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educere WINTER 2011 :: Issue 01

M AGA ZINE

f rom t h e S c h oo l o f E ducation and Human P er f ormance

Inside this issue

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS in THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE Student North Carolina Association of Educators (SNCAE)

Real Men Teach A new wave of teacher leaders

P. 16

P. 24

Winter 2011 :: Issue 01

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Elementary Education Math Education

Special Education

Master of Rehabilitation Counseling (MRC)

Physical Education Master

of

Arts

in

English Education

Te a c h i n g - ( M G E

SPE)

Birth窶適indergarten Education

Exercise Science

Rehabilitation Studies

Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education (M.Ed.)

Middle Grades Education Motorsport Management Science Education Master of Arts in Teaching-English/Language Arts

Rehabilitation Counseling

Sport Management

M a s te r of A r t s i n Te a c h i n g En g l i s h a s a S e co n d L a n g u a g e ( T E S O L)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TRADITIONAL , YET INNOVATIVE

Student Centered

Developing Professionals for 21st Century

Responsive Excellence is the Norm

Leader

Reflective

Collaborative with the Community

Experiential Learning

Academically Rigorous Respect for History

Visionary

Transformative

Progressive

Change Agent

Creative Growing

Committed

EDUCERE

M

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Z

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table

pg. 16 pg. 4

Interim Dean’s Message School of Education and Human Performance P.4

Therapeutic Recreation Majors Club

pg. 19

P.5

Motorsport Management Club

pg. 8

P.8

Project PASS Teacher Education Candidates are Polishing the Apple in the TEAP Center’s Organization Project PASS P.11

WSSU Professors and Students Participate in 2010 Summer Study Abroad Program to Ghana and Benin P.12

International Experiences P.19

Your Scholarships at Work: Focus on Brianna Galbreath P.26

pg. 28

Student North Carolina Association of Educators (SNCAE) P.16 Physical Education and Exercise Science Majors (PEM)Club P. 20 Sport Management Majors Club P. 21 The Student Rehabilitation Counseling Organization P. 22 Kappa Delta Honor Society P. 23 Real Men Teach: New Wave of Teacher Leaders P. 24 In Memoriam P. 28

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a message from MANUEL P. VARGAS, INTERIM DEAN

Dean’s Message S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N P E R F O R M A N C E

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ince the last issue of Educere, we have been busy working on activities associated with the beginning of a new academic year. Some of these activities include, among others, gathering information and pictures in preparation for the second issue of Educere. We have selected “Student Organizations and International Experiences” as major themes for our fall 2010 issue. We want to tell you about the organizations and activities which provide value-added to the total university experience of students in the School of Education and Human Performance (SEHP). When I previewed the rough draft of this issue, I was struck by the diversity of student and faculty voices that describe, in vivid detail in some instances, the life-changing experiences of participants. This is the case, for example, of the student who writes how activities of her Therapeutic Recreation program club “have enhanced and broadened my view of people with disabilities and helped me see the world through the eyes of others.” Activities included in this issue may have taken place in the local community, such as the previous example, or in a far-away country like Ghana, West Africa. A student who traveled to this country also writes how her visit to Elmina Castle, one of 60 slave castles on the coast of Ghana, “was heart-wrenching but eye-opening.” Thus, the range of experiences will vary not only in terms of location, but also in the nature of personal or professional benefit. Student organizations and co-curricular activities represent a variety of interests that provide academic, social, cultural, pre-professional, and public service opportunities intended to complement the curriculum expectations of each academic major. Participation in campus organizations is a great opportunity to develop leadership skills, team spirit, and life-long relationships. While completing their specific academic programs, our students engage in decisions with far-reaching consequences and participate in experiences that broaden their world view. The overall purpose of student organizations and co-curricular activities is to enhance what happens in the classroom. Clearly, it is not only attending classes, writing papers, and taking tests that make up the educational experience. As one academic program coordinator so aptly puts it, “out-of-classroom experiences … give students that extra edge.” So, be it a program

majors club, Project PASS, summer study abroad, national or international professional organization, the Fulbright Senior Specialist program, Real Men Teach, or other enriching experience, they all provide exciting learning opportunities. A complete education takes place in and out of classrooms, in on- and off-campus environments and in national and international arenas. It is the student organization or the international experience that provides a unity of purpose and the opportunity to grow personally and professionally. Planning for an activity or a trip, meeting a deadline, and correcting a task associated with a project are but a few of the challenges that contribute to a total education. It is extremely rewarding for us, those who have been entrusted with the responsibilities of guiding the education of younger generations, to see our students change for the better. This is quite evident when we listen to the transforming experiences of students who have traveled abroad. These are invaluable experiences that, in addition to adding knowledge of other cultures and peoples, provide an opportunity for our students to value, and perhaps in some cases re-discover, their own cultural identity. We are also including an In Memoriam section in this issue. This is something we feel compelled to include out of honor, respect, and appreciation. The sudden passing of two members of our SEHP family, Dr. Catherine Eilenberger and Ms. Altinea D. Pugh, a faculty member and graduate student, respectively, left us saddened and shaken. Intense experiences like these bring sobering thoughts for those who must continue the tasks of teaching and learning. We trust that you will get an opportunity to look through the eyes of Educere and learn what some of our students and faculty are doing. We thank Drs. C. Griffin-Famble and Cedric Bass for the initial gathering of stories and photographs and the compilation of articles for this issue. Dr. Francine G. Madrey gathered additional stories and pictures and, with her able pen, provided substantive editing and refinement of the total issue. Thank you to all contributing writers, initial co-editors, and editor-in-chief.

MANUEL P. VARGAS, INTERIM DEAN

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THERAPEUTIC

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Members of the Therapeutic Recreation (TR) Majors Club participate in campus and community activities that strengthen their experiences in leadership and planning. They take the lead role in planning and coordinating events that not only enhance what they learn in the classroom, but

D r. Cynthia Stanley, Program Coordinator, Th e re pe utic Recreation

they are able to apply what they have learned to real-world situations. As TR majors, these students learn interventions to improve the functioning of individuals with illnesses or

The TR Club is an

disabling conditions. Their professional development, ser-

important educational

vice learning, and co-curricular social opportunities allow

and experiential oppor-

them to come together as a team, support each other’s learning, and use what they have learned to meet the needs of individuals who face special challenges.

tunity for Therapeutic Recreation majors. It allows them to apply what they learn in the classroom to real-life

One example of this real-world application is the wheelchair-washing event we held last year. While most of us see people daily who must rely on wheelchairs for mobility, many of us never think about the kind of care and maintenance necessary to keep those wheelchairs in good working condition. Through a service learning projects, TR majors washed wheelchairs for patients at the Salem Dialysis Clinic in WinstonSalem last year. Washing wheelchairs? Think about how important the wheelchair is for mobility and how difficult it must be for someone in a wheelchair to keep it clean. Persons who use wheelchairs have a hard time standing or moving around, so it’s very difficult and sometimes impossible for them to wash the chairs themselves. Washing a wheelchair can sometimes be messy: you must use soap and water or some other cleanser; then you have to wipe everything down. Wheelchairs become like a body part for people who rely on them for mobility. So, just like most of us prefer to have clean bodies, people with wheelchairs appreciate having clean wheelchairs.

situations and, at the same time, provides much-needed services to persons in the community who need assistance in performing daily routines.

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The rape utic Recreation Program Stude nt s at th e 201 0 Annual Cooko ut a nd Re union at Winston L a ke .

Wheelchairs can get dirty quickly from regular use and from just being “out and about” and need to be cleaned often. Just as we bathe or shower regularly, the wheelchair also needs regular washing. Imagine all the grime, dust, and bacteria that we collect on the bottom of our shoes. Think about the germs our shoes collect during a visit to a hospital or clinic, from walking on sidewalks and in parking lots. We then track those germs back into our homes and offices. We wipe our feet to clean debris from the bottom of our shoes. In the same manner, persons with disabilities wash their wheelchairs as a matter of hygiene. Yet, many persons confined to wheelchairs lack the physical ability to clean them, and not everyone has a family member who can perform this task. So, persons who use wheelchairs may never get this task accomplished. When the TR Majors Club cleaned wheelchairs for the dialysis patients, they not only performed a needed service, they also helped raise community awareness about the importance of wheelchair washing. The “Triad Trackers” is a basketball team sponsored by Winston-Salem Parks and Recreation Department and comprised of players who are confined to wheelchairs. The TR Majors Club operates the game clock and scoreboard during games and provides general assistance for the team. Shannon Grimes, vice president of the TR Majors Club, is a strong contributor to the Triad Trackers. She keeps scores during games, practices with the team, and helps with team fundraising activities, such as the spaghetti suppers. “These activities have enhanced and broadened my view of people with disabilities and helped me to see the world through the eyes of others, such as someone who uses a wheelchair. Now, I do not sweat the small stuff.” Shannon has developed friendships through 68

these and other community service activities, and she keeps in touch with some of the persons she’s met. Brandon McRae, who joined the club recently, also enjoys participating in community service activities, especially assisting with the Triad Trackers. He commented, “The players can do so much more than I thought they could.” We also sponsor nature hiking activities for children with disabilities and help teenagers with disabilities complete craft projects. We provided funding to support Challenge Course training for TR students, which is conducted in collaboration with The Children’s Home. Our spring Challenge Course training was facilitated in conjunction with WSSU’s Real Men Teach (RMT) protégés. This collaborative helped meet our team-building goal as majors but also strengthened our relationship with the RMT protégées. Justin Thomas, music major and RMT protégé, said that the Challenge Course “was some of the best fun I’ve had in my life.” He explained in detail an activity in which the group had to transport several random items from point A to point B using only a salad server suspended with strings and encountering several distractions and obstacles along the way. “There were about 20 people each holding strings attached to this one salad server. The rules were that the advisors could not speak and that the participants could not drop the items being transported. Some of the items were stuffed animals, bean bags, rubber balls, and a rubber chicken.” Other protégés described the event as “a learning experience, bond building, ice breaking, thought-provoking, solutions-oriented/problem/solving, and totally necessary for a group that wants to increase communication and productivity.” M AA GG AA ZZ II NN EE EE DD UU CC EE RR EE M

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Holly Madrey Pitts, RMT Coordinator, describes the impact of the Challenge Course training on the protégées. The RMT protégés had so much fun interacting with the TR majors. They were challenged physically and emotionally. They had to learn how to trust and rely fully on students they had just met. For them, it was important to see what can be accomplished when people work together, and I hope they will transfer these skills as they complete their teacher education programs and after they enter the classroom. Effective teachers work as teams, and the Challenge Course training helped the protegés see that what they accomplished together would not have been possible had they attempted it alone.

The TR majors also sell merchant coupon books to raise funds for scholarships so TR students can attend professional development conferences and workshops. Students also like to recognize their peers’ academic accomplishments, so we host an annual Seniors Luncheon, where we honor and celebrate seniors who are entering the semester-long internship. Because the internship is so demanding, we think it is important to show our support for the intense experience that one of our own is about to enter. We also sponsor first-aid and CPR training sessions on Saturdays. For fun, we host an annual cookout and reunion. The TR Club is an important educational and experiential opportunity for Therapeutic Recreation majors. It allows them to apply what they learn in the classroom to real-life situations and, at the same time, provides much-needed services to persons in the community who need assistance in performing daily routines. n S C H O O L

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Motorsports Management Club The Motorsport Management (MSM) Club provides MSM majors the opportunity to organize, direct, coordinate, supervise, and establish experiences that will enhance students’ learning, increase their chances of gaining employment, and provide recreation. Membership is limited to students enrolled in the program, although a Motorsports Management faculty member may recommend other students based on specific qualifications and interests consistent with the goals of the MSM program. MSM majors participate in a broad range of activities that help them network with professionals in the field, attend professional racing events, and complete various handson assignments. Students not only benefit professionally from these experiences, but they derive personal satisfaction and growth.

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Marcia Tealer, a senior from Greensboro, NC, describes her first professional racing event: The first time I used my passport was to attend an Indycar road race in Toronto, Canada. I had never attended an Indycar race before, and seeing it firsthand brought the classroom lectures to life. Being a motorsports management major, I had knowledge of the series from previous lectures and classroom projects, but nothing compared to the race experience. During the trip, I was able to meet industry professionals, who painted a realistic picture of the industry, the good and the bad. I spoke with industry professionals in operations, media, client services, and other areas of the series. Speaking with professionals in the industry allowed me to focus on potential career options. The Indycar Toronto race was an educational experience in a foreign country in the middle of a bustling city. I met new people, added Facebook friends, and received a passport stamp. Theo Searcy, a sophomore from Winston-Salem, attended his first major racing event, the Indy Racing League (IRL) Peak Antifreeze 300 at Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, IL in August. He described it as a “highly educational experience for me” and recounted what this initial experience felt like: The trip was not only my first open wheel event, it was my first major opportunity to participate in on-site marketing research measuring the “ fan experience” at a race event. I learned a great deal about how to observe and think more critically when attending future events. Our first-hand learning sessions proved to be very beneficial. Hearing how others felt about the effectiveness of IRL marketing really helped me gain an understanding of the complexities that sanctioning bodies face in capturing their target audiences. The weekend provided several opportunities to observe and learn firsthand in a relevant motorsports environment.

D r. Travis Teague with M otorspor t M a nage m e nt stude nt s at B ristol M otor S pe e dway

The hands-on experiences help our students see the connection between the classroom and the motorsports industry.

In 2007, the MSM program entered into collaboration with Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI). The course resulting from this collaboration, which is taught every other summer, allows students from each institution to spend two weeks on each other’s campus. Leon Pruitt, a senior from Winston-Salem, pointed out some of the benefits of this kind of partnership: This year, we were given the chance to stay on campus at IUPUI as part of a collaborative summer course. During our time there, we learned about the technical side of motorsports. We heard lectures from industry personnel who specialize in making racecars safer, faster, and more aerodynamic. We toured the races shops of top National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) and World of Outlaw teams, and we were given the chance to visit the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway

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and Re becc a S earcy e njoye d a q uick brea k before the vic tor y cele bration at th e NHR A D rag Race , Z- M ax D ragway, Concord , NC .

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R yan Robe r t son , drive r of the WSS U race c ar, and his fathe r M ike Robe r t son , owne r of the WSS U race c ar, at a c ampus publicit y eve nt .

and the local shorts tracks, O’Reilly Raceway Park, and the Indianapolis Speedrome. We also met Sarah Fisher and Helio Castroneves, two of the stars of the Indy Racing League! The summer experience at IUPUI is great for any motorsport or sport management student. It’s a unique opportunity to see what racing means to the city of Indianapolis.

Motorsports Management Club

In addition to traveling out-of-state and abroad, MSM students had the opportunity to work at the Charlotte Motor Speedway (CMS), one of the premier NASCAR facilities in the United States. Our students have been working at CMS since 2008 and have gained many wonderful experiences in marketing, operations, and hospitality. Sophomore Vanessa Hayes from Indiana, described how it felt to help work at the event: Last fall, a hand full of our MSM students attended Charlotte Motor Speedway, where we got the opportunity to work with the Robertson Racing Showcar. Throughout the day, we each got the chance to talk with several different people explaining and promoting our program. I thought this was a fun and helpful event because of all the opportunities to make connections and hype up our program. Membership in the MSM Club provides countless professional experiences for MSM majors. Students travel to new sites, network with other students and professionals in the field, and learn what it means to be a part of one of the nation’s most exciting (and fastest) sport. The hands-on experiences help our students see the connection between the classroom and the motorsports industry. The MSM Club helps to provide those unique experiences that bridge classroom and work and give our students a real connection to their future. n

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[ Project PASS ]

Peer Advanced Success Strategies K imbe rly B ody, S e nior, Ele me ntar y Educ ation M ajor and Preside nt of Projec t PA SS , and K r ystal M ackey, S e nior, Ele me ntar y Educ ation M ajor and S e cretar y of Projec t PA SS

Teacher Education candidates are Polishing the Apple in the TEAP Center’s Project PASS, according to Kimberly Body, Senior, Elementary Education Major and President of Project PASS, and Krystal Mackey, Senior, Elementary Education Major and Secretary of Project PASS.

Real Men Teach were major participants in helping the TEAP Center host its first annual “Preparing to Make a Difference” conference, which focused solely on cultivating professional dispositions. Even though the focus was on teacher education majors, the conference was open to all students.

Project PASS is one of the School of Education and Human Performance’s best kept secrets. The Peer Advanced Success Strategies (PASS) organization is comprised of teacher education candidates who rely on each other for support to progress through their respective courses of study. Operating under the auspices of the Teacher Education Advisement and Partnership (TEAP) Center, Project PASS provides opportunities for members to enhance their professional dispositions and skills and to gain valuable information on the state-mandated standardized examinations that are required for admission to the teacher education program.

I had the opportunity to serve as the proud president of this organization for two consecutive years. After all of the leadership preparation and professional development and being part of Project PASS, I feel fully prepared to lead in my classroom. As a sociable individual, it has truly been a pleasure being a part of this organization. The advisors genuinely care for you, and you have the opportunity to meet new friends who share a common interest. It is clear that you definitely will not leave out as you came!

Providing support to one another through tutoring, smallgroup workshops, and one-on-one support, Project PASS also maintains a very busy schedule of other activities to help students gain that extra edge. Project PASS has hosted professional conferences and seminars on time management and lesson planning and sponsored etiquette luncheons. Two years ago, the organization was recognized as an official student organization through the WSSU Office of Student Affairs. This gave us more exposure and allowed us to partner with other organizations at the university to complete special programs and service projects. In April 2010, Project PASS and

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We meet regularly to encourage one another and share valuable information. At the end of each semester, Project PASS seniors return to share their advice on how to have a successful student teaching experience. This enables candidates to hear from their peers about what it means to finally be able to teach. These sessions help dispel anxieties but also give students a reality check about what they need to focus on while still in the preparation stage. It is important to build a support unit as a pre-service teacher before going out into the professional world, and Project PASS allows teacher education candidates to do just that! Membership is free, and all teacher education majors are invited to come and join and allow the TEAP Center to continue “polishing the apple.” n

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WSSU PROFESSORS AND STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN

SUMMER STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM TO GHANA AND BENIN

Dr. Claudia Warren, Coordinator, Birth-Kindergarten Education Program, and Brianna Galbreath, Senior, Elementary Education Major Brianna’s Perspective

Schools, slave cabins, cano-

pies, national parks, underdevelopment, teacher preparation, experiential learning – these identify just some of the experiences from our summer 2010 four-week study-abroad visit to the University of Cape Coast in Ghana, West Africa. WSS U stude nt s visiting the C a nopy Walk way

B ria nna G albreath , Ele me ntar y Educ ation major (3rd f rom lef t), S hame ka J o e , E xe rcise S cie nce major (back row, right), and stude nt s at school in G hana

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Dr. Warren’s Perspective I had the opportunity to accompany fifteen WSSU students and two WSSU faculty members on the four-week study-abroad trip sponsored by the WSSU Office of International Programs and the University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana. Brianna J. Galbreath and Chemeka D. Woods, both elementary education majors, and Monica Skipwith, a 2010 secondary education graduate, were among the students. Faculty members were Dr. Guy Martin from the Department of Social Sciences and Dr. Mohaman Mousses from the School of Health Sciences.

During our first week in Africa, we went to Kakum National Park, which is home to one of the world’s four canopy walks. This particular canopy walk is the longest and highest in the world. It is a bridgelike structure built hundreds of feet above ground level, which, when you are walking across it, gives you the feeling of walking on top of the trees with no sight of the ground below. Scary, but fun! Scary, but not funny at all was the tour of Elmina Castle, one of the 60 slave castles along the coast of Ghana. About 60 million Africans went through the Elmina Castle before being placed on slave ships bound for the Americas. The visit was heartwrenching but eye-opening. It was a very humbling experience for me to be in a place that housed my ancestors for up to three agonizing months. We participated in an in-depth lecture about the educational system in Ghana and traveled to three schools. We learned that courses in early childhood teacher preparation have only been available for the past three to five years. Most of the educators who teach the younger children have only the equivalent of a middle school or high school education. This is also true for those who teach grade school. Both countries, Ghana and Benin, have very low numbers of girls attending school, mostly due to societal expectations in Ghana concerning women, which include early marriage and motherhood and taking care of household chores. Women also face strong resistance from men who do not believe in education for girls. In addition to our daily lectures and site visits, we participated in the community life of Cape Coast and returned to the capital of Ghana, Accra, to conclude our stay in Africa.

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The goals of the study abroad experience were (a) to learn about the history, culture, and educational systems in Ghana and Benin and other broad issues that impact education; and (b) to engage with faculty at the University of Cape Coast Education Department for the purpose of developing collaboration agreements between WSSU’s School of Education and Human Performance and the University of Cape Coast, specifically as related to early childhood education and the field of teacher education. At the conclusion of the trip, we witnessed the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which provides for exchanges between faculty and students of both institutions. Under the terms of the MOU, both institutions will conduct basic and applied research, education and training, technology and information transfer, economic development, cooperative and collaborative projects, and programs and activities that will enhance each institution’s programs. The MOU remains in effect for an initial period of five years and may be extended by mutual agreement for an additional five years. We are excited about the agreement and look forward to our relationship with the University of Cape Coast. According to Dr. Martin, the WSSU Department of Social Sciences initiated the African and African American Studies (AAAS) program in 2007-2008. One of its components is the African Diaspora Studies Program, which focuses on the African and African American historical and cultural experience. The program is available to all students enrolled in institutions in the University of North Carolina System. It was exhilarating to participate in the lectures and tour the schools, university campuses, Central Regional Hospital in Cape Coast, museums, national parks, villages, towns, and slave castles. For each lecture, we visited related historical and cultural sites, which included Cape Coast Castle, Elmina

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Castle, Kakum National Park in Cape Coast, the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial in Accra, the Manhyia Palace Museum, Bonwire (home of Kente cloth), and the Carving Village and Center for National Culture in Kumasi. The lectures by Professor Eric Quaye on “Ghanaian Life and Culture” and the “Geography of Ghana” preceded our visit to Kakum National Park, which was set aside by the government in 1960 for human recreation and enjoyment and for animal and environmental protection; it is restricted from most development and was established as a way to conserve animal and plant life. The lecture also included topics on Ghanaian traditions, religious beliefs, and conservation. We learned that some Ghanaians believe in lesser gods such as trees, rivers, and mountains, which are perceived as ancestors who had lived a good life and now watch and protect the people. Some segments of the Ghanaian society practice witchcraft, which they define as a positive or negative supernatural power given to an individual. We also learned from Professor Quaye that Ghanaians adhere to oral traditions in order to protect and conserve life. One example of conservation is the “No Fishing on Tuesday” practice, which sets aside Tuesday as the day for Ghanaians to mend their nets rather than go to the sea to catch fish. Sure enough, we observed fishermen mending their nets on Tuesday; there was no fishing. The lecture by Professor Nana Jane OpokuAgyemang, Provost of the University of Cape Coast, on “The Slave Castles” was a favorite of all participants. Her presentation was so vivid that we were able to envision then much of what we eventually saw when we visited the Elmina Castle. The conditions under which human beings lived in the castles were horrific. I wondered how they survived in Ghana before being transported under even more abominable conditions to other parts of the world. We were so impressed by Provost Opoku-Agyemang that we recommend her as a WSSU commencement speaker. Schools in Ghana have undergone major reforms throughout the years. Currently, public education in primary and middle schools is tuition-free, and it is predicted to become mandatory as soon as there are enough teachers and facilities to accommodate all the children. According to September 9, 2010 issue of The Ghanaian Journal, the government of Ghana is committed to achieving universal primary education by ensuring that all children of primary schoolage enrolled by 2015 complete the educational

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programs. The Ghanaian government has demonstrated its commitment by implementing policies and interventions, such as the Education Strategy Plan for 2003-2015, the Growth Poverty Reduction Strategy, the free Compulsory Universal Education Program, and the 1992 Ghana constitution. Despite these efforts, the goal toward universal education may not be realized by 2015 because of a multiplicity of challenges, such as the unavailability of teachers in some areas of the country, unfavorable socioeconomic and cultural factors, location of people in geographically hard-to-reach areas, low enrollment of children with disabilities, over-aged out-of-school children, especially girls, lack of available facilities, and financial constraints among families who cannot afford to pay fees and purchase uniforms.

It was exhilarating to participate in the lectures and tour the schools, university campuses, Central Regional Hospital in Cape Coast, museums, national parks, villages, towns, and slave castles.

In his lecture on “Education in Ghana,” Professor J. Ghartey Ampiah from the University of Cape Coast discussed changes that have occurred in Ghanaian education since the seventeenth century. Before the arrival of the Europeans in Africa, children were taught by their parents; girls were taught how to care for the home, their husband, and children, and boys were taught how to build and hunt. Formal education by the Portuguese occurred in 1529 in Elmina Castle at Cape Coast, where the privileged children of African-Portuguese descent and the children of wealthy indigenous Africans were taught reading, writing, and the scriptures. Ampiah described a second education reform that occurred in Ghanaian education in 1637, when the Dutch, whose focus was on Christianity, taught the Dutch language.

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As a Birth-Kindergarten educator, I was very much interested in the education of young children in Ghana. Through lectures and visits to schools, I learned that public education for young children is a recent phenomenon in Ghana. Because they were under the constant care of their mothers, most young children did not attend early education programs. Three years ago, the government approved public education for young children. The cost of attending public pre-school is not a major issue, as tuition is free; however, parents who want their children to attend private pre-school must pay thirty Ghanaian cedi, which is equivalent to twenty U.S. dollars. According to Professor Ampiah, there are various reasons parents do not allow their children to attend early childhood centers, ranging from their beliefs that their children may not be prepared for school or that teachers are not well prepared. My observation of a pre-school setting indicated that young children in Ghana are taught using the same methods as those for primary schools, with no distinction for the specific needs of young children. In addition, pre-school teachers are trained to teach elementary school children and have very little preparation in the area of pre-school education. We look forward to working with our colleagues at the University of Cape Coast in developing programs and projects and conducting research to enhance the preparation of pre-school teachers and improve educational practice in both Ghana and in North Carolina. The opportunity to travel to another country and engage students in this discovery has led to many benefits. One of the first outcomes is the students’ presentations to the university community, where they talked about their educational discoveries. They shared stories about what they had learned about other cultures while studying abroad, and they emphasized the importance of all students expanding their educational experience by visiting other countries and learning how life is lived beyond the United States. Another important benefit is the personal discovery many of the students experienced as they took off their shoes and walked in the path of their ancestors as they were led aboard slave ships to travel to lands unknown, lands from which they would never return. These prospective teachers now have in their repertoire an abundance of personal stories, experiences, and knowledge that can be integrated into their lessons and used as a catalyst in creating classroom environments that are responsive to the needs and interests of diverse learners. n

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Top image: WSS U stude nt s par ticipating in 201 0 study abroad M iddle image: Elmina C astle B ot tom image: C anopy walk

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“The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree,” SNCAE’s awarding-winning slogan coined by 2009 Elementary Education graduate Rachel Hicks from Charlotte, captures the essence of this student organization. SNCAE is a pre-professional organization for undergraduate and graduate students interested in a career in education. Its mission is to prepare college students for their future as educators. SNCAE is a division of the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE), which is the professional organization for North Carolina educators. And, NCAE is the state affiliate of the National Education Association (NEA), the largest education association in the

S por t M anage me nt M ajors Club me mbe rs conduc ting a club ac tivit y.

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Student North Carolina Association of Educators (SNCAE) Dr. Brenda J. Kennedy, Director, Office of Student Teaching and SNCAE Co-Advisor, and Mrs. Fran Oates, Coordinator, Elementary Education Program and SNCAE Co-Advisor

In addition to offering professional development opportunities on campus, SNCAE supports members’ participation in three annual conferences. The Fall Forum, which is held in different locations across the state, is designed for SNCAE advisors and officers and focuses on developing statewide goals and activities for the upcoming year. The Spring Conference offers workshops critical to the success of future teachers. Last spring, eight members attended the SNCAE Spring Conference in Raleigh. Rodney Ellis, a Winston-Salem State University alumnus, serves as vice-president of NCAE and gave the keynote address on “Construction Tools Needed for Building Successful SNCAE Chapters.” Breakout sessions during the conference included “Classroom Management Strategies,” “Code of Ethics and Teacher Rights,” “Parent/ Community Partnerships,” “Social Networking,” and “Tech Tools for Supporting Learning.” Cindi Rigsbee, 2008 North Carolina Teacher of the Year, was the featured luncheon speaker. We were encouraged and challenged by her address on “Becoming the Best You Can Be” and “Tips on Being Resourceful.” The Joint Issues Conference promotes the interaction between SNCAE members and practicing teachers. Last fall, four SNCAE members attended the Joint Professional Development Issues Conference at the Koury Convention Center in Greensboro. The conference, titled “In the Circus Act of Life: Strengthening Your Tightrope to Meet the Demands of 21st Century Schools” offered sessions to assist teachers and pre-service teachers in multi-tasking and managing the stress that is sometimes associated with teaching. SNCAE members also receive professional and student publications from NCAE and NEA, which help inform them about current education news and trends across the state and nation. They also have access to NCAE’s and NEA’s instructional and professional resources. Members receive money-saving discounts on a variety of services, such as vision care, hotel and travel. One of the organization’s major attractions for students is the professional liability insurance that protects members who work with students in schools. Krystal Mackey, a senior Education major, talks about why she became a member of SNCAE: The reason I joined SNCAE was because I initially needed liability insurance for my classes in order to do field experience. After joining, I saw what great opportunities the organization had to offer. I feel that SNCAE continued on page 18

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stands out from the other educational organizations because it does a lot to help future educators. Also, SNCAE provide members with very informative magazines and newsletters that relate to educational topics from the world around us. Overall, I am satisfied that I joined this great educational organization. . . . I plan to continue to be a member. I definitely recommend this organization to my peers who are majoring in education. Each SNCAE chapter operates with a high level of autonomy. This allows us to respond to the particular needs and interests of our own community by sponsoring events that focus on children, families, and the community. This year, our focus on children included reading. We donated and read books to local schoolchildren at Petree Elementary and Cook Elementary Schools and assisted with school festivals at Kimberly Park Elementary and Cook Elementary Schools. To expand our involvement with families, we collected cell phones for battered women. We exchanged our WSSU red for green by facilitating a “Go Green Project” community initiative with the WSSU Child Development Center and Laboratory School. Each year, we collaborate with other campus organizations at Thanksgiving to collect canned goods for needy families. Last year, we collaborated with North Carolina A & T State University’s SNCAE chapter on a Greensboro Habitat for Humanity Project. Opportunities to network and develop professional skills are two of the main reasons Starus Dyson, a senior Elementary Education major, joined the organization. SNCAE has been a wonderful gateway to the fundamental beginning of my professional education career. I have been an active member since spring 2007. I chose SNCAE because it allowed me to meet other prospective teachers who share my goals and aspirations for changing the future. This past

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April, I was given the opportunity to attend the North Carolina state conference for SNCAE. The conference was a wonderful experience because I was able to learn about North Carolina’s ethical standards for teachers and the new professional teaching standards, and I got a chance to see firsthand some of the benefits of being a part of a professional organization. The conference presenters also gave tips about how to land our first job as well as how to prepare for our first interview. I would recommend this organization to anyone who is interested in becoming a teacher. So many doors that I never thought possible will be opened as a result of belonging to SNCAE.

our program’s advisors and mentors at WSSU. Because the organization offered me guidance and an abundance of educational resources and materials as SNCAE president, I decided to pursue membership in NCAE on a local level when I became a teacher. The experience I gained from SNCAE allowed me as a first-year teacher and new member of NCAE to join in the effort of advocating for teachers’ rights. While fighting to increase the school district’s budget and save teachers’ jobs, I gained a deeper understanding of the benefits of belonging to a professional organization. I also had access to resources the organization makes available to help improve key skills in my field.

Benefits of membership extend beyond graduation into the classroom. SNCAE helps provide new teachers with a repertoire of skills to assist them in addressing some of the challenges of entering the classroom as a new teacher. Jonathan Mack, a December 2009 Elementary Education graduate and now a first-year teacher at Kimberly Park Elementary School, explains some of the long-term benefits of membership:

New teachers like Jonathan who have been members of SNCAE receive a dues rebate during the first year of membership in the professional organization, which makes it more affordable for them to continue their membership and receive all of the benefits, including liability insurance, which provides important legal protection to new teachers.

When reflecting upon my experience as past president of SNCAE, I can truly say that it has been an unforgettable experience – an experience that taught me a multitude of lessons while allowing me to develop as an individual. SNCAE helped strengthen such areas as leadership, team building, and planning. I realized after entering the school system shortly after graduation that all the lessons learned would soon be put into practice. Taking on small leadership assignments within my school, I could not help but reminisce about some key information from the “What It Takes to Be An Effective Leader” session that I had attended during the state conference in Raleigh. Keeping these pointers in mind guided me through many successful assignments. The success I experienced from these and other endeavors is attributed, in part, not only to the guidance I received from conferences and workshops but also from

The WSSU chapter of SNCAE has approximately 200 members. Services and resources of SNCAE are a strong complement to the teacher preparation program. Opportunities for holding offices, planning and coordinating activities, networking with other teacher education majors and teachers across the state, and advocating for key issues are just some of the ways that teacher candidates demonstrate leadership. Since leadership is an essential element of the new North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards, SNCAE serves a unique purpose by giving members a platform for cultivating and demonstrating their leadership skills. n

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International

Experiences

D r. J ames Etim , Coordinator, M iddle G rades Educ ation , a nd Fulbright S e nior S pe cialist

To further my interest in global awareness and interaction, I applied for and received a Fulbright Senior Specialist Award to travel to Obafemi Awolowo University in IleIfe, Nigeria in summer 2010. The mission of the Fulbright program is to “promote linkages between U.S. academics and professionals and their counterparts at universities abroad.” The program awards “grants to qualified U.S. faculty and professionals, in select disciplines, to engage in short-term collaborative two- to six-week projects at higher education institutions in over 100 countries.” Participating in this study abroad supports global awareness, which is one of the strands of the School of Education and Human Performance’s conceptual framework. This study abroad experience is also consistent with one of the goals of UNC Tomorrow: UNC should promote increased partnerships between its own campuses and international universities and enhance the global awareness of its faculty and staff. During May and June, I spent 38 days as a Fulbright Senior Specialist in the Department of Special Education and Curriculum Studies at Obafemi Awolowo University. The award afforded me the opportunity to teach a graduate course in English Language Arts, to begin working on collaborative research projects with members of the department, and to serve as a resource for many of the faculty members as they carried out various research projects.

I also began working in three collaborative areas of research: reading, use of technology by pre-service teachers, and curriculum reforms in Nigeria. Over the next three years, we anticipate this collaboration will result in several journal publications and a book. In addition to teaching graduate course, I was able to interact with doctoral students and advise them during the literature review phase of their programs. One of the graduate students plans to travel to the USA to further her research in the area of science education.

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Physical Education and Exercise Science Majors (PEM) Club International

Experiences During my visit, Professor Adediran, Director of Linkages at Obafemi Awolowo University, presented me a copy of a letter of intent that he hopes will lead to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between his institution and Winston-Salem State University. I explored the possibility of furthering future student-tostudent contacts through the Global Understanding Project, which is something that could be initiated by students in the Middle Grades Education program. I observed that many of the library resources at Obafemi Awolowo University were out of date. As part of further collaboration, I am interested in instituting a book drive, for which I will collect books from faculty and staff at WSSU and send to Nigeria. Books in the areas of education, business, literature, and health sciences would be the most useful. The Fulbright program can serve as a catalyst for faculty who want to broaden their professional interaction with colleagues at institutions from other countries. As a result of their participation in this program, faculty are able to create cross-cultural opportunities that promote interaction and exchanges between their students and students in other countries. This leads to heightened global awareness and understanding, which strengthens the preparation of 21st century teachers to teach in diverse classrooms. n

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Cynthia Williams Brown, Chair, Secondary Education Department The Physical Education and Exercise Science Majors Club (PEM) strives to promote wellness, social involvement, community service, leadership development and professional involvement among physical education majors and exercise science majors. While PEM sponsors and supports numerous activities throughout the year, our major annual service activity is HOOPS for Heart. HOOPS for Heart is a national program that is sponsored by the American Heart Association and the American Alliance for Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. This event engages students in physical activity while raising funds to support critical cardiovascular research and education. Team events include three-on-three and single-elimination basketball tournaments for men and women; individual events include a three-point shoot-out. HOOPS for Heart is an important activity the club sponsors annually to meet its fundraising goals. HOOPS for Heart also helps students contribute to their community’s welfare through education. Heart disease is the nation’s number one killer; stroke ranks third in the cause of death and is the number one cause of serious disability. Both, African Americans and Caucasians in the southeastern United States have a greater prevalence of high blood pressure and higher death rates from stroke than those in other regions of the country. By hosting HOOPS for Heart and raising funds, students have the opportunity to inform the community about these deadly diseases. HOOPS for Heart is held each year in April. It provides an opportunity for our majors to participate in a community service event. It also provides them with an opportunity to plan and implement a major event. Under the supervision of a faculty mentor, students establish and chair committees and learn the logistics for hosting such an event. The PEM club has been participating in HOOPS for Heart for the past 12 years and has donated over $7,500 to the HOOPS for Heart Campaign. n

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SPORT MANAGEMENT MAJORS CLUB The mission of the Sport Management program is to prepare students for entrylevel positions in the business of sports, such as event facilities/area management, intercollegiate athletic management, sport organization management, sporting goods sales and management, and broadcasting and sport promotions. We make sure our graduates have the skills required to meet the demands of the sport industry, and the Sport Management Majors (SPM) Club provides out-of-classroom experiences to help give students that extra edge. All students who major in Sport Management are automatically members of the SPM club. However, members must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5, pay membership dues, and exhibit specific dispositions, such as attending professional conferences each year, demonstrating behaviors expected in a professional work environment, and raising funds for the organization.

equipment for the North Carolina Alliance of Athletic Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance state conference held in Winston-Salem. Five majors have volunteered to work at the will-call window for all WSSU home basketball games this season. We believe that our majors should be well-rounded and acquainted with other sport-related industries. These diverse experiences help promote students’ holistic development and expand their awareness of the sport industry. The diversity of experiences promotes students’ development of professional dispositions required by the program. They also enhance these students’ visibility. For instance, the Athletics Department’s marketing office took note of the special skills D r. D e nnis Felde r, of the 44 club members and provided them Progra m Coordinator, the opportunity to assist as volunteers S por t M a nage m e nt last year. Drs. Travis Teague and James progra m Hand from the Motorsport Management program organized a trip to Martinsville, VA and Concord, NC for eighteen SPM majors to shadow track officials and gain hands-on experiences in motorsports. These experiences improve graduates’ marketability and enhance others’ awareness of the tremendous contribution these students make to the campus and community.

To support majors in meeting their One of the hallmarks of Club memfundraising requirement, Sport bership is the commitment to proManagement faculty member Jaime fessional development. Members Oregan organized an opportunity demonstrate this by participating in for nine majors to work the PGA Golf professional conferences and volunTournament in Cary, NC during the teering on campus and in the comspring semester. In addition to raising munity. SPM majors engage in many $500, SPM majors benefited greatly professional opportunities to hone G e rald M cD o ugald , S por t M anage me nt from the exposure and opportunity to their skills, network, and learn what major (lef t), D e re k S aunde rs , preside nt network with professional golfers and it means to be a new professional. As of the S por t M anage me nt M ajors others associated with management an example, nine students attended Club (right), with Elon College S por t of the golf tournament. the 18th Annual Sport Management M anage me nt major, par ticipating in a Conference sponsored by Georgia golf f undraise r at the C ar y SA S Champion Southern University in Savannah, The SPM Club operates under the G olf Tourname nt, C ar y, NC , fall 201 0 capable leadership of Derek Michael GA. Thirteen majors worked with the Saunders, president, and co-vice presiCompliance, Marketing and Media dents T. C. Gammons, Jacob B. Loy, and Sabian C. Culbreth. Relations Directors for the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference These students have a vested interest in their program of study (MEAC) Tournament in Winston-Salem. For the last ten and in their careers. Their hard work, spirit of volunteerism, and years, five - ten students have worked with the Central commitment to the program have gained them well-deserved Intercollegiate Athletics Association (CIAA) Conference recognition. They have also demonstrated to the campus and assisting the director of events, media, and public relations, larger community the ability to meet the high expectations the play-by-play radio director, and the program director. Last fall, thirteen members extended their participation in and demands of the sport management profession. n professional athletics organizations by assisting the director of W I N S T O N - S A L E M

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THE STUDENT

REHABILITATION COUNSELING ORGANIZATION

The Student Rehabilitation Counseling Organization (SRCO) was founded in fall 2007 and serves as the studentbased organization for majors in the Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling (MSRC) program. The purpose of the organization is twofold: (1) to offer an opportunity for students

...SRCO members served as station volunteers during the 2009 Special Olympics. Although volunteers in this role do not generally require experience or special skills, SRCO members have gained valuable skills and experience, and they share a special commitment to working with persons with disabilities.

to participate in disability-related functions on campus, and (2) to foster professional networking with the rehabilitation community, both at the local and state levels. These are consistent 24 22

with the goals of the program, and they provide expectations for students who wish to participate. Activities are centered around volunteer projects and services to individuals with disabilities, and the term “volunteer� is emphasized strongly. As an example, SRCO members served as station volunteers during the 2009 Special Olympics. Although volunteers in this role do not generally require experience or special skills, SRCO members have gained valuable skills and experience, and they share a special commitment to working with persons with disabilities. These student volunteers operated training stations at the Special Olympics basketball camp and served as group leaders to camp participants. As group leaders, they were responsible for facilitating large groups of the participating athletes in various competitions. The SRCO has also provided disability awareness training on and off campus. On campus, they sponsored a disability etiquette seminar for WSSU employees during Disability Awareness Month in 2007 and 2008. This helps enhance the awareness by employers and employees alike concerning the importance of creating a comfortable and hospitable environment in which persons with disabilities can perform

D r. Chad B et te rs , A ssista nt Professor, Re habilitation Counseling

their duties. Each year, SRCO members host a Veterans Appreciation event at the local Veterans Administration Outpatient Clinic. This event not only gives an opportunity for SRCO members to acknowledge and express appreciation to veterans for their service, but it also serves as a vivid reminder of the high prevalence of disabilities among veterans. SRCO members have a stake in their own professional development, and they participate in professional organizations to help ensure that this objective is met. They have represented the MSRC program at professional conferences, including the American Counseling Association (ACA), the National Council of Rehabilitation Education (NCRE), the National Association for Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns (NAMRC), and the North Carolina Rehabilitation Association (NCRA). They present rehabilitation research at these conferences, provide disability-related assistance to conference attendees needing accommodations, and serve as program volunteers. At the helm of SRCO are Kentrell Pittman, president, and Tierra Caldwell, vice president. All current MSRC students who are in good academic standing are eligible to join and participate in organizational functions. The demands and expectations of the organization, however, require a high level of dedication and, most importantly, a strong commitment to giving of one’s time, effort, and talent to help meet the needs of persons with disabilities. n

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Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society

D r. D e nise T. J ohnson , A ssistant Professor, and D r. C assandra El-Amin , Professor, D e par tme nt of Educ ational Leade rship, Counseling and Professional Studies

The Alpha Beta Xi chapter of Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society in Education was chartered at Winston-Salem State University on April 29, 2004. Founded in 1911 by Dr. William Bagley at the University of Illinois, Kappa Delta Pi (KDP) represents knowledge, duty, and power, which are symbolized by its name. KDP promotes excellence and advancing scholarship, leadership, and service among educators. Since its inception on our campus six years ago, the Alpha Beta Xi chapter has inducted more than 60 faculty and students from the School of Education and Human Performance and the College of Arts and Sciences. These members demonstrate a commitment to service, leadership, and scholarship, as well as to preparing students for global citizenship. As members, they join the ranks of other prestigious KDP members, including such notables as Albert Einstein, George Washington Carver, James Banks, Howard Gardner, and more than 1,200,000 educators worldwide. In May 2010, the Alpha Beta Xi chapter inducted 33 new members, its largest induction class ever. Members represent a variety of majors, including Birth-to-Kindergarten, Elementary Education, Special Education, Secondary Education, Music Education, and Physical Education. Willie Stroud, a senior Music Education major from Kannapolis, NC who was inducted this year, said “I joined the organization because I wanted to be surrounded by other students (and faculty) who have a passion for teaching and the social development of all children. Being a member of this organization helps me gain confidence and clarity in my dispositions and enhances my overall professional presentation as an aspiring teacher.” The aspect of networking was reiterated by Justin Thomas, a Music Education Major from Greensboro, NC, as an important reason for joining. “I joined Kappa Delta Pi because I felt it would be a great opportunity for me to network with other potential teachers. The membership of this elite organization is a tool that reminds me every day why I chose to be a teacher.” Clayton G. Williams, a senior Music Education major from Detroit, points to Kappa Delta Pi’s emphasis on excellence in education and fellowship among peers. He feels that as an aspiring music educator,

It behooves me to join an organization that will help me improve my skills and offer the best to my students. When compared to other professions, such as those including doctors and lawyers, teaching is not always considered as a profession, but I know different. Teachers are the ‘vertebrate’ of America and we are the ones who teach the doctors and the lawyers. The importance of teachers in our society is often misunderstood and undervalued. The organization provides expanded opportunities for students to gain leadership and planning skills. Alpha Beta Xi members are also engaged in service activities in local schools. Recently, they sponsored a food drive to help support families in need. Membership is open to Education majors who have completed a minimum of 30 credit hours; education faculty may also join. The honor society chapter operates under the leadership of Jennifer Henry, president, and Laura Foster and Meaghan Simmons, c o - p r e s i d e nt s - e l e c t . Because both students and faculty are eligible for membership in Kappa Delta Pi, many opportunities exist for joint interaction, mentorship, support, and collaboration. Together, students and faculty build strong partnerships and networks. n K r ystal M ackey prese nting

a t-shir t design to m e mbe rs at a Fall 201 0 me eting .

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REAL MEN

TEACH

“The New Wave of Teacher Leaders” Holly Madrey Pitts, Coordinator, Real Men Teach Program Christopher Graham, Junior, Physical Education Major and Real Men Teach President

Real Men Teach (RMT) is the brainchild of former SEHP dean, Dr. Cynthia Jackson Hammond. The program was instituted on the campus of Winston-Salem State University during 2007-2008.

Its purpose

is to attract, prepare, and encourage more young men to teach.

RMT offers support and resources

to maximize the academic growth and potential of these young men so that they may be prepared to teach and lead effectively in diverse school settings. In fewer than five years, more than 40 young men have expressed strong interest in and commitment to becoming a part of the teaching profession. The first two RMT protégées to complete their programs of study graduated in May 2010.

A number of North Carolina schools have seen declines in student test scores and increases in dropout and suspension rates. Many of these conditions are most prevalent among minority males. While RMT’s major focus is to reverse the all-time low number of male teachers in Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12 (P-12) schools, program initiatives also include discussion about issues related to the education of black male students in P-12 schools in general.

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Christopher Graham, a junior Physical Education major and RMT president for the second consecutive term, discusses his involvement in RMT and the organization’s role in his development as a preservice teacher: Henry Adams once said that ‘a teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.’ That is exactly what a program at Winston-Salem State University is doing. The School of Education and Human Performance has developed a program called Real Men Teach to help address the shortage of male teachers in the classroom. In its fourth year, the program continues to impact WSSU and the greater Winston-Salem community. The RMT program provides leadership training, male mentoring, limited financial support, social development, and personal enhancement, all of which speak to the total preparation of male teacher leaders.

RMT emphasizes the academic success of its protégés because the quality of the teacher helps determine the success of his students. RMT encourages and supports protégés in the acquisition of knowledge and skills required of highly effective teachers. This is achieved in part through their participation in workshops, scholarly forums, and professional conferences. Workshops focus on professionalism, image, communication skills, etiquette, interviewing skills, and other topics designed to address their specific needs and interests. During the E D U C E R E

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“When I enter the classroom I will be a creative, reflective, diverse, and passionate educator.” Harvey Long, RMT Vice President

201 0 Real M e n Teach Ind uc tion Ce re mony

past year, protégés also attended professional conferences in Manhattan, NY, Atlanta, GA, and Santa Clara, CA that focused on improving their knowledge and professional skills and dispositions. This past summer, several protégées traveled with RMT mentor Darius Cureton to DeKalb County Schools in Georgia to participate in an RMT-exclusive forum that featured school district administrators and included tours of selected schools. Cureton explained that “events such as this one really help us to see what education is like in different parts of the country. Our horizons are widened not only by this trip, but also through this great program.” The mentoring component gives protégés the opportunity to engage with male professionals in several meaningful ways. Each protégé is assigned up to three mentors who encourage his development academically, socially, and personally. “The mentors are really the base of the pyramid in this program. They help us develop into teacher leaders and become great men,” says sophomore English Education major and RMT vice president Harvey Long. He reflected on how RMT has impacted his personal and professional aspirations: “This program has drastically changed my life and views on what a great educator should be. I feel confident that when I walk across the stage at my commencement, I will be one of the best teacher applicants from which any school district in America can choose. When I enter the classroom I will be a creative, reflective, diverse, and passionate educator.” Junior Elementary Education major Malcolm Toby from New Jersey describes RMT as “a program that is not only pushing me to become a better student and future teacher but is W I N S T O N - S A L E M

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teaching me to help others think outside the box and become productive members of society.” The program also provides financial support to help cover the registration fee for the examinations required for admission to the teacher education program and for licensure. Limited resources are available to assist with textbook purchases.

Christophe r G ra ha m , Preside nt, Real M e n Teach

It is our goal to reach more young men and help them achieve their dream of becoming teachers and teacher leaders. In so doing, we will increase the number of male teachers in the classroom and in educational leadership positions. We believe that the presence of a male teacher in the school has a positive impact on male students and affects the performance of female students in a positive way. RMT is in the process of developing a standardized format to support other colleges and universities that wish to replicate the RMT program on their campuses. We would like to expand our efforts to other universities because this supports our goal of reaching larger audiences, establishing more mentor-protégé relationships, and developing teachers and teacher leaders who will serve as role models and educate the next generation. As a result, we will begin to see an increase in the number of male teachers nationwide and a corresponding increase in the performance of children in P-12 schools, especially among African American male students and children from low-income families. n 25

Your Scholarships at Work FOCUS ON BRIANNA GALBREATH I am a recipient of the Millennium Teacher’s Scholarship/ Loan. This scholarship has been instrumental in my matriculation, for it has allowed me to focus fully and completely on my studies without the worry of how I would be able to pay for college. I have not had to take out loans thus far in my collegiate career. My first reaction to receiving the scholarship was one of excitement! The summer before my freshman year, I received a call saying that I had been chosen to receive the scholarship. However, I think my parents were more excited than I was. As scholarship recipients, we are often thought to possess “words of wisdom” to give other students in pursuit of their academic achievement. It is clear, however, that what has worked for me might not be applicable to other students. Nevertheless, there are some approaches to education that I have taken, and I believe they may have some value for students. It’s also hard for me to think of “words of wisdom” to give other students because I am still learning as I continue my own professional growth. There are three strategies I have used in my own academic pursuits to help me stay on track:

• Staying true to myself

• Knowing what I want/expect from my university, and • Knowing how to use what I have gained from my university and using that knowledge to stay on track. The most significant aspect of my college educational experience has been discovering myself, which has come as a result of my participation in the vast opportunities presented – and some that I was able to create for myself because of the inspiration, courage, and determination that WSSU instilled in me. I learned what it means to take greater responsibility for my education and to go beyond the classroom to make my education real.

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During the 2008-09 school year, I decided to apply for an opportunity to study abroad. I did not have a scholarship, and I had not applied for study abroad. I knew I would be responsible for finding my own resources to support the trip. I decided on the Dominican Republic, and in summer 2009, I was blessed with the opportunity to embark on a spectacular journey to the Dominican Republic through the Orphanage Outreach program. I was in the Dominican Republic for four weeks, and during my stay I taught English to children in grades six through eight at the English Institute. This trip was simultaneously challenging and remarkable. I am not fluent in Spanish, which is the native language in the Dominican Republic, so this sometimes posed problems for me. However, I came out of this experience at least knowing the Spanish name for all of my body parts! At the English Institute, I taught a group of children for two hours in the morning and a different and more advanced group of children in the afternoon. Children in the Dominican Republic do not attend school for seven or eight hours a day like children do in America. They go either in the morning for four hours or in the afternoon/evening for four hours. The cultural practice that honors “nap time” was one of my favorite experiences of the school day! Each week during English camp, we focused on a different subject, ranging from music, numbers, alphabet, art, health/ body parts, environment, and food. The children went to different stations with their assigned group and participated in activities based on one of the particular subjects. My favorite parts were the opening and closing sessions. We sang various types of fun songs, such as “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes,” and an upbeat version of the alphabet. These are just two of the many songs and chants that I will carry into my classroom when I become a teacher. When we were not in the classroom or preparing lessons, we were able to venture out and explore the country with our group leaders. We went to museums where we learned about the “real” Christopher Columbus, the history of the Dominican Republic, and the history of Haiti, which today is

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the poorest country on the western hemisphere. I was able to visit the Haitian market located on the border of the two countries. This market is open to Haitians only on Mondays and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon, during which time they come to the Dominican Republic to purchase such necessities as toilet paper, huge blocks of ice, dried foods, and produce. Visiting this market was an eye-opening experience, and it reminded me of how truly blessed I am. B rianna G albreath prese nting award f rom SNC AE

I stayed at El Hogar de Esperanza de Monte Cristi (The Home of Children in Monte Cristi), which is an orphanage that is home to 45 boys and girls. I also had the opportunity to reside at an all-boys orphanage, which housed 20 boys, in the town of Jaibon. Each day, three hearty meals were prepared for me, including pancakes, cereal, and fruit for breakfast and mostly rice and plantains for lunch and dinner. I ate very well and took cold showers daily, while also constantly trying to repel mosquitoes! My stay in the Dominican Republic was fantastic! I had the opportunity to learn firsthand about another culture. I was able to see many differences but perhaps even more similarities between people in the Dominican Republic and those in the United States. Perhaps the most important aspect of this trip was the thirst it instilled in me to visit other countries and learn about different peoples. I had such an opportunity this past summer, when I was able to study abroad for four weeks in Ghana, West Africa (see page 12 for details about my study abroad). Participation in these activities gave me many opportunities for self-discovery. It fueled my desire to work in an environment that focuses on helping children learn about themselves. It also gave me the inspiration to apply for an internship with the Philips Exeter Academy, which is a co-educational 9th12th grade residential school in New Hampshire. The school was founded in 1781 and has a tradition of academic excellence. Part of its uniqueness is its history of “educating young people to find their place in the world.” I chose this school

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to Rodney Ellis , Preside nt of NC A ssociation of Educ ators , during H omecoming 201 0.

because of my passion for helping children discover themselves, the world around them, where they fit in this world. I was not accepted to the Exeter program, but I had the courage to try, and I learned from the process. Had I not used all of my resources here at WSSU – including the study abroad – I would not have even known about The Philips Exeter Academy and I might not have had the motivation to apply. Traveling with my peers to West Africa this summer was the best experience I have had at WSSU thus far! It was nothing less than amazing. I would not have experienced this small portion of the vast continent of Africa if I had not had the initiative to grab just some of the many opportunities my university has to offer. My career aspirations are not set in stone, although I do have plans for the next five years. After receiving my B.S. degree in Elementary Education in December 2011, I plan to join Teach for America for two years. After the completion of my two years with Teach for America, I will return to North Carolina to teach for the next three to four years. I would like to travel and dedicate time to the Peace Corps after gaining five years of teaching experience. n

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In Memoriam

Catherine Eilenberger (Dec 13, 1944 – Oct 22, 2010)

Dr. Catherine (Cathy) Louise Eilengerger was a member of the faculty in the Therapeutic Recreation program at Winston-Salem State University. She was a native of Fort Worth, TX and came to WSSU in 1988. Dr. Eilenberger was a caring and compassionate teacher and a strong advocate for persons with disabilities and the elderly. She came to WSSU two years after the Therapeutic Recreation program was established here. She and Cynthia Stanley, who is now Coordinator of the Therapeutic Recreation (TR) program were among some of the first faculty in the program. Dr. Stanley shares some of her most vivid and fond memories of those initial years: The TR program began in 1986. I came in 1987 and Cathy came in 1988. From then until Himanshu [Dr. Gopolan] came in 1995, it was just the two of us that comprised the TR program faculty. Thus, she was instrumental in the growth and development of the TR program. In addition to teaching and advising, she worked with, and at times sponsored, the TR Club. She was good at networking professionally with both practitioners and educators in TR. She had worked in the field for a number of years before she began teaching. The area I remember her mentioning most often was when she worked with clients with severe developmental disabilities in a residential setting. Cathy designed 28

and taught the Leisure and Aging course that is required for Gerontology majors. This is a example of her desire/ ability to collaborate with other programs and faculty.

Dr. E: Thanks for your understanding words and patience. TR program will never be the same without you. Now you can play Solitaire in peace! Much love – Martesha Cheers

Several of Dr. Eilenberger’s students and colleagues remembered seeing her walk through the hallways of the Anderson Center on her way to class on the Thursday preceding her death. She participated in the Founder’s Day Convocation on Friday morning, the day before she passed away. She fulfilled her duties as a member of our faculty until the time of her death. She will always be remembered for her dedication and commitment.

No words can express how truly missed you will be. Only God knows . . . . One thing that I will always remember that you used to say, “Use your time wisely.” And trust this, Dr. E., I will. – Ashlee Townsend

Many of Dr. E’s students have commented about the life lessons she taught, and they expressed honor and gratitude for having had her as their teacher. They spoke of her intelligence, wit, and enthusiasm, her warm and giving spirit, which many said was always accompanied by a smile. The Monday following Dr. E’s death, several of her students shared their feelings on a giant poster that had been placed on the door to her office. Here are some of their comments: Just three days ago, you were advising me in your office – doing all you could to help me as a student in the TR program. Times such as these, I will never forget – Markela Batts Dr. E: You were definitely someone with so much wisdom. I’m sad you won’t be able to share that any more. Rest in peace. – Ashley Dawson No farewells were spoken, No time to say goodbye, You were gone before we knew it And only God knows why. Love – Precious Churchill

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Some alumni from the program attributed their current success as therapists to what Dr. E. had taught them and noted that she had had a great influence on them. She was called advisor by some, mentor by many, a “great professor” by others, one who encouraged her students to “love the field,” one who wanted only the best from them, and one who had inspired them to enhance the lives of people with and without disabilities. As a member of the faculty, Dr. Eilenberger fulfilled both teaching and service roles. She served in various roles on campus and on many boards and councils in the community. She was a member of the Forsyth County Aging Services Planning Committee for over ten years and was Chair of the Home and Community Care Block Grant Subcommittee. For the past fourteen years, she served on the Region I Aging Advisory Council. She was well respected for her service to the community and particularly for her advocacy for older adults. Dottie Lyvers, Director of the Northwest Piedmont Area Agency on Aging, said, “Older adults in the Triad have lost a true advocate and friend.” She described Dr. Eilenberger as “an active member of the Northwest Piedmont Area Agency on Aging’s Region I Aging Advisory Council as well as

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the Forsyth County Aging Services Planning Committee. Dr. Eilenberger will be greatly missed by many in the Aging Network.” Dr. Eilenberger’s passion for her work with the aging was matched by her astuteness at planning and coordinating events. She remembered every detail, as Dr. Stanley recounts: The last thing Cathy did on campus was talk with graduates who came to see us at a mini-TR reunion held the Friday afternoon of Homecoming weekend [which was the day preceding her death]. We had a very pleasant time chatting with our TR alumni. Cathy provided the refreshments, and she made sure there were two sweet snacks and two salty snacks. Also, she made sure the drinks were iced down hours before the event. These are examples of the details to which a good event programmer attends. A memorial service was held on the WSSU campus Thursday, November 4, to a standing-room only audience of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends. This was a very moving and emotional celebration as many reflected on Dr. E’s helpfulness, scholarship, teaching, and service. During a 10-minute moment of silence, attendants were encouraged to plant an herb seed into flower pots or write a poem, song, story, or other memorabilia to be shared with Dr. E’s family. Dr. Eilenberger is survived by several family members, including a sister, aunts, two stepbrothers, nieces, nephews, and cousins, and her best friend and unofficially adopted sister, Carol Bock of Winston-Salem. n

Altinea DeShevara Pugh (June 3, 1982 – Oct 4, 2010)

Altinea DeShevara’ Pugh, from Fayetteville, NC, was enrolled in the Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling program at WinstonSalem State University at the time of her death on October 4, 2010 at the age of 28. Altinea is remembered fondly by her fellow Rehabilitation Counseling students as diligent, persistent, caring, and humorous. In this online course, she and her peers interacted primarily via emails and online discussion board and never met each other face-to-face. However, Altinea’s helpfulness toward others and her strong commitment to completing her degree, despite personal challenges, permeated their discussions and online interactions. Christopher V. Tillman, a second-year graduate student, said in his reflections about Altinea: I had the opportunity to participate in two courses with Ms. Pugh, and she often communicated how she was determined to push past her physical limitations and earn her degree. As a distance learning student, it is always hard to really gauge a person’s personality over a discussion board. However, this was easy for me concerning her because her writing and responses spoke volumes about her character, drive, integrity, and intense passion for the profession.

Deanna White, also a second-year graduate student, echoed Christopher’s impression of Altinea. Despite never being able to meet each other, she said Altinea’s personality shone through and inspired her. “As a distancelearning student, we seldom get the chance to meet each other in person, and even though Altinea and I did not get that opportunity, it did not seem that way. In the few classes we took together, through sharing emails and checking in on each other, I was able to get to know her and be inspired by her beautiful spirit and dedication to helping others.” The School of Education and Human Performance includes in its conceptual framework a number of professional dispositions that students are expected to develop and demonstrate. During Altinea’s matriculation in the Rehabilitation Counseling program, she not only exhibited many of these dispositions, but she also set an example to other students about what they could become. Warrick Stewart, a spring 2010 graduate of the program who is now pursuing his doctorate, described Altinea as “the algorithm of determination, commitment, and tenacity. If anyone deserves to be honored, it is Altinea. She was truly a model of what I can only hope to be one day!” In addition to the high regard in which she was held by her peers, Altinea also impressed her professors by demonstrating the professional dispositions that are so important to a student’s overall development. Dr. Chad Betters, assistant professor in the Rehabilitation Counseling program, instructed Altinea in two courses. He described her as “an exemplary student. I appreciated her work ethic and commitment to her professional

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In Memoriam development. Altinea reflected those qualities in a student that makes teaching graduate students rewarding.” Dr. Betters’ description of Altinea were reiterated by Robyn L. Lowery, assistant professor and fieldwork coordinator in the Department Of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies. Altinea was approaching the completion of her program and was scheduled to complete her internship next semester, a milestone about which she was extremely excited. Her persistence, helpfulness, sense of humor, and ability to inspire others are recurring themes in others’ depiction of her. In her reflections, Ms. Lowery commented that “Altinea had such a vibrant spirit and a huge personality! I recall our discussion about a roadblock she faced in completing a certain degree requirement, and

used her disability an excuse for what happens in life. There were many times when she had to re-do assignments several times, not because the quality of her work was poor but because her assistive technology/computer did not always work or save an assignment. Nevertheless, she still completed assignments on time and with high quality. She was truly a “model student” in and out of the classroom. She continues to motivate me too as a rehabilitation educator.

she always seemed to insert a layer of humor regarding the ordeal. But more than that, she was a student that strived for excellence, which invigorated peers and faculty alike.” Her ability to motivate and inspire her faculty left a lasting impression on them. Dr. Yolanda Edwards, associate professor and coordinator of the Rehabilitation Counseling program notes Altinea’s perseverance and her ability to rise above personal challenges and still perform at a level she had set for herself. She was described as a student who never made excuses but, instead, used setbacks and obstacles to propel her to a higher level of accomplishment. According to Dr. Edwards,

Miss Pugh is survived by her parents, a sister, her grandparents, a greatgrandmother, aunts, her godparents, and other relatives and friends. n

Altinea was one of the students who never complained about anything and always performed at a high level. What impressed me the most is that she never

Those Who Make It Possible:

Focus on Our Benefactors Francine G. Madrey, Associate Dean, School of Education and Human Performance The occasion was the 2010 Founder’s Day Convocation. We had heard challenging and inspiring comments from our alumni achievers and the keynote speaker, who is also an alumnus. The musical performance by the WSSU Choir was, as always, impeccable. The traditional litany and lighting of the candles had been performed with solemnity, and all that was left on the program was a special presentation. Customarily, the alumni class in reunion makes its financial contribution to the university, and this year was by no means an exception, except perhaps in the level of generosity -- $82,000 from the Class of 1960! This much-appreciated gift and all the preceding activities would have been sufficient to call this Founder’s Day a special

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one. However, we were in for yet another special presentation. No doubt, many of us had never heard of Lorraine Hairston Morton. That is no longer the case. Obviously, persons in her community were very familiar with her, for she had been elected mayor of Evanston, IL, a position from which she retired in 2009 after 16 years. Mrs. Morton was the first African American mayor of Evanston and also the first African American teacher there to transfer from an all-black school when asked to move to a suburban school, where she later became principal. It was the occasion of her retirement as mayor that had prompted her friends to present her with a special gift. Rather than give the traditional clock or watch, they wanted to honor Mrs. Morton in a more lasting and significant way. Her friends and supporters decided to establish

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Corporate Sponsors and Donors 2008-2010 CORPORATE SPONSORS Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation American Honda Foundation Sport Dimensions Inc. North Carolina Motorsports Association N.C. Mutual Life Insurance

DONORS The School of Education and Human Performance gratefully acknowledges the donors who made financial contributions to the school between 20082010. We appreciate the generous support of our alumni and friends. We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this donor list. Please contact 336-750-2184 if you are aware of any omissions or have questions or concerns about the list.

School of Education and Human Performance

Ms. Saundra Pridgen Amos

Ms. Barbara Moore Brown

Ms. Vertis Armstrong

Mr. Frank Brown

Ms. Ida R. Bailey

Ms. Mildred Bryant

Mr. Michael Bailey

Mr. Willie Jethro Buie

Ms. Delores C. Bailey

Mr. Logan Burke

Mr. Leslie Baker

Ms. Mary Vanhook Burt

Ms. Remona Mackins Banner

Mr. Stephen Allen Butler

Ms. Barbara Barnes

Mrs. Vonnie Wilson Carrington

Ms. Dorothy Ann Battle

Ms. Daisy R. Chambers

Ms. Norma Baynes

Ms. Rose Williams Chavis

Dr. Edwin D. Bell

Mrs. Harris Clara

Mr. Henderson Benjamin

Mr. Gilbert J. Clark

Ms. Betty I. Bennett

Ms. Dorothy Sidberry Clark

Dr. Carolynn B. Berry

Ms. Shannon O’Brien Clarke

Mrs. Ruby Wiggins Bethel

Mrs. Doris M. Clawson

Mr. Lawrence D. Billups

Dr. Jo Ann Coco-Ripp

Mrs. Dollie Settle Bishop

Ms. Betty Collins

Ms. Shirley L Borders

Mrs. Dorothy Greene Craine

Ms. Ruth Shackleford Bowen

Ms. Margie B. Crawford

Mr. Donnell Bowie

Ms. Bessie B. Dancy

Ms. Thurlia W. Brandon

Ms. Bronnie Harris Daniels

Ms. Bertha L. Brandon

Ms. Rita C. Darby

Ms. Grace McRae Broadnax

Ms. Bernice Howard Davenport

Ms. Janet R. Brower-Thomas

Ms. Ulysses Davis

Mrs. Barbara Moore Brown

Mr. Robert Dawkins

Mr. Carl Edward Brown

Ms. Olivia G. Day

Dr. Cynthia W. Brown

Ms. Johnsie Yongue Dease

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a scholarship in her honor as an appropriate parting gift for their beloved mayor. They worked with the Forrest E. Powell Foundation to raise funds to establish the Lorraine Hairston Morton Endowed Scholarship at her alma mater.

She is a strong advocate for youth in her community, and she has received numerous awards and honors for her service. The scholarship that has now been established in her honor is yet another way for Mrs. Morton to support young people.

Mrs. Morton is a native of Winston-Salem and a 1938 graduate of Winston-Salem Teachers College. She received her master’s degree at Northwestern University and honorary doctorate degrees from Kendall College and Northwestern University. After retiring from the school system in 1989, she was appointed to the Evanston City Council. Four years later, she ran for mayor, and at age 74 she won the office, which she held for 16 years. Mrs. Morton was 90 years old when she retired last year as mayor of Evanston. On the occasion of her retirement, the Evanston City Council voted unanimously to rename the Evanston Civic Center the Lorraine H. Morton Civic Center.

The Morton Endowed Scholarship will be awarded to a WSSU junior who is majoring “in education, demonstrates a strong desire to be a teacher and shows a strong commitment to extracurricular activities in the arts and community service.”

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WSSU is honored to support the establishment of the Morton Endowed Scholarship, and the School of Education and Human Performance is exceptionally pleased that the recipients of the scholarship will be students from our school. n

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Ms. Lois Patterson Dixon

Ms. Susie Smith Keele

Ms. Wynolia Pulliam

Dr. Patricia Douville-Ricker

Ms. Shirley Kimbrough

Ms. Colleen P. Ramsey

Ms. Celesta J. Dudley

Ms. Margaret S. King

Ms. Thelma Beaty Reed

Ms. Autumn Patrice Duke

Ms. Bettie H. Kornegay

Ms. Evelyn Parker Reives

Ms. Winnie Little Dula

Mrs. Ericsteen Jefferson Lash

Ms Inez S. Richardson

Mrs. Jacqueline Rainey Dunlap

Mr. Daniel C. Laws

Mr. Willie G. Richardson

Mr. Benjamin T. Dupree

Ms. Glorious Sharpless Leaven

Ms. Inez S. Richardson

Ms. Josephine M. Edge

Mr. Charles B. Lewis

Ms. Elizabeth A. Rights

Ms. Jeanne D. Edwards

Ms. Hazel Lipscomb

Mr. Eugene Roseboro

Dr. Catherine Eilenberger

Ms. Yvonne Carraway Lofton

Mr. Bobby Rowe

Ms. Tressie Ellis

Ms. Nina Bolden Long

Ms. Barbara G. Scott

Ms. Alice Jean Ellis

Ms. Shirley Parker Long

Mrs. Eldria Cheatham Sherrill

Mr. Cleveland Ellison

Ms. Muriel Lewis Lovell

Ms. Bertha McIver Sightler

Mrs. Elvira Hunt

Mr. Donald E. Lowrance

Ms. Edith Cash Sloan

Ms. Jakay W. Ervin

Ms. Brenda S. Lyles

Ms. Julia G. Small

Mrs. Minnie Jackson Evans

Ms. Pamela Lyons

Ms. Carrie F. Smith

Mr. James Henry Evans

Mr. Dorothy L. Mack

Ms. Margaret Powell Smith

Ms. Sadie E. Faison

Ms. Mildred M. Macon

Ms. Margaret Shaw Smith

Ms. Shirley W. Farrar

Mrs. Barbara J. C. Manning

Mrs. Bessie Snuggs

Mr. James D. Franklin

Ms. Candace D. Marsh

Mrs. Theresa Jordan Snuggs

Ms. Barbara A. Freeman

Ms. Beatrice Harris Martin

Mr. Willie D. Snuggs

Mr. James W. Freeman

Ms. Edith Williams

Ms. Yasmyn R. Southerland

Ms. Irma Gadson

Mrs. Minnie R. Dawkins McDonald

Ms. Denise D. Spaugh

Mr. Milfred Filmore Greene

Ms. Johnnie McFadden

Mr. Crosby Spencer

Mr. Thaddeus Shoaf Griffin

Ms. Erma F. McGimpsey

Ms. Bernice Crosby Spencer

Mr. Thomas S. Gunnings

Mr. Michael McKenzie

Dr. Cynthia Stanley

Ms. Ashley D. Hairston

Ms. Mary Seymore McKinnon

Mr. Herbert F. Stover

Dr. Beth D. Hairston

Mr. Herman McNeil

Ms. Sadie Barnhill Streeter

Mr. Peyton T. Hairston

Mr. David L. Meadows

Ms. Wilma Lawrence Sumler

Ms. Tanya Hairston

Mr. Joe N. Middleton

Ms. Dorothy M. Tanner

Mr. Gregory C. Hairston

Ms. Shirley Elaine Mills

Ms. Annie Jones Taylor

Mr. Eugene Leroy Hanes

Ms. Bennie Mary Milton

Dr. Travis L. Teague

Mrs. Clara Hampton Harris

Ms. Vera Crockett Mitchell

Ms. Jessica Teague

Mr. William U. Harris

Mrs. Barbara R. Morris

Mrs. Gwendolyn Terrell

Ms. Danielle Arnetta Harris

Ms. Douise T. Morris

Ms. Margaret Fisher Thomas

Mr. James R. Hart

Ms. Barbara R. Morris

Mr. Edward T. Thompson

Mr. Robert N. Harvey

Ms. Mary S. Morrison

Ms. Verona Barnes True

Mrs. Paul Hayes

Ms. Madge Murray

Mrs. Jeraline J. Truesdale

Ms. Catherine Hemingway

Mr. William C. Nelson

Ms. Minnie Ross Turner

Mr. Benjamin F. Henderson

Mr. Henry L. Nesmith

Dr. Manuel P. Vargas

Ms. Annie Hicks-Hager

Mr. David L. Ness

Dr. Claudia A. Warren

Mrs. Johnnye Bratton Hill

Ms. Maggie Leatha Newkirk

Ms. Beatrice Mials Whitaker

Ms. Eleanor Artis Hinton

Ms. Kecia Page

Mr. Rudolph V. Wiggins

Ms. Martha Grimes Holland

Ms. Rose Vaughn Palmer

Mrs. Marjorie T. Wilkins

Ms. Sara L. Hughes

Ms. Beverly A. Parker

Mrs. Ernestine R. Williams

Ms. Agnes Langston Hughes-Griffin

Ms. Brenda Patterson

Ms. Constance Wilson

Ms. Elvira Rebecca Hunt

Ms. Brenda Pendleton Patterson

Ms. Jakala Dior Wilson

Mrs. Madie E. Ingram

Ms. Mable Scarver Patterson

Dr. Carole A. Winston

Ms. Priscilla Jackson-Wiggins

Mr. Freddie Bullock Pearson

Mrs. Bernese Witherspoon

Ms. Iris Bonds Jarrell

Ms. Viola N. Perry

Ms. Linda Smith Zachary

Chancellor Alex B. Johnson

Dr. Sophia B. Pierce

Mrs. Hattie L. Johnson-Norris

Mr. Jasper L. Powell

Ms. Thea Victoria Jones

Ms. Shirley Daye Price

Ms. Dermetta Jones

Mr. Elgient Pritchett

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E D U CE R E Maga z i n e Winston -S ale m State U nive rsit y S chool of Educ ation and H uman Pe r formance 6 01 S . M ar tin Luthe r K ing J r. D rive 2 37 Ande rson Ce nte r Winston -S ale m , NC 27 1 1 0 - 0 0 01

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NON - PROFIT ORG . U S . P OSTAG E PAI D WI NSTON SALEM , NC PER M IT NO 2 57


Educere Magazine - Winter 2011