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GRAFFITI AND STREET ART MAGAZINE

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THE ORIGINS OF STREET ART This issue is our Street Art Edition which focuses on showcasing unconventional street art methods and artists

OTTO SCHADE |BANKSY | SEEN | FORTUNA | L’ATLAS  STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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EDITOR’S NOTE TAG Magazine has been a platform for artists you’ve heard of and artists you should get to know. Through our print editions and online presence we are building a community of artists and connoisseurs from all over the world, and showcasing a diverse collection of styles, in uences, and processes. We hope to bring it to life for you all, ensuring our readers enjoy viewing it as much as we have had the privilege to. nfo@tag.com tag.com Design and Art Direction: Annie Leon annieleonn.com Published by TAG Media. All rights reserved TAG Media. Cover art by Annie Leon

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“I LOVE Y BUT...” — OTTO SCHADE


YOU

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CO08 NT24 EN30

THE ORIGINS OF STREET ART Where Did It Come From 10 The movement From Style Writing to Art

GRAFITTI The Art of the Outlaws 26 Street art for all ages Graffiti that breaks stereotypes

STREET ART ARTISTS Otto Schade 34 Banksy, Banksy & More Banksy! Art by Banksy 40 “She’s a Leader” from Germany MadC

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THE ORIGINS OF STREET ART

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WHERE DID IT COME FROM? THE HISTORY OF STREET ART ORIGINATED WITH TAGGING, OR SCRATCHING NAMES ON PUBLIC PROPERTY.

Any type of history is a discourse in its own right. What is more, when talking about art history, the discourses seem to flourish immensely from one into another, and so on into many more. In the context of the beginnings, one cannot but firstly reflect upon the artwork of graffiti. Later on, by the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st, street art has evolved into complex interdisciplinary forms of artistic expression. From graffiti, stencils, prints

and murals, through largescale paintings and projects of artistic collaboration, to street installations, as well as performative and video art, it is very much safe to say that street art has found it’s way into the core of contemporary art. And rightly so. Some of the earliest expressions of street art were certainly the graffiti which started showing up on the sides of train cars and walls. This was the work of gangs in the 1920s and 1930s New York. The impact of this subversive culture was extraordinarily felt in the 1970s and 1980s. This cultural movement was recorded in the book The History of American Graffiti, by Roger Gastman and Caleb Neelon. These decades were a significant turning point in the history of street art – it was a time when young people, by responding to their socio-political environment, started creating a movement, taking the ‘battle for meaning’ into their own hands. Soon, this subcultural phenomenon gained the attention and respect in the ‘grown-up’ world. From the fingers and cans of teenagers, it had taken a form of true artistic expression. STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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MO STYLE VE MEART THE ORIGINS OF STREET ART

FROM

WRITING TO

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THE ORIGINS OF STREET ART

In the late 60s, graffiti arrived in New York City, after an introduction on the Philadelphia side. Whatever the legend, no one really knows if it happened in a deliberate effort or as a spontaneous occurrence, but it seems it all started in Manhattan’s Washington Height section. Originating from the upper west side of Manhattan, most of the early writers used to add to their name a number reflecting the street they actually lived on, as in TAKI 183 or TRACY 168. Graffiti writers from the other boroughs also appeared quickly, such as LEE 163 from the Bronx, FRIENDLY FREDDIE from Brooklyn.

STAY HIGH 149 Quickly such as STAY HIGH 149 brought the whole thing up, adding a key element: style. To the usual writing one would add ornaments like stars, crowns, arrows and even characters that would soon become legendary and meaningful Stay High 149 leaves behind a lasting memory in both the graffiti community, as one of the original writers on the trains and arts community, as the precursor to Keith Haring and other street artists, who used images and symbols rather than the letters as their tag. In the days after his passing, artists, both in the graffiti subculture and outside, have been paying their respects via Twitter, Facebook and in countless articles.

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“GRAFFITI IS MY LIFE, ALWAYS HAS BEEN AND ALWAYS WILL BE!” — SEEN AKA THE GODFATHER OF GRAFFITI Soon all the NYC trains are painted from to to bottom in a raging war for style reognition. Often referred to as “The man who invented modern graffiti”, SEEN is precocious and wildly creative. And while his name is easily recognizable in his works, his style is changing.

As one can see, SEEN’s multi — layered backgrounds are extremely complex, combined to spray — canned softies that are as good as his best trains. His spraying strokes are technically perfect, and SEEN is able to express himself with ease.

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FUTURA — THE CLASH (1981) In his artistic work, FUTURA’s approach is unique : a futurist style to create an abstract universe in which he mixes drippings and clean—cut lines. “For me the transition was rapid, one minute we were bombing trains and living the culture, and the next minute boom.”

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“ YOU CAN’T SLEEP ON AN IDEA”

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ON LY 94

STEREO PINK SPRAY PAINT

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PIECES BY SPACE INVADER At the wake of the 90s suddenly the movement evoles. New types of signature appear. Writing then abstraction, and now concept. The message becomes the mean… Invader (French, b.1969), also known as Space Invader, is an Urban artist original-

ly based in Paris. He affixes mosaic images of characters from the 1970s video game “Space Invaders” in cities around the world. Invader puts up iconic installations in cities around the world based on popular 8—bit video games from the 1970s and 80s.

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L’ATLAS After 40 years the movement shines by its constant renewal.Each signature is unique and a new quest. ’Atlas is a French artist whose work is all about lines and forms. The main theme of his paintings, graffiti, and installations is the displacement of the people around the world. www.latlas—art.org

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His works remind of an intersection between geometric abstraction and minimalism where every letter is a form, and every form is a letter. L’Atlas tries to put together his interest in geography, maps and archeology on one side together with his devotion to the history of writing on the other side.

L’ATLAS — GÊNES, 2008

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L'atlas

SQUARE TOP

—50%

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L'atlas

T—SHIRT NOIR

—25%

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GRAFFITI: THE ART OF THE OUTLAWS

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THE ART OF THE

OUTLAWS

To understand graffiti, we shall observe it as a form of street art which usually involves tagging, but also the creation of more complex paintings. From its earliest days, it was done outside the law, with writers taking big risks when making their works, this sometimes leading to their arrests. The excitement of being a renegade and the fear of getting caught is what many artists consider the very core of graffiti culture, especially during the days of rough, growing competition and the willing to become as good at drawing as you possibly could. When caught in act, however, the writers get charged with vandalism, fined, and given community service hours during which they help clean up graffiti. By definition, it is “an action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property”, and while we can’t argue that graffiti (mostly tags, considered a reductive form of art within graffiti community itself) often end up on someone’s walls, we do have to wonder if it really is “destruction” and if, perhaps, we’ve been asking the wrong question the whole time.

IS GRAFFITI STILL VANDALISM IF IT’S… LEGAL? Let’s put it like this – someone painted over your house and, of course, you’re not too happy about it. No one has the right to do that without your permission and, without even looking at it, you can pronounce it vandalism. But would you feel the same way if you saw a really breathtaking piece of graffiti art on an

otherwise dull wall in the city? The authorities wouldn’t care if it was a drawing in the range of a Picasso – if it’s painted on an owned property, it’s an act of vandals. So, does that mean that graffiti is art if it’s done legally? That would surely explain the immense success it had within museum and gallery walls worldwide, with artists like Banksy and Shepard Fairey having important exhibitions and making serious money from making their artworks. If created on canvas and placed on a wall at, say, Tate Modern, graffiti becomes a respectable form of art. Street art, in general, is a highly polarising matter, where contradictions create and depend upon themselves, yet what’s sure is that it’s called “street” art for a reason, and its public existence is still crucial for its spirit.

PAINT THE PICTURE OF THE FUTURE Today, there are many urban art festivals around the world, created to promote street art everywhere and to encourage young creatives to pursue their dreams. Many of them are city—funded as well, with a scope of beautifying the environment with some extraordinary artworks. Even big corporations such as Red Bull, Adidas or 55DSL engaged graffiti talents in their advertising campaigns, over and over again. In cities like Stockholm and neighborhoods as Brooklyn’s Bushwick, you can find the world’s most famous legal graffiti walls areas, where tagging, bombing and writing are actually required. STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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GRAFFITI: THE ART OF THE OUTLAWS

SPRAY PAINTING By 1973, writing moved from the streets to the subway cars and quickly became competitive. At this point writing consists of mostly “getting up”. Writers would hit as many cars as possible, tagging inside the trains while it rides station to station. It wasn’t long before they discover that many more subway cars could be done inside the train yard with more time to paint and less chance of getting caught. The concept and method of bombing are now established. Every line has its King. A king is a writer whose pieces are the most visible, biggest and most beautiful. Kings are respected by other writers who sometimes ask them to help paint pieces at night. In 1975 all the standards has been set. A new school was about to reap the benefits of the artistic foundations established by prior generations in a city in the midst of a financial crisis. New York City was broke, therefore the transit system was poorly maintained. This led to the heaviest bombing in history. Subway trains were not easy to paint in the yards were they would park at night. The artists had to face many risks, from the electrified third rail to being chased by the Transit Police’s Vandal Squad. All of this would not stop the most hardcore writers from expressing themselves and risk their live every time they would go out painting. Subway trains were not easy to paint in the yards were they would park at night.

WALL PAINTING At the end of the train era, New York writers had to switch targets. Many has turned their interest to murals while the train scene continued his way in Europe. If graffiti can still be observed on Copenhagen or german subway trains, it also found his way to some city councils. Many cities organise Hip hop events where writers are invited to paint sophisticated pieces on walls. The New York Tats Cru (Nicer, Bio, Just 195, Nosm…) the Mac Crew (Juan, Kongo, Alex…) and the GrimTeam (Chaze, Soda, Dize, Pro…) from

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Paris have become professional muralists. At the Kosmopolite festival in Bagnolet near Paris, old school writers from New York paint murals with younger european generations. From Marc—Aurèle Vecchione “Writers” to the “Trumac” or “Wild War”, a wide range of videos relate the different tendencies of the new scenes to the public.

POST GRAFFITI The interest in showing graffiti on canvas has developed as soon as graffiti sprayed in the city. In 1972, Hugo Martinez, sociology major at City College in New York took notice of the legitimate artistic potential of the early graffiti writers generation. United Graffiti Artists and Martinez selected top subway artists from all around the city and presented their work in the formal context of an art gallery. UGA provided opportunities once inaccessible to these artists. The Razor Gallery was a successful effort of H. Martinez and the artists he represented: Coco 144, Pistol, Flint 707, Bama, Snake, and Stitch 1.A 1973 article in New York magazine by Richard Goldstein entitled “The Graffiti Hit Parade” was also early public recognition of the artistic potential of subway artists. In the early 80’s in NY, Art galleries like Fashion Moda, Patti Astor’s Fun Gallery and a little later on Sydney Janis started to show graffiti works on canvas to expand their horizons. These and subsequent galleries would prove to be an important factors in expanding writing overseas.

MTA REMOVE GRAFFITI Between 1970 and 1985 the Metropolitan Transit Authorities spent between 100 and 150 millions dollars to remove graffiti from its network, unsuccessfully. For example, the removing of one quadrate meter costs about 750 dollars, a whole car is 78 000 dollars, using high pressure water with specific chemistry (the ‘buff’).


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GRAFFITI THAT BREAKS

STEREOTYPES 32

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Scientific developments and the democratization of access to health services in the last half—century have brought, among other things, the increase in average life expectancy. In any country considered developed, we know that we won’t be so easily struck down by diseases like our ancestors. Thus, there is in each of us the clear notion that we have a fair amount of years to live, and this is, in fact, an admirable achievement of mankind, gained in a very short time of History. But, as it is well known, quantity is not quality. And quantity without quality is just a big curse. As a society we are still trying to learn how to approach these recently won extra years, which we call “third age”.

In Europe, a relatively small territory there are many countries and many cities where the population ageing phenomenon is easily detectable. In the squares and gardens of the cities we see fewer and fewer baby strollers and more and more groups of retired people whose lives were not dynamically reworded. Daily we watch day and night pilgrimages of senior citizens who get out of their homes, not to go to the usual mass or card game, but to follow every detail of the paintings. We heard a thousand stories on what it could be appearing on the walls and it moved us hearing things like “today I feel more safe with the image of the shepherd, who accompanies me everyday at the window”. STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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ART FOR ALL 34

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LATA 65 Urban Art workshop for seniors, has emerged as a challenge to take this interest shown by urban art beyond, with objective intentions:

POWER TO FOMENT, TO PROMOTE AND TO VALUE the DEMOCRATIZATION OF the ACCESS to the Contemporary ART;

— to prove that concepts such as ACTIVE AGEING and intergenerational solidarity make more sense every day;

— to bring the less young closer to a form of artistic expression usually associated with younger ones;

— to demonstrate that Urban Art has the

— to demonstrate that age is just a number.

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STREET ART ARTISTS

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OTTO SCHADE A native of Chile, Otto Schade took his vibrant art to England in 2005. After attaining an architecture degree in Concepción, Otto began his career as an urban sculptor. But it was his fascination with surreal art that led him toward his passion to paint. Inspired by masters of the past like Dali, Magritte, Miro, Giger, and Beksiński. The eclectic works of Otto Schade can be found on the streets of many European cities – including Berlin, Amsterdam, Moscow, Paris, Barcelona, Porto, Luxembourg, Stockholm, Gothenburg, Brussels, and London – and can be viewed in various galleries and exhibition centres across Europe. The eclectic works of Otto Schade can be found on the streets of many European cities – including Berlin, Amsterdam, Moscow, Paris, Barcelona, Porto, Luxembourg, Stockholm, Gothenburg, Brussels, and London – and can be viewed in various galleries and exhibition centres across Europe. Otto is available for commissions for art collectors, fashion designers, interior designers and other creative projects.

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“DISTORTED FACADE” — Otto Schade STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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ART

BY BANKSY A four years, it has been the two—fingered salute to the conventional art world, a poke in the eye for homophobes and a feather in Brighton’s non—conformist cap. But now, seven years after its creation on the side of the Prince Albert pub, Banksy’s “kissing coppers” is set to be shipped out and put on sale in America. The work, which depicts two policemen in a passionate clinch, has become a shrine for fans of the elusive graffiti artist and a regular stop on Brighton’s tourist trail. But, after repeated attacks on the artwork left it severely damaged, the pub owner has decided to sell the original through a New York gallery for an sizeable fee, estimated to be anywhere from £500,000 to £1m.

“KISSING COPPERS” (2004)

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“WAITING IN VAIN’ On day 24 of Banksy’s month long October ‘residency’ on the streets of New York, in front of the Hustler Club on 51st street a new work called “Waiting In Vain” appeared. While I enjoyed seeing this work, when I happened by it, there were about 50 people standing on the street taking photos and posing with the wall. Thanks for ruining the world Instagram and Facebook! The club had a beefy security guard next to the ‘priceless’ work of art and apparently minutes after I took this photo, they sliced the wall and moved this work of art inside the club. That’s one way to drive customers into the club when people get tired of looking at strippers. Imagine all the photo ops that are going to flood the internet. I wish all these people that were gathered around knew Banksy’s work when it was really great and not just a hype machine event that can be retweeted and forgotten in 30 seconds. Maybe they should check the archives of this site?

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“THERE IS ALWAYS HOPE” — BY BANKSY - BANKSY STREET ART 2019 | TAG

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ANY SURFACE

EXIBITION 20. 05. 2019

Graffiti exhibition in London open NOW WHITECHAPEL GALLERY

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STREET ART 2019

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