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Wiltshire Family History Society Journal APRIL 2008 Issue 109

Editorial

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More Obscure Marraiges

21

Chairman’s Notes

3

Wilton to Winchester

24

Branch Programmes

4

The Tale of George Bristow

32

Diary Dates

6

The Tailors of Newton Toney

35

News and Information

6

Book Reviews

39

Coach Trips 2007/8

8

Useful Web Sites

40

Notice of the EGM and AGM

9

Wiltshire FHS Publications

40

From the Branches

10

Letters to the Editor

41

Archive News

13

Help Wanted and Offered

45

A Unique and Unusual Tale

15

Pass It On

48

The Lenards of Devizes

17

Members’ Intersts

49

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ONTRIBUTIONS, articles, letters, comments, photographs, illustrations, and other items are welcomed. Please submit by e-mail or on disc if possible. Address all communications for the journal, except enquiries about nonreceipt of an issue, to The Editor, Dr Bethanie Afton, Yerbury Almshouses, 17 Roundstone Street, Trowbridge, Wilts, BA14 8DL or editor@ wiltshirefhs.co.uk.

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EADLINE for ISSUE 110, July 2008 is 10 May 2008. Material submitted after this date may not be included in the Journal.

HANGES TO PERSONAL DETAILS Members are reminded of the need to advise the Membership Secretary of any changes to their name or address. This will ensure that the membership record is kept up to date and avoid correspondence and journals being sent to the wrong address.

The journal is the official publication of Wiltshire Family History Society. All articles are the copyright of their authors and the Society and must not be reproduced in any form without written permission. The Society does not accept responsibility for personal views expressed in the articles. 1

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Editorial

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by Bethanie Afton

nce again, it is time to send the Journal to press and, as usual, I’m delighted to have had contributions from so many of our members. Even more exciting is the fact that many of you are now including illustrations. It makes the Journal more fun to look at and read. I do agree with Sue Hobbs (see the letters) that it would be good to have an article from the Melksham area. I would add Westbury and Warminster as well. Does anything happen in family history on the Salisbury Plain? Generally, I think this Issue has a good distribution from around the county, so there should be something of interest for everyone. One of the most onerous tasks in putting the Journal together is proof reading it. This is done each quarter by David Weaver. He does an excellent job and I would like to thank him for all his efforts. He has a much better eye for mistakes than I do! And while I’m thanking people, I would like to thank the staff at Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre; especially Steve Hobbs whose contribution usually appears quarter and Michael Marshman who has always been so helpful with illustrations for the Journal. And to all of you, I hope you enjoy this issue of the Journal!

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Chairman’s Notes

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by Jerry King

o you live within reach of Devizes? If so, why not enjoy an evening out and help your Society at the same time? I’ll explain.

In my Notes last October I mentioned some of the constraints that we work under, successfully in the past but now with emerging limitations. Since then, a working group of Brian Hook, David Chilton, David Weaver and Jim Renahan has taken a look at providing more flexibility in the running of our Society. As a result, an enclosure with this Journal explains the constitutional changes that your Executive Committee is proposing. They are imaginative and we believe will be effective. The proposed Constitution will be voted on at an EGM in Devizes on Tuesday 20th May, which leaves time to apply it (or not, if rejected) in preparing for the AGM in June. A quorum is fifty voting members, noting that family membership carries only one vote. While the numbers at Devizes meetings go a fair way towards that total, we will need more members present to ensure that the proposal can be voted on. We don’t think that it will take long, so Devizes members are kindly arranging a social evening with buffet; it will be a chance to meet old friends, to make new ones and to look at some exhibits of interest to family historians. So, if you can join us, please do so: it will be an enjoyable way to spend a late Spring evening and your votes will help set the Society on a sound course for the future. Talking of the future, as you see from the Society Diary Datess, the next three months will bring a range of attractions. The largest one is in London at Olympia for three days in early May, an even larger event than last year in an even larger hall. Brian Hook is organising a coach to get there as well as his other trips to Kew this summer. Nearer home, various societies around our region have their open days, and Cy Cutler and committee are arranging our own at Trowbridge on 21st June, to be followed by the AGM and that evening by our annual dinner. So there is, as they say, plenty for everyone. We hope that you will join us. If you can’t, have a splendid summer all the same, or if you are one of our many Southern Hemisphere members, have a splendid winter instead! Whatever the weather, why not try the newly released CDs of our first 100 Journals? They are fascinating to search, with masses of information about Wiltshire families and places just a few mouse-clicks away. Good hunting. 3

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Branch Programmes CHIPPENHAM/CALNE

Chippenham Museum, Market Place (entry from car park at back of the Museum), second Tuesday each month, 7.15pm 8 Apr

Remembering the Sons of Swindon – Mark Sutton

13 May

A Thousand Years in One Area – Martin Whittock

10 Jun

With Whom Did Your Ancestors Meet? – Colin Chapman

8 Jul

Son in Faversham, Sex in Shorditch, Sins in Southampton – Rodney Whale

CONTACT – Ann Brinkworth 01249 443555

DEVIZES

The Nursteed Centre, Nursteed Rd, (signed 800 yards along A342 towards Andover, on the right by the pedestrian crossing) first and third Tuesdays each month, 7.30pm 1 Apr

Extracts from Devizes Advertiser 1871 to 1872 – Barbara Fuller

15 Apr

Slavery: Abolition and the Royal Navy – Paul Booy

6 May

17c Wiltshire Quakers – Kay Taylor

20 May

Society Extraordinary General Meeting

3 Jun

The Archives of the Future – Claire Skinner

17 Jun

Trials & Tribulations of finding George Barrett – Mary Dyer

1 Jul

Members evening

CONTACT – Mrs Barbara Fuller, 01380 724379

MALMESBURY

Le Flambé Centre, Birdcage Walk, Malmesbury (Use the rear entrance via a gate (near the clock tower) in the wall along Birdcage Walk, a footpath beside Abbey News in the Market Cross; park at Cross Hayes Car Park or behind the Market Cross) fourth Wednesday each month, 7.00pm 23 Apr

Family History – Fact or Fiction – Pat Hase

28 May

The Origins of some Wiltshire Towns – Ken Rogers

25 Jun

TBA check on the wWFHS website)

CONTACT – Mike Langtree, 01666 823982 4

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SALISBURY

Wilton Community Hall, third Wednesday each month, 7.45pm 16 Apr Salisbury Architecture – Gerald Steer 21 May

Aliases, errors, oddities, and strange beliefs – Douglas Jackson

18 Jun

TBA

CONTACT – Robert Hambling, 01722 710716

SWINDON

Gorse Hill Community Centre, Chapel Street, alternate Thursdays, 7.15 pm 10 Apr

Queen Caroline - The unwanted Queen – Paul Booy

24 Apr

A voyage around my grandfather – Bob Banister

8 May

The Fair Sex - Women’s Work in GWR – Dr Rosa Matheson

22 May

Swindon Football – Dick Mattick

5 Jun

Local History and Family Stories – Members

19 Jun

Marlborough - Walk about and talk

3 Jul

Newspapers – Richard Moore, FSG

CONTACT – Mr & Mrs J Scott, 01793 823632

TROWBRIDGE

Bridge House (side door off car park), Stallard Street, second Wednesday each month, 7.30pm 9 Apr

You Obedient Humble Servant – Sue Mackay

13 May

Tommy Atkins – Steve Williams

11 Jun

Conceptions and Misconceptions – John Hurley

CONTACT – Mrs Veronica Cantello, 01225 702331

WESTBURY

The Methodist Church, Station Road, Westbury, fourth Thursday each month, 7:15pm 24 Apr

My Family History in the Cotton Mills and Coal Mines of Lancashire – Peter Pickup

22 May

TBA

26 Jun

TBA

CONTACT - Christine Mitchell, 01373 300716 5

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Society Diary Dates 2008 5 Apr

Herefordshire FHS Fair, Hereford Racecourse

19 Apr

Gloucestershire FHS Open Day, Gloucester*

20 Apr

South Coast FH Fair, Worthing

2-4 May “Who do you think you are?”, Grand Hall, Olympia, London * 9 Jun Gwent FHS Open Day, County Hall, Cwmbran* 21 Jun

Wiltshire FHS Open Day, Trowbridge *

12 Jul

Glamorganshire FHS, Waterside Museum, Swansea*

26 Jul

Buckinghamshire FHS, Grange School, Aylesbury*

20 Sep

Oxfordshire FHS, Exeter Hall Kidlington*

21 Sep

Hampshire FHS, Horndean*

27 Sep

Bristol & Avon FHS, Thornbury*

28 Sep

West Middlesex, FH Fair, Hampton*

1 Nov

West Surrey FHS, Woking Leisure Centre* *WFHS may attend

News and Information MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL

donations to the Premises Fund and the Special Fund

Members are reminded that the new membership year starts on the 1st of April and, that if you do not renew your subscription, no further copies of the Society Journal will be sent to you. Unless you pay your subscription by standing order or have already paid for 2008/9 by cheque or through Genfair, the renewal form sent to all members earlier this year should be completed and returned with your payment to the Membership Secretary. Please note that the new Membership Secretary is David Chilton, 2 Sycamore Drive, Bishopdown, Salisbury, SP1 3GZ.

The Society gratefully acknowledges receipt of the generous donations sent in by members. These have been allocated in accordance with individual wishes.

JOURNAL ON CD

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The Society’s Journals for its first 25 years to 2005 have been scanned and produced for sale on 2 CDs in a jewel case. Now it is possible to search either an individual issue or all 100 issues at once for a name, word or phrase. Alternatively, the Journals

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can be read on screen at leisure (using Adobe Reader). This remarkably useful facility costs only £6.50 including postage for UK customers and £8 by air mail for overseas. Order from the Resource Centre or online with credit card payment at www.genfair.com.

The amalgamation will enable a wider audience to access the most complete suite of family history records available online in the UK and will benefit the genealogy industry by enabling genealogists and amateur family history enthusiasts to access hundreds of millions of records in one place. Scotland Online recently won the tender for the 1911 England and Wales census records, which will be available during 2009....

Announcement about the building work BY TNA During the building work there will be significantly reduced seating capacity as well as noise and disruption to our services until late spring 2008. We regret that you may have to wait a long time before you can look at any original documents. There is also a risk that you may be unable to look at any original documents on the day that you visit us. You may wish to avoid coming to Kew on Tuesdays or Thursdays, as these are our busiest days. Or, even to delay planning your visit until the work has been completed.

For family historians researching a family in the UK, this merger seems a good way to bring many records together. The WFHS is considering the option of placing our publications on the site.

2008 Electoral Roll The first release of the 2008 Electoral Roll for the UK is now available online at www.192.com. • 20 million new names and addresses have just been added. • 4 million of these names and addresses were not listed on the 2007 Electoral Roll. • A second release of 8 million additional records will be added next month. So if you have ‘lost cousin’ or are searching for someone that has moved house or changed name, now is your chance to find them! This release also includes a preview of Age Guides for people on the current Electoral Roll.

We apologise in advance for any inconvenience that these essential building works may cause you.

findmypast.com has been acquired by Scotland Online Press Release: The merger will see Scotland Online’s current online genealogy service, ScotlandsPeople, working closely with findmypast.com to create a dynamic family history resource to serve millions of family history enthusiasts worldwide. 7

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Coach Trips 2008 by Brian Hook

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egretfully, the trips on the 9th of February to Central London and the 5th of April to the National Archives (TNA) have had to be cancelled. The first, through lack of support and the latter, because TNA had asked us to cancel the visit. The building work being carried out at TNA is well behind schedule and will not be completed by the date of our visit. Now for the good news, subject to no unforeseen problems arising, it is our intention that the schedule of visits planned for the remainder of the year is to go ahead as follows: Saturday, 3 May - London Olympia for “Who Do You Think You Are?” Live and the Annual Fair of the Society of Genealogists. Return coach fare £13.50. Group Discounted Admission Ticket £7.50 p.p. Saturdays, 7 June and 6 September - the National Archives at Kew. Return coach fare is £13.50 p.p. Saturday, 22 November – Central London (London Metropolitan Archives; Society of Genealogists; City of London Guildhall Library; and the Church of the Latter Day Saints Family History Centre in Exhibition Road) Return coach fare £13.50 p.p. Coach boarding points and times: 07.00: Car-park of Sainsbury’s Superstore at Chippenham located on the A4 Chippenham to Bath Road. 07.20: The Link Centre, West Swindon District Centre 07.30: Opposite St. John the Baptist Church, Winterbourne Avenue, Swindon SN3 Booking applications accompanied by your cheque made payable to “Wiltshire FHS” should be sent to Brian Hook, 30 Cabot Drive, Grange Park, Swindon SN5 6HG; 01793 639722 or e-mail brian.hook@ntlworld.com if you are boarding at one of the Swindon pick-up points, or to Cyril Cutler 18 Anglesey Mead, Chippenham SN15 3UB; 01249 655469 or e-mail journal-exchange@wiltshirefhs. co.uk if your boarding point is Chippenham. For updates between Journals please visit our website www.wiltshirefhs.co.uk

WILTSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY ANNUAL DINNER Saturday 21st June, 6.00pm for 7.00pm At Hilbury Court, Hilperton Road, Trowbridge Why not join us for an excellent dinner for £16 per person after the Open Day and AGM? Booking is essential. For details please send a sae before 21st May To Cy Cutler, 18 Anglesey Mead Pewsham Chippenham, SN15 3UB 8

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WILTSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY Registered Charity 290284 NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING An Extraordinary General Meeting of Wiltshire Family History Society will be held on Tuesday 20th May at the Nursteed Centre, Nursteed Road, Devizes, SN10 3AH commencing at 7.30pm. The business of the meeting will be to approve the Executive Committee’s proposal to replace the existing Constitution with the new Constitution set out in the papers accompanying this Journal. The EGM will be followed by a social gathering with light refreshments. Directions. From central Devizes take the A342 Nursteed Road towards Pewsey and Andover. The Centre is on the right after about ½ mile by traffic lights at a pedestrian crossing. Notes: 1. No other topics may be raised at the meeting, as twenty-eight days’ written notice of business to be discussed must be given. 2. An EGM requires a quorum of “ten percent of the membership or fifty members whichever is the lesser”. 3. The Constitution shall be amended only if three-quarters of the paid-up members attending the meeting vote for such amendment. 4. Family membership confers one vote per family, and the Chairman shall have a casting or a second vote.

WILTSHIRE FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY Registered Charity 290284 NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The Annual General Meeting of Wiltshire Family History Society will be held on Saturday 21st June at Trowbridge Civic Hall, Trowbridge commencing at 4.30pm. The business of the meeting will be to: receive the annual report of the Executive Committee as Trustees; to receive the accounts of the Society for 2007/2008; to elect the officers and members of the Executive Committee other than the seven Branch Representatives for the ensuing year; to re-elect or elect where necessary the President and Vice-Presidents of the Society for terms of six years; to transact any other business on the agenda to be circulated at the meeting. Proceedings and the election of officers will be in accordance with the Constitution in place at that time. This will be either the revised Constitution being presented by the Executive Committee for adoption at the Extraordinary General Meeting of the Society to be held on 20th May 2008 or, if that is not adopted, the current Constitution of June 2006 which will remain in effect. Both versions are set out for reference in the papers accompanying this Journal. Nomination forms for the elections may be obtained from the Chairman by post or by email chairman@wiltshirefhs.co.uk. They should be signed by the proposer, the seconder and the nominee and reach the General Secretary by Saturday 7th June 2008.

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From the Branches Devizes

Monmouthshire about 1865 and, despite the purchase of many cerNov 20, Heraldry, William Naetificates, false leads and countless reSmith William, a Devizes group search hours, her parentage remains member who has studied this subject unproved. Research involved census, and attended courses on it, gave a parish records, G.R.O. records, famdetailed history of heraldry. The sysily knowledge and wills and John is tem started in France in the twelfth still hopeful of success. century for identification purposes. Rod Whale In England, it has been controlled since 1484 by The College of Arms. Malmesbury The components and reasons for hatchments were explained and we 28 Nov, Dating Old Photographs, all learnt a great deal about a subject Jean Debney From Mr Fox Talbots that to many family historians, is an improvements of 1839 came the photographs as we know them tounknown quantity. day. Jean gave us a fascinating talk 15 Jan, Accessing Basic Sources, showing the evolution of different John Hurley The first ‘proper meet- fashions and background props and ing’ in our new hall attracted several reminding us of the continuous hisnew members. John itemised many tory of advances in photography that basic sources and the new members brought us up to the present day of must have benefited. He explained colourful, instant photos. how genealogy, fuelled by 1901 census, attracted many new devotees 23 Jan, The History of the Midlands and that organisations such as S&N Railway, Chris and Judy Rouse Computing and Ancestry have great- This railway was founded on the ly increased the available sources transportation of coal in 1832, but and simplified research. The final re- it soon diversified into passenger minder was to check original records trains. Gradually it built up a netbecause transcribing errors have not work of lines and ended up buying a shipping firm and building up a netgone away and will always exist. work in Northern Ireland. Thomas 5 Feb, The Saga of Beryl Hurley’s Cook used this railway for his travel Grandmother Updated, John Hurley. agency from 1849. John explained that Beryl had given a Jennifer Walker version of this talk twenty-five years previously and that they tried to identify her maternal grandmother, Swindon Fanny Richards, up to Beryl’s death. John is still persevering. Fanny 7 Jan, Memories of the Railway Although was apparently born in Newport, Factory, Dave Ellis 10

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extensive staff records were kept, sadly some were destroyed by enemy bombs. Of those surviving were lists of disciplinary offences. These included a case of an engine driver seen playing cards whilst driving a loco. The GWR hospital provided good health care for employees and was used as a model for the NHS in 1948. In the war years bomb production occupied part of the factory. Promotion was by seniority - not the most efficient way perhaps. Trip Week was a big event and some thirty special trains were laid on to take workers and their families to some dozen or so seaside resorts around the coast. About thirty thousand people left Swindon and many took food for their landlady to cook meals during the week. Some trains left as early as 5.00 am.

had to be returned to their place of birth or apprenticeship. This meant that families were split apart if the parents were sent away and teenage children remained in the village. Sometimes a young man was persuaded to marry an unmarried mother. One such lucky fellow was given £5 to marry with vicar`s fees, licence paid for plus beer and victuals at the local inn. We hoped the marriage was happy. The paupers were usually old, infirm, orphans, and unmarried mothers. Sums of money ranging from 1/- to 2/- per week were paid out, and clothes, food, and kind were distributed. Philip and Molly Steele

Trowbridge

Jan 9, Little-Known Spas Around Bath, Mr Stewart Clews There were 31 Jan, The Overseer and the Pauper, eleven spas around Bath. These inMervin Penny A few years ago the clude the Wiltshire spas at Melksham, Shrivenham parish chest was opened Holt, Middle Hill near Box, and after many generations. Inside were Seend. The word ‘spa’ came into use found several interesting artefacts, in the sixteenth century. Although including the poor law overseers not all springs were hot, at first they books for the years 1738-1758. These were recommended for bathing to gave a good insight into how the ease a variety of ills. Different kinds poor were treated during the reign of businesses also emerged. At some of George II. Normally the overseers spas, the brewing process used the were church wardens,,but, occasion- waters and at others, like at Purton, ally, they would elect a lady. Most bottling and selling mineral water unusual for those days! was carried out. R Grist Money was raised by a tax of 1½d to 4½d in the £1 (1p-2p for younger folk). House and landowners were Westbury liable, and, as now, there were people who objected or evaded paying. Nov 22, Life in Nelson’s Navy, Tony The Settlement Act of 1662 was diffi- Coutts-Britton, Nelson was born in cult and costly to abide by. Beggars Norfolk in 1758 and was killed at 11

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the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. The weekly ration for the seaman in his navy was 7lbs biscuits, 4lbs salt beef, 2lbs salt pork, 12ozs cheese, 1 ½ pints of oatmeal, 6ozs butter, 6ozs sugar, 2 pints peas and 7 gallons of beer plus a ration of rum and limes. All navy rope has a strand of coloured yarn through it and this led to the expression “spinning a yarn”. If a seaman was insubordinate, he received the lash with the cat of nine tails that he had to make himself; this was then put in a bag and hung on the mast until it was time to dispense the punishment and the cat of nine tails was taken from the bag and the punishment began, this is where we get the expression “cat out of the bag”. There were 14 men from Westbury at the battle of Trafalgar with 11 of them being Royal Marines who would have been trained at Eastleigh Barracks in Westbury. Tony finished his presentation by inviting members to try a typical crew meal.

Salisbury and Westbury triangle started with an introduction to the life and times of the highwayman, giving an insight to the people themselves and their not so poor victims. They plied their trade from horseback, using the many prominent way markers (small clumps of trees) along the routes across the plain as staging posts for their hold-ups. These activities included holding up numerous mail or private coach, along with the individual traveller, who were winding their way home from a successful day at the local markets or just passing through to destination farther a field. She recanted the story of the infamous Highwayman Dick Turpin, who, on one occasion stole a horse (his “Black Bess”) from a farm near Trowbridge leaving in its place an old brown nag (fair swap one thinks!!). Eventually many of these blackguards met their end either by the Hangman’s rope being hanged (not hung) near Salisbury, or, if the Jan 24, The Highwaymen of judge was more lenient, by being deWiltshire, Kathleen White, ported to the colonies to serve their Kathleen’s talk on highwaymen (and sentence. women) operating in the Devizes, Christine Mitchell and Gary Palmer

WHITE HORSE BAPTISM INDEX

An index of 300,000 Baptisms in 120 parishes (some Non-Conformist records & North Dorset parishes included) Searches: 10 entries for £5 (minimum charge) Fee for large searches negotiable Write with SAE for full list of parishes/ dates. Robert Marsh, 67 Hythe Crescent, Seaford, East Sussex BN25 3TZ Email WHINDEX@aol.com Requests held on file 2 years will be deleted unless renewed 12

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Wiltshire and Swindon Archive News Steve Hobbs, FSA

One of the most important individual items acquired for some time is a survey of the manor of Maiden Bradley made in 1634, that was purchased at auction with assistance of the V&A Purchase Fund (Ref 3656). The manor belonged to the Seymour family, Dukes of Somerset, whose archive is held in the History Centre. This item fills a gap in the history of the parish which was the centre of the family’s estates in Wiltshire. It describes the estates of over 200 leaseholders and copyholders, making it a rich source of both genealogical and local history research. The topography of the village is revealed by properties in High Street, Church Street, and East Street. Three properties in Church Street are described as burgage tenements, suggesting vestiges of a borough. Stony Street occurs several times, a name which might be an indicate shrinkage of the village or a separate hamlet. It might be evidence of a much earlier linear feature. A smith’s shop in the High Street, a tan house at Pipe Marsh and a former tucking mill ‘lying beneath’, ie below, the buildings of the late dissolved priory, illustrate the industrial history of the village. Maiden Bradley was predominantly a rural parish, as it remains today,

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and through this detailed survey the patchwork of small holdings of land in both enclosed and open fields can be reconstructed. These are just some of the interesting questions raised by the survey, which closer examination may answer. We have successfully filled a gap in an important run of patient case books from the Old Manor Asylum at Fisherton Anger. Our series, which came as part of the hospital’s archive, began in 1849, with volume 2. The earlier volume was removed from the archive, many years ago judging from its clean and excellent condition. It dates from 1845 and includes details of about 200 individuals admitted between 1845 and 1849, with notes on five patients admitted between 1823 and 1839. The majority of these were paupers and criminals. The County Asylum at Roundway did not opened until 1850, and the asylum for the criminally insane at Broadmoor until 1863. The volume is also useful in completing case notes that ran on into the second volume, something which emphasises the interlocking nature of the series, each book being more a jigsaw piece than a discrete item. 13

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A Unique and Unusual Tale about A Headstone in Malmesbury

Jim Renahan (4725)

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n the Wiltshire Family History Society’s Monumental Inscriptions file, there is an entry which reads Ref No. 168750 – Hannah TWYNNOY – Malmesbury – 23 Oct 1703 – Age 33 – killed by tiger fierce Is her story a local legend? Is it partly speculation, perhaps mythological or a fable, but based on fact?

A poetic inscription, on a widely known Malmesbury headstone, has informed its readers for some 300 years of a touching fragment of family history. It reads IN MEMORY OF Hannah Twynnoy Who died October 23rd 1703 Aged 3 3 Years In bloom of Life She's snatched from hence She had not room To make defence; For Tyger fierce Took Life away, And here she lies In bed of Clay Until the Resurrection Day

In the graveyard, within the grounds of Malmesbury Abbey, this headstone poem appears to be all that exists as the story of Hannah Twynnoy’s death. Only a few yards from Hannah’s grave prominently stands the Abbey, now a parish church, where a monk called Eilmer (born 980 AD) tied on his back wings he had made in an attempt to fly. Perhaps he prayed before he jumped from a tower of the Abbey and possibly crossed the graveyard when he covered some 200 yards before falling to earth and breaking both legs. The Abbot cancelled his plan to fly again. Inside the Abbey is the tomb of King Althestan, the first King of all England. Malmesbury was home to both William of Malmesbury, claimed as the father of English history (11th Century), and Thomas Hobbes, father of modern English philosophy. Close to the Abbey proudly stands one of the best examples of a market cross in England, dating from 1490. Today, Malmesbury is a 15

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Malmesbury Abbey and the graveyard containing Hannah Twynnoy’s headstone

small, pretty town, well worth wandering round during a tour of Wiltshire. A visit to the Abbey House garden is not to be missed. This is Hannah’s environment. Hannah Twynnoy is reported as being the first person to have been killed by a tiger in Britain and this grim tale is a part of Malmesbury's folklore. It is generally accepted that Hannah Twynnoy was working as a barmaid in the White Lion Inn in the centre of the Malmesbury, when, in 1703, a circus came to town and settled at the rear of this inn. The circus animals included a tiger, which Hannah was warned against upsetting. Some believe that she took pleasure in riling the tiger until, one day, the tiger broke free and took its revenge on her. Whilst the only available evidence of this story is the gravestone itself, Hannah’s burial presents family historians with mysteries. Poetic epitaphs on headstones appear to have been popular at around the turn of the 18th century and were generally only for the wealthy. An intriguing question is, could Hannah’s family have paid for a carved headstone, plot, poet and internment? The phrase in bloom of life raises a further question. Is it poetic language for explaining that Hannah was pregnant when she died? In the early 1700s, a thirty-three year old barmaid could hardly have been considered in the bloom of youth. In 2003, on the 300th anniversary of Hannah’s death, a remembrance ceremony 16

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was carried out at her graveside and every local schoolgirl under 11 years of age and called Hannah placed a flower on her grave. A road in a new development in Malmesbury was named “Twynnoy Close” in 1993. Christmas 2006 saw a performance in the Abbey of the musical “Hannah & The Tyger”. It was composed by a local musician John Hughes and a colleague, Mike Scanlon provided the libretto. Eilmer’s flight was also commemorated with a musical story of his venture. Local historian, John Bowen, confirms the basic problem with Hannah’s history. When Mayor of Malmesbury, he said that no one yet knew the real facts behind her demise and appealed for more information about Hannah, saying it was ‘a great story of murder, mystery and suspens’ of which there is ‘very little information about and I would just love to know a bit more’. There is an entry in Malmesbury’s Parish Register dated 24th October 1703 “Hannah Twynnoy, ‘killed by a Tygre at the White Lyon’”. Her demise was also recorded in The Beauties of Wiltshire, (3 vols: 1801-25) by John Britton and E. W. Brayley. These are the only known surviving historical accounts of Hannah's death or her life. However, this tale thrives as a local legend. It is curious and intriguing and all the more so because answers have yet to be discovered! What a wonderful challenge to family historians!! jim_renahan@hotmail.com

The Lenards

Plumbers and Glaziers in Devizes Janet Dando (5250)

1751-1849

As a child, I always wondered why my father's middle name was ‘Lenard’ and not the more familiar ‘Leonard’. The puzzle that was solved when I found out that Lenard was my grandmother's maiden name. I knew little about her side of the family except that her father had been a career soldier and that she had been born in India. Much later, when bitten by the family history bug, the discovery that my great-grandfather had been a sergeant-major in the Worcestershire Regiment of Queen Victoria's army led me to The National Archives at Kew where I found his army records. It was a surprise to learn from these records that Great-grandfather Lenard hailed from Devizes, a town

we had often driven through going home from Sussex to Bristol. I have always loved Wiltshire, spent the 17

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the country moved rapidly from a state that we would find difficult to comprehend to something much more like the democratic, industrial world we are familiar with. The Lenards' business first appears in the Devizes records with an entry in the St. Mary's churchwardens' accounts which shows William Leonard being paid ÂŁ0.5.2.d for glazing in 1753. The name varies through Linnard, Linard, Lenard, Lennard and Leonard in the records but eventually settles as Lenard. This is how the family spell it. The births of William's five children were easy enough to find, but his marriage was elusive until by chance I found, in the Rowde transcriptions, the marriage of a A view along Little Britox looking towards the William Sinnard to Mary Webb in 1751. William's only son was Devizes Market Place (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre) named William Webb, making it likely that his mother's maiden war years at Box, and still have famname was Webb. An examination of ily in the area. There was a perfect the original Rowde register showed excuse for several holidays researchthat Mary Webb married William ing in Devizes Museum and the old Linnard, not S but L! Wiltshire Record Office in Trowbridge. It was another surprise to find that I found two Lenard wills in the the Lenards had run a plumbing and Wiltshire Record Office. The 1760 glazing business in Devizes from at will of the first William Lenard sugleast 1751 to 1849. This was a dra- gests that his mother came from matic century which included the Christ Church - perhaps the one in American War of Independence and Hampshire (now Dorset). There were the Napoleonic Wars, and saw great indeed Lenards in Christchurch - but hardships - extreme weather at times, so far I have not been able to make harvest failures, food shortages, star- a connection. This will was written vation and disease, as well as unprec- when his son was just a year old. The edented growth and expansion of in- first William must have died fairly dustry, trade, building and culture as young for his wife was widowed by 18

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1770. However, the business continued, perhaps run by Mary with the help of journeymen, until William Webb was old enough to take over. The business was run from premises in the Brittox (in what is now part of the Boots building) until 1812 when it moved to Maryport Street and eventually extended across to Monday Market Street (the buildings are still there). William Webb must have prospered, working sometimes with the builder Benoni White on major projects such as the building of a new parsonage house and outbuildings at Headington in 1824.

the fourth generation of plumbers Sadly, he died in his early twenties. Another son, James, my greatgrandfather, was working as a cabinet-maker from workshops on the Monday Market Street/Maryport Street premises in Devizes during the 1830s. The Lenard plumbing business itself folded with the death of the original William’s grandson, William, in 1848. The premises was sold, but a nephew, Richard Hill, carried on a plumbing and glazing business, eventually from Parnella House, 23 Market Place into the twentieth century. Richard served the comWilliam Webb's eldest son, another munity in many capacities. He was William, carried on the plumbing mayor of Devizes in 1882. James and glazing business. His eldest Lenard appears to have died around son William, the survivor of twins, 1849/50 but I have no direct evidence. was apprenticed to his grandfather, In the 1851 census, his wife is a widWilliam Webb, and destined to be ow receiving alms. James' death was not registered in Devizes and I have

View along Maryport Street Devizes, where the Lenards had a plumbing business (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre)

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Mary Underhill, from Wickwar, Glos. in 1877 at Bristol Register Office and in 1878, shortly after the birth of his first daughter Eleanor, was posted to India where my grandmother, Annie Sophia May, was born in 1880. In 1881, Joseph returned to England to become Regimental Sergeant-Major at In the late nineteenth century, the business moved to Par- Norton Barracks. In nella House where Richard Hill, a nephew, carried on into 1896, he received the the twentieth century. Meritorious Service (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre) Medal. been unable to find it in the national registers. I have not found a burial in Devizes either.

Family history is full of surprises. For me, the biggest surprise has been the amount of inforJames' second son, Joseph, was recruit- mation that may be found about an ed into the Army in Devizes in 1860 ordinary family from 250 years ago. and joined the 29th Regiment of Foot, I should like to thank Lorna Haycock at later to become the Worcesters. Was the Devizes Museum and the staff of the it for a more exciting life or had the W&SA for their help in tracking down family fallen on very hard times? In the documents on which this short acany event, Joseph prospered during a count is based. thirty-one year army career that took M.R.Dando@Bradford.ac.uk him around the world. He married

Berrow's Worcester Journal Thursday, March 18, 1762

They write from Aubourne in Wiltshire, that the violent Hurricane of Wind the 21st ult. blew so hard at North, to which their Church was greatly exposed, that upwards of ten Tons of Lead were blown from the North to the South Side of it, and in its Fall beat down the South Wall of the upper Part of the Church, and several of the principal Pieces of Timber from the Roof. Richard J Heaton rjheaton@hotmail.com 20

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More Obscure Marriages Steve Hobbs, FSA

I

n my piece on Obscure Marriages in the April 2007 edition of this journal, I included a note by John Archer of the marriage of William Ambrose and Jane King that found its way into the ‘Great Roll’ for the Quarter Sessions held in January 1654 (A1/110/1653H/174); the date of the wedding was 5 January 1654, not 1563 as published in the note). I suggested that, as Archer signed the bishops transcript of 1640 for Swallowcliffe, this was probably where the marriage took place. However, two more certificates by Archer on the same sheet of paper have come to light in the archives of the prebend of Durnford which suggest that the parish was in fact Ansty. (D9/4/1). These are to certifie that Ralf Prestly and Elizabeth Gilbert were maried the second day of februarie 1663 in the kings free chappell of Ansty in the county of Wilts Without any Impediment that could be found. Ita test’ Johan Archer Presbyter There was married also att that Instant Richard Talbut and Jone Williams of the parish of Durnford in the time of divine praiers in the face of the Whole congregation.

that couples could be married there without recourse to either licences or banns. The union of William Ambrose and Jane King took place during one of the close seasons when marriages were forbidden under canon law - a further indication that Ansty was beyond the pale. This would have attracted those preferring a secret or clandestine marriage. Nevertheless, certificates such as these were an important means of authentification should the need arise. A similar certificate of the marriage of Lawrence Holloway and Susannah Bittine (?Bainton) ‘both of wilshire’ in Ansty chapel on 14 January 1685 by Edward Worley, minister of Ansty is among papers in the archive of the prebend of Hurstbourne and Burbage (D11/1/1). Despite its name, it dealt exclusively with Burbage, which was probably parish of one or both of the couple. Among the papers of the Peculiar of Chute and Chisenbury, which, confusingly, covered the parishes of Chute and Winterbourne Dauntsey, is a note of the marriage in Winterbourne of Thomas Sutton and Eleanor Kent on 16 Feb 1618 (D7/4/2).

Objections to two contracts of marriage were presented to the justices As a royal chapel, Ansty, was ex- of the peace at the Quarter Sessions empt from all ecclesiastical jurisdic- for their consideration, as they were tion within the diocese. No copies empowered to do so under the or transcripts of its register were re- Commonwealth. Their confirmaquired to be made; and it is probable tions of both unions are recorded in 21

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the order book (A1/160/2). The marriage of John Saintsbury and Susan Bristowe, both of Fisherton Anger was recorded in the parish register on 29 June 1654. The order book reference provides the additional information that John, a shoemaker, was the son of John Saintsbury, a yeoman of Market Lavington, and Elizabeth’s father was William Bristowe, also of Market Lavington. The objection was made by Anthony Turnor, a shoemaker of Salisbury. The other contract, although upheld by the justices, does not appear in the register of Salisbury St Thomas, the parish in which the certificate was issued for the marriage of Henry White, gentleman and Susan Studly, singlewoman, both of Downton. The objection was made by Alice Lowman on behalf of her daughter, Katherine. It was stated that Henry was over 16 years of age, and Susan was over 14. This contract was upheld by the justices at the Sessions on 8 January 1656. A letter (D25/5/1) from Thomas Hewitt, vicar of Westbury, provides a more detailed picture of the different circumstances of two couples; William Blake, 25, of Woolverton in Road, Somerset and Eleanor Adlam, 35 of Dilton, and Mr Robert Kevil, 24 and mistress Sarah Bence, 26, both of Westbury. Marriage licence bonds for both survive in the Precentor’s collection that is covered by the WFHS index, although it would appear not without some prompting. Writing to Mr Boucher, an attorney in Salisbury, for a couple of marriage licences and bonds, on 22 September 1765, he continues

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Please fill up two Bonds & Licences & send ‘em directly. mr Kevil & mrs Sarah Bence have fixed to be married next Thursday morning without fail. it was a sore disappointment they wee to have been married last Thursday morning to hear, no Licence cou’d be had. some of her Friends came fm London & Amesbury, & Dinner was provided; so pray don’t fail to send the two Licences & two Bonds now sent for. mr Kevil is a Tradesman of himself; a Cabinet maker, & lodges & diets at miss Bences Fathers & the match has been long agreed on to my certain knowledge & no danger… mr Kevil has no Father nor mother Living & miss Bences Father is the officer here of Excise. all being therefore clear & Parties agreed on both sides this Long time & house took, no difficulties can arise a bout or the other marriage … Wm Blake is only a Poor Carter and lives with a Farmer at Woolverton. he tells me he has only a mother living at Stratton [probably Stratford sub Castle], within a mile of Salisbury a Poor widow Woman, who only gets her living by Carding & spinning & has now Relief of the Parish. Eleanor Adlam spins & cards for her Living; a Poor Woman only she has saved a triffle of money. perhaps you may know Blakes mother. he tells me he lived with a Farmer at Dunford [Durnford] formerly. knew mr Talman & 22

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you also. I believe what he says is true. & seems to be a Poor Fellow; so no danger. In short he seems so mean, that I have made him pay for the Licence. They wou’d & cou’d be married at Road, but she chuses & he too to be married at Dilton Chapel, if they can, next Sunday morning; for he has not time to be married on a Week Day; pray send the Licences by the Post,

as I must not disappoint ‘em no more. The licences and bonds had not arrived by 26 September when Hewitt wrote again, stating that the Kevil and Bence union had been agreed for more than twelve months, and that he had sent his servant to Salisbury to collect the documents. The bonds were signed on the same day. stevenhobbs@wiltshire.gov.uk

FROM THE DEVIZES & WILTSHIRE GAZETTE JULY 27TH 1837

James Wallis was indicted for killing and slaying a child of the name Ann Shail in the parish of Chilton Foliat. Mr Bingham defended. Martha Shail examined: I am turned 13 years of age and live at Chilton Foliat. I remember on the 1st May last, being out walking with my little sister in my arms in the evening. My sister was then nearly 9 months old. I saw a flock of sheep coming along, the prisoner was driving them. I made this remark to him, "I don't know, Shepherd, what would become of you tonight, were it not for your white faced dog, you are so tipsy."This was all I said. I had not seen him before. He does not belong to my country. He said, "I'll tell you all about being tipsy" and then struck me three times with a little tapering stick and hurt me. After that he went away and came back and struck me three times more. I think the child had six blows. I said "Pray shepherd you will kill the baby" He said he didn't care about the baby. I then took the child home. I had no bonnet on at the time but the child had. The child did not cry. I went home and gave her to my mother. Cross examined, I did not call him a fool, I said his white dog must take care of him. The mother called the Doctor the next day and the child died later. The child had been poorly on Sunday - this had happened on Monday Sentenced to One months hard labour. submitted by Tony Maslen (2511)

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Wilton to Winchester via ‘Willow’ or

A Schoolmaster’s Tale of Rags to Riches Sandra Naish (901) In 2001, because of our mutual surname and my work as the editor of the journal of the Hampshire Genealogical Society, Canadian, Ian Naish, approached me asking if I had any information on his family. I had nothing to share, but decided to help Ian, who was attempting to trace John Naish, his greatgreat-grandfather. Ian knew from the 1851 Census that John was a teacher at Trafalgar House School, Winchester, Hampshire with his birth about 1811 in ‘Wellow, Wiltshire.’ Additionally he knew that John’s wife was P Naish, who was from Chilhampton, Wilts. Wellow turned out to be a complete red herring! Having checked out both East and West Wellow parish

John Naish, Schoolmaster

courtesy of the Hampshire Record Office (85M88W/16, fo. 34)

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baptisms, John Naish had NOT been baptised there, and, with only one burial traced in several centuries, the parish was not a nest of Naishes. Before checking neighbouring parishes, the obvious next step was to view Winchester’s 1851 census to see if it was correctly transcribed. Looking through St Thomas’ parish, Trafalgar House School came under Trafalgar Street and listed John Naish, 37, ‘Schoolmaster’ definitely born ‘Wilts’, but untidy handwriting meant a mistranscription of Wellow. Three bad letters followed the first three ‘Wil---’. The word looked like WILLOW, so Hampshire knowledge had swayed the transcriber to state Wellow. However, it was just as easily WILTON, Wilts, which I believed was correct. In addition to John’s wife (“P”) and baby son, “W” aged 7 months, there were 32 male pupils at the school. Ian’s ancestor was William Henry Naish, a Corporal in the Royal Engineers who lived 24

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in Bedford before retiring to Pe m br oke sh i r e. Ian’s research in Kew’s military records had confirmed the year and William’s place of birth as Winchester. Family tradition was adamant that his ancestors were teachers, soldiers, and vicars. The Baptisms Register of St. Thomas’ Parish Church, Winchester, idenTrafalgar House, Winchester, formerly Trafalgar School, tified the baby founded in 1805 by Matthew Lush and run from the 1830s by baptised 30th Oct. James Naish 1850 as William Also of Georgianna who Henry, son of survived her sister only a John and Priscilla Naish of Trafalgar fortnight aged 11 months Street, Schoolmaster. A bonus was his date of birth, 23rd August 1850, More was discovered about John in the margin. William had not been Naish from subsequent Winchester the only child of John and Priscilla as census. At 2 Trafalgar Street in the 1871 Ian had always thought. Two daugh- census, John Naish, 56, Schoolmaster ters, Harriett Ellen baptised 1846 (Classical and Commercial) resided and Georgiana baptised December with birthplace clearly stated as 1847, had tragically both died. Baby Wilton, Wiltshire. His wife, Ellen A. Georgiana’s burial on 22nd September Naish, 44, was born Whaddon, Wilts. 1848 was found at Winchester’s West Their four children, all WinchesterHill Cemetery, where this inscription born, were Walter aged 11, (baptism on one headstone exists: Dec. 1859); Alfred 4 (Alfred William In Memory of Harriot Ellen bapt 1866); Ellen 3, (baptism February Naish 1868), and Godfrey 2 (baptism May who died September 1848 aged 1869). Also present in school staff was 2 years 10 months, Governess Annie Alexander, 23, born 25

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at Salisbury. Additional baptisms traced in St Thomas’ Parish showed that John and Ellen’s first child was daughter Augusta, baptised July 1857, with other sons Edward (1861), Albert (1864) and Sidney (July 1871). Alfred Naish’s September 1888 will referred also to ‘my half sister Marian Priscilla Garner.’ So, John’s first wife, Priscilla, died and he remarried, probably going back to his home county for another bride. Whaddon, a few miles outside Salisbury, is not far from Wilton. Priscilla’s burial was not traced in Hampshire so perhaps she was taken home to Wiltshire, but a Winchester death registration was found in

December 1854 quarter. The Naish family remained at Trafalgar House with John’s Wilton birthplace reconfirmed in 1881. He was still married to Ellen at 67. In 1881, the residents included their sons, Alfred, Godfrey and Sidney, while Walter, 21, was an unmarried “Undergrade of Dublin University”. Seventeen boy scholars plus cook and housemaid completed the household. John Naish, patriarch of the family, was described now more grandly as ‘Schoolmaster, Magistrate and Alderman’. He had gone up considerably in the world from his birth in a small Wiltshire town, as I discovered from the lengthy newspaper obituary following his death on 27 July 1883 at Winchester.

The funeral of “Mr Alderman Naish, J.P.” as a public figure, was fully reported in the Hampshire Chronicle of Saturday 4th August. Five sons and two nephews attended the service on “Wednesday prior,” and John had been a Freemason, “amongst whom deceased had held foremost rank. In all some 80 brethren of the craft ...assembled at the church and here also the Mayor and nearly every member of the Corporation Church of St Mary, Wilton attended”. (the Old Church in use prior to 1845) 26

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In 1891, with one servant, John’s widow, Ellen Augusta Naish, resided at 22 Ranelagh Road with her children - Ellen a student, architect Sidney, and Godfrey, at 22 still studying dentistry. Walter was now a clerk in Holy Orders resident with wife Elizabeth at 2 Trafalgar Street, having taken over the school. Ellen died aged 69 at Winchester on 20th November 1896 with her will granted probate in March 1897. Thereafter her “Superior furniture and effects” including 200 books, much mahogany furniture and a walnut pianoforte, were auctioned with her six-bedroom home.

Wilton Free School The Moat House’ Today

In the year that Trafalgar was fought, Mr. Matthew Lush opened a private school... (and) carried on the school for thirty years, but in 1835, on consequence of his wife’s health, he retired and went to live at Wilton. Mr John Naish had practically taken over the school two years previously… 1833-1883.

To Ian’s great delight, portraits plus details of two sons, Rev. Walter Naish of Littleton and Alton dentist, Godfrey, exist. Being a prominent Victorian citizen, John’s photograph was included in an album at Hampshire Record Office, and Godfrey’s photograph appeared in a 1905 biographical book. A newspaper obituary for “Lieut-Col The Rev Walter Naish” (d. 27 Oct. 1923) added information on Trafalgar House School, which Walter operated after transfer from his father. The school had opened in 1805 as Lush’s School, and so a further Wiltshire connection became clear. The report stated 27

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A great deal more on John Naish the man, and his numerous commercial dealings unfolded from further research in the Hampshire Record Office. An indentured conveyance, document W/F1/21/1 dated 29 Sept. 1853, carried the clear, flowing signature of ‘Jno Naish’ and detailed St. Clement Street premises “being sold to Mr John Naish, Schoolmaster.” Repetitious legal jargon abounded, but the gist is that he paid £310 for two messuages bought by auction

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in June 1853. A plan was drawn on the document but the most important piece of genealogical text it contained was And the said John Naish (who was married on the 9th day of February, 1839) hereby declares that no woman who may hereafter become his widow shall be entitled to dower out of the said messuage

Seagrim was an 1834 Freeman of the City (ref. W/B8/1). Document W/F1/21/6 concerns conveyance of three Winchester cottages from Mr Matthew Lush to John Naish. F. M. Lush signed this January 1870 document; witness was William Philpott, Clerk to Devizes Solicitors, Meek, Jackson & Lush. It reads Indenture made this day between Henry Johnson of Winchester, Bookseller, William George Vawdrey Lush formerly of Burdensball, Wilton, Wiltshire, but now of Weymouth, Dorset, and Frederick Matthew Lush of Devizes, Wilts, Solicitor, on one part, and John Naish of the City of Winchester, Schoolmaster, on the other part. Matthew Lush died 22 May last in possession of hereditaments described and intended to be conveyed by his last will and testament dated 12 December 1866 and bequeathed all etc. property to Henry Johnson, W.G.V. Lush & Frederick Matthew Lush, executor (District Registry of Salisbury probated 4 August last) whereas they agreed with John Naish for the sale to him of the said hereditaments at price of £300...

This confirmed that Priscilla Naish, his legal wife, was quite alive then, and confirmed that our John Naish had married her at Wilton in February 1839. This particular Wilton marriage of John Naish, bachelor, ‘Linen Draper’ of Wilton, (father William Naish, clothier) to Priscilla Ford Tabor of Wilton (father William Tabor, farmer) had already been traced at old St Mary’s Church. Mary Ann Penny plus brothers Frederick and John Tabor were witnesses. Priscilla’s family lived at Chilhampton, on the Wilton to Warminster road between South Newton and Fugglestone St Peter parishes, where stood only a farmhouse and some farm cottages. Priscilla (baptised 22nd Sept. 1815) was the seventh child of William Tabor who married Harriet Ford at South Newton on 29th April 1805. Other Chilhampton-born Tabors John Naish, Winchester schoolmaswere resident in Winchester at 1851 ter, was definitely native to Wilton, Census. and only this baptism - 27 March There was more evidence of a Wilton 1814, son of William Naish, “shearto Winchester wealth connection. man” and wife Sarah - of any John at In HRO Quarter Sessions material Wilton Parish Church existed. This is a February 1836 document (Ref. tied in with his age given each cenQ21/4/2) referring to ‘George Seagrim sus decade. Research switched toof Wilton, Gent.’ while Charles tally to Wiltshire. 28

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William Naish (died 27 October 1852 aged 70) married Sarah Becket at St. Mary’s Church, Wilton on 8th November 1807. Subsequent children’s baptisms there include: Epharim 28 August, 1808, Hannah 1 July, 1810, William (1812-1816), then John 1814 above, Mary Ann 11 August 1816, and William 25 Dec., 1818. John Naish’s ancestry progressed back another generation with the 28th December 1766 marriage of William Naish (b. 1742) to Anne Coole. Their Wilton-baptised offspring were: Sarah 1768; Ann 1774; John 1777; Ephraim 1780 and William 1782. Surnames Naish and Nash abound in Wilton parish registers with many connected to the textile industry as weaver, spinner, shearman or just plain cloth-worker, as William Naish, 24, was described when the Allegation for his Marriage

Licence was issued 26th Dec. Valentine Hearne accompanied bachelor William to be bound that day in a large sum of money. Anne, described as a 22-year-old spinster, would seem to be the daughter of John and Anne Coole, Wilton-baptised on 11 August 1745. Then Wiltshire FHS helped enormously with their Salisbury Area Apprenticeships and Wilton Free School. Wow! It contained multiple names, birthdates, and confirmed parentage as early as 1709 for many Naishes in the weaving or kersey, a coarse, narrow cloth woven from long wool,weaving trades. Ephraim Naish, b. 30 July 1808, was apprenticed 1824 to Salisbury tailor John Munday. Henry, b. 27 June 1821, was apprenticed to his clothier father in 1836 but died Aug. 1848 aged 27. Finally, our John Naish was born 22

Oldest House in Wilton next to Wilton Free School, North Street

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February 1814, educated 1823 until 1828, but not apprenticed. It all fitted perfectly.

from apprenticeship to his father so was also a shearman (a woven cloth cutter), then recorded as a clothier (cloth-maker). In introductory words Many of William and Anne’s chilbefore the indexed lists, Tim rightly dren attended Wilton Free School in wrote, “Many former Free School North Street, founded 1714 under the Boys became prominent citizens of terms of the 1706 will of Wilton nathe town.” I can add, “Not just that tive Walter Dyer of London, so that town.” “twenty poor Wilton boys would be taught to read and write, learn arith- The ownership of cloth mills ran in metic and be educated in the doctrine the Naish family. Bedford cord was of the Church of England.” Richard made at Quidhampton until its deUphill and Robert Sumption made struction. Jill Chambers details in further legacies. The school later ad- Wiltshire Machine Breakers how a riotmitted fee-paying pupils as well as ous mob “marched on Quidhampton boarders and continued until 1924. Mill, a factory for the manufacture of woollen cloth belonging to William Thanks to Tim Morland, who tranNash” and destroyed machinery on scribed those precious details, an 24th November 1830. John Ford aged exact date of birth (18 April 1782), 17, Wilton labourer, was charged over was obtained for William Naish, this attack while Samuel Dowding William and Anne’s son. He came and Josiah Pitt gave evidence against from the Sunday school, was educathim. Crow Lane Mill, Wilton, manued until 1797, and certainly married factured cloth, was also attacked that Sarah. William learned his trade day. Five machines were broken up despite the efforts of Samuel Brasher, son of proprietor, John Brasher, who rented the old textile mill in 1800 to make corduroy. Bravely, he confronted hundreds of rioters. Fifty-five people including children lost their work as a consequence. Nine Wilton men eventually transThe John Naish House at the Corner of West Street, Wilton ported to Australia 30

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Crow Lane Mill, Wilton

after committal to Fisherton Goal, Salisbury. Following destruction of his textile plant during these ‘Swing Riots’, Brasher continued in a reduced capacity but handed the lease over in 1835 to John Naish. In 1859, James Goddard approached Naish to suggest they manufacture piano felt and phase out cord to concentrate instead on this new product that reached worldwide markets. John’s younger brother, felt manufacturer, William Naish, was extremely successful at Crow Lane Mill. The 1881 census records that 22 men, ten women and four boys were employed. Naish Felts Ltd continued there operational to recent times. Indeed, Kelly’s 1964 Directory lists E.V. Naish Ltd. Three

decades later, Sawyer wrote, “Today, the recently refurbished mill, with members of the Naish family still involved, ...has diversified into a whole range of modern products.” The company today, apparently in German ownership, still bears the Naish name on its Wilton premises. Sources: R. Sawyer, Tales of a Wiltshire Valley - The Nadder (1995) J. Chambers, Wiltshire Machine Breakers (1993) Chris Rousell Town and Villages of England; Wilton (1993) 77 Athelstan Rd, Bitterne, Southampton, Hants, SO19 4DE San78@tiscali.co.uk 31

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The Tragic Tale of

George Bristow

Derek Bristow (5470)

G

eorge Bristow, my first-cous- information I could find. in-twice-removed, first came Where to start? If the hanging was to my attention on a visit to true, there ought to a report in a local Mere way back in the twentieth cen- newspaper. I contacted the Wiltshire tury. It was also my first trip to the Record Office and learned that they town which, for some 200 years, had had copies of the Wiltshire Gazette been home to my ancestors. for the year in question, 1912. The I had visited the cemetery, but al- person I spoke to did say, however, though I found a number of graves that this paper rarely covered the bearing the Bristow name, I found no Christian names that I recognised. I asked an attendant if there were others and he told me that they were all over the cemetery, adding that maybe I should look at the burials book that was still on site. I spent well over an hour going through it, making a note of all the Bristows I could find. Against the entry for George was the note “hung himself�. Recently, with leads to earlier ancestors having dried up, I turned my attention to George again to see how much

Primitive Methodist Church, Mere where George and Harriet Ellen Hicks married in 1896 (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre)

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corner of the county in which Mere lies. Nevertheless I decided to check for myself only to discover that the advice had been correct. A more likely newspaper was the Salisbury Journal, copies of which are held at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes. This proved successful and I found a lengthy report of the Coroner’s Inquest, held in Mere on the day George died. From the report it is clear that George had turned to drink and that this had apparently been going on for a number of years. At the inquest, evidence was given by an inspector from the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), that George neglect his children. The report states that George had told the inspector that he wanted to have his son, Richard, examined by a medical man. The doctor was called and a visit was made to the house where they ‘…found the boy in bad surroundings likely to injure his health.’ So George had a family! But where was his wife? No mention of her in the report.

George’s birth was not registered, neither was that of at least one sibling, suggesting, perhaps, that the family were struggling financially. In 1891, according to the census of that year, the family was living at The Field, Mere. George junior was still living at home, working as general labourer, his father a general dealer. Trawling the Marriage Index I found the entry for George that, on receipt of the certificate, showed that on 6 December 1896, he had married Harriet Ellen Hicks at the Primitive Methodist Chapel in Mere. Harriet, according to the 1881 census, had been born, the fourth of six children, in Silton, just across the border in Dorset. Her birth seems not to have been registered either. At the time of the marriage, she was living in Zeals, a few miles from Mere. Her father, Harry Hicks, had been a moulder in an iron foundry but had already died. George was still a general labourer and Harriet a dressmaker.

A search of the Admissions Registers for the British School in Mere, held at the Wiltshire Record Office, revealed Armed with the date on which he two children, Albert John and Lilian died, I started looking for BMD reg- Florence whose father’s name was istrations and also looked at the Mere George. Fortunately these births had parish records for a marriage. I was been registered and certificates connot really surprised when I found no firmed that George and Harriet were marriage in the parish register. I al- the parents. ready knew that at least some of my Albert John, was born on 14 December family had been nonconformists. 1896, only a week after the couple I also knew from the age given when he died and other research that George was born in 1872, the sixth of twelve children born to George Bristow and Rachel Doddington.

were married. Either it was a long time before George decided to do the honourable thing, or, possibly, he was not the father. Albert’s birth took place in Bourton, Dorset and so

33

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The death certificate of George Bristow showing cause of death as ‘strangulation through hanging himself whilst not of sound mind’

was registered in Shaftesbury. Since drink and his eventual suicide only that is where her family was living 18 months later. in 1881, Harriet appears to have gone So what of the son, Richard? He back to her mother’s home for the does not appear on the 1901 census event. Lilian Florence was born on and his mother died in 1911. A trawl 23 November 1899, in Castle Street, of the births index between these Mere, where the couple had, by this dates revealed no child of that name time, set up home. registered – anywhere! No child Two further questions remained of that name appears in the School unanswered – Why no mention of Admissions Registers either, although Harriet at the inquest and what of both Albert’s and Lilian’s names are there. What possible explanation the son Richard? could there be? Since neither of his A further trawl of the Deaths Index parents’ births had been registered it revealed that Harriet died on 12 may not be thought surprising but by April 1911 of acute lobar pneumonia, this time registration was supposed the death being certified by Dr. F B to be compulsory. Perhaps George’s Rutter. She was buried on 15 May. The condition was such that he just forearly death of his wife could not have got to register the boy. Might the been easy for George and may have reported of the inquest have got the contributed to his decline through 34

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forename wrong?

a Dr. Barnardo’s Home. Thankfully Going back to the information I had this boy’s birth had been registered recorded from the school admis- and when the certificate arrived it sions register, I found an entry for confirmed my suspicion that he was a Reginald, born on 21 August 1902 indeed the third child of George and and whose father was George. By this Harriet. The newspaper report was time George was living at The Field wrong! Whether the reporter misin Mere, as were other Bristow fami- heard or later incorrectly transcribed lies. Further evidence was needed. his notes we will never know. But it There was a note against the school does confirm the old saying – “never admission register entry to the effect believe what you read in the papers”. that Reginald had left in 1912 to go to dbristow@talktalk.net

The Many Tailors of Newton Toney Penny Poulton This account is about the tailors of Newton Tony and particularly about a tailor called William Walter who lived and worked there. Tailoring was in his family and in his descent, as we shall see. William was born at Dinton, Wiltshire, the fifth child of Thomas Walter (son of Alexander Walter and Ann née Dew) and Martha née Barnes, both of Dinton, and was baptised there on 20th September 1760. His uncle, also called William Walter, baptised 27th December 1732 at Dinton, was almost certainly a tailor at Amesbury, Wiltshire. Another uncle, by marriage, Richard Dew, who may also have been a The Newton Toney Church built when William Walter second cousin, was a tailor was a member of the vestry in the 1841 census at Dinton. (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre) 35

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William and his wife Mary had three sons. The first, Thomas, was baptised at Newton Toney on 10th August 1783, but probably died in infancy as there was a Thomas Walter buried on 13th June 1784. Next came William junior, baptised 23rd March 1785. He became a tailor and married Rachel Poole at Newton Toney on 18th December 1806. He and Rachel began their family in the village, but around 1813 after the death of their third child, Thomas, aged one year, the family moved to Penton Mewsey just across the border into Hampshire. There they had at least another five children. One of them, Alexander, baptised on 4th March 1821 at Penton, moved back to Newton Toney to live with his grandparents and work as a tailor there (see below). Another son also tailored in Newton Toney later. William and Mary's third son, Alexander, was baptised at Newton

William married Mary Phillips at St Andrew's, Newton Toney on 21st July 1782. He probably worked in the village until his death on 21st May 1842 in his 84th year. He was buried in the village on 26th May. As well as working as a tailor in the village, William served as a member of the vestry. He was present at meetings when the decisions to demolish the old church and build the present one were taken. He owned his house with over an acre of garden and orchard that had a rateable value of ÂŁ5. He paid 5 shillings rates to the Poor Law Commission on 3rd December 1839. He also occupied over 3 acres of glebeland with a rateable value of ÂŁ2 19s 3d owned by the Reverend Hugh Price, Vicar for which he had to pay 3 shillings in addition in 1839. Similar payments continued to be paid around the quarter days until the death of his wife in 1845.

FROM THE NEWTON TONEY CENSUS 1841 Name

Age

Occupation

Place of birth

William WALTER

80

Tailor

Born in the county

Mary WALTER

90

Born in the county

Mary WALTER

55

Born in the county

Alexander WALTER 15

Tailor J

John CROOME

15

Tailor Ap

Born in the county

James BARNES

20

Tailor J

Born in the county

John ALLEN

60

Tailor J

Not born in the county

Not born in the county

George WATERMAN

10

Not born in the county ( HO107/1 165/12 f 5 p 3)

36

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The small village of Newton Toney seems an unlikely place to have at least five men occupied as tailors. (courtesy of Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre)

box) entry for William Walter's household raises an intriguing question. How could such a small village, with, according to the 1841 census, only The 1851 census shows another man 324 people, in 65 dwellings, need five with the surname Walter tailoring people tailoring? One explanation in Newton Toney. This was William suggested to me was that at the time Walter aged 34 and born in Penton there were five "big houses" in the Hampshire. He was another grand- district. Perhaps William was just suson of the elder William Walker. pervising (or not!) at the age of about Curiously, Alexander Walter, bap- 81. Alexander Walter was William's tised at Penton in 1821, tailor, who grandson, born at Penton Mewsey, was widowed and living with his Hampshire. He left the village but parents in Penton in the 1851 census, returned later. Alexander, along seems to have been back at Newton with James Barnes and John Allen, Toney with a new wife Jane and hav- were journeymen (‘J’ on the census) ing little Jessica Elizabeth baptised who had completed their apprenticein the village on 20 February 1859. ship and were paid by the day. James However, by this time he is described Barnes may also have been a relative, as Barnes was William's mother's as a gamekeeper. maiden name, plus his aunt Ann The Newton Toney 1841 census (see Walter married a Thomas Barnes in 37

Toney on 12th April 1789. He was also a tailor and married on 16 October 1817 at Newton Toney Mary Walter his cousin from Dinton.

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1761 and William's youngest sister was baptised Ann Barnes Walter in November 1770 at Dinton.

Another of the elder William's grandsons was also a tailor and my ancestor. Henry Charles Walter, baptised Interestingly, James Barnes seemed 30th May 1824, moved in adulthood to stay in Newton Toney and is men- from Penton Grafton in Hampshire to tioned in William Henry Swift's story Abbotts Ann (also Hants), to Surrey A Wiltshire Village in the 1870s, as be- and then to Clerkenwell in London ing the parish clerk and a tailor. His where, according to the 1861 census, name can be found along with that of he had a tailor and outfitter's shop in Alexander Walter, William's grand- Little Warner Street. son, both tailors, at Newton Toney in The question remains. Why were the Post Office Directory of 1848. He is there so many tailors in the small given in the 1861 census at Newton Wiltshire village of Newton Toney? Toney as aged 40, a tailor, born at Major sources: Codford St Mary, Wiltshire, with P. Barfoot and J. Wilkes, Universal his Middlesex born wife Sarah aged British Directory 1793-1798 49 and 16-year-old daughter Emma, Salisbury & Winchester Journal born at Newton Toney. & General Advertiser of Wiltshire, Hampshire, Dorset and Somerset, Monday 6th June 1842 Poor Law Commission Rate Book William Henry Swift, A Wiltshire Village in the 1870s Dinton Families in 1842 (WFHS, 2004) Glenalmond, 18 Alum Way Down End, Fareham Hampshire, P0168RJ

John Croome, the apprentice tailor in the census, came from Dinton, and is mentioned by the then new vicar of Dinton, the Reverend James Charles Stafford M.A.. B.D.. in his notes of 1842 as he was getting to know his parish. Young John was an orphan, and along with several siblings, was in the care of his aunt, Miss Croome. He was noted as being apprenticed to a tailor, Newton Toney.

One Hundred WFHS Journals on CD from 1980 to 2005 2 CDs in jewel case Fully searchable using Adobe Reader ÂŁ6.50 including postage UK and ÂŁ8.00 overseas by air mail Order with credit card from www.genfair.com or by post from WFHS Resource Centre, 10 Castle Lane, Devizes, Wiltshire SN10 5AP 38

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Book Reviews The Wiltshire Cotswolds, by Ken Watts, £12.95 Chitterne a Wiltshire Village, by Sue Robinson, £9.95 The Donheads past & present by Michael Coward, David Mclean, Rex Sawyer, Christine Speak, £12.95

(All published by Hobnob Press, 2007, and available from WFHS)

Not many of us originating outside the county associate Wiltshire with the Cotswolds. However, in his book, The Wiltshire Cotswolds, Ken Watts explores this western part of Wiltshire extending from Bradford on Avon in the south to Cricklade in the north. After examining some general aspects – archaeology, farming and industry and the like – this useful book looks at the history, landscape, architecture and people of the many villages in the region. What makes the book special, is that Ken Watts has obviously walked the region. He notes, for example, the often missed and more spectacular view of Malmesbury from the west; most only approach from the A429 in the east. He entices his readers out into the countryside by including numerous walks. The book makes a good companion to the author’s earlier books on the north and the south of the county – all in the Exploring Historic Wiltshire Series. Two other books, each dealing with an individual village, have recently been added to those available from the Society. Sue Robinson had written a well illustrated book, Chitterne a Wiltshire Village. She talks about many aspects of the village including the lords of the manor, the military effect and farming, but also includes an excellent tour of the village. The Donheads past & present by Michael Coward, et al, again is a well illustrated village history. It is made special by the section ‘Donhead Memories’ in which sixteen villagers tell their stories. Perhaps one is your relative. Each book will provide anyone with Wiltshire ancestry from the area a more complete idea of their history. 39

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Useful Web Sites Rod Whale (3914)

A

s I am sure you all know, http://www.findmypast.com/ is a chargeable site but with an index which is free to use. It has recently added a new database, which is an index of Great Western Railway shareholders from 1835 until 1910. I had a look at it and as the railway had a large passage through Wiltshire I suspect quite a few members will find an ancestor in the index. As usual with databases I inserted the surname Giddings and five are listed. To obtain full details an item costs seven units. Another site worth checking is http:// www.bmdregisters.co.uk/ that is available in co-operation with National Archives. The entries are from non-parish sources such as non-conformist registers; the index is free but again further information is chargeable. Again Giddings is among the many surnames on the site.

Some members probably have an interest in the history of Wiltshire schools and that can be found at http:// www.wiltshire.gov.uk/dirschool/#facil After selecting the location in question to find the history it is necessary to scroll down the screen and it will appear. A site called English Family History and Genealogy is at http://www.pricegen.com/english_genealogy.html (N.B. There is an underscore after “English”). This site offers an insight to many subjects all of which can be seen by following the links listed. Some are by courtesy of National Archives and some from Ancestry as well as other sources but it is possible to find a lot of useful information even if it does not assist the personal research of the person looking at the site. clargo@tinyworld.co.uk

Wiltshire FHS Publications John Hurley

T

he latest parish register transcription to be completed is that of Bremhill, a parish just outside Chippenham. As is standard practice, we include all baptisms and burials in registers and bishop’s transcripts from the earliest surviving to 1837, and include also any later baptisms where the person seems to have been born before July 1837.

For Bremhill, the number of entries proved to be larger than expected, due to it including many people from the Pewsham area of Chippenham which was expanding towards the end of that period. The most common names were HADDRELL/HATHERELL with over 200 baptismal entries. These two 40

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names seem to have been interchangeable, with register and bishops transcripts for the same event spelt with the alternative spelling. Other names with over 100 entries are SMITH, SOMMERS/SUMMERS, FREEGA(U) RD, WHEELER/WHELLER, SLADE and SCOT(T) The price of the baptisms transcript including postage is ££8.60 UK and £10 overseas, and the burial

transcript £5.20 UK and £6.60 overseas surface mail. They can be purchased with card payment on www. Genfair.com, where the postage rates will vary from those quoted, all overseas mail being by air. The next parishes to be completed will be Edington, followed by Winsley or Alton Barnes and Alton Priors. jbhurley@supanet.com

Letters to the Editor The views expressed in the letters published in the journal do not necessarily reflect the views of either the editor or Wiltshire Family History Society.

FOND MEMORIES OF BERYL HURLEY Until I read the latest Wilts magazine, I had no idea that Beryl had passed away, which was very sad news to read there although the tribute was excellent and I’m sure she would have been pleased with it. She was a vital part of the Wiltshire Society for a long time and certainly a main player from my involvement with the people I regarded as my Wiltshire friends from quite early days. She must have joined the Wilts FHS slightly before me from our membership numbers, but I can only say that she was always there for a friendly chat at every Family History Fair and AGM I attended in Wiltshire either personally or representing Hampshire, as well as at the annual SOG event in May.

three ladies of the Wilts FHS reunited now. It felt like ‘girl power’ at the Wilts FHS for many years. As was written, always a smiling face and a cheerful outlook plus so much knowledge in Beryl. My abiding memory is of them at the Federation ‘Conference 2000’ hosted by Wiltshire FHS at Bath University when those three ladies were all dressed up in fancy costumes and wigs of the Georgian period for the evening dinner at the Assembly Rooms and we were all laughing happily and joking about while waiting for the transport. Sandra Naish (901) san78@tiscali.co.uk

THE STAFF OF SIR DANIEL GOOCH

The picture of a staff on page 26 of the January Journal mentions Sir I will miss her as I have both Jean David Gooch, CME of the GWR. I Cole and Marjorie Moore - the ruling expect you have had many ex-GWR 41

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train spotters writing to tell you that he was Sir Daniel. In fact Google also turns up 3 articles about Sir David Gooch, the one I looked at also incorrectly writing about Sir Daniel. Thank you for an interesting article, and magazine Peter Beaven (BFHS member) appleshaw@clara.net

A REPLY FROM THE AUTHOR With reference to the article on The Wardrobe in the last issue could you please insert the following correction: - the reference to the Chief Mechanical Engineer of the GWR should of course have been Sir Daniel (not David) Gooch. Steps have been taken to amend the Museum’s database which was the origin of the information. Thanks to those readers who took the trouble to point out this

error.

Sue Johnson sarumsue@hotmail.com

Missing graves at the Zion chapel, trowbridge Are you looking for a missing grave in Trowbridge? During recent alterations at Zion Chapel in Union Street Trowbridge three headstones were found in the front of the building (see below). Also, we are having an Open Day At Zion Chapel, Trowbridge, April 5 10-4pm this will include a historical display. All welcome! Andrew Jones adjones66@hotmail.com Editor’s Note: Andrew has produced an updated edition of Twenty Golden Candlesticks which is available from him or through the Society.

Sacred to the memory of Maria Huntly who died June 24th 1853 aged 56

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Sacred to the memory of Jane King wife of John King who died October 21 1835 aged 36 years Ann King their daughter died in infancy

Sacred to the memory of Mary Bannister who died May 12 1855 aged 71 years Her children arise and call her blessed The Lord is a good stronghold in the day of trouble and He knoweth them that trust in Him

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A PLEA FOR RESPONSES TO MEMBERS’ INTEREST QUERIES I would like to make the following point which I think could be mentioned in the next edition of the Journal. I noticed in the last edition that a new member was researching the same family as myself in the same area and the same dates. I sent off an email within a day and have not had a reply. I can’t understand why people have their interests published if they don’t intend to answer any e-mails or letters they may receive. Over the years this has happened to me on a few occasions and it is very frustrating. I don’t want my name printed to avoid embarrassment, but I would appreciate if a kindly reminder to members that a reply to any e-mails or letters would be appreciated. I would stress that the majority of members I have contacted over the years have replied promptly to my letters or e-mails. (Name supplied)

IS THERE FAMILY HISTORY IN MELKSHAM? I have been a member since 1994 and I have enjoyed reading the journals relating to the county of my birth. Each quarter I peruse the contents page in the hope that someone will have contributed an article about Melksham. It seems that nobody has

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an interest in sharing any of the history or records of the place. There is no WFHS branch in Melksham yet I understand there is a flourishing local history society. Occasionally other members contact me to enquire whether their interests and mine coincide. My responses often fall on deaf ears. Oh dear, this reads like a lonely hearts column! Are there others out there with similar difficulties? The national concerns over waste recycling reminded me of the pig swill bin which stood on the corner of The Crays and Montague Place in the 1940s. I have no idea how often it was emptied but for us children it made a useful base for games of Tin Can Tommy so it can’t have smelt much. Sue Hobbs 37 New Street, Barrow on Soar, Loughborough, Leics. LE12 8PA. sue.hobbs2@virgin.net

THE SUN MONUMENT AT WENTWORTH CASTLE, Lady Mary Wortley-Montagu and the SMALLPOX Vaccine Shortly after reading Margaret Fay’s article in the July journal on “Inoculation for Smallpox” I visited Wentworth Castle near Barnsley, Yorkshire, and was intrigued to find in the grounds is an obelisk called the “Sun Monument” erected in 1747 in honour of Lady Mary WortleyMontagu (see p 45). The inscription reads “To the memory of the Rt Hon 44

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Lady Mary Wortley-Montagu who in the year 1720 introduced inoculation of the smallpox into England from Turkey.” The booklet on Wentworth Castle states “It is claimed as the only garden monument in England that celebrates the intellectual achievements of a woman.” This particularly interested me since I have done a little research of Louisa Matilda Jane Montagu, daughter of Lt Col George Montagu of Lackham, Wiltshire. She was born 1787 at Easton Grey and married Matthew Crawford, a barrister at the Middle Temple, who was born in Staindrop, Co Durham. Louisa wrote a lot of commonplace books and poetry which mention many of her noble ancestors and link with Bonnie Prince Charlie. If anyone is researching the Montagu family of Wiltshire they may be interested to read her story of “The Battle of Culloden” and other works which are at Teesside Archives, along with the will of her father George

The Sun Monument commemorating the achievenemts of Lady Mary WortleyMontagu who introduced smallpox inoculation into England

Montagu. Contact Teesside Archives in Middlesbrough on 01642 248321 or e-mail teesside_archives@middlesbrough.gov.uk. Beryl Turner (4027) 19 The Avenue, Stokesley Middlesbrough, TS9 5ET

Help Wanted and Offered This is a free service, but, due to restrictions on space, priority will be given to members’ letters or those with a Wiltshire content. Letters over 200 words may be edited to fit into the space available. Since this can result in the unintentional editing of what the writer considers essential information, it is in your interest to keep to this word limit, and to send letters by e-mail if possible.

Seeking the Slades of Calne

and Sarah, née Ponting. Joseph’s son George bought a cafe in the late fifties in Calne and we believe, contacted My mother-in-law (deceased) was relations of Joseph’s brother, Henry. a Slade whose grandfather Joseph They may have lived at Alm Terrace, was born in Calne in 1859 to Mark Slade Road, Calne. We believe he 45

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had three daughters, two of whom married brothers called Dixon. Are there any descendents around Calne who would like lots of info on Slades in Surrey and Sussex in exchange for info on them? Avril Thomas (5721) 23 Framfield Road UCKFIELD E Sussex, TN22 5AH avril@thomas1802fsworld.co.uk

workhouses My grandmother, Rhoda Emily Beer née Yates, died in The Tower House Institution, Downton Road, Salisbury, on the 2nd December 1917, aged 42. I have been unable to find where she is buried, but, I believe, it could be a pauper’s grave with perhaps some other unfortunate people. I would like to know when she entered Tower House and if her two sons accompanied her. Frederick was born in 1899 and Albert in 1901. My grandfather left his family in about 1901/2 to live in Jersey. I think this is why Rhoda ended up in the workhouse. Perhaps other members can help me with this problem. joan white (5446) 2 Bridges Cottages, Shamblehurst Lane N, Hedge End, Southampton SO32 2BY

action in the Mediterranium, After the war, he worked at Swindon Railway Works. Was this the same Fred Usher who served during WWII with 40th Royal Marine Cammandos and who was awarded the Military Medal for his involvement in a battle that took place during the invasion of Italy? david merrick(6676) 88 High Street Lydd, Kent TN29 9AW

WILLS FROM WITHERINGTON FARM The article on Witherington Farm (pp 23-25 of January 2008 issue) was of interest, having spent a few days B&B there in 2005. When recently looking through data extracted from Hayter wills sent to me by Susan Tonge when we were liaising over our family history, I noted two wills connected with Witherington Farm; the 3rd of Mary Hayter of Downton may also be of interest to your readers (see opposite) Jill Birch ( 6686) 23 Magyar Crescent, Nuneaton, CV11 4SG tj.birch@btinternet.com

One-Name Study on the Culverhouses I would be most grateful if you

The family of Fred usher, could mention in the journal that I Swindon rail Worker am doing a One-Name Study on the I am seeking the Fred Usher, my late father’s cousin, who was an apprentice at the GWR Swindon Works. During WWII he was awarded a medal for

Culverhouses, many of whom were from Wiltshire. Any information anyone can give me on the above family would be greatly

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These wills relating to Witherington Farm may be found in the Wiltshire Wills on-line index at http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/heritage/index.php

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appreciated. Although I have a lot of information on them, there are some gaps, particularly in the early twentieth century. Roll on the 1911 census! If I am able to help any members, I shall be happy to do so. A very good 2008 to you. I love receiving the journal. Valerie Norris (1619) 10 Queens Avenue, Byfleet, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 7AD. val.norris@ntlworld.com

I have visited the new Chippenham Archives with little success. I am willing to join your society if you think it will help me in my search. Rosemary Pearce (née Bricker) pearcejohn50@yahoo.com

Editor’s Note: I hope Rosemary will get a good response from readers. It certainly would be to her advantage to join the Society. Each issue has a list of members researching names. By joining, Rosemary could add her interCan WFHS help find my ests to those published online and in Bricker family? this Journal. The Resource Centre in I am trying to find if anyone in the Devizes would be also able to supply her Wiltshire area are researching a with a list of members looking for her family by the name of Bricker, par- family ticularly a John Bricker born about 1803 in the Bradford-on Avon Area.

Pass It On Do you have unwanted material that may be of some use to others? This may be a perfect way to pass it on. Neither the Resource Centre nor the editor can be involved in any transaction, so be sure to include an email or postal address. I have a number of certs that are not mine and wonder if anyone would be interested in them. I would only require £2.50 each plus a s.a.e. Birth cert: Louisa Hunt 9/5/1845 at Grittleton George Wiltshire 6/6/1838 at Chippenham Frederick Wiltshire 19/3/1866 at Seagry Kathleen Louisa Wiltshire 27/2/1897 at Christian Malford Frank Pragnell 23/7/1871 Romsey, Southampton Frank Pragnell 13/12/1872 at Broughton, Stockbridge, Southampton, Marriage cert: Jonas Parsons to Elizabeth Isles Scull, 31/10/1874 at Dauntsey Death cert: Elizabeth Wiltshire 1/4/1851, Darryhill, Bowood, Calne Mrs. Catherine Webb (6514) KatyCheshire@aol.com 48

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Members’ Interests New members’ names and addresses will not be published in this journal until they supply their interests. The Society reserves the right to limit the number of research names for any one member to sixteen in any one journal, but other names may be submitted for later publication. There is no charge for this service. Members wishing to have names published should submit details to the Membership Secretary (see inside front cover). Research requests should be sent to the Members’ Interests Secretary, Resource Centre, Wiltshire Family History Society, 10 Castle Lane, Devizes, Wilts, SN10 1HJ, UK or members-interests@wiltshirefhs.co.uk including a SAE if using regular mail. There is no charge for members of the Society providing that they quote their membership numbers; nonmembers are invited to make a donation for this service, preferably by cheque payable to Wiltshire Family History Society. WFHS will be responsible for any payment of VAT due.

CHAPMAN COUNTY CODES ENGLAND

BDF Bedford BKM Buckingham BRK Berkshire BRS Bristol CAM Cambridge CHS Cheshire CLV Cleveland CMA Cumbria CON Cornwall CUL Cumberland DBY Derby DEV Devon DOR Dorset DUR Durham ERY East Riding Yorks ESS Essex GLS Gloucester HAM Hampshire HEF Hereford HRT Hertford HUM Humberside HUN Hunting-don IOM Isle of Man IOW Isle of Wight KEN Kent LAN Lancashire LEI Leicester LIN Lincoln LND London MDX Middlesex MSY Merseyside NBL Northumberland NFK Norfolk NTH Northampton NTT Nottingham OXF Oxford RUT Rutland SAL Shropshire SFK Suffolk SOM Somerset SRY Surrey SSX Sussex STS Staffordshire SXE E Sussex SXW W Sussex WAR Warwick WES Westmorland WIL Wiltshire WMD W Midland WOR Worcester YKS Yorkshire WRY W Riding NRY N Riding EYK E Yorks NYK N Yorks SYK S Yorks WYK W Yorks

WALES (WLS)

AGY Anglesey BRE Brecon CAE Caernarvon CGN Cardi-gan CMN Carmarthen CWD Clwyd DEN Denbigh DFD Dyfed FLN Flint GLA Glamorgan GNT Gwent GWN Gwynedd MER Merioneth MGM Mid-

Glamorgan MON Monmouth MGY Montgomery PEM Pembroke POW Powys RAD Radnor

SCOTLAND (SCT)

ARL Argyllshire AYR Ayrshire BAN Banffshire BUR Buteshire CAI Caithness-shire DFS Dumfriesshire, INV Invernessshire, KKD Kirkcudbrightshire, LKS Lanarkshire MLN Midlothian NAI Nairnshire RFW Renfrewshire SEL Selkirkshire WIG Wigtownshire

IRELAND (IRL)

ANT Antrim CAV Cavan COR Cork, KER Kerry, LDY Londonderry, LOU Louth MAY Mayo, MEA Meath, MOG Monaghan, ROS Roscommon, WIC Wicklow, NIR North-ern Ireland TYR Tyrone

OTHER

CHI Channel Islands IND India BLG Belgium, BGU British Guiana CAN Canada, GER Germany SA South Africa, USA United States of America, WI West Indies AUS Aus-tralia

NOMENCLATURE

< pre or before, > post or later than, year or century shown; e early e.g. e19c early 19th century.

NAMES UNDER RESEARCH ID

NAME

LOCATION/DATE

6987 ABRAHAM

Devizes, Wil, 19-20c

6987 ABRAHAMS

Devizes, Wil, 19-20c

7603 ABRAHAMS

Hilperton, Wil, 17-18c

7607 ALEXANDER Bremhill, Wil, 19c 7607 ALEXANDER Devizes, Wil, 19c 7607 ALEXANDER Marlborough, Wil, 19c 7609 ALLIX

Channel Islands, CHI, All

7605 ANDREWS

Preshute Within, Wil, 18-19c

4110

ANGEL

Liddiard Tregoze, Wil, 17c

7611

ANGELE

Bremhill, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELE

Chippenham, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELE

Melksham, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELE

Trowbridge, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELL

Bremhill, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELL

Chippenham, Wil, 16-19c

49

2008 Apr 109.indd 49

20/02/2008 20:21:09

7611

ANGELL

Melksham, Wil, 16-19c

7611

ANGELL

Trowbridge, Wil, 16-19c

7596 ARMSTEAD

Newton toney, Wil, 19c

7596 ARMSTEAD

Winterslow, Wil, 19c

7033 ASLETT

Any, Ham, 15-17c

7613

BAILEY

Bishops Cannings, Wil, 18c

7613

BAILEY

Market Lavington, Wil, 18c

7598 BAISH

West Lavington, Wil, 19c

6741

BALCH

Chippenham, Wil, 18-19c

7617

BANNING

Any, Wil, 17-19c

7597 BROKENBROW

Colerne, Wil, 18-19c

7597 BROKENBROW

North Wraxall, Wil, 18-19c

7519 BROMFIELD

Salisbury, Wil, 18c

7597 BROWNE

Castle Coombe, Wil, 17c

7597 BROWNE

Kington St Michael, Wil, 17c

7597 BROWNING

Castle Coombe, Wil, All

7617

BROWNJOHN

Alderbury, Wil, 18c

7617

BROWNJOHN

Winterslow, Wil, 18c

BURTON

Cranbourne, Dor, Any

7597 BARNES

Leigh delamere, Wil, 18c

7616

7597 BARNES

Nettleton, Wil, 18c

7605 BUSHELL

7617

BARNES

Tidworth, Wil, 17-18c

Preshute Within, Wil, 18-19c

7612

BASTIN

Wootton Bassett, Wil, 18-19c

7605 BUSHELL

Shalbourne, Wil, 18-19c

6759 BUTCHER

Warminster, Wil, All

7612

BASTING

Wootton Bassett, Wil, 18-19c

7581 CARLILL

Elloughton, Yks, 17-20c

7581 CARLILL

Hull, Yks, 17-20c

7609 CARTER

Cricklade, Wil, 18-20c

7596 CHUBB

Dinton, Wil, 18-19c

7596 CHUBB

Idmiston, Wil, 18-19c

7605 CLEMENTS

Cannings, Wil, 18-19c

7562 CLIFFORD

Hanham, Gls, 19c

7609 COCHRAN

Cottingham, Yks, 19-20c

7597 COLE

Lacock, Wil, 18-19c

7597 COLLIER

Lacock, Wil, 18-19c

7601 COLLIS

Winchester, Ham, 17-20

7488 COOMBS

Donhead St Andrew, Wil, 19c

7488 COOMBS

Semley, Wil, 19c

7603 COOPER

Langley Burrell, Wil, 17-18c

7603 BATTEN

Hilperton, Wil, 17-18c

7596 BAUGH

Winterslow, Wil, 18c

7613

Bishops Cannings, Wil, 18c

BAYLY

7613

BAYLY

Market Lavington, Wil, 18c

6741

BEAVINGTON

Draycot Cerne, Wil, 18-19c

7541 BISHOP

Kilmington, Wil, 19c

7541 BISHOP

Mere, Wil, 18c

7541 BISHOP

Stourton, Wil, 18c

7592 BLANCHARD

North Bradley, Wil, 18c

7581 BLAZIER

Hull, Yks, 19-20c

7596 BLICK

Broad Chalke, Wil, 18c

7597 BOND

Lacock, Wil, 19c

7594 COSTARD

Appleton, Oxf, 17c

6987 BOWSHER

Kington St Michael, Wil, 19c

7608 COSTER

Swindon, Wil, All

7607 BOX

Marlborough, Wil, 19c

7608 COSTER

Wroughton, Wil, All

4067 BRACEY

Any, HRT, 18c

7594 COSTERD

Besselsleigh, Bks, 17c

7541 BRACHER

Stourton, Wil, 18-19c

7594 CRIDDLE

Any, Som, 18c

7609 BRAINE

Greenwich, Ken, 19c

7587 CROOK

Tytherton, Wil, 18c

50

2008 Apr 109.indd 50

20/02/2008 20:21:09

7519 CULLY

Salisbury, Wil, 18c

6759 CURTIS

Australia, Aus, 19-21c

7616

CURWOOD

Beckenham, Ken, Any

7613

DARK

Market Lavington, Wil, 18-19c

7613

DARK

West Lavington, Wil, 18-19c

7603 DAVIS 4110

Bradford on Avon, Wil, 17-18c

4957 FLIPPANCE

Milton Lilbourne, WIL, 19c

7596 FORDER

Winterslow, Wil, 18c

7597 FOWLE(S)

Devizes, Wil, 19c

7597 FOX

Melksham, Wil, 18-20c

7603 FRANCES

Westbury, Wil, 17-18c

7618

Cliffe Pypard, Wil, 19c

FRANKLIN

7609 FREETH

Corsham, Wil, 18c

7609 FREETH

Cricklade, Wil, 19-20c

7609 FREETH

Crudwell, Wil, 19c

7616

FRY

Chelsea, LDN, Any

7616

FRY

Cranborne, Dor, Any

7616

FRY

Fordingbridge, Ham, Any

7616

FRY

Fulham, LDN, Any

7616

FRY

Penge, LDN, Any

7616

FRY

Sandhurst, Sry, Any

FRY

Yeovil, Som, Any

DAVIS

Woolstone, Brk, 17c

4306 DEADMAN

Melksham, Wil, 19c

4306 DEADMAN

Milton Lilbourne, Wil, 19c

4306 DEADMAN

Semington, Wil, 19c

7625 DEAN

Liverpool, Lan, All

4067 DIMMOCK

Any, BKM, 18-19c

7605 DOBSON

Chilton Foliat, Wil, 18-19c

7605 DOBSON

Frodsham, Wil, 18-19c

7616

7605 DOBSON

Shalbourne, Wil, 18-19c

4306 GAISFORD

Melksham, Wil, 19c

7605 DOBSON

Tedworth, Wil, 18-19c

4306 GAISFORD

Semington, Wil, 19c

7541 DODDINGTON

Kilmington, Wil, 18c

7598 GALE

Christian Malford, Wil, 19c

6741

Guist, Nor, 19c

4306 GALE

Melksham, Wil, 19c

7598 DRAKE

DOUGHTY

Rowde, Wil, 18-19c

6741

GARDENER

Chippenham, Wil, 18-19c

7616

Poole, Dor, Any

6741

GARDENER

Christian Malford, Wil, 18-19c

6741

GARDINER

Chippenham, Wil, 18-19c

6741

GARDINER

Christian Malford, Wil, 18-19c

6741

GARDNER

Chippenham, Wil, 18-19c

6741

GARDNER

Christian Malford, Wil, 18-19c

DYETT

7594 ELDRIDGE

Ducklington, Oxf, 18c

7379 EMM

All, Wil, All

7603 EMM

Codford St Peters, Wil, 17-18c

7379 EMMES

All, Wil, All

7379 EMMS

All, Wil, All

4957 EVERETT

Salisbury, WIL, 19c

7603 EXTOUS

Sutton Veny, Wil, 17-18c

6741

FARMER

Bradwell, Oxf, 18-19c

6741

FARMER

Chippenham, Wil, 19c

7597 FERRIS

Colerne, Wil, 19c

7597 FERRIS

Hullavington, Wil, 19c

7603 FLIGHT

Winchester, Han, 17-18c

7596 GAY

Chippenham, Wil, 19c

4306 GERRISH

Melksham, Wil, 19c

7597 GIDDIN(G)S

Lacock, Wil, 19c

7617

GILBERT

Collingbourne Aughton, Wil, 17-19c

7617

GILBERT

Collingbourne Kingston, Wil, 17-19c

7617

GILBERT

Shipton, Ham, 17-19c

51

2008 Apr 109.indd 51

20/02/2008 20:21:09

7573 GILES

Newbury, Bks, All

7528 GODDARD

Market Lavington, WIL, Any

4306 GOODHEAD

Birmingham, War, 19c

7592 GOODWIN

North Bradley, Wil, 19c

7607 GOSTELOW

Aylesbury, Oxf, 16-19c

7607 GOSTELOW

Cropredy, Bkm, 16-19c

6987 GREENLAND Devizes, Wil, 19c 7585 GREGORY

Devizes, Wil, 18-19c

7585 GREGORY

Rowde, Wil, 18-19c

7601 GREY

Andover, Ham, 17-20

7601 GREY

Dover, Ken, 17-20

7601 GREY

Ludgershall, Ham, 17-20

7617

GUMBLETON Any, Wil, 17-18c

7488 GURD

Berwick St John, Wil, 18c

7488 GURD

Donhead St Andrew, Wil, 18-19c

6741

HULL

Christian Malford, Wil, 18-19c

7598 HUMPHREYS Christian Malford, Wil, 19c 7598 HUMPHRIES Christian Malford, Wil, 19c 7541 HUNT

Calne, Wil, 19c

7588 HYDEN

Chard, Som, 19c

7528 IRELANDS

Downton, WIL, Any

7528 IRELANDS

Woodfalls, WIL, Any

4067 ISAAC

Any, Som, 18-19c

4067 ISAACS

Any, Som, 18-19c

4957 ISAACS

Salisbury, Wil, 19c

7579 JAQUES

All, Wil, 17-19c

7579 JAQUES

Somerton, Som, 17-19c

7616

Damerham, Dor, Any

JARRETT

7609 JARVIS

Blunsdown, Wil, 18-20c

7594 JEFFS

Bladon, Oxf, 17c

7625 JENKINS

Bradford on Avon, Wil, All

7625 JENKINS

Tredegar, Gnt, All

7587 JONES

Leigh, Wil, 19c

7587 JONES

Oaksey, Wil, 18-19c

7603 JOYCE

Hilperton, Wil, 17-18c

7596 JUDD

Winterslow, Wil, 16-19c

7384 KEMP

Steeple Ashton, WIL, 18-19c

7581 HAINES

Ashton Keynes, Wil, 19c

7581 HAINES

Hull, Yks, 19-20c

7581 HAINES

Sheffield, Yks, 19-20c

7597 HAND

Calne, Wil, 18

4957 HAND

Downton, WIL, 19c

4957 HAND

Isle of Wight, Ham, 19c

4957 HARDING

Salisbury, Wil, 19c

6759 HAYTON

All, Wil, All

7581 HEATH

Hull, Yks, 18-20c

7594 HIBBERT

Bladon, Oxf, 17c

7603 KING

Boyton, Wil, 17-18c

4067 HOLLAND

Any, Som, 18-19c

7488 KING

7596 HOLLOWAY

Idmiston, Wil, 18-19c

Donhead St Andrew, Wil, 16-19c

7596 HOLLOWAY

Newton Toney, Wil, 18-19

4067 HOLT

Any, BDF, 19c

6759 HOLTON

Warminster, WIL, All

7609 HORNBLOW

Blunsdown, Wil, 18-20c

4067 HORNE

Any, BDF, 19c

7594 HUDSON

Witney, Oxf, 17c

7603 HULBERT

Hilperton, Wil, 17-18c

6741

Chippenham, Wil, 18-19c

HULL

7528 KINGSHOTTS Downton, WIL, Any 7528 KINGSHOTTS Woodfalls, WIL, Any 7541 LAMBERT

Oldland Common, Glo, 19c

7593 LASBURY

All, All, All

7605 LEVY

Shalbourne, Wil, 18-19c

7607 LEWIS

Batheaston, Som, 16-19c

7562 LEWIS

Bitton, Gls, 18-19c

7594 LINE

Rowde, Wil, 18c

7579 LISTON

Steeple Ashton, Wil, 18c

52

2008 Apr 109.indd 52

20/02/2008 20:21:09

7579 LISTON

Trowbridge, Wil, 18c

7594 OSBORN

Bladon, Oxf, 17c

7603 LITTLE

Trowbridge, Wil, 17-18c

7594 PAIN

Cannington, Som, 17c

4067 LOCK

Any, Som, 18-19c

7033 PARRIS

Basingstoke, Ham, 15-17c

7596 LONDON

Idmiston, Wil, 18c

6759 PEARCE

Warminster, Wil, All

7430 LONG

Brookend, Wil, Any

7596 PEARCE

Winterslow, Wil, 18c

7430 LONG

Luckington, Wil, Any

7562 PHILLIPS

Cherhill, Wil, 19-20c

7430 LONG

Tetbury, Gls, Any

7562 PHILLIPS

Devizes, Wil, 20c

6671 LOVE

Aldbourne, Wil, 18c

7562 PHILLIPS

4110

LOVE

Hook, Wil, 17-19c

Fisherton de la Mere, Wil, 19-20c

4110

LOVE

Liddiard Millicent, Wil, 17-19c

7562 PHILLIPS

Keynsham, Som, 19c

7613

PHILPOT

Edington, Wil, 17-18c

4110

LOVE

Liddiard tregoze, Wil, 17-19c

7613

PHILPOT

Lavington, Wil, 17-18c

4110

LOVE

Market Lavington, Wil, 17-19c

7594 LYNE

Rowde, Wil, 18c

6759 MADOX

All, Wil, All

7596 MAFFEY 7596 MAFFEY

South Wraxall, Wil, 17-18c

7603 POTHECARY Heytesbury, Wil, 17-18c 7625 POTTICARY

Bradford on Avon, Wil, All

Idmiston, Wil, 17-19c

7625 POTTICARY

Hilperton, Wil, All

Kings Somborne, Ham, 17-19

4957 PREWETT

Alderbury, Wil, 18-19c

7594 PUSY

Appleton, Oxf, 17c

7596 READ

Kings Somborne, Ham, 18c

7573 REEVES

Heddington, Wil, All

4

REYNISH

Any, Any, Any

4

REYNISH

Salisbury, Wil, 17-19c

7562 MANNEL

Newton ferrers, Dev, 19c

7603 MARKS

Heytesbury, Wil, 17-18c

7625 MARTIN

Bradford on Avon, Wil, All

7625 MARTIN

Rode, Som, All

7585 MCTIER

Pewsey, Wil, 18-19c

7617

METHWEN

Any, Som, 16-18c

7617

METHWEN

Any, Wil, 16-18c

7617

METHWIN

Any, Som, 16-18c

7617

METHWIN

Any, Wil, 16-18c

7592 MOORE

7603 PIERCE

North Bradley, Wil, 18-19c

7603 RICH

Trowbridge, Wil, 17-18c

7585 RIXON

Tisbury, Wil, 18-19c

7594 ROWE

Cannington, Som, 18c

7617

RUSSELL

Alderbury, Wil, 18-19c

7617

RUSSELL

Grimstead, Wil, 18-19c

7617

RUSSELL

Whaddon, Wil, 18-19c

7592 SARGENT

North Bradley, Wil, 18c

7605 NAISH

Bishops Cannings, Wil, 18-19c

7607 SAUNDERS

Fawley, Wil, 19c

7562 NAISH

Bitton, Gls, 18-19c

7607 SAUNDERS

Harbridge, Wil, 19c

7348 NEWBURY

Maiden Bradley, Wil, 19c

7581 SCOTT

7594 NORTH

Witney, Oxf, 17c

Collegweston, Nth, 18-19c

7581 SCOTT

Rotherham, Yks, 19-20c

4067 SEARLE

Any, Som, 18-19c

7608 SHEPPARD

Ramsbury, Wil, All

7617

NORTHEAST Any, Dor, 18-19c

7617

NORTHEAST Any, Ham, 18-19c

7617

NORTHEAST Any, Wil, 16-19c

53

2008 Apr 109.indd 53

20/02/2008 20:21:09

7598 SHORE

West Lavington, Wil, 17c

7594 SLATTER

Bladon, Oxf, 17c

7594 SLATTER

Yarnton, Oxf, 17c

7609 SMITH

Banchory Ternan, Kcd, 17-19c

7609 SMITH

Blunsdon, Wil, 18-20c

7609 SMITH 7609 SMITH

7607 WARD

Black torrington, Dev, 18-19c

7607 WARD

Meeth, Dev, 18-19c

7607 WARD

Northlew, Dev, 18-19c

7601 WATERS

Andover, Ham, 17-20

7601 WATERS

Ludgershall, Ham, 17-20

Hull, Yks, 19-20c

7598 WATTS

Plymouth, Dev, 18-19c

Stanton fitzwarren, Wil, 18-19c

4110

WEAVINS

Woolstone, Brk, 17c

7613

WEBB

Lavington, Wil, 18c

4957 SMITHS

Downton, Wil, 18-19c

7617

STONE

Alderbury, Wil, 17-18c

7617

STONE

Downton, Wil, 17-18c

7617

STONE

Winterslow, Wil, 17-18c

7625 WEBB

Runcorn, Chs, All

6671 WEEKS

Any, Wil, 18c

4957 WEEKS

Salisbury, Wil, 19c

7605 WESTON

All Cannings, Wil, 18-19c

7605 WESTON

Bishops Cannings, Wil, 18-19c

7592 SUMPTION

North Bradley, Wil, 18c

7588 TALBOT

Chilton Foliat, Wil, 18c

7588 TALBOT

Great Bedwyn, Wil, 19c

7605 WESTON

Shalbourne, Wil, 18-19c

7608 TALMAGE

Ramsbury, Wil, 17c

7618

Rushall, Wil, 19c

6987 TAVENER

Slaughterford, Wil, 18c

7625 WILKINS

Birmingham, , All

6987 TAVERNER

Slaughterford, Wil, 18c

7625 WILKINS

Liverpool, Lan, All

6759 TAYLOR

All, Wil, All

7625 WILKINS

Madras, IND, All

6759 TEAGUE

All, Wil, All

WHITE

7616

WILKINSON

Cranbourne, Dor, Any

4067 TEMPLEMAN Any, Som, 18-19c

7616

WILKINSON

Penge, LDN, Any

7562 TOMLINSON Buxton, Dby, 19-20c

4957 WILLIS

Wellow, Ham, 19c

7562 TOWNSEND

Cherhill, Wil, 19-20c

7609 WILSON

Rue, DNB, 17-19c

7596 TOWSEY

Idmiston, Wil, 16-18

7601 WINSER

Dover, Ken, 17-20

6741

Langford, Brk, 19c

7601 WINSER

Tenterden, Ken, 17-20

Great Somerford, Wil, 15-17c

4306 WINSLOW

Melksham, Wil, All

4306 WINSLOW

Steeple Ashton, Wil, All

7616

Cranbourne, Dor, Any

TRIPP

7033 TURTLE 7616

VINEY

Cranbourne, Dor, Any

7348 WALTERS

Maiden Bradley, Wil, 19c

7384 WALTERS

Maiden Bradley, WIL, 18-19c

WOOD

7592 WOODS

North Bradley, Wil, 18c

6671 WREN

Any, Wil, 17-18c

7616

Cranbourne, Dor, Any

ZEBEDEE

ADDRESS OF MEMBERS WHOSE INTERESTS APPEAR IN THIS JOURNAL 4

WILSON, Mrs Pat, 11 Ardmore Close Tuffley GLOUCESTER Gloucs GL4 0BJ UK: p.w@ blueyonder.co.uk

4067

MARSHALL, Mrs Wendy, 2 Giles Avenue w.marshall248@btinternet.com

4110

LOVE, Mr Ron F, 20 Wilverley Avenue HAVANT Hants PO9 2LL UK: wags01@globalnet. co.uk

CRICKLADE Wilts SN6 6HS UK:

54

2008 Apr 109.indd 54

20/02/2008 20:21:09

4306 4957

WINSLOW, Mrs L R, Hapenny Cottage 458 Bowerhill Lane MELKSHAM Wilts SN12 6RA UK: lindywinslow@yahoo.co.uk MORTIMER, Mrs Gillian, Rockvale 125 London Road SALISBURY Wilts SP1 3HA UK

6671

BOONE, Mrs Diane, Stable Cottage Ginhall Lane LEOMINSTER Herts HR6 8RD UK: DiBoone1@aol.com

6741

SPARKS, Mrs Rosemary Ann, 2 Silbury Road CALNE Wilts SN11 0ES UK: roseterry@ tiscali.co.uk

6759

CURTIS, Mr Derek R, 30 Trelawney Road ST AUSTELL Cornwall PL25 4JA UK: drcmail@ tiscali.co.uk

6987

BARROW, Mrs Wendy, 38 Rusper Road HORSHAM West Sussex RH12 4BD UK: bandwbarrow@tiscali.co.uk

7033

CROSS, Mrs & Mr Wendy, Cherchefelle, Back Road Murrow WISBECH Cambs PE13 4JW UK: cherchefelle@talktalk.net

7348

BUTCHER, Mrs Janice, Carpenters Cottage, Hemplands Lane Privett ALTON Hants GU34 3NU UK: janice@jbsurveys.demon.co.uk

7379

JOHNSON, Mrs Sheila M, 38 Fern Meadow OKEHAMPTON Devon EX20 1PB UK: sjohnson095@aol.com

7384

STEVENS, Mr Peter, 60 Crane Street Brampton HUNTINGDON Cambs PE28 4UX UK: pete.stevens1@ntlworld.com

7430

LONG, Mr Paul W A, 111 Cliddesden Road paul.p.w.long@btinternet.com

7488

DAWSON, Mrs D E, Low Rigg Lakeside ULVERSTON Cumbria LA12 8AU UK: dedawson8@btinternet.com

7519

CULLY, Mr & Mrs Roger, 'Belmont' 103 Vicars Moor Lane LONDON N21 1BL UK: rogercully@tiscali.co.uk

7528

GODDARD, Mr & Mrs Ivor, 45 Hillside Drive CHRISTCHURCH Dorset BH23 2RS UK: ivor.mary@talktalk.net

7541

TILLING, Mrs Linda J B, 35 Horsecroft Gardens Barrs Court BRISTOL BS30 8HU UK: linda@tilling6698.freeserve.co.uk

7562

BASINGSTOKE Hants RG21 3EY UK:

ASHBY, Mrs Audrey, 32 St Peters Way Spixworth NORWICH Norfolk NR10 3NS UK

7573

GILES, Mr Philip, Cuanna Aberdeen Road TARLAND Aberdeenshire AB34 4UA UK: pmg_sats@msn.com

7579

JAQUES, Mr Roger, 2 Upper Chapel Lane FRAMPTON COTTERELL Gloucs BS36 2HY UK: fran@jaquesart.fsnet.co.uk

7581 CARHILL, Mr Mike, c/o Sir John Lemon High School Rings Field Road BECCLES Suffolk NR34 9PG UK: mike@sjlhs.suffolk.sch.uk 7585

RIXON, Mr Peter, Ingelnook Cottage Broad Green BROADWAS-ON-TEME Worcs WR6 5NW UK: peter@rixon25.wanadoo.co.uk

7587

JAGO, Mrs Christine, Boscarne House St Buryan PENZANCE Cornwall TR19 6HR UK: wandcmjago@btinternet.com

7588

FOSTER, Mrs Jackie, The Barn, Bridge Farm, Main Road Parham WOODBRIDGE Suffolk IP13 9LZ UK: jackiefoster@terryfoster.co.uk

7592

MOORE, Mr Nigel, Little Paddocks Panteg Cross LLANDYSUL Ceredigion SA44 4SU UK: nigel.moore7@btinternet.com

55

2008 Apr 109.indd 55

20/02/2008 20:21:10

7593 7594

LASBURY, Robin, 57 Westbourne Road Whitchurch CARDIFF CF14 2BR UK: familyhistory@lasbury.com SUTTON, Mr Roger, 4 Penstone Close LANCING West Sussex BN15 9AR UK

7596

BROWN, Mrs Karen, Hayes Lodge Far End BROAD CAMPDEN Gloucs GL55 6XA UK: brown.karen.j@talk21.com

7597

BRANEY, Ms Jane, 106 Priory Street CORSHAM Wilts SN13 0AX UK: braneyjane@hotmail.com

7598

KNIGHT, Mrs Carol, 47 Princess Gardens Hilperton Marsh TROWBRIDGE Wilts BA14 7PT UK: hilperton1945@googlemail.com

7601

MARSHALL, Mrs Lesley, 96 Bidwell Hill HOUGHTON REGIS Beds LU5 5EP UK: research@smtd.co.uk

7603

LITTLE, Mr B, 5 Grasby Close Barnwood GLOUCESTER Gloucs GL4 3TP UK: barrylittle@ swindon-college.ac.uk

7605

DOBSON, Mr Brian, 2 Hollin Close TUNBRIDGE WELLS Kent TN4 8EF UK: brian.dobson1@tinyworld.co.uk

7607

FERGUSON, Mrs Meegan, PO Box 502 VIRGINIA Northern Territory 0822 AUSTRALIA: chrismeegan@bigpond.com

7608

CLEGG, Mrs Ann, Morreps, Wharf Road Lelant ST IVES Cornwall TR26 3DU UK: annclegg@btinternet.com

7609

SMITH, Mr Brian, Fern Cottage Compton Abdale CHELTENHAM Gloucs GL54 4DR UK: blmsmith@aol.com

7611

FAUX-LARKMAN, Mrs Daphne, 37 Kingstanding Road Perry Barr BIRMINGHAM Warks B44 8BA UK

7612

BASTIN, Mr William, 3 Tudor Court Park OXFORD Oxon OX2 9NG UK: wbastin@aol. com

7613

CUSHMAN, Ms Elizabeth, 21945 Wildwood Street DEARBORN MI 48128 USA: ecushman@comcast.net

7616

SMITH, Ms Glynice June, 4 Chester House Prospect Road NEW BARNET Herts EN5 5BW UK: glynices@aol.com

7617

ASHWORTH, Mrs Norma, 8 Greatwood CHISLEHURST Kent BR7 5HU UK: norma.ashworth@tiscali.co.uk

7618

PORTER, Mrs Elizabeth, 38 Brickley Lane DEVIZES Wilts SN10 3BH UK: liz.porter@ lineone.net

7625

TOOLEY, Mrs Barbara, Flat 2, Norlands Court 142 Bebington Road ROCK FERRY Merseyside CH42 4QD UK

We regret to announce the death of the following members: 1309

Mrs Marjorie Ethel MEESON 38 Hampton Court Avenue EAST MOLESEY Surrey UK

2120

Mrs Margaret BALLARD 219 Marlborough Road SWINDON Wilts UK

5585

Mr John TRIBBLE 22 Flawforth Avenue Ruddington NOTTINGHAM Notts

56

2008 Apr 109.indd 56

20/02/2008 20:21:10


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