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World Society for the Protection of Animals

GLOBAL REVIEW

2011

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF ANIMAL WELFARE

A world where animal welfare matters and animal cruelty has ended. This is our vision.

WHO WE ARE

The World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) tackles cruelty to animals across the globe. We work directly with animals and with the people and organisations that can influence their treatment to ensure animals experience respect and compassion. We do this by running and supporting effective campaigns to:

• help people understand the importance of good animal welfare

• encourage the implementation of

animal-friendly practices and solutions through changes in national policy

• build the science-based evidence for change.

We focus our work locally We bring about improvements in the way animals are treated by engaging directly with communities and owners. Working on the ground with local partners for the greatest effect, we are active in more than 50 countries across the world.

We have a global reach With special consultative status at the United Nations and consultative status at the Council of Europe, we engage with change makers including national governments, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Organisation for Animal Health. We influence key decision-makers who have the power to change animal welfare standards at an international level and improve the lives of millions of animals. WSPA works to ensure that the needs of animals find a place in the most pressing global debates and to demonstrate that true sustainable development must include animal welfare.

Contents Welcome

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30 years of making animals matter

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Saving animals in communities

8

Keeping animals in the wild

14

WSPA vets make a world of difference

20

Protecting animals in disasters

22

Speaking out for animals in farming

26

Creating a world of animal welfare

30

Financial summary

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Thank you

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How you can help

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© Alexandre C. Mota \ Aldeia \ WSPA

We are there in emergencies When disaster strikes, WSPA is the organisation that makes sure that animals, so vital for community recovery, are not forgotten. Working with partner organisations, governments and international agencies, we provide hands-on help and world-leading expertise in how disasters affect animals, how they can be helped and what preparations can be made to reduce future risks. Our long experience in collaborating with governments and humanitarian groups means we are sometimes the only animal organisation able to access disaster-struck regions.

WSPA International 5th Floor 222 Gray’s Inn Road London WC1X 8HB T: +44 (0)20 7239 0500 F: +44 (0)20 7239 0654 E: wspa@wspa-international.org W: www.wspa-international.org WSPA operates as an alliance of charitable organisations, the principal being established in the United Kingdom with registered charity number 1081849 © 2012 All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reprinted or reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise without the prior written permission of the publishers. Writer: Michaela Miller Editor: Kate Green Production Manager: Jaimee Damon Designer: Russell Neal Visual editor: Georgina Ash Printer: Triangle With thanks to: Conor McGeown and Richard Cunningham

Cover image: Leela, freed from the trauma of bear baiting, enjoys the freedom of WSPA’s Balkasar sanctuary

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WELCOME We are delighted to welcome you to our Global Review 2011, dedicated to our 30th anniversary and the achievements you have made possible to improve the lives of animals worldwide. Your generosity in 2011 has been responsible for some outstanding successes – notably the rescue of animals affected by terrible floods in Thailand and El Salvador and the thousands of suffering livestock saved from starvation and disease by our emergency mission during the Kenyan drought. With your help we have also saved hundreds of thousands of dogs from persecution and cruel deaths thanks to Red Collar: our new campaign dedicated to ending mass dog culls in the name of preventing rabies. Throughout the year we have also exposed the desperate plight of farm animals. In terms of the scale of their suffering and the huge numbers confined to industrial systems, they represent the worst animal welfare problem in the world. Our campaigns – Cage Free in Canada, Not in my Cuppa in the UK and the Humane Chain in Australia – have effectively raised awareness

of the horrors that farm animals face and are marshalling ever-growing public support to say ‘no’ to cruel and unacceptable practices. Ultimately, we are working to ensure that the animal agriculture of the future is both humane and sustainable. Your generosity also enabled us to continue our longstanding work to free bears from their captive misery. In 2011 we particularly focused on our fight to persuade governments in Asia to ban bear farming and our highly successful work in Pakistan to stop the cruel sport of bear baiting, two areas of work that have long resonated with our supporters. Although in the past 30 years we have covered so much ground there are still many challenges facing us, as outlined in this review. We are working hard to make WSPA as effective as possible in the changing political, social and

WSPA Board of Trustees WSPA’s UK-based Board of Trustees is largely composed of representatives from some of the world’s largest and most influential animal welfare organisations and offers guidance to all regional WSPA boards.

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President Ms Hanja Maij-Weggen, Netherlands

Dr Bjarne Clausen, Denmark

Dr Dennis Turner, Switzerland

Dr Chinny Krishna, India

Ms Sonja Van Tichelen, Belgium

Deputy President Mr Dominique Bellemare, Canada

Mr Carter Luke, USA

Ms Cecilia Vega Leon, Mexico

Ms Marcelle Meredith, South Africa

Mr Mark Watts, UK

Dr Andrew Rowan, USA

Dr Hugh Wirth, Australia

economic landscape. While our heritage is our identity, we are moving ever forward to be a major global animal welfare force for the 21st century, with new structures and an exciting five-year strategy to help us achieve the best results for animals.

Hanja Maij-Weggen President

As you read these pages we hope you will feel inspired by what you have already helped us to achieve and will share our determination to create a brighter future for the animals that still need our help. We are so proud to work on your behalf for a world where animal welfare matters and thank you wholeheartedly for your belief in our work.

Mike Baker Chief Executive Officer

WSPA senior staff Chief Executive Officer Mr Mike Baker

Director of Resources Mr Nick Stevens

Deputy Chief Executive Officer Mr John Trampleasure

Chief Veterinary Adviser Dr David Wilkins

Interim Director of Programmes Ms Rachel Youngman

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30 YEARS OF

MAKING

ANIMALS

MATTER

Since WSPA’s founding 30 years ago, our dedicated supporters have helped us make an amazing difference for animals all around the world. Here are just 10 incredible highlights that you’ve made possible… 1987: Effective campaigns for change After a six-year campaign our tenacity paid off when India, the world’s largest exporter of frogs’ legs, banned this cruel trade, saving more than 30 million mostly wild-caught frogs from agonising deaths. Now, as then, your support is vital in helping us stamp out the cruelty inflicted on wild animals in the name of trade.

1981

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1985

1981: Strong beginnings

1985: Banning the bullfights

Formed by a merger of the World Federation for the Protection of Animals and the International Society for the Protection of Animals, in WSPA’s first exciting year we exposed the cruelty of the frogs’ leg trade; investigated the suffering of transported livestock; and alleviated animal suffering in earthquake-stricken Southern Italy.

Since the launch of Dance with Death, our first anti-bullfighting video, you have helped us battle this cruel ‘entertainment’ all over the world. We were delighted when bullfighting was outlawed by the Catalonian Parliament in 2011 – a big thank you to all 165,000 WSPA supporters who fought for a ban alongside the Catalonian people.

1987

1992: Consistent care for bears Many supporters will remember the launch of Libearty, a high-profile campaign to save the world’s bears from exploitation. Since then we have eradicated bear dancing from Greece, Turkey and most areas of India. Today, we are giving sanctuary to baited bears in Pakistan and continue to campaign hard against the intense cruelty of Asia’s bear farms.

1990

1992

1996

1990: Saving dogs across the years

1996: Facing down disaster

This was the year we first gave the Sierra Leone Animal Welfare Society equipment, advice and support that has since enabled them to vaccinate 56,000 dogs against rabies, sterilise and de-worm them. Our work with dogs continues: in 2011 we launched a global dog protection campaign, Red Collar, which seeks to eradicate rabies-driven culls.

When thousands of animals were at risk after a volcanic eruption in Montserrat, our disaster experts stepped in to co-ordinate relief efforts. Today, saving animals when disasters strike and helping disaster-prone areas prepare to protect them is central to our work. Your generosity allowed us to help an amazing 330,000 animals in 2011.

2010: Making animals matter at the UN When India’s Minister of State for External Affairs pledged his support for the development of a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare, he became the 2 millionth signatory to our Animals Matter campaign. So far 40 national governments have joined hundreds of thousands of our supporters in backing this core initiative.

2001: Battling against baiting When we saved Rustam, a badly injured bear, from a horrific baiting event, he became the first resident of our Kund Park sanctuary. Since then this cruel ‘sport’ has sharply declined in Pakistan, thanks to the education and campaigning work we have carried out with the Bioresource Research Centre of Pakistan, and to your kindness.

2001

2007

2010

2007: Building a brighter future Your amazing support allowed us to save Borneo’s Nyaru Menteng Sanctuary from closure, giving the 650 resident orangutans a more secure future. By the end of 2010 we had helped the sanctuary develop enough financial self-sufficiency to purchase a long-term lease for a huge area of forest to serve as a safe orangutan release site.

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biro written capt

2011: Changing the world for farm animals We have always worked hard to improve the lives of billions of industrially farmed animals. Today, our Pawprint campaign is calling for humane and sustainable farming to be put firmly on the agenda at the influential UN Earth Summit in 2012, which could sow the seeds for a better future for huge numbers of farm animals.

2011 THE NEXT

30 YEARS >>

Thanks to your dedication we have already stopped so much suffering. But more needs to be done. We know that the next 30 years will bring us many more animal welfare challenges – to meet them head on we will need you more than ever. Learn more at www.wspa-international.org 7

Collars not cruelty: children play with a vaccinated dog in Bali

SAVING ANIMALS IN

COMMUNITIES

Globally, 20 million dogs are What we do We run mass dog vaccination programmes, brutally killed every year. One targeting 70 per cent of the dog population, to prove excuse governments give for that the compassionate approach can and does out this horrific disease. We then share our culling dogs is halting the spread stamp successes with national governments across the world to convince them to stop culling dogs and of rabies – a deadly disease adopt mass dog vaccination – the only humane and which kills more than 55,000 effective solution to halt the spread of rabies. people annually. But it is a cruel and tragic waste: poisoning and shooting dogs does not stop rabies spreading. With your help we are proving that there is a better way. 8

© WSPA \ Ulet Ifansasti \ Getty Images

Thanks to you: successes in 2011 Targeting rabies Your generosity allowed us to dedicate ourselves to anti-rabies projects large and small throughout the year. We’re proud to share some highlights.

• Over 300,000 dogs in Bali have been saved

from culling thanks to your support for our island-wide vaccination programme. In just six months our project partner, the Bali Animal Welfare Association, vaccinated 210,000 dogs, with spectacular results. Human rabies deaths fell by 35 per cent and the incidence of rabies in dogs dropped by over 75 per cent. The Balinese government, impressed by our results, has agreed to carry out the regular vaccination programmes needed to prevent the lethal threat of rabies returning.

• On September’s World Rabies Day we launched Red Collar – our huge global campaign dedicated to ending the inhumane culling of dogs in response to rabies. Just a month later we were able to report good news from our new project in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh’s principal resort town, where local authorities stopped cruelly killing dogs in favour of our humane rabies vaccination programme. By the end of November, 3,200 dogs had been vaccinated. And more good news followed: dog culls in response to the threat of rabies were banned in the capital, Dhaka, from January 2012. We are now talking with the government about the best ways to start a nation-wide programme which will save the lives of thousands of dogs in the first year alone.

• We had several successes throughout the year

in our mission to save dogs in the Philippines, where over a million are at risk of being culled. We were invited to support the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the World Health Organization (WHO) on a rabies elimination project in 16 provinces. This involves carrying out vaccination projects and dog population surveys; training government vets; and promoting the effectiveness of humane rabies control methods to government officials. By working with local partners in the country we also achieved a ban on ‘tambucho’, a shockingly cruel practice where unclaimed dogs in pounds were gassed to death with carbon monoxide from vehicle exhaust fumes.

• We were delighted when the Nepalese

government agreed to fund a widespread rabies vaccination programme from 2012-2013, working with the WHO. This will replace the use of strychnine poisoning as a means of managing rabies, which has caused hundreds of thousands of dogs to die needlessly and in agony. The government’s decision follows the successful vaccination programmes that your kindness has helped us carry out with our partners in the cities of Kathmandu, Pokhara and Biratnagure.

• Our anti-rabies work in Latin America also made

great progress throughout the year. We signed an agreement with the Pan American Health Organization enabling us to vaccinate dogs and carry out education work in Lima, Peru, and Jalisco, Mexico. In Jalisco we protected 70,000 dogs through vaccination and trained 45 vets in sterilisation techniques.

Together for animals: 2012 and beyond “Every year millions of dogs are brutally killed across the world – they die in horrific ways including poisoning, beating and electrocution. Through our Red Collar campaign we will seize every opportunity to convince national governments to stop culling dogs in response to rabies and to implement the only proven and humane solution: mass dog vaccination. We will also work with six national governments, including Indonesia and Bangladesh, to deliver mass vaccination programmes that will protect dogs from terrible cruelty and halt the spread of rabies. Thank you so much for your continued support for this vital work.” Ray Mitchell, WSPA International Campaigns Director

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BETTER LIVES, ONE DOG AT A TIME We’ve been working for many years to improve the lives of dogs and create healthier relationships between roaming animals and the communities they live in. Every dog counts, and in our efforts to protect as many animals as possible we have helped numerous government authorities and local organisations introduce compassionate methods of population control. In 2011 we continued this work in 13 countries where local partners sterilised thousands of dogs, treated their health problems and vaccinated them against rabies and other diseases. Education campaigns promoting responsible pet ownership are also central to our work in population control projects. Our ultimate aim is to ensure that we help communities develop the skills needed to manage the dogs they live alongside in a compassionate way.

“WSPA’s support has helped us to dramatically change the perception of so many people towards animals. Today I receive up to 15–20 calls a day regarding animal problems – simply because people are more aware. Our humane education programmes, public awareness campaigns and the practical care and treatment we give through our day-to-day work are all working together to give Sierra Leone’s dogs better lives. I think we are on our way to a brighter future.” Dr Gudosh Jalloh, Sierra Leone Animal Welfare Society

Our work proves animal welfare works, for animals and for people. And by the end of the year, we had commitment from local or national governments to take over some or all aspects of our dog welfare projects in countries including Sierra Leone; Zanzibar, Tanzania; Sri Lanka; Colombia; and with the First Nations (indigenous) communities in Canada. Throughout 2011 we also continued to work hard to persuade the authorities in Cairo, Egypt, to adopt humane methods of control rather than using poison or shooting to cull the 50,000 dogs that are roaming the city’s streets.

TAKING DOG MEAT OFF THE MENU Around 2 million dogs are farmed and cruelly slaughtered for food every year in South Korea. To tackle this we are working with local partners Coexistence for Animal Rights on Earth (CARE) and the Korean Association for Animal Protection (KAAP) to influence public opinion and to lobby the government to end this cruel trade.

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Puppy love: three-year-old Antora comforts her puppy after his vaccination in Co x’s Bazar

In July, CARE worked with other local groups to prevent a South Korean dog meat festival from taking place. The festival, organised by the Dog Farmers Association, planned to ‘showcase various canine delicacies including barbecued dog’. But thanks to a huge groundswell of protest generated by online campaigns, the festival was abandoned by the organisers. At first the Dog Farmers Association simply attempted to relocate the festival, but was eventually forced to cancel it completely when other venues declined to rent space for the event. In 2012 our partners’ work will continue, informed by opinion polls we developed together in 2011 to survey the Korean public’s attitudes towards dog meat.

SEEING RED IN COX’S BAZAR Life for the thousands of dogs and people in the slums and villages of Bangladesh’s Cox’s Bazar district is far from easy. They face the daily challenges of malnutrition and poverty and death from rabies has long been a grim reality. But as part of our Red Collar campaign you have made a new project possible. Launched as a pilot in Bangladesh in 2011, it is already bringing both dogs and people hope and freedom from this horrific disease. In two weeks in November, four WSPA-trained vaccination teams immunised more than 70 per cent of the Cox’s Bazar dog population – enough to ensure that local dogs and the community will be safe from rabies. Around 3,200 dogs are now sporting bright red collars and flashes of non-toxic yellow paint to symbolise that they’ve been officially vaccinated against rabies, a disease that reportedly kills 2,100 Bangladeshi people every year.

“We had been stalling and thinking of so many excuses so that we didn’t have to shoot the dogs and then WSPA came along and offered us another option – this vaccination project. People in Cox’s Bazar have the biggest hearts, as big as the ocean that we live by, and we express our gratitude for your support in training our people to run this project. It’s a big sin to kill dogs, this is much better.” Helena, local councillor, Cox’s Bazar

A less painful approach Prior to WSPA’s Red Collar campaign and this pilot project, dogs in Cox’s Bazar were poisoned or shot by local authorities in an attempt to halt the spread of rabies. The dogs died both in agony and in vain, as culling is ineffective in stopping the disease. Nurul Kabir is a former municipal street cleaner who had to carry out these horrific tasks. “I used to shiver about doing such work,” he says. “We should not have been doing such things to dogs, it was awful and I used to dread having to go to work every day.” Today, Nurul is happy in his job. He is a WSPAtrained animal control officer, skilled in gently coaxing dogs forward to be vaccinated by trained vets. He is also living proof that healthier, kinder animal–human relationships benefit everyone.

Next steps: going nationwide Throughout 2012 we’ll be saving countless lives – both animal and human – as we work with Bangladesh’s government to stop the dreadful cruelty of dog culling in response to rabies and implement a nation-wide rabies elimination programme. Safe and sound: a dog vaccinat ed in Cox’s Bazar wears a red collar

THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT OUR PROJECTS SAVED OVER 300,000 DOGS – A RECORD NUMBER – FROM SUFFERING IN 2011. Thank you for helping stop cruel culls – we couldn’t protect dogs without you. Follow Red Collar at www.wspa-international.org 11

IN FOCUS

LEADING THE WAY FOR

EQUINE CARE

For many years we have provided veterinary care and treatment for thousands of working horses, donkeys and mules, as well as support and advice for their owners. In many parts of the world your generosity has stopped these animals from literally being worked to death. What we do Enabling the projects we support to become truly independent has always been a major goal. The three successful equine projects featured on these pages are now well on the road to self-sufficiency. Here are some of this year’s highlights…

Local learning: a WSPA-funded vet advises on grooming in Kamo Sar, Cambodia

AMAZING CHANGES FOR PALESTINE’S DONKEYS The clinic linked with our Palestine project, which focuses on improving the lives of thousands of donkeys that live in the Bedouin and farming communities around Bethlehem, reported some truly heartening results this year. Between 2010 and 2011 the project, run in conjunction with the Palestine Wildlife Society, has been responsible for:

• more than halving the number of parasite

infections which cause donkeys terrible sores and painful skin conditions

• reducing cases of life-threatening heat stress by 60 per cent

• halving instances of pressure sores caused by ill-fitting equipment.

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The project’s community facilitators are a vital component – they embed knowledge locally, acting as ambassadors for donkey care in their villages. The facilitators are now very often a first point of contact for owners regarding donkey ill health.

“There have been some wonderful improvements. Local people are using the nose band protectors that WSPA supporters provided, protecting donkeys from the harsh chain bands which cut into their flesh; more and more people are taking water to the fields with them so their donkeys can drink during the day.” Alistair Findlay, WSPA Middle East Programmes Manager

So far people in around 25 villages, owning hundreds of ponies, have taken part in activities that raise their awareness of the problems that their animals face and explore the simple things they can do to improve their pony’s life.

CAMBODIA: SIMPLE STEPS TO HEALTHY PONIES Curry combs made of bottle tops are just one of the unusual tools of our Cambodia-based project, which has encouraged people to provide good care for their hardworking ponies since 2008. The ponies pull heavy carts for long hours; they are vulnerable to colic, skin problems, infections, lameness and an often fatal sleeping sickness called ‘surra’.

Focus on prevention Teaching villagers how to combat colic has been achieved using a 22-metre strip of cloth to represent a pony’s intestine and explain how the wrong type of food can lead to a blockage that can cause agonising pain and even death. “Since the project started we have noticed that more villagers understand how to prevent colic rather than trying to fix the problem with their own remedies which were not working,” says Hang Piseth, a vet with our partner the Cambodian Welfare Organisation. Villagers have been also been inspired to implement a number of other simple welfare measures, including giving their ponies bigger stables so they can move around and lie down freely and using mosquito nets in the stables to stop their ponies from being bitten by insects carrying surra.

“Expecting owners to buy a western-style horse brush to prevent skin problems is not practical, but showing them how to make “Thanks to WSPA supporters, the Cambodia project a simple grooming tool out of bottle tops has achieved so much for the ponies,” says WSPA’s means that grooming, essential in promoting Gabrielle Shaw. “We are confident that when the equine health, is suddenly in reach.” time is right we will be able to leave its continuing Gabrielle Shaw, WSPA Director of External Affairs, Research and Learning

ISRAEL’S EQUINE AUTHORITY Since 2007 your support has helped Pegasus, a local organisation in Israel, rescue horses and donkeys from the cruellest of circumstances. We have helped dedicated founder Zvika Tamuz and his team provide a safe haven where these suffering animals can be given new lives. By the end of 2011, 132 horses and donkeys had been rescued and cared for by Pegasus, and 117 safely rehomed. Zvika’s good work has won him an expert reputation: Pegasus is now backed by the Israeli government to work at the crossings between Palestine and Israel, where his advice on equine care has resulted in fewer animals being confiscated under Israeli law because they are in better condition than ever before.

work in safe hands.”

“Pegasus has become highly respected by Israel’s government and police, who contribute funding to the rescue work Zvika does on their behalf. They are now working to generate even more funding with the goal of becoming self-sufficient,” says Alistair Findlay, WSPA’s Middle East Programmes Manager. In addition, pressure from Pegasus resulted in new government regulations for private riding establishments, further reducing the number of confiscations, cruelty and abuse cases that Zvika – as the designated authority called upon to investigate complaints – sees.

“I am so grateful to WSPA supporters. Now I’m looking forward to the future. With WSPA’s help I know we can become a self-funding and independent Pegasus in charge of our own destiny.” Zvika Tamuz, Pegasus founder

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KEEPING ANIMALS

IN THE WILD

The world’s extraordinary and unique wild animals and their habitats should be valued by everyone on the planet. Sadly, this is not the reality. Every year tens of millions of animals are subjected to intense cruelty and often death – abducted from the wild to fuel the exotic pet trade, ‘entertainments’ featuring wild animals and products made from their body parts. With your support we are striving to protect as many as we can from harm.

“As a direct result of our lobbying this year, for the first time in its history the European Union adopted a formal policy of support for work to improve whale welfare. This was an exciting and symbolic victory towards our vision of a future where whales are shot only with cameras. Protecting whales is a huge global challenge and we’re extremely fortunate to have had our supporters right behind us at every step.” Claire Bass, WSPA Oceans Campaign Leader

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What we do We lobby governments, persuading them to introduce laws that safeguard wild animals; we support our partners, investigating and exposing cruelty where it occurs; and we encourage authorities to bring perpetrators of crimes against animals to justice. And by raising the public’s awareness of the true horror and living cost of the wildlife trade, we try to reduce the demand for wild animals at its source.

Thanks to you: successes in 2011 Making waves for welfare • United action by 53,000 WSPA supporters in the US helped persuade President Obama to impose diplomatic sanctions against Iceland due to its defiant whale hunting activities. This sends a strong message: commercial whaling is unacceptable.

• Your generous support of our advocacy work

helped us intensively lobby two key groups within the International Whaling Commission (IWC), the body that regulates international whaling. We persuaded 25 EU member states to support proposals to improve the welfare of whales and to continue and strengthen their opposition to commercial whaling. In addition, nine Latin American countries – the Buenos Aires Group – issued a public statement in February calling on Japan to call a complete halt to its so-called ‘scientific’ whaling activities in the Southern Ocean.

• We were delighted when our expert workshop,

held with the UK government, resulted in a series of technical recommendations to safeguard whale welfare against human threats. These were presented at the 63rd meeting of the IWC in June and despite opposition from the pro-whaling nations of Norway and Japan, eight other countries, including Germany, Australia, Argentina and Mexico, gave their support and have pledged to work with the UK on this issue in 2012.

• We used strong economic arguments in our

campaign against Norwegian whaling, helping our two local partner organisations lobby the Norwegian Trade and Industry Committee. We presented Seas of Change, a specially commissioned report which revealed a dying industry dependent on government subsidies and made the case for an independent and public review of Norway’s pro-whaling policy.

• Our undercover footage exposed the horrors of

Namibia’s seal culls, in which 85,000 baby seals are killed for their fur each year. Additionally, our specially commissioned economics report showed that eco-tourism based around seal watching is worth four times the value of seal hunting to Namibia. We are now using this compelling evidence as we work with the tourism industry to help promote the case against hunting to the Namibian government.

• More than 8,000 Chilean people joined our

campaign to save thousands of sea lions from a government cull. The sea lions were being blamed for the lack of fish in Chilean waters; in fact decades of overfishing are to blame. Campaigning jointly with local partner Ecoceanos, we exerted pressure which has already paid dividends: together we persuaded fishery authorities to investigate non-lethal ways of protecting fishing stocks. We will keep up the pressure to protect the sea lions in 2012.

Marine majesty: with your help, WSPA protects whales like this breaching humpback

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Thanks to you: successes in 2011 Caring for bears • Throughout the year we continued our mission

to stamp out bear baiting in Pakistan. Working with our local partner the Bioresource Research Centre, we saved nine bears from pain and suffering and gave them a safe haven and expert care at our Balkasar sanctuary. We also gained the support of a further 300 mosques in stamping out this cruel ‘sport’. Meet the bears on p.18.

• By the end of 2011, 59 bears rescued from cruel captivity were enjoying large forest enclosures at the Romanian Bear Sanctuary. The sanctuary was built with your support and is now run by our Romanian partners Millions of Friends. We’ll be fundraising in 2012 to build a new and final enclosure to provide a home for the estimated 25 bears still suffering in cages and zoos around the country.

• Your generosity funded a poll of South Korean

people which showed that 90 per cent of the public are against the breeding and killing of bears for their gall bladders. This evidence, alongside our long-term campaigning and action from other NGOs, finally led to a big step forward: in September the Korean National Assembly voted to look at ways of phasing out bear farming for good.

• ‘Bear bile tourism’ also received a major blow in

March thanks to an investigation carried out by our partner Education for Nature Vietnam (ENV). It revealed that bile was being extracted from bears kept in Quang Ninh province to meet the demand from visiting Korean tourists. The Vietnamese government ordered the tour companies to stop the visits or lose their licences.

“It is a great partnership and WSPA’s supporters deserve a big thank you for making it happen. We feel WSPA really cares about what we do and how we do it. Our goals are clear and so are theirs. This is why we work so well together on our joint mission to stamp out the bear bile trade.” Quyen Vu, Education for Nature Vietnam Founder

• Three illegally-held young Asiatic black bears and

two cubs were rescued from captive misery thanks to public tip-offs to the ENV Wildlife Crime Hotline. Your support has enabled ENV to run and promote the hotline – which encourages the public to report illegal advertising for bear bile products or the whereabouts of bears – since 2005, with numerous successes. Thank you.

TRACKING DOWN THE TRADERS

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er Ratclif fe

Animal pro tectors: th e Met Polic WSPA to st e are workin a mp ou t w g with ildlife crime

© Christoph

The illegal trade in wildlife will be a major focus for our work in 2012 and close contact with enforcement teams will be critical to our success. Follow our progress in battling this cruelty at www.wspa.org.uk

\ WSPA

When we discovered in 2011 that the London Metropolitan Police’s Wildlife Crime Unit was in danger of shutting down due to UK government cutbacks, we stepped in to help. Thanks to your support, we will be part-funding the Unit’s work to ensure its fight against wildlife crime will continue. This is vital: London is a renowned international hub for this cruel trade, in which a whole range of animal species suffers at every stage.

JOINING FORCES FOR FOREST PROTECTION Your amazing support has been responsible for helping people in Terebeda, a remote village of just 50 houses in the state of Orissa, India, learn how to protect wild animals in their forest rather than hunt them. Their work stepped up a gear in 2011 with several poacher prosecutions. Men, women and children are all involved in the Village Forest Protection Force (VFPF), set up through a joint initiative between WSPA and the Wildlife Trust of India. The VFPF now works with the government’s forest protection team to stamp out poaching of all animals in the area, but particularly protecting bear dens with cubs.

Anti-poacher patrols The Terebeda team, which is one of four permanent teams we have helped set up in rural India, goes out on patrol for around five hours at least three times a week. The women and children, who go to the forest every day to collect firewood, fruit and herbs, are usually the first to tip the patrol off on any suspected poacher activity. They often spot ‘hides’

on the river banks that the poachers use to keep out of sight of animals that may come by to drink and graze. “We use their reports to choose trails and do random checks. When we find poachers, we are backed up by armed forest department teams who make the arrests and follow up the legal process,” explains Balaram Pradhan, who has been involved in the patrols for two years.

A warning to wildlife traders The Terebeda VFPF was responsible for bringing six poachers to justice by November, a small number but a huge deterrent and clear message in an area where punishment for this wildlife crime has previously been almost non-existent. “On one occasion we even caught a poacher hiding in a tree over our heads!”, says Balaram. “We always hope that our team’s exploits will get lots of publicity in the local newspapers so that news spreads quickly that no one messes with our forests.” We thank you for being an important member of this hands-on animal protection team.

Together for animals: 2012 and beyond “The next few years will bring us great challenges as we strive on your behalf to protect the world’s precious wildlife. With your help we will target the international trade in exotic pets, responsible for snatching millions of animals from their natural habitats every year. This illegal trade causes great suffering and kills huge numbers of animals before they even reach their final destinations. Persuading communities to stop the horrific hunts which annually target small whales and dolphins in their thousands will also be a major focus for us. And your dedicated support will inspire us to keep on fighting against the horrors of bear farming and the brutal ‘sport’ of bear baiting.” Emily Reeves, Director of Programmes, WSPA Asia-Pacific

YOUR HELP MEANS WE CAN DO SO MUCH TO PROTECT WILD ANIMALS FROM HARM: WITHOUT YOU, THESE ANIMALS ARE PAINFULLY VULNERABLE. Find out about our latest projects at www.wspa-international.org 17

IN FOCUS

FRESH STARTS FOR

BAITED BEARS

During 2011 your generosity helped our local partner the Bioresource Research Centre rescue nine bears from the horror of bear baiting and take them to our sanctuary at Balkasar, where they received specialist care and treatment. Sadly, despite our best efforts to save them, two of the bears – Azad and Sawan – died in August from pre-existing health conditions. But the others are thriving, and living lives so very far from their past terrors. Meet the bears whose new starts you have made possible…

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Leela

Bhoori

Kaali

When Leela arrived in January, she was in very poor condition; her coat was patchy and she was suffering from blindness caused by poor nutrition. But now this eight-year-old is like a “new bear”, says Malik Sarwar, Balkasar’s senior sanctuary manager. “Her coat is glossy and she can now see well out of one eye. She is a very busy bear and roams around her enclosure confidently. It is so wonderful to have been able to make such a difference to her quality of life.”

For eight-year-old Bhoori, Balkasar has meant security and kindness, although memories of her traumatic past seem to remain. “She is a beautiful bear, but has the habit of hanging her tongue out of one side of her mouth. We think that this could be because she was always hungry and thirsty – her owners didn’t really understand how much bears need to eat and drink – or it could be a reaction to the stress of being set upon by dogs,” explains Sarwar. When she first arrived Bhoori kept very much to herself, but now socialises, wanders and forages in her large enclosure.

Thanks to you, five-year-old Kaali’s life has also dramatically improved. She was very subdued when she arrived at Balkasar and, as is common with bears used in baiting, her teeth and hind claws had been removed. “In the wild, bears would be climbing trees and foraging for food,” says Sarwar. “But we can’t set bears like Kaali free because they couldn’t feed or defend themselves. But here we can greatly improve their quality of life.” Kaali is now learning to climb trees and is getting on well with some of the other bears, especially Bhoori.

Lala When Lala arrived in October her muzzle had a gaping wound, forming a deep hole which obviously hurt so much that she wouldn’t take any food at all. But thanks to specialist treatment from Dr Nasir, the sanctuary vet, her wound is starting to heal. “Unfortunately she can’t be moved into the main enclosure to meet the other bears until it is better. Playful bear behaviour could make it open up again,” explains Dr Nasir. We hope Lala will meet the other bears very soon.

Shama

Nita

Shama had endured a horrific number of bear baiting events before coming to Balkasar. “Although only five years old, we think she must have been used intensively for fighting throughout the year,” says Sarwar. Despite her terrible start in life, Shama was physically in good condition and like Milla was keen to leave quarantine and explore. Sarwar tells us: “It’s good to see the close bond she and Milla have formed; they like to sit together in the grounds of the main enclosure.”

When Nita was brought to Balkasar she had been used in baiting for two years, was blind in one eye and the other was badly injured. But Dr Nasir was able to save it and she is now doing well. Sadly, Azad – owned by the same individual as Nita – was not so lucky. Despite the best efforts of Balkasar staff to treat his health problems he died about two months after his arrival. “This was a great tragedy for us – we did everything we could but he just got weaker and weaker,” says Sarwar.

Milla Five-year-old Milla arrived at Balkasar in October, blind in one eye and with a heavily scarred muzzle from being set upon by dogs. Her reddish black, shaggy coat was in poor condition too, but despite all her hardships Milla has made a good recovery. “She is a very spirited bear. Like all the bears that come to Balkasar she was put in a quarantine enclosure so we can monitor any health problems and protect the other bears from potential disease. Being released into a bigger enclosure after quarantine can be daunting for some, but not Milla. She started exploring at once and making friends with Shama,” explains Sarwar.

FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN HELP US END BEAR BAITING IN PAKISTAN FOR GOOD ON PAGE 38.

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WITH YOUR HELP:

WSPA VETS MAKE A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE

Throughout 2011 – World Veterinary Year – we highlighted how vital vets are to improving animal welfare across the globe. Your generosity helps us employ an international network of WSPA veterinarians, all working to change animals’ lives for the better. Meet just seven members of our dedicated team…

DR DAVID WILKINS MBE:

Chief Veterinary Adviser

DR MELANIA GAMBOA:

Programmes Manager

Respected worldwide for his animal welfare knowledge and scientific approach, David is a former director of Eurogroup, one of Europe’s most effective animal welfare lobbying organisations. Working with WSPA, David has done a huge amount for animals everywhere: influencing the veterinary profession to support a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare and creating a formal agreement between WSPA and the World Organisation for Animal Health to develop and implement international animal welfare standards.

Melania’s ambitious goal – to see animal welfare become central to vet training – took a leap forward in 2011 when she achieved an agreement from the Association of Mexican Veterinary Schools to develop our Concepts in Animal Welfare training programme for Mexican universities. In 2012, she will be working hard on our Red Collar campaign to help stamp out rabies-led dog culls in Latin America.

DR ROSANGELA RIBEIRO:

Veterinary Programmes Manager When floods and landslides devastated communities in Rio’s mountain areas, Rosangela and the WSPA team helped more than 3,000 animals by distributing 14 tonnes of food for dogs and cats and 1,500 kg for cattle, pigs, horses and birds. In 2012 Rosangela will be encouraging the Brazilian authorities to include animals in disaster prevention plans and training both government staff and local vets in how best to care for animals when disaster strikes. 20

DR RASTO KOLESAR:

Specialist Farm Animal Vet Protecting the world’s billions of farm animals is a priority for specialist vet Rasto. And thanks to your support, more than 6,000 people involved in meat production in Brazil and China have been trained by Rasto and WSPA teams to treat animals more humanely and to improve slaughterhouse facilities. Rasto will be focussing on training for Indonesian governmental officials and industry in 2012.

DR IAN DACRE:

Disaster Management Operations Manager

DR JAN SCHMIDT-BURBACH:

When disaster hits the Asia-Pacific region, Ian works hard to shield animals from harm. During the devastating Thai floods of 2011, WSPA teams distributed nearly 56 tonnes of food as well as medicines and veterinary supplies to temporary animal shelters, helping an incredible 10,000 animals. “Our work isn’t always pleasant, but at the end of the day we all feel good knowing that we are helping defenceless animals survive in these trying times,” he says.

Wildlife Veterinary Programmes Manager Jan oversees our bear sanctuary at Balkasar, a safe haven and rehabilitation centre for bears rescued from the horrors of baiting. “Seeing the amazing transformation as the bears start to take an interest in the trees and bathe in the pools really makes my job worthwhile,” he says. In 2012, Jan will be researching the welfare of animals used in entertainment.

DR WILSON JOSEPH:

Project Manager for Companion Animals Wilson’s (pictured left) love of dogs is a daily inspiration as he works to help the governments of several African nations introduce rabies vaccination schemes and humane dog population control. “We must have compassion for all life – human life is not the only life worth protecting,” he says. 21

Š Kate Holt \ WSPA

PROTECTING ANIMALS

IN DISASTERS

Disasters can rip the lives of What we do When disasters strike, WSPA’s international team animals and people asunder, of experts acts swiftly, working hard with partners destroying livelihoods, killing and and national governments to deliver emergency aid where it is needed most, as quickly as injuring loved ones and leaving possible. Preparing countries for the worst by training them to protect their animals, which in an aftermath of hopelessness turn safeguards the wellbeing and livelihoods of and despair. But with your their citizens, is a no less vital aspect of our work. support, we can make a desperately needed difference. 22

Expert help in challenging times: WSPA provided livestock feed and veterinary care in drought-ravaged Kenya

Thanks to you: successes in 2011 Through hands on help… • Your generosity allowed us to help more

animals in need this year than ever before. Our emergency action in 15 countries – where we delivered feed, veterinary medicine, treatment and health care – benefited more than 330,000 animals and the communities they live in.

• Our first African Veterinary Emergency Response Unit (VERU) went to the aid of more than 35,000 animals at risk of dying from severe drought in Kenya. Throughout 2011 we continued to train and support all eight WSPA-founded VERUs, which remain primed to respond quickly and effectively when disaster strikes.

• When Japan was devastated in March by a

horrific earthquake, tsunami and resulting nuclear accident, your donations funded three temporary animal shelters. The shelters did vital work, enabling often distraught owners and volunteers to continue to walk, feed and care for rescued pets, giving both animals and people some normality in their post-disaster lives.

• Sheep and goats were threatened with starvation in June as ash from the Puyehue volcano showered a 15-centimetre layer on Argentine grasslands. But thanks to you, we could provide feed for 120,000 animals and train 720 farmers in how to care for those stricken by ash-related illness, helping relieve the suffering of both livestock and owners.

• In a year of devastating flooding in Asia,

your support meant we could take action for vulnerable animals in seven countries. In India we delivered feed and health care to animals in six of the worst affected villages in West Bengal; we also worked with local people to help them prepare to protect their animals in the future. In Thailand, our VERU system meant we could provide more than 10,000 animals with food, medical supplies and shelter.

• Just over one year after launching the Animal

Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH) mobile clinic, which treated and vaccinated 70,000 animals affected by the island’s worst-ever recorded earthquake, we were proud to hand it over to the Haitian Ministry of Agriculture. We expect that this facility will be a lifeline to thousands more animals in the years to come.

How preparation pays… • In 2011 we invested in vital research projects

to support a major part of our work: convincing governments to integrate animals into national disaster plans. Research topics included the cost of livestock loss to communities affected by disaster and an investigation into the problems faced by animals during and after emergencies.

• Your kind support meant we could start the

process of integrating animals into Australia’s emergency management plans by running a workshop for the national government. We look forward to this resulting in long-term plans to assist animals in areas that are susceptible to natural disasters including floods, bush fires and droughts.

• A massive 140 million people in Latin America were reached by our disaster preparedness messages, meaning many more pets will be well looked after if the worst happens. Aired for free by the Warner Channel, this was 100 million more viewers than 2010. Millions more people had the chance to see our broadcasts on American Airlines flights and on 10 airport television channels in the US.

• Thanks in no small part to our supporters,

animal welfare is a growing international concern. This year, we were invited to join several key organisations and working groups looking at the importance of protecting animals in disasters, including the Asia Pacific office of the World Organisation for Animal Health and a national committee for emergency planning in India.

23

Together for animals: 2012 and beyond “Thank you so much for supporting our life-saving work. Throughout 2012 we’ll be convincing governments, humanitarian and development agencies that including animal welfare in emergency planning is vital for effective disaster management. To support this, we will gather compelling, independent evidence of the importance of animals during times of disaster and celebrate the successes of regions already considering animals in their plans. We hope our awareness campaigns will help local people safeguard their own animals and encourage them to lobby their governments to implement national plans too. Our efforts to create a shared understanding of how the animal welfare community can best respond and collaborate in disasters will also help save animal lives.” James Sawyer, WSPA Campaign Director, Disaster Management

SUPPORT IN TOUGH TIMES Alejo is from Jacobacci, a small town in Argentina. He is just one of the farmers whose animals you helped us save after grazing lands were covered in thick volcanic ash when the Puyehue volcano erupted in June. Alejo’s few angora goats and merino sheep are his only sources of income. When our team arrived he explained that some of his animals had died after grazing on the ash-covered grass. He was in a desperate situation with no money to buy another source of food for his surviving animals, which were increasingly at risk of starvation and even death.

“Like so many people in this region Alejo lives in poverty. His own home is as tiny as his animals’ enclosures. When we arrived there wasn’t enough water for either himself or his wife or for his goats and sheep. He was so glad to see us.” Ricardo Jimenez, WSPA Communications Manager, South America

“Sometimes I had to go to the fields and carry them because they were too weak to walk back to their enclosures,” he told us.

Strength to face the future Your support meant we could give Alejo’s livestock the best chance of survival, by providing fresh food and water, vaccinating them against disease and treating their injuries. Some animals were also given vitamin shots to help them make it through the harsh Argentine winter. “Alejo was overwhelmed with gratitude. He gave me the most sincere thank you hug I have received in recent times!” says WSPA’s Ricardo Jimenez. With your support we delivered 171 tonnes of feed to this devastated region and vaccinated 99,000 animals to protect them in the tough recovery period that lay ahead.

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A healthy sign: WSPA staf f mark the sheep that have already rece ived treatment in the af termath of Puyehue volcano the .

DELIVERING HOPE

Dr Henry Mutembei, vet and senior lecturer at the University of Nairobi, jointly coordinated the 32-member Veterinary Emergency Response Unit, set up with WSPA funding and support. He describes arriving at Motosya, a droughtstricken village of 2,500 people around 250 kilometres from Nairobi: “Farmers were waiting for us in the scorching sun with their cattle, sheep, goats and donkeys. Most had walked several days to reach the ever-shrinking water holes near the village. The animals were in poor condition; it was very obvious their owners were suffering too. But when we arrived they had hope written all over their faces.”

Life-saving action The team of vets and students quickly gave life-saving veterinary medicines, treatments and emergency feed supplies to improve the suffering animals’ health and give them a far better chance of survival.

© Kate Hol

But your generosity meant WSPA could act in the worst hit areas, launching an eight-week rescue mission in October. Thanks to you, more than 35,000 animals were fed, treated and had their immune systems boosted.

t \ WSPA

When the rains failed to fall on Kenya’s Mwingi district for the third year running, animals belonging to local farmers were suffering badly and at risk of dying in their thousands. Desperate owners were powerless to help.

s veterinar enry uses hi H : e c n a h c A fighting rought survive the d vital livestock

y skill to help

“Dakane, a camel owner, had walked for three days. He explained that he had to come, as this is the only water in the area. His older camels and his sheep had died because of the drought. When he saw us he said: ‘It is like God has answered our prayers…’” Dr Henry Mutembei, project coordinator of the WSPA-funded Veterinary Emergency Response Unit, Kenya

Animals in two other villages based near watering holes also received vital treatments during the relief effort.

THANK YOU FOR MAKING OUR DISASTER MANAGEMENT WORK IN 2011 POSSIBLE: YOU ARE A VITAL PART OF OUR TEAM. To find out where our experts are working right now visit www.animalsindisasters.typepad.com 25

SPEAKING OUT FOR ANIMALS

IN FARMING

More than 60 billion animals are farmed for food every year; the majority suffer in industrial systems. Crammed together, unable to behave naturally, they may never see a blade of grass, breathe fresh air or feel sunlight on their bodies. These factory methods not only cause animals a range of painful health problems and intense stress, they also represent an unsustainable drain on our planet’s precious resources.

What we do We campaign for farm animals to be treated more humanely at every stage of their lives. We believe that humane farming not only saves animals from enormous suffering, it can also help us battle some of our most urgent global crises including poverty and pollution. To get this vital message across, our campaigners, scientists and educators are using positive examples to show governments, policymakers, producers and consumers that humane and sustainable agriculture not only protects animals and makes good business sense, it is key to protecting all of our futures.

26

Thanks to you: successes in 2011 • There was good news for chickens as Canadian

supporters embraced our Million Egg Challenge and sent more than 30,000 letters to fast food giant McDonald’s, urging them to switch one million eggs to cage-free sources. Those letters helped us achieve a meeting with McDonald’s; in 2012 we will continue that dialogue. In addition, five academic institutions including Canada’s largest university switched to cagefree eggs in their dining halls. As a result, more than 400,000 eggs annually will now come from hens that have the freedom to move, stretch their wings and express natural behaviours.

• It was cause for celebration when our efforts to

ensure that farm animal welfare features strongly at the Rio Earth Summit in June 2012 paid off in December, with the co-Chairs’ Summary of the ECE Regional Preparatory Meeting stating that: “development of policies for sustainable agriculture, conducive to people’s wellbeing, the welfare of farm animals and the preservation of natural resources and ecosystem services [is] essential.” Global recognition that farm animals are a key part of our future will create a worldwide launch pad for better animal welfare.

• The plight of farm animals also moved more than 100,000 caring supporters to join our Pawprint campaign, launched at the end of 2011. They put humane, sustainable farming in the spotlight, urging governments around the world to put the compassionate treatment of farm animals at the heart of the sustainable agriculture debate at the Earth Summit.

• Throughout the year WSPA’s teams ran more

than 100 training courses for slaughterhouse workers and government officials, resulting in more humane treatment for the animals at the end of their lives. Thanks to your ongoing support of this vital training work, the handling and welfare at slaughter of an estimated 20 million farm animals in China and Brazil have improved dramatically since 2009.

A natural life: pasture-dwelling Brahman cattle in Costa Rica

• In 2011 your generosity enabled us to

commission studies revealing the benefits of humane farming for animals, people and the planet. This included fascinating work with academics to assess the carbon footprint and economics of pasture versus industrial dairy farming, and research to assess the benefits of humane farming to livelihoods in developing countries. This is crucial work: if we are to convince world leaders to take action for animals, our campaigns must be backed by sound scientific research.

• The animal advocates of the future are already

in action: our annual Brazilian Farm Animal Welfare prize attracted more entries than ever before this year. More than 400 veterinary, animal science and agronomy students worked with their lecturers to complete theoretical and practical tasks that focused firmly on improving the health and wellbeing of farm animals.

• Throughout 2011 we worked hard to expose the

long and horrific journeys by road, rail and sea that millions of farm animal suffer each year as they are transported for slaughter. We continued to focus on key routes in Europe, from Australia to the Middle East and Indonesia, and from the US mainland to Hawaii and across Canada. Your support for our work resulted in two exciting animal welfare victories: In Hawaii our campaigning and direct pressure from our supporters resulted in three supermarkets and a shipping company pledging to stop purchasing pork from pigs imported live from the US mainland. This resulted in a 25 per cent reduction in live pig shipments, saving around 3,000 pigs from suffering cruel and unnecessary journeys. And in Canada our Curb the Cruelty report on live animal transport resulted in the national food inspection agency agreeing to publicise information about companies that have violated animal transport regulations and the penalties they received. Consumers will now have the data they need to make informed and humane choices.

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BRITAIN SAYS “NOT IN MY CUPPA!” “WSPA’s Not in my Cuppa campaign displayed creativity, and went beyond the standard public affairs approaches… This campaign has repositioned WSPA from a purely fundraising organisation to one recognised for advocacy. It would not be an overstatement to say that their work has changed the future of British farming and established WSPA’s reputation as a force for the future.” Public affairs judging panel, Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) Excellence Award 2011

Our Not in my Cuppa campaign was launched in the UK in 2010 to stop the rise of intensive mega dairies, where cows would be kept indoors all year. Huge success followed in February 2011, when the campaign resulted in Nocton Dairies withdrawing its application for a farm in Lincolnshire. We strongly believe that if successful this application would have opened the floodgates to large-scale intensive dairy farms in the UK. Able to hold thousands of cows at a time, this style of farming puts the animals at risk of severe health problems such as lameness and mastitis; could put smaller farmers out of business; cause serious environmental damage; and would change the nature of UK dairy farming forever.

United behind better welfare Our campaign mobilised support from MPs, farmers, other charities ttled a: together we ba – including Not in our cupp and won for cow welfare Compassion in World Farming and Friends of the Earth – the public and WSPA supporters through direct lobbying, media activity, events and social media. It also bridged political divides: a total of 161 MPs from across UK parties signed our Early Day Motion and 19 parliamentary questions on the subject were tabled. In addition, 18 celebrities including Stephen Fry joined the campaign and American ice cream company Ben and Jerry’s agreed to support us. By the end of the year, Not in my Cuppa had 30,000 sign ups, 10,000 Facebook fans and 1,500 Twitter followers. We were delighted when our campaign was recognised for its success by winning the prestigious CIPR Excellence Award in June. Thanks to your generosity we will be continuing to work with the UK government and farmers to support Free Range Dairy, a farmer-led movement to promote grass-based dairy farms.

Together for animals: 2012 and beyond “With your continued support we will keep working to create a brighter future for farm animals. We are determined to ensure they will be treated as thinking, feeling beings that deserve care and respect rather than as expendable production units. Changing the attitudes of policy-makers is key to improving billions of animals’ lives and so we will be working hard on your behalf to ensure that farm animal welfare becomes integral to food business and government policies.” Basia Romanowicz, WSPA Acting Head of Farming

28

MAKING INROADS AGAINST LIVE TRANSPORT Our Humane Chain campaign to end the suffering endured by millions of sheep and cattle transported from Australia to the Middle East and Indonesia gained valuable ground throughout the year. By the end of 2011 we had inspired 112,000 Australians to sign up to the Humane Chain website and 28,000 people to write letters to their MPs calling for an end to live transport overseas. And an amazing 170,000 supporters from 80 countries – Egypt, Brazil, the US, UK and Panama to name but a few – joined our global petition against the trade which was presented to Australian MPs including Janelle Saffin at Parliament House in August.

Marshalling mounting opposition Ms Saffin, a Federal Labour MP, had worked with us earlier in the year to introduce the first ever Parliamentary Private Members Bill to end live exports. Although the Bill was unsuccessful, the surrounding debate highlighted the sense of opposition that Australians feel towards the trade. A 2010 survey showed that 79 per cent believe that sheep exports are cruel and 86 per cent agree that the government should phase out live animal exports if there is an alternative that saves Australian jobs.

“It’s disappointing that government policy currently supports an industry that’s not only damaging the value-adding domestic meat processing industry but also has a long history of horrific animal welfare abuse. We applaud Janelle Saffin and her colleagues for raising this issue in Federal Parliament.” Jessica Borg, WSPA Campaign Manager

and gave a presentation to the Senate inquiry into live exports emphasising that not only is the trade inherently cruel, but investing in local processing and jobs would provide a more stable base for farmers and the Australian economy.

More links in the chain… Through our Move Forward initiative, established in December, we are mobilising supporters to obtain media coverage of the issue in their area. We hope this will inspire even more people to join the Humane Chain and deliver the message to their local representative that ending live exports is the clear way forward for Australia.

During the rest of the year we helped the Australasian Meat Industry Employees Union finalise their policy statement against live animal exports

Chain gan g: WSPA’s Hum a ne C 170,000 su hain attrac pporters ted

WE URGENTLY NEED YOUR HELP TO CHANGE THE WORLD FOR FARM ANIMALS. SO MANY ARE SUFFERING RIGHT NOW. Find out how you can create a brighter future for them at www.wspa-international.org 29

CREATING A WORLD OF

ANIMAL WELFARE Your generosity and commitment has enabled us to look ahead and consider the world’s ever changing political, social and economic landscape, and make some organisational changes that will enable WSPA to be a major global force taking action for animals for years to come.

Thanks to you: successes in 2011 Developing global policy… • Our international campaign to gain United Nations

recognition for a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare (UDAW) continued to gain ground in 2011 – particularly in Latin America where we focussed on working with environmental and youth groups. The Costa Rican Scout Movement alone collected 300,000 signatures in support of a UDAW. By the end of the year 2.3 million people and 42 governments had signed up to the campaign; we plan to keep this momentum going through 2012.

• Your support has helped us put animal welfare A specialist team created in 2011 – External Affairs, Research and Learning – will be key to our success for animals. This global team ensures that all of our projects and campaigns are backed by credible scientific, educational and investigative expertise. This strong backbone will allow us to build the respected and effective relationships with governments and international organisations that we need to shape animal welfare policies worldwide and make huge changes to animals’ lives.

30

firmly on the policy-makers’ agendas.

In New Zealand we advised the government on drafting their revised Animal Welfare Act, which we hope will include the concept of sentience – that animals can suffer and feel pain – for the first time. In the Middle East we were asked to make recommendations on draft animal welfare legislation for the Gulf Cooperation Council. If accepted, these recommendations will mean that animal welfare is protected through the national legislation of several influential countries, including Saudi Arabia.

• Thanks to you, we moved on apace with the

development of a new resource to support animal advocates all over the world. The Animal Mosaic website is a unique forum for animal welfare professionals and other interested parties. It will enable networking and will include up-to-the-minute, credible resources in a number of specialist areas including disaster management, education, scientific research and animal welfare legislation. Animal Mosaic will launch in 2012, initially in English, Portuguese and Spanish.

Making education matter… • This year we achieved further success in our

campaign for animal welfare to be formally taught within the world’s primary and secondary schools, as well as at colleges and universities. Our efforts to persuade the Brazilian government to teach animal welfare in its schools paid off when it was included in proposed changes to the Environmental Education Law Bill. Environmental Education is a compulsory subject and – if the bill is approved – millions of children across Brazil will be taught about the need to care for animals.

• Your support allows us to provide training and

resources that ensure effective animal welfare teaching across 10 countries. One of these countries is Thailand, where we are running a First Concepts in Animal Welfare (FCAW) training pilot project with the Bangkok Metropolitan Authority. FCAW is aimed at primary school teachers and their students; our Thai project involves 87 teachers. One from every primary school in a Bangkok district. We expect it will give us a successful case study that we can use to help us roll out similar programmes elsewhere in the country and across Asia.

• Our Advanced Concepts in Animal Welfare

programme successfully embedded animal welfare in key subject areas in a number of tertiary education institutions in Colombia this year, including the prestigious Nacional University. It has also been integrated into the Colombian Agriculture Institute’s continuous professional development programme for in-service veterinarians, lecturers and other animal related professionals. Such widespread use has the potential to improve the lives of many animals used in farming and research or treated by veterinarians.

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EDUCATION IN ACTION Although life is often difficult for impoverished teenagers in the unpaved streets of Llanos de Santa Lucia, some are changing their community for the better by helping the animals that live in it. Inspired by art teacher Ana Maria Castro, who attended WSPA humane education training courses through an agreement between WSPA and Costa Rica’s Ministry of Education, 12 young people aged 13-15 have united to form Alianza Juvenil por los Animales (Youth Alliance for Animals). “Education should be an agent of change,” says Ana, “a way of getting closer to people and improving their situation.” This is the second year of the Alliance, and with Ana Maria’s support the group has learned about veterinary care and how IT can be used to help animals, as well as being involved in a host of animal welfare activities.

“WSPA educational training has been essential for me both personally and professionally. It extends my knowledge and my viewpoint. A teacher has to be a facilitator that awakes students’ ideas about how to make things better. This is just one of the reasons to keep going and making a difference to animals.”

They check the health of their community’s stray cats and dogs, feeding them when they need help. They give talks about animal welfare to businesses and other schools. And although there are few computers in the area, this year they have developed their own website and Facebook community to spread the welfare word further.

A class act for animals Carlos Chacón, WSPA Education Manager, says Ana Maria is an excellent example of what education should generate in people: “Every one of the initiatives we carry out in the programme is aimed at educators and students transforming knowledge into concrete actions to improve living conditions for animals and for themselves.” Since 2004 your donations have helped us train more than 1,200 Costa Rican teachers, giving them the potential to reach around 50,000 students with humane education messages every year.

Ana Maria Castro (right), Llanos de Santa Lucia High School, Costa Rica

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The art of animal welfare: teacher Ana Maria Castro inspires her students to care for animals

GATHERING INTELLIGENCE

ESTABLISHING SOUND SCIENCE

Since its founding in March 2011 our Investigative Affairs team has already been hard at work in over 20 countries obtaining information, compiling evidence and generating intelligence to support our campaigns. They have particularly focused on investigating the illegal trade in wildlife and played a key role in supporting our new partnership with the London Metropolitan Police’s Wildlife Crime Unit. Together we seek to tackle London’s position as a major international illegal wildlife trading hub.

We believe that convincing governments, international organisations and members of the public that animals can feel pain and suffer is essential to bringing about the changes in the laws and policies that will ultimately protect them. Our Science team, established halfway through 2011, is dedicated to promoting the scientific evidence for sentience and developing critical partnerships within the scientific community to ensure the credibility of all our campaigns and advocacy work for animals.

Together for animals: 2012 and beyond “In these challenging times, the scientists, educators, investigators and policy experts in our global team will be working hard throughout 2012 to inspire and motivate influential people to think and act in ways that create lasting change for animals. Your generosity means we will be working on a variety of vital projects including progressing the Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare, launching the Animal Mosaic website to animal welfarists worldwide, developing the Animal Protection Index (a comparative index of national animal welfare policies), promoting the science of sentience and other global initiatives.” Gabrielle Shaw, WSPA Director of External Affairs, Research and Learning

YOUR SUPPORT IS CRUCIAL: PLEASE CONTINUE TO BE A POWERFUL ADVOCATE FOR ANIMAL WELFARE. To find out how you can help visit www.wspa-international.org 33

FINANCIAL SUMMARY 14% 2011 US$’000

2010 US$’000

Appeals, gifts and donations – regular

43,086

37,684

Appeals, gifts and donations – single

20,322

17,072

Bequests

10,013

6,584

-184

1,061

24

45

73,261

62,446

Income

28%

58%

Investments Other

TREASURER’S REPORT

Dr Andrew Rowan

34

The past year saw WSPA expand significantly in all areas. Global expenditure grew by over 6 per cent, but this was outstripped by an exceptional fundraising performance, with an increase in income of 17 per cent despite the cost of fundraising rising by only 7 per cent. The surplus will allow us to accelerate our programme of work to improve animal welfare.

small in absolute terms) grew by 52 per cent. The only area of decline was in investment income, where we suffered a small loss, reflecting the wider investment situation. With the growth in reserves, WSPA trustees are reviewing our investments to ensure a positive contribution to WSPA’s income and long-term stability.

All fundraising streams showed increases. Regular donations (accounting for almost threefifths of all income) grew by an impressive 14 per cent while legacy income (still relatively

Geographically the increase in income has occurred in all resource countries with some of the highest growth rates in our newer fundraising countries, including Sweden and Thailand.

Expenditure

6%

9%

20%

17%

9%

29%

2011 2010 US$’000 US$’000

End inhumane culling

5,819

5,529

Humane and sustainable agriculture

10,489

8,055

Disaster management

5,294

7,495

Commercial exploitation of wildlife

6,043

10,399

Global advocacy for animals

18,219

12,962

Fundraising

12,737

11,904

3,525

2,096

62,126

58,440

Organisational support

10%

Surplus

2011 2010 US$’000 US$’000

11,135

All this suggests that, despite the poor economic climate, we are successfully conveying to a global public the importance of animal welfare. That is the most important point, since we fundraise not for its own sake but to provide the resources to relieve suffering and improve the lives of animals. This past year (2011) saw the launch of our new strategy. As some programmes begin and others wind down, expenditure patterns will reflect these movements. The greatest rise was in our global advocacy for animals, a central part of the new strategy. This includes education, research and much of our work to improve the policies and practices of governments and other organisations. Disaster management remains a priority area of work for WSPA. Expenditure on disaster management fell in absolute and relative terms, partly because there was no single event on the scale of the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Continuing

4,007

development of a new regional structure, with more local decision-making, caused a small increase in organisational support costs. This should allow us to deliver our global animal welfare programme more effectively. We are very fortunate to have so many generous and committed supporters who share our vision for animals. We are extremely grateful to you all. The road ahead has many challenges but we believe that, with our new long-term strategy, we will make the greatest possible difference to the largest number of animals. Disclaimer

The figures are extracted from WSPA global consolidated accounts which are non-statutory and unaudited. They are provided for general information purposes only. All accounts of individual WSPA offices however are audited locally. For more financial details of WSPA’s global financial affairs, please contact WSPA International. For further financial information about individual WSPA offices, please contact the relevant office (details on back cover) or WSPA International.

35

Your support has given Milla and Shama sanctuary

THANK YOU

Your generosity helps us ensure that animals live better, safer lives, all over the world. This review is dedicated to you.

36

WSPA Australia

WSPA Germany

Daniel and Berry Almagor; Rita Andre; Karen Bevilaqua; The Body Shop; Shirley Brine; Jeff and Linda Brivik; Denis Brophy; Jeff and Debbie Compton; Steven De Celis; Wayne Fitzherbert; Gayl Harrison; Peter and Barbara Hoadley; Hunter Hall; Intrepid Travel Pty Ltd; Nigel Madeley; Robyn McKeown; Victor Menson; Jane Mundy; Mary O’Sullevan; Vivienne Porter; John and Alice Purcell; Maria Risdale; Rhonda Rowland; Dr Alice Simpson; Meridy Taite; Marjorie Wallace.

Arcanum Stiftung; Eva Mayr-Stihl Stiftung; Fressnapf Tiernahrungs GmbH; Oak Foundation; Elina Sistonen, Cats Country.

WSPA Canada

WSPA South East Asia

Dora Ahdab; Aqueduct Foundation; Betty M Beattie; Michele Bergeron; David and Paula Blackmore; BMO Bank of Montreal; The Calgary Foundation; Marlene Cook; Laura Cull; Margaret O’Hanley Duffy; Eden Conservation Trust; Debbie Fong; Giuseppe Monticciolo Jr Investissements; Sheila V Grant; Muriel Gray; Lucylle Hartnell; Betty Hasler; June Haugen; Jennifer L Hopper; Hullmar Realty Canada Ltd; The James A and Donna-Mae Moore Foundation; Leonore Loft; Eric Margolis; Bruce Palmer; Nikki Payne; The Schad Foundation; Lynda Solomon; Telus Corporation; Tides Canada Foundation; Toronto Community Foundation.

WSPA Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean Jennifer Berengueras; Mr Amos Bien; Ms Idelisa Bonnelly; Mr Xavier Castellanos; Ms Giovanna Costantini; Dr Eduardo Pérez Eguía; Carla Ferraro; Ms Darci Galati; Mr Rodrigo Garcia; Ms Sara Rincon Gallardo Garcia; Mr Alex Hasbun; Dr Juan Salvador García Hernández; Ms Martha Honey; Jennifer Ibarra; Mr Allan Lavell; Mrs Pamela Lawson; Mr Luis Antonio Molina; Evette Peterson; Mr Erick Quirós; Dr Daniela Ramos; Mr Javier Rodríguez; Mrs Sandra Saborío; Ms Mafi Sandoval; Mr Luis Simó; Mr Juan Taylor; Dr Juan de Jesús Taylor; Mrs Cecilia Vega; Ms Gisela Vico; Ms Diana Webster; Mrs Hannia Woodman; Ms Noelia Zepeda; Licda. Martha Acosta Zúñiga.

WSPA Denmark Aage V Jensen Charity Foundation; CC Klestrup og hustru Henriette Klestrups Mindelegat; Fabrikant Mads Clausens Fond; Fonden af 24. december 2008; Fru Ellen Bremerdals Fond til hjælp for hjemløse katte og andre vildtlevende dyr; Grosserer Ludvig Berlins og Frøken Marie Poulsens Fond; Lund Fonden; Ole Kirk’s Fond; Toyota-Fonden.

WSPA New Zealand Miranda Brookie; Flo Davies; Pukeko Trust; Reiko Sugiyama. In memoriam: Josephine Bull; Pauline Cotton; Margaret Gardner; Iris Gunning; Valmai Hern; Alma and Reginald Langley; Lilian Penny; Molly Smith.

BuxAway; Central Plaza Rama 2; JerHigh; Kanorr; RTB Referral Animal Hospital; ThaiBev; TRUE; Wall’s; Wrangler.

WSPA United Kingdom Anna Rosa Forster Charitable Foundation; David Ansell; Bear Group SA Trust; Betty and Stanley Abbett Charitable Trust; Paul Davies; Dischma Charitable Trust; Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust; Stephen Hall; David Innes; Investigo Ltd; Graeme MacGregor; Muriel Jones Foundation; Persula Foundation; Francesca Quint; Ruth Smart Foundation; John Scott; Tom and Suzanne Thomson; Tubney Charitable Trust. WSPA would like to thank the Tubney Charitable Trust for their significant investment in support of our work to promote humane and sustainable animal agriculture around the world. In memory: Numerous donations were made in memory of loved ones. Our heartfelt thanks go out to the friends and families who honoured their cherished memories by making a gift to WSPA. Our special thanks go to the Reading Cycle Club and Sue, Dave and Theresa Maynard for their wonderful fundraising efforts in the memory of their son and brother, Anthony. Legators: We would like to remember the many people who left WSPA legacies in 2011. Their generosity ensures that WSPA’s work will continue well into the future.

Strauss Foundation; Peggy Kavookjian and David Nora; Diana and Abner Kingman; Lannan Foundation; Belina Lazzar; Lightspeed Financial, Inc; The Merial Corporation; Oliver S and Jennie R Donaldson Charitable Trust; Sharyl Owen; The Pegasus Foundation; Gaile Russ; Ori Sofer; Eugenie SotiropoulosFoss; Amanda and Andrew Street; William and Charlotte Parks Foundation for Animal Welfare; Mary and Michael Wood; Eleanora Worth. Bequests: H Helenah Allen; Claude Burt; Wayne Castello; Daniel Cady Trust; Evelyn Davies; Theo and Leona Gerichter; Marjorie Halter; Barbara Hansen; Anabelle Howard; Kay F Collier Remainder Trust; Robert Kreimer; Mary Levy; Alice McCutcheon; Nina Purdon Charitable Foundation; Rene Porteau; Arnold Schmidt; Barbara C Smith.

Celebrity supporters Marc Abraham; Steve Anthony; Jamie Archer; Tony Audenshaw; Kristin Bauer; Chris Bisson; Tatjana Blacher; Kyly Boldy; Ruth Bratt; Dominic Brunt; Alexandra Burke; Kelly Caldwell; Grace Cassidy; Mark Charnock; Chris Cheney; Marlene Cook; Claire Cooper; Kevin Eldon; Gail Elliot; Marty Fields; Ricky Gervais; Jacqueline Greenly; Melissa Grelo; Paula Hamilton; Chrissie Hynde; Natalie Imbruglia; Leisel Jones; Daniel Johns; Holly Elissa Lamaro; Leona Lewis; Tom Lister; Sami Lukas; India-Rose Madderom; Deborah Meaden; Dr Melissa Meehan; Marian Mudder; Wendi Peters; Andrew Reid; Miranda Richardson; Natalie J Robb; Norbert Rosing; Martin Rütter; Andrew Sachs; Por Thrisadee Sahawong; Loretta Schrijver; Jenny Seagrove; Steph Song; Aliya Jasmine Sovani; Kylie Speer; Dawn Steele; Michaela Strachen; James Thornton; Twiggy; Charlotte Uhlenbroek; Connie Wilson; Liisa Winkler. Special thanks to Collingwood AFL captain Nick Maxwell who helped WSPA raise AUS$500,000 through our Bricks for Bears campaign.

WSPA USA The Amgen Foundation; ASPCA; The Baobab Fund; Debra and Leon Black; The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region; Mary Crowe; Christine Dale; The Edith B and Lee V Jacobs Fund No. 2; Elinor Patterson Baker Trust; The JE Fehsenfeld Family Foundation; Moraig Jardon; The Josephine Peiser Charitable Foundation; Judi and Howard

37

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Passionate. Dedicated. Inspiring. These are just some of the words we use when asked to describe our supporters. We know that the work we do for animals simply would not be possible without you. Your continued support helps us plan for the future and allows us to make a real difference to the world’s animals on your behalf. There are so many ways to help… MAKE a donation to WSPA: our work never stops INSPIRE your friends, family and colleagues: tell them about our work LEAVE a gift in your Will that will protect animals for many years to come ACT with us: join our campaigns and work with us to save animals HOST a WSPA fundraising event for friends or colleagues DONATE as you earn through your company charitable giving scheme GIVE a gift through a grant-making trust NOMINATE WSPA as your company’s Charity of the Year THINK animal-friendly when you shop, eat and travel.

38

Your gifts meant this dog, caught in flooding in Costa Rica, received vitamins, food and care

Everything you do for WSPA saves and improves animals’ lives. Visit our websites or contact your nearest WSPA office to find out more.

39

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World Society for the Protection of Animals

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2011 Global Review