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Westminster CONNECTING YOU TO THE WESTMINSTER COMMUNITY

REVIEW

THE WESTMINSTER WAY

How Competency-Based Education is Changing Learning P A G E 3 6

MIND CONTROL

Students Design Systems for Controlling Computers with Thoughts

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ALUMNI NEWS, EVENTS, and more...

WESTMINSTER’S

Growing Food Culture

THE STUDENTS AND PROFESSORS BEHIND THE CAMPUS MOVEMENT TO EAT WISE AND EAT WELL P A G E 26

Bringing Home the Glory

Westminter’s Student Athletes Rocked the Medal Count at Sochi

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C O N N E C T I N G YO U T O T H E W E S T M I N S T E R C O M M U N I T Y

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FOOD RULES by Autumn Thatcher, MPC (’15) and Robin Boon From how Westminster helps students rethink nutrition and taste to an Executive Chef running the in-house restaurant service, there’s more going on here than meets the eye…or the stomach.

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TALKING COMPETENCYBASED LEARNING by Autumn Thatcher MPC (’15) Less “seat” time, but more effective learning: Westminster breaks new ground with high-performance education for the full-time-and-then-some student.

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THE COMMONS

DEPARTMENTS

ALUMNI NEWS

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Opening Shot

16 Faces

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Campus Lore

20 Good Works

46 Westminster’s Road Warrior

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Alumni Tale

22 Travel

10 In Short

24 Griffin Olympians

ON THE COVER

14 The Sporting Life

42 Gifts in Action

Photographed by Heidi Larsen foodiecrush.com

50 Class Notes 52 Save the Date 59 In Memoriam 60 Alumni Events

Westminster—We are Purple and Gold (and Silver and Bronze, too!)

Gold Medalist Maddie Bowman - Photo: Sarah Brunson

DEDICATED&STUDENTS DEDICATED ATHLETES

Westminster congratulates our 23 student athletes who made us proud in the 2014 Sochi Olympic Games, including four medal winners: Maddie Bowman, Joss Christensen, Alex Deibold, and Devin Logan.

Meet our athletes at westminstercollege.edu/Sochi2014

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PRESID EN T ’S MES S AG E

President Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich

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Vice President of Advancement Steve Morgan Executive Director of Integrated Marketing Communications Sheila Yorkin

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Consulting Editor Jeremy Pugh Contributing Editors Helen Hodgson Autumn Thatcher MPC (’15) Art Direction Heidi Larsen, foodiecrush.com Courtney Bankhead

been here recently. In this issue, we share with you the work we are doing in creating new ways of student-centered learning in a world where job competition is more fierce and workplace stability seems to be a thing of the past. Today many working professionals are electing to return to school in the hopes of building a more secure future. Many full-time employees are turning to “competency-based” education to help accomplish their goals. Our innovative competency-based degree programs remain true to our commitment to student-faculty learning relationships and a faculty-led curriculum. And we’ve watched this new generation of students who are particularly attentive to the quality of their diets and the food they eat. In this issue, we explore Westminster faculty and staff members who engage students in food education that ranges from growing food in our campus organic garden and raising chickens and keeping bees to using food and cooking to illustrate chemistry. Our students’ involvement is ensuring that campus dining choices are healthy, sustainable. and mindful of the environment. I hope you enjoy this edition of the Review. Sincerely, Brian Levin-Stankevich Westminster College President

Photography Thomas Cronin Adam Finkle Heidi Larsen Contributors Robin Boon Krista DeAngelis Jeffrey Driggs Joshua Fisher Michelle Barber Lynakis (MPC ’06) Audrey Maynard (’03) Sara McCaskey (’14) Jessica Smith (’14) Autumn Thatcher MPC (’15) April M. Torres (’14) Arikka Von (’15) Westminster College Board of Trustees Kim T. Adamson* Hamid Adib** Jeanne Ambruster** Gretchen Anderson, Vice Chair Martha Felt Barton* Judith Billings Michael Bills* Preston Chiaro James R. Clark Curt P. Crowther** Thomas A. Ellison, Chair Bing L. Fang* Thomas Fey Robert J. Frankenberg Robert Garda Clark P Giles Susan Glasmann Hank Hemingway Colleen Kearns McCann* Peter D. Meldrum O. Wood Moyle IV* Jeffrey R. Nelson* William Orchow Catherine Putnam-Netto Robert Rendon Patricia Richards Alvin Richer* David E. Simmons Greg Winegardner *Alumni **Parent Give us your feedback The editors of the Review would like your feedback. Let us know what you like or what misses the mark. Please direct your comments to Westminster Review Office of Communications Westminster College 1840 South 1300 East Salt Lake City, UT 84105 review@westtminstercollege.edu

CH RIS JAMESON

ife at Westminster College has been busy since the last fall’s issue of the Review. Since then, the campus community has been working collectively to finalize our Strategic Plan. For the latest information or to read the plan, visit westminstercollege.edu/strategicplan. We look forward to sharing the finalized plan when with you later this spring. I am also pleased to report that Westminster has accepted an invitation to join the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. The transition from the NAIA to the NCAA requires admission to the NCAA Division II. Our application has been submitted, and in July, we expect to find out if we have been successful. This move is in line with our Strategic Plan’s focus on excellence and best-of-class goals for the college. Additionally, the Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business is in the process of completing AACSB accreditation. This is a great move toward an even higher level of academic excellence that will also benefit the college in recruiting, particularly in the international arena. Off campus, we watched with excitement as our 23 Griffins (and three former Griffins) competed in the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, fully 10 percent of the entire US winter Olympic team. We will welcome our athletes home with a gathering this April in conjunction with the Sugar House business district and community. At our Sugar House residence hall, the new tunnel at the Draw (1300 East and 2100 South) will be completed this summer, and a new restaurant will open in Westminster on the Draw—just a few reasons to visit campus if you haven’t

Managing Editor Robin Boon

THINKING ABOUT GRAD SCHOOL?

DISCOVER Graduate 14 Programs Westminster College’s

Westminster offers the following graduate programs: • Master of Accountancy • Master of Business Administration • Master of Business Administration in Technology Management • Project-Based Master of Business Administration (Online) • Master of Professional Communication • Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling • Master of Strategic Communication (Online) • Master of Education • Master of Arts in Teaching • Master of Arts in Community Leadership • Master of Public Health • Master of Science in Nursing-Family Nurse Practitioner • Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia • Master of Science in Nursing Education

Call us at 801.832.2200 or go to: www.westminstercollege.edu/gradprograms5 WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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commons KEEPING UP WITH WHAT WESTMINSTER ALUMNI HAVE IN COMMON

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INTRICATE PATTERNS OF SIMPLE SALT HELP HEAL THE HUMAN HEART Motoi Yamamoto Brings His Art to Us We Return it to Our Inland Sea the stunningly beautiful saltworks of Motoi Yamamoto reflect a style similar to that of Tibetan sand mandalas. Rather than sand, he uses salt, a symbolic element of purification and mourning in Japan and many Eastern cultures. Yamamoto was born in Onomichi, Hiroshima, in 1966 and spent the first part of his life working at a dockyard. In 1995, he earned a bachelor’s degree in art from Kanazawa College of Art with an emphasis in oil painting. While he was still in school, his sister died from brain cancer and, stricken with grief, he turned from oil to salt, creating fascinating and compelling art with everyday table salt. Viewed from above, Yamamoto’s installations can resemble raging seas, byzantine labyrinths, the image of a flattened brain, or staircases to the heavens—all formed from nothing but salt, with each expansive saltwork becoming another memorial to his sister. Like the Tibetan sand mandalas that are ceremoniously destroyed after completion to demonstrate the transitory nature of non-metaphysical life, Yamamoto’s dramatic and expansive works are painstakingly piped by hand, enjoyed briefly, and then swept away, always “returned to the sea.” The Westminster saltwork will be returned to Utah’s own inland Great Salt Lake “sea” on April 12, at 9:00 am. Those who wish to participate are welcome to join us at the Meldrum Science Center, scoop up a bag of salt, caravan to the Spiral Jetty at the northeast shore of the Great Salt Lake, and place the salt into our little “sea.” Like life, Yamamoto’s works are more wondrous because of their impermanence. He has become an acclaimed artist, winning the Philip Morris Art Award in 2002. In 2012, he published an anthology of his saltworks entitled Return to the Sea. For more information, visit greatsaltlakeinstitute.org. BORN OUT OF GRIEF,

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SALTWORKS BY MOTOI YAMAMOTO

Through April 12 Public Viewing Meldrum Science Center (Please enter through the east doors.) Campus map available at westminstercollege.edu/campus_map. April 10, 7:00 pm SALT: Panel discussion on our favorite rock, timelapse video, and salt tasting Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business Auditorium April 12, 9:00 am Return to the “Sea” Caravan from Meldrum Science Center to the Spiral Jetty, Great Salt Lake

COURTESY OF MAKOTO MORISAWA

MOTOI YAMAMOTO’S SALT INSTALLATION AT THE MONTEREY MUSEUM OF ART, SUMMER 2013.

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MUSING SHAKESPEARE Dr. Elree Harris, professor of English literature, art historian, and the sleuth behind Westminster’s Shakespeare’s Heroines collection, points out her top three prints. By Autumn Thatcher (MPC ’15)

English Professor Elree Harris has spent more than a decade researching the origin of a set of Victorian-era prints of Shakespeare’s heroines discovered in the Nightingale Library. Here are three of the images and her discoveries. For more about Harris and the research, see page 16.

I M O GEN FROM

MAR IANA

Cymbeline

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“I have a theory that this model is Ellen Terry, a famous Victorian actress who specialized in Shakespearean works. I haven’t proved it yet, but I am working on it.”

Measure for Measure

“This print seems to be influenced by a famous painting (also titled Mariana) by Pre-Raphaelite artist John Everett Millais. Millais’ inspiration is an 1830 poem, “Mariana, or the Moated Grange,” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Victorian viewers would have instantly recognized the connections.”

R O SALIN D FROM

As You Like It

“I love the detail of this print and the texture in the printing. It has a certain playfulness from the deer and the squirrel in the background to the shelf fungus barely visible at the base of the huge oak.”

SEE THESE LEADING LADIES FOR YOURSELF

Westminster’s Shakespeare’s Heroines collection is located on the upper level of the Giovale Library. They have been cleaned, restored, and framed for your viewing pleasure. 8

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TAKING AIM

Denise Parker talks about what it takes to become an Olympian archer. By Robin Boon

NAME

Denise Parker GRADUATED

1997 MAJOR

Marketing VOCATION

Olympic Archer and CEO of USA Archery AGE 10

Took up archery AGE 13

Earned first of many Gold Medals in the 1987 Pan American Games AGE 14

Became youngest competitor on the US Olympic team and Bronze Medalist at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, Korea HALLOWEEN

Katniss, of course. “Archers are the new vampires!”

ADAM FINKLE

NO PRESSURE

Speared a Life Saver at 15 yards on The Tonight Show.

Films like Brave, The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, etc., have enhanced the sport by 110 percent, but they show widely varying techniques. Why? A more traditional form is used when archers are shooting without any aiming device. In this case, the archer’s hand that is used to draw the bow is usually closer to the face and up toward the eye so the arrow can be used as an aiming device. However, Olympic archers, who are using a sight (aiming device), will place their draw hand under

their chin more, because they do not need to look down the arrow for aiming, and it provides what is called a more solid “anchor.” By the way, Jennifer Lawrence was trained by an Olympic archer for her role in The Hunger Games. What is the key to good form? It is critical to be consistent and to shoot effectively exactly the same way for every shot. It’s actually very similar to golf. Why archery? I was always a huge Olympic fan and always wanted to be an Olympian. The only sports I knew were actually in the Olympics were swimming and track and field, all of which I liked, but was not particularly good at. Then I tried archery at age 10, and it came so easy—I was a natural. Then someone told me I could go to the Olympics in archery, and it all started from there. How does anyone become a superior archer? It helps to have a combination of a bit of the “genetic lottery,” a fiercely competitive spirit, and the ability to work extremely hard at it. And it didn’t hurt to have parents who supported and sometimes pushed me to be the very best I could be. And I found sheer joy in the process of perfecting the form. What is it about archery and girls? Archery is a huge confidence builder for girls. While initially intimidating, there is something empowering about “mastering” the bow. When they realize they can do it, it’s like they discover a side of them they never knew existed. Ever used archery for its original intent? Yes. Two deer and an antelope. Any injuries? Just weeks before the Johnny Carson show, when I was helping a family friend (and surgeon) skin a deer, he accidentally sliced into my shooting fingers. My appearance had to be rescheduled. [And she still nailed that Life Saver at 15 yards!] WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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WESTMINSTER NEWS AND NOTES From Touring Singers to a Bid to Join the NCAA, Griffins are on the Move.

New Minor in Outdoor Education and Leadership

WESTMINSTER HAS CREATED a new minor in outdoor education and leadership to address the demand for graduates who can lead in the outdoor industry and beyond. Utah’s outdoor industry brings in nearly $6 billion annually, with 14 ski resorts, five national parks, and 1,000+ outdoor product companies that contribute to the state’s economy. The new minor will help students develop effective leadership, communication, management, and technical outdoor skills to help place them in companies and organizations in this growing industry.

New RN to BS in Nursing Program

CHAMBER SINGERS TOURING ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND IN MAY THE WESTMINSTER CHAMBER SINGERS

will be embarking on an exciting 16-day tour of Scotland and England in May 2014. As part of their European tour, the Chamber Singers will perform in various universities, churches, and cathedrals. Dr. Christopher Quinn, director of the Chamber Singers, says, “This choir is highly motivated and extremely excited to be touring throughout Europe.” The 39-member choir is the largest group he has ever directed at Westminster. “They have a wonderful sound, and the entire choir is very excited about performing outside of Utah.”

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WESTMINSTER’S RN TO BS in nursing program uses high-tech learning tools for distance education and combines it with a handful of seminars each semester. The program offers flexibility so students can continue to work. The program was introduced to address an industry goal to see 80 percent of RNs nationwide earn a baccalaureate degree by 2020. “To meet the more complex demands of today’s healthcare environment, the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice has recommended that at least two-thirds of the basic nurse workforce hold baccalaureate or higher degrees in nursing,” said Dr. Sheryl Steadman, dean of Westminster’s School of Nursing and Health Sciences. “There is ample research that indicates improved patient safety and more positive patient outcomes in facilities that have more baccalaureateprepared RNs.

Geology Major an Answer to National Industry Boom

DURING THE LAST decade, there has been a huge expansion of the fuel industry, resulting in a strong demand for mineral exploration. Geologist are now some of the most highly sought-after industry experts, both nationally and regionally. In response to this demand, Westminster has created a major in geology. “With all of its natural resources, Utah is a natural place for a geology major,” said Dr. David Goldsmith, Westminster geology professor and program chair. “Jobs in geology are abundant and well-paying—even with just a bachelor’s degree. As a result, there has been a huge increase in geology enrollment nationwide.”

Westminster Applies for NCAA Division II Membership

PRESIDENT BRIAN LEVIN-STANKEVICH announced that Westminster has accepted an invitation to join the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference and has applied for NCAA Division II membership. Westminster has been a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) since the 1950s. The decision to switch affiliation comes after a yearlong review of options that were presented at that time and is a result of a limited opportunity open to the college to join a conference that is expanding its membership. The board of trustees agreed that, strategically, the NCAA and RMAC are better long-term fits for the goals and aspirations they have for the college and its athletic department. It’s a move that will gain our student athletes more exposure.

Sixteen Student-Athletes Represent US in World University Games

THE WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES (WUG) United States snowboard team was comprised entirely of Westminster student-athletes. The 16 members of the team represented the US in Trentino, Italy, in December. The WUG, also known as Universiade, is second only in importance to the Olympic Games. Ten men and six women from Westminster received the prestigious invitation to compete in the WUG games because of their athletic achievements. The women’s team has taken the national title for five years running, and the men’s team placed second in nationals for those same five years. At the WUG in Italy, Mal Prior (‘14) placed third in the finals of half pipe.  Billy Wandling (‘14), Owen Golden (‘16), and Shaun Nakamine (‘15) advanced to semi-finals. In slopestyle, Jaime Vincent (‘16) landed in the finals for the women, and all four men were in the finals (Mal Prior, Billy Wandling, Aidan Melen, and Brolin Mawejje (‘15). Billy Wandling came home with the silver medal! “We were up against some of the best riders in the world. A lot of teams brought their Olympic teams and used this as an Olympic prep competition,” said Sara Beaudry, Westminster head snowboard coach. “We literally were lined up against Olympians, and I am beyond proud of how our team did.” And when Westminster’s snowboarders weren’t competing on the Italian slopes, they provided commentary of the event on CBS Sports.

Westminster Joins SkyWest Airlines Pilot Cadet Program

A NEW PARTNERSHIP with SkyWest Airlines offers opportunities for students earning their professional pilot degrees to become SkyWest Airlines first officers. Under the SkyWest Pilot Cadet Program, students who have earned flight operations degrees from Westminster and have been hired as flight instructors for the college are eligible to apply. They will not only be mentored by SkyWest captains, but will retain their SkyWest date-of-hire, assist with job fairs and outreach, and have a guaranteed pilot interview with the airline after qualifications are met. They must also maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average, complete advanced jet training courses, and attain the FAA ratings of Commercial Pilot/ Instrument and Multi-Engine, and Certified Flight Instructor/Instrument. ABOVE: CAPTAIN BEN LOWE ANNOUNCED THE SKYWEST/WESTMINSTER BRIDGE AGREEMENT AT LAST SPRING’S AVIATION AWARDS CEREMONY FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS.

MBA Student’s Company to Help Emerging Local Artists Eric Morley MBA (‘13) UNDERSTANDS that pursuing a career as an artist isn’t easy. After observing the challenges his partner, Marcus Gibby, faced with chasing his artistic dreams, Morley decided to take an approach to his new company that could leverage both his business acumen and Gibby’s artistic talents. And from there, Mod-a-go-go was born. “Mod a-go-go specializes in contemporary art, from new and emerging artists, paired with mid-century modern furniture,” said Morley. While pursuing his MBA, Morley gained the knowledge and tools to make his company a reality. He used Mod-a-go-go as a case study and solicited feedback from his peers. With the help of the college’s Center for Entrepreneurship, Morley was able to develop a business plan and strategy that helped him take the company to the next level. Their stylish shop is located at 242 E South Temple, or you can visit them online at modagogo.com.

MADELINE ALBRIGHT HONORS PRATIK RAGHU FOR A WINNING ESSAY

Former Secretary of State Madeline Albright presented Westminster College junior and Honors student Pratik Raghu (’15) with a $2,500 check in recognition of his winning essay for the statewide college student writing competition that runs in conjunction with the annual McCarthey lecture. The essay contest—open to all Utah college students—focused on the theme of “The role of independent journalism in diplomacy.” WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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NEWS & N OTES

BY THE NUMBERS

NEWS SHORTS

bon appétit

Westminster’s Unique BFA in Dance Debuts Fall 2014

The new campus restaurant company, Bon Appétit, has the strict sustainability standards we required. They opened to rave reviews from faculty, staff, and students. For more, see page 24.

“WE ARE ‘SEEKING students who dance in their dreams,’” says Associate Professor of Theatre, Nina Vought, as she describes the sort of students Westminster is targeting…and what the promotional materials now say. Nina is excited to be directing the new dance program that starts this fall. Limited to 16 students, Westminster’s BFA in dance is unique to Utah in that while the focus is on artistic achievement, it is achievement (and an eye-popping curriculum) that is framed by community cultural development, advanced technology (to prepare students for an arts future that will be increasingly digital), and a highly respected and widely known partner, the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company. If this dance degree sounds like it would be a perfect fit for an eager dancer you know, contact Nina Vought at 801.832.2439.

1,644

TRANSACTIONS OCCUR PER DAY AT THE CAFETERIA, ON AVERAGE.

450 to 500

78 GALLONS

EGGS AR E U S ED I N TH E CA MPU S K IT C H EN EAC H DAY.

O F C OF F E E A R E S E RV E D EAC H DAY O N CA M P U S B Y BO N A P P É T IT.

campus organic garden

Students are getting their hands dirty learning where food comes from, experiencing sustainable and organic gardening practices, and learning which came first, the chicken or the egg.

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Number of students who volunteered in the garden this growing season

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PLANT SPECIES

Hours of work the students who volunteered in the garden contributed

Giant Turtle Meets Dr. Barry Quinn

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NUMBER OF CHICKEN

NUMBER OF ACTIVE

SPECIES IN THE COOP

COMPOST BINS

TO BE PLANTED THIS YEAR

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THE CENTER FOR Financial Analysis (CFA) recently announced the installation of a new stock ticker and video boards that will provide business students with a more dynamic learning experience. The installation gives users access to real-time global market data, in-depth financial information, and historical economic data. “This is an exciting time and shows Westminster’s commitment to provide a state-of-the-art facility for students, alumni, and the community,” said Jonathan McKenzie, CFA director.

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The campus chickens lay 30 to 35 eggs a week in the summer and fall, and 14 to 16 eggs a week in the winter. NUMBER OF

Center for Financial Analysis Unveils New Technology

DON’T FORGET EARTH DAY, APRIL 22

LEGENDARY PROFESSOR EMERITUS (biology) and intrepid global traveler, Dr. Barry Quinn enjoyed a visit to the Galapagos Islands recently. As we see him carefully examining this giant Galapagos turtle, we can imagine that this very turtle could be one of the offspring of the turtle that inspired Darwin to consider the incredible diversity found on the islands.

Dr. Raquel (Gabbitas) Cowell (’08), a McNair Scholar, Begins a Tenure-track Position this Fall COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGIST Dr. Raquel (Gabbitas) Cowell is a 2008 alumna of Westminster College. In summer 2013, she completed her PhD in child psychology from the prestigious Institute for Child Development at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Cowell currently holds a postdoctoral research position at the University of Chicago; in fall 2014 she will begin a tenure-track faculty position at St. Norbert College in DePere, Wisconsin. We are all so very proud her accomplishments!

Lois Fitzgerald Takes to the Air, Again

WHEN LOIS WAS just seven, she remembers Lindbergh’s visit to the Salt Lake airport in celebration of his flight across the Atlantic. Learning to fly was still in the back of her mind when she became an air traffic controller in order to save money to take lessons while she was still at Westminster. When Francis Fitzgerald learned she had soloed, he was captivated and gave her flying lessons; she aced the flight test. They married, moved to California, and bought a BT 13, a trainer plane, which “Fitz” retrofitted to make room for their young son. Fast forward many decades and, on a recent flight to Ogden in a Westminster plane, Lois remembered landing at that airport many times. You can still see the love of flying in her expression.

MBA Student Launches Business, Provides Micro-Loans to Women in Developing Countries

COMBINING HER LOVE of baking and entertaining with her desire to be her own boss, Sherrita “Rita” Roberts Magalde, MBA (’14), created “Sheer Ambrosia,” a company that specializes in homemade baklava that is “truly food for the gods.” Magalde, an MBA student, started making baklava when she was 16 years old, after working for a Greek family who taught her to make gourmet desserts and pastries. “After finishing the first year of my MBA, I took Westminster’s ‘Lectures in Entrepreneurship’ series with Linda Muir and Michael Sutton, and they put a fire in my belly,” she said. “I felt like if I’m going to do this, if I’m serious, I really need to take this to the next level.” As part of its mission, Sheer Ambrosia is committed to allocating three percent of all net profits towards micro-loans to women in developing countries who need financing for their businesses, safe spaces to interact, and education.

WHEN WE’RE WRONG, WE’RE WRONG In a past issue of the Review, we had talked about how the Westminster crest—the one you see on the Westminster license plates, came to be in 1968. We explained that the quadrant of the crest containing heraldic lions had originally been inspired by the Lowenbrau beer lions. We stand corrected, thanks to Robert McCarthy (’68), who was part of that creative posse who designed the art for the crest. We now know that it was the Coors lions that provided the inspiration. Robert still proudly owns a beer mug that was created with the Westminster crest.

What’s Student Cody Reeder up to this Year? MARS?

YOU LAST MET physics major Cody Reeder (’15) in the Summer 2013 issue of this magazine, where he was the official Westminster beekeeper. Once again, Cody makes news, this time as a finalist for Mars One Project. Cody is one of 1,058 candidates selected from a worldwide total of 200,000. The list will be narrowed down to a final team of four. Currently, Cody is still studying physics at Westminster, and he is still the college’s beekeeper. Enjoy his very clever application video at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=tny2J2uzdt4. (And if you’d like to know more about beekeeping, check out his other videos.) Mars One plans a permanent human settlement on the red planet starting in 2024!

Alumnae Win Women Tech Awards

TWO WESTMINSTER ALUMNAE, Dayna Stevenson (’13) and Zlatina Todorov (MBA, (’11) were honored for their technical accomplishments during the sixth annual Women Tech Awards luncheon on September 12. Stevenson was presented the “Academic Excellence” award, and Todorov was presented the “Technical Excellence” award during the ceremony. Each year, the Women Tech Council (WTC) recognizes technology-focused women who are driving innovation, leading technology companies, and making key contributions to the community. Stevenson was among three student finalists, and Todorov was selected from among 17 finalists working in the technology field. A selection committee from the technology industry, venture, government, and professional communities selected the finalists and award winners. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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SPORTS ROUND-UP Griffins’ Success Continues

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The Westminster women’s soccer team made yet another run to the NAIA National Championships in 2013. After getting off to a 1–3 start to the campaign, the Griffins responded by closing with an 8–2–2 mark that included a run to the Unaffiliated Group Conference Tournament title. The season was anchored by a stretch of 430 minutes without allowing a goal over a fivegame span. The team came up 12 minutes short of an upset at Number 2 Westmont (California) in the opening round of the national tournament before falling in penalty kicks. Nicole Carter (’14) was named the Frontier Conference Player of the Year, while Jessica Harris (’14) earned the Unaffiliated Group Player of the Year award. Harris was also selected as an honorable mention NAIA All-American. Head Coach Tony LeBlanc (’05) was awarded the Unaffiliated Group Coach of the Year with Carter, Megan Molumby (’16), and Brianna Wilson (’14) making the conference all-star team.

MEN’S SOCCER

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The 2013 Westminster men’s soccer season was a series of highs and lows. After a 2–0 start to the campaign, the Griffins would see the record eventually finish at 9–11. They qualified for the Unaffiliated Group Conference Tournament, where they defeated Walla Walla (Washington) 6–1, in the quarterfinals, before falling 4–3 to Rocky Mountain (Montana) in the semi-finals. Manuel Dueñas (’15), Omar Jaimes (’14), and Ryan Smith (’14 ) were all named to both the Frontier Conference and Unaffiliated Group All-Conference teams. Lucas Matelich (’14) joined the three on the All-Frontier Conference squad. Smith finished 36th in the NAIA with 14 goals, including eight in the team’s final four games.

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1. ALEXIS AALONA (’15) 2. EMILY ATKINSON (’14) 3. JESSICA HARRIS (’14) 4. LEXI SINO (’14) 5. MANUEL DUEÑAS (’15) 6. RYAN SMITH (’14)

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The number of trips to the NAIA National Championships made in the track and field career of OLIVER LANGE (’13), including his trip in 2013.

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The number of Westminster studentathletes selected as a NAIA–Daktronics NAIA–Scholar-Athlete during the fall sports season. WOMEN’S SOCCER led all Westminster teams with nine selections.

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The final position of OLIVER LANGE (’13) at the NAIA National Championships, a school best and 43 positions better than his 2012 appearance.

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The school-record total of service aces by senior EMILY ATKINSON (’14) during her Westminster volleyball career. She also recorded 3,693 assists in her career, also a school record.

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL The Westminster women’s volleyball team compiled a 17–14 overall record and they finished fourth in the Frontier Conference by going 10–6 in league matches. The Griffins closed the season with wins in six of their final eight matches, including a 3–2 win over then-Number 24 Montana State–Northern to hand them their only conference loss of the season. The Frontier Conference selected Alexis Aalona (’15) and Mayra Ramirez (’17) as first team all-conference performers. Jovana Sisovic (’15) was named to the second team by the conference. During the season Emily Atkinson (’14) became the school’s all-time leader in both assists and service aces, while Kyndall Kordakis (’14) set the career record for digs.

SNOWBOARDING TEAM RAGES INTO 2014 The 2014 season looks to be an exciting one for the Griffin Snowboarders as they look to make it a sixth-repeat for the Women’s National Collegiate Championship and finally take the men’s team title as well. With 16 returning riders the team is strong and full of talent. This year’s team includes Senior Mal Prior (’14), two-time men’s overall National Champion who is hoping to win it for a third time his senior year. The team boasts five women’s team all-Americans and four men’s team all-Americans. Junior snowboarder, Phil Hessler (’15), says, “Everyone on the

KEY SPRING MATCHUPS 3

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3 team throws down. I couldn’t be more stoked to ride with such good snowboarders and friends every day.” The men’s team has won the runner-up National championship team title for the same five years the women have won it all. Last year they barely missed the top spot on the podium, but have their sites set high this year. Sophomore rider and first-team all-American Grant Giller (’16) won the National Championship in slopestyle last year and has high hopes for this year’s team. “Our performance last year at nationals was incredible, but we didn’t win the championship. This year we are going to get it. We are coming through. We are ready,” he said.

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3

4

4

4

4

1,937

The number of career digs recorded by KYNDALL KORDAKIS (’14) in her Westminster volleyballl career. The school’s all-time leader in the category finished with 637 digs in 2013.

16

The number o riders from the WESTMINSTER COLLEGE SNOWBOARD TEAM invited to represent the USA at the World University Games in Trentino, Italy, in December 2013

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8

13

March 6 – Men’s lacrosse opened the 2014 home season against Utah Valley. March 8 – The Women’s lacrosse home opener against Utah State resulted in a 20–5 win for the Griffins.

March 13 – Arizona took the Griffins to overtime in a Men’s lacrosse game that ended in a 10–11 loss.

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March 21 – Women’s lacrosse welcomed in-state rival BYU to Dumke Field.

28

March 28 – Outdoor track competed at the Utah Valley University meet in Orem.

4

April 4 – Another Women’s lacrosse in-state rival, Utah, visits Dumke Field.

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April 5 – Men’s lacrosse faces Utah on Senior Day.

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11

April 6 – Women’s lacrosse plays UCLA in its final home game of the season.

April 11 – Outdoor track participates in the Utah Spring Classic at the University of Utah.

BY SARA BEAUDRY

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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FACE S OF W ES T MINSTER

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ELREE HARRIS, PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH LITERATURE ELREE HARRIS IS COMMITTED TO SOLVING THE MYSTERY OF HOW THE SHAKESPEARE’S HEROINES PRINTS CAME TO WESTMINSTER. SHE ENCOURAGES ALUMNI AND

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WESTMINSTER REVIEW

THE HEROINE FILES

ELREE HARRIS’ s Shakespearean Research Quest Takes Westminster with Her Into Retirement BY AUTUMN THATCHER, MPC (’15)

D

r. elree harris has spent

ADAM FI N KLE

the last 25 years teaching English literature at Westminster, and as she prepares to retire from her beloved profession, the award-winning professor is on a mission to find answers to a research project that has had her digging in libraries across the globe. Well over a decade ago, an eager student insisted that Elree visit the then Nightingale Library to look at a series of black-andwhite prints depicting leading ladies from Shakespeare’s works. Upon first glance at the prints, Elree fell in love. She noticed the publication date of 1888 but was more intrigued by the signatures in pencil at the bottom of the prints. An expert on Victorian art (Elree published a book on women painters of the Victorian age), Elree was excited by the names she discovered: John Waterhouse, Val Princep, and Charles Perugini—to name a few. “These were all household names at the time,” Elree explains. This launched the research project that has consumed the last 10 years of Elree’s career. Her persistent research, aided and encouraged by Westminster alumna Sara Mortensen (’13), led Elree to discover that the prints were commissioned in the mid-

Not grading papers. I will most miss the students and staff. FAVORITE AUTHOR TO TEACH? Only one? It’s a RETIREMENT PERKS:

1880s by The Graphic magazine—a popular London-based art magazine. The publication selected famous artists to paint a heroine from one of Shakespeare’s plays, then had the colored paintings copied onto plates by the Goupil Gallery of London. The magazine turned the colored prints over to Christie’s for an auction in 1889 and went on with its planned publication of the black-and-white prints. It was London publisher Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington who issued the book: Shakespeare’s Heroines. Through grants provided by Westminster, Elree has traveled to England to research in the British Library, where she found one of the original books comprising all 21 prints, and to the California State Library in Sacramento. Thus far, Elree has found three copies of the book in its entirety—none of which contain signed copies of the prints. She hopes that a Westminster alumna/us will read this story and have a memory of seeing a print maybe hanging on an English professor’s wall or perhaps a classmate’s wall. “Anything would be something,” Elree says, encouraging anyone with a memory of the prints to contact her. After retiring in May, Elree will take another trip to the British Library to continue her quest to solve this Shakespearean mystery.

toss-up among Oscar Wilde, Charles Dickens, and Neil Gaiman. FAVORITE FOOD? Samphire.

ANYONE WHO MIGHT HAVE A LEAD ON WHERE THESE PRINTS CAME FROM AND WHERE THE OTHERS MAY BE TO CONTACT HER AT EHARRIS@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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FACES O F WE S T MI N S T ER

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THE SEASONED ADMINISTRATOR

New Enrollment VP Came via Biology to the Higher Ed Biz BY JESSICA SMITH (’14)

M

ost students travel no farther than 500

SECRET AGENT

He held a similar job that also included student-life supervision at the American College in Athens. FAVORITE MOVIE

Being There ( with Peter Sellers). MOST LIKELY TO ENJOY JOHN BAWOROWSKY, ENROLLMENT VICE PRESIDENT

Speaking in front of a group.

miles to go to college. But the life of a professional enrollment expert ranges further afield. Westminster’s new VP, John Baworowsky, PhD, moved more than 700 miles to the Salt Lake Valley from San Rafael, California, to bring his skills to the college. His first impression of Westminster was the pride that people have in the college. From student engagement to the campus connection to Sugar House, he recognized that the potential here was huge. It didn’t hurt that the college has great curb appeal, too. Now that he’s here, though, in the words of Dr. Baworowsky’s mother, what exactly does he do? He creates relationships that build pipelines: meeting with high school counselors and spreading the word about how students succeed at Westminster. He analyzes data about student applications, student retention, etc. He stops trying to explain the details and provides a bigger picture: he challenges people in different areas to do what they can, where they are, for the college’s enrollment. While Dr. Baworowsky was brought on to work with Westminster’s enrollment, he also sees his job as making sure that the Westminster community advocates for itself. Find yourself talking to someone in line at the grocery store? Put in a good word for the college. Even Dr. Baworowsky didn’t know that his job was a job when he was an undergraduate. He may have spent his classroom time earning a bachelor’s degree in biology, but his extracurriculars were all about campus involvement. When an administrator pointed out that he could pursue a career in higher education, he was hooked. When he visited as a candidate, he learned that writing is integrated into Westminster’s science curriculum, and he was impressed. From his own liberal arts experience, he knows that great communication skills are the common denominator to success. Dr. Baworowsky is joining Westminster on the eve of its new strategic plan, and he’s excited to contribute. Much like the way he approaches enrollment management across the college, he sees the liberal arts as a way to understand the interconnectedness that we all find in our daily lives.

FROM GREECE TO THE MIDWEST, JOHN BAWOROWSKY BRINGS A WEALTH OF ENROLLMENT EXPERIENCE TO WESTMINSTER,.

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NANCY PANOS-SCHMITT, MARKETING PROFESSOR, WITH THE LEGENDARY WALL

LEGENDARY MARKETING PROF ABIDES It’s the People that Make Westminster Great BY JESSICA SMITH (’14)

TH IS PAGE AN D OPPOSITE: ADAM FI N KLE

N

ancy panos schmitt came to Westminster

in her 20s, but she’ll tell you she grew up here. She’ll lean in when she says it. When you ask her about the trip, she’ll hold her hands up, look left to right, like she’s got her emotions in her palms for you to see. And in that gesture, you do see it: the unexpectedness and happiness of it all. Nancy is good at school, so she did school. One bachelor’s in biology, one in philosophy, a master’s in genetics, then the start of a PhD program in genetics. When she moved to Utah, she enrolled in an MBA to pass the time until she resumed her PhD studies. She became intrigued by a realization in her accounting class: people got concrete answers to questions. She stuck with the program. After earning her MBA, she got a call about a little school down the road that was starting a marketing program that needed her help. She joined Alan Rogers to build the department. They had one month to create a curriculum, but decided to stay for two years. After all, the college really needed their help...then they’d move on to what

they were “really going to do.” Thirty years later, she works beside a magnificent bookshelf/wall of international soda cans. She’s been remembered in more countries than she knows, and each time the collection grows by one. She doesn’t plan to pass it on. She’ll let someone else deal with it after her term at Westminster comes to a close (which is no time soon, she says). Until then, she considers her success in terms of her students, watching them as they move through college into careers across the nation. She also moves them right back into the classroom—as guest speakers. Nancy isn’t shy about bringing in guest speakers or using outside resources to enhance what she’s teaching. She’ll tell you about engaged learning, the way that liberal arts leads to a breadth of inquiry. But before all that, she’ll tell you about the people at Westminster. “I thought I’d be here for two years,” she says. “That is a testament to this place, and the people here make this place.”

LEAST LIKELY

To sing in public FAVORITE MOVIE American Beauty; recent, American Hustle CONTINUALLY INSPIRED BY

Vince Lombardi

NANCY PANOS SCHMITT IS OFTEN THE FIRST PERSON MENTIONED IN THE SAME BREATH AS THE “GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS.” WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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I

magine looking at your desktop and controlling your computer with the power of your thoughts—no keyboard, phone, or mouse involved. Twenty years ago, this concept was science fiction. However, in 2014, the idea doesn’t seem so far-fetched. Working together with a group of fellow undergraduates and faculty members, Westminster senior and neuroscience major Chrono Nu is attempting to construct a brain-computer interface (BCI) using artificial intelligence and electroencephalography (EEG) that will “fully operate any normal computer with only your brain.” Yeah. It’s Star Trek stuff. “The general idea of any brain-computer interface is that you are reading some kind of signal that’s emitted from the brain, and you use it to do something, whether it’s controlling a computer, robot, or something electrical,” said Nu. “With ours, we’re trying to code very, very specific kinds of movement—that being each of the 10 fingers—then trying to interpret brain signals related to how you shift your eyes in a small dimension of space. In turn, we would use those signals to operate a common computer.” Nu’s project is called the “EggLink Project,” and the group of highly intelligent, motivated team members of the “EggLink Team” include two fellow McNair scholars Hailey Edwards and

MEMBERS OF THE EGGLINK PROJECT STAND AT THE GATEWAY TO A REALM OF ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE, SUPERCOMPUTING, AND REALLY UGLY MATH­—EEG BRAIN SCANNER AT THE READY.

EGGLINK PROJECT: THINKING KEYSTROKES An Ingenious Band of Students Sets Out to Change the World BY KRISTA DEANGELIS

INTERESTED IN MAKING A TAX-DEDUCTIBLE GIFT TO SUPPORT THIS GROUNDBREAKING WORK?

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WESTMINSTER REVIEW

Katie Mullen; Westminster senior Ben Cohen; and two faculty members, Dr. Russ Costa in neuroscience and Dr. Richard Wellman, a mathematics professor. “Because of the scope of the project, Chrono needed to build an interdisciplinary team, not just neuroscience people,” said Dr. Costa. “This is very much a student-led and student-driven project. It’s a field I’m interested in for theoretical reasons, but I never really would have started a large research project given that it’s more difficult from a mathematical, engineering, computer science perspective than what we typically ask of our science seniors… most don’t have the computer science or mathematics background to pull off a project like this, but Chrono does.” In theory, the process of EggLink seems relatively simple: an EEG electrode net is placed on a subject’s head, the subject is then asked to perform specific movements (moving right hand, left hand), and the team records the EEG signals that indicate various kinds of brain activity. The signals are then processed through a supercomputer that interprets those signals and determine whether the subject moved his right hand or left hand, etc. “Brain waves are very random looking and impossible to visually interpret,” explained Nu. “So the idea is that with a sophisticated computer-learning, artificialintelligence algorithm and the right kind of math to back up the theory of what you’re doing, you can take these very ugly waves and interpret them in ways that actually reveal what your brain is doing.” According to Nu, most researchers who are designing similar systems, whether for gaming or other purposes, have proprietary systems custom-built just for them. “You could never just plug one into your office computer or something, but that’s what we’re trying to do,” he said. “We want to make these very sophisticated movement and signal analyses, then apply them to operate on any computer, so that becomes an accessible form of technology.”

NEUROSCIENTIST HAILEY EDWARDS DEMONSTRATES THE HIGH-FASHION APPEAL OF BRAINCOMPUTER INTERFACING.

“Take people who are completely paralyzed from the neck down: if they imagine moving the way they used to, just thinking about it, we’ll be able to read those same signals, whether or not they can, so from that is granted the opportunity to allow these people to re-engage in functional lives.”

The altruistic possibilities could be endless. “When we considered how functional the system could be and what it could do, the obvious application would be that you could play a game, type, etc., but we were trying to think of a way to really make it stand out,” said Nu. “Most BCI researchers have one very specific target community— the medical community with paralyzed, locked-in amputees, people who can’t normally interact with the world—so we immediately started orienting all of the functionality and underlying processing and things that we’d have to work on around helping somebody who can’t move at all, and that is the threshold that we are trying to meet.” “The reason this [system] can potentially work is that assuming that you were born with functional limbs, but lost 10 fingers in the Iraqi War, the brain signals and activity that go on when you move your hands are the same whether or not you’ve got your hands. Take people who are completely paralyzed from the neck down: if they imagine moving the way they used to, just thinking about it, we’ll be able to read those same signals, whether or not they can, so from that is granted the opportunity to allow these people to re-engage in functional lives,” he added. While the benefits of such a program are clear, the funding for the EggLink venture is not. Much of the equipment required for such research and development of EggLink is expensive, so the team has looked to crowdfund the initial $62,000 through Kickstarter. If the team is not able to acquire the funds, the future for the project may be uncertain. “There’s a point where we’ll simply have to say all right, this hasn’t worked, let’s try for the simpler ideas,” added Nu. “That’s kind of the idea I had for the Kickstarter (campaign)­—if that doesn’t work, we’ll just have to try something else…maybe we’ll have to just make the EggLink Beta version or something like that.”

PLEASE CONTACT LISA ACTOR AT 801.832.2731 OR LACTOR@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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TRAV EL

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CLOCKWISE: MAY TERM GANG AT THE CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. “MITTENS” AT MONUMENT VALLEY, AND GAMES WITH THE LOCAL CHILDREN. HIKING CANYON DE CHELLY.

PASSION INSPIRES SCHOLARSHIPS FOR MAYTERM “You Learn About Yourself and How to Leave Your Comfort Zone” BY JOANNA PHAM (’13)

A

long with being a dedicated student, well-

spoken, and just Houston-Texas-sweet, ASWC’s current student body president, Brian Fredrich (’14), is an avid traveler. Over a cup of coffee, Brian and I gushed about the importance and, well, enjoyment of traveling. Together, we agreed that to travel

to a foreign land is to be brave. It requires one to ask questions. It also requires one to be willing to fail. In our interview, Brian says, “Traveling makes you more empathetic. It allows you to look through a different lens—going into all parts of the world. You learn about yourself and how to leave your comfort zone.” Having taken two Westminster May Term Study Abroad trips

WESTMINSTER AND STUDENT GOVERNMENT ARE LAUNCHING THE FIRST-EVER FUND TO HELP STUDENTS TRAVEL

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to South Africa and the Hopi and Navajo reservations, Brian can truly say that traveling—especially as a student—can change and inspire a person. It was this mindset that motivated him to generously donate his ASWC stipend of about $8,000 toward a May Term Scholarship. Being in a college environment, we’ve all witnessed it: students eating Top Ramen or something Ramen-esque three to four times a week. When it’s hard enough to pay for classes, textbooks, and laundry, the thought of travel expenses is somewhat unnerving. Brian saw this and recognized the need for financial aid and scholarships for students to have the opportunity to travel and study abroad. With the aid of Institutional Advancement, Brian, members of the ASWC Senate, and donors helped establish funds that would later go to about 14 scholarships. With a put-your-money-where-yourmouth-is kind of attitude, Brian donated his entire stipend—hoping that his effort to give back would, as he states it, “catch fire.” This May Term, Westminster will offer 11 study-abroad trips.

Among other places, students will get to travel to countries such as Austria, Colombia, India, Ireland, Poland, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Thailand, and—as I type in awe and absolute jealousy—Cuba. Thanks to Brian and many other donors, more of our Top Rameneating students will have the opportunity to explore a few of those destinations. As students in a foreign place, they will have the chance to be brave, ask questions, and be willing to (at times) fail. Not only will they get a chance to have and create invaluable learning experiences—they’ll be closer to affording it. Brian hopes that other students will come back from their May Term Study Abroad trips with new and favorite experiences. By planting a seed, he also hopes that other students will experience May Term and, in turn, be motivated and inspired to give back. At the end of our conversation, I asked where Brian saw his next destination. He mentioned Australia and Slovenia and that, ultimately, the list is endless. As it should be.

MAY TERM 2014 CLASSES THAT INCLUDE A ONE TO THREE-WEEK TRAVEL COMPONENT HOPI AND NAVAJO CULTURES NORTHERN ARIZONA AND SOUTHERN UTAH

Students are introduced to Hopi and Navajo peoples. The course includes social, educational, environmental, political, economic, artistic, health, and caring aspects of the cultures. CHINA: ANCIENT AND MODERN HONG KONG, BEIJING, THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA, TIANANMEN SQUARE, THE FORBIDDEN CITY, XI’AN (THE TERRA COTTA WARRIORS), AND SHANGHAI

China’s economy has seen remarkable growth in the last two decades. It will eventually rival that of the US, and it continues to be one of our most important trading partners and creditors. IRISH HISTORY, FILM, AND LANGUAGE DUBLIN (CHRIST CHURCH, TRINITY COLLEGE, AND KILMAINHAM

Students will attend a poetry slam by John Walsh and visit Coole Park and the Aran Islands, as well as other historical landmarks.

providers, incorporating their public health/medical/cultural Spanish vocabulary. They will also travel through Bogotá to Villa de Layva, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

NORWAY AND SWEDEN

INDIA: SCIENCE EDUCATION &

GAOL), CORK, AND GALWAY

A REAL-WORLD GENDER UTOPIA?

SERVICE LEARNING

Students will be exposed to gender equality issues from a cross-cultural and historical perspective, as they meet women leaders working on issues central to women’s lives in the areas of politics, higher education, and the non-profit and corporate worlds.

The course includes on-campus classes and an intensive servicelearning project in Wai, India, and surrounding areas where Westminster has been developing partnerships with schools. The partnership extends to a school for students with disabilities.

SERVICE-LEARNING IN

THE LESSONS OF NAZI

COLUMBIA

SCIENCE

programs constitute a major theme for the course. SERVICE-LEARNING IN THAILAND

The course explores global citizenship and responsibility in the 21st century by understanding the education, health, and developmental needs of rural Thai citizens, as well as of indigenous populations, through cultural immersion and active participation in service projects designed to benefit the local peoples. MISPERCEPTIONS OF CUBA

PERSPECTIVES ON CULTURE, GLOBAL HEALTH, AND SPANISH

The course provides cultural immersion and service-learning opportunities to explore rural and urban health needs, as students work alongside local health care

The course includes a trip from Prague through Poland, Austria, and northern Italy, visiting important sites of Nazi human/biomedical and physical science programs. Cultural politics, ethics, and the societal implication of the research

Students confront their misconceptions through the lens of environmental science and policy, politico-economics, music and dance, and culture. Students will explore themes such as how the US embargo and collapse of the Soviet Union resulted in Cuba becoming a world leader in organic farming.

L DURING MAY TERM. IF YOU’D LIKE TO HELP, CALL 801.832.2825 OR SDEMKO@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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OLYMPIANS: 23,MEDALS: 4, PRIDE: INFINITE. Westminster Brings Home Gold BY ARIKKA VON, MSC (’15)

A

n astonishing 23 Westminster students competed in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi—10 percent of the entire US team. Four of our current students reached the medals podium, and three former* students won medals as well. “It takes immense dedication to compete at such a high level. That kind of focus is inspirational to our entire campus,” said Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich, president of Westminster College. “We thoroughly enjoy working with these elite athletes and being part of their success off the slopes.” Westminster and the US Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA) recently renewed a partnership that has provided a college education to more than 100 national team athletes since 2005. The tuition grant program allows the athletes to combine elite-level training with higher education. “Westminster’s an awesome program. I’m super appreciative that they’ve given me this opportunity. It’s probably the best sponsorship that I’ll ever get in my entire life,” said bronze medal winner, Alex Deibold. With more students in the Winter Games than any other college or university in the nation, Westminster and its 23 students grabbed headlines nationwide, and the campus followed the progress of each of the athletes online. It was a joyous occasion celebrated in the hallways, classrooms, and offices all over campus when we learned another one of our Olympians was doing amazing things. Congratulations, Griffins! HERE’S THE BREAKDOWN

Maddie Bowman

Kaitlyn Farrington*

Joss Christensen

Jonathan Midol*

Alex Deibold

Vic Wild*

Gold in ski halfpipe

Gold in ski slopestyle

FROM THE ENDLESS WORK OF A WAX TECH IN VANCOUVER TO THE GLORY OF A BRONZE MEDALIST IN SOCHI, ALEX DIEBOLD IS AN INSPIRATION TO BOARDERS (AND SKIERS) EVERYWHERE.

Bronze in snowboardcross

Devin Logan

Silver in ski slopestyle

Gold in snowboard halfpipe Bronze (France) in skicross  old (Russia) in snowboard G giant slalom *former Westminster students

THROUGH A SPECIAL TUITION GRANT PROGRAM, WESTMINSTER IS THE OFFICIAL PARTNER OF HIGHER EDUCATION TO THE

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2014 WESTMINSTER ATHLETES IN SOCHI ALEX DIEB OLD

men’s snowboard cross Bronze medalist Freshman

BRYAN FLET CHER

nordic combined

MADDI E B OWMAN

woman’s ski halfpipe Gold medalist Sophomore

DE VI N LO G AN

woman’s ski slopestyle Silver medalist Freshman

TAYLOR F LE TCH E R

JOS S CHRIS TENS EN

men’s ski slopestyle

Gold medalist Freshman

JES S IE DIGG INS

cross country Sophomore

JU LIA FORD

alpine skiing

Freshman

nordic combined

T RAVIS G ANONG

JARE D G OLDBE RG

FAYE GU LINI

Freshman

Freshman

Sophomore

alpine skiing

Freshman

alpine skiing

Freshman

snowboardcross

JACKI E HERNAN DEZ

LI N D S E Y JACOBELLI S

JES S IKA JENSON

Freshman

Freshman

Freshman

snowboardcross

JES S ICA JEROM E

ski jumping Junior

HEAT H ER MCPHIE

snowboardcross

TORI N KO O S

cross-country skiing

Master of Professional Communication

E LI Z A O U TTRI M

moguls

moguls

LEAN NE S M IT H

MARCO S U LLI VAN

Sophmore

Freshman

Junior

alpine skiing

Freshman

alpine skiing

snowboard slopestyle

M EGAN MCJAM ES

alpine

Freshman

BRITA S IGOU RNEY

ski halfpipe Junior

JACQU ELINE WILES

alpine skiing Freshman

US SKI AND SNOWBOARD ASSOCIATION (USSA). OUR STUDENT-ATHLETES EXCEL AT IT ALL, MAINTAINING A 3.5 AVERAGE GPA. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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From the Classroom to the Garden, Food Culture is Alive at Westminster. B Y A U T U M N T H AT C H E R , M P C ( ’ 1 5 ) P O RT R A I T S B Y A D A M F I N K L E F O O D P H OTO G R A P H Y BY H E I D I L A RS E N

OD RULES FR O M VO R AC IO U S S T U D EN T S trying to eat healthy and thoughtful-

ly to foodie faculty employing empirical techniques to create amazing food education, Westminster is thinking about food. You’ll find an organic garden, campus chickens and bees, a raw-food class, and a slow food movement started by students. Faculty and staff members engage students in food education. Science students switch out their lab coats for oven mitts in the Chemistry and Society class. During the warmth of May, students can find three professors in Meldrum Science Center teaching the science of brewing beer. Two theatre professors offer classes to educate students on how to really enjoy food and to know where it comes from. Westminster’s new onsite restaurant company, Bon Appétit, uses local and organic foods to provide thoughtfully crafted and healthy meals that encourage students to leave the college cliché of dorm room pizza behind and eat well. In a world of homogenous chain restaurants, factory farms, and childhood obesity, the Westminster community is taking a different path and walking the talk that we are, indeed, what we eat.

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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A LITTLE KNOWLEDGE GOES A LONG WAY ustainable Food and Garden Coordinator for the Environmental Center IDEANA CARRASCO is a junior on a pre-med track while majoring in environmental science. Armed with a bubbly personality and an extensive knowledge of food, Ideana is on a mission to educate her peers on how to become environmentally active. In addition to overseeing Westminster’s community garden, helping to care for the Griffin chickens, and running a campus-wide walking farm stand in the fall, Ideana is responsible for organizing cooking classes to provide students with easy-to-make, healthy meals. The monthly cooking classes began three years ago. Along with encouraging the Westminster community to become engaged in cooking seasonal, local, and organic meals, the classes allow students to practice the craft of cooking quick meals for themselves—a life skill that is as important to the college experience as the classroom. “We [teach] meals that are accessible to college students— those that are cheap and inspire folks to go back home and cook more of their own foods (and consume less-processed foods) and foods that build that connection with what they’re nourishing their bodies with three times a day,” explains Ideana. The cooking classes—also open to faculty and staff—incorporate recipes using seasonal ingredients that are readily accessible. The class is open to 20–25 participants and costs only $2. For those who would rather not pay the sign-up fee, a scholarship option is available. “We try to prepare enough food for the class, as well as enough food for people to take home. Registrants are encouraged to bring a container to take leftovers,” says Ideana. As Ideana and her colleagues in the Environmental Center look to the future, one of their immediate goals is to work with onsite restaurant company, Bon Appétit, to determine foods to grow in the campus garden that can be used for menus for the spring, summer, and fall. Ideana hopes students will take advantage of the many resources on campus and educate others on what they have learned. “There are very easy, tangible ways and choices that individuals can make to help mitigate or alleviate some of the huge issues we are going to see coming from our food system. By using these resources and being educated, you can make really impactful decisions that are beneficial for everyone.”

S

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IDEANA’S RECIPES

FOR STUDENTS ON-THE-GO Almond Butter and Honey Sandwich

No-Bake Energy Bites

It seems like such a staple in a busy college student’s diet, but this spin on a PB&J is more flavorful and healthful: almond butter and honey sandwich with cinnamon, banana slices, (sometimes) and chia seeds. Ideally, the almond butter would be natural (if possible, organic); the honey would be raw/ organic and/or local, like Coxland or Miller’s Honey; and the bread would be whole grain, preferably free of preservatives, and corn syrup, and organic or local. Try sprouted grains, if you’re interested!

This is a great versatile snack or small meal with tons of different flavors available, but the basic recipe is as follows: 1 cup dried rolled oats 2/3 cup coconut flakes 1/2 cup peanut butter 1/2 cup ground flaxseed 1/2 cup chocolate chips 1/2 cup honey 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract. Mix all ingredients together, refrigerate for 1/2 hour, then roll into balls. Store refrigerated in airtight containers.

EAT WELL, STRESS LESS usband and wife faculty duo MICHAEL AND NINA VOUGHT have been involved in the Westminster theatre program since 1995. The pair emanate life experience and wisdom that allow for students to feel comfortable in approaching them with random food and health questions. The Voughts are eager to answer questions surrounding healthy eating, and Nina is not hesitant to offer a beautiful piece of produce to support her advice. “Theatre has been our vocation, but we have always felt that food was our avocation,” says Michael, who has been the chair of the theatre program for more than 18 years. The food enthusiasts began incorporating healthier eating into their lifestyles more than 30 years ago, after reading a book by John Robbins called Diet for a New America. The Voughts were inspired by the book on many levels—but in particular, they were shocked to learn that how a person eats affects the environment. “Not eating one pound of beef saves more water than not showering for one year,” Michael explains. “Every person who is a vegetarian saves more than an acre of rain forest a year in terms of it not being cut down.” The Voughts want to impart knowledge on how food can positively affect students during times of stress—and, for theatre students in particular, how eating right can be a lifesaver for the stage. In doing this, they are careful to stay away from labels such as vegan or vegetarian. “We have always thought that performing is a lot like an athletic event. You need to prepare yourself the way an athlete would. There is a lot of stress that goes on before you perform and during a performance. There is so much stress associated with this sort of profession that we thought, ‘let’s help the students be healthier so that they have some resiliency,’” says Nina. The idea for teaching a food-based class came to the Voughts on a road trip to California after they had been approached by students who were curious about how the couple ate. As Michael drove, Nina took notes, and soon the Ecological Eating class was ready to roll—and was met with immediate success. Now, years later, the class fills up so quickly that Nina says you have to get in early. The Voughts also teach a class called Eating Evolution, in which they educate students on where their food is coming from and how what they choose to eat affects

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The Voughts advise buying as close to the earth as possible. This means organic food such as oranges, almonds, cashews, and any other types of fruit or vegetable that have not been sprayed with pesticide. the planet. What they pay particular attention to is making sure students understand that changing the way in which they eat is a process, one that has taken the Voughts 30 years to get to where they are in their dietary lifestyle and which they anticipate will always be evolving. “Our goal isn’t to make you vegan or to make you this or that, but to make you a conscious eater to where you are aware of what you are putting in your body. You’re making choices that are moving you along that continuum toward a more healthy and sustainable diet,” explains Michael. “What I would say to people who want to be healthier is eat whole food. Eat more plants,” says Nina. Michael adds, “What we try to do is root for a healthy, sustainable, plant-based diet, so that we’re all moving toward better eating.”

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Bon Appétit prescribes ethical consumption of food: no hormone-fed beef or milk is allowed, and the company is an industry leader in taking a stand against GMO crops and battery-farmed chicken and eggs.

CHEF POWELL WHIPS UP SOME PORK MEDALLIONS ROBERT WITH BUTTERMILKWHIPPED YUKON GOLD POTATOES AND WILTED GARLIC SPINACH...AND YOU CAN, TOO.

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THE ACCIDENTAL EXECUTIVE CHEF nlikely as it may sound, DOUG POWELL wound up in the kitchen because he bailed on a high school English class and had to take an incomplete. You’d never imagine he had slacked off in English classes by the way he writes or talks or cooks—all of which he does in a rambunctious, galloping style, laced with precision. Chef Powell is the executive chef for Bon Appétit, Westminster’s onsite restaurant company—and we have an English teacher and her husband to thank. In typical high school fashion, Powell figured he’d compensate for the incomplete by getting a job as a dishwasher. However, when the restaurant owner/ husband informed his English teacher/wife whom he had hired, she wouldn’t hear of it. She had her husband promote Doug to a fry cook, because he was “too smart to wash dishes.” Some guys have all the luck. The fast-paced pirate attitude fostered in the kitchen hooked the native New Yorker, so he set his sights on the legendary Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Twenty-two intense months later, with skills refined, he graduated with the designation “Executive Chef,” and he has loved every minute of his profession since then.

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Last year when a restaurant where he was working closed, he checked out Bon Appétit (BA), having heard that it was a chef-driven operation. Now he can determine any menu, as long as the food is within budget and complies with BA’s rigorous sustainability standards. He claims, “It’s like operating a restaurant in a corporate/school setting.” He’s very picky about the fundamentals (the right way to make stocks, soups, sauces, etc.) and proper technique. Powell says, “When you have those mastered, then you can foster your creativity and play with fun ingredients and toys.” Powell says there are no shortcuts: no canned prepared foods or precooked products in his kitchen, “We believe food isn’t just for nourishment: it’s a celebration of the good things our planet provides…and it helps bring us together as people.” BA prescribes ethical consumption of food: no hormone-fed beef or milk is allowed, and the company leads the industry in taking a stand against GMO crops and batteryfarmed chicken and eggs. It also sources from local farmers and meat producers. Westminster’s students who operate the organic garden coordinate with Powell to grow vegetables and herbs for use in daily operations, while BA supplies the garden with compost for the organic garden production. — R O B I N B O O N

We asked Powell to share a recipe with readers that was quick, delicious, and easy to prepare. This recipe has some pro tips that are very helpful, even for the experienced cook.

Pork Medallions Robert with ButtermilkWhipped Yukon Gold Potatoes and Wilted Garlic Spinach Serves 2

FOR THE PORK

Avoid using olive oil for sautéed dishes. It has a low smoking point and develops a “sour” smell when it overheats. Canola is an ideal oil for this type of preparation as it has a higher smoking point and a neutral flavor.

heat and add shallots. Sauté until translucent. Deglaze pan with white wine, reducing by half. Add demi-glace and mustard, reducing slightly. Add pork back into pan, finish cooking 2–3 minutes. Remove pan from heat. Swirl in butter until dissolved. Set aside in warm place for plating.

PRO TIP

62  -oz pork medallions (use pork loin or boneless center-cut pork chops), pounded thin ½ C flour Salt and pepper 4 oz canola oil 1 T. minced shallot 4 oz white wine 4o  z demi-glace (made previously; see recipe below) 1 tsp good-quality Dijon mustard 1 l arge pat of softened unsalted butter In a large sauté pan, heat canola oil on medium-high heat until you can see it “shimmer.” Turn heat down slightly. Mix 2 pinches each salt and pepper with flour. Dredge 3 pork medallions in flour and lay in sauté pan from front to back, being careful not to allow oil to splash up on your hand. Pork should sizzle when it hits the pan; if not, turn heat up slightly. Let medallions sauté on one side until golden brown. Carefully turn medallions over to finish sautéing. Remove from pan and place on plate lined with paper towels to absorb excess oil. Repeat sequence with remaining three medallions, adding more oil to pan as necessary. Drain all but 1 oz of oil from pan. Put back on medium

FOR THE WHIPPED POTATOES

Never overmix whipped or mashed potatoes. Always mix when very hot. Overmixing or attempting to mix cold potatoes causes the potato starch to stretch out and creates a gummy, unpleasant taste. PRO TIP

8 medium-sized Yukon Gold potatoes 1 C buttermilk 2 oz unsalted butter Salt and pepper Cut Yukon potatoes in half with skin on. Steam or boil until soft. Place in bowl or mixer. In small saucepan, heat buttermilk and butter until hot. Add to potatoes and mix until smooth (Note: skin will still be apparent, but you don’t want to have lumps of potatoes). Season with salt and pepper to taste. Cover and set aside in a warm place for plating.

SPINACH INGREDIENTS

Leafy vegetables don’t need much cooking time. “Wilting” allows them to attain a cooked appearance, without affecting the color, texture, or nutritional value. Let the heat of the pan and steam from deglazing do the work for you after the pan is off the burner. PRO TIP

½ bag fresh spinach 2 oz canola oil 1 T minced shallot

1 T minced garlic 2 oz white wine Salt and pepper Heat canola oil in medium-size sauté pan until oil “shimmers.” Add garlic and sauté until translucent. Deglaze with white wine. Add spinach and turn 2 or 3 times until it starts to wilt. Remove from heat; spinach will continue to wilt until just cooked. Add salt and pepper to taste. Set aside in a warm place for plating.

Demi-Glace Demi-glace is the secret ingredient that turns any good dish into a great one. The key to a good demi-glace is properly roasting the veal bones (dark, but not burned) and caramelizing the tomato paste correctly. 10 p  ounds veal bones (from a butcher, or ask your local grocery store’s meat department to order some) Cold water 4 large white onions, peeled and large diced 2 large carrots, peeled and large diced 1 bunch celery, cleaned and large diced 3 T canola oil 1 small can tomato paste 1 bunch parsley 1 bunch thyme 1 T whole peppercorns 2 whole bay leaves (dry) ½ bottle red wine (cabernet or something similar) Salt and white pepper In a 400° F oven, roast veal bones until very dark, but not burned. Place bones in large stockpot. Scrape any drippings or meat into pot as well. Toss diced vegetables with oil. Place in pan used to roast bones. Using spatula, smear

tomato paste on top of vegetables. Roast vegetables in oven until soft and tomato paste begins to caramelize. Do not burn. When vegetables are done, remove and scrape into pot containing bones, again getting any bits that are stuck to pan. Add enough cold water to pot to come one inch over top of bones and vegetables. Add herbs and aromatics. Bring to simmer; then turn down heat until you get a very slight bubble. Cook slowly for 6–8 hours, checking for color and smell. If too much water evaporates before the cooking time is complete, add more cold water. After 8 hours, strain stock into separate pot. Discard bones and vegetables. Put stock back on stove; add red wine. Simmer until reduced by half. The stock should have noticeable body. If not, reduce more as necessary. When stock is complete, adjust seasoning with salt and white pepper. Cool down. Use as desired to finish sauces or stews. PRO TIP When demi-glace cools, it attains a jellied consistency. It can be stored cold for up to 2 weeks or frozen indefinitely. Use an ice cube tray to portion demi-glace and freeze it. This technique gives you perfect cubes that can be used any time.   PLATING

Warm two dinner-sized plates. Place a 4 oz. portion of whipped potatoes at the center of the plate. Reheat pork medallions in sauce. Place three medallions on each plate, resting against potatoes. Ladle sauce equally on pork portions. Place wilted spinach on top of potatoes. Garnish with chopped parsley if desired.

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FOOD STARS

W E S TM I NSTE R ALUMNI IN THE FOOD BUSINESS leslie f iet (’96, MPC ’00) opened mini’s cupcakes in 2007 and was the champion of Food Network’s Cupcake Wars in November 2012. She sources locally and delivers. Two locations in Salt Lake City: Mini’s Downtown, 800 South 14 East (between Main and State Streets), Salt Lake City, phone 801.363.0608, email Leslie@minicupcakes.com; Mini’s Sugarhouse, 1751 South 1100 East, 84105, 801.746.2208. scott evans (MBA ’06) opened his first award-winning restaurant, pago, in 2009, followed by f inca, (artisan tapas and main courses) in 2012. Pago: 878 S 900 E, Salt Lake City, 801.532.0777; Finca: 1291 S 1100 E, Salt Lake City, 801.487.0699. sherrita magalde (MBA ’14) launched her gourmet baklava bakery, sheer ambrosia, in 2008 and was

been the official provider of baklava for the Salt Lake City Greek Festival in 2010. Sheer Ambrosia Bakery: 834 East 9400 South, Sandy. Sheer Ambrosia ships nationally. Visit the online store at sheerambrosiabakery.com or call 801.601.8880.

ruth and ryan kendrick (’10) and brett smith

founded their award-winning artisan confections, chocolot, in 2008 in Ogden, Utah. A second-generation chocolatier, Ruth appeared on the FoodNation with Bobby Flay. Visit chocolot.com for vendor locations and the online store or call 801.475.5050.

chad corbin and ryan corbin (’10) opened java jo’s, a coffee retailer, in 1996 with four locations in

Salt Lake City. Java Joe’s has been recognized by This American Life, Salt Lake Magazine, and many other local and regional media. Three locations serve Salt Lake City: 401 1st Ave, 801.532.2899; 4670 S 900 E, 801.590.8898, or 6895 Highland Drive, 801.930.9070.

lisa gough (MBA ‘07) is President of sysco intermountain food service, a part of a national com-

pany with a global reach. Lisa enjoys staying engaged in a fast-paced and constantly changing environment.

bill mouskandis  (’57) is chair and former president of nicholas and company, the largest independent

food distributor in the Intermountain West. With more than 70 years of experience, they opened their second distribution center in Las Vegas in 2014.

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Robyn believes that if you prepare your own food, you tend to enjoy a healthier lifestyle, and she uses science to help students feel more comfortable in the kitchen by teaching them “how stuff works.”

PERIODIC TABLE OF FOOD ELEMENTS R. ROBYN HYDE is a chemistry professor who greets you with a glowing smile and sparkling eyes. Two years ago, she began teaching a class called Chemistry and Society, which aims to help students understand some of the fundamental chemistry principles so that when they read or hear about issues related to science, they can better understand them. “If they hear about nuclear weapon proliferation and the isolation of uranium-235, they know what that means. If it is a controversial topic, they should be able to better critically analyze the information and make an informed decision for themselves on where they stand in the controversy,” says Robyn. One of the ways in which her class teaches fundamental chemistry is by turning the science lab into a kitchen. Robyn has supplied her lab with kitchenware for herself and her students to use as they cook things such as fudge,

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chocolate chip cookies, and even gravy. Part of what cooking in the lab does is provide students with scientific information that can be incorporated into everyday living. “I think what surprises students is how much chemistry pervades their everyday lives. If you understand the science of food, it makes the act of cooking more enjoyable,” explains Robyn, who says that her students use the periodic table of elements to learn how to measure and count calories in food. Robyn is eager to show her students how a love for science can be translated into creating delicious foods. By understanding the chemistry of ingredients, students learn how to change the flavor of foods and are eventually encouraged to cook without recipes. Robyn believes that if you prepare your own food, you tend to enjoy a healthier lifestyle; She uses science to help students feel more comfortable in the kitchen by teaching

them “how stuff works.” By the end of the class, students understand ingredients and are able to manipulate and substitute them to create something new and unique. “The students can easily follow any recipe and actually know what they are doing. They can then adapt any recipe to make it their own; they are no longer limited to just following recipes,” Robyn says. She encourages everyone to learn about and understand the ingredients of their food, saying that cooking for yourself can be a wonderful way to decompress. “If you understand the science of food, you are more likely to experiment and create a dish that is unique to you. Your dinner becomes a part of your day when you are engaged in a fun activity, and that will help relieve the stresses of the day. When you do your own cooking and enjoy it, it adds quality to your life.” WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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PROFESSORS WILLIAM DEUTSCHMAN, BRIAN AVERY, AND PAUL HOOKER PREPARE TO MAKE BEER.

LET’S GET CHEMICAL en years ago, chemistry professor PAUL HOOKER and biology professor BRIAN AVERY introduced the campus to the Chemistry and Biology of Brewing Beer. While a class centered on brewing beer may sound like the perfect way to get your hands (or taste buds) on some delicious master-crafted brews, the May Term class is very scientific, and there are prerequisites: introductory chemistry and biology. The class provides students with lab skills that will help them land jobs in the future, and it guides them through understanding how food works on a scientific level. “For a lot of students it’s the first time they ever encounter the idea that there are people out there who actually study food, who manipulate food—who are using science to produce these things that everybody takes as just second nature,” explains WILLIAM DEUTSCHMAN, a biochemistry professor who is now part of the brewmaster teaching team. In the lab-based class, students are given four weeks to make a couple of brews on a gallon scale and monitor them as they are going. Throughout this time, students make measurements of elements such as alpha acids from the hops, of whether they are going to have enough sugars in their product, and of yeast levels. This monitoring helps develop an understanding of extracting sugars and nutrients from grains through the fermentation process. The professors involved also work with local breweries such as Red Rock and Squatters to provide students with exposure to large breweries where 800–1,000 gallons of beer are being created at a time.

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Will Deutschman did a summer internship with Red Rock brewery in order to better educate students on the craft of brewing, and even local brew scientists have taken the class to gain insight on the scientific aspects of brewing. Ultimately, an understanding of the science involved in making beer results in a better product. “Unless you know the quality and composition of your ingredients, you are not going to be able to predict the final outcome of the beer. There is a lot of analysis in that respect—it’s a pretty intense experience. Students come in at other times, not just class time, to monitor the brew,” explains Paul. As students begin to understand the fermentation process, they make associations with other fermented foods. The understanding of science behind beer is suddenly applied to foods that they eat regularly. “There is a whole food/understanding-the-scienceof-food angle [in the class],” says Brian, “Students who may not be interested in beer are surprised at what is fermented: chocolate, coffee, yogurt, cheese… lots of things go through similar processes. Thinking about the science lets us apply science to life.” So in what direction would the professors point you in a grocery store? “I usually argue that it’s the stuff that’s whole­—whole fruits and vegetables and unprocessed meats and grains,” says Brian. Paul adds that while whole foods are better for you, they are also more fun because you get to create your own edible concoctions. “It’s the chemistry of flavor and taste and smell.” One of the team’s ultimate goals is to educate students to be able to use science to establish their own opinions about beer (they suggest seasonal) and food. “There are things that you can do to process food that are very reasonable, are natural, and have been done for years. You can take those same things into a lab, think about what’s actually happening, and then think about how to make that process better or more focused,” explains Will. “Each person has to make that decision on where she or he sits on what’s okay and what’s not okay, what’s artificial and what’s normal. As soon as you start pulling it apart in a scientific way, you get a better understanding of what’s going on.”

As students begin to understand the fermentation process, they are able to make associations with other foods that are fermented.

FOOD FOR FITNESS f you have ever visited the Health and Wellness Center, then it is likely that you have seen LAURA IVERSON around. As the Assistant Director of Fitness, Wellness, and Recreation at Westminster, Laura has her hands in all kinds of health-related pots. Her love for fitness began at a very young age. In fact, Laura recalls asking for a NordicTrac for her 10th birthday—and she got one! As she grew older, Laura continued her education in health and wellness. Having worked as a personal trainer and group fitness instructor, she now teaches a variety of exercise classes at the Health and Wellness Center, organizes a monthly free Wellness Series, and posts recipes and fitness tips on her blog, bodyofsunshine.com. A health foodie, Laura shares some tips and quick recipes for individuals on the go: “Preparing food ahead of time and packing snacks are definitely a must. Otherwise, it’s easy to get too hungry and end up at the vending machine. Good snacks to keep in your backpack are baby carrots, sliced apples with almond butter, almonds or pistachios, hummus and veggies, and granola bars.”

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FROM OUR KITCHEN TO YOURS

Laura’s Quick and Easy Black Bean Burger (vegan and gluten-free)

INGREDIENTS

2 C cooked quinoa 21  5-oz cans black beans, rinsed and drained 2 tsp chili powder 1 tsp cumin 2 T tomato paste 1 tsp salt or to taste 1/2C sun-dried tomatoes, minced (not the kind packed in oil), optional 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 yellow onion, diced DIRECTIONS

Pre-heat oven to 350° F and generously coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. First, prep all your ingredients; then smash your beans a little. You may use a food processor and pulse a few times. Don’t over-process, as you want some whole and half beans—not bean purée. If you don’t have a food processor, use a fork or potato masher. Next, mix all ingredients together in a very large mixing bowl. Form the mixture into burger patties and place on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes on one side; then flip and bake for 10 minutes on the other side. Be gentle when flipping them, and use the spatula to re-smoosh them if they start to break apart.

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TALKING

Competenc Education

Westmi

BY AU T U M

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cy-Based

MASTER OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION STUDENTS JOHANNA SNOW, (’14) DAVE BLACKMER (’14), AND KOFFI SESSI (’14) SHARE IDEAS ABOUT AN UPCOMING ASSIGNMENT.

inster Provides Students with a Quality-Driven, High-Touch Experience in a Virtual World.

M N T H AT C H E R , M P C ( ’ 1 5 )

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n a struggling economy where job competition is fiercer than ever and stability in the workforce seems to be a thing of the past, many working professionals are electing to return to school in the hopes of building a more secure future. The decision to pursue a degree is not always an easy one to make. Completing a degree while working full time is a tough go, and many professionals are turning to Westminster’s Competency-Based Education (CBE) programs to build a better future. According to a November 2013 report published by the Center for American Progress, CBE programs have been around for more than 40 years, but the educational method has only recently become popular among working professionals. Westminster began developing its CBE programs in 2006 in response to the college’s 2004 strategic plan. Since that time, key figures on campus have worked tirelessly to design enriching competency-based programs that provide students with the skill sets to become leaders in their professions, coupled with a flexible method that fits in with their working lives. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs James “Cid” Seidelman has coordinated Westminster’s competency-based education implementation—along with colleague Dr. Aric Krause—since its inception. From the onset, Seidelman and his team have worked to combine CBE techniques with Westminster’s high-touch, engaged-learning experience. The key, he says, is truly providing CBE students genuine, clear access to their faculty mentors­—a key component of the Westminster experience—while still stepping away from the traditional classroom

Associates become leaders by gaining the respect of their colleagues and peers, rather than the support of a boss. environment. CBE program faculty educate students by designing projects that require them to work both independently and together in group settings. By utilizing resources provided by their faculty mentors, students complete various projects and assignments and, along the way, master the competencies to become leaders in their fields. Seidelman calls it, “flipping the classroom,” as opposed to more traditional formats where learning is measured by seat time. “You make the students

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responsible for the content: accessing and learning the content,” he explains. “In a competency-based model, time is variable, but learning is constant. Students don’t progress until they demonstrate mastery. They continue to work on a particular competency and learning goals until they demonstrate mastery. In this particular case, time is variable, but learning is fixed or constant.” By working alongside students as a coach or a mentor, faculty members in the CBE programs are changing the traditional learning experience. Westminster students enrolled in a competency-based program are getting the best of both the learning and the working world; they are provided the opportunity to work alongside highly qualified faculty, while developing skill sets that they can turn around and use in real time, on the job. “[The role of] a faculty member is less and less about presenting material to you and more about assessing learning and coaching in terms of ‘here’s where you are strong, here’s where you are weak,’ and then guiding students into various kinds of learning experiences that help students achieve those specific competencies,” explains Seidelman. As Seidelman and his colleagues work to grow the CBE programs and bring awareness to what Westminster has to offer, the provost must also address some misconceptions that surround competency-based education. “There is a perception that it has to be online or that it’s low quality. There is a wide range of quality in terms of how you deliver competency-based education. Whether or not we are delivering education in the traditional classroom or we’re delivering it online or we’re delivering it in a hybrid approach that does both, we want to have a very, very strong learning relationship going on between our students and our faculty,” Seidelman says. Currently, Westminster offers four CBE programs: the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), the project-based Master of Business Administration, the Master of Strategic Communication, and the RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The BBA program is geared toward undergraduates wishing for a more flexible, but high-quality degreecompletion program that can accommodate professional and personal commitments. This program is also ideal for students who may need to transfer from a traditional program because of new challenges resulting from employment, athletics, or other commitments that require more flexibility. Dr. Jerry Van Os, a faculty member in the accounting department, has played a major role in

CLOCKWISE: PROVOST AND VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, JAMES “CID” SEIDELMAN, AND PROFESSOR JERRY VAN OS OF THE BILL AND VIEVE GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ARE TWO KEY FIGURES IN WESTMINSTER’S COMPETENCY-BASED EDUCATION PROGRAM; MSC PROFESSOR HELEN HODGSON INTERACTS WITH STUDENTS ONLINE; FACULTY/MENTOR RULON WOOD WORKS WITH KOFFI SESSI (’14) DURING AN MSC RESIDENCY WEEKEND.

developing core curriculum for the BBA program. This responsibility is key to ensuring that students are provided with the tools necessary to master the competencies that will prepare them for their future careers. Van Os especially encourages students looking for flexibility to consider the BBA program. “With the focus on demonstration of competency mastery, not class attendance, residencies focus on building relationships with faculty coaches, communicating about project expectations, developing higher levels of performance in competencies mapped across projects, and promoting community building to enhance team building and networking,” Van Os explains. The BBA program, as well as the other three CBE programs offered at Westminster, is designed to be a high-touch experience for students. This means that even though students are not in the classroom, they

still enjoy the intimate experience of a Westminster classroom on a virtual level due to the accessibility of faculty mentors. Students are able to work with their mentors through texting, Skype, Google Hangouts, email, etc. In each program, the faculty mentors meet with students in person during a residency weekend at the beginning of the semester to get to know one another and determine the form of communication that is going to work best for the student. The Master of Strategic Communication (MSC) program—one of the newest project-based graduate programs on campus—is spearheaded by four faculty members who also teach undergraduate communication courses and classes in the Master of Professional Communication program. Helen Hodgson, James Hedges, Christine Seifert, and Rulon Wood are dedicating a significant amount of time and effort to ensuring their students graduate as promising leaders. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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“This [program] has been designed to empower students to actually take some ownership of their own learning experience,” says Hedges, who adds that faculty members work backward in a competency-based education program because they assess what competencies students will master by first looking at the end result of the program: “What do we want them to walk out with? What kind of skills, what knowledge should they have coming out that they can demonstrate?” For these accomplished professors, the MSC program is their first experience working in this high-touch, virtual format. While they still find value in the classroom, each of the four faculty members is excited by the incredible opportunities that competency-based education provides for both students and their mentors: it also creates a special bond that is ~ CID SEIDELMAN, PROVOST different from that developed in the classroom. “[The students] make us part of the work—I am working alongside them, instead of make sure we were teaching the concepts they in front of them,” says Seifert, who is known to needed when they entered the job market.” The MSC program will see its first set of gradu- meet with her students in the Shaw cafeteria on Saturday mornings for donuts and brainstormates this August. Students entering the MSC ing. program do so in groups called “cohorts” and Wood is spending the spring semester acting can begin the program in either the fall or the as both a coach and a group member in order to spring semester. Each semester, students working in the cohort master the competencies within help dispel the idea of his presence as an authority figure. “I am actually a member of the teams. that semester’s sequence. When I am on their teams, I don’t answer questions like a professor. They assign me tasks, and I work as a member of the team. Then for two hours during office hours in the week, I’m the coach, and I answer questions as the coach. I am actually going to be there side-by-side with them in these collaborative learning projects to see how that changes the dynamics.” As competency-based education grows at Westminster, the faculty and staff involved continue to work hard to ensure that students get a valuable educational experience that they won’t find at any other institution. “Academic excellence and personalized learning are attributes this college has always been known for,” Hedges says. We are creating these dynamic learning environments. Students come to us, and then we guide them toward resources. We don’t tell them how to do things—it’s up to them. They get empowered in this process.” Wood says, “One of the unique things about the MSC program is that we conducted focus groups with industry professionals to figure out what competencies folks going out in the job market should have. “We weren’t just guessing at what people should know when they came out of the program: we actually talked to people who are from marketing, who are from technical writing, who are from a variety of disciplines—to

“Westminster plans to add additional competency-based programs and to deepen its capacities to assess student learning and create accelerated pathways to degree completion. The college also plans to continue its focus on providing degrees and programs centered on academic excellence, personalized learning, and successful graduates.”

FACULTY MENTOR CHRISTY SEIFERT ENJOYS AN INFORMAL MOMENT WITH MSC STUDENTS TREVOR CRUMP (’14) AND ADRI MONTERO (’15).

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MEET COMPETENCY-BASED EDUCATION STUDENTS AND ALUMNI THREE QUESTIONS WITH THREE BBA ALUMS

M AT T H E W T W E L D E N B BA ( ’ 1 2 )

WENDY GILLIHAN BBA (’10), MACC (’13)

What factors made you decide to How has the BBA program affected you both personally enroll in the BBA program? and professionally? “I had seen what an amazing program it was as my wife, Wendy, went through it. The professors were partners in the learning process. They were responsive to the type of demanding learners that my wife and I are. Unlike a traditional program, I saw that the program would allow me to get as much out of it as I had the energy to put in. The final factor was the intimacy. Having personal connections with the professors and administrators is something unavailable at traditional institutions. Wendy and I call it ‘concierge education.’”

“The biggest benefit from the program was confidence. I now lead an advisory commission here in Seattle that directly advises the mayor and city council. That would not have happened prior to the BBA and the mentoring I received at Westminster. Professionally, I created my company’s business plan for project five. I now have several employees and am expecting more growth this year. I do not know where I would be if I had not received the postcard promoting the BBA. It has allowed me to expand on my knowledge, but more importantly, it gave me the confidence to get out there and create something of my own with it.” 

DANIEL R SMITH BBA (’11), MBA (’12)

Once you were a student in the program, when was that “aha!” moment when you knew that “this is really the degree for me?” “In the first semester, I was given specific feedback on what I did well, ways I could improve, and what I would need to do if I wanted to apply the feedback and resubmit my work. I have always believed that learning is directly proportionate to the speed and volume of feedback received. (I always disagreed with traditional ‘all or nothing’ grading or even worse, timed quizzes or tests.) In business, completing your work or project is rarely an ‘all or nothing’ situation and never a timed test. The real world functions on a very collaborative and iterative process, where you revise and clarify understanding until you have a solid finished product. The project-based learning style of submitting, receiving feedback, applying what you learned, and then resubmitting is the closest to the ‘real world’ a learning method could get.”

CHECKING IN WITH FUTURE MSC ALUMNI DA N I E L L E C A L D W E L L M S C ( ’ 1 4 )

DAV I D B L AC K M E R M S C ( ’ 1 4 )

How has the MSC program benefited you both personally and professionally?

Would you recommend it to others in the market for a master’s degree in communication?

I have gotten feedback from my boss that she has seen tremendous growth in my output, and it has awakened in me a number of possibilities professionally that I had never before considered.

Absolutely. This program is on the cutting edge of education, is taught by seasoned experts, and covers the kind of education employers are looking for. The real-world experience offered in conjunction with the MSC program is crucial to expanding portfolios and providing great talking points in job interviews. Since I started this program, I’ve received two promotions, two raises, and three bonuses at work.

For more information regarding Westminster’s Competency-Based Education program, visit westminstercollege.edu or call 801.484.7651

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LOIS TOOK A FLIGHT WITH A WESTMINSTER INSTRUCTOR. “WE FLEW UP TO OGDEN AIRPORT, WHERE I’D BEEN A CONTROLLER IN THE TOWER AND ALSO LANDED MY PLANE MANY TIMES,” SAID LOIS.

A STORY AS FULL ASTHE SKY Beloved Alumna Honors Husband’s Memory With Gift of Flight BY APRIL M. TORRES (’14)

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he happiness in her eyes

flooded the room with joy as she proudly said, “I used to be Lois Wheatlake, now I am Lois Fitzgerald.” Having moved to Sugar House in 1925 from Denver, Lois grew up near Westminster, and she developed a love for the campus. Her father, B. C. J. Wheatlake, became a member of the Westminster Board of Trustees, and in 1952 he became interim president of the college for a year. Lois’ mother, Florence, served on the Westminster Woman’s Board for 40 years. Lois, her siblings, and two of her children attended Westminster. “Probably the most fun years of my life were there. The friends that I met are still

my best friends,” she said. “Thank goodness, even though it’s bigger now, Westminster still has that feeling—the love that you don’t get going to another school.” After a few years at Westminster, Lois attended Whitman College in Washington. “I wanted to be an architect,” she said. “My dad told me that I didn’t like math enough to be an architect. So I went into biology.” Shortly before Lois graduated from Whitman, the devastation at Pearl Harbor occurred, forever changing her life and the lives of her friends. “The minute we got out of school, we got jobs,” said Lois. “The women had to take over all the jobs that the men had. They became bus drivers and Rosie the Riveters. My friend and I got jobs with the govern-

ment as air traffic controllers.” The job reignited in Lois a life-long desire to learn to fly. She was part of a generation transfixed by Charles Lindbergh’s momentous flight across the Atlantic Ocean. In 1927, when she was seven years old, Lois attended Lindbergh’s victory tour and will never forget his landing at the airport, basking in the adulation of hundreds of onlookers. “I don’t know that I thought of flying myself then, but I guess it was in the back of my mind­—that I always wanted to fly.” While working in air-traffic control at Ogden Tower, Lois learned to fly. She also met a young pilot named Francis “Fitz” Fitzgerald, the man she would eventually marry.“He learned that I had just soloed a plane,” said

WESTMINSTER’S $10 MILLION SCHOLARSHIP CHALLENGE STILL NEEDS YOUR HELP. MAKE A LIFE-CHANGING,

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Lois. “He told me that if I wanted to fly the plane up to Ogden, he’d give me lessons, which he did and got his foot in the door. I must have had a little talent, because I passed the tests.” Francis joined the Air Force Ferry Command and was taught to fly “any type of plane, wherever they needed it,” said Lois. “We ended up marrying in Los Angeles. He got the biggest kick out of telling people that we got married in a cemetery, which we did, in a wedding chapel in the middle of a big cemetery.” The newlyweds moved to Fresno, California, where Francis had grown up. They bought a BT 13, a basic trainer plane. “We had a child by then, so my husband had built a thing over the radio compartment in back of me, where our son could either sit up or lie down. I’d hold him on my lap when we took off and landed, but other wise he was back there. The roar of the engine was noisy, and it put him right to sleep.” When describing what it feels like to fly, Lois determined that it’s too hard to explain. “You can’t say you felt high, because that wouldn’t sound good, but it was exciting to take off and fly,” she said. “It’s something both of us loved a lot.” The bond that drew her and Francis together stayed strong throughout their 47-year marriage, until his passing in 1991. “The love of his life was flying,” Lois said. “He was a home-body. That’s why he didn’t want to become a pilot for the airlines. He just loved home life and his kids.” To honor Francis’s memory, Lois created the Francis F. Fitzgerald Aviation Scholarship at Westminster. “Fitz gave up a flying job to be a husband. He didn’t know I was going to establish a scholarship, but he would have been so honored to know that he was helping students to do what he loved in his life.” “I really can’t think of a better thing to do with your money because without all these scholarships, I know a lot of students couldn’t afford to go to school,” said Lois. “If this scholarship can help in any way, that’s what’s important. Even though it’s just a little help in how much it costs to graduate in aviation, if it can help anyone achieve their goal, it makes me feel really good.” Recently Lois was invited to take a flight with a Westminster aviation instructor. “We flew up to Ogden Airport where I’d been a controller in the tower and also landed my plane many times,” said Lois. “She asked me if I wanted to fly, and I was chicken. I didn’t want to take her up on it, but if she asked me again, I probably would see if I could still fly after all these years.”

JANIE DAHLE (’14), FLANKED BY HER BEAMING AND PROUD PARENTS, JONI AND ROB.

WESTMINSTER PARENTS PAY IT FORWARD BY DANA TUMPOWSKY “westminster has given so much to our daughter, Janie, academically and financially. We give so that maybe we can help keep this scholarship program going,” said Rob Dahle. The recently inaugurated mayor of Holladay, Utah, and his wife, Joni, feel strongly that they have an obligation to contribute so a future Westminster student may afford the benefits of a private college experience. Janie decided she would attend Westminster based on its small classes, nursing program, and close location. “We were lucky to have the small, private college option right here in Salt Lake City,” said Joni. Since she too is a nurse, Joni was well aware that “Westminster nurses are better prepared!” Janie was offered an automatic Dean’s Scholarship after applying to the college and the choice to attend Westminster was made. The Dahles feel that a Westminster education is an excellent value— especially when they found that Janie’s scholarships brought her tuition costs

close to that of a large public university. Janie’s parents expressed their pleasure that Westminster has not only made Janie feel special from the beginning, but that she is “absolutely doing what she wants to do.” Janie works evenings at Primary Children’s Medical Center. Her learning experiences have taken her around the world for service in Thailand during May Term and earned her a leadership position as president of SNOW (Student Nurses of Westminster) for the past two years. Joni said Janie has created meaningful friendships with her professors, in particular Han Kim and Peter Ingle. “Janie was so proud to tell me that she had even received ‘permission’ to call nursing professor Diane Forster Burke by her initials—a privilege reserved for only some nursing students. “Isn’t this why you volunteer and contribute to your community?” asked Rob. “We feel we have an obligation to give back.”

TAX-DEDUCTIBLE DONATION. HELP PROVIDE ANOTHER STUDENT WITH THE OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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WHAT COMES AROUND,GOES AROUND BY APRIL M. TORRES (’14) sue duthweiler (’69) received a scholarship to attend Westminster College in the late 1960s. “My dreams of graduating from the school wouldn’t have become a reality without the generous financial aid Westminster gave me,” said Sue. Recently, Sue and her husband, Frederick, established an endowed scholarship at Westminster, considering their donation a payback for Westminster’s support. The Duthweilers hope many students can receive the same funding that helped Sue’s dreams come true. “Our contribution demonstrates the value we place on education, and in our case, the importance of a broader education in the physical sciences. Our gift expresses our gratitude for the financial aid and for the many kindnesses shared by the college, its staff, and Sue’s classmates. We anticipate watching our repayment nurture students in the coming years,” wrote the Duthweilers. Thirty-five years ago, Sue named Westminster as beneficiary of her IRA. They recently realized that it was “not only possible, but practical, to establish an endowment now, rather than later,” she said. From now on, the Duthweilers’ endowed scholarship will create six scholarships every year. To create an endowed scholarship, a donor gives $5,000 annually for at least five years. In July 2010, Westminster launched a $10 million scholarship campaign. Only $1.1 million remains to be raised to reach the five-year campaign goal. Thanks to those alumni and friends who have contributed, 269 more students have benefitted from the newly-established scholarship funds this year. The college expects to be able to help 500 Westminster students each year by the end of the campaign.

ALUMNA’S SCHOLARSHIPTO HELP WOMEN BECOME BUSINESS LEADERS BY LYNN HEINLEIN sarah bebo sherer (’03) currently serves as the Director of Employee Relations for the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics. “I really feel that it is important to encourage future women business leaders by giving back to Westminster. The Bill and Vieve Gore School of Business is where I learned so much, and my experience at Westminster enabled me to have the success that I have today,” explained Sarah. Sarah had supported the college with donations to The Westminster Fund in the past, but this year, when a student called her for an annual gift, she asked to receive information about creating a scholarship. “I had a conversation with a staff member who explained the scholarship options. I realized that I could create a scholarship at a gift level that made sense for me, and that I could choose the criteria of a young woman studying business and illustrating leadership to receive my scholarship.” This scholarship will be awarded for the first time this spring, and Sarah looks forward to meeting the first recipient. “I guess I wanted to support young women who could have been me when I was in college. I relied on scholarship aid and was very grateful for those donors. I was a first-generation college student, so the scholarships were really important to me. I want young women who are studying now in the Gore School to know that they can achieve great success: they can be leaders on campus and in the business world. I believe in them, and I believe in the opportunity they are receiving at Westminster.”

TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN CREATE A SCHOLARSHIP FOR A WESTMINSTER STUDENT,

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STAGECOACHES,HORSES, AND LEADERSHIP BY APRIL M. TORRES (’14) AND SAFIA KELLER wells fargo & company, one of Westminster College’s longtime corporate partners, has given more than $275,000 since 1993 to various lecture series; scholarships; the Eccles Health, Wellness, and Athletic Center; the Meldrum Science Center; the Annual Scholarship Benefit Gala; and many other programs at the college. The college also appreciates the leadership that Wells Fargo executives have provided through volunteering on various boards and committees over the years. Westminster Trustee Greg Winegardner is president of Wells Fargo–Utah Operations. Senior VP of Private Client Services Sam Sleiman served for many years on Westminster’s Foundation Board, and Wells Fargo’s Vice President of Community Relations, Denise Winslow, is a member of the Master of Arts in Community Leadership Advisory Board at the college. The Executive Leadership Lecture Series sponsored by Wells Fargo was launched in 2013. These lectures feature speakers who are experts in their fields and address issues and trends pertaining to leadership and today’s business environment. The series began with two outstanding speakers: Four-Star General Barry McCaffrey and Jim Rogers, President, CEO, and Chair of Duke Energy. Don Knauss, CEO of the Clorox Company, spoke on March 10th of this year. Wells Fargo & Company, founded in 1852, is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.5 trillion in assets, providing banking, investments, insurance, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance.

FLORENCE J.GILLMOR FOUNDATION GIVES $1.2 MILLIONTO WESTMINSTER BY JEFFREY DRIGGS a generous $1.2 million gift from the Florence J. Gillmor Foundation will support the college’s music program during the next six years. The funds will be used to support music scholarships, program development, and a music professorship. The foundation—named in honor of Florence J. Gillmor, a 1938 Westminster music graduate who passed away in 2009—has supported the Westminster music program for many years. Gillmor’s generosity has made the dreams of many performers, like Westminster sophomore Nicole La Count, possible. “The moment I was awarded a Gillmor scholarship, I knew that I was being given the opportunity

of a lifetime to attend Westminster and follow my passion,” said La Count, a music major in vocal performance. “I am beyond grateful to have been awarded scholarships that have provided a way for me to grow as a student and musician without constantly worrying about my financial situation.” The gift will provide $600,000 during the next five years for music scholarships to as many as 20 outstanding music students annually. An additional $300,000 will be used for the development of the college’s music program to enhance operations and student learning opportunities. The final $300,000 will be used to fund the Florence J. Gillmor Music Pro-

fessorship, which will increase the music department’s teaching capacity and recognize exceptional faculty. The first professorship will be filled by the Director of Music at Westminster, Dr. Christopher Quinn. Dr. Quinn began directing the college’s music program in 1994, leading the department through remarkable growth. Westminster’s music program offers a bachelor of arts in music, as well as a music minor, and the following ensembles: Westminster Chorale, Westminster Chamber Singers, Westminster Chamber Orchestra, Westminster Jazz Ensemble, Westminster Opera Studio, Percussion Ensemble, Acappella Choir, and a Chamber Music class.

PLEASE CONTACT JANE CAMPBELL AT 801.832.2770 OR JCAMPBELL@WESTMINSTERCOLLEGE.EDU. WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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46 ROAD WARRIOR 47 OLYMPIC CELEBRATION 48 THE KEEPERS 50 CLASS NOTES 52 SAVE THE DATE 59 IN MEMORIAM 60 ALUMNI EVENTS 64 THE NETWORK

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BREANNE NALDER, MS, RDN reanne Nalder (’07) says she’s pinching herself. As a nationally ranked category one pro-female cyclist on the DNA Cycling/K–4 Racing team and sports nutritionist for Plan 7 Endurance, Breanne is living her dream. Breanne started racing while she was studying biology at Westminster. “I always rode bikes for fun and cross training, but when I discovered that racing brought it to such an intense competitive level, I was hooked.” Breanne said. In 2007, she entered the Snowbird Hill Climb and won her age group. Now going

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into her seventh year, Breanne is the Snowbird Hill Climb female record holder, the state hill-climb champion, and the state time-trial champion. Breanne says all the hard work and training is paying off. In March 2014 she competed in her first international race in El Salvador. Breanne credits her success to her coach, Dave Harward, founder of Plan 7 Endurance Coaching­—who hired her as a nutrition coach for all of his athletes—after she graduated from the University of Utah with an MS in nutrition and sports dietetics. “The best part

of my job is that I get to work with motivated people who want to change and reach their nutrition goals.” Breanne said. Breanne’s primary work is with athletes, but she’s also a registered dietitian and helps anyone with dietary needs. Her areas of expertise include: weight loss, allergies, diabetes, vegan, and gluten-free diets. Breanne continues to teach cycling at Westminster’s Dolores Doré Eccles Health, Wellness, and Athletic Center. You can contact Breanne by visiting plan7coaching.com/ nutrition.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CATHERINE FEGAN-KIM

Road Warrior

ALUMNI NEWS

DRIVE YOUR PRIDE

Show Off Your Westminster Colors and Help Support Student Scholarships

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ast spring, you helped

Save the Plate—now what? To keep our specialty license plate, we need to (continuously) have 500 license plates on the road. Share this opportunity with your family, friends, and former classmates to help us maintain the plate. The Westminster license plate was in danger in 2010 when the Utah State Legislature passed a bill to end distribution of specialty plates from organizations with fewer than 500 registered plates. Now we have more than 500 plates on the road, raising more than $15,000 for student scholarships and showing pride everywhere our alumni, staff, faculty, and current students drive. “This is an opportunity to benefit Westminster College in a variety of ways,” said Michelle Barber-Lyhankis, director of alumni relations. “It allows students to afford a Westminster education and shows our alumni’s pride in their institution.” This ongoing project needs the help of all alumni. If at any time we fall below 500 plates, we will lose our opportunity to raise important scholarship funds for our students. Visit westminstercollege.edu/westminsterplate for a simple, printable order form. You don’t even need to go to the DMV! And drive your pride. Visit westminstercollege.edu/westminsterplate for a printable order form and answers to frequently asked questions.

Distinguished Alumni Award Moves to Reunion Weekend Each year Westminster College acknowledges alumni who live out the values of a Westminster education. The Distinguished Alumni Award is the highest honor presented to alumni. In 2014 the awards will be presented at Reunion Weekend. “The Distinguished Alumni Awards in one of my favorite alumni events,” says Michelle Barber Lyhnakis (MPC ’06), Director of Alumni Relations, “The alumni we honor do great things in our community, and I’m always so proud to be associated with them.” The alumni recognition committee who selects the award recipients believes that honoring our alumni during Reunion Weekend will give more faculty, staff, and alumni an opportunity to join in the celebration. Reunion Weekend will be September 25–28, 2014. Westminster President Dr. Brian Levin-Stankevich and the 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award Recipients, Solomon Awan (’07, MBA ’12), Volunteer of the Year Noreen Rouillard (Honorary Doctorate, ’12), President Brian Levin-Stankevich, Julie Balk PhD (’83), and Trustee Kim T. Adamson (’79).w

A Celebration of Olympic Proportions Friday, May 9, 2014 11:00 am–1:00 pm

Join us to celebrate our 23 Olympians (10 percent of the TEAM USA!) who competed in the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi. You’ll hear from the athletes and VIPs, and you can have your photo take with an Olympian. Check westminstercollege.edu for details. DEVIN LOGAN WITH HER SILVER MEDAL

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THE KEEPERS Keepers (n.) the aboriginal people of North America are the keepers of the game of lacrosse.

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ALUMNI NEWS Since Westminster started a club Lacrosse team in 2006, more than 20 alumni have gone on to coach in Salt Lake area schools and clubs. It’s clear they love the game and want to inspire the next generation of lacrosse players in the same way their coaches inspired them.

The hard work, friendships, and success of being a coach is just as sweet as when you are a player on the team. Dallas McLellan (’11), University of Utah Lacrosse, Utah Starz

I initially transferred from Wheaton College in Massachusetts and wanted to have a lacrosse experience similar to the one I had there at the NCAA DIII level. Westminster gave me that and even more. Chelsea Farrell (’13), Mamaci

Lacrosse opened a lot of doors and helped me get to know some of my best friends. I have been involved in the game for 18 years now, and I couldn’t imagine my life without it. Chris Baer (’12), Skyline Women’s Lacrosse

Playing lacrosse at Westminster made me feel like I had a reason to excel in school and on the field. I continue to be involved because I like to watch the sport grow in Utah.

FROM LEFT: STEVEN HIRNING (’12), TYLER SELDOMRIDGE (’11), SCOTT KELLNER (‘13), KAICEE BEAL (’13), BRETT BIRD (’12), GIAN SEXSMITH (’13), CHELSEA FARRELL (’13), JEFFREY J. ETCHEVERRY (’11), DALLAS J. MCLELLAN (’11), ERIN A. FOSLID (’12), JAMES M. BRAND (‘08), CARSON M. CHAMBERS (’12), CHRIS BAER (’12).

ture. I made incredible memories, learned countless lessons through my many hours practicing, traveling, playing games, and spending time with the team. Go Griffins! I believe being a member of a sports team is an incredibly empowering and educational experience.   Carson Chambers (’12) Skyline Women’s Lacrosse

Playing for Westminster gave me a family away from home—an immediate resource to figure out everything from which classes to take to where to go skiing. Today this same family is helping each other find employment. It’s by far been the strongest network I’ve been part of. Growing up I had great role models; the majority were coaches or older players who offered support when I needed it the most. They were the ones I looked up to and the ones I wanted to model certain aspects of my life after. Today I’m involved with lacrosse in hope of returning the favor.

Gian Sexsmith (’13), Olympus High School

Dallin Hall (’12)

Varsity Lacrosse

Adrenaline Lacrosse

Bus rides or team dinners were when I had the opportunity to talk with my coaches and hear about their lives. It gave me perspective to see how life evolves from playing lacrosse to being in college to transitioning into the professional lifestyle. Today I take the principles I learned from great coaches like Coaches Goodhand, Levoie, and Long, and apply them with the boys I work with. Jeff Etcheverry (’11) Waterford School

Being a college athlete gave me an identity, a passion, goals, and struc-

be where I am in life right now if it weren’t for lacrosse. Lacrosse took me to Pennsylvania, then set me down at Westminster—which ended with a National Championship. Ricky Larkin (’09) Wasatch Lacrosse Club/Repetition Lacrosse

I continue to be involved with lacrosse today because I believe in giving back to a community which has given me so much. I had a great experience learning from the most knowledgeable coaches in the game, and I believe I can pass some knowledge onto the future generations of the sport. Steven Hirning (’12) Utah Starz (Fall 2012–Fall 2013)

Lacrosse helped mold me into the type of person, parent, and professional that I wanted to be after college. The popularity of the sport in the state of Utah has made lacrosse a great avenue to have a positive impact on our youth and community. James Brand (’08) Skyline Lacrosse

Brett Bird (’12) Head Varsity Coach for Jordan High School Lacrosse Team

Playing lacrosse at Westminster was the best part of my college experience. The camaraderie of our team was absolutely inspirational, and my teammates were best friends: we were a family. We still are. Lacrosse isn’t just a sport, it is a lifestyle. Giving back to the sport by coaching, officiating, and playing in post-grad leagues creates a sense of community. By staying involved in the sport, we can encourage the younger generations to work hard so that they can have the same college experience we had.

I continue to be involved with lacrosse still because I love it. I wouldn’t

Kaicee Beal (’13) Head Coach, Utah Mamaci Assistant coach, Westminster Women’s lacrosse Certified Women’s Official, Utah Lacrosse

Since day one, Westminster Lacrosse stressed the importance of community service and giving back to the lacrosse community. My enjoyment of playing college lacrosse has given me a strong commitment to help others have similar experiences. It seemed a perfect fit to begin coaching at the high school level in Utah and prepare kids to play at the next level.

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CLASS NOTES ’10s Gregory Dean (’13) is pursuing

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CHUCK JOHNSON THE FIRE STARTER

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huck Johnson (’83) jokingly

says, “If you are willing to work hard enough, you can make money playing with matches.” Chuck is the owner of the nationally known pyrotechnics company, Vortex Firework Artists. At age 24, Chuck was working in a Sugar House bakery when a customer complimented his skills. “The last thing I want to be was the guy who makes the best onion rolls.” Chuck said. That afternoon he drove to Westminster and introduced himself to the first person he saw. “With dough still under my fingernails, I said, ‘I need to enroll immediately.’” The person Chuck met was Jay Lees, the theatre department chair. Jay helped Chuck register, and within two weeks, Chuck was starring in plays, and Jay became a close friend and mentor. Chuck went on to graduate with a double major in

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theatre and speech. Chuck started his career in commercial advertising, developing a reputation for the special effect stunts he dreamed up. His creations got national attention after a commercial he worked on won a coveted CLIO award. The special effects became bigger until he earned so many government licenses for pyrotechnics that he decided to create his own fireworks company. “It’s not about blowing something up. It is about making it look like you blew something up—making it look scary and frightening and loud, when in reality, it is controlled and no one goes home with a scratch.” Chuck said. Chuck continues his involvement with Westminster College. He regularly attends Westminster Player productions, and even teaches a few master classes for the theatre department about special effects and pyrotechnics.

a master’s degree in astronautics and space technology engineering at the University of Southern California. During summer 2013, Gregory interned with NASA at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. He worked in in the Technologies Application Branch of the Research Directorate. His work was noticed, and Gregory received permission to telework from California while in graduate school. Gregory was a 3–2 Engineering student who graduated Magna Cum Laude in 2011 from the University of Southern California with a BS in Astronautics and Space Technology Engineering. He then enrolled at Westminster where he graduated Magna Cum Laude with a BS in Physics in 2013. He plans to complete his master’s degree in May 2014. He is currently the chief engineer of the Alpha Chapter of Sigma Phi Delta, the professional engineering fraternity and serves on the executive board of Tau Beta Pi, the most respected engineering honors society.

CLASS NOTES Pat Sinnott (’13) accepted a position as a flight operations specialist at Sentient Jet in Massachusetts.

Mentoring Makes A Difference! Connie Deianni (’13)

Wendy Gillihan (BBA ’10, MAcc ’13) and her husband, Matthew Welden (BBA ’12) celebrated Wendy’s completion of her Master of Accountancy program with a trip to Hawaii, shown here in the Pololu Valley in North Kohala.

Eric Morley (MBA ’13) founder of Mod a-go-go was recently featured in articles in the Salt Lake Tribune, and City Weekly. The company also won an Arty Award, from City Weekly, for “Best 24/7 Gallery!” Mod a-go-go features stylish home decor and art by local artists. Mod a go-go is located at 242 E. South Temple in Salt Lake City. Visit online at modagogo.com.

Keni Nelson (’13) recently accepted an Account Management position with Friendemic, a Salt Lake City start-up that delivers social media engagement and brand reputation management to companies around the United States.

Dayna Stevenson (’13) was presented the “Academic Excellence Award” honored during the sixth annual Women Tech Awards luncheon September 12, 2013. Dayna is enrolled in the graduate gaming program at the University of Utah. Paul Wyner MBA (’13) was working in human resources for the University of Utah hospital (UUHC) until August of 2013, when he was hired as a Customer Service Manager for the Redwood Health Center at the (UUHC). He manages 20 employees and assists in the managing of 45 doctors. Paul says, “This experience has nicely aligned my MBA skills with the need of the UUHC. I strongly believe I received this job because of my decision to obtain an MBA.”

In July, Michael Thomas Toomey (’13) summited Mt. Whitney (14,508 feet), the highest peak in the contiguous United States. He completed the 2,000foot vertical ascent in just over three hours using a combination of mountaineering and free solo climbing.

completed her marketing degree as a non-traditional student at Westminster. While working full-time, she attended school fulltime. For those of you who graduated in 2013, you may remember her as your commencement student speaker. While at Westminster, the seed was planted to launch her own business and in January 2014, she finally realized that dream. With the encouragement of a few professors, referrals from colleagues, and the unwavering support of her family, Corepoint was formed to design custom mentor programs for large, small, and non-profit entities. Realizing that the genuine engagement of employees in any company is the real key to success, Connie designs programs around the mentee needs, incorporates the company goals, and includes measurements for success. Warren Buffet once said, “someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.” This is the very essence of a mentor program. Corepoint is the result of Connie’s passion to give back and pay forward the mentoring experiences she has received over a 30+ year career in the corporate environment. Corepoint is an employee-engagement consultancy with business acumen that translates across many industries. Corepoint bridges the gap between existing company leadership programs and greater possibilities for future engagement by employees. Corepoint is focused on building customized mentor program strategies to support leadership development, bench strength, and the retention of valued employees. Other services include onboarding programs, diversity initiatives, existing mentor program evaluation, and speaking engagements. The foundation of Corepoint is built on ethics, integrity, relationships, and the basic belief that everyone is capable of delivering amazing results when she or he knows that someone genuinely supports and believes in their capacity as an individual. Engaged, passionate employees deliver higher quality, higher productivity, and legacy-level results to the organization when they feel connected through relationships. You can contact Connie through www.corepointhq.com. Note: Connie was among the Zion’s Bank team named in American Banker magazine’s prestigious “Most Powerful Women in Banking” issue in October 2013.

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CLASS NOTES Jeremy Dailami (’12) was featured in the Enterprise in September 2013 for being elected to a three-year term on the International Refrigerated Transportation Association’s board of directors. The Roseville & Granite Bay Press Tribune reported that Army 2nd Lt. Nicholas R. Little (MPH ’12) graduated from the Infantry Basic Officer Leader Course at Fort Benning, Columbus, Georgia. The course is designed to produce physically fit, competent, and confident infantry platoon leaders.

Kait Thomas (’12) was interviewed by CNN about her work as a park ranger in Arches National Park.

Alysha Bruce (’11), Tiffany Mantlo Pestotnik (’06), Eva Tukuafu (’10), and Michele Thomas (’10) graduated with their Master of Social Work from the University of Utah.

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YOU’RE INVITED, SO SAVE THE DATE! The Woman’s Board Silver Tea Enjoys its 98th Consecutive Year May 10, 2014 // 1:00 pm In the time-honored tradition, Westminster College will once again host the traditional Annual Silver Tea at 1:00 pm in the Jewett Center for the Performing Arts. The event includes a silent auction, bake sale, flowers and plants, children’s crafts, and a High Tea. Price is $20 for adults and $5 for children. All proceeds go toward Westminster student scholarships. The High Tea is open to the public. Hats and gloves are encouraged! Please RSVP by May 5 to Kaye Stackpole at 801.832.2735.

Jean Millar MBA (’12) is currently the Director of Women’s and Children’s Services at McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden, Utah, part of the Intermountain Healthcare system. She has been in that role since May of 2011.  Brett Bird (’12) has been working for ARUP laboratories since graduation in the Infectious Disease Division, and Special Microbiology Department, primarily working with isolation, identification, and treatment for tuberculosis. Brett has just been accepted to Penn State College of Medicine to be part of their inaugural Physician Assistant Program, where he will receive a Master of Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS) and become a medically licensed PA. Since graduating, he has also been traveling the world, having traveled to England, Ireland, Amsterdam, Belgium, Peru, and Italy! “Travel while you can” is his motto. Brett also became a member of the Westminster Alumni Board, and is excited to continue to support

LEFT TO RIGHT: MRS. WILLIAM L. CONE, MS. MILDRED D. DUBOIS, MRS. ROBERT E. CARLESON, MRS. STANLEY HUGHES, MRS. A. RALPH BAKER ENJOY AN EARLIER SILVER TEA MOMENT.

the alumni program in the years to come!

Jason Dunnigan (’11) and his wife Emily (Ericson) Dunnigan (’06) welcomed their first baby, Nixon, in August 2013. In October 2013, Jason launched a men’s lifestyle blog, http://the-modern-dad.com/.

Chelsea Nelson MPC (’11) is creating communications strategy for United Way of Salt Lake, a nonprofit organization. In her spare time, she is the voice of Heartbeat Nosh (heartbeatnosh.com), cont. on p. 54

Reunion on Mount Denali Brian Muller (’10), Robin Hill (’10), Brody Leven (’10) and Max Lowe (’11) had an unexpected reunion on Alaska’s Mount Denali in May 2013. Mount Denali is the highest peak in North America. The four alumni first saw each other at 14,000foot camp, and then headed up to 17,000 feet, and happened to summit within 15 minutes of each other. The four alumni were all Westminster Outdoor Rec Program trip leaders in 2010. They emailed this photo to Liz Rogers, director of Westminster’s outdoor recreation program, thanking her and the program for inspiring their passion. BRIAN MULLER (’10) ROBIN HILL (’10) AND BRODY LEVEN (’10) HAVE AN UNEXPECTED WESTMINSTER ALUMNI REUNION AT THE SUMMIT OF MT. DENALI.

CLASS NOTES Connecting People, Building Community

Pursuing a Dream and Setting an Example

Westminster Mathematician Scores in the NBA

As a teen mom, Alicia M.

Andy Larsen (’12), Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz, and host of a weekly radio show of the same name, owes much of his success to getting bad grades. “I had a really bad term in high school, and my mother told me I wasn’t allowed to use the computer for anything other than school work. I decided to do a school project on baseball statistics, which meant I spent a lot of time on the computer studying baseball statistics and trends.” Andy said. That project turned into a passion of combining math and sports. Andy graduated from Westminster’s honors program with a BS in Mathematics. His plans to go to graduate school to become a math professor were interrupted when he won a contest—one that allowed him to write for the Utah Jazz’s Jazzbots website. And those math skills were a bonus: he began to write basketball analytics and analysis. Through his work, he met the former managing editor of Salt City Hoops. When he left the company, Andy was promoted to managing editor. “It is my goal to make Salt City Hoops the top site for the Utah Jazz market, expand our recognition regionally, and continue to be featured on ESPN.com. Follow Andy at SaltCityHoops.com

Emerson (’11, Med ’13) never thought college was an option. “I was a single mother of three who was working a dead-end job; I never thought I could afford to go to a college, let alone Westminster.” Alicia said. One day she was at the doctor’s office with her children and started talking to the pediatrician about her dream of higher education. Her child’s pediatrician was Dr. Tom Metcalf (’65), who asked Alicia if she had considered Westminster College. “Dr. Metcalf insisted that I talk to the admissions office, he actually called right then and there,” Alicia said. After meeting with Admissions and Financial Aid, Alicia learned that Westminster had grants and scholarship money to help her make college affordable and she enrolled. In 2011 she graduated with a BA in English, and then went on earn a master’s degree in education in 2013. Now she’s pursing a PhD in education from Walden University and is a professor of humanities and liberal arts at Neumont University. “My passion for teaching and learning is largely due to the phenomenal professors and staff at Westminster, and I only hope that I can spark a similar passion in the hearts and minds of my students.” Alicia said.

After Ashley Babbitt (’10) graduated from Westminster with a BA in communication, she immediately began freelance writing, then quickly moved to working for a nonprofit organization to finally launching a small business. She is now “changing the way communities do business with their young people.” Ashley currently serves as a member of the six-person Executive Council of the Promise South Salt Lake Initiative, charged with actualizing South Salt Lake Mayor Cherie Wood’s vision to ensure that every child has the opportunity to attend and to graduate from college, that every home and neighborhood is safe and clean, and that every South Salt Lake resident has the opportunity to be healthy and to prosper. South Salt Lake is a city with unique challenges, including having 85 percent of students in public school identified as having limited English proficiency and 95 percent receiving free or reduced lunch rate, which demonstrates children

living in poverty. “What sets us apart from other high-risk communities is the way we are working together to meet those challenges. The great news is that Westminster is building a bridge where students and faculty have been working to build capacity in our community.” Ashley said. “Westminster is an institution founded on the idea of relationships being transformational,” Ashley said. “And in our nine neighborhood centers of Promise South Salt Lake, we know every youth on a one-onone basis. Those meaningful relationships are being considerably strengthened through our two communities working together to drive success for our youth, families, and students.” In 2012 America’s Promise Alliance named South Salt Lake in the Top 100 cities for children to live, learn, and grow. There are many opportunities to get involved with the Promise South Salt Lake and Westminster partnership. To learn more, contact Julie Tille in the Westminster Center for Civic Engagement at jtille@ westminstercollege.edu.

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CLASS NOTES cont. from p.52 a notable Salt Lake City food blog that ranks #6 on Urbanspoon’s list of top Utah food blogs. She is an avid proponent of eating locally, supporting sustainability, and is active in the Salt Lake City food and arts community. Chelsea currently lives in Sugar House with her husband, Russ, and two crazy, but loveable, dogs.

Life-Long Learning Jennifer Duffield (’04, MBA ’06), director of Dancing Moose Montessori School believes in life-long learning. Her love for education started as a child, as she remembers coming to the Westminster campus with her mother, Dr. Joyce Sibbett, a professor at Westminster. After earning a bachelor’s degree in chemistry, Jennifer decided she did not want to spend endless hours in a lab, but instead, wanted to interact with people. She decided to come back to Westminster to get an MBA and pursue a family dream. “All of my projects and presentations focused on early childhood education and the foundation of a Montessori school.” Jennifer says. Upon completion of her MBA, Jennifer and Dr. Sibbett opened the first location of Dancing Moose Montessori School in West Valley City, Utah. Dr. Sibbett is behind the educational curriculum and Jennifer leads the business aspects of the school. “This is the most important age in childhood development and life. If we can start those critical-thinking and problem-solving skills this early in a child’s education, they are going to be top of their class for the rest of their time in school and beyond.” Dancing Moose has been named “Best of State” for private preschool (2009 and 2010), Best of the Best in Education (2011), and Private Sector Project Development (2012). In January of 2014, Dancing Moose Montessori School opened a second location in South Jordan, Utah. Learn more at mydancingmoose.com.

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Susan Orton (MSNEd ’11) recently transferred to Las Vegas Veterans Affairs as a clinical nurse educator for mental health.

Zlatina Todorov (MBA ’11) received the “Technical Excellence” award at the sixth annual Women Tech Awards luncheon September 12, 2013. Zlatina is the director of enterprise application support and software engineering at O. C. Tanner.

well as winning or placing in 14 other screenwriting competitions. His play Fair Shake was an Official Selection in the 2013 Kauai Shorts at Women in Theater in Kauai, Hawaii, as well as the Hit and Run VII at Stage Left in Spokane, Washington. His play Horst and Graben in the Contest of the Unfinished Man is an official selection in “The Puzzle” New Play Festival in New York City. Jeffery is an International Movie Database-listed, award-winning producer, screenwriter, playwright, composer, full member Dramatists Guild, member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, member AIGA, and alumnus of the Sundance Institute.

and running footwear. In the last year, Brody traveled to Denali, Iceland, Ukraine, Patagonia, South America, Romania, Whistler, and Mount Hood. Brody chronicles his adventures on his blog, Brodyleven.com. With more than 26,000 followers on Instagram, Brody is hailed as a social media guru. In January 2014, Brody also joined the pro team of Discrete Headwear.

Amanda Anais Ruiz (’10) graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School this past May with the magna cum laude honors and the school’s Public Service Award. She also received a commission as an officer in the US Navy to serve as JAG Corps lawyer.

Ashley Pedersen (’10) accepted a new job as Director of Education at the Tucson Botanical Gardens.

Brody Leven (’10) Jeffery Gold’s MPC (’10) screenplay Steen’s Folly was an Official Selection in the 2013 Columbia Gorge International Film Festival Screenplay Competition and the 2013 Woods Hole Film Festival Screenplay Competition, as

signed on as a four-season athlete with Solomon, the leader in technical design and innovation in mountain sports. Brody is a mountaineer and storyteller who will represent the brand’s alpine and outdoor product lines, including skis, apparel, protective,

Bryan Craven (’10) and Ali Monjar (’10) were married in September 2013.

Rebekah Schuler (‘10) accepted a full-time

CLASS NOTES therapy position at Copper Hills Youth Center upon graduating. Copper Hills Youth Center is an adolescent residential treatment center which specializes in treatment of youth with trauma and attachment related disorders. She has held multiple positions at the residential treatment center, including primary therapist and program administrator. Rebekah is currently the director of clinical services for the facility of more than 115 clients. Her efforts are aimed at the quality of clinical care given to each and every client who comes for treatment.

Hans Romo (’10) graduated from NYU law school in May

2013, and passed the New York State Bar Exam. He’s working for the New York City public defender’s office.

’00s Jennifer Amos (’09) began working as A/P clerk at Nichelson Construction in May 2013.

Jenna Wendler (’09) was recently hired as an account manager at Richter7, a Salt Lake City-based advertising and public relations agency. Before joining Richter7, Jenna had worked for another advertising agency as an integration manager.

Tim Harden (’08) is in his fourth year at Brandeis University in Boston, working on a PhD in physics. He’s an avid marathoner, and he qualified for the 2015 Boston Marathon.

Ryan Helber (’08) and Emily Rohn-Alleman (’08) were married in June in Southern California surrounded by family and many friends from Westminster. Emily Helber is finishing up her last year of veterinary school at Western University in Southern California. Last May, Ryan graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder with an MBA. He is currently working as a Clinical Project Manager in the Clinical

Research division of Catholic Health Initiatives. 

Daniel Iverson (’08) is the Communications Manager for the Montana Lottery and was recently awarded the Ott Brown NASPL Scholarship Award. NASPL is the North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries, an international lottery industry organization. The Ott Brown NASPL Scholarship is awarded to one lottery professional per year. The scholarship allows him to attend one of NASPL’s educational events free of charge. Samuel Johnston (’08) graduated in May of 2013 from the

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ALUMNI NEWS University Of Utah S.J. Quinney College Of Law, passing the Utah State Bar. He was hired as Associate General Counsel at the Utah Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel, which is a nonpartisan staff office of the Utah Legislature.  

Jessica Felt Mertlich (’08) and Neil Mertlich (’09) welcomed their baby boy, Beckett Mertlach, in February 2013.

Kirsten Darrington (’07) was selected as the assistant director of Utah Arts and Museums. Kristen has worked for Utah Arts and Museums since February 2012. As a member of the Community Arts team, she managed various division events; provided support to performing artists and local arts agencies; and worked with the Change Leader Program, a professional development course created by Utah Arts and Museums with more than 160 members across the state. Most recently, she participated in Americans for the Arts’ leadership development series, the Local Arts Classroom. After graduating from Westminster with a BA in Arts Administration, she earned a MFA in arts administration from Southern Utah University, where she managed the Shakespeare in the Schools tour for the Utah Shakespeare Festival.

Lindsay Harden (’07) is in her third year of medical school in St. Louis, Missouri.

Jordan Larsen (’07) began classes in the MBA program at BYU this past fall.

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Nick Nageli (’07) started his career in Seattle, Washington, after graduating with a master’s degree in accounting from the University of Washington. He worked for Ernst & Young as an auditor for four years, and transferred down to San Diego. He has been living in San Diego for four years, and just purchased his first house. He currently works for Pulse Electronics as the Manager of Financial Reporting. He has been mentoring several Westminster College students in accounting and loves volunteering his time for his Alma Mater. 

Josh Madrigal (’06) is working in the government affairs group of AREVA, Inc., in Washington DC. AREVA is a French nuclear company with a rather large presence in the United States. He’s been able to work on some nonproliferation issues, do some work on the Hill, and learn the business side of civilian nuclear.

Chris Wharton (’06) graduated from S.J. Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah in 2009, and, after working at a small firm for three years, opened his own solo law practice in the summer of 2012. Chris Wharton Law focuses on family law, criminal defense, and LGBT legal issues in cases across the state of Utah. In addition, Chris serves as the chair of the Salt Lake City Human Rights Commission and as a member of the board of directors for the Utah Pride Center. Diana Elms (’05) is the director of special education at Beehive Science and Technology

school. Diana is honored to have been able to touch the lives of her students and those around her. In 2012 she received the Council for Exceptional Children Special Education Teacher Award and was nominated for Charter School Teacher of the Year 2013. In December 2012, she married her high school sweetheart. Diana also cares for her mentally ill son, Michael.

Roger Arsht (’04) and Caitlin Hawker published their first book, A Slam Dunk, a compelling tale of what happens when money, power, and brutality become intimately acquainted in a world where professional athletes want nothing more than to get away with murder. A Slam Dunk is available in hardcover, paperback, and for Kindle.

Audrey Maynard (’03) and Willy Ray welcomed Olive Pauline Ray into the world on December 21, 2013. Olive joins big brother, Charlie, and the family resides in Murray, Utah.

Cameron Grange (’04) is a family medicine doctor at Northern Rockies Rural Health Clinic and Northern Rockies Medical Center in Cut Bank, Montana. After graduating from Westminster, Cameron went on to medical school at St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies, then completed his residency at Lincoln Medical Education Foundation in Nebraska. Jeffery Nelson (MBA ’04),

CEO of Nelson Laboratories, was appointed chair of the STEM Action Center Board by Utah Governor Gary Herbert. Nelson will oversee the STEM Board’s decisions and STEM Education’s progress throughout the state.

Sam Houston (’02, MBA ’05) and his wife, Bonnie, welcomed the newest addition to their family, Archer, in November 2013. About a month earlier, the Houston family took family photos in the Kim T. Adamson Alumni House. Photographed, Sam and Bonnie Houston with future griffins Mersadies, Melaney, Braden, Amelia, and Quincy.

ALUMNI NEWS welcomed their baby, Adriana Jennifer Gillespie, on June 6, 2013.

Michelle Leo Cousin (’02, MPC ’09) launched Michelle Leo

Kim Casaday (’02) was among the Zion’s Bank team named in American Banker’s magazine’s prestigious “Most Powerful Women in Banking” issue in October 2013.

Marisa Gillspie (’01) and her husband Ethan Gillespie (’02)

Events, an event design and planning company, in 2010. Within eight months, Michelle Leo Events was awarded Utah’s Best of State award in event planning services. Michelle has received the best of State Award in 2012, and 2013. Z Gallerie awarded Michelle as the recipient of their 2013 Designer of the Year Award. Michelle’s work has appeared in several local publications such as Park City/Salt Lake City Bride magazine, Utah Bride and Groom magazine, and Utah Valley Bride magazine. Her work has also been

featured on many national and international wedding blogs and magazines. In 2013, Brides magazine recognized Michelle as one of the top 50 wedding planners in the world. To learn more, visit www.michelleleoevents.com.

Anne Peterson (’01) has

Bridal Boutique for the past five years in downtown Boise, Idaho. Chic Bridal Boutique is a small, high-end bridal shop that sells mostly European designer wedding gowns that Anne handpicks herself from fashion shows in Spain, England, and Holland. In September 2013, Chic Bridal Boutique received the 2013 Best of Bridal Award, a national award given out by The Knot bridal magazine to the top three percent of bridal stores across the United States based on customer service, quality of the gowns, and the shop’s relationship with designers. Anne has also been honored with local Boise awards given by various organizations.

been the proud owner of Chic

Westminster

Annual Golf tournament presented by

Friday, June 6, 2014 the Jeremy Golf and Country Club

Register at westminstercollege.edu/golftournament. For more information or for sponsorship opportunities, contact Safia Keller at 801.832.2733 or skeller@westminstercollege.edu.

$200 per person • Proceeds support the student-athlete scholarship fund.

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CLASS NOTES Tracey Tabet (MPC ’00) is the new director of Salt Lake County aging services.

’90s Cece Mitchell (’96) was among the Zion’s Bank team named in American Banker magazine’s prestigious “Most Powerful Women in Banking” issue in October 2013.

Tamera Ziter (’94) recently joined Verisk Health as a Human Resources Generalist in their South Jordan, Utah, location. She was previously with Acosta Sales and Marketing for the past seven years. She is living happily in Herriman, Utah, with her three teenage children.

Heather continues to operate her thriving dog training business and Jeff is the CEO and founder of Utopian Luxury Vacation Homes and continues to be involved with Westminster, serving on the board of the School of Aviation. The family is currently living in Park City.

’80s The WCF Courier reported the Cedar Valley Catholic Schools’ Board of Education hired Jac-

queline (Haus) Hoggins (MBA ’89) as marketing and communication director.

’70s Lynsee Lynn Ohran Cain (’77) was a preschool teacher

Jeff Jenson (’92)  and  Heather Hampsten (’94) welcomed their first child, Hailey Hunter Jenson, in August 2012. Both entrepreneurs,

for a year after graduation before moving to California where she worked in assembly work, data entry, computer programming, and secretarial work. She married and, after having two premature babies, started a support group for parents of premature births. While raising her two kids, she worked as a marketing surveyor, chat room moderator, and found her faith, becoming a Christian. She now lives in Georgia, where she is a housewife, making baby blankets in her free time.

Maxine Turner (’77) founder of Cuisine Unlimited was featured in an article in the Salt Lake Tribune in November 2013. The article, “Utah catering company planning big US exhibit for Rio Olympics,” highlighted Maxine and her husband, Marvin, who have formed a nonprofit corporation to construct, contract with sponsors, and operate the United States Welcome Pavilion in Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 Summer Olympics. Unlike other country’s houses, the United States Olympic House is not open to the public, just open to Olympic sponsors and VIPs. The US Welcome pavilion would be a place to feature US heritage products. Cuisine Unlimited has participated directly or indirectly in seven Olympic Games. Learn more about Cuisine Unlimited at cuisineunlimited.com.

Patricia (Arakaki) Price (’73) married Ron Price on October 13, 2013. They both work at Harmon’s.

Steve Kazor (’70) enters his seventh year in the St. Louis Rams scouting department, where he is responsible for scouting the southwest area of the United States. Prior to joining the Rams, Kazor served as offensive line coach with the CFL’s Ottawa Renegades. He has had head coaching posts at College of DuPage (2004–2005), Wayne

State University (2000–2003), McPherson College (1998–1999), and Iowa Wesleyan (1993). From 1994–1996, he coached the tight ends, offensive line, and special teams for the Detroit Lions. For 11 seasons (1982–1992), Kazor worked with the Chicago Bears as special teams coach, defensive assistant, tight ends coach, and assistant to the coach, Mike Ditka. In 1980, Kazor signed on with the Dallas Cowboys, where he served as administrative assistant to the vice president, Gil Brandt, and head coach, Tom Landry. Prior to his first stint in the NFL, he served as linebacker coach and recruiting coordinator at the University of Texas at El Paso from 1979–1980, and from 1977–1978, he was the secondary assistant at the University of Texas at Austin. Kazor, and his wife, Colleen, have two children, Lance and Kyle.

Franklin Robinson (’70) is pleased to announce his granddaughter is going to school to become a nurse practitioner, and a grandson will graduate in May from medical school at Tufts University in Boston.

’60s Tom Metcalf (’65) hasn’t slowed down for a minute since retiring from his long career as a pediatrician. He taught pediatrics for three months to physician

HOW TO SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE Michelle Barber Lyhnakis wants to hear from you! We want to celebrate the milestones in your life. Email her about your wedding, new baby, promotion, retirement, new job, adventures, or honors and awards. We’ll include your update in the next issue of the Review. Send us your Class Note along with a 1-megabyte photo to mbarber@westminstercollege.edu.

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CLASS NOTES assistant students at the College of Health in Ghana. Tom has a blog that chronicles his trip to Ghana. He is now the chair of the board of the Utah Health Policy Project, whose mission is to assure access to quality, affordable health care for all Utahns. The current focus of the organization is lobbying the Utah Legislature to accept the affordable care act and its Medicaid expansion.

Mike (’64) and Peg Hogben (’64) have relocated from Colorado to New Jersey for two reasons, Peg’s health (she has asthma and breathing problems with the altitude), and the desire to be closer to their son, Dave, and his wife, Connie.

Robert Zancanella (’61) is still enjoying retirement and singing with the Oratorio Society of Utah.

’50s Carol (Klenck) Matson (’56) and her husband, Wayne, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in June 2013.

A TALE OF TWO ROOMMATES

Brittany Northrup After graduating from Westminster, Brittany Northrup (’10) began teaching free movement and Spanish at Dancing Moose Montessori School in West Valley, Utah. She loved teaching, but dreamed of living abroad. In August 2011 Brittany moved to Incheon, South Korea, to teach English to elementary and middle school students. Her first year in Asia, Brittany traveled to China, Thailand, Taiwan, and Indonesia. She then headed back home for six months to travel, where she visited friends and family all over the US, headed off to Panama and Costa Rica. Now she’s back in Korea teaching English, this time at a private kindergarten in Seoul. Last year she ran two half marathons, traveled to Okinawa, Japan, and volunteered during Christmas with Young Pioneer Disaster Response team on Bantayan Island in Cebu, Philippines, after Typhoon Yolanda.

Sarah Pike Sarah Pike (’10) is a PhD student at Texas Christian University (TCU) in Fort Worth studying Rhetoric and Composition. She’s a regular presenter at national conferences, and has been teaching composition and technical writing courses at Iowa State, TCU, Salt Lake Community College, and Central Arizona College for the past three and half years. Last summer, Sarah had the opportunity to be a teaching assistant in London for the TCU’s Schieffer School of Journalism, assisting professors with strategic communication and media ethics courses. Sarah earned a master’s degree in rhetoric, composition, and professional communication from Iowa State University in 2012. When she’s not in the classroom or conducting research, she’s a campaign volunteer for Texas senator Wendy Davis.

District VII

WESTMINSTER WINS MORE GOLD, THIS TIME FOR YOUR ALUMNI MAGAZINE We are Honored…and Astonished, Given Our Competition Westminster College was recently presented with a Gold Award for its alumni magazine, the Review. The winning entry was produced in the spring of 2013 and featured Westminster’s legendary soccer coach, Chris Dorich. The magazine won the award for the western region, District VII, of the US (Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Northern Mariana Islands, and Utah) and competed against entries from those higher education institutions with magazine circulation less than 29,999. The award was given by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE), which supports alumni relations, communications, development, and marketing professionals at educational institutions worldwide.

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ALUMNI EVENTS

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3

4

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ALUMNI EVENTS 6

Reunion Weekend 2013 Westminster Alumni returned to campus last fall for the annual Reunion Weekend. Highlights included a Campus Ghost Tour, where alumni learned the haunted history and chilling tales of Westminster College; Westminster Thinks Big; a Ted-Talks style conference, where faculty, alumni and students speakers shared their passions in 10 minute lectures, Reunion Brunch, where alumni shared memories of their time at Westminster, and Oktoberfest. Save the Date for Reunion 2014 – September 25-27, 2014.

7

Opposite Page 1. (From left to right) Chad Dorton (’00, MBATM ’09), Stephanie Rhen, Elvie Nelson (’79, MM ’84), Dane Ishihara (’02), Lacey Ishihara (’01), Staci Whitford (’92), and John Whitford at Westminster’s Reunion Weekend Oktoberfest. 2. Zeke Dumke IV (’03) and Marc Weyerstall celebrated Oktoberfest in style. 3. Mary Siciliano (’74) and Jane Brook (’74) in the Oktoberfest Photo Booth. 4. Becca Merrill, Chris Weed (’11), Harley Ringer (MBA ’10) Kelci Ferguson-Ringer (’08, MBA ’10) get silly in the Oktoberfest Photo Booth. 5. Mike (’64) and Peg (’61) Hogben pose for a photo with Noreen (Honorary Doctorate ’12) and Don Rouillard (’48) during the Reunion Weekend annual brunch.

8

This Page 6. Karl Gerner (’12), Lexie Banks (’13), Brandon Lloyd (’14), Kendall Brannen (’13) and Hannah Gramson at Westminster Thinks Big. 7. Jennifer Mitchell (’06), Dean of Students Mark Ferne, Tyson (’08) and Adrienne (’10) Smith at Westminster Thinks Big. 8. Westminster Thinks Big student and faculty presenters Chrono Nu, Kerry Case, Richard Badenhausen, Heidi Van Ert, and Nicole Bedera pose for a photo after their widely successful presentations. Alumni presenters included Jeff Nelson (MBA ’04) and Richelle Raich (’09).

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ALUMNI EVENTS

NYC ALUMNI Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development in New York City in September 2013. The Governor invited alumni from all Utah schools, Westminster had the biggest turn out, and rumor has it, shut the party down. Thomas Paresi (’09), Chelsea Buma Paresi (’11), Governor Gary Herbert, Eliza Romero(’02), Kelly Sabey (’08), Casey Hatch (’09), Tatyana Ayrapetova (MBA ’07); Back Row - Ali Jahromi (’08), Hans Romo (’10), Lian Quinn (’09) at a reception hosted by the Gore 25th Anniversary.

Terri Kelly, CEO of Gore-Tex Industries, engages an audience member before her keynote address during the Gore School of Business 25th Anniversary.

Gore 25th Anniversary Gore School of Business Dean Jin Wang, Ginger Giovale (’65), Gore and Associates CEO Terri Kelly, and Lisa Actor unveiled new signage for the Gore School of Business 25th Anniversary.

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Alumni Kim Kutsch (’76) and Pat Iversen (’76) reconnect with emeritus faculty member Barry Quinn after an alumni panel on innovation at Westminster. Kim and Pat credited much of their success to mentors like Dr. Quinn.

ALUMNI EVENTS (

Kids Club

A couple of highlights from the Halloween Kids Club, which included a costume contest, story time, and mad science with the American Chemistry Club.

Theatre Night

Chett Boxley (MBA ’06) Shannon Boxley, Binmattie Sewnarain (’12), and Esar Chickrie at the alumni and donor volunteer appreciation reception before Westminster’s production of Getting Out.

IN MEMORIAM

)

William Armstrong (’69)

Kathryn Jacobsen (’96)

died on October 12, 2013

died on November 28, 2013

Roland Arterburn (’88)

Walter Latshaw (’39)

died on December 20, 2013

died on July 1, 2013

Kenneth Bagnell (’61)

Everett Mitchell (’39)

died on October 7, 2013

died on June 22, 2013

Christine Buckner (’04)

Barry Naus (’68)

died on September 18, 2013

died on August 19, 2013

Dennis Card (’94)

Grant Nelson (’70)

died on June 28, 2013

died on December 24, 2013

Romagene Christensen (’79)

Adrienne Nystrom (’98)

died on Nov. 28, 2013

died on January 3, 2014

Raymond Clark (’64)

Reed Petersen (’78)

died on October 1, 2013

died on September 25, 2013

Barbara Cummings (’82)

Dean Petrulas (’59)

died on December 26, 2013

died on October 23, 2013

Don Dahlquist (’41)

Kathy Sargent (’67)

died on June 28, 2013

died on September 8, 2013

Lynette Despain (’86)

Patricia Saville (’76)

died on December 23, 2013

died on May 29, 2013

Judson Faler (‘69)

Ruth Schwager (’70)

died on October 14, 2013

died on October 9, 2013

Stuart Felton (’70)

Barbee Shadoan (’93)

died on July 17, 2013

died on November 3, 2013

Ruth Foulks (’72)

Carole Shaffer (’54)

died on July 13, 2013

died on October 24, 2013

Whitney Germaine (’91)

Gerald Sheya (’53)

died on October 18, 2013

died on August 10, 2013

Tommy Gilbert (’75)

Colette Shuler (’84)

died on August 4, 2013

died on July 20, 2013

Glen Hampton (’76)

William Smith (’56)

died on November 16, 2013

died on July 7, 2013

Thomas Hansen (’47)

Jackie Stangl (’74)

died on August 3, 2013

died on October 29, 2013

Douglas Hanson (’69)

Delbert Townsend (’50)

died on December 30, 2013

died on August 13, 2013

Lloyd Hogan (’71)

Ronald Wagstaff (’64)

died on October 7, 2013

died on November 23, 2013

Joyce R. Hansen, MED, Former Faculty, died on August 23, 2013

WESTMINSTER REVIEW

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THE WESTMINSTER NETWORK— MAKE IT WORK FOR YOU t is estimated that up to 75 percent of all people land their jobs through networking. That means that employers fill positions with people whom they know or with people who are referred to them by colleagues. “Making a ‘bad hire’ is really expensive,” says Mechelle Adamson, alumni career coach at Westminster, “If an employer can hire someone based on a recommendation from a trusted colleague, the risk is greatly reduced.” Most employers prefer to fill positions through their contacts, and to become one of those contacts, you need to network.

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HOW TO START Networking is not “schmoozing.” Keeping score of who helped whom, or trying to figure out how to use someone for your own benefit isn’t the way to succeed. Successful networking isn’t cold or impersonal either. Networking is building relationships—genuinely connecting with people and sharing your knowledge and resources in effort to provide value to others, while simultaneously increasing your own. You will not only be talking to the people that you know but, indirectly, to all the people that they know.

“The Westminster Network is likely your largest network,” says Michelle Barber Lyhnakis, director of alumni relations, “Being a graduate of Westminster connects you to nearly 19,000 other alumni, faculty, and staff.” However, making the assumption that just because you both bleed purple will get you job is dangerous. “Networking is about building mutually beneficial relationships,” Barber-Lyhnakis says. “The fact that you have a shared educational experience is a place to start the conversation.” In order to benefit from the Westminster Network you need to participate and follow the unspoken rules of networking.

Never ask for a job. “It sounds counter-intuitive, as you’re likely networking to get a job,” Adamson says, “but, asking for a job makes people feel uncomfortable.” Do ask for information. Most people want to be helpful and will answer tactful questions. If you’re networking for a job, research their company and prepare questions that will help you understand their career path, the culture of the company, and whether or not the company would be a good fit for you. Chances are if there is an opening, they’ll let you know, or they’ll think of you when there is an opening.

Westminster Offers alumni, students, faculty, and staff many opportunities to be part of the Westminster network including the following: Create your profile, and then search for Westminster College in the Universities menu. From there you can search the profiles of more than 10,000 Westminster alumni. You can see where they work, where they live, and what they do.

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WESTMINSTER REVIEW

GORE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS MONTHLY NETWORKING LUNCHES

The third Friday of the month, graduates of the Gore School of Business meet at a Salt Lake City restaurant for a casual networking lunch. Visit westminstercollege. edu/alumni to find out where the next lunch is.

Each Fall and Spring semester the alumni office and career center team up to coordinate one-time informational interviews for students and alumni. Sign up to Take a Griffin to Lunch at westminstercollege.edu/careerexplore.

TAKE A GRIFFIN TO LUNCH

Be genuine. Networking is not a numbers game. Be sincere in your desire to get to know someone. Your goal shouldn’t be to gather as many business cards as you can, only to mass email your new contacts. You reach out to individuals with a specific purpose. Bring something to the table. Be prepared to share experience, expertise, advice, and resources. Networking is about building mutually beneficial relationships. Some, especially those that are new to networking, worry that people will not want to be bothered or that networking is somehow unethical. However, realize that networking isn’t one sided. The people with whom you network may need to use your resources one day. Also, when someone recommends you to someone in their network and you do a great job, their social and professional capital goes up.

A new BFA program launches fall 2014. Contact Nina Vought, Chair, Westminster Dance: nvought@westminstercollege.edu, 801.832.2439


Westminster Review Spring 2014