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AMY SUN YOON SELECTED WORKS 2008 - PRESENT email | amysunyoon@gmail.com phone | 703.595.5849

amy sun yoon Contact

phone: 703 595 5849 email: amysunyoon@gmail.com permanent address: 13171 Kinnicutt Dr. Woodbridge, VA. 22192

Education 2008 - 2013 University of CIncinnati class of 2013 2600 Clifton Avenue Cincinnati, OH. 45221 Major: Interior Design

Awards

Dean’s List, second year spring quarter, third year, fourth year, and fifth year 2007 - 2008 Prince William County Classy Award for Governor School, Cincinnatus Century Scholarship, Academic Competitiveness Grant, Principal Award for Excellence for Governor School, IB Diploma Award, First Place Prince William County Service Authority Water Art Scholarship Competition

Work Experience 2013 Summer Internship Employer: Yabu Pushelberg 88 Prince Street 2nd Floor New York, NY 10012 Description: Worked closely with design team on Hyatt Resort Project in Aqaba, Jordan. Responsibilities: AutoCad, SketchUp, furniture selection, custom furniture and accessory designs (ie: concierge desk, custom area rugs, etc), material selection, specifications, issuing CD sets, presentations, Adobe Creative Suite, renderings (digital and hand).

2012 Fall Co-Op Employer: Gensler Architects 2 Harrison Street Suite 400 San Francisco, CA 94105 Description: Worked closely with designers on workplace projects including Sales Force, Wells Fargo, and Kilroy. Responsibilities: AutoCad, Revit, SketchUp, Adobe Creative Suite, material selection, furniture selection, renderings 2011 Summer Co-Op, 2012 Winter Co-Op Employer: Rockwell Group 5 Union Square West New York, NY 10003 Description: Worked closely with designers on projects including Shangri-La in Manila, Nobu in Las Vegas (featured in Forbes Magazine), and Andaz in Wailea, Edition Hotel with Marriott in New York. Responsibilities: AutoCad, Rhino, PhotoShop, InDesign, Illustrator, Spexx, material selection, graphic design, renderings 2011 Winter Co-Op Employer: Gensler Architects 2500 Broadway Suite 300 Santa Monica, CA. 90404 Description: Worked closesly with designers on various projects including Samsung, AT&T, and Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Responsibilities: AutoCad, SketchUp, Revit, PhotoShop, InDesign, Illustrator, Spexx, material boards

Special Skills

Revit, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, AutoCad, SketchUp, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Spexx, Hand rendering, Hand drafting, Model building Languages: Conversational Korean and

conversational French

Community Service 2009 and 2010 Relay for Life Description: Walked to raise money for cancer research and spearheaded fundraising campaign 2005 and 2006 Mexico Missions Description: Provided relief to the citizens of Cacalchen, Mexico. Offered educational and medical aid

Extracurricular 2008 - 2012 Backpacking through Europe / Morocco Description: Traveled to several different cities (over a period of 4 years in 2-3 month periods) to investigate trends in design in varying cultural contexts. 2002 - Present Fine Arts Description: Explored different mediums and practiced various methods of drawing, painting, and sketching about five days a week 2003 - 2007 Tae Kwon Do Description: Trained in traditional Tae Kwon Do and learned about the art of discipline and selfdefense

*references available upon request

SELECTED WORKS 2008 - PRESENT

“how can design transcend trends to create a memorable experience?�

bedroom rendering for male client

maleable space spring 2010

The idea behind these suites began with the transient nature of Las Vegas. The city draws floods of consumers, all with varying tastes of opulence. Each guest seeks a different, yet equally mesmorizing experience.

The architectural details are bold while still maintaining gender neutrality. LED screen walls (seen above with fireplace) is covered with a slightly frosted glass. This allows the wall art to be controlled electronically while adding a sense of modernity and glamour.

In order to work within this notion, the suites are designed to be personalized according to each guest. By providing a neutral space, the hotel will be able to achieve a better understanding of the client and offer a unique experience no other hotel could.

In order to counter the low ceilings, the carved stone walls (featured towards the right of the space) retreat into a shallow lit cove. This creates the illusion of the heavy sculptural component extending beyond the ceiling.

To help establish different spaces without building partition walls, simple material changes were used throughout the suite. This allowed the suite to remain spatially neutral while still maintaining a level of luxury and intrigue. Spatial neutrality is further elevated by working with a simple program. The suite as a whole becomes easily malleable and flexible. Furniture configurations and styles can be easily changed according to the client’s needs.

The flexibility of the suite will allow the space to transcend trendy designs by responding to current design trends rather than remaining static.

maleable space spring 2010

rendering of lounge area in female 4-bay suite

maleable space spring 2010

rendering of lounge area in female 5-bay suite

maleable space spring 2010

rendering of bathroom elevation in female suite

rendering of 4-bay suite floor plan

maleable space spring 2010

rendering of lounge area elevation in male suite

rendering of 5-bay suite floor plan

“how does design translate from concept to reality?�

Assembly fall 2011

‘Assembly’ began with the question of how to best use a 4 x 8ft sheet of birch ply. This was an experimental project that addressed the following criteria: • • •

Method of construction Efficient use of material Environmental responsibility

This design is based on Medio Design’s Elephant chair. Medio’s rendition is founded on the idea of interlocking joinery details much like a balsa wood glider plane.

In studying the construction of the Elephant chair, the most critical element of the design was found to be the perfectly measured and cut slots. This required careful calculation of the real dimensions of plywood rather than its nominal dimensions. In doing so, I was forced to interact with the reality of the material rather than its aesthetic value. To construct the chair, I chose to have the 4 x 8ft sheet of ply CNC routed. This method of construction limited the dynamics and the curves of the chair. This begged the

question of how to design a comfortable and well-thought out chair. By slotting the seat, I was able to introduce a subtle curve on the frame to help embrace the user’s glutes. To maximize the efficiency of the birch ply, I incorporated as many straight lines as possible. I then arranged the pieces on the sheet to reduce waste. In addition to efficient use of material, I designed the chair to piece together without the use of wood glue or any other

chemical adhesives. The chair was sealed with beeswax to help increase the chair’s longevity. Despite the careful calculation, when built I discovered that certain aspects of the design worked while others failed miserably. The back of the seat was flat and stiff, and is in dire need of a soft and supple curve.

“How can design inspire users to seek an adventure?�

dusk rendering of exterior form

Lust for Life | SEPHORA fall 2011

Lust for Life is a Pop-Up project commissioned for a competition hosted by SEPHORA. The premise of this project began with the idea of empowering women through make-up. How can I translate that same sense of empowerment through spatial design?

I wanted users to feel inspired and empowered to seek their own adventure. In order to use design to reconnect users with the world around them, the following questions were addressed: •

Rather than pursuing the obvious route of maximizing on technology and social media, I decided to use a low-tech approach. This concept was inspired by the ancient Japanese notion of Wabi Sabi. Ultimately,

How to simplify the space (both in terms of design and materiality) while still fulfilling the functions required by SEPHORA How to diffuse light (to minimize harsh lighting) while still maintaining a visual

connection to its context How to construct and take-down the pop-up How to make the pop-up accessible How to advertise and campaign the pop-up so that users will be encouraged to seek its location

The rice paper will diffuse the light without robbing the space of its connections to its context. Finally the chalkboard paint is a low-tech method to incorporate SEPHORA’s signature black and white branding logo, break up the space, and create interactive writing surfaces for the users.

The materials of the pop-up were limited to wood, rice paper, and chalk-board paint. The unfinished wood will give the space a fragrant scent allowing users to create strong multi-sensory experiences.

By designing the pop-up to be flat-packed and easily shipped by ground, air, or sea, it can be constructed anywhere. The romantic notion that this pop-up will lead you to beauty and self-awareness.

• • •

Lust for Life | SEPHORA fall 2011

The flat-pack design allows the SEPHORA pop-up to be easily transported to various locations. By creating a series of simple marketing schemes, users will be given exclusive passes to the event. The pop-up is meant to work in conjunction with local food vendors and other vendors of interest that would create an inviting and memorable experience. Ultimately, the pop-up is a vehicle for the

experience of feeling empowered and excited about life and being present. Diagram featured on the left depicts the pop-up packed and ready to be shipped to its next location. Each component of the pop-up is designed to fit within a shipping container so that it can be transported by ground, air, or sea. The exploded axon displays the pop-up in it’s constructed form. It is comprised of interlocking wood frames and panels. To

provide a soft even light ideal for makeup application, rice paper is used to diffuse sunlight.

Lust for Life | SEPHORA fall 2011

This rendered elevation depicts the exterior presence of the pop-up in an outdoor setting.

“How can a phenomenon and a culture of waste be translated into a spatial experience?�

rendering of initial ideation

RE/CAP

spring 2013

The Catalyst Returning from a ten week trip around Europe, I was left with a peculiar question. Why are we so afraid of trash? It is not irrational to argue that there is a legitimate fear of decay and garbage. Garbage is strongly associated with lack of infrastructure, poor social classes, disease, crime, and even violence. But why? Trash is simply a product of our own creation. In the same manner that we create buildings and parks, we create garbage. We take as much care and planning into creating garbage that we do when building a home. As a society, our issues with trash are obvious. We produce waste, yet have no effective way of disposing it. This study will address the strained relationship we form with trash in an attempt to educate the public on how to use resources wisely.

The Idea The most effective tool in the fight for sustain ability is education. How can we present the facts in a digestible manner? The Summer Warm-Up hosted by PS1 MoMA is an ideal event to shed light on the numerous issues of wastefulness. In conjunction of the Summer Warm-Up, the Young Architects Program competition focuses on the annual event. Competitors must successfully marry art and design in the manifestation of an interactive installation. By abstracting the phenomenon of waste into a space, visitors will become immersed in the issue and draw parallels between the installation and their daily lives. Plastic is a mundane, common, and permanent material. It will never biodegrade (with the exception of cellulosebased plastics). The ultimate goal of the installation is to get visitors to re-think the use of plastic in their lives and what it is really doing to our liveable space.

2012 YAP winner, WENDY by HWKN.

Spatial Configuration

A.

A. Dance floor & Stage - This area is left primarily open (with flexible furniture pieces) in order to accommodate for large number of people B. Timber Structures - These timber frame structures, based off of greenhouses, will serve various programs including a small gallery C. Shop - This smaller courtyard (approx. 18’ x 18’) will accommodate pieces of equipment needed for construction of bottle canopy and for bottle planters D. Plants, Food & Alcohol - Mid-sized courtyard will accommodate a small garden nursery, food vendors, and a bar

B. C.

Greenhouse Programs

D.

A. B. C.

A. Holding space (on pilotis, not meant for occupation) for transient bottles B. Resting space for occupation with flexible furniture arrangement C. Resting space for occupation with flexible furniture arrangement D. Transient space for movement and circulation E. Space of pause featuring pieces by various artists F. Informative space briefly exposing the intentions and facilities of the installation G. Gardening space allowing visitors to recycle plastic water bottles into selffiltering planters H. Space allocated for food and beverage vendors as specified by PS1 MoMA

D.

E. F. G.

H.

RE/CAP

spring 2013

NS

The greenhouse structure oriented NS (traditional orientation) is a long central circulation space that guides users to maximize the spatial potential of the courtyard and of the installation.

EW

All greenhouses facing EW are spaces of pause and holding. This allows users to connect with the space and to impact the landscape of the installation by crafting planters or adding on to the bottle canopy.

Final Design As the canopy grows, the bottles will begin to drape over the greenhouse structures, invading the usable spaces. However, users may begin to adapt to the canopy, using the pieces to create privacy, shading, or even seating. The layout and the design is calculated and intentional but ultimately, the users make the space what they need it to be. The notion that users will begin to adapt to the bottle canopy is similar to the we behave in reality. We begin to adapt to our trash accumulation rather than finding an effective solution.

NE

The structure facing NE is aligned to the orientation of the site. This structure is the largest and can adapt to several uses. During the day it is a small garden nursery to plant herbs, and at night it may become a bar or it may simply become additional seating.

RE/CAP

spring 2013

A PH

SE

1

The premise of the project is based upon the phenomenon of wastefulness. As a society, we discard re-usable resources and landfill them where they will sit for thousands of years. PP5 or polypropylene is a commonly used polymer that is often non-recyclable due to its difficult collection process. By focusing on a singular material, it will streamline the concept, and strengthen the design. The final design was an attempt to explore space vs. non-space. In doing so, I am

A PH

SE

2

arguing that waste is slowly depreciating our living space to hold what we have deemed as “useless garbage”. The timber structure greenhouses are just an indication of space without physically enclosing space. The enclosure begins when the bottle canopy grows and begins to drape over and into the timber structures, changing the tone of the space it has now created. By using “waste” to build “space” I am presenting the trash as a powerful element in design.

A PH

SE

3

A PH

SE

4

Drawing from Nature After several failed designs, I scratched everything and began with an empty courtyard once again. I looked back at the initial ideations, and extracted the recurring concept from each. I realized, that I am trying to portray waste as a storm essentially. A storm that we may not be prepared to endure. Everything seems so calm, but within seconds, you are completely consumed by waste. Furthermore, in the same way we have built our homes to defend ourselves against nature, we have built our homes to adapt to our rapid accumulation of waste. As the summer goes on, the canopy will begin to grow, becoming increasingly overwhelming for the guests. Where the canopy will initially be an element overhead, it will become an element that begins to cover the ground, drape areas that were once occupiable, and begin to displace the visitors.

Drawing from Man While living in San Francisco, I had the strange luck of living behind the US Department of Agriculture. At night, the greenhouses would glow, which struck me as beautiful. I realized that greenhouses were an interesting type of architecture. They were built to grow exotic fruits all year round. They essentially are, our attempt at creating a microcosm; a miniature world. The interiors of these spaces are so well controlled and manicured to stimulate life and growth. I implemented simple house structures throughout the courtyard for several reasons: 1. They are symbolic of control 2. They are symbolic of lush growth and nature (a falsified nature) 3. They are reminiscent of the typical house paradigm (what do children draw when we ask them to draw a house) The houses will serve different purposes. Some act as a transitional space, others act as a gathering space. Some are completely inaccessible to the public. However, by creating symbols that the users will associate with shelter and safety, will heighten their interactions with the existing architecture and the canopy. The object is to make the visitors feel exposed, despite all of the methods of shelter (houses, canopy, pilotis).

upwards view of plastic bottle canopy

visitors create self-filtering planters using recycled water bottles

RE/CAP An in-depth look at the growing phenomen of waste and its psychological effects in society.

VISITORS GUIDE

LIKE THE FURNITURE? LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO PURCHASE YOUR OWN P5 RECYLCED FURNITURE PIECES AT MOMAPS1.ORG.

WEEKLY EVENTS

P.S.1 MoMA presents:

SUNDAY

1 - 3 PM: COMMUNITY GARDENING! COME AND HELP STAFF ROTATE THE PLANTS, MAKE YOUR OWN SELF-FILTERING PLANTER, OR LEARN HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR GREENS!

MONDAY

5 - 6 PM: GUEST LECTURE. CHECK PS1 MOMA WEBSITE FOR UPDATES ON VISITING ARTISTS!

THURSDAY

4 - 6 PM: LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT PLASTICS AND TAKE PART IN THE MOVEMENT TO PREVENT PLASTIC POLLUTION BY HELPING TO CREATE A SERIES OF DOCUMENTARIES!

FRIDAY

4 - 6 PM: POP IN FOR ADULT CRAFT NIGHT! LEARN HOW TO TURN WASTE INTO TREASURES WITH A GLASS OF THE “DRINK-OF-THE WEEK” BY LOCAL MIXOLOGISTS. THEN STAY FOR THE SUMMER WARM-UP SERIES HOSTED BY PS1!

SATURDAY

1 - 3 PM: KIDS CRAFT! BRING YOUR BABES FOR A SESSION IN CREATIVE RECYCLING.

ENTRANCE TO M. WELLS DINETTE WATER BOTTLE CANOPY: MADE FROM THOUSANDS OF DISPOSABLE WATER BOTTLES THAT COVERS THE MAIN STAGE AND DANCE FLOOR. HOLDING SPACE FOR WATER BOTTLES: BRING YOUR WATER BOTTLES AND DISPOSE OF THEM HERE. SPACES OF PAUSE: LOUNGE HERE AND EXPERIENCE THE SPACE THE WORKSHOP / TRANSIENT SPACE: BRING YOUR WATER BOTTLES AND WORK WITH THE RE/CAP STAFF TO CONTINUE BUILDING THE WATER BOTTLE CANOPY.

SPACES OF PAUSE: ROTATING GALLERY SPACE WHICH WILL FEATURE NEW ARTISTS OR DESIGNERS EACH MONTH. COME HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE INSTALLATION AND THE PHENOMENON OF WASTEFULNESS. THE GREENHOUSE: BRING YOUR WATER BOTTLES AND COME HERE TO CONSTRUCT YOUR OWN SELF-FILTERING PLANTER TO KEEP. LOCAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE VENDORS, COME AND SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES AND LEARN ABOUT SUSTAINABLE DISPOSABLE SILVERWARE AND TO-GO CONTAINERS. CASH BAR: OPEN DURING SUMMER WARM-UP HOURS (CHECK PS1 MOMA’S WEBSITE FOR CONCERT SCHEDULES). MAIN ENTRANCE AND EXIT.

BE A PART OF THE MOVEMENT.

= FIRE EXITS

view of greenhouse draped in plastic water bottles

view of greenhouses used as spaces of interaction and activity

RE/CAP

spring 2013

These furniture pieces featured in the installation are part of a limited edition PS1 MoMA outdoor furniture series that can be purchased through the museum. The pieces are made from recycled P5 through an injectionmold process. The furniture is lightweight, durable, and weather-proof. They will serve as flexible furniture pieces during the installation. The used furniture will be donated to schools and other community organizations.

amysunyoon@gmail.com 703 595 5849


Selected Works 2008 - 2013