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Sarasota Police Department STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Title: POLICE VEHICLE OPERATION Established: September 1, 2005 Number: 406.00 Last Revised: July 1, 2013

Distribution: All Personnel

Last Reviewed: July 1, 2013

Annexes:

None

406.10

PURPOSE:

406.11

To establish policy and procedure for police vehicle operations concerning routine driving, levels of response to calls for service, and police vehicle pursuits. It also provides for an administrative review of incidents involving police vehicle pursuits.

406.20

POLICY:

406.21

The discretionary decision to initiate an emergency response shall be based upon the seriousness of the incident, possibility of an arrest, conditions of the police vehicle, vehicular and pedestrian traffic, roadway conditions and the possibility for injury or property damage.

406.22

Public safety is a prime responsibility of the Sarasota Police Department and the protection of life and property are the primary functions of any police officer. The department recognizes its responsibilities in apprehending offenders but is also aware that officers involved in a pursuit are more likely be involved in a crash than during normal vehicle operations. Driving a patrol car is the most dangerous activity officers are exposed to while on duty. The use of emergency equipment combined with high speeds can expose officers and citizens to life threatening injuries and/or property damage. Therefore, it is paramount that when entering into a pursuit officers must make a decision, based on the totality of the circumstances, which balances the need to apprehend the criminal with the need to protect the officer and others from the dangers associated with a pursuit. The necessity of immediate apprehension must outweigh the level of danger created by a pursuit. Officers and supervisors will be accountable for their actions, or inactions, during any pursuit.

406.23

The Sarasota Police Department shall conduct an administrative review of all incidents involving police vehicle pursuits.

406.24

Department policy should not be construed as a creation of a higher legal standard of safety or care in an evidentiary sense with respect to third party claims.

406.30

DEFINITIONS:

406.30.1

AUTHORIZED EMERGENCY VEHICLE: “Vehicles of the fire department (fire patrol), police vehicles, and such ambulances and emergency vehicles of municipal departments, public service corporations operated by private corporations, the Department of Environmental Protection, the Department of Health, and the Department 1

of Transportation as are designated or authorized by their respective department or the chief of police of an incorporated city or any sheriff of any of the various counties.” [Section 316.003(1), Florida Statutes]. 406.30.2

BLOCKING: Using police vehicles to obstruct a stationary suspect vehicle before it reaches an avenue of escape.

406.30.3

DEADLY FORCE: Force that is likely to cause death or great bodily harm.

406.30.4

EMERGENCY CALL: Any call that an officer is dispatched to, or directed by a supervisor, to respond to Code 1: A.

A felony in–progress.

B.

A vehicle pursuit.

C.

An officer in need of immediate help.

D.

An incident where the officer is likely to have to give first aid upon arrival.

406.30.5

POLICE VEHICLE: An authorized emergency vehicle as defined in Section 316.003(1), Florida Statutes.

406.30.6

POLICE VEHICLE - MARKED: An authorized emergency vehicle which has the agency's insignia and other jurisdictional markings prominently displayed on the vehicle.

406.30.7

POLICE VEHICLE - UNMARKED: An authorized emergency vehicle which does not have agency insignia and other jurisdictional markings prominently displayed on the vehicle.

406.30.8

PRECISION IMMOBILIZATION TECHNIQUE – Intentionally using a law enforcement vehicle to physically force a fleeing vehicle from a course of travel in order to stop it. Precision immobilization technique is a specific technical maneuver that requires advanced practical training prior to use.

406.30.9

ROADBLOCKS: Stationary Roadblock: Using police vehicles to block a roadway in advance of a fleeing suspect vehicle. This does not include the approved use of DUI roadblocks or other checkpoints. Moving Roadblock: Using one or more police vehicles to box in a moving vehicle that flees in an attempt to avoid arrest.

406.30.10

USE OF FORCE: The application of physical strength or use of any device or instrument to affect control or overcome resistance.

406.30.11

VEHICLE PURSUIT: The chase of a vehicle by a police vehicle when, in the officer’s judgment, an individual clearly exhibits an attempt to avoid arrest by using a vehicle to flee.

406.40

POLICE VEHICLE EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT:

406.41

The proper use of emergency equipment is essential to the safety of the officer and other motorists when conditions exist that justify their use.

2

406.42

All authorized emergency vehicles of the Sarasota Police Department will be outfitted with emergency equipment.

406.43

For purposes of this policy, emergency equipment will include the following: A. B. C. D. E.

406.44

Red and/or blue lights. Hazardous warning lights (white strobe lights). Spotlight (mandatory in marked vehicles only). Public Address (PA) system. Siren.

Sarasota Police Department officers are authorized to use emergency equipment only in the following circumstances: A. B. C.

When authorized directly by a superior. As determined by the nature of the dispatched assignment. When confronted with situations that in the officer’s best judgment indicate the need for use of emergency equipment.

406.45

The unnecessary or inappropriate use of vehicle emergency equipment is strictly prohibited.

406.50

LEVELS OF RESPONSE - VEHICLE OPERATION MODES:

406.51

CODE 3 – NORMAL OPERATION: The arrival of the officer will not have an effect on the outcome of the case.

406.51.1

Under normal, non-emergency conditions and while responding to routine calls for service, officers shall strictly adhere to all traffic laws and drive defensively in a safe, courteous manner.

406.51.2

Code 3 operation will be used when conditions at the call are stable and there is no need for an expedited response.

406.52

CODE 2 – EXIGENT OPERATION: The arrival of the officer may have an effect on the outcome of the case:

406.52.1

Conditions at the scene of the call may or may not be stable. Officers shall respond directly to the scene without delay. The response mode may have to be adjusted to meet a changing situation. Emergency equipment may have to be used on an intermittent basis.

406.52.2

Section 316.126(3), Florida Statutes, requires the use of emergency equipment when an emergency vehicle is en route to meet an existing emergency.

406.52.3

Section 316.072(5)(a)(1), Florida Statutes, authorizes emergency vehicles to commit traffic infractions, “…when responding to an emergency call, when in pursuit of an actual or suspected violator of the law, or when responding to a fire alarm….”.

406.52.4

When officers are responding to an exigent situation, in a Code 2 mode, they will not use excessive speed or other dangerous movements and shall use emergency equipment (lights and siren) if it becomes necessary to exceed the posted speed limit or commit any traffic infraction. 3

406.52.5

Tactical considerations may give rise to an officer's option to preclude the use of emergency equipment, headlights and/or taillights to allow officers to respond stealthily (shutting off lights and siren a few blocks from the scene) to avoid alerting a suspect to their arrival or location of officers for the purpose of improving officer and/or citizen safety or the likelihood of apprehending a suspect.

406.52.6

Section 316.217(4), Florida Statutes, authorizes law enforcement vehicles to be operated without headlights under certain conditions.

406.52.7

The provisions of Sections 316.072(5)(b) and 316.217(4)(d), Florida Statutes, does not relieve the operator of the vehicle from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons, nor shall such provisions protect the driver from the consequences of his or her reckless disregard for the safety of others.

406.52.8

Occasionally a call for service originally dispatched as code 2 contains sufficient information to lead an officer to reasonably believe that the nature of the incident may be an emergency in progress and that a timely arrival could reduce the likelihood of physical injury, protect property or result in apprehension of a suspect, yet the call was not originally classified Code 1 by dispatch, (e.g. burglaries and robberies in progress). Under such circumstances officers may adjust their response mode to address the situation, but will so advise the dispatcher.

406.53

CODE 1 – EMERGENCY OPERATION: The arrival of the officer on scene will have an effect on the outcome of the call:

406.53.1

If conditions at the scene are not stable and an emergency exists, the response mode is emergency operation, Code 1.

406.53.2

Officers may operate in a Code 1 mode under the following conditions: A.

When dispatched Code 1.

B.

When they have sufficient information to reasonably believe an emergency exists, as described in section 406.30.4 of this standard operating procedure.

C.

When they have knowledge that an emergency exists such as another officer calling for immediate help or a passerby advises them of an emergency situation.

406.53.3

There will be no escorts of private vehicles in a Code 1 mode.

406.53.4

Officers should remain aware and safety conscious that although circumstances and state law may authorize a Code 1 response, there still may be pedestrians or drivers in the area who are unaware of an emergency vehicle proceeding Code 1, despite the continuous use of emergency lights and siren. Especially at intersections, officers must make sure that all cross-traffic has yielded before proceeding.

406.53.5

Only sworn personnel in an authorized emergency vehicle will drive Code 1.

406.53.6

Only the units assigned to the call will respond Code 1.

406.53.7

Officers shall comply with the provisions of Sections 316.126(3) and 316.072(5)(a)(1), Florida Statutes, Emergency Vehicle Operations. 4

406.53.8

Code 1 requires the continuous use of emergency lights and siren.

406.53.9

Under Florida Statute, officers responding to Code 1 may do the following: A.

Exceed the maximum speed limit.

B.

Proceed through stop signals or signs.

C.

Disregard regulations governing direction of movement or turning.

406.53.10

Nothing under Florida law allows an officer driving in a Code 1 mode to drive in a reckless or unsafe manner. Officers responding to a Code 1 mode will exercise extreme caution and take care not to needlessly endanger life or property. See 406.52.7 for applicable Florida Statutes.

406.53.11

Officers will not use the four-way flashers during a Code 1 response because this may interfere with the brake lights. However, use of the public address system, spotlight, and take-down lights are authorized as additional safety measures during emergency operation.

406.53.12

When responding officers become aware that the situation has been stabilized and the emergency no longer exists, they shall immediately downgrade their response mode.

406.53.13

The use of lights and sirens to conduct routine traffic stops shall not be construed as a Code 1 response.

406.53.14

Officers shall immediately terminate emergency operation when ordered to do so by a supervisor.

406.60

VEHICLE PURSUIT OPERATIONS (CODE 1):

406.61

AUTHORIZATION:

406.61.1

Officers are authorized to and held accountable for their use of force and employment of emergency driving techniques by Sections 776.05, 776.06, 316.072, 316.126, Florida Statutes.

406.61.2

Section 316.126 (5), Florida Statutes states: “This section shall not operate to relieve the driver of an authorized emergency vehicle from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons using the highway.�

406.62

JUSTIFICATION FOR PURSUITS:

406.62.1

Pursuits are justified ONLY when the officer knows or has reasonable belief, that the suspect presents a clear and immediate threat to the safety of others (including other motorists), and when the necessity of immediate apprehension outweighs the level of danger created by the pursuit. A vehicle pursuit may be justified for the following reasons: A.

To capture an individual, who attempted, committed or is committing a forcible felony as defined by Section 776.08, Florida Statutes.

5

B.

To stop a driver who would be likely to injure himself or others if allowed to continue, in instances where the driver’s behavior was not in response to police action (e.g. suspected DUI driver, an apparent disoriented elderly driver, leaving the scene of an accident involving serious injury or death, etc.).

406.62.2

Section 776.08, Florida Statutes defines a forcible felony as “...treason; murder; manslaughter; sexual battery; carjacking; home-invasion robbery; robbery; burglary; arson; kidnapping; aggravated assault; aggravated battery; aggravated stalking; aircraft piracy; unlawful throwing, placing, or discharging of a destructive device or bomb; and any other felony which involves the use or threat of physical force or violence against any individual�.

406.62.3

To engage in a pursuit there must be justification to increase the risks to life and property. There must be justification at all times to continue a pursuit. Officers shall evaluate the circumstances and make the decision to pursue in accordance with this policy. Supervisors shall also evaluate the circumstances and make the decision to permit or terminate the pursuit. Vehicle pursuits are NOT justified for the following incidents:

406.62.4

A.

Minor traffic offenses, including Section 316.1935, Florida Statutes Fleeing or Attempting to Elude violations initially arising from an attempt to stop for a minor traffic violation.

B.

Municipal ordinance violations.

C.

Misdemeanors.

D.

When the identity of a non-violent felon is known or can be established and the suspect poses no immediate danger to the public.

E.

Stolen vehicles, unless violence was used or threatened in stealing the vehicle or the pursuit complies with other justification criteria in this standard operating procedure.

Many factors must be considered when initiating or continuing a vehicular pursuit. These include the following: A.

Seriousness of the originating offense.

B.

Safety of the public in the area of the pursuit.

C.

Safety of pursuing officer(s).

D.

Time of day.

E.

Volume of vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

F.

Location of pursuit (e.g. residential, rural, school zones, etc.).

G.

Weather conditions

H.

Road conditions and type of road. 6

I.

Speeds involved.

J.

Officer’s ability and experience.

406.70

PURSUIT PROCEDURES:

406.71

Only two vehicles will participate in a vehicle pursuit unless expressly approved by a supervisor.

406.71.1

The primary unit is the officer who initiated the pursuit and is in direct pursuit of the fleeing vehicle. If at anytime during the pursuit another unit takes over in directly pursuing the vehicle, that unit will become the primary unit.

406.71.2

The secondary unit is the back-up unit.

406.72

PRIMARY UNITS:

406.72.1

The initial primary officer in the pursuit will take the following steps as soon as possible once the pursuit has been initiated: A.

Identify their unit.

B.

State the location and direction of travel.

C.

State the reason for the pursuit.

D.

Give a vehicle description.

E.

Estimate and describe the number of occupants/offenders.

F.

Give the traffic conditions.

406.72.2

The primary pursuit vehicle shall not be passed unless required by exigent circumstances. The exigency will be documented in the pursuit report.

406.72.3

The primary pursuit officer can request additional units if it appears that two units are not enough to safely apprehend the suspect(s). Additional units must be expressly approved by the supervisor monitoring the pursuit.

406.72.4

The primary and secondary pursuit vehicles may pursue outside of the City unless otherwise directed by the supervisor monitoring the pursuit.

406.72.5

Public Safety Communications Center (PSCC) shall notify the appropriate law enforcement agency if the pursuit goes outside the city limits.

406.73

SECONDARY UNIT:

406.73.1

The secondary unit is authorized to pursue at a safe distance for back-up purposes.

406.73.2

The secondary unit will communicate information when required by the supervisor monitoring the pursuit or when necessary to relay significant information.

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406.74

SUPPORT UNITS:

406.74.1

All other police units shall stay clear of the pursuit, remaining alert to the status and location of the pursuit termination so that they may assist if needed.

406.75

PROHIBITED ACTIONS DURING PURSUITS:

406.75.1

Police vehicles with an authorized rider shall terminate their pursuit as soon as another marked unit is available to take over.

406.75.2

Police vehicles transporting other non-sworn personnel will not participate in pursuits.

406.75.3

Unmarked police vehicles and motorcycles will not be utilized in pursuit of other vehicles unless: A.

Occupants of the pursued vehicle represent a serious threat to cause serious physical injury to the officer or others.

B.

No other viable means of apprehension exists.

C.

A supervisor expressly approves the pursuit.

406.75.4

Unmarked police vehicles and motorcycles shall terminate their pursuit as soon as a marked unit is in a position to take over.

406.75.5

Vehicles without police emergency equipment (lights and sirens), including leased vehicles, will not participate in pursuits.

406.75.6

Under no circumstances will officers pursue with their vehicle traveling against traffic.

406.75.7

Officers of the Sarasota Police Department will not use roadblocks of any type (i.e. stationary, moving, etc.) as a technique to end a vehicle pursuit, unless no other means are available to defend human life or in the defense of a person in imminent danger of serious physical harm.

406.75.8

Roadblocks may be utilized to cordon off roadways in order to detour civilian traffic in reference to critical incidents or to ensure public safety (i.e. armed subject, high risk situations, street flooding, etc.), see SOP 437.00, Traffic Direction and Control.

406.76

PURSUITS INITIATED BY OTHER AGENCIES:

406.76.1

The same standards shall apply to pursuits initiated by other agencies that enter the City of Sarasota.

406.76.2

If two or more vehicles are already involved from the other agency, SPD vehicles will not join in the pursuit, but will be available to assist unless expressly authorized by an SPD supervisor to join the pursuit.

406.76.3

Upon notification from another agency about a pursuit the PSCC shall put out a BOLO with the appropriate information and update it continuously. 8

406.76.4 406.80

If the pursuit leaves the city limits with two vehicles from the other agency involved, SPD vehicles will not follow, unless expressly authorized by an SPD supervisor. USE OF FORCE:

406.81

Officers in pursuit will be guided by Standard Operating Procedure 703.00, Use of Force.

406.82

Each officer is reminded that the use of deadly force against a fleeing suspect is only justified under certain circumstances. In Tennessee vs. Garner, (S. Ct. 1989), the United States Supreme Court held that deadly force may not be used unless it is necessary to prevent escape of a felon and the officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others.

406.82.1

If the suspect threatens an officer with a firearm or there is probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed a crime involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm, deadly force may be used if necessary to prevent escape and if, where feasible, some warning has been given.

406.82.2

Officers of the Sarasota Police Department shall not discharge a firearm at or from a moving vehicle, unless no other means is available to the officer to defend human life, or in the defense of persons in imminent danger of serious physical harm.

406.90

PURSUIT TERMINATION:

406.91

The responsibility for initiating a pursuit rests with the individual officer and a pursuit may be canceled by that officer or a supervisor at any time.

406.92

A pursuit is no longer justified when the risks created by the pursuit outweigh the necessity of immediate apprehension or the seriousness of the offense involved.

406.93

Officers shall terminate a pursuit when: A.

The pursuing officer believes that because of the traffic, roadway, weather or location, the risks created by the pursuit outweigh the necessity of immediate apprehension.

B.

No supervisor or higher authority can be contacted to approve the pursuit’s continuation.

C.

The officer loses visual contact with the vehicle.

D.

The pursuing vehicle loses radio contact with Communications.

E.

A supervisor orders the pursuit to be terminated.

F.

The suspect’s identity has been established and there is no longer any need for immediate apprehension.

406.94

STOP STICKS:

406.94.1

Officers are authorized, upon approval of a supervisor, to use stop sticks to deflate the tires of vehicles that are fleeing or attempting to elude officers. Refer Standard Operating Procedure 410.00, Stop Sticks for stop stick guidelines. 9

406.94.2

Once authorization to use stop sticks is received, the primary pursuit vehicle shall coordinate with the deploying officer and communicate the following information concerning the fleeing vehicle: A.

The description.

B.

The direction of travel.

C.

The lane in which the fleeing vehicle is traveling.

406.94.3

Communications shall notify other law enforcement agencies involved in the pursuit of the decision to deploy the stop sticks and the location of the deployment.

406.95

PRECISION IMMOBILIZATION TECHNIQUE:

406.95.1

Precision immobilization technique is a controlled maneuver involving the use of a police vehicle as a use of force option. The objective of precision immobilization technique is to safely end a pursuit and, in doing so; minimize the risk of injury to the public, the officer and the suspect.

406.95.2

Only officers who have successfully been trained and certified by the Sarasota Police Department in the use of the precision immobilization technique shall be approved to utilize it.

406.95.3

If, in the judgment of the police officer or officers in pursuit, the fleeing vehicle must be stopped immediately to safeguard life and preserve the public safety, the Precision Immobilization Technique may be used. A pursuing officer, subject to supervisory review, may make this decision. This is important, because of all of the parameters and situational change that occurs and alters from second to second. Only the officers in visual contact with the situation can evaluate the need to use, or not use, this technique. Just as an officer has no time to request permission to use his firearm, no time is available, in every case to have supervisory permission to use precision immobilization technique.

406.95.4

The precision immobilization technique is considered less lethal when properly executed.

406.95.5

When possible, there should be a minimum of two marked units to deploy this technique.

406.95.6

The decision to the use precision immobilization technique must be based on the totality of the information and possible effects of its use. It must be executed at a time and place and in a manner that human life and property are not unreasonably endangered. Officers shall consider the following factors: A.

Seriousness of the originating offense.

B.

Safety of the public in the area of the pursuit.

C.

Safety of pursuing officer(s).

D.

Time of day.

E.

Volume of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. 10

F.

Location of pursuit (e.g. residential, rural, school zones, etc.).

G.

Weather conditions.

H.

Road conditions.

I.

Speeds involved.

J.

Officer’s ability and experience.

406.95.7

All precision immobilization techniques will be executed below 50 MPH.

406.95.8

The use of the precision immobilization technique against motorcycles and vehicles having a high center of gravity, (i.e., certain sport utility vehicles, trucks, and vans), is prohibited.

406.95.9

Trained officers operating sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks or similar vehicles may only use the precision immobilization technique with extreme caution and only under those conditions when it can be applied with relative safety to the officer, suspect and innocent parties.

406.95.10

The use of the precision immobilization technique against vehicles with a deflated tire is prohibited.

406.96

BLOCKING:

406.96.1

The use of blocking to prevent a stationary vehicle from moving is authorized. (i.e. blocking a suspect vehicle in during a traffic stop, etc.).

406.96.2

Blocking may be used to prevent a suspect vehicle from moving or reaching an avenue of escape.

406.96.3

Vehicle damage resulting from the officer initiating a blocking will be reviewed by the Level of Resistance Review Board.

406.100

VEHICLE CRASHES:

406.101

A crash caused by a suspect, who is being pursued, is not considered to be the result of use of force by the pursuing officer, unless determined otherwise by the Crash Review Board.

406.101.1

Police vehicle crashes, which occur during pursuits, will be reviewed by the Crash Review Board.

406.102

Whenever a pursuit is terminated with a vehicle crash and there is property damage and/or personal injury, the supervisor monitoring the pursuit will cause the City of Sarasota Risk Management office to be notified as soon as possible.

406.103

If the vehicle crash includes only minor property damage (e.g., unoccupied vehicle, still drivable), immediate notification is not necessary. A copy of the crash report will be forwarded by the Records Unit to the City of Sarasota Risk Management office within 24 hours. 11

406.110

SUPERVISORY / COMMAND RESPONSIBILITY:

406.111

Supervisors are responsible for monitoring police vehicle response and upgrading or downgrading the response mode and the number of units involved, as necessary.

406.112

Supervisors are responsible for monitoring pursuits and will expressly authorize or terminate them as necessary.

406.113

The supervisor monitoring the pursuit shall go to the scene where the pursuit ends and take command.

406.114

The supervisor with responsibility over the pursuing officer will document their role in the pursuit in a report.

406.120

REPORTING PROCESS:

406.121

Any officer driving a Department vehicle involved in a pursuit will document his or her involvement in all appropriate and necessary reporting formats: A.

Incident Report or Supplement.

B.

Probable Cause Affidavit.

C.

Uniformed Traffic Citation.

D.

Stop Sticks Report.

E.

Other report forms as may be applicable.

406.122

If a pursuit is terminated without property damage or injury, and the suspect is not apprehended, the primary officer will document the pursuit in an Incident Report. Secondary officers will document their involvement in a Supplement Report.

406.122.1

If there is property damage or injury, the supervisor with responsibility over the pursuit will respond to the scene as soon as practical to gather information, make a preliminary determination, and cause the preparation of the appropriate report forms with regard to whether the damage or injury was the result of a: A.

Crash - unintentional action by an officer or fleeing suspect resulting in property damage or injury.

B.

Assault - intentional act to do violence by a fleeing suspect that may or may not result in property damage or injury.

C.

Use of Force - intentional action by an officer resulting in property damage or injury.

406.123

The supervisor with responsibility over the pursuing officer will document their role in the pursuit in a report.

406.124

The supervisor with responsibility for the pursuit will also be responsible for forwarding a copy of the case report and all associated documents through the chain of command to the Vehicle Pursuit Review Board. 12

406.125

The supervisor with responsibility for the pursuit will be responsible for requesting the PSCC to make a tape of all radio transmissions concerning the pursuit and obtaining the tape(s). A transcript log containing the pursuit times and other pertinent information from the beginning to end of the pursuit should be requested from PSC. Once obtained, the supervisor will submit the tape and transcript log to the Vehicle Pursuit Review Board.

406.126

The supervisor with responsibility for the pursuit will be responsible for making or ensuring notification to the City of Sarasota Risk Management office when required, see 604.92.

406.130

VEHICLE PURSUIT REVIEW BOARD:

406.131

The Vehicle Pursuit Review Board will be staffed by Department personnel selected and assigned by the Chief of Police.

406.132

The number of Department personnel assigned to the Vehicle Pursuit Review Board and the duration of assignment will be set by the Chief of Police.

406.133

The Chief of Police shall appoint an Administrative Liaison for the Vehicle Pursuit Review Board.

406.134

Information coming to light after the pursuit is terminated or the suspect is apprehended shall have no impact on a decision by the Board. The Vehicle Pursuit Review Board will convene at the direction of the Chief of Police to review all vehicle pursuits to determine the facts of compliance with Department pursuit policies.

406.135

406.136

Motor vehicle collisions involving personal Injuries or damage to Department vehicles during pursuits will be classified by the Vehicle Pursuit Review Board as: A.

A Crash.

B.

An assault by the suspect.

C.

A Use of Force by an officer.

406.137

Crashes involving Department vehicles will be referred to the Crash Review Board.

406.138

Uses of Force will be referred to the Level of Resistance Review Board.

406.139

The Vehicle Pursuit Review Board will make a written report to the Chief of Police.

406.140

TRACKING:

406.141

The Vehicle Pursuit Review Board will keep track of all Department pursuits and will make an annual report to the Chief of Police, which will describe: A.

The number of pursuits.

B.

The number of Department vehicles involved.

C.

The number of vehicles damaged and the extent of damage. 13

D.

The number of injuries and the extent of all injuries.

E.

The number of pursuits determined by the board to be within and/or outside department policy.

406.142

The Vehicle Pursuit Review Board Administrative Liaison will be responsible for publishing an annual report on vehicle pursuits.

406.150

DISTRACTIONS WHILE DRIVING:

406.151

While driving a Department vehicle, employees shall not engage in any activity that unnecessarily distracts them from safely operating the vehicle. Activities that are prohibited while driving a department vehicle include, but are not limited to, the following:

A.

Reading, typing, and/or sending text messages or emails.

B. C.

Talking on a cell phone (non-work related). Using an MDT/MDC for non-work related functions such as surfing the internet.

406.160

USE OF VEHICLE SAFETY BELTS:

406.161

All employees of the Sarasota Police Department will wear a seatbelt when operating or riding as a passenger in any City owned, leased, rented or privately owned vehicle being used for City business.

406.162

All private citizens who are transported as front seat passengers will comply with the requirements of F.S.S. 316.614 or 316.613 as may be applicable.

406.163

It is the policy of the Sarasota Police Department that all personnel will comply with the requirements of F.S.S. 316.613 – Child Restraints, when transporting children in any City owned, leased, rented or privately owned vehicle being used for City business. __________________________________________________________________________________ THIS STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE REPLACES G.O. 406.00 DATED 7-9-12. Approved and issued by order of,

___________________________ BERNADETTE DIPINO CHIEF OF POLICE

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Sarasota Police Pursuit Policy