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50 moot court and law review golden anniversary Years Later The Class of 1960 Looks Back on Their National Moot Court Championship and Willamette’s First Law Journal In December 1959, students from Willamette University College of Law came seemingly out of nowhere to win the National Moot Court Competition in New York City, beating numerous big-name and Ivy League schools from across the country. It was a great victory for the small, relatively unknown law school from Oregon, one that stunned most other participants. Most, of course, except the three-man team from Willamette. From left; Richard A. Franzke, Martin R. Wolf, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart and Theodore C. Carlstrom “The level of performance throughout our entire law class was really great,” said Theodore C. Carlstrom JD’60. “The team was well prepared because of the good competition from our second-year moot court classmates. They set the standard for the team that went to New York.” All Willamette law students participated in the school’s moot court competition, and the best among them went on to compete in the regional competition. Within the Class of 1960, Richard A. Franzke BS/JD’60; Martin R. Wolf BA’57, LLB’60; and Ted Carlstrom were deemed Willamette’s “dream team” for the regionals. Like many students at the time, Carlstrom came to law school by way of the military. Carlstrom earned a bachelor’s degree at Pacific Lutheran University before being drafted into the U.S. Army in 1955. He spent 21 months at Far East Command Headquarters in Tokyo during the early days of the post-Korea Cold War. “The Army gave me great discipline for law school,” he said. “If you can push your body until it hurts, you can push your mind as well.” When his active duty drew to a close, Carlstrom applied to law school before deciding to pursue a master’s degree in history. He enrolled at Stanford University but then reconsidered. 16 | Willamette Lawyer

Willamette Lawyer | Fall 2009 • Vol. IX, No. 2

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