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educere SUMMER 2013 :: Issue 01

M AGA ZINE

from the S chool of E ducation and H uman P erformance

Inside this issue

THE UNLIKELY FACE OF PUBLIC P-12 EDUCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA:

RODNEY ELLIS '99 FIRST-YEAR TEACHER FROM WSSU RECEIVES PROMISE AWARD FOR TEACHING P. 11

RESEARCH DAY 2013 P. 22

Summer 2013 :: Issue 01

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

u n d e rg r ad uate an d g r ad uate p rog r am s

Elementary Education Math Education

Special Education

Master of Rehabilitation Counseling (MRC)

Physical Education Master

of

Arts

in

English Education

Te a c h i n g - ( M G E

SPE)

Birth窶適indergarten Education

Exercise Science

Rehabilitation Studies

Master of Education Degree in Elementary Education (M.Ed.)

Middle Grades Education Motorsport Management Science Education Master of Arts in Teaching-English/Language Arts

Rehabilitation Counseling

Sport Management

M a s te r of A r t s i n Te a c h i n g En g l i s h a s a S e co n d L a n g u a g e ( T E S O L)

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

tr aditi o nal , y e t i n n ovative

Student Centered

Developing Professionals for 21st Century

Responsive Excellence is the Norm

Leader

Reflective

Collaborative with the Community

Experiential Learning

Academically Rigorous Respect for History

Visionary

Transformative

Progressive

Change Agent

Creative Growing

Committed

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of Contents

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Z

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table

pg. 17

Dean’s Message

pg. 4

School of Education and Human Performance P.4

Educere? W hat's That Again?

pg. 25

P.5

Focus on Alumni: Joelle Davis Carter, Class of 1994 P.6

Tomorrow's Education Leader: Christopher Graham, Class of 2012 P.8

Donald Benson, Class of 1965 Legacy: Campus ROTC, Student Information Systems, and Student Engagement P.10

First-Year Teacher from WSSU Receives "Promise Award" for Outstanding Teaching P.11

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Preparing Teachers in Music Education P.14 The Unlikely Face of Public P-12 Education in North Carolina: Rodney Ellis, Class of 1999 P.17 Research Day 2013 P. 22 More Than I Could Have Imagined P. 23 O'Connell Travels to Rio de Janeiro P. 24 GEMS P. 24 Improving the Cultural Competence of Early Childhood Educators P. 25 I Am Ready to Teach: Voices of Elementary Education Graduates P. 26 Real Men Teach Welcomes New Coordinator P. 28

Waves, Sand, Seagulls, Beach: The Perfect Setting for Experiential Learning Rehabilitation Studies Conference

S C H O O L

Dr. Yolanda Edwards Receives the Dr. Sylvia Walker National Multicultural Award P.14

Alumni News P.30 Corporate Sponsors and Donors P.32 EDITOR: Francine G. Madrey, Ph.D. Professor of Education and Associate Dean School of Education and Human Performance

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a message from MANUEL P. VARGAS, DEAN

Dean’s Message S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N A N D H U M A N P E R F O R M A N C E

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trust that you will enjoy reading the contents of Educere’s fourth issue as much as we have enjoyed preparing it. As we have mentioned previously, the purpose of this annual publication is to tell the good story about the School of Education and Human Performance, especially as it relates to the educational aspirations and accomplishments of our students. For this reason, we believe that the Latin word Educere appropriately captures the essence of our educational mission. Consequently, we take special pride in highlighting the contributions we have made to the intellectual growth of young and adult learners and the contributions our students have made to the university, P-12 schools, local agencies, professional organizations, and beyond. In this issue, we showcase examples of academic accomplishments, educational leadership, creativity, early success in the classroom setting, commitment to professional growth, and initiatives intended to support the overall intellectual development of our students. We certainly rejoice in the success of our students and alumni. Joelle Carter Davis, assistant vice president for retention and student services at Western Kentucky University, and Rodney Ellis, president of the 70,000-strong North Carolina association of public school educators, are alumna and alumnus, respectively, of the middle grades education program at Winston-Salem State University. Who could have predicted the overarching positive influence that these two individuals would have on the lives of so many? Read more about them, especially our feature story.

of Chris Graham, physical education major, who is clearly on his way up to positions of leadership and greater responsibility. Another recent case is that of Tamara Levi, a spring 2011 graduate from our birth-kindergarten education program, who became one of three recipients of the 2012-13 Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County Schools’ Promise Award. Awards are also a part of our highly engaged faculty, such as the one bestowed upon Yolanda Edwards, professor of rehabilitation counseling, who is now chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies. Talent abounds; this is specially the case of our music education candidates. What would the world be without music? This year, in particular, our music majors have made our celebrations especially joyous. You will learn more about them when you read the story written by Debbie O’Connell, assistant professor of music. Research, whether graduate or undergraduate, is also music to my ears. Learn more about our undergraduate researchers when you read the story written by Michael McKenzie, associate professor of exercise science, about our spring 2013 Research Day. The remaining stories describe the professional commitment of our alumni and faculty to teacher education, cultural competence among pre-school professionals, retention of more male teacher candidates, and experiential learning for rehabilitation studies majors. On a more personal note, I want to thank faculty, staff, students, and alumni for having allowed me to be a part of the educational efforts of this institution. After more than twenty years of service to WSSU, it has truly been an honor and a privilege to have contributed, in a small part, to the educational and professional opportunities of so many.

Read also about our emerging leaders who recently walked WSSU’s halls of learning. This is the case

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EDUCERE?

What’s That Again? Educere means (1) to lead forth, draw out, bring away, (2) to bring, summon, (3) to bring up or lead away, (4) to take out with one, and (5) to lead forth, march out (Numen – The Latin Lexicon). Educere is also the title of the School of Education and Human Performance’s annual magazine. “According to the Oxford English Dictionary, ‘education’ is derived from its Latin root, ‘educare’. Educare means ‘to rear or to bring up’. Educare itself can be traced to the latin [sic] root words, ‘e’ and ‘ducere’. Together, ‘e-ducere’ means to ‘pull out’ or ‘to lead forth’” (The Educare Institute). Educere is pronounced e–du’–zcer–ee or e–du’–car–ee. The term “to educate” comes from “educere,” which means “to bring/draw out.” So, the next time someone asks, “How do you pronounce the name of the SEHP magazine?” you’ll have an answer. The Educare Institute, retrieved from http://www.educare.org/index2.html Numen – The Latin Lexicon, retrieved from http://latinlexicon.org/definition.php?p1=2018768

Next issue

ALUMNI RETURN TO SERVE YOUR SCHOLARSHIP DOLLARS AT WORK MEET OUR NEW SEHP FACULTY AND STAFF

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Joelle Davis Carter, a 1994 graduate of WSSU’s middle grades education program was named assistant vice president for retention and student services at Western Kentucky University in fall 2012.

As a student, Joelle always knew she wanted to be an educator, but it was not until her senior year that she realized a graduate degree program actually existed that would allow her to combine her love for education, her concern for holistic student development, and her passion for leadership. And, thus began her exploration of a graduate program in student leadership and higher education administration. Joelle became part of a group of students participating in an annual trip to The Ohio State University as part of its diverse student initiative. It might be an overstatement to say that she caught a little of the Buckeye spirit when she first arrived at a campus of over 55,000 students; it was more of an “unenthusiastic response” to the massive campus but, at the same time, rather exhilarating for this student from Oxford, NC, whose 2012 population estimate was 8,575.

in the Department of Education Leadership, Higher Education and International Studies at the University of Maryland College Park, where she received the doctor of philosophy degree in 2010. Her research agenda is shaped by the study of student engagement and examining how students’ participation in academic and co-curricular activities influences their academic success and career preparation.

J o elle Davis C ar te r

At OSU, Joelle enrolled in the Student Personnel program and continued her trend of campus leadership. She became active in the Black Graduate and Professional Student Caucus (BG&PSC) and the Council of Graduate Schools at OSU. She was elected president of BG&PSC and led the organization to realize a number of successes that included an annual scholarship banquet and graduate education preparation workshops for undergraduates. Dr. Carter earned the Master of Arts in Student Personnel degree from OSU in 1997. Subsequently, she pursued studies 68

Dr. Carter has served in a number of mid- to senior-level higher education positions at the University of Maryland College Park, Morgan State University and Winthrop University. In these roles, she has been responsible for the management and development of professional staff, establishing and evaluating academic programs, and working with senior-level administrators such as deans, assistant vice presidents and provosts on major institutional issues, including retention, diversity and staff development.

Immediately prior to joining Western Kentucky University last fall, Dr. Davis was director of undergraduate programs in the School of Business at The George Washington University. There, her appointment included responsibility for developing and coordinating retention and engagement efforts that encompassed the School of Business’ first-year development program, undergraduate research program, sophomore year experience initiative, business student leadership organizations, and living and learning communities. In 2012, her first EEDDUUCCEERREE MMAAGGAAZZI INNEE

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C ar te r, delive ring address to graduates of the S chool of Educ ation and H uman Pe r formance at the Fall 201 1 S EH P G raduation G ala

edited book, Business Principles and Perspectives: Preparing Undergraduate Business Students for the First Year, was published for students enrolled in the first-year seminar course. Upon her appointment at Western Kentucky University, Dr. Brian Meredith, associate vice president for enrollment management, said, We are excited Dr. Carter will be joining the Enrollment Management leadership team...She brings a depth of experience in the areas of student retention, engagement and persistence. I look forward to working with Dr. Carter to enhance our retention initiatives moving students closer to their degree goals and ultimately graduation. Dr. Carter’s passion and focus on student success make her an excellent addition to our team and WKU’s Rally for Retention. Dr. Carter has also maintained an active research agenda while serving in her varied leadership roles. She has a specific interest in examining issues facing students who attend minority-serving institutions, such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Joelle’s research and professional experience have resulted in invitations to serve on a number of scholarly panels and publications. The Journal of Educational Foundations recently featured an article “An Analysis of White Student Engagement,” which was drawn from Carter's dissertation. She is also co-author of two book chapters, “People, Places and Things: Examining the Impact of Institutional Characteristics on the Experiences of Black Males” in the forthcoming book, Black Males in Postsecondary Education, and “Yes I Can! Strengths-Based Approaches for Engaging Academically Underprepared Black Males,” from the book Black Men in Black Colleges: Implications for Diversity, Recruitment, Support and Retention. Carter continues to receive invitations to examine and publish research specific to the experiences of students within HBCU environments.

In 2003, Dr. Carter received the Exempt Staff Award for Minority Achievement from the President’s Commission on Ethnic Minority Issues. Since 1997, she has been extremely active with the Southern Association for College Student Affairs (SACSA) through a number of leadership roles and committee work. In SACSA, she has served as vice president for partnerships, program chair, and chair of the Multicultural Issues Committee. Currently, she is chair of the Association’s foundation. In 2002, Dr. Carter received SACSA’s New Professional Award, and in 2011 she was the recipient of SACSA’s Melvene Draheim Hardee award, which acknowledges the leadership and promise one has demonstrated to the organization and to the field of higher education Dr. Carter has been recognized by local, regional and national organizations for her work and commitment to the student affairs profession and for her contributions to higher education and the larger community. In 2007, she was named Woman of the Year by the Prince George’s County Business and Professional Women Organization for her work with a program called Girls Excelling in Math and Science. As a Woman of the Year recipient, she received citations from the Prince George’s County Council as well as from the Office of the Governor in Maryland. Dr. Carter and her husband, Randall, resided in Accokeek, MD for more than 13 years, where they were active in their community and worked to empower youth through discussions and presentations on leadership and life development skills. In 2007, the Carters received the Clarence E. “Bighouse” Gaines “Unsung Hero” award from WSSU. They recently relocated to Bowling Green, KY and have already begun establishing themselves in the local community. Joelle was selected as one of the keynote speakers for the city’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Annual Weekend Celebration, and Randall has volunteered with a local male mentoring group. n Portions of this article were reprinted with permission by Western Kentucky University from http://wkunews.wordpress. com/2012/07/11/joelle-carter/ (July 2012)

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TOMORROW'S EDUCATION LEADER Christopher Graham, a native of Snow Hill, NC and spring 2012 physical education graduate, has been selected to participate as a 2013 summer intern with the Southern Education Fund’s (SEF) Nonprofit Sector Social Justice and Education Policy Internship program.

Chris is currently enrolled in

the college counseling/student development in higher education program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Christopher Graham, Class of 2012

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Each year, SEF selects a group of outstanding upperclassmen and graduate students interested in this summer experiential learning opportunity. Over the years, more than 150 students have been placed in almost 70 non-profits and foundations in the Southern region of the U.S. In their roles, these interns assist in “providing advocacy, grant-making, policy analysis, research, community organizing, and direct service in education” (SEF website). Interns work for eight weeks during the summer in an organization focused on equity and excellence in education. Participants are exposed to research in the field, learn about civic engagement, and develop change-making strategies. In addition, they meet and interact with experienced leaders from education policy and practice. In working with other interns, they learn about contemporary education issues, create strategies for taking what they have learned back to their respective communities, and become a part of a network of emerging leaders in that particular focus or area of interest. Social justice is a major thrust of the summer internship program, an emphasis that is also one of the core propositions of WSSU’s School of Education and Human Performance. Chris’ assignment is at the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities in San Antonio, TX. According to the SEF website, he is researching and developing policy analyses on student success at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) and forming policy briefs, fact sheets, and data on the demographics of HSIs. Participation in SEF is an extension of the impressive record of participation Chris demonstrated while enrolled at WSSU, where he served as president of WSSU’s Real Men Teach program and as president of the Student North Carolina Association of Educators, the student affiliate of the National Education Association (NEA). He describes this new venture as a “huge challenge.” As a student at WSSU I took pride in finding ways to be engaged, sharpening my skills set, increasing my knowledge, and expanding my network. The same holds true today as an alumnus of WSSU. Being selected as a fellow of the Southern Education Foundation leadership initiative is humbling, especially when considering that the first fellow in the organization’s history was W. E. B. Du Bois.* So, I have a huge challenge ahead of me, but the challenge has been accepted, and it is exciting! The organization only selected about ten percent of its applicants, so it is by far one of the most competitive opportunities in the country. But that isn’t what makes me most proud. What gives me great joy is the opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder with some of

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the best and brightest young scholars from around the country and let them know that it was WSSU that developed such a scholar [as Chris]. I get the opportunity to showcase what it is WSSU has done and will continue to do – develop great scholars who go on to contribute to the world in remarkable and innovative ways. As I reflect while moving forward, the question I ask myself is, “What do I do with the privileges I have been afforded?” This internship will be a beginning in finding some answers to that very profound question as I continue my journey toward becoming a higher education administrator. As a student, Chris showed remarkable leadership acumen and resolve. In July 2012, he and a group of other student members of NEA met with U. S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in Washington to share their views about how the nation can improve its recruitment and support of great teachers and how best to learn from them. They expressed that they wanted to be respected for their choice to become educators, to serve schools and communities, and to get better support as they transition from being students to becoming teachers. Among the attendees were newly elected and outgoing leaders of student NEA chapters, including those from Virginia, Maryland, Tennessee, and North Carolina. In addition to the issue of student engagement, students also discussed concerns about schools that have decided not to allow student teachers in their schools; year-long, residential, classroom-based programs that pair new teachers with veteran teachers, similar to hospital-based residency programs; rigorous classroom-based performance assessment at the end of the candidacy period; minority teacher recruitment; funding for education; the Race to the Top program; and charter schools. While they did not agree on all issues, they did reach common ground when discussing the critical role educators should play in policy discussions and acknowledged that teachers’ voices are frequently not heard when such discussions are underway. * Chris provided this historical perspective about SEF: The foundation began in 1865 as the Peabody Education Fund, and Du Bois was a fellow with that organization. The Peabody Fund established several educational programs and endowments that funded public education system in the South. One of the most famous is the Peabody School of Education at Vanderbilt University. n

The original article appears on the NEA Today website: http:// neatoday.org/2012/07/10/how-should-we-support-new-teachersarne-duncan-hears-from-nea-student-members/ For more information about the Southern Education Foundation, go to www.southerneducation.org

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DONALD

Class of 1965

Donald B e nson

BENSON

Legacy: Campus ROTC, Student Information Systems, and Student Engagement Donald L. Benson enrolled in Winston-Salem State University in fall 1961. He graduated in 1965 with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. As a consummate scholar, he received academic awards each year of his matriculation as the student with the highest academic grade point average and was selected valedictorian of his graduating class. His scholastic recognition included Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities, the annual Sethos Scholarship for Academic Excellence and Citizenship, the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Award – given to the senior with the highest grade point average in Education, and the Student Teacher of the Year Award. Following his graduation from WSSU, Donald received a R.J. Reynolds scholarship to study as a special student in the area of race relations. In 1978, he was awarded the master of education degree in educational administration from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Almost 50 years have passed since Benson walked the campus of WSSU as a student. Today’s students, faculty, and staff continue to derive benefits from two special programs he initiated during his tenure as an administrator. As an educator, leader, and advocate for WSSU students, Donald established the Army ROTC program at the university in 1971 as a vehicle by which students might pursue a career in the military after being commissioned as an officer upon graduation. In this cross-enrollment program with Wake Forest University, Donald served as the WSSU academic advisor, as the program liaison between the two institutions, and as the institutional representative to Fort Bragg. This relationship with Wake Forest University continues today, and each year, during commencement exercise, graduates are commissioned into the United States Army at the rank of second lieutenant. Another of his innovations was the implementation of the Student Information System (SIS) that automated and integrated student records to meet the university’s student records maintenance requirements. This system is the precursor to WSSU’s current Banner system that serves students, faculty, and staff.

1965 to 1971, he taught at Fairview Elementary School, where he also served as assistant principal. Not one to be idle during the summers, Donald worked as a counselor and director of special activities in the Upward Bound program for three consecutive years. In 1971, he moved into higher education at WSSU, serving as dean of men, director of student life, director of student support systems, and assistant vice chancellor for student affairs. For three years, Donald served WinstonSalem State University as vice chancellor for student affairs. In 1996, he retired after twenty-five years of devoted service to his alma mater and over thirty years of service as an educator in the state of North Carolina. While deeply devoted to serving the students of WSSU, Donald has also demonstrated his concern for the welfare and development of youth in general, mostly notably through his service to the Best Choice Mentoring Program, the James A. Rousseau Minority Male Mentoring Program, the Bolton Elementary School Mentoring and Math Tutoring Project, and the Forsyth Technical Community College Advisory Board. His involvement in the Social Promoters Club, Jack and Jill of America, and the Couples Club reflects his commitment to family, friendship, and fellowship. Among various other avenues through which he serves the community are his membership formerly in the Laymen’s League at New Bethel Baptist Church and currently at United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church, the Executive Board of the Old Hickory Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Advisory Board of Crisis Control, and fifty years of service as a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Additionally, he is a 2012 recipient of the Clarence E. “Bighouse” Gaines “Unsung Hero” award from WSSU. Donald is married to Pauline Gaston Benson, a WSSU alumna (’65) and retired teacher. They are the exceptionally proud parents of a daughter, Dominique L. Benson, a 2001 alumna of North Carolina A&T State University and a 2007 graduate the Master of Business Administration program at High Point University. n

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First-Year Teacher from WSSU Receives “Promise Award” Three Additional New Teachers from WSSU Nominated (Excerpts

On April 15, the Forsyth Education Partnership celebrated first-year

reported by

teachers and recognized four of them for outstanding teaching. Of the

Kim Underwood

26 teachers (including four from WSSU) nominated by their principals

on Winston-

for The Promise Award, one of the four final recipients was Tamara

Salem/Forsyth

Levi, a spring 2011 graduate of the birth through kindergarten educa-

County Schools

tion (BKE) program. Ms. Levi, a pre-school teacher at the Children’s

website, with

Center, received $1,000 as this year’s Promise Award recipient.

permission) Ms. Levi has always known that she wanted to teach. After receiving her associate’s degree in speech and language, she worked as a teacher assistant at the Children’s Center while completing her degree in BKE at WSSU. She has extensive experience in education, given her years as a teacher assistant, but this is her first year as a classroom teacher. Carol Kirby, principal of the Children’s Center, recognized and appreciated Levi’s talent and enthusiasm when Levi came to the school as a teacher assistant. As soon as the opportunity presented itself, Kirby said she offered Levi a teaching position. “She brings that positive energy into the school every morning,” Kirby said. Tamara Levi

Levi’s class at the Children’s Center includes children with disabilities as well as children who do not have disabilities. She said that as a classroom teacher, she enjoys the freedom to be more creative than she was as a teacher assistant. Although she said she is not terribly excited about the added paperwork, she loves working at the Children’s Center. It is such a positive place. My heart is happy. . . I feel honored to be a teacher. I am so fortunate to work in a classroom where typically and non-typically developing children play together and learn together. My classroom is filled with such rich diversity that I find it an honor to not only teach these children developmentally and educationally appropriate curriculum, but also enhance their social-emotional relationships as well. The three other recent WSSU graduates nominated for The Promise Award are Rhonda Howell, B.S. degree in Elementary Education, fall 2011; Chaka Wilkes, Master of Arts in Teaching, Special Education-General Curriculum, spring 2012; and Latessa Sharpe, Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, spring 2012. n Excerpts reprinted from Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools website, retrieved April 16, 2013 from http://wsfcs.k12.nc.us/site/default.aspx?PageType=3&DomainID=1&ModuleI nstanceID=12708&ViewID=047E6BE3-6D87-4130-8424-D8E4E9ED6C2A&RenderLoc=0&Fle xDataID=118851&PageID=1

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WAVES

SAND SEAGULLS

BEACH: The sounds of breaking waves and seagulls. The crisp smell of salt in the air. The soft sensation of sugary sand between your toes. All of these conjure up memories of being at one of the most relaxing environments known to mankind. However, every spring, the beach serves another purpose for a group of individuals who share a common goal of working with individuals with disabilities. Since 1983, members of the North Carolina Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment Association (NCVEWAA) have met to conduct an annual professional conference, which has come to be known affectionately by the rehabilitation professionals in North Carolina as the “beach conference.” Each year, they have met at the same location – the sandy shores of Atlantic Beach, NC. And each year, they have met at the same hotel, the historic Clamdigger Inn. Apparently, the members of NCVEWAA, which is a state chapter of the national Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment Association (VEWAA), prefer consistency. The structure of the conference agenda has remained unchanged since the mid-1990s: a dayand-a-half meeting for rehabilitation professionals seeking networking opportunities with fellow practitioners and educators, highly-sought-after speakers sharing both clinical and data-driven presentations, and a traditional eastern style BBQ pig pickin’. The concurrent session times are exactly the same each year, and the meetings are held in the same rooms at the hotel every time. And the conference has served

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The Perfect Setting for Experiential Learning Rehabilitation Studies Conference Dr. Chad Betters, Assistant Professor, Rehabilitation Studies

as much as a reunion for North Carolinian “rehabbers” as it has an educational conference. Each year, the close-knit group that can recall the “early days” convene at the beach to reconnect and keep the tradition alive for another year.

2013 Rehabilitation Studies Student of the Month, stated that,

Going to this conference has further illustrated for me that staying

This year, however, the NCVEWAA conference looked a little different. The conference attendees typically include professionals in the field, educators from various universities, and graduate level students who present research posters and meet and greet for possible employment opportunities or doctoral program inquiries. The NCVEWAA student registration this year differed drastically from every other year in the history of the conference, thanks to the 27 undergraduate rehabilitation studies students who attended and proudly represented our program. The rehabilitation studies program, coordinated by Dr. Shawn Ricks, prepares students to work with individuals with disabilities in a variety of occupational settings, including various counseling arenas, occupational and physical therapies, and community-based rehabilitation positions. Established at WSSU in 2003, the rehabilitation studies program has graduated students who have gone on to pursue graduate training in a multitude of disciplines as well as those who have entered the labor market to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities. This nationally-accredited program has implemented programmatic objectives addressing student professional development, which now also includes student attendance at professional conferences.

involved in the field you go into is important for the professional contacts you can make, as well as staying current in what is happening in your field. This realization has encouraged me to make a point to stay involved within my profession in the future. The students also had a chance to see their professors in a different work environment. Dr. Chad Betters, who is currently NCVEWAA President, cocoordinated the conference and made presentations on national vocational evaluation credentialing issues. Dr. Shawn Ricks also presented on the impact of diversity within rehabilitation settings. The NCVEWAA will continue to operate as it always has, with the exception of a new addition to the beach conference: WSSU's rehabilitation studies program. Given NCVEWAA’s track record for honoring traditions, members can expect to see Rams at the beach for years to come. Now, that's the start of a new tradition for the conference! n

Student feedback has helped confirmed the success of this experience. Myra Bowman, who is the April

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Dr. Yolanda Edwards Receives the Dr. Sylvia Walker National Multicultural Award from the National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns Dr. Yolanda Edwards, professor of rehabilitation counseling and chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies, is this year’s recipient of the Sylvia Walker National Multicultural Award from the National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concern (NAMRC). The award was presented in August 2012 at the annual conference. Established in 2004, the award is named in honor of Dr. Sylvia Walker, a professor, researcher, and director of the first federal Research and Training Center (RTC) focused on minority issues and disability. Dr. Walker was also a longtime advocate for multicultural issues in rehabilitation.

D r.

The goals of the award are to honor and recognize an NRA member/group or organization in addressing multicultural issues Yola nda Edwa rds at the local regional or national level, and to maintain and stimulate NRA’s diversity and multiculturalism focus as a part of society. Nominees must demonstrate a leadership role in advancing multicultural issues within their areas of influence, provide examples of how they address multicultural issues, and demonstrate the benefits and outcomes of their efforts on service planning and/or delivery. Ultimately, their involvement should enhance the organization and the rehabilitation profession. Dr. Edwards was honored for her innovative curriculum development in rehabilitation studies that has increased the rate of student certification as rehabilitation counselors from 43 to 75 percent. She was nominated by her colleague, Dr. Brenda Cartwright, professor rehabilitation counseling at WSSU. Dr. Edwards holds the bachelor’s and master’s degrees from South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. She earned the doctorate in counselor education at the University of Iowa. She has been at WSSU since 2007, having served as coordinator of the rehabilitation counseling program until her appointment in January 2013 as chair of the Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies. n

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Preparing Teachers in Music Education Dr. Debbie O’Connell, Assistant Professor of Music Education - Department of Music

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Music with

music

education

licensure

is

designed for students who want to teach music to students in kindergarten through twelfth grade in the public schools. Students in this concentration acquire a broad liberal arts education, develop competencies in their choral or instrumental specialty area, and complete professional courses in education. The specialty courses in music develop the knowledge, musicianship, and skills that students need to be able to teach and direct music activities from early childhood through secondary school. Candidates in music education are required to meet specific program benchmarks, which include the completion of general education courses, formal admission into teacher education, a minimum semester and cumulative grade point average, early field experiences in schools, preclinical and student teaching, and other requirements for their specialty area. Upon successful program completion, candidates receive a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music and become eligible to apply for a North Carolina teaching license in music. As music education majors, our students must participate in ensembles such as marching band, symphonic band, jazz band, choir, and orchestra. They

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perform across campus throughout the year at football games, basketball games, homecoming, Founder’s Day, commencement, as well as in student recitals and concerts. Not only do our music education majors perform on campus and locally but nationally and internationally as well. From these experiences, students gain skills, get exposure, and develop networks to support their development. Music Education major, JaKenya Pearson, from Brown Summit, NC, reflected on her performance experience at WSSU: As a music education major here at Winston-Salem State University, the opportunities presented to me have been countless! I have been fortunate enough to belong to the University Choir as well as be a member of the Burke Singers Ensemble for several years. As a member of the choir, I have had the pleasure of performing in tours along the southern and eastern coasts, performing with the choir at Carnegie Hall in 2009, and singing as a featured soloist for commencement. Also as a choir member, I was in awe to perform under the direction of Donald Nuen for the performance of Haydn’s Creation and the Queen Pop Concert in the fall of 2011. As a music major, with voice concentration, I had the opportunity to participate in master classes with Awadagin Pratt and Maria Howell. In 2010 and 2011, I was selected as one of two representatives to perform in the 105 Voices of History choir in Washington, DC and Nassau, Bahamas, respectively. As a member of the 105 VOH, I had the pleasure of sharing the stage with gospel artists such as Kim Burrell and Shirley Caesar. This experience was a phenomenal opportunity to network with aspiring music educators, conductors, and renowned vocal instructors from HBCUs around the United States. As a former member of the Burke Singers Ensemble, my experience and opportunities were prodigious! Performing as a backup singer for Patti Alston and singing in the Pop Series with Robert Moody were amazing experiences, but perhaps the most significant experience I have gained from being in the ensemble was

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partaking in the voyage to Ghana, West Africa. This incredible opportunity was not only a once-in-a-lifetime event, but it solidified my passion for music and the art form it is. My experiences and opportunities as a whole have been nothing short of miraculous, and I am forever grateful to the instructors that have opened doors for any future career opportunities. Music education majors must take applied lessons each semester within their specialty area. They must demonstrate the depth of their understanding and application of content knowledge related to music through the presentation of a creative musical product for their senior recital, which is a capstone course that combines all of the music content areas, including music theory, music history, ear training, and performance technique. In addition to practicing and performing, our students must be prepared to teach in the public schools. Because our students are licensed to teach grades K-12, they must take a variety of music methods courses that prepare them to teach successfully at each grade level. Music methods courses are taught by professors who have taught extensively in the public schools and hold a current North Carolina teaching license. In addition to our excellent faculty, the music education majors take full advantage of the Teacher Education Advisement Partnership (TEAP) Center to assist them in preparing for the Praxis exam, practicing for the virtual introduction, and completing their admissions packet to the Profession Education Committee. Our male students have benefited from participating in the Real Men Teach (RMT) program, which provides students with the tools, training, and experiences that prepare them to be successful in their journey through the program to graduation. Music education major, Brandon Jenkins, is a RMT protégée, and he reflected on his journey to become a band director: I have had a tremendous experience at WinstonSalem State University studying to become a music educator. I have known that I wanted to be band director since the 6th grade, so my drive and continued on page 16

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motivation are really high in this vigorous program. Dr. Michael Magruder, director of bands and department chair, has been my primary teaching influence. Dr. Magruder has mentored me through words of wisdom and giving me teaching opportunities with the wind band ensembles at Winston-Salem State University. I was recently invited to join the “Red Sea of Sound” Marching Band staff as an assistant and music arranger. I have also been a guest student conductor with the University Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band, in which I conducted standard wind band literature as well as some of my own arrangements for those ensembles. These experiences helped me to have a very successful preclinical and student teaching experience in which I proved, with a sense of bravura, to both of my cooperating teachers that I am very capable of running and leading a successful band program. I have learned not only how to be an effective and efficient band director, but also how to be a leader in the classroom and an advocate for education everywhere. When our students graduate with a degree in music education, they are able to teach in the public schools or continue their education in graduate school. Our recent graduates have been able to quickly secure teaching positions in Winston-Salem, Greensboro, and Charlotte. Other graduates are currently enrolled in graduate school at the North Carolina School of the Arts, George Mason University, and Howard University. Our music education program is designed to give students the tools they need in order to be successful in their teaching career. Recent graduate Rolyndria Anderson reflected on her time at WSSU and how it has prepared her for her future endeavors, including her recent admission to Howard University’s Master of Music program in jazz vocal studies. Being a music education major at Winston-Salem State University has certainly been one of the most life-changing experiences I've had thus far. I came to the university expecting to improve upon my musical knowledge and enhance my musical skills but left with the latter, including a more mature outlook on life, a stronger sense of respect for those who teach, and

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a heightened sense of passion for all things musical, especially when it comes to singing. I have made global connections traveling with The Burke Singers, one of many ensembles featured at the university. As a member of this ensemble, I formed lifelong bonds with other highly-talented, female vocalists, traveled to Ghana, West Africa for an intercollegiate conference, embraced the art of improvisation, arranging, and composition through singing a cappella music arranged by members of the group, and served my collegiate community through performing at various events for a plethora of occasions. One of the greatest pieces of knowledge that I take away from my college experience encompasses the anatomy and preservation of the voice. Many vocalists do not succeed because they do not have a full understanding of what it takes to preserve their voice, how the voice works, how the human body works in tandem with the voice, and how to sing properly. To this day, I am grateful to my voice instructor, Ms. Deena Moore, who not only took time to coach me in regards to performance, but also in how to correctly take care of my vocal instrument. One of the beautiful things about being a music major at Winston-Salem State is the fact that you are being placed in some of the most giving, protective, supportive, and patient hands of all the faculty on the yard. Once they see your tenacity and drive, they immediately plug in and will do all they can to ensure your success and graduation from the program. Being a music education major has served as a way to do children's outreach, to do community service with various churches, and has definitely prepared me to serve in the professional world as a music educator and performer. During and after my tenure at WSSU, I have taught in many musical workshops as a vocal instructor and coach, been a music teacher assistant in public schools, and performed for the Inaugural Prayer Service in 2009 and 2013 with the Greensboro Symphonic Orchestra, the famous R&B recording artist Patti Austin, classical pianist Awadajin Pratt, and much more. I have been accepted and plan to attend Howard University in fall 2013 for a master’s degree in jazz vocal studies. The music education is proud of its students’ many accomplishments and looks forward to the challenge of adding more music education teachers to the field to help inspire, coach, and excite young children about music. Several studies show a strong correlation between music and academic performance. Our students have demonstrated the interdependence of these two factors and, as music educators, they are excited about adding to young children’s enjoyment of and participation in music and, clearly, they accept the challenge of employing their musical talents to help children improve their overall performance in the classroom and beyond. n

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y l e k i l n u

THE FACE OF PUBLIC P-12 EDUCATION IN NORTH CAROLINA:

RODNEY ELLIS, CLASS OF 1999 PRESIDENT, NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS The teaching force in the United States – and in the state of North Carolina – is primarily female and white.

According to the

U. S. Department of Education (2012), although more than 35% of students in public schools in the United States are African American or Latino, less than 15% of teachers are African American or Latino. Less than two percent of teachers in the nation are African American males. Moreover, black males are

disproportionately

repre-

sented among students who are suspended and expelled from school, assigned to special education classes, and classified as dropouts.

According

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only 10% of Black males were proficient in Grade 8 reading; this compares with 16% for Latino males and 35% for White, non-Latino

students. More than three times as many

Ellis was born in Mocksville, NC, the oldest of five children. He recalls being terrified on his first day of school. He and his cousin were dropped off at the school, looked at each other and realized where they were, and immediately bolted toward the front door to “get out.” He doesn’t recall why he was terrified; he just knew that he was. This is his first real memory of school, a memory that far too many students still hold about school.

Black as White, non-Latino students nation-

The Ups and Downs of School

males. One out of six African American students (17%) and one in fourteen Latino students (7%) were suspended at least once in 2009-10, compared to one in 20 White

ally are given out-of-school suspensions. Part II of the 2009-10 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) reports among its key findings that “African-American students, particularly males, are far more likely to be suspended or expelled from school than their peers. Black students make up 18% of the students in the CRDC sample, but 35% of the students suspended once, and 39% of the students expelled” (U. S. Department of Education).

Rodney Ellis, president of the state’s 70,000-member association of public school educators in North Carolina – and a 1999 graduate of Winston-Salem State University, can identify with these statistics. He’s a black male, a black male educator, and a black male who found life outside school more enjoyable than inside, so he stopped going – and failed. Ellis could have become what society commonly calls “a statistic,” that pejorative term used to characterize so many of America’s black youth, especially black males. And had it not been for two “amazing” school teachers, as Ellis Rodn ey Ellis calls them, and a supportive, loving, nononsense mother, his life would have turned out completely different. Not only did Ellis’ teachers make a tremendous impact on him as a young boy, but they helped inspire him to become a teacher. Today, Ellis is returning the

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favor as the (unlikely) face of public P-12 education in North Carolina.

By third grade, Ellis said he had made a personal commitment to do well in school each day, primarily so he could enjoy the privilege of going outside for recess. He and his cousin Keith were the only two black students in his third grade class in Mocksville, and they were also the only two generally excluded from going outside at recess to play with the other children. For reasons that he could never understand, he and Keith were required to put their heads on their desks while the other children exited the classroom for the playground. Each day, he tried harder and harder to do his work so he could go outside, thinking it was something he was doing wrong that prevented him from being able to go to the playground. He recounted that he was much too young to understand anything about racism; he just remained perplexed about why he and Keith could never go outside. One thing he did learn, however, was how to play table football, a game he and Keith played every day while the other children were outside on the playground. He became an expert at the game. Not to be discouraged by the forbidden playground incident, Rodney entered fourth grade equally determined to “do good” and where Mrs. Gore, his new teacher, made him feel that he “mattered.” She called on Rodney to read – something his third grade teacher had never done, praised him for his work, and even called in the principal and coach to listen to him read one of his assignments. He read voraciously, and he learned to write what he calls “great sentences.” Math was not one of his strongest subjects, so he immersed himself in reading and writing, which encouraged him to read and write all the more. Ellis credits Mrs. Gore with rekindling his love of school. Just last year, he thanked her personally – and publicly – at an event for retiring teachers. When asked if she remembered him, she said she “could never forget those eyes.” Ellis said his love of reading was fostered through comic books, for which he had an insatiable appetite. If he came across a word he didn’t understand, he went to the dictionary because he wanted to

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know what the main characters were saying to the villains. He then repeated these “big words” in class and in his conversations. This practice, he said, is what expanded his vocabulary. As excited as Mrs. Gore had made him feel about being such an excellent student, Ellis’ interest in reading and writing waned, taken over by his new love: basketball. By eighth grade, basketball had become more important to him than anything else. Ellis was as adept at skipping school as he was on the basketball court. He would leave home every morning, meet up at school with his “buddies,” and head for the basketball courts. Ellis recalls that he didn’t actually go to school “that many days” that year. He said he honestly felt confident the school would just let him pass to the ninth grade, so he continued to skip school, hanging out with his buddies and mastering the game of basketball. Just as daily practice in third grade had made him a table football expert, skipping school during eighth grade had made him a basketball expert. Ellis’ hopes of going to high school the next year, however, were dashed when he failed eighth grade. He says the reality of failing was nothing compared to his humiliation of now having to be in the same grade as his younger sister. He absolutely hated it! Once the reality of having failed sat in, Rodney “turned it around” again. He was an excellent eighth-grade student the second time around, making A’s and B’s, and becoming the starting player on the school’s basketball team, which went all the way to the state championship. Although his team lost, Ellis’ interest in school had been rekindled, due primarily to his coach, Mike Hrabek, whom Ellis credits with influencing his decision ultimately to teach eighth grade. He sees eighth grade as a significant transition point for students and thought this would be a good phase where he could make a difference in students’ lives, just as Mr. Hrabek – whom he thought of back then as “a cool white guy” – had done for him. It’s Personal As the oldest child, Ellis said he became very responsible, independent, and self-sufficient at an early age. By the time he was ten years old, he could cook, wash, iron, clean, and take care of himself and his siblings. He believes his role as the oldest child created within him a nurturing spirit that carries over into his role as a teacher and father. Ellis credits his mother for much of his success and describes her with obvious affection and appreciation. The day prior to our interview, he had mailed her a commemorative picture from President Barack Obama’s inauguration, which he had attended, and framed prints of Ellis with such dignitaries as Vice President Joe Biden, activist Al Sharpton, television and

radio talk show host Tavis Smiley, and journalist and syndicated columnist Roland Martin. He was anxiously awaiting the call he knew he would get from her as soon as she opened her mail at her home in Mississippi. Ellis speaks with immense pride about his four siblings. His oldest sister, who is one year his junior, is retired from the military and is currently a judge advocate general (JAG) in Tennessee. His brother, two years his junior, is a gunnery sergeant with the U. S. Marines, and his youngest brother, who is seven years younger than Ellis, owns a carpet and office building cleaning service. His youngest sister had the potential to become a professional singer, and Ellis said he wishes he had been able to do more to help her succeed at this. Ellis takes no personal credit for his career success. In addition to the lessons from his mother, he credits his wife, who is a registered nurse, and children with providing him with the daily motivation and energy to do his job. Ellis met his wife, Lisa, in 1989 while he was taking business classes at Miller-Motte Business College in Winston-Salem and she was enrolled at North Carolina A&T State University. MillerMotte eventually closed its Winston-Salem campus and transferred its students to the Greensboro campus. Tired of the daily commute, Ellis dropped out of school and picked up a third-shift job at Royal Cake Company in Winston-Salem. He met Lisa through his sister, who by now had enrolled at WSSU. After a brief courtship, Ellis and Lisa were married. Their first child was born almost two years later. Responding to his mother-in-law’s concerns that Lisa’s pregnancy would result in her dropping out of school, Ellis made a pledge to her that Lisa would graduate, and she did in 1992. The subsequent year, their second daughter was born. Working at night gave Ellis what he calls the rare privilege of being able to stay home during the day to take care of their daughters. Still working third shift, he often considered returning to college after his wife graduated, but he procrastinated. Ellis said his “defining moment” occurred one night in 1993 while he was working his third-shift job. It was his custom to read the local newspaper each night during his lunch break. He recalled that each night the paper was filled with stories about crime-ridden areas in eastern Winston-Salem, where drug abuse was reportedly rampant and the number of persons being killed – including young children – was escalating. Ellis decided he had to do something. He folded up the newspaper, went in to see his supervisor, resigned that night, and applied for admission to WSSU the following day! The rest, as they say, is history. He said he did not know any of the children he read about each day, but he felt the scourge of drugs was destroying young children and that he had to do something. He lived in continued on page 20

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the Bethabara area, so his personal life was untouched by the kind of activity he read about in the paper. But he said he was personally hurt by the stories he read about what was happening to children in this community. Again, he felt his nurturing spirit coming to the forefront. Ellis laughs when he remarks that it took him six years to graduate. When Miller-Motte College closed, officials told students they would not be responsible for paying tuition. However, Ellis was later billed and required to pay. On his salary, he said he could ill afford to pay Miller-Motte, cover his tuition at WSSU, and take care of his growing family. When his money did not “stretch” far enough, he simply enrolled part-time. He attended school during the day, worked at night, and skipped the extracurricular activities WSSU offered – until his junior year, which set the stage for the position he would eventually hold as the state’s leading teacher advocate. Ellis joined the Student North Carolina Association of Educators (SNCAE), the student affiliate of the National Education Association. At the insistence of his former professor, Dr. Wilbur Sadler, Ellis ran for president of SNCAE and won. He publicized and helped build the organization by entering a float in WSSU’s annual homecoming parade that year, spearheading fundraising events, and renting a vehicle to take fellow WSSU students to the state SNCAE meeting. That year, he also ran for president of the state chapter but lost. Following a tie vote, Ellis said he conceded the election because winning obviously meant more to his opponent – who cried upon learning of the tie vote – than it did to him. He committed to running the next year, and this time he won. He credits Dr. Sadler for fueling his involvement in campus life, which set the stage for his running for state office.

Road to the NCAE Presidency Furthering his path toward the presidency of NCAE, which even Ellis could not have fathomed at the time, he continued his involvement in the association after his graduation by becoming an active member of the Forsyth County Association of Educators (FCAE). His first teaching position was at Atkins Middle School (now Winston-Salem Preparatory Academy), where he served as the building representative for FCAE. He was chosen Teacher of the Year at the end of the school year but because of school policy could not be awarded the title. The second year, he received the distinction. Serving as the FCAE building representative at Atkins provided the opportunity for heightened involvement at the local level. Colleen Lanier, then president of FCAE, encouraged him to run for office. He entered his own name as a nominee for president; however, when the ballot was published, he was surprised to see his name listed as a candidate for vice president. Although seeing this was a bit unsettling, Ellis allowed his name to remain on the ballot, and he was elected vice president. Shortly after the election, the president became unable to serve, and Ellis, by default, became the local president.

black youth, especially black males.

Serving in the local chapter allowed Ellis to gain statewide recognition as a leader and, of greater importance to him, as a person of integrity. He created a newsletter, sponsored highly-attended events for teachers, and increased the local membership by over 700 persons. The local chapter, under his leadership, received numerous awards, which kept him in the public eye. The following year, Ellis was encouraged to run for vice president of the state affiliate. When asked what the key factor was in his election as vice president and later president so early in his career, Ellis said he believes it’s his integrity.

At WSSU, Ellis and two other students comprised many of his middle grades education classes, which were taught by Professor (now Dean) Manuel Vargas. He still recalls his classmates’ names – Jeff Barnes and Sandy McCauley. Ellis described some of the “amazing lessons” they learned in class but gave high attribution to the lessons he learned from Dr. Vargas outside the classroom. During his junior year, he was invited by Dr. Vargas to serve as his assistant for CERTL (Center of Excellence for Research, Teaching and Learning),

Ellis acknowledges that the role of state president is not entirely as he had envisioned it. One of his greatest challenges has come from his realization that teacher education issues across the state are not addressed in the same manner as had been done in his local chapter. He said that some issues he believed in at the local level have left him with questions at the state level. One example is NCAE’s non-partisan status, which seems contrary to the organization’s practice historically of supporting Democratic party candidates. This practice challenges his personal beliefs and the organization’s

Ellis could have become what society commonly calls “a statistic,” that pejorative term used to characterize so many of America’s

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a summer program for middle school students interested in careers in the health sciences. Frequently, he and Dr. Vargas would go to lunch together, and there they would have some of the most intimate and in-depth conversations. They discussed their philosophical beliefs, views about education and what it should be, and their aspirations for the education of children. He confided in Dr. Vargas, and they developed a strong and lasting relationship. He credits Dr. Vargas with “sharing so much wisdom and knowledge about life, about being a man, and having a lot to do with what I would become.”

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stand on non-partisanship. He believes that an individual’s support of the “education of our children,” not his or her political party affiliation, should be the determining factor in whether the candidates receives the support or endorsement of NCAE. Some members, he believes, feel disenfranchised simply because of the perceived partisan nature of some decisions. He is attempting to move the organization in a nonpartisan direction but realizes this will be a major challenge of his tenure as president. Although the presidency has not been exactly as he had envisioned it, he says, “We are going to do what is right.” At Home Ellis is most excited when talking about his children. His oldest, Gabby, will graduate this spring with degrees in sociology and Spanish from Western Carolina University. While he makes it clear that all his children hold a prominent place in his heart, Gabby is his firstborn. He recalls that as an infant, she would stay awake at night until he returned home from his third-shift job and promptly fall asleep on his chest. Each day, the two of them would fall asleep in this manner, which he says naturally makes her “close to my heart.” She’s a member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, which, along with his membership in Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., “keeps the blue and white in the family.” She returned home in December after spending a year in Uruguay, and Ellis said he was most proud of her when he visited her in July and saw her interacting with citizens, speaking the language fluently, and just “dealing.” He says she inherited his nurturing spirit. Ellis’ second daughter, April, is a rising senior political science major at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She has his tenacity. He says she always has a job, is committed to supporting herself without waiting for her parents to send money, and is what he calls a “hustler.” He thinks she will do well in politics. His 13-year-old “cheerleader extraordinaire” participates in a modeling school and is preparing for her debut. “She’s a natural,” he says. His only son, a 10-year-old fourth grader, is a phenomenal athlete. He plays AAU basketball and Pop Warner football, and he is a starting point guard, a starting quarterback, and a middle linebacker. He has Ellis’ athleticism but, to Ellis’ dismay, “He doesn’t share my love for reading.” The distinctive “twinkle” in Ellis’s eyes becomes considerably more obvious when he talks about his wife, whom he says has played a very instrumental role in his life. She has been an ardent supporter and source of great strength. He adds, “My wife and I have been together 24 years now, and I surely would not be who I am, where I am, without her unwavering support. My wedding day was great, probably the happiest day of my life, but I could never distinguish between that and the joy of my children’s births – “something special about that for

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me,” he says. I think I would say my wedding day was a very close second, followed by my graduation from WSSU and subsequent recognition with the Alumni Achiever Award [in 2010],” which he says is proudly displayed in his office. The “Unlikely Face” Ellis’ vision is for educators to enjoy their jobs again and to love what they do. If they are miserable, it shows in their behavior, and their students know it. He said too many of the decisions that impact teaching and teachers are made by people who have never taught. Ellis was the first black male president of FCAE. He said during his initial year, the organization lost many of its members. He suspects much of that had to do with his ethnicity but he feels he was able to “turn it around” once educators understood that he was their advocate and that he is a person of integrity. Recently a member told him that he did not know what Ellis was “about” at first but after hearing him speak and observing some of his actions, he said that Ellis was “all right.” He still finds himself in many venues throughout the state as the sole African American in the room. His support for public education and public school educators and professionals is unquestionable. That being settled during the course of his encounters, he says, “I walk in as a black man, but I leave as a man.” n

2012 The Schott 50 state report on public education and black males. Retrieved May 13, 2013 from http://blackboysreport.org/ urgency-of-now.pdf New data from U.S. Department of Education highlights educational inequities around teacher experience, discipline and high school rigor, March 6, 2012. Retrieved May 13, 2013 from http:// www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/new-data-us-department-education-highlights-educational-inequities-around-teache) Ricks, Dionna. Educating boys for success: are today’s classrooms biased against boys? U.S. Department of Education, March 6, 2012. Retrieved May 13, 2013 from http://www.nea.org/home/44609.htm U. S. Department of Education, Celebrating success: remarks of Secretary Arne Duncan at the Xavier University commencement, May 8, 2010.

Retrieved May 13, 2013 from http://www.ed.gov/

news/speeches/celebrating-success U. S. Department of Education, U.S. Secretary of Education Duncan and film producer Spike Lee to call on Morehouse students to pursue teaching careers. Retrieved May 13, 2013 from http://www. ed.gov/news/media-advisories/us-secretary-education-duncanand-film-producer-spike-lee-call-morehouse-stude

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RESEARCH DAY 2013 Dr. Michael McKenzie, Associate Professor, Exercise Science On April 9, 2013, instead of holding classes, WSSU held its annual Scholarship Day, a full day devoted to scholarship and research. Each year, during either the morning or afternoon of Scholarship Day, academic departments hold seminars for all their majors, but the highlight of the day is always the university-wide poster session that takes place in the Thompson Student Services Center. This year, the poster session was held in the dining hall to provide wider visibility and allow interested students and guests to view the posters and interact with student researchers. A total of 130 research posters were on display, with student researchers standing by ready to answer questions about their projects. Eleven posters were presented from the Department of Human Performance and Sport Sciences. They ranged from student-led investigations to funded grant projects. For two hours, students came into the dining hall and viewed one poster after another, asking numerous questions, and answering quiz assignments that had been given by their instructors. Some students attempted to locate their faculty mentors, and others simply wanted to learn more about current research in their respective fields.

Tell me and I forget; show me and I re me mbe r; involve me and I unde r stand . – Chinese prove rb

Lauren Pulliam, a senior exercise science major, presented a poster on her findings from a high-intensity training study. She had previously presented her work at a regional professional conference in April. Lauren said, “This day gave me an opportunity to brush up on my presentation skills and to learn what types of questions to anticipate moving forward.” Lauren’s work will be presented at a national conference in Indianapolis this summer. Elizabeth Reynolds, also a senior exercise science major, commented on the importance of the day: “It's a prime opportunity for students and professors to congregate and discuss their current research and studies. Ideas are shared and thoughts are provoked, which allow for greater work in the future.” This day was the culmination of work that had spanned an entire semester, during which students had paired with faculty mentors, prepared abstracts of their research, attended a poster-making session, created their posters, and presented their research professionally. The skills learned in this process are invaluable, as research is an ever-growing industry and is vital to the field of education, and students need to feel comfortable conducting research in their professions. It is very encouraging to know that there is such high quality work occurring across all disciplines at WSSU. It gives great hope for the students’ future and for the future of Winston-Salem State University. Due to record numbers of submissions and students in attendance, plans are already underway to expand next year’s scholarship day. n

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MORE Than I could have imagined In spring 2009, I graduated from Winston-Salem State University with a degree in elementary education and a minor in mathematics. Every day, 17 bright-eyed kindergarten children call me “Ms. Hicks.”

Rachel Hicks ’09, Elementary Education

WSSU prepared me to handle the everyday challenges of being an educator and a professional. I’ve spent the past three years refining my craft and further developing my expertise. It was a great honor, therefore, to be named the 2012-2013 Teacher of the Year, representing South Fork Elementary School for the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School system. The year 2012 was very exciting for me. During the summer, I was asked to co-write the kindergarten social studies unit plans for the entire county. I immediately agreed to help out with the project because I was able to see past the “summer homework” and understand the project for what it could really mean for me – an opportunity to grow as a professional educator. I was given the opportunity to research the Essential Standards and decide what information students in the county would be expected to learn at their respective grade levels. I did not take this responsibility lightly, and I poured myself fully into the project. When the school year started in August 2012, I was asked to take on another project, the opportunity to pilot a new technology initiative. I was given the task of introducing Hatch Early Learning Tablets into my education plans. These Android-based tablets are bursting with the potential to educate my five- and six-year-old students. As a Ram, I embraced the challenge and, once again, saw the hidden potential for me to grow as a professional educator. I entered Winston-Salem State University to learn, and with the help of my professors and advisors, I departed with more knowledge and skills than I could have ever imagined. n

Since Rachel submitted her article, we have learned that she completed her graduate coursework at Appalachian State University this summer and plans to graduate in December. Next school year, she will be teaching fourth graders instead of kindergarteners. Her class is participating in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools’ “Bring Your Own Device” initiative, which Rachel says will help enrich her students’ educational experience and enable them to meet the rigorous demands of the Common Core. To support students who cannot afford the tablet, Rachel has enrolled in the Donors Choose program so that interested persons may to donate to her project. Once the project has been fully funded, the Google Nexus 7 Android tablets will be shipped to the school. More information about Rachel’s Donors Choose webpage can be found at h t t p : // w w w. d o n o r s c h o o s e . o r g / we-teach/1862348.-41933477

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O’Connell Travels to Rio de Janeiro

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Dr. Debbie O’Connell, assistant professor of music, has been selected to participate in an international faculty development seminar in Rio de Janeiro this summer. Dr. O’Connell coordinates the music education licensure component of the Bachelor of Arts in Music program. The Community Engagement and Development Seminar will be conducted May 22-31. It is hosted by the Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro. Dr. O’Connell will learn about the history, culture, and socioeconomic conditions of Rio de Janeiro. Part of the seminar about culture will feature Samba D e bbie O 'Conn ell and Brazilian percussion lessons. Through a series of service learning projects, Dr. O’Connell will see how the community engages in selfimprovement efforts. The Rio de Janeiro community strives to integrate more of the marginalized parts of society into the middle class as a way of improving the city’s safety and economic viability. Dr. O’Connell will reside with a host family during part of her stay. Dr. O’Connell is also co-author of an article entitled “Sound Exposure Levels of University Jazz Band Members” published in the Fall 2012 issue (Vol. 48, No. 1) of the Journal of Band Research. The study investigated the sound exposure levels of university jazz band members across the state. Results from the study reveal that the majority of university jazz band members experience sound overexposure during a typical jazz band rehearsal. Dr. O’Connell also co-authored an article on drum corps sound exposure. “How Loud Is a Drum and Bugle Corps?” appears in the July/August 2013 issue of Halftime magazine. n

GEMS

(GIRLS EMPOWERED BY MATH AND SCIENCE)

Dr. Denise T. Johnson, assistant professor in the Master of Arts in Teaching – Middle Grades Education program, received a $5,000 cash award from Time Warner Cable through its Connect A Million Minds (CAMM) program. CAMM is committed to buildD r. D e nise T. J ohnson ing the next generation of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) problem solvers. The cash award was given in support of efforts by WSSU and GEMS (Girls Empowered by Math and Science) to promote the involvement of middle-school girls in mathematics and science. n The CAMM "Connectory" is located at www.connectamillionminds.com

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Improving the

Cultural Competence of Early Childhood Educators

Dr. Beth Day-Hairston, associate professor of special education, is principal investigators for a grant-funded program to improve the cultural competence of the early childhood workforce in North Carolina. The grant of $957,797 was awarded by the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services' Division of Child Development and Early Education. It is being funded by North Carolina’s federal Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge program, which is designed to promote innovation and reform in early child care and education. Dr. Day-Hairston and the colleagues who assisted in developing the proposal believe that the program will help early childhood educators develop, practice, and enhance culturally responsive teaching practices and enable them to engage parents to support their children’s learning and development. The grant will support efforts to develop a comprehensive and responsive curriculum for early childhood professionals, who are very influential in the care and education of young children. The WSSU Practice Improvement Collaborative that has been established from these funds will engage 100 participants in learning institutes and in teams to develop a curriculum that strengthens the ability of teachers, programs, and agencies involved in early childhood education to offer high quality programs. Equally important are programs that are being designed from a cultural and linguistic basis that values the diversity of children served, enhances their learning, and engages their families. The collaborative is comprised of a cross-cultural group of teachers, parents, and community leaders, emerging and experienced early childhood leaders, center administrators, staff from the state Division of Child Development and Early Education, and WSSU teacher education faculty. Dr. Kimberly Pemberton, assistant professor of elementary education, will play a key role in helping train staff, engage parents, and develop curriculum materials that reflect the cultural and linguistic diversity of young children in North Carolina’s early childhood facilities. Action research, which is a central focus and outcome of the collaborative, will be facilitated by coaches who have expertise in cultural competence and early childhood care and education. n

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I AM READY TO TEACH:

VOICES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION GRADUATES Fran B. Oates, Coordinator, Elementary Education

“Exuding Levels of Excellence” is the winning slogan for elementary education (ELE) teacher candidates. The slogan, coined by Satira Holliday, a spring 2012 graduate from Philadelphia, captures the essence of the historical legacy of Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) and its continuous drive for excellence in teacher education. The focus of excellence began when WSSU was founded in 1892 as the Slater Industrial Academy. Winston-Salem State University has a long history of contributions to the field of elementary education. The new ELE slogan reflects the continuous high quality of elementary school teacher preparation that in 1925 warranted the General Assembly of North Carolina to reward the University with a new name, WinstonSalem Teachers College, and a new charter with authority to confer degrees. As such, “Teachers College” became the first historically Black institution in the United States to grant elementary education degrees. High levels of excellence, no doubt, were required in order for the institution to receive this auspicious recognition. It is fitting during this year of our 120th anniversary to recognize the tenacity and courage of our founder, Dr. Simon Green Atkins, for his commitment as an advocate for social justice: liberating African Americans from the bondage of illiteracy. The legacy of his devotion to educating those who would otherwise not have had the opportunity represents the levels of excellence expected in WSSU’s elementary education program today and is embodied in the program’s commitment to social justice. Fra n B . Oates

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As a 1974 graduate of WSSU’s elementary education program, I am a product of Dr.

Atkins’ vision of excellence. In fall 2006, I returned to serve as coordinator of the elementary education program. My strong desire to continue the legacy of excellence propels me to make habits of excellence as contagious among my students as my WSSU professors made them for me. Today, I teach habits of excellence in each course, and my students and I celebrate excellence at all levels. When asked, “At what level will you perform as an ELE major?”, teacher candidates respond in unison, “There is a high expectation for excellence in the demonstration not only of knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed for teaching, but also in the social understanding of oneself, not only as an educator, but as a citizen in society.” Excellence, then, is not just a grade for which elementary education majors aspire; it is a habit, and it is an expectation that Satira Holliday fulfilled during her matriculation in the program. Her voice and the voices of the spring 2012 graduates echo the slogan “Exuding Levels of Excellence.” Satira explains her basis for developing this slogan, what it represents to our program, and why she feels she is now ready to teach. I came to Winston-Salem State University because my uncle was a Ram, and he was determined to have one of his nieces or nephews carry on the family’s Ram tradition. All he talked about was his great experience here. I did my research about the elementary education program and heard that it was great, so I applied and got a full scholarship. I am now ready to teach, and I am excited to have my own classroom. What prepared me best for teaching were

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WS S U e duc ation stude nt s par ticipate in the B eginning Teache r Suppor t Institute breako ut session on J une 1 5 , 2012 .

the hands-on experiences, field experiences, and the actual opportunity to be in the classroom. I had the foundation, but once I was in the classroom, I could practice the theory I had been taught. Everything came into reality. This is the first time I had you [Ms. Oates] as an instructor; excellence is an expectation. In everything you say and everything you do, it comes through, it exudes. I chose those words because ELE is the acronym for elementary education and I found out that the elementary education program is excellent. When excellence exudes, it means you know it, you can see it everywhere. It means coming forth; you can’t stop it; it’s coming from everywhere. No matter where we go and no matter what we do, everyone else can see it coming from us. People recognize excellence when they see it. It’s been a great experience and I can’t imagine being anywhere else. I value all that I have learned and all that I have gone through: the good, the bad, the ugly, everything. I look forward to coming back and sharing with new candidates what I have learned. Elementary education majors performed at high levels of excellence this year, as Satira and others in her cohort demonstrated. They were the first to participate in edTPA (Education Teacher Performance Assessment), which is a national teacher performance assessment. Our decision to participate in this collaborative represents a historically significant move for the elementary education program and the department of education. We are the only HBCU in North Carolina to complete the national assessment and the state-required evidence assessments, which has a level of rigor that exceeds the North Carolina teaching standards.

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Octavia Hammond, also a spring 2012 graduate and a teacher at Julian Gibson Elementary School in Winston-Salem, completed both the national and state performance-based assessments. She speaks to their rigor and the value of going through the process. The TPA was like nothing I had ever done before. I knew I would be looked at nationally, and I wanted to be meticulous and thorough. Not knowing what to do, without an example, really scared me at first, but now I can O c tavia H a mmond see how struggling through it to learn my own teaching skills was well worth all the work. It was hard, and it took an enormous amount of time to complete, but it was worth it to know how to reflect on all that I do as a teacher. I am ready to teach and I am so excited to have my own class. WSSU, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and East Carolina University are the only three teacher education programs in North Carolina participating in edTPA. They join a consortium of teacher preparation programs in 23 other states. This is just one more indicator of our efforts to ensure excellence in the elementary education program. Only those experiences at the highest levels could yield the degree of competence reflected in these graduates’ performance. They are now members of the historic and prestigious league of educators who have graduated from Winston-Salem State University. The spring 2012 elementary education graduates walked through the infamous arches ready to learn, and they have departed well-prepared and ready to teach! n

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Real Men Teach Inducts 18 ProtÉgÉs... Dr. Rodney Coleman, Coordinator, Real Men Teach

Real men teach. Not only does this slogan respond affirmatively to the question about the proper role of men in a profession dominated disproportionately by women, it also describes the School of Education and Human Performance’s unique student services program and is the recruitment mantra for a new wave of teacher leaders. Real Men Teach is a multifaceted academic program designed for emerging male teacher leaders. Since its inception in 2007, the Real Men Teach program has continued to provide male students – called protégés – with a unique and welldefined mentoring and support system, which includes assistance in passing the state-required Praxis I exam required for admission to teacher education programs and the Praxis II exam required prior to program compleD r. tion, modest financial support, personal development, educational leadership preparation, and professional skills training. In addition, each protégé is paired with a mentor who offers holistic coaching during the protégé’s matriculation. One such mentor is James Braswell, physical education lecturer, who comments on how he views his role as an RMT mentor: It is my duty to stand with these young men and to help prepare them for the walk of their lives. I am a firm believer that if you ‘give a man a fish, he will eat for a day; teach a man to fish, he can eat for a lifetime.’

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The protégées value these relationships with mentors and understand the tremendous role mentors play in helping them achieve success. Two of the most recent inductees reflected on what the program means to them. Eric Glenn, II, a sophomore middle grades education major from Charlotte, says, “I’ve never had a mentor before. I’m excited that RMT will offer me great mentorship, which will support me while I pursue my goal of becoming a teacher.” Trimaine Sligh, a junior physical education major from Durham, echoed Glenn: “RMT has given me the support needed to pursue my dream of becoming an educator. I want to become an educator to have a positive impact on children, uplift my community, and be a role model to others.” RMT currently serves 32 active protégés, Ro dney Cole man whose areas of preparation include nine specialized fields: physical education, elementary education, music education, middle grades education, secondary mathematics, secondary English, special education, and birth through kindergarten education. Of the 32 protégés, 18 – the largest class ever – were inducted during the spring 2013 ceremony. On March 23, in the presence of family and guests, and following the challenge by guest speaker Nigel Alston, protégés recited their pledge and were draped with the signature RMT necktie. But RMT is about more than just reciting the pledge and wearing the neckties. RMT helps to equip male students with the skills they need to become effective

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teachers and teacher leaders, and this path toward leadership in the profession begins with assuming responsibility and leadership on the campus. Chris Graham, former Real Men Teach protégé (spring 2012 graduate) and past president of the organization, described some of the benefits he derived from participating in the RMT program: As a first-year graduate student at UNCG’s nationally ranked (third in the nation) college counseling/student development in higher education program, I have grown to admire and appreciate how RMT helped me develop even more. It was in that program that I started my leadership journey. I also faced challenges that taught me about self, service, and commitment. I've always had a commitment to excellence, and that was magnified for me during my tenure in the program. I will always remember and be grateful for the WSSU SEHP family, not only for developing such a great program but also a young, aspiring leader. The thing I love about RMT and what makes it different from other programs is that RMT not only prepares great teacher leaders, but it provides them with the skills needed by young men in the program to become great in all walks of life. I am well on my way as I prepare for my career in higher education, and RMT has a lot to do with that. I am proud to be a product of RMT and WSSU!

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Graham has also agreed to give back to the program by becoming one of the RMT newest mentors. He wants to ensure that the current RMT protégés receive the same support that was given to him during the time he was a protégé. Rodney Ellis, President of the North Carolina Association of Educators, gives back to the program continuously. As an RMT mentor, he has been one of the program strongest advocates. Each semester, he returns to the university to provide seminars and workshops to assist the protégés in enhancing their leadership skills. He also stops by the campus from time to time to speak with students informally and attend meetings. Ellis praises WSSU for its focus on preparing male educators. He adds, I am elated that my alma mater has an awesome student support program like Real Men Teach that ensures that our males who declare education as a major will receive adequate and holistic support during their matriculation, ensuring that they will become the nation’s next greatest teacher leaders. The Real Men Teach program continues to carry on WSSU’s and SEHP’s legacy by producing great male professional educators who have entered to learn and who will depart to serve our communities by becoming positive role models and by serving as agents of change to ensure that the lives of students in our communities are impacted in rich and positive ways. Black males comprise less than two percent of America’s teachers, making the need for a program like RMT especially significant, as Dr. Manuel Vargas, dean

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of the School of Education and Human Performance, notes: To say that we need more male teachers is to state the obvious. While we need excellent teachers, male or female, the need and demand for male teacher role models is immense. Of the nearly 12,000 new teachers that the state of North Carolina needs every year, public universities produce only one-third of that. Of this third, only a fraction is made up of male teachers. These numbers tell the truth; we need more of you!

AND WELCOMES A NEW COORDINATOR The 2013 induction ceremony coincided with the arrival of the new Real Men Teach project coordinator, Dr. Rodney L. Coleman, a 1999 graduate of Winston-Salem State University. Dr. Coleman earned his bachelor of science degree in elementary education, his master’s degree from Wake Forest University, and his doctorate from United Theological Seminary, with a specialization in financial literacy. Prior to returning to his alma mater, Dr. Coleman spent four years with Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools as a third grade teacher, two years as a sixth grade language arts teacher, and three years as a primary reading teacher for students in grades K-6. In 2012, Dr. Coleman, who is also a songwriter, musician, and music

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producer, launched Colebro Music Academy, a music literacy academy that teaches middle and high school students the art of songwriting and music production, while also helping them comprehend the many synergies that music education has with other education disciplines, including English/language arts, mathematics, and science. Dr. Coleman, who comes from a family of teachers, attributes his desire to attend Winston-Salem State and become a teacher to his mother, Verna Coleman, a 1972 graduate of Winston-Salem State University and retired educator who spent forty years as a kindergarten teacher. Coleman credits the many professors and support staff in Winston-Salem State University’s department of education for his successful teaching career. He said that during his matriculation, they nurtured him, encouraged him, and prepared him to enter the educational workforce. Dr. Coleman explains that this is why he was so excited and honored to return to his alma mater. “I am fortunate and blessed to return to Winston-Salem State University’s School of Education and Human Performance so I can give back to the program that shaped me into the professional I am today.” When asked about his vision for the Real Men Teach program, Coleman responded, “My vision for this program is simple: growth, sustainment, and enhancement. Many sacrifices, great and small, have been made to ensure that our male students who aspire to become teachers are given the best holistic support services this university and SEHP have to offer. I am honored to have taken this mantle to ensure that the Real Men Teach program goes to another dimension.” n

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ALUMNI Danielle Anderson (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches at Petree Elementary School in Winston-Salem.

Toward the goal of preparing “more of you,” Dean Vargas and the Real Men Teach staff inducted the following students as RMT protégées in spring 2013: Kevin Alston, Master of Arts in Teaching/ Special Education Dale Barger, senior, Elementary Education Christopher Bearden, junior, Physical Education Kristyn Daney, Master of Arts in Teaching/ Middle Grade Mathematics Eric Glenn, II, sophomore, Middle Grades Education Thomas Hubbard, junior, Middle Grades Education Bradley Kiger, senior, Special Education

Rolyndria Anderson (2012 B.S. in Music Education) has been accepted to Howard University’s Master of Music program in jazz vocal studies. She will enroll this fall. Martha Arrington received her teacher’s license in physical education in spring 2012; she is the athletic director and physical education teacher at the Millennium Charter Academy in Mt. Airy. Zsaquia Baxter (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a first grade teacher at North Hills Elementary in Winston-Salem. Hilary Bellinger (2012 B.S. in Music Education) has been a teacher and band director at the STEAM Academy in WinstonSalem. In fall 2013, he will move to another local school.

H ila r y B e lling e r, right

Jasmine Clyburn (2011 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches second grade at Petree Elementary School in Winston-Salem.

Mason King, junior, Secondary Mathematics Westley Krider, senior, Elementary Education Tony Lindsay, sophomore, Pre-Education Major Jason McRae, senior, Middle Grades Education JaMarkis Mitchell, freshman, Middle Grades Education Krishawn Noble, junior, Middle Grades Education

Shemekia Dennis (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches third grade at Konnoak Elementary School in Winston-Salem. Dominica Deloatch (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches second grade at Bolton Elementary School in Winston-Salem. Taylor Dodson (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches second grade in Maryland. Jason Freeman (2011 B.S. in Music Education) is pursuing a master’s degree in music performance at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts.

Frederick Royster, freshman, Elementary Education Roger Thompson, sophomore, Elementary Education Jonathan Watson, junior, Birth to Kindergarten Education Travon Woods, sophomore, Elementary Education Jarrin Wooten, junior, Elementary Education

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Octavia Hammond (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a third grade teacher at Julian Gibson Elementary School in Winston-Salem.

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N E WS Pamela Haskins (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches fifth grade in Winston-Salem. Rachel Hicks (2009 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a kindergarten teacher at South Fork Elementary School in Winston-Salem. She was also the 2012-13 Teacher of the Year at South Fork Elementary. She will teach fourth grade this fall.

M a rg o Ford H olm a n (ce nte r lef t) surro un d e d by h e r s tu d e nt s a n d co te a ch e r D orothy

Margo Ford Holman, a 2007 graduate of the birth through kindergarten education program, received her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Ashford University in December 2012. Currently, Mrs. Holman is a pre-school educator at Vandalia Elementary School in Greensboro. At her school, Mrs. Holman participates in the threeyear Mission Possible Leaders Grant, in which Mission Possible teacher leaders model, coach, and observe, while ultimately increasing student achievement.

B ulla rd (ce nte r, right)

Brianna Hooks (2012 B.S. in physical education) teaches physical education at Kingswood School and Walkertown Middle School. Next school year, she will be teaching at Kernersville Middle and East Forsyth Middle in Kernersville. d uring th e sch o ol ’s

“ Paja m a Day ” eve nt .

Ruby Norman, a 2005 graduate of the birth through kindergarten education program, received her master of arts degree in education with a specialization in early childhood Ruby N o rm a n education in 2012 from Ashford University. Currently, Ms. Norman is director of the McElveen Child Development Center, Guilford Child Development, in Greensboro. The center has four pre-K classrooms, two Early Head Start classrooms, and two Head Start classrooms; it serves approximately 120 children. Natasha Nesbitt (2013 B.S. in Music Education) has received a scholarship from Norfolk State University’s School of Music, where she will pursue her master of music degree, with a concentration in vocal performance. Hakim Nelson-Wilder (2013 B.S. in Music Education) has received a graduate assistantship from Tennessee State University, where he will pursue the Master of Science in Music Education degree beginning fall 2013. The assistantship covers full out-of-state tuition and is valued at over $15,000. H a kim N e lso n -Wild e r Amy Phaup (2011 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a third grade teacher at Bolton Elementary School in Winston-Salem.

Rhonda Howell (2011 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a teacher at Walkertown Elementary School in Winston-Salem. She was nominated by her principal for the Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County Schools Promise Award for outstanding teaching, spring 2013.

Kwan Rothwell (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches third grade in Indiana.

Janee Johnson (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches second grade in Virginia. Krystal Mackey (2011 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches first grade at Hampton Elementary School in Greensboro.

Latessa Sharpe (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) is a second grade teacher at North Hills Elementary; she was also named “Rookie Teacher of the Year” and was nominated by her principal for the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Promise Award for outstanding teaching in spring 2013.

Setoria Moore (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches at Eno Valley Elementary School in Durham.

Travis Strong (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches in Shelby.

Michah Moxley (2011 B.S. in Physical Education) is a physical education teacher at Winston-Salem Preparatory Academy in Winston-Salem.

Chaka Wilkes (2012 Master of Arts in Teaching in Special Education-General Curriculum) was nominated by her principal to receive the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Promise Award for outstanding teaching in spring 2013.

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Renea Scott (2012 B.S. in Elementary Education) teaches at Ibraham Elementary School in Winston-Salem.

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Corporate Sponsors and Donors 2008 – May 2013 CORPORATE SPONSORS

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation American Honda Foundation Sport Dimensions, Inc. North Carolina Motorsports Association N.C. Mutual Life Insurance

DONORS The School of Education and Human Performance gratefully acknowledges the donors who made financial contributions to the school between 20082013. We appreciate the generous support of our alumni and friends. We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this donor list. Please contact 336-750-2184 if you are aware of any omissions or have questions or concerns about the list. Ms. Brenda Cooper Adams Ms. Mamie Alston Ms. Saundra Pridgen Amos Ms. Phyllis D. Anderson Ms. Chanda Armstrong Ms. Vertis Armstrong Ms. Ida R. Bailey Ms. Dennette C. Bailey Mr. Michael Bailey Ms. Delores C. Bailey Dr. Amber Baker Mr. Leslie Baker Ms. Remona Mackins Banner Ms. Barbara Barnes Ms. Dorothy Ann Battle Ms. Norma Bayes Mrs. Edna Gwynn Bazemore Mr. James Beatty Dr. Edwin D. Bell Mr. Henderson Benjamin Ms. Betty I. Bennett Dr. Carolynn B. Berry Mrs. Ruby Wiggins Bethel Mr. Lawrence D. Billups Mrs. Dollie Settle Bishop

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Ms. Shirley L Borders Ms. Ruth Shackleford Bowen Mr. Donnell Bowie Mrs. Minnie Harris Boyd Ms. Thurlia W. Brandon Ms. Bertha L. Brandon Ms. Janet Ann Brinker Ms. Grace McRae Broadnax Ms. Janet R. Brower-Thomas Mrs. Barbara Moore Brown Mr. Carl Edward Brown Ms. Carolyn A. Brown Dr. Cynthia W. Brown Ms. Barbara Moore Brown Mr. Frank Brown Ms. Mildred Bryant Mr. Willie Jethro Buie Mr. Logan Burke Ms. Mary Vanhook Burt Mr. Stephen Allen Butler Ms. Lucy Cabell Dr. Joelle Davis Carter Mrs. Vonnie Wilson Carrington Mr. Charles Carrouthers Ms. Daisy R. Chambers Ms. Rose Williams Chavis Mrs. Harris Clara Mr. Gilbert J. Clark Ms. Dorothy Sidberry Clark Ms. Shannon O'Brien Clarke Mrs. Doris M. Clawson Mr. Robert J. Claybrook Ms. Azell Cockerham Dr. Jo Ann Coco-Ripp Ms. Gloria and James Devane-Coleman Ms. Betty Collins Mr. Stenson Conley Ms. Jennifer Marie Correll Ms. Shirley Coward Cox Ms. Gloria Green Cox Mrs. Dorothy Greene Craine Ms. Margie B. Crawford Ms. Bessie B. Dancy Ms. Bronnie Harris Daniels Ms. Rita C. Darby Ms. Bernice Howard Davenport Ms. Ulysses Davis Mr. Robert Dawkins Ms. Olivia G. Day Ms. Johnsie Yongue Dease Ms. Brandi N. Dennis Ms. Lois Patterson Dixon Dr. Patricia Douville-Ricker Ms. Celesta J. Dudley Ms. Autumn Patrice Duke Ms. Winnie Little Dula Mrs. Jacqueline Rainey Dunlap Mr. Benjamin T. Dupree Ms. Josephine M. Edge Ms. Jeanne D. Edwards Dr. Catherine Eilenberger Mr. James Ellis Ms. Tressie Dingle Ellis Ms. Alice Jean Ellis

School of Education and Human Performance Mr. Cleveland Ellison Mrs. Elvira Hunt Mrs. Jakay W. Ervin Mrs. Minnie Jackson Evans Mr. James Henry Evans Ms. Sadie E. Faison Ms. Shirley W. Farrar Ms. Laura Earnestine Ford Mr. James D. Franklin Ms. Barbara A. Freeman Mr. James W. Freeman Mrs. Claudia F. Fuller Mr. Leon Gabriel Ms. Mary Gabriel Ms. Irma Gadson Mr. Lester Gaither Mr. Bobby and Barbara Garrett Ms. Yasmin Gay Ms. Mae Godette Ms. Flora E. Golden Ms. Geraldine Green Gooch Mr. William A. Goodlett Mr. Donald Leon Gorham Ms. Alice Boyd Grady Ms. Janelle W. Graves Mr. Milfred Filmore Greene Ms. Gwendolyn Friende Greens Ms. Allegro Bryant Greene Mr. Thaddeus Shoaf Griffin Mr. Thomas S. Gunnings Ms. Annie M. Hicks-Hager Ms. Annie Richardson Hairston Ms. Ashley D. Hairston Dr. Beth D. Hairston Mr. Peyton T. Hairston Ms. Tanya Hairston Mr. Gregory C. Hairston Ms. Merna R. Hampton Mr. Eugene Leroy Hanes Mrs. Eunice H. Hannah Ms. Tari Hanneman Ms. Rachel Hargis Mrs. Clara Hampton Harris Ms. Danielle Arnetta Harris Mr. William U. Harris Mr. James R. Hart Mr. Earl Hart Mr. Allen Leroy Hartie Mr. Robert N. Harvey Mrs. Paul Hayes Mr. William Hayes Ms. Catherine Hemingway Mr. Benjamin F. Henderson Ms. Alice E. Hightower Mrs. Johnnye Bratton Hill Mr. Rudy Hill Ms. Mary Hinson Ms. Eleanor Artis Hinton Ms. Elaine Hitchcock-Melvin Ms. Martha Grimes Holland Ms. Margo Holman Ms. Gertrude Euzenia House Ms. Wilma Lee Howard Ms. Sara L. Hughes

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Corporate Sponsors and Donors Ms. Agnes Langston Hughes-Griffin Mr. Tom Humble Ms. Elvira Rebecca Hunt Ms. Gloria Newton Hunt Ms. Rebecca Hunt Mrs. Madie E. Ingram Ms. Priscilla Jackson-Wiggins Ms. Iris Bonds Jarrell Chancellor Alex B. Johnson Mrs. Evelyn J. Johnson Ms. Shenae E. Johnson Ms. Vivien Oden Johnson Ms. Gwendolyn G. Johnson-Green Mrs. Hattie L. Johnson-Norris Ms. Casey Jones Ms. Dermetta Jones Ms. Thea Victoria Jones Ms. Aretha V. Jones-Moultrie Ms. Jeanie Joyner Ms. Susie Smith Keele Ms. Shirley Kimbrough Ms. Margaret S. King Ms. Bettie H. Kornegay Ms. Gwendolyn Nesbitt Kornegay Ms. Barbara Miller Lash Mrs. Ericsteen Jefferson Lash Mr. Daniel C. Laws Ms. Glorious Sharpless Leaven Mr. Elliott Lemon Mr. Charles B. Lewis Ms. Hazel Lipscomb Ms. Yvonne Carraway Lofton Ms. Nina Bolden Long Ms. Shirley Parker Long Mrs. Wilhelmina B. Long Dr. Charles Love Ms. Muriel Lewis Lovell Mr. Donald E. Lowrance Ms. Brenda S. Lyles Ms. Pamela Lyons Mr. Dorothy L. Mack Ms. Mildred M. Macon Dr. Francine G. Madrey Mrs. Barbara J. C. Manning Ms. Candace D. Marsh Ms. Beatrice Harris Martin Ms. Edith Williams Massey-Stephens Mr. Donald Mebane Ms. Norma Miklea Mr. Jerry A. McCollum Ms. B. D. McCown Ms. Barbara W. McCracken Mrs. Minnie R. Dawkins McDonald Ms. Lillian C. McDowell Mr. Richard A. McElrath Ms. Johnnie McFadden Ms. Erma F. McGimpsey Mr. Michael McKenzie Ms. Mary Seymore McKinnon Ms. Betty J. McNeil Mr. Herman McNeil Mr. David L. Meadows Mr. Tyrone J. Melvin Mr. Joe N. Middleton

Ms. Barbara and William Miller Ms. Shirley Elaine Mills Ms. Bennie Mary Milton Ms. Vera Crockett Mitchell Ms. Virginia B. Moore Mrs. Barbara R. Morris Ms. Douise T. Morris Ms. Mary S. Morrison Ms. Lorraine Hairston Morton Ms. Madge Murray Ms. Cora Neelon Mr. William C. Nelson Mr. Henry L. Nesmith Mr. David L. Ness Ms. Maggie Leatha Newkirk Mr. Albert L. Newton Mr. Alvin Newton Dr. Jaime Orejan Mr. Anthony L. Pace Ms. Kecia Page Ms. Rose Vaughn Palmer Ms. Beverly A. Parker Ms. Kimberly D. Parks Ms. Omega C. Parraway Mr. Thomas Parrish Ms. Brenda Patterson Ms. Brenda Pendleton Patterson Ms. Gwendolyn Newton Patterson Ms. Mable Scarver Patterson Mr. Freddie Bullock Pearson Ms. Viola N. Perry Ms. Verndene P. Pettiford Mr. Malcolm A. Pharr Dr. Eva C. Phillips Ms. Flora Phillips Dr. Sophia B. Pierce Mr. Jasper L. Powell Ms. Shirley Daye Price Mr. Elgient Pritchett Ms. Wynolia Pulliam Ms. Colleen P. Ramsey Ms. Novel Russell Ratchford Ms. Thelma Beaty Reed Ms. Mederia A. Reinhardt Ms. Evelyn Parker Reives Ms. Inez S. Richardson Mr. Willie G. Richardson Ms. Inez S. Richardson Ms. Elizabeth A. Rights Mr. Travis L. Rivens Ms. Marie J. Robinson Mr. Eugene Roseboro Mr. Bobby Rowe Mr. Chase Rushing Ms. Grace Samuel Ms. Barbara G. Scott Ms. Caroll Seaborn Mr. Theo Searcy Ms. Odetta Shepard Mrs. Eldria Cheatham Sherrill Ms. Rachel Shoffner Ms. Chlories P. Shore Ms. Bertha McIver Sighter Ms. Frances R. Simmon

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P E R F O R M A N C E

2008 – May 2013

Ms. Mary Isler Simmons Ms. Mary L. Simmons Mr. Lawrence Simpson Ms. Annette Hanley Sipe Ms. Edith Cash Sloan Ms. Julia G. Small Ms. Carrie F. Smith Ms. Margaret Powell Smith Ms. Margaret Shaw Smith Mrs. Bessie Snuggs Mrs. Theresa Jordan Snuggs Mr. Willie D. Snuggs Ms. Yasmyn R. Southerland Dr. Darlene Sowell-Darby Ms. Denise D. Spaugh Mr. Crosby Spencer Ms. Bernice Crosby Spencer Dr. Cynthia Stanley Mr. Herbert F. Stover Ms. Sadie Barnhill Streeter Ms. Wilma Lawrence Sumter Ms. Dorothy M. Tanner Ms. Annie Jones Taylor Dr. Travis L. Teague Ms. Jessica Teague Mrs. Gwendolyn Terrell Ms. Margaret Fisher Thomas Mr. Edward T. Thompson Ms. Sarah T. Thompson Ms. Earline Hairston Thornton Mr. Jonathan Tillery Mr. Christopher Tillman Time Warner Cable Mr. James Todd Mr. Nathaniel Tollison Ms. Georgia M. Topping Ms. Lindsey Troutman Ms. Verona Barnes True Mrs. Jeraline J. Truesdale Ms. Brondelia W. Tucker Ms. Estelle Crowder Turner Ms. Minnie Ross Turner Dr. Manuel P. Vargas Dr. Lelia Vickers Ms. Rosa B. Walker Ms. Vernice Shivers Walker Dr. Claudia A. Warren Wells Fargo Educational Matching Ms. Beatrice Mials Whitaker Mr. Rudolph V. Wiggins Mrs. Marjorie T. Wilkins Ms. Bridgett Williams Mrs. Ernestine R. Williams Mr. James Edward Williams Mr. Mack Williams Ms. Rosa L. Williams Mr. Christopher Wilson Ms. Constance Wilson Ms. Deena Wilson Ms. Jakala Dior Wilson Dr. Carole A. Winston Mrs. Bernese Witherspoon Ms. Linda Smith Zachary Mr. Kyle Zimmerman

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E D U CE R E Maga z ine Winston -S ale m State U nive rsit y S chool of Ed uc ation a nd H uma n Pe r formance 6 01 S . M a r tin Luthe r K ing J r. D rive 2 37 Ande rson Ce nte r Winston -S ale m , N C 27 1 1 0 - 0 0 01

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Educere - Summer 2013