechamber” and four rooms with chiselled cavities, which have been explained as places for the welcome of statues. Cave of Asfentos The cave “of Asfentos” is situated at the position”Skordolakia”, at the westeastern part of the beginning of the gorge of Asfentos . Cave of Agia Sofia The cave of “Agia Sofia” is at the western walls of the gorgo of Topolia, at a distance of 47 km from the city of Chania. It consists of two rooms on different levels.

Gorges The Gorge of Samaria Route Length: 18 km, Route Duration: 7 Hours, Visit Period : May-October

We propose... you choose | Nous vous proposons ... vous choisissez | Schlagen wir vor, Sie wählen ... | мы предлагаем ... вы выбираете Vi foreslår ... du vælger | Vi föreslår ... du väljer | Foreslår vi ... du velger | Ehdotamme ... valitset | 我们建议...你选择 MUNICIPALITY OF CHANIA Municipal Market The Municipal Market of Chania, the large building of 4000 square meters in a surrounding area of 17.200 square meters, is the “heart” of the city. It is an original building that, apart from a business activity center, also provides a concrete image of the ancient Greek marketplace. Great for shopping tradiotional Cretan products. Venizelos Tombs One of the most popular spots offering a panoramic view of Chania are the Venizelos family tombs, a few kilometres east of the city, on the road to Akrotiri and the airport. Old Harbour Chania’s old Venetian Harbor is the most picruresque and world wide known site seen of the hole Crete. Lots of choices to drink your coffee, to have lunch or dinner in the restaurants or enjoy shopping time. Stavros Stavros is located on Akrotiri, only 13km from Chania, 3km from the airport and 10km from Souda harbour. One of the finest beaches for swimming. British Commonwealth War Cemetery in Souda Bay The War cemetery is a quiet and restful place for the allied forces who lost their lives here on the Battle of Crete in 1941. Aghia Marina Agia Marina is one of the most important tourist resorts of Chania. Great beach for swimming and lots of choices for shopping, eating and clubbing. MUNICIPALITY OF PLATANIAS Thodorou Just a few miles to the north west of the port of Chania. The island is a nature reserve and it is therefore forbidden to go ashore, except that is for one day a year (8 June), when visitors are allowed to take the path to the church and back in order to worship. Platanias The heart of tourism in western Crete. Everything can be found in Platanias... swimming, eating, clubbing, shopping. A “must” place to visit or stay. All days and all nights are different in Platanias and you will find out why. Maleme German Cemetery

The cemetery is 3km south up the winding paved road. The 4,465 men buried here fell in the Battle of Crete in May of 1941. The Germans landed at the small airport of Maleme when they attacked Crete. Samaria Gorge If you come to Chania and you don’t pass through the Samara Gorge then your visit is just... incomplete. The Samariá Gorge is a National Park of Greece, a major tourist attraction of the island and a World’s Biosphere Reserve. A must for visitors to Crete is to complete the walk down the gorge from the Omalos plateau to Agia Roumeli on the Libyan Sea. The village of Samariá lies just inside the gorge. It was finally abandoned by the last remaining inhabitants in 1962 to make way for the park. MUNICIPALITY OF SFAKIA Frangokastello The castle of Frangokastello stands since centuries. It reminds of the Venetians, Turks and Greeks, battles and blood, slaughters and sacrifices. The legends are still alive, taking us in their own world and left the “Drosoulites”, visiting us again some magic mornings. Sfakia The south-eastern region of the Prefecture of Chania is called Municipality of Sfakia and includes the villages Hora Sfakion, Anopoli, Agios Ioannis, Agia Roumeli, Asfendou, Loutro, Patsianos, Skaloti, Impros, Askifou and Fragkokastello. The distamce to Chania is about 70 kilometres. Entire Sfakia is characterized by the natural beauty of wild mountainous landscape which is combined unique with the sea. Loutro The village was named by the baths that were found there. The water was coming from Anopoli. Between the old buildings that you can see there, there is also the goverment building that was used during the revolution at 1821. From Loutro you can visit the ruins of ancient Aradenas with the Byzantine church of archangel Michail and Anopolis. Perfect place for a weekend escape. Aghia Roumeli It is a coastal settlement in south-western Crete and it allocates a wide beach while the access is feasible only with boats from Hora Sfakion, via Loutro and from Palaiochora or Sougia, while the village does not allocate road access. Constitutes popular tourist destination because it is located at the southern entry of the Gorge of Samaria, the biggest gorge in Greece and one of the biggest in Europe with a length of 18 kilometres.

MUNICIPALITY OF APOKORONAS Kalyves Picturesque village located about 20 kilometres east of Chania, in one of the greenest areas of Greece. The village It is surrounded by wonderful sandy beaches with crystalline waters like Kalyves and Kiani Akti. Good place for shopping with lots of traditional tavernas. Just 3 km away is Almyrida, with traditional travernas to enjoy lunch after your swimming. Georgioupolis A resort village 43 km east of Chania, about 22 km west of Rethymno. Formerly a small fishing village, Georgioupolis is very much a tourist town now, with many cafés, tavernas and small hotels and apartment blocks. MUNICIPALITY OF KANDANOS-SELINO Sougia Located in a distance of 70 roughly km south-western of Chania. It is built in the ruins of the ancient Syias where mainly in the Roman and first Byzantine period people lived here. Saved ruins are vaulted graves and water reservoirs from the Roman period and a church from the 4th century with eminent mosaics. Nice beach where you can have free camping. Paleochora Located in the south-western part of the prefecture. The distance to Chania is about 70 kilometres. It is built on a peninsula between two beautiful bays where it is rained by the Lybian Sea and it is right to consider it the “Nymph of the Lybian Sea” and “Land of the sun”. The movement in the region is high in summertime, on one side from the excursionists choosing it as the harbour of departure to the Island of Gavdos, Sougia, Agia Roumeli, Loutro and Sfakia and return from the Samaria Gorge, on the other from the holiday-makers that select it as a place of their summer vacations.Palaiochora has all the benefits the visitor needs as banks, doctors, supermarket, drugstores, police, post, Hellenic Telecommunications Organization, port authority, custom, cinema, bars, disco, and rented cars.

reserve. On the mainland the 17th century Chrysoskalitissa Monastery is approximately 5 km from the island. One of the best places for swimming in the whole world MUNICIPALITY OF KISSAMOS Falassarna May be the best beach on earth, as awarded by its visitors. The place to be for swimming. Also, don’t miss the great party the first weekend of August. Gramvousa-Balos At the north western point of Crete you will find Gramvousa, a small island with an impregnable castle, a fortress, a masterpiece of the 16th century, and Balos, the unique lagoon of Crete, with its blue green waters, it pink sandy beach and famous shells! An impressive and unique environment of steep rocks and cliffs, an immense blue sea and hidden sandy beaches, and the serene lagoon of Balos, combines with the remains of the long lasting history of the region: monasteries, churches and the imposing castle of Imeri Gramvousa. MUNICIPALITY OF GAVDOS Gavdos is a small island which is located 26 naval miles (48 kilometres) southern of Crete and it’s extent is 27 square kilometres. It is the most southern Greek and simultaneously European point with population of 98 residents. Perfect for a daily cruise.

Elafonissi When the weather is fine it is possible to walk to the island through the shallow water. The island is a protected nature

Culture | Kultur | Kультура | Kulttuuri | 文化 A first-time visitor to Chania is surprised by the great number of buildings and monuments on which can be found traces of its great history and rich civilisation. The old town, on and around the hill of Kasteli, was built upon the ruins of Minoan Kydonia and is surrounded by the Byzantine wall, the Venetian wall and the sea. The Minoan civilisation left behind grand tombs, interesting ceramics and objects. During its occupation by the Venetians and the Turks, people of different nationality, culture and religion co-existed. Christians (Catholic and Orthodox), Jews and Muslims, have left discernible traces and produced particularly interesting creations. In the neighbourhood of Topanas with its narrow paved streets, the visitor meets Venetian manors with elaborately decorated facades and Turkish houses with architectural protrusions. There we can find Fort Firkas, the Naval Museum and the church of San Salvatore of the Francheskan Monks (15th - 17th cent. AD) which hosts the Byzantine collection of Chania. The collection of ΙLΑΕΚ and many shops offering traditional

handicrafts can also be found there. In the old Jewish neighbourhood there is the synagogue and on Halidon street the folklore museum (Cretan house) and the church of St. Frangiskos. The church hosts the town’s archaeological museum and houses treasures from the Minoan to the Hellenistic period. Opposite there is the Metropolitan temple of Isodia (representation of the Virgin Mary) with its exquisite hagiographies and close to that are the old Turkish baths. In the area of Sintrivani, around the homonymous square, there is the mosque of Kiuchouk Hasan (1645) and opposite that the quay with the Venetian lighthouse. A little further away, 7 out of the original 17 docks (Neoria) can be found (14th-16th cent. AD). Eye-capturing is the Great Arsenal, which today is used as a convention and exhibition centre. Along the harbour, small cafeterias and restaurants create an inviting atmosphere. On the hill of Kasteli there are still parts of the old Rector’s palace and its court and the engraving on a lintel over a door

reminds us of the existence of Venetian Archives. Near there, the excavation of ancient Kydonia and the ruins of the church of St. Maria of Mirakoli (1615) are located. At the “stivanadika”, which is still characterised by Eastern features, one can buy leather goods. Next to that is the building of Chrisostomos and the new public Art Gallery. In the old Turkish neighbourhood Splantzia is the square of the former monastery οf St. Nicholas (1204) with a bell-tower and minaret. The small church of the period of enlightenment’s of St. Rokkos (1630) can also be found there. Near that is the church of St. Anargyroi (16th cent. AD) with its priceless hagiographies and St. Catherine’s church. Outside the walls, to the east of the old town, we come across Koum-Kapi where during the last years of the Turkish occupation, Beduins built a village. Today the area is a favourite meeting place for young people. In the neighbourhood of Halepa there is the palace of Prince George, the house of Eleftherios Venizelos, the French School

(1860), the church of St. Magdalea (1903) and the church of Evangelismou. From later periods the following places are of interest: the manor “Villa Koundourou”, a workshop of fine arts and a youth centre, the municipal park (1870) with its clock, the market (built 1913, cross-shaped building with hundreds of small shops), the park of peace and friendship of people, the court house, the prefecture, the Venizelion School of Music, the Historic Archives Museum, the War Museum and the Museum of Chemistry. In the neighbourhoods outside the walls there are many neoclassical buildings with beautiful gardens which smell of hyacinth, honey suckle and rose trees. At the border of the town with the cape (Akrotiri) are the graves of Eleftherios and Sofocles Venizelos. The town of Chania, the first capital of Crete, kept its historical heritage of so many centuries almost unaffected. Its atmosphere attracted scientists, philosophers, poets and artists of different origins and it became a cultural centre.


CHANIA... THEN (a photographic journey through time by G. Fantakis-St. Aggelakis/ART STUDIO, 18 Dimokratias str., +30 28210 43150)

Santrivani Square

Venetian Old Harbour

Dimokratias str.

Archbishop’s House

General Tzanakakis str.

Halidon str.

Band playing music just outside Papadakis Patisserie

The Old Town Hall at Santrivani Square

The Halepa Neighborhood

Santrivani Square

Venetian Old Harbour

Dimokratias str.

Archbishop’s House

General Tzanakakis str.

Halidon str.

No band playing music today, but our harbour is always magic

The Old Town Hall at Santrivani Square

The Halepa Neighborhood

AND... NOW!!! (same places but different time by P. Mpouzis)


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Cretan flora and fauna | Flore et la faune crétois | Kretische Flora und Fauna | Kритские флора и фауна | Kretiske flora og fauna Kretensiske flora og fauna | Kretensiska flora och fauna | Kreetalainen kasvisto ja eläimistö | 克里特岛动植物 The climate and t he conf igurat ion of t he l and ma ke t he count y of C hani a a p aradis e for t hous ands of pl ants and anima ls. L i lys of t he s e a (p ancrat ium mar it imum), l avd ano (l avd anum), c ycl amen (c ycl amen cret ic um), Cret an tu lips (tu lip a cret ic a), maple (acer cret ic us). The endemic and unique ditt any (or iganum dic t amum), ma lot ira (f ider it is cret ic a) and matzourana (or iganum maiorana), are me dicina l b oi ling pl ants w hich are abund ant. On t he pl ain of Oma los you c an f ind st amnagat hi (ci hor ium spinosum). Dr ie d or f resh ly c ut, t hes e sp e ci a l me dicina l herbs

c an b e found in t he Public Market or lo c a l shops. O ver 1742 unique Cret an pl ants c an a ls o b e found, 10% of w hich exist on ly in t he count y of C hani a. The proud Cret an b e ast (c apra aegag r us cret ic a) lives f re ely on ly in t he Samar i a G orge. There and els e w here, you c an s e e Cret an e ag les (aqui l a chr ys aetos) and p ar t r idges (a le c tor is chukar). Fer rets, skun ks, we as els, hares, haw ks etc. c an a ls o b e s e en in op en pl aces. There is a ls o an ende avour to prote c t an are a on t he nor t h shores of t he count y esp e ci a l ly for t he tur t les (c arett a-c arett a) t hat live t here.

Conference tourism | Le tourisme de conférence | Konferenztourismus | Конференц-туризм Conference turisme | Konferensturism | Conference matkailu | 会议旅游 St. Sofia Foundation - Agii Pantes Tel.: (+30) 2821057043 Orthodox Academy of Crete in Kolympari Tel.: (+30) 2824022060 Fax: (+30) 2824022245 Email: oac@otenet.gr Http: www.oac.gr Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania Tel: (+30) 28210 35081, 35080 E-mail: baouraki@maich.gr και confer@maich.gr http://confer.maich.gr Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/

Cultural Centre Of Chania 70, A. Papandreou Street, Hania Tel.: (+30) 28213 44400-4

Information | Informationen | информация | Tiedotus Informasjon | 信息 Emergencies 112, 100, (+30)2821028746/25791 Police (+30)2821025700 Tourist Police (+30)2821028750/25931 Ambulance Service 166 Hospital of Chania (+30)2821022000-9 Naval Hospital of Souda (+30)2821082538/82414 Gavrilakis Clinic (+30)2821070800 Kapakis Clinic (+30)2821052688 Tsepetis Clinic (+30)2821027633 Health Centre of Vamos (+30)2825022580 Health Centre of Kandanos (+30)2823022550 Health Centre of Kissamos (+30)2822022222 Fire Brigade 199 Airport (+30)2821063171/63264 Tourist Information Centre (+30)2821092943/92624

Cultural Center of the Metropolis - Hania Tel.: (+30) 2821027808 Fax: (+30) 2821027823 Email: imka@grecian.net Http: www.imka.gr Centre of Architecture of Mediterranean (Megalo Arsenali) Tel.: (+30) 2821040201 Fax: (+30) 2821027184 Http: www.kam-arsenali.gr

Tourist Information Centre of the Municipality of Chania, (+30)2821036155/36204-6 Weather Forecast 1448 Οrthodox Cathedral (+30)2821043802 Catholic Church (+30)2821093443 Evangelist Church (+30)2821022365 Synagogue (+30)2821086286 Mountain Rescue Club (+30)2821044647/44359 Foreign Embassies: Great Britain (+30)2810 224012 Denmark (+30)2810 243714 Finland (+30)2810 284270 Norway (+30)2810 225991 Sweden (+30)2821060605

Transportation | Transport | Tранспортировка | Kuljetus | 运输 - Airlines: a. OLYMPIC AIRWAYS, 88 Tzanakaki str., tel. 80111 44444, airport: 28210 63818/63633/66088 (www.olympicair.com). b. AEGEAN AIRLINES, 12 El. Venizelou str., tel. 80111 20000, 28210 51100, airport: 28210 63366 (www.aegeanair.com). - Sea Lines: a. ANEK LINES, Sof Venizelou sqr., tel. 28210 27500 (www.anek.gr). Souda to/from Pireas daily. Ticket office (Souda port) tel. 28210 80050/1.

b. ANENDΥΚ (20.30 Promitheos str. VIO.PA Souda), tel. 28210 95511/95530 (www.anendyk.gr), e-mail: anendyk@anendyk.gr, info@anendyk.gr . Sea links between the south ports of the county. - Port Authorities: a. Chania, tel. 28210 98888, e-mail: chania@chg.gr b. Souda, tel. 28210 89240, e-mail: souda@chg.gr c. Kissamos, tel. 28220 22024, d. Paleochora, tel. 28230 41214, e. Chora Sfakion, tel. 28250 91292. e-mail: xsfakion@chg.gr

- Local buses (blue): Departures from Municipal Market sqr. and 1866 sqr. to all districts of the town and surrounding areas, Akrotiri, Souda (port), beaches, etc. Tel. 28210 93345/98115.

- Car and motorbike rentals: There are many international and domestic companies. Information at the Tourist Information Centre of the Greek National Tourism Organisation, 40 Kriari str., tel. 28210 92943/92624.

- Long distance buses (green): Main Bus Station (KTEL), Kydonias str. To Rethimno-Iraklio, Vrisses-Chora Sfakion, Kasteli, Εlafonissi, Kandanos-Paleochora, Sougia, Omalos-Samaria etc. Also to Thessaloniki (via the port of Pireas). Tel. 28210 93306/93052.

- Taxi: Tel. 18300, 28210 94300 (service for disabled people too). - Aeroclub of Chania: Magical flights around the county and the Aegean islands by qualified pilots (or using your own license) in Cessna 4-seat aircraft. Tel. 28210 27272 (www.aer.gr).

Samonas - Apokoronas - Chania - Crete - GR 73003

www.samonas.gr   email: i n f o @ s a m o n a s . g r facebook: /SamonasTraditionalVillas website:

       

online booking: https://samonas.reserve-online.net


Churches/Monasteries | Eglises/Μonastères | Kirchen/Klöster | Церкви/монастыри | Kirker/Κlostre | Kyrkor/Κloster | Kirkot/Luostarit | 教堂和修道院 The Holy Patriarchal and Stavropegic Monastery of Chrysopigi lies a short distance from the town of Chania on the route to Souda harbour. Operation Hours: 08.00-12.00 and 15.30-18.00 Telephone: (+30)2821091125, (+30)2821029840 The monastery of Agia Triada of Tzagarolon is one of the richest and most beautiful monasteries in Crete. It is built near the airport of Chania, in the position Tzobomylos of the Cape Melecha and at the foothills of Stavros Mount. The distance from Chania is only 15km. Gouverneto Monastery. The actual Monastery complex was built from 1537 till 1548. According to tradition, it was connected with miraculous St John the Hermit, and was used for the housing of the Saint’ s pilgrims. Telephone: (+30)2821063319

Katholiko monastery is located 20km east of Chania, near the northern shores of Cape Akrotiri. It is located near the exit of the gorge Avlaki, at a short distance from the sea. The monastery of Panagia Chrisoskalitissa is located 72km south of Chania, very close to the magnifi cent lagoon of Elafonissi. It operates as a nunnery and reminds of a fortress, perched on a 35m high rock with boundless sea views. The Monastery of Saint George in Karydi (in Apokoronas Province) is located about 2km east of Vamos village. The monastery was abandoned for many years but was restored in 1996 and today it is operating normally. Monastery of Pasinos. It is a complex of monasteries built during the Venetian rule (16th century). It architectural style is western, the church being placed in the centre of the complex.

St George of Mythimna - Kisamos. The single-room, vaulted church of St George in the archeological site of Methymna, near Drapania of Kisamos, was built during the fi rst half of the 15th century, in the place of a late Roman Bath. The Holy Monastery of Partenon or Life-Giving Spring was founded by the Bishop of Kisamos & Selinon Anthimos Leledakis in 1905-1910. It was renovated between 1962 and 1965, by Bishop Irineos Galanakis. Early Christian Basilica at Almyrida Apokoronou. It is an early Christian three-aisled basilica of the second half of the 6th century. The church of St George in the centre of Kournas, a settlement with interesting folk architecture. It was built at the end of the 12th century.

Places to visit | Lieux à visiter | Orte zu besuchen | Места для посещения | Steder å besøke | Steder at besøge | Sevärdheter | Käyntikohteita | 景点

Ancient Aptera This site is located 15 km South-east of Chania, near the village Megala Chorafi a. The strategic location of the city with two ports, Minoa (modern Marathi) and Kissamos (near Kalives today) at the entrance of the natural bay, which guaranteed the possibility to control the movement of trade, boosted its growth. Ancient Falasarna The site of the ancient Falassarna located on the western edge of Cap Gramvousa the west coast of Crete. The town was surveyed again in the 19th century by English tourists, who identified the village and closed the port. Ancient Lissos The ruins of Lissos are saved between Paleochora and Sougia. It

was the port city of Dorian Elyros. It fl ourished in the Hellinistic, Roman and the fi rst Vyzantine period and destroyed by the Saracens Arabs. It also issued its own currency, as Lissos. Ancient Tara (St. Roumeli) The ruins of the ancient city Taras found at south coast of Crete near the village of Agia Roumeli. The city fl ourished particularly during the Roman era. They found the remains of a temple, possibly dedicated to Artemis and Apollo. Souda’s Castle The castle is built on the islet of Souda, and protected the port of Souda and Chania. It occupies almost the entire island. Built in 1715 and surrendered to the Ottomans in 1715. On February 14 the Greek fl ag was raised, lowering the Turkish and giving the signal that there is now the Greek sovereignty over

the island of Crete. Archaeological site of ancient Anopolis The archaeological site of ancient Anopolis located 87 km south of Chania. Anopolis was an independent city during the classical times and fl ourished during the Roman and Byzantine times. Firkas Castle Castle Firkas was built in the 16th century by the Venetians to protect the city of Chania. There Venizelos declared the offi cial union of Crete with Greece. Today it hosts the Maritime Museum and a small theater. Intzedin Castle Located 14 km east of Chania. Has been characterized as his-

torical monument. Built in 1872 in the position of the tower was built in 1646 by the Turks, who drove the Venetians. The name comes from the name of the son of Sultan Abdul Aziz Intzedin. Has been used as a prison for political prisoners, among them which has been the El. Venizelos. During the dictatorship of Pangalos many dissidents jailed, and when the dictatorship fell, Pangalos was imprisoned there too. Finally, from the isolation rooms of Yaros, in 1948, the fi rst communist political prisoners were moved there.

Ancient Polirinia The ancient city was Polirinia in place of the village Polirinia Kissamos, 49 km west of Chania. At the top of the hill was the citadel of which was T-shaped, from where the view was immense, from Crete to the Libyan Sea, which stretched the realm.

Cultural events | Evénements culturels | Kulturelle Veranstaltungen | Культурные мероприятия | Kulturarrangementer | Kulturelle begivenheder | Kulturevenemang | Kulttuuritapahtumat | 文化活动 May: - Celebration of the battle of Crete. It includes events commemorating those who were killed and several cultural events. - “Koresia” athletic games Canoe kayak at Kournas Lake. Beginning of summer: Venizelia - Track events at the National Stadium of Chania. May - September: Athletic events in Nea Kydonia which include: Beach volley Beach Soccer - Beach Handball and racket games. July - August - September: - Cultural Summer Events of the municipality of Chania. It includes music and stage performances at the theatre of Eastern Trench, Public Garden, Venizelio music school, Park of Peace and Friendship and other events in several neighbourhoods of

the town. - Cultural summer events are also organised by the municipalities of Kisamos, Apokoronas and Kandanos-Selino. June: - Cherries Festival in Karanou. - 24 June: Festivity of St. Ioannis Klidonas, in Fres, Akrotiri, Perivolia, Therisso, Vamvakopoulo. - 29 June - 6 July: Naval week festival. July: - Festival of Kalitsouni cheese pie, in Kandanos.

Religious events | Evénements religieux | Religiöse Veranstaltungen Религиозные события | Religiøse begivenheder | Religiøse begivenheter Religiösa evenemang | Uskonnollisiin tilaisuuksiin | 宗教活动

Asi Gonia, St. George’s Day, April 23rd or after Easter Day: A big festival. All the shepherds of the area bring their animals to the mass in order to be blessed, then they milk them and distribute the milk to the pilgrims. Agios Ioannis Sfakion, St John’s Feast, May 8th: Traditional festival of Sfakia. Azogyre, The Holy Fathers’ Feast, October 7th: In the beautiful village with the visitable impressive cave of the Holy Fathers. Elos, Agios Dikaios,May 6th: Extraordinary view and a unique fair. Lissos, St Kyrikos, July 15th: The pilgrims start arriving ancient Lissos on foot or in boats from Sougiaγια early in the afternoon of the previous day. A real fair of Selino in a mythical place. Sembronas, Apopigadi, St. John’s, June 24th: One of the feasts, that take place on a very high location, with an incredible view. Sougia, Harey, St. Antony 1-2 of July: Unique traditional fair at the seaside small church which is situated in Harey. The route on foot from through the E4 path that lead from Sougia to Agia Roumeli lasts two hours with the unique background of the Lybian sea and piney slopes. It is possible to go there also by boat from Sougia. Overnight stay outdoor.

Therisso, Assumption of the Mother of God, August 15th: In the beautiful village where Eleftherios Venizelos declared the revolution of 1905.

- Naval week in the old harbour and every second year in Palaiochora and Georgioupolis. - 21-28 July: Elafonisia - Municipality of Kissamos. Including memorial service at the monument of Elafonisi, athletic games, performances, festivity in honour of the elderly and traditional treat. - 26 July: “Promotion of Kisamos” - Club, Grambousa pilgrimage excursion from the port of Kisamos to Balos and to

the island of Grambousa. - 30 July: “Pottery Festival” in Nohia.

- 30-31 July: Wine festival in Vouves. August: - First Sunday of August: Blessing of the fruit of the earth at the Monastery of Archangel Michael (Rotonda) Kato Episkopi. - 8-9 August: Wine festival in Vouves. - 1-10 August: Venetian Harbour of Chania photography exhibition for Chania Music Tradition. - 16 August: Honey Festival in Afrata. September: - 1-10 September: Sardine festival in Nea Chora and in Souda. - 27 September: World Day of Tourism. Festive events at the old harbour of Chania. End of October or beginning of November: - Chestnut festival in Prases and Elos.

<< The little sea village of Loutro, just 30 minutes from Chora Sfakion by ANENDYK Ferries. Excellent choice for a weekend “escape”. Great beach and good tavernas all over the place.

Sfakia, Thymiani Panagia, last Sunday of May. Chrysoskalitissa, the Assumption of the Virgin, August 15th: At the beautiful monastery, which is a real «balcony» to the Lybian Sea a famous festival takes place. Frangokastello, St. Nikitas’, September 15th: Big festival during which riding races take place. August 6th, the Transfiguration: Ksirosterni, Tzitzife, Karres of Kissamos, Sassalo August 15th the Assymption of the Virgin: Voulgaro Panagia of the Summit, Kolympari Gonia, Pemonia, Fre, Eksopolis, Litsarda, Alikampos, Kefala, Kalikrati, Koustogerako August 29th,John the Precursor’s: Rodopou Gionas, Douliana, Stylos, Kournas September 8th, Birth of the Mother of Christ: Gavalohori, Tzitzife, Sassalo September 14th, Feast ofthe Holy Cross: Nippos, Rodovani September 15th St. Nikitas’: Kampia

Imeri Gramvousa. There is an old ^^ shipwreck of a small cargo ship dating from 1968. << Everyone who comes to Crete is going to Platanias, the most famous place in Chania Prefecture. Full of tourists every summer, with sandy beaches, lots of stores, night clubs, restaurants and cafes.


PLATANIAS THEN AND... NOW!!! (photos taken by the book of Timoleon Fragakis “Platanias of History and Memories“)

A very rare photo of Platanias from Henri Turot (1897)

Platanias coming from the east by the old road (1900)

Pano Platanias and the island of Thodorou (1975)

The restaurant “MYLOS TOU KERATA” (1982)

The village of Platanias (1916)

That’s where you can find “MYLOS CLUB” today (1889)

A view of Platanias and Agia Marina (1972)

Panoramic view of Pano Platanias from the yard of the school (1973)


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perial and metric measurements. It is appropriate for most cake and pastry recipes where quantities are critical.

Sources : http://www.oliveoilsource.com http://www.livestrong.com https://theolivepress.com http://www.amazingoliveoil.com http://www.newhealthguide.org http://thepassionateolive.com http://www.traditionaloven.com

Tip Of The Month Proper cultivation of the olive tree, requires that unwanted new branches emerging around the root or above, to be removed also during this period. It is important to start this month (if not started already) the olive fly control, using environmental friendly methods like traps, baits etc.

by Manolis Karpadakis Terra Creta Marketing Mngr

for more nature news click on http://cretepost.gr

p. 35

more nutrient value with no downside, unlike the alternatives and can be readily substituted in most main course dishes where margarine or butter is used for frying or sautĂŠing. Using olive oil for baking is a familiar feature of Mediterranean cooking. While it may sound a bit odd, baking with olive oil has actually been done for centuries. Olive oil gives cakes and cookies a light texture and can be used with confidence in lieu of butter or other oils. One tbsp.(3 ml). of olive oil has 120 calories and 14g of total fat, including 12g of unsaturated fat. Olive oil contains no trans fats or cholesterol. Salted butter has 102 calories per tbsp. and 11.5g of total fat, of which 7g are saturated. Butter also contains 31mg of cholesterol. Excess monounsaturated fats, a low saturated-fat content and an absence of cholesterol make olive oil a better alternative than butter for the heart. Olive oil dramatically cuts back on the cholesterol and saturated fat content of desserts. It produces lighter-tasting baked goods and allows the flavor of the other ingredients to come forth. Because olive oil contains vitamin E, it helps to naturally maintain the freshness of baked goods and creates moist cakes, biscuits and muffins. Another great benefit of using olive oil in place of butter is that you actually need less, which means you save money along with calories and fat! You can also use olive oil for preparing a baking pan before adding the dough or other mixture. Simply brush the oil onto your favorite baking pan, cookie sheet, spring-form pan or other type of

baking dishes or pans. You should also consider the taste factor. A mild tasting late harvest olive oil could be used in most cake and pastry recipes because cooking will get rid of the aromatic olive oil flavors. Uncooked confections such as cake frosting would taste more than a bit unusual if made with olive oil. This chart shows the substitution amounts for butter or margarine in im-

cretan nature

Extra Virgin Olive oil offers so much

Using Olive Oil instead of Butter


House of Eleftherios Venizelos in Halepa, reopens

After three years of exterior and in-

terior works, the house of the greatest Greek politician, Eleftherios Venizelos, in Halepa, Chania, reopens. The house will reoperate as a museum and tourists or citizens of Chania may visit it as follows: June 15 to September 30 • Monday to Friday: From 10.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. and from 6.30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Saturday: From 10.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m.

October 1 to June 14 • Monday to Friday: From 11 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. • Saturday: From 11 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. Entrance fee: 3 euros (+2 euros in the room of interactive technology)

Exhibition “Reflections” One of the most interesting aspects

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of holding a Fine Art exhibition in Chania is that of meeting and talking to many interesting people from all over the world. Many have such different backws ne re grounds and cultures ltu cu e or m r fo r t.g and then there are the os ep et cr :// tp click on ht locals who say such good things and have a great respect for art. One of the common questions I get asked is “how long does it take to make a painting like that?” I try to explain all that is required and a rough idea for certain works because many take months to complete. The other question that crops quite a lot is one for which I get a few mysterious expressions on faces when I reply. The question is usually two-fold and is “who are your favourite artists and which have provided the biggest influence on your work?” My answer includes Monet, Dali, Sisley and a few others that most people have heard of. The quizzical looks come when I mention the four biggest influences: Maxfield Parrish, Samuel Palmer, Constant Troyon and Edouard Leon Cortes. I am sure that many people think I am inventing the names, but if you have never heard of them may I suggest you try and find some images of their paintings on the Internet. Samuel Palmer is considered by many to be the best English landscape painter ever. Maxfield Parrish did a lot of imaginative magazine covers but his general works showed a sense of dreamy atmosphere that I think has not been attained by any other artist. Cortes painted mostly cityscapes and especially Paris on rainy days and nights and the lighting in Troyon’s paintings of pastoral life showed a complete understanding of how sunlight creates the effects that we often take for granted. Although I try to produce original work I am sure you will find many influences from those four masters in most of my works. As well as art, I have a great love of music and prefer to sit down and listen to good music instead of watching the television. One couple that bought a couple of postcards had a very distinctive Scottish accent. Somehow we got on to

the subject of music and they were very surprised that I knew about a Scottish rock group ‘Runrig’. In August 2013 they had been at a 40th Anniversary concert that was called “The Party on the Moor”. They were very surprised that I had a copy of the DVD of that concert and that I could name and owned most of their albums and had seen them play live. Staying on the theme of music, an American, who also bought postcards, was wearing a ‘Woodstock’ t-shirt (and it was in excellent condition considering its age, almost 46 years old). I asked him if he had bought it at this famous musical festival and he acknowledged the fact. One of the sets that I know was excellent was that by

Jefferson Airplane and I asked him if he had seen it. He said he could not remember but had seen Canned Heat and then he started to struggle to name others. So to help him out I just said, “It is true what they say then – if you were actually at Woodstock you remember very little about it”. People from close to where I Iived in the UK produced many discussions but one of the most interesting was a conversation I had with a woman from Australia, whose maiden name was Capon. This reminded me of a Floridian who called in about 3 years ago. After looking at the paintings he came up to me and asked if I was David Capon. After my affirmation he asked me if I knew where my name comes from.

by David Capon

He advised me that he had spent thousands of dollars and had had people working for him and he had traced his ancestry back to the 1600s. His surname was the same as mine and he advised me that his ancestors (and possibly most, if not all, Capons) came from Crete and the Peloponnese about 400 years ago. Many visitors call in and want to know the history of certain areas around Chania and many are surprised at how rich that history is. Luckily a lot of the history can be seen in the buildings and I am positive that so many tourists find the city and its architecture fascinating. For many this would have been their first visit, especially those on cruise ships, and we stress that they should return and spend much time looking around the city and touring western Crete. Most agree and say that they are so taken by the area that they do want to return. There were many different conversational topics and I remember a few, such as the Greek economy (regularly), the recent winter (often), Finnish weather, famous people from Luxembourg, an Iranian’s view of Crete, Honfleur and Caen (France), life on The Keys (USA), Aptera, wild tulips, the geology of Crete and two very odd subjects – co-existent multiple universes and how to approach the square root of a negative Complex Number. Another subject that was regular was the weather as we had rain, thunder and lightning and there was the tragic thunderbolt at Knosos all during the period of the exhibition, when most tourists would have been expecting settled weather. As I write this, my studio is getting back to normal and I can get down to completing new work and other requests. The preparatory work and the after work of a good exhibition are enormous and I was very tired afterwards. But the atmosphere and the interesting people I meet are so rewarding and I now have to wait for the next exhibition – sales are important, but my lingering memories will be of the interesting people and sometimes odd conversations I have had, even if I cannot understand how we got too many of those subjects.


The

Famous Cretan sculpturer Nikos Sotiriades died suddenly, due to heart attack

creator of “The Abduction of Europe” (the sculpture outside European Parliament in Strasbourg), Nikos Sotiriades, died suddenly, due to heart attack. Zeus, the father of Gods, fell in love with a beautiful princess from Phoenicia named Europe. Her name implied that she had great eyes and wide forehead. He approached the lady of his heart, disguised into a white bull, as she played with her fellowship on a coast of her country. The girls, bewitched by the beauty of the robust animal and as it seemed quite friendly, caress and play with the bull and at some point, Europe tries to ride it. The moment has come for Zeus; the bull suddenly rushes to the sea and abducts her, despite her tears and cries and through the waves of the Mediterranean he carries the woman that he loves to Crete. Three wonderful men come to life of

Zeus’ and Europe’s bond: Sarpidon, Radamanthus and Minos and they, by their turn, give birth to a wonderful period of archeology – The Minoan Era. Nikos and Pandelis Sotiriades, inspired by this beautiful story, created the “The abduction of Europe” a sculpted complex of monumental size, which today stands outside the European Parliament

in Strasburg. The dimensions of “The Abduction of Europe” are monumental: the sculpture is 15 ft. (440 cm) high, 5 ft. (150 cm) wide and 16 ft. (500 cm) long. Its’ weight exceeds the 8.818 lb. (4.000 kg). Europe is made of bronze, the bull is made of stainless steel, while on the back of the complex glass sheets are mounted in

order to give an air of movement and of the water that the divine couple came through, but also, a sense of human-to-animal transformation in a way that, materialistically, provides the link with modern Art. Crete, the place that the divine love affair bloomed for more culture news in, offered to the click on http://cretepost.gr place that the heart of united Europe is beating, a sculpted present that symbolizes its’ new -and yet very old- identity: the name of the continent and its’ new monetary unit originated in Crete. The transportation and installation of “The Abduction of Europe” was completed in October 2005. Nikos and Pandelis Sotiriades acknowledge that there is a major difficulty on making art nowadays. However they insist to live and create and they do it where they were born, because they believe that Inspiration springs authentically from each one’s Birth Land.

SFAKIAN

PIE FESTIVAL Taste the original recipe Gareth Williams’ powerful novel -set on Crete- wins Wales Book of the Year Award 2015

Oes Efa by Lleucu Roberts. Caernarfon-based writer Patrick McGuinness wrote the English-language Wales Book of the Year 2015. His book, Other People’s Countries, the book centres on the town of Bouillon on the Belgian border, where the author’s mother came from and where he has been going three times a year since he was a child. It was the second time Patrick has won the Wales Book of the Year Award, having been awarded the main prize in 2012 with his novel The Last Hundred Days. Paul Henry, on behalf of the English-language judging panel, said: “The stylistic quality of this brilliant, lyrical mem-

Daily Post

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away. I’ve won the Tir Na Nog award six times and I still get the same kick of excitement.” Llŷr Gwyn Lewis took home the Creative Non-Fiction Award for his volume Rhyw Flodau Rhyfel. Accepting the award he said it was based on the wartime experiences of an uncle in the Middle east. “He fought in the Palmyra area of Syria, an area where war is still raging. We don’t seem to learn any lessons from war,” he said. The winner of the poetry category is Un Stribedyn Bach by National Eisteddfod chair winner Rhys Iorwerth. The winner of Gwobr Barn y Bobl, the Welsh-language public vote, was Saith

oir is best described through a simile from the book where a bracelet of water “doesn’t run over the stones but flexes like clear muscle over its riverbed.” It’s a poet’s prose at its best – perfectly paced, effortless in its devices.” The winner of the Roland Mathias Poetry Award 2015 was So Many Moving Parts by Tiffany Atkinson, an eccentric meditation on the awkwardness of body and spirit and their unexpected, often unwanted intrusions into everyday life. The 2015 Fiction Category winner was The Dig by Cynan Jones. Judges said the novel is built on the interlocking fates of a badger-baiter and a disconsolate farmer. The Wales Arts Review People’s Choice Prize 2015 winner is Jonathan Edwards with his poetry collection My Family and Other Superheroes. Lleucu Siencyn, Chief Executive of Literature Wales said: “Reaching the Wales Book of the Year Short List is no mean feat. “It’s also wonderful to see Welsh writers set their sights firmly on the horizon, taking the readers of Wales to distant lands and embracing different cultures and histories whilst succeeding to stay true to our own.”

culture

A powerful novel, set on the island of Crete during the Second World War, won an author a prestigious book award. Gareth F Williams, originally from Porthmadog, was the winner of the main Welsh-language Wales Book of the Year Award for his novel Awst yn Anogia. He took home two trophies and cheques totalling £8,000 and a stainless steel trophy created by Angharad Pierce Jones. The winners were announced at a ceremony at Galeri Caernarfon. Gareth said: “I had been on holiday to Cephalonia, another Greek island, and afterwards started reading about the island and in one article it mentioned what had happened in Anogia on Crete. “I immediately thought there was material for a strong story here.” Gareth Potter, on behalf of the judges, said the book is full of compelling characters and despite being more than 500 pages long he could not put the book down. A six-time winner on the children’s Tir Na Nog award this was the first time he has won Wales Book of the Year Award. He said: “I can’t describe how good it feels winning this award. It inspires you to go home and start writing straight


In the dark

(by Niall Finn)

For science, dark is just the lack Of light; where none exists is black. A certainty that leaves no room For inward blackness, depths of gloom Where you are truly in the dark Of hopelessness - the terror, stark And staring, that you cannot cope With high-stacked problems, where the hope That lit each synapse in your brain In youth’s been bludgeoned black by pain, By disappointment, failure, grief And fear - not of some night-time thief Or moonlit mugger – no, instead The threat’s within; inside your head.

ws for more culture ne ost.gr ep et click on http://cr

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Kalives lunch

(by Niall Finn)

We order fish… it comes. My God! There’s calamares, prawns and cod A dozen battered sardines too To tease our tongues: meanwhile the

Beautiful August is here. There are a

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culture

by Elis. Pramateftakis Teacher

million reasons why Chania is an ideal city to spend this magnificent season. Chania is a paradise – as an English lady living in Crete recently told me. And I could not agree with her more. First of all, it’s the time of the year you can enjoy the sea you have been looking at with admiration all year round. Diving into the crystal clear waters, playing with the waves, feeling the freshness of the beach will remind you how blessed you are. You can swim in all kinds of seas, relax at red sandy beaches, wear your hat, glasses and best smile, and feel happiness filling your soul. Young children will have the time of their lives, playing with the sand and learning how to swim and elder people will feel younger once again. Then, you can drive around the mountains and feel you are a great discoverer. You will soon come across beautiful little villages and kind people offering a glass of “Raki” and traditional cheesepies while opening their doors to everyone. You can indulge in hikes and bicycle rides around mountains or walk through the world famous Samaria gorge. There you will be astonished by the wild beauty of the landscape, the height of the cliffs, and the tranquility of the sur-

view Of beach and waves till, quite replete, We thank the stars we live in Crete. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Meteora

(by Niall Finn)

Above an outward-jutting cliff A crust of walls and roofs as if Halfway between the sky and earth There’d been some kind of magic birth; As if a mountaintop could be By click of switch a monastery. The truth is more amazing still Those first ascetics’ nerve and skill To scale the crag in faith and hope And from the top let down a rope With which their aching arms would hoist Each brick, each stone, each beam and joist; Their progress measured inch by inch Through countless turnings of the winch. Yet in each gruelling working day They’d find the time to think and pray

And help each other when in need. It’s not my faith, don’t share their creed But now at least I’ve understood Just how they built their brotherhood.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Rules of the Cretan road

(by Niall Finn)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Chania harbour

(by Niall Finn)

Where in summer tourists stroll I saw a man, a great long pole And bucket in his gnarled old grip, Just where they moor the tourist ship. The harbour water crystal clear, The snowy mountains looking near, The softer sun of January, No ripple on the winter sea. Three metres down with gentle care He prised sea urchins from their lair His bucket full, I have a hunch He had the most amazing lunch. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Lines on a giant pothole

(by Niall Finn)

I think that I would sell my soul

Walking on sun-shine

roundings. And who knows, you might have an unexpected encounter with a Kri-Kri – a unique animal species resembling a goat found only in Chania. This will be an once in a lifetime experience. Finally, as the sun slowly sets in the horizon, it is undoubtedly the best time to walk down the old town. Presenting an exciting patchwork of past and present images, the scenery in the area is idyllic. Picturesque little streets with Venetian buildings, stone-built pathways decorated with flowers and numerous café-shops are there to be discovered.

To have a road without a hole; Chances are I’ll spend my pension On repairs to my suspension. This hole’s so deep you’d give up hope Unless you have a climbing rope. An optimist, though, has it made Except at noon, he’s in the shade

The driving style can be a pain Like turning from the straight-on lane A motorcyclist’s show-off swerve Or passing on the blindest curve. And sometimes “Oh, oh, I’ll be blowed; He’s stopped to chat right in the road!” But if it’s difficult for us, I’m mighty glad I’m not a bus! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Stroll in Gavalachori (by Niall Finn)

I too enjoyed the morning walk Companionship and time to talk. The mountain view from on the ridge, The scramble to the old stone bridge, Bright flowers and Venetian wells, Those “nooses” used for ringing bells, Enormous painted planted pots, In fact I liked it lots and lots!

and as their lights reflect on the surface of the blue sea, it certainly becomes the ideal place. You just need to pick up a bench and sit together with your beloved ones. You will take numerous pictures but the best ones will be those found deep in your mind and your soul. That being said, no matter where I go or how far I travel, I am always happy to have Chania as my home. Home is where the heart is – as they say – and my home happens to be a real paradise. You need neither expensive possessions nor a lot of money so as to enjoy it. You just need your family, your friends and your warmest smile. This city has so much to give during the summer time that you must only lie down and let your soul fill with joy. So walk down the city ,experience every single moment and smile. It will be like walking on sun-shine!

Once you get there time will stop for a while. You will be lost wandering the little streets but soon all your senses will guide you to the magnificent old harbour. There words cannot possibly describe the emotions filling one’s soul. The old lighthouse, the city’s landmark, stands Books firm with grace in the --- Consumables Stationery middle of the sea and little boats surround the area. Popi Loupassaki-eodoraki Multi coloured buildings Crossroads to Galatas National Road Chania-Kissamos create a stunning vision Old Tel.: +30 28210 32359

- Office supplies - Gis - Photocopies


by Petros Chatzistavros Civil Engineer (T.E.)

Masonry 1. Know your maintenance cycles. Most buildings need tuckpointing maintenance every 50 to 60 years. 2. Match the mortar. New mortar should match as closely as possible in color, consistency, and elevation. Using too much Portland cement in the mix creates hard mortars, which can damage old buildings. 3. Never grind out joints. Only deteriorated mortar should be removed. If someone tells you otherwise, run. 4. Never use sealers. Sealers trap moisture, compounding problems during freeze/thaw cycles. 5. Replace in kind. Damaged masonry units should be replaced whole or via Dutchmen of the same material. Voids filled with putty don’t last.

home improvement

Radiators 6. Don’t throttle a one-pipe steam radiator. The steam and condensate have to share that confined space. Keep the valve either fully open or fully closed to avoid water hammering and squirting air vents. 7. Create a perfect pitch. One-pipe steam radiators must pitch toward the supply valve. Use two checkers under radiator feet—they’re the perfect shape and size. 8. Gain control. Thermostatic radiator valves are a great way to zone any radiator and save fuel. Hot-water and two-pipe steam radiators get them on the supply side; one-pipe steam radiators get them between the radiator and the air vent. 9. Get a great finish. Pros agree that sandblasting followed by powder coating gives the best, long-lasting, non-sticky finish— but don’t try this at home. 10. Don’t worry about fires. Even with steam heat, a radiator gets only about half as hot as the temperature needed to kindle paper, so you can rest easy.

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Woodworking 11. Use heartwood. Heartwood is always the most disease-resistant. Sapwood of most species should never be used. 12. Rift or quarter-grain cuts are best. These cuts are the most stable. Flat grain often expands and contracts seasonally at twice the rate of quartered stock. 13. Install plain sawn lumber with the heart side up. Flat lumber will wear better with the heart facing up. If there’s cupping, the edges will stay flat, and only the center will hump slightly. 14. Learn to use hand tools. Most historic woodwork was produced by hand tools, and

35 Tips For Restoring Old Houses most machine-made millwork (late 19th century and after) was installed with them. Historic woodwork finishes produced with hand planes can’t be reproduced by modern machines like sanders. 15. Use traditional joinery. Component repairs should be made using traditional joinery instead of non-historic methods like a wholesale epoxy casting of a missing part.

Plaster 16. Save it. Original plaster is a key historic element of any old house. Removing it, especially to replace it with inferior drywall, significantly changes the historic appearance and value of your home. 17. Don’t use buttons. Plaster that has detached from its substrate (lath) needs to be held back in place to be saved, but plaster buttons can further crush plaster, and they create a surface bump that must be skimmed over to blend in. Glue-injection reattachment is a more secure option. 18. Fill in the cracks. Taping over cracks rarely works and is usually unsightly. Dig out cracks in a V-notch fashion and infill with plaster or setting compound for a longer-lasting, more invisible repair. 19. Match up repairs. A like-and-kind mix is preferable, but mixing modern gypsum plasters with traditional materials like lime putty and hair offers a faster solution that will still blend in well. Coarse plaster (like Structolite) best mimics the oldest plasters, while finish plasters create smooth surfaces befitting later eras. 20. Practice first. Try your plaster mix and trowel technique out in an inconspicuous area or on a board before tackling a high-visibility repair. Slate Roofing 21. Identify your slate. To correctly care for your slate roof, find out what type of slate

it is. Just as you can’t repair a Chevy with Ford parts, you should never use New York red slate on a Pennsylvania gray slate roof. 22. Understand your roof ’s longevity. If your roof only has 100 years of longevity and is 95 years old, it’s not worth sinking money into. But a roof with 200 years of longevity that’s 75 years old is a young roof that should be highly valued and properly maintained. 23. Inspect your roof regularly. At least once a year, walk around your house (use binoculars if necessary) and look at your roof. If you see missing, broken, or sliding slates, or flashing that looks suspect, call your slater. 24. Shop around for quality. Good slaters are out there, but you have to look for them. It’s worth the effort to have someone who truly knows what he’s doing. 25. Educate yourself. There are many slate roofing resource materials available to the public online. Take some time to review, read, watch, and learn. Your best defense against an unscrupulous contractor—and damage to your roof—is knowledge. Windows 26. Save your wood windows. Thirty percent of windows being replaced are less than 10 years old—plastic parts fail and can’t be repaired, seals fail on insulating glass units, or the glass fogs up. Your original wood windows have lasted a century or more; they can last another. 27. Each window is different. Consider individual window needs. You might carefully restore the house’s front windows and add interior air panels seasonally, add weatherstripping and exterior storms to side windows, and replace the rotting windows out back. And some windows may need nothing at all. 28. Old windows can be energy efficient. Adding weatherstripping and keeping up storms can make original windows as en-

ergy-efficient as replacements. Interior air panels and curtains or roller shades also add comfort and boost energy savings. 29. Maintenance lasts. Simple maintenance and minor repairs will pull your windows through another decade or two. Complete refurbishing will set them up for the rest of this century. 30. Enjoy your old windows. Their original molding profiles and old wavy glass provide authentic character that is not easily recreated. Hardware 31. Clean gently. To clean dirt and general gunk from antique hardware, use cleansers (such as Autosol) with natural ingredients. 32. Remove paint carefully. When removing years of paint, be gentle; you don’t want to destroy 40 years of patina in the process. A solution of TSP (trisodium phosphate) and water is best. Toxic cleansers can damage finishes. 33. Be patient. It takes time to loosen multiple layers of paint; check on solution-submerged hardware daily. When the paint loosens, rub it off, then finish with a light scour with very fine steel wool (grade 00). 34. Know what you’ve got. The more specifics you can give about a piece of hardware, the more likely you’ll be able to match it. Take measurements (overall and between holes), take pictures, and if it’s a lock you’re looking for, make sure you know what type of interior mechanism it has. Whenever possible, bring the original item with you to the store or salvage yard. 35. Be flexible. Exact matches can be hard to find, but a close match can be just as good. Differences in drawer pulls can be hidden on a chest, for example, by moving originals to the top and using the near matches at the bottom. www.oldhousejournal.com

SPECIAL OFFER DECO-Domi fast... 8.500 euros • • • •

renovation package includes repaintings interior doors plumbing and electricity works bathroom and kitchen

a brand new house in... just 20 days! call us at:

28210 91670 or 6944 822990

CFS is now operating online only, but always from Kalyves, Apokoronas, Crete. With so much of our business now operating purely online we have made the hard decision to close our shop and focus on the success of our online webshops. We are now operating from our admin office in Kalyves which will also be a click and collect point for online orders. Please do Visit Us, Call us, Email us or visit our webshop at www.cfshome.com for further information.


Charcoal A (Messy) Classic The charcoal grill is a time-honored, traditional BBQ choice. When you want a long-lasting heat with lots of smoke flavor, you get out the charcoal. Charcoal grills get much hotter than gas grills. The fire can get as hot as 500 degrees Fahrenheit, but that’s not a benefit when it comes to barbecuing. The perfect barbequed meat is cooked for a long time at a lower heat, usually no more than 225 degrees. However, it’s hard to control the heat of a charcoal fire, so you won’t always be cooking at the optimal temperature. Another negative aspect of a charcoal grill is that it can get dirty quickly, leaving behind lots of ash that has to be cleaned up. The coals must be stacked well inside the grill, and you’ve got to catch them on fire once you’re ready to cook. Charcoal grills are best used in a controlled environment, and they’re good for big gatherings when you need a hot, sustained fire to cook a lot of food. They also come in small sizes, and can be ideal for camping when you don’t want to cook over the open fire.

If you get a smoker box, you can even add wood chips to give food that smoky taste. Among gas grills, natural gas burns a little cleaner than propane. However, gas grills don’t create as much smoke as old-fashioned charcoal. With charcoal, the meat drip-

pings land on charcoal and create extra steam during cooking, an effect that doesn’t happen so well with gas grills. Because you need the gas to cook with, gas grills aren’t always easy to transport. Lugging a gas grill around can be a bit of a chore because you’ll need to bring a gas tank or make arrangements to have access to a gas line. Electric Portable, But Slow-Going An electric grill will heat up quickly, and it really is a no-fuss grilling option. You don’t need charcoal, you don’t need a gas line, and you don’t need to light anything to get it to work. The beauty of electric grills is that they can be used virtually anywhere -- even in public areas where gas and charcoal grilling is not allowed. There’s much less mess with an electric grill, and it can even be used indoors in times of bad weather. Electric grills don’t generate a lot of heat, however, and take a long time to really get going. This can make food take longer to cook. With an electric grill you won’t notice that grilled, smoky flavor that makes BBQ taste so good. Because electric grills can go anywhere, they’re great in tailgating.

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on doing, and where? Once you know the answer to these questions and know your grilling options, you’ll know how to make the perfect BBQ grill buying decision.

Gas - Easy to Clean (But Not to Transport) Gas grills are very easy to use. Essentially, you flip a switch to turn them on and in a few minutes you’re ready to cook. Gas is much cleaner to work with than charcoal.

do it yourself

What kind of grilling do you plan

BBQ Shopping Guide


Controlling Your Cholesterol Cholesterol by Miltiades Markatos Pneumonologist

is a waxy substance. It travels in your blood through the blood vessels. When you have high cholesterol, it builds up in the walls of the blood vessels. This makes the vessels narrower. Blood flow decreases. You are then at greater risk for having a heart attack or a stroke.

Good and Bad Cholesterol Lipids are fats. Blood is mostly water. Fat and water don’t mix. So our bodies need lipoproteins (lipids inside a protein shell) to carry the lipids. The protein shell carries its lipids through the bloodstream. There are two main kinds of lipoproteins: LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is known as “bad cholesterol.” It mainly carries cholesterol. It s new th heal delivers this cholestere mor for gr ol to body cells. Excess ost. click on http://cretep LDL cholesterol will build up in artery walls. This increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is known as “good cholesterol.” It is mostly a protein shell. The shell collects excess cholesterol that LDLs have left behind on blood vessel walls. That’s why high levels of HDL cholesterol can decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke. Controlling Cholesterol Levels Total cholesterol includes LDL and HDL cholesterol, as well as other fats in the bloodstream. If your total cholesterol is high, follow the steps below to help lower your total cholesterol level.

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health & nutrition

• Eat Less Unhealthy Fat o Cholesterol-lowering good health calls for a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, skinless poultry, nonfat dairy, beans, seeds, nuts, and healthy vegetable oils like olive or canola. Your diet should restrict saturated fat, trans fat, and salt. You should also cut back on sugar and refined flour, which have been linked with high triglycerides, another dangerous fat in the blood. o A more sensible diet should help you keep your weight within a healthy range, with a body mass index of 18.5 to 25. A healthy weight also reduces your chances of developing metabolic syndrome, a condition associated with high cholesterol, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and a high risk for type 2 diabetes. o Cut back on saturated fats and trans (also called hydrogenated) fats. A diet that’s high in these fats increases your

bad cholesterol. It’s not enough to just cut back on foods containing cholesterol. o Eat about 2 servings of fish per week. Most fish contain omega-3 fatty acids. These help lower blood cholesterol. o Eat more whole grains and soluble fiber (such as oat bran). These lower overall cholesterol.

• Be Active o Regular physical activity is critical to improving your cholesterol levels

and cutting your risk for heart disease. Exercise reduces not only total cholesterol, but also LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, and increases HDL (“good”) cholesterol. o Choose an activity you enjoy. Walking, swimming, and riding a bike are some good ways to be active. o Start at a level where you feel comfort-

able. Increase your time and pace a little each week. o Work up to 30 minutes on most

A life changing visit to our pharmacy can make you change the way you see life and put your body and mind in harmony. Have you ever visited a pharmacy to taste health? A different pharmacy in the centre of the old town of Chania is waiting to share with you secrets of well being and longevity. Taste the biolo gical honey, the royal jelly, tea from plants carefully chosen in therapeutic recipes, high concentration and purity juices of pomegranate, cranberry, aloe. Orthomolecular nutrition with suggestions on detox programs and a carefully selected range of supplements, vitamins an gluten free products from all over the world. In the same premises you can find a live homeopathic lab with 6.000 homeopathic remedies in stock and the ability to produce any kind of homeopathic form i.e. pills, granules, solutions etc Evangelia Sakka is the pharmacist in charge who has created that special pharmacy and will be happy to introduce you to that fantastic world but also suggest whatever will be more settable for you. Our philosophy doesn’t stop on food and supplements but we want you to think of your mind and body as well. That’s why we have created next to our pharmacy the Green Care SPA. A SPA that helps to uplift your mind and body with biological face an body treatments, reflexology, reiky, su jok and moxa treatment, Bach flower remedies, homeopathy sessions, bowtech as well as nail therapies. We are waiting for you to restart your life at Daskalogianni 43 - 45, SAKKA Pharmacy www.my-pharmacy.gr / www.greencarespa.gr

days. You can break this up into three 10-minute periods. o Remember, some activity is better than none. o If you haven’t been exercising regularly, start slowly. Check with your doctor to make sure the exercise plan is right for you. • If you drink, do so in moderation. Excessive alcohol use increases triglyceride levels. • Reduce stress. It may help keep your cholesterol in check. • Quit Smoking: Quitting smoking can improve your lipid levels. It also lowers your risk for heart disease and stroke. • Take Medication As Directed: Many people need medication to get their LDL levels to a safe level. Medication to lower cholesterol levels is effective and safe. (But taking medication is not a substitute for exercise or watching your diet!) Your doctor can tell you whether you might benefit from a cholesterol-lowering medication. Healthy Cholesterol Targets These are common targets. Ask your doctor for target numbers that are right for you. Total cholesterol: Under 200 HDL: 40 or higher for men, 50 or higher for women LDL: Under 100 Triglycerides: Under 150


How the massage affects the physiology of the human organism

Benefits of massage on the Skeletal System a. Exercises joints through a range of motion –joints are nourished by joint fluid, which is moved and circulated by massage. b. Can aid flexibility to a scar tissue and limits inflammations. c. Improves muscular balance and decreases joint and bones stress. Benefits of massage on the Muscular System

a. Can relieve from stress, spasms, rigidity, and limitations of the muscle tone. b. Can relax the muscles and improve flexibility. c. Can improve the blood circulation by bringing more oxygen and nutrients to the muscles causing fatigued muscles to be restored sooner. d. Can remove toxins and unnecessary substances from the muscles.

different parts of the body which is often described as pain and malfunction of the tissues. Benefits of massage on the Lymphatic System a. Aids in reducing edema (swelling) by boosting the lymphatic flow and removing unnecessary substances from the lymphatic system. b. Assists the flow of lymph throughout

by Despina Karamanlidou - YMON ANATRIPSIS

skin, increases the nutrition of the cells and regenerates them. b. Increases perspiration through sweat glands that help urea to be released from the body. c. Improves the colour of the skin. d. Aids in vitality and elasticity of the skin. e. Increases the production of smegma, thereby improving the softness of the skin and strengthens the skin against infections. Benefits of massage on the Respiratory System a. Can loosen the intercostal muscles and allows greater chest expansion, thereby deeper breathing. b. Slows down the breathing pace through the sympathetic nervous system.

Benefits of massage on the Circulatory System a. Can improve blood circulation by helping blood flow to the heart. b. Can help the blood vessels to be more effective through vasodilatation. c. Can boost blood flow by improving the transfer of fresh oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and speeding the removal of toxins and carbon dioxide though venous system. d. Can temporarily reduce arterial pressure due to the dilatation of capillaries. e. Can calm the pulse rate through relaxation of the nervous system. f. Can lessen ischemia. Ischemia is the reduction of the blood flow to many

the body, thereby assisting the immune system to prevent disease. Benefits of massage on the Nervous System a. Can relax or stimulate the nerves, depending on the type of treatment. b. Influences the parasympathetic nervous system and helps relaxation and stress release. c. Can be effective in pain control by affecting the release of secretions, such as endorphins. Benefits of massage on the Integumentary System a. Improves the microcirculation of the

Benefits of massage on the Urinary System a. Increases the production of urine because of the stimulation of blood circulation and the flow of lymph through tissues. Benefits of massage on our psychology a. Reduces stress and anxiety by relaxing both the mind and the body. b. Creates a feeling of wellness and self-esteem. c. Creates a positive perception about the image and the condition of our body through relaxation. d. Eases a possible sentimental trauma through relaxation.

Thank you again for your trust! Keep in mind that our body Feels- Hears-Acts.

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again! Have a nice month! This time I would like to extensively inform you about the benefits of massage on the human system. Of course, you are more than welcome to visit my place and have a face-to-face discussion on the matter. I want to start by clarifying that the massage has a better effect on our body if we participate to the procedure every way we can and by following the instructions/ advice of the massage therapist. At this point, I would like to say that there is a number of habits in our everyday life that influences and puts an extra stress to our physiology. For example, the wrong posture when we sit, drive or study. Also, lack of water and bad respiratory function can make us feel more tired during the day. It would be very helpful if we consciously started changing some of our habits. In no time, we will realize all the positive effects that will occur to our body by these changes. Because we all have to remember that our body Feels – Hears – Acts.

health & nutrition

Hello


Dog Tags: What You Need to Know to Keep Your Pet Safe

If you’ve ever lost a pet, you know

about the importance of ID tags. Having identification and contact information securely attached to your pet’s neck makes it much more likeby Giannis Venetakis Zoo Technician ly that you’ll get your furry family member back if he decides to take off on a solo adventure. Yet a recent study published in Preventative Veterinary Medicine revealed that only 33 percent of owners keep ID tags on their pets. If you’re one of the 67 percent who sometimes, rarely or never puts tags on your pet, consider this: They considerably increase the return-to-owner (RTO) rate if your pet is lost. “In most communities, the RTO rate hovers between 10 and 30 percent for dogs,” says Dr. Emily Weiss, vice president of shelter research and development for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. “But personalized ID tags that contain contact information for the dog owner can help assure lost anfor more pets news imals are quickly reunitclick on http://cretepost.eu ed with their families.” It’s also important to remember that just because your dog is microchipped, it doesn’t mean that he doesn’t also need an ID tag. “Vets and shelters can scan for chips, but collar tags are still the fastest way for someone to reach you in the event that they find your lost pet,” says Dr. Jules Benson, veterinarian of an Animal Medical Clinic. What Info Should Appear on My Pet’s ID Tags? Your pet’s name, your phone number and the city where you reside are essential. “Putting a cell phone number on a tag is a smart way to ensure that you are reachable, no matter where you

More

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his collar. It’s also important to update tags whenever you move or change your phone number. You should also check your pet’s tags every couple of months for legibility. “Most ID tags are not engraved very deeply, and the information does tend to wear off,” says Smith. “Make sure they’re still easily readable, and replace them if they’ve become worn or scratched.” Smith also recommends keeping one or two spare sets of tags around the house. “Dogs lose tags more often than you think,” she says. “One of my dogs lost not one, not two, but three complete sets of tags — ID, chip registry and rabies — in the span of a couple years.” What Should I Look For When Buying ID Tags? Just like breeds of dogs, there are a variety of choices when it comes to pet tags. Bottom line: Choose one that fits your lifestyle best. Globetrotting Pets If you travel with your pet often, you may want to con-

sider portable tags, which are waterproof metal tubes or barrels that screw open and shut. You can write your hotel or destination contact information on a piece of paper to insert into the unit, and then change it whenever you head out of town. Rambunctious Pets If you hate the sound of jangling tags, a dog tag silencer may be a good idea — especially for homes with sleeping babies. The soft pouches fit snugly around your pet’s IDs, muffling the sound of clanging metal when he runs through the house to greet you. All Pets If you know that you aren’t moving anytime soon, you may want to consider a tag that comes with a lifetime guarantee. These sturdy tags are typically made of stainless steel, and companies will replace them for free if they become illegible. Don’t want to deal with hanging tags, which tend to wear and fall off? Consider a secure collar tag, which is less likely to get caught on things. vetstreet.com

Pet-friendly Beaches in Greece Growing in Number

and more beaches across mainland Greece and on its islands are welcoming pets, according to media reports citing a recent decision by the shipping ministry in collaboration with the tourism ministry, which designates beaches where pets are allowed to swim.

pets & vets

are,” says Dr. Benson. You can include your address, but sometimes there isn’t enough room on a tag. Plus, some people may not feel comfortable having that much personal information in the hands of whoever finds their pet, says Cheryl Smith, a dog expert and the author of Grab Life by the Leash. If your dog is microchipped, which experts recommend, you should attach a second tag to your pet’s collar that lists the microchip company’s name and phone number. Finally, it’s a good idea to also have your pet wear his proof of rabies vaccination to let whoever finds him know that he’s up-to-date on his shots. Some countries require by law that your pet wear his proof of rabies vaccination at all times. The number on the rabies tag is also another way to identify your pet — and find you — in the event that your buddy is lost. How Often Should I Change My Pet’s Tags? Each time that your pet is revaccinated, make sure that you affix the new tag to

According to these reports, the two ministries are expected to present maps with these assigned areas in the coming period. However, according to the Panhellenic Animal Welfare and Environmental Federation, it is unclear whether these decisions are legally applicable.

Beaches in Attica where pets are welcome include Vourleza in Porto Rafti, Marikes beach in Rafina and Helmi Coast in Lavrio. According to the same reports, beaches in Loutraki, Corinth, Agioi Theodoroi, Diakopto, Mani and Kinouria, mostly near camping areas also welcome pets.

Beaches on the islands of Skopelos, Elafonissos, Agistri, Ithaki, Kythnos, Sifnos, Paros, Antiparos, Kos, Tilos, Kasos, Kimolos, Milos, Sikinos, Naxos, Koufonisia, Ikaria, Patmos, Symi and Crete, have also been referred as pet friendly. news.gtp.gr


There’s always something to be do-

ing in the garden, whether it’s pruning, tidying or sowing, so we’ve put together our top gardening tasks for August. In the flower garden • Cut back faded perennial plants to keep borders tidy. • As your Penstemon flowers fade, cut them back to just above a bud to encourage more flowers. • Cutting back growth in hanging baskets can encourage new flowers and foliage and will revive the display. Make sure you that feed your baskets well after doing this. • Cut back hardy Geraniums and Delphiniums after the first flush of flowers to encourage new growth and further blooms. • Continue to tie in and train new growth on climbing plants.

earliest known Africa gladiolus grown in Europe dating back to 1680. Europeans were aware of this flower for centuries as an inhabitant of fields where corn grew around the Mediterranean Sea. Europe received the first South African species of gladiolus between 1739 and 1745. They were delivered by Dutch and English ships that stopped in Cape Town for supplies and water.

Gladiola corms were used as a medicinal poultice that assisted in drawing splinters from skin. When powdered corms were mixed with goat’s milk it became a drink that aided in the relief of colic. Gladioli are also the symbol of the Four Days Marches in the Netherlands. In fact, the oldest city in that country, Nijmegen, changes the name of one major street there to Via Gladiola once a

www.whatsmybirthflower.com

What to do in the garden in August

• Prune Wisteria now. Just remove the whippy side-shoots from the main branch framework to about 20cm from their base (about five leaves from the main stem). • Prune lupins to encourage further flowers. • If you need to prune your deciduous Magnolia, now is the best time to do it. • Divide clumps of Bearded Iris now so they have time to form roots and flowers buds for next year before the cold weather arrives. • Take cuttings from your favourite tender plants for over-wintering indoors. Cuttings can also still be taken from shrubs and herbaceous perennials. • Dead-head bedding plants and perennial plants to stop them self-seeding and to encourage further flowering. • Dead-head your roses to keep them

looking tidy. Leave the flowers in place if your rose produces attractive hips (seed pods). • Dead-head sweet peas regularly to keep them blooming. Water daily in dry weather. • Capture seed heads from dandelions and other weeds. Collect them before they get a chance to release their seeds and spread throughout your garden. • Keep an eye out for pests on plants, early treatment is best. • Stop rust damaging hollyhock foliage

by pruning out affected leaves and/or spraying with a fungicide. • Look out for Clematis Wilt. Symptoms include wilting leaves and black discolouration on the leaves and stems. Cut out all affected material and dispose of it in your household waste. • Now is a good time to spray ground elder, bindweed and other persistent weeds with a glyphosate-based weed killer as the plants now have lots of leaf surface area with which to absorb it. www.thompson-morgan.com

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native to tropical and South Africa and are any plant of the genus Gladiolus. The plant has sword-shaped leaves with one-sided spikes of funnel-shaped, bright flowers. Discovered in South Africa in the 17th and 18th centuries, the gladiolus was used as a food. In ancient Rome, gladiator battles were fought ‘to the death or gladioli’ where the victor was buried under gladioli by cheering crowds in celebration for winning the fight. It was from this history that the glad has also become known as the ‘sword lily’ and referred to as the flower of the Roman gladiators. The meaning attached to the flower is that of moral character. The name for the flower is from the Latin word ‘gladius’ which means sword, a reference to the shape of the plant leaves. The earliest written reference to the glad is in The Bible in the Book of Matthew (6:28) which states, “And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin.” Hybridization and experimentation started around 1800 in Britain with the

year and welcomes walkers on the last day of the Four Days Marches. They are celebrated as heroes and spectators present gladioli to the walkers to honour them. The Dutch have adapted the ancient Roman chant to a modern day saying which roughly translates to ‘death or the gladioli’ in English. The meaning of the chant is ‘all or nothing’ and as the flower has become a sign of strength and victory – as the reward presented following a great achievement – the expression of honour is extended to the walkers participating in the Four Days Marches. The symbolic gesture signifies that the walkers are viewed as being as heroic and the ancient Roman gladiators were in their era. In more contemporary times, singer Morrissey danced with gladioli hanging from a back pocket. for more gardening new s He also had a bunch of click on http://cretepost.gr yellow glads he swung around in the music video ‘This Charming Man.’ “Love At First Sight” is the meaning of this flower when offered as a gift.

plants and gardening

Glads, as they are often called, are

The August flower is the Gladiolus


Recipes of the month...

by Antonia Tsakirakis Cook

Cuttlefish with fennel and green olives Ingredients • 1 1/2 kilos cuttlefish, cleaned • 5 spring onions, finely chopped • 1 glass EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL • 1 glass white wine • 1/2 kilo fennels, finely chopped • 5 tomatoes, grated • salt and pepper • 1 / 2 kilo tsakistés green olives

on for more news click r http://cretepost.g

• •

Ink from three cuttlefish 2-3 cloves of garlic

Preparation Clean and cut the cuttlefish. Saute with garlic and spring onion and extinguish with wine. Add the fennel, tomatoes, olives, salt, pepper and ink dissolved in 1/2 glass of water and boil over low heat for about 20 minutes.

Traditional Cretan Taverna

Tel.: +30 28210 75997

Summer Pudding

quintessentially British pud, packed with juicy summer berries, is so much easier than it looks, perfect for beginners.

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food & wine

• • • • •

Ingredients 300g strawberries 250g blackberries 100g redcurrants 500g raspberries or 1¼kg/2lb 12oz mixed berries and currants

Ingredients • 1 kilo fresh octopus • 500gr small onions • 250gr tsakistès olives • 1 wine glass EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL • 250gr firm red tomatoes • Salt and pepper

Drakona, Kerameia (20 km from Chania)

“Tzaneris & Archontissa”

T his

Octopus with olives

Preparation Cook the octopus in its liquid for some time. Extinguish with wine and add the olive oil, salt and the grated tomatoes. Bring to a boil and add the small onions peeled and cut into half or whole, if small. When half done, add the olives. Cover the pot and let the food boil. Simmer over moderate heat. Serve with french fries.

www.tzaneris-archontissa.gr

Mob.: +30 6973 210487 / +30 6973 786747

by Marilou - Chief executive chef at Marilou Cupcakes and more. info@marilous.gr • •

of your choice 175g golden caster sugar 7 slices day-old white bread, from a square, medium-cut loaf

Preparation 1. Bring out the juices: Wash fruit and gently dry on kitchen paper – keep strawberries separate. Put sugar and 3 tbsp water into a large pan. Gently heat until sugar dissolves – stir a few times. Bring to a boil for 1 min, then

tip in the fruit (not strawberries). Cook for 3 mins over a low heat, stirring 2-3 times. The fruit will be softened, mostly intact and surrounded by dark red juice. Put a sieve over a bowl and tip in the fruit and juice. 2. Prepare the bread: Line the 1.25-litre basin with cling film as this will help you to turn out the pudding. overlap two pieces in the middle of the bowl as it’s easier than trying to

get one sheet to stick to all of the curves. Let the edges overhang by about 15cm. Cut the crusts off the bread. Cut 4 pieces of bread in half, a little on an angle, to give 2 lopsided rectangles per piece. Cut 2 slices into 4 triangles each and leave the final piece whole. 3. Build the pud: Dip the whole piece of bread into the juice for a few secs just to coat. Push this into the bottom of the basin. Now dip the wonky rectangular pieces one at a time and press around the basin’s sides so that they fit together neatly, alternately placing wide and narrow ends up. If you can’t quite fit the last piece of bread in it doesn’t matter, just trim into a triangle, dip in juice and slot in. Now spoon in the softened fruit, adding the strawberries here and there as you go. 4. Let flavours mingle then serve: Dip the bread triangles in juice and place on top – trim off overhang with scissors. Keep leftover juice for later. Bring cling film up and loosely seal. Put a side plate on top and weight down with cans. Chill for 6 hrs or overnight. To serve, open out cling film then put a serving plate upside-down on top and flip over. serve with leftover juice, any extra berries and cream.


ikia announces officially the preparations for 3rd Ermonikian races in October 2015. The date of Ermonikia events will be announced during the symbolic ascent to the local mountain of Vorizis in the area of Lampi Rethymnon. “The 2nd mountain meeting of Ermonikia friends, has the purpose to give the motivation for people to enjoy the nature, establishing a yearly outdoor event with a cultural and educational character”. The trekking excursion to Vorizis will take place in Sunday morning 12th July. It is open for all, guided by the Hellenic Alpine Club of Rethymnon and the volunteers of Ermonikia. Apart from the picturesque Spili village, the beautiful southern beaches and the freshing sea are in close distance, waiting for the ones who like to continue the feeling of the day. For more information about Ermonikia, the spirit, the events, the races and the 2nd Mountain meeting, you can visit the page www.facebook.com/

Ermonikia or send e-mail to: ermonikia@gmail.com. About Ermonikia Ermonikia is two-days cultural and athletical event, taking place every year in area of Lampi Rethymnon. The 2nd Ermonikia 2014 was held with big success, having 400 participants from Greece and other countries. Top athlets, artists, and many visitors came to live the unique experience. The two-days programm includes 4 running races, presentation of ancient Greek musical instruments, live performance of ancient Greek music, speeches, presentation of the Ancient Greek martial art “Pagration”, horse cavalcade, local trekking excursion, traditional Cretan music and dances.

Two of the most famous Greek bas-

ketball players, Vassilis Spanoulis and Nikos Zissis, enjoyed their vacation on Crete. Along with their families, they spent their holidays in Lassithi. They also had the chance to enjoy traditional Cretan recipes in a local tavern of Agios Nikolaos and -of course- the owners of the restaurant did not miss the chance for a photo with them. Gareth Bale also on Crete According to information from his team -Real Madrid-, Gareth Bale was

No more AGO Rethymno…

Here come Rethymno Cretan Kings! AGO

Rethymno and the blue colour belong to the past. As officially announced by the team management, the new

Badminton on Crete I have a great love of some televised

sports: Nordic and Alpine skiing, biathlon, curling and hurling. Before moving to Crete I was a long time member of Exeter Chiefs Rugby

Club. I played cricket to a reasonable standard and became club and first team captain for my club as well as a selector for the League. But the sport I loved most of all and at which I attained a

on vacation on Crete. The Welsh superstar came into a hotel in Heraklion and enjoyed the sun and the sea. Also in the same hotel, Jérôme Boateng of Bayern Munich spent his summer vacation a few days ago.

very high standard was badminton. I used to play all year but the darker months was the period of league matches as well as open and invitational tournaments. Some of my rackets were expensive so I decided to bring some with me to remind me of my enjoyment. To my surprise there were rumours that a friend of mine was going to start a club. The rumours were true and last year a badminton club opened at the school sports hall in Vamos. So, twice a week (Tuesday and Thursday afternoons) I don my tracksuit, collect my rackets and get to the sports hall. Sports halls in the UK are designed to accommodate many sports (including tennis, indoor football) and usually the minimum number of badminton courts is four; whereas halls here are designed for basketball and volleyball. This means that we have two courts but we are not complaining. The Club has members of varying stan-

name of the will be “Rethymno Cretan Kings”… just like the NBA. The emblem of the team is the Minotaur and the new colours are dark red and gold. CretePost.gr and Chania Post wishes all the best for our Cretan basketball team!

by David Capon

for more sports news click on http://cretepost. gr

dards, including beginners, and many ages, including teenagers. There are a few rackets that can be hired for anyone wishing to try the sport or wanting to re-acquaint themselves but have no rackets with them. Coaching and advice is available for anyone requiring help. The instigator of the Club, Keith Franks, is a Badminton England Coach and can be contacted at keithfranksgames@hotmail.com or on mobile 694 3250 229. If you are interested in playing this wonderful sport (again) or would like to learn to play contact him directly. The only thing we need now is a shop or individual, locally, that can restring badminton rackets. (You may have noted I have made no mention of soccer. The reason is, as a contradiction to the mention in early issue of the paper that said all English love football, I have not even the slightest interest in that game).

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The Athletic Committee of Ermon-

Spanoulis, Zissis and Bale for vacation on Crete

sports & leisure

Official announcement of the Ermonikian preparations


August2015  
August2015  

The new issue of Chania Post is here. The only newspaper in English for Chania Prefecture.

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