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JANUARY 2014 |

The Monthly Magazine of the League of California Cities速

2013 LEGISLATIVE YEAR p.8 IN REVIEW

How Local Officials Can Support Citizenship p. 7 Montclair and Ontario Invest in Future Workforce p. 15

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CONTENTS 2 Calendar of League Events 3 Executive Director’s Message League Leadership Reviews Progress on New Advocacy Strategy And Sets 2014 Goals

8 2013 Legislative Year In Review

By Dan Carrigg

In 2013 the League focused on sponsoring and supporting legislation to help develop new community and economic development tools and funding options for city services. On other fronts, it was another busy year for defending local control on measures that would undercut local authority and revenues. And a visible change occurred with the prospect of longer legislative terms.

By Chris McKenzie

When the leadership of the League gathered in November for the annual goal-setting meeting, the League staff was pleased to report that the organization had concluded a largely successful 2013 legislative year.

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City Forum

Connecting Veterans With Services Benefits The Entire Community

By Carolyn Ballou

California is currently home to 1.8 million veterans. In addition, more than 40,000 veterans are expected to return to the state every year for the next several years.

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News from the Institute for Local Government

How Local Officials Can Support Citizenship and Civic Participation Approximately 2.5 million “lawful permanent residents” living in California are eligible to become U.S. citizens. Local officials can leverage their leadership to encourage naturalization efforts and strengthen their communities.

15 California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence

Montclair and Ontario Invest in Future Workforce

 ike many cities throughout L California, Montclair and Ontario are faced with breaking the cycle of low adult educational attainment, family poverty and workforce development hurdles. An innovative partnership, the Promise Scholars Initiative, offers a way to overcome these community challenges.

16 Job Opportunities 23 Professional Services Directory

 On the Cover: State Capitol dome  Photo: Yvonne Hunter

President José Cisneros Treasurer San Francisco

1400 K Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 658-8200 Fax (916) 658-8240

First Vice President Tony Ferrara Mayor Arroyo Grande

Second Vice President Katherine Miller Council Member Stockton

Immediate Past President Bill Bogaard Mayor Pasadena

Executive Director Chris McKenzie

leaguevents

Magazine Staff Editor in Chief Jude Hudson, Hudson + Associates (916) 658-8234 email: editor@westerncity.com

JANUARY 2014 22 – 24

New Mayors and Council Members’ Academy, Sacramento This vitally important training prepares newly elected officials for the demands of office and introduces them to the legal constraints on city councils.

Managing Editor Eva Spiegel (916) 658-8228 email: espiegel@cacities.org

23 – 24

Advertising Sales Manager Pam Maxwell-Blodgett (916) 658-8256 email: maxwellp@cacities.org

Policy Committee Meetings, Sacramento The League’s policy committees review issues of interest to cities statewide and make recommendations to the League board of directors.

Administrative Assistant Anita Lopez (916) 658-8223 email: alopez@cacities.org

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Legal Advocacy Committee, Sacramento The committee reviews and recommends friend-of-the-court efforts on cases of significant statewide interest to California cities.

Contributors Terry Amsler Mahvash Hassan JoAnne Speers

FEBRUARY

Associate Editors Jim Carnes Carol Malinowski Carolyn Walker

5–7

City Managers’ Department Meeting, Long Beach Geared to the unique needs of city managers, this conference covers issues affecting cities throughout California.

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20 – 21

Advertising Design ImagePoint Design For photo credits, see page 17. Western City (ISSN 0279-5337) is published monthly by the League of California Cities, 1400 K St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Subscriptions: $39.00/1 year; $63.00/2 years; student: $26.50; foreign: $52.00; single copies: $4.00, including sales tax. Entered as periodical mail January 30, 1930, at the Post Office, Los Angeles, CA 90013, under the Act of April 13, 1879. Periodical postage paid at Sacramento, Calif.

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MARCH 26 – 28

Public Works Officers’ Institute, Sacramento Designed for professionals at every career level, this conference covers the latest developments in public works.

26 – 28

Planning Commissioners’ Academy, San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront Tailored to meet the needs of planning commissioners, planning directors, planning staff and other interested officials, the academy offers sessions on the major planning and land-use issues facing cities.

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Postmaster: Send address changes to Western City, 1400 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Western City Trademark Reg. U.S. Pat. Off. ©2014 League of California Cities. All rights reserved. Material may not be reprinted without written permission. This issue is Volume XC, No. 1.

Board of Directors’ Meeting, San Francisco The League board reviews, discusses and takes action on a variety of issues affecting cities, including legislation, legal advocacy, education and training, and more.

Event and registration information is available at www.cacities.org/events. W

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For the latest information on League conferences and events, follow us on Twitter @CaCitiesLearn. For legislative and policy updates and more, follow @CaCities. Follow Western City @WesternCityMag. Join us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/westerncity www.facebook.com/LeagueofCaCities www.cacities.org

Executive Director’s Message by Chris McKenzie

League Leadership Reviews Progress on

New Advocacy Strategy and Sets 2014 Goals Stepping back every few years to evaluate strategies and tactics is essential for a major organization to remain effective. The League took this approach during the past year through the work of a special task force of city officials from throughout the state. In April 2013 the League board of directors adopted the task force’s recommended Multi-Year Advocacy Strategies to Expand and Protect Local Control. And in November 2013 the leadership of the League board, divisions, departments, policy committees and caucuses gathered to collectively assess the progress made so far on implementing the new strategic advocacy plan and to set policy goals for 2014.

business interests, where possible, to protect local authority and expand funding options; • Engaging in selective litigation, as required, to defend core local control authority and revenues; and • Using the initiative process when necessary to protect or enhance local authority and funding. continued

The plan not only laid out a series of strategies and tactics for the League in 2013 but also established a five-year multifaceted organizational roadmap. The plan focuses on: • Building on and expanding the engagement of city officials, who form the cornerstone of good government in California as well as the League’s political strength; • Building and maintaining constructive relationships with legislators, the governor and officials in his administration; • Partnering with other organizations representing local governments and

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Western City, January 2014

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League Leadership Reviews Progress on New Advocacy Strategy and Sets 2014 Goals, continued

A New Legislative Playing Field Major developments on the legislative front provided motivation for setting a new advocacy strategy. November 2012 brought a class of legislators to the Capitol who were elected under significantly different redistricting and primary (top-two) and term-limit rules, allowing them to serve 12 years total in one house or a combination of both. Nine new legislators are alumni of the League’s own prestigious California Civic Leadership Institute®, an educational program for local government elected officials who are interested in running for the Legislature. The task force and board of directors concluded that these developments were

so significant that they collectively may help legislators to cultivate deeper policy expertise, work more closely with the League and produce better legislative outcomes for cities. While time will tell whether this is correct, it appears to be a reasonable hypothesis that the League’s new advocacy strategy is designed to test. Implementation of the strategy began in early January 2013 with city officials, the League’s officers, board members and League lobbyists investing considerable time in meeting face-to-face with legislators, their staff and key administration personnel. The effort continued throughout the legislative session with hundreds of meetings with legislators and staff, supplemented by phone calls, letters and emails. At key stages in the legislative process,

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League of California Cities

city officials were active contributors to the League’s legislative strategy, meeting with legislators — at times in their districts — to drive home the importance of local control and the League’s policy goals of economic development and continued pension reform. On one critical gut-andamend effort at the session’s end, a city official was able to secure a meeting with the author of a bill that the League strongly opposed, opening the door to vitally important amendments.

Assessing Progress and Looking Ahead When the dust of the legislative session settled, the League had clearly made substantial progress on economic development legislation. The pension reforms of the prior year were being effectively implemented and protected from possible erosion. The League also took important steps to improve its relationship with the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) as that agency carries out its continually evolving policies that dramatically affect city budgets. When the leadership of the League’s divisions, departments, policy committees and diversity groups gathered in November with the League board for the annual goal-setting meeting, League staff was pleased to report that the organization had concluded a largely successful 2013 legislative year. This suggests that the League’s new multi-year advocacy strategy is having a positive impact overall. While dealing with hundreds of bills during the session, the League sponsored bills and also stopped or obtained significant amendments to many others affecting local control and revenues, secured the passage of some important economic development bills and laid the groundwork for progress on economic development in 2014. The League adopted three strategic policy goals for 2014 at the November meeting. (These goals are intended to encompass and supplement the resolutions adopted www.cacities.org

THE ORGANIZATION CONCLUDED A LARGELY SUCCESSFUL 2013 LEGISLATIVE YEAR. THIS SUGGESTS THE LEAGUE’S NEW MULTI-YEAR ADVOCACY STRATEGY IS HAVING A POSITIVE IMPACT OVERALL.

by the General Assembly at the League’s 2013 Annual Conference concerning the important needs of cities in the area of water infrastructure and improved implementation of the 2011 AB 109 public safety realignment.) The 2014 goals are: 1. Provide New Options for Infrastructure Investment and Economic Development. Advocate for new tools, authority and funding to enable increased investment in state and local infrastructure and economic development to support expanded job growth and economic opportunity for all Californians.

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While implementation of the new advocacy strategy will continue throughout 2014, city officials should take pride in their early successes and consider continuing to invest in this important effort. After all, the best lawsuits and statewide ballot measures are the ones that are unnecessary because the League, state Legislature and governor are collaborating effectively to meet the needs of the many millions of Californians; share a mutual respect for the important role each plays in doing so; and agree to focus on the strategic goals outlined here and on other important issues that will arise. ■

2. Expand Reform of Pension and Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) Policies to Better Contain Long-Term Costs. Build on recent pension reforms and urge the adoption of additional measures to contain and manage the long-term growth of pension and OPEB costs, ensure the sustainability of these employee benefits and protect the capacity of cities to adequately fund vital public safety and other community services. 3. Build Effective Partnerships to Help Respond to Growing Community Needs. Build effective partnerships with state and local officials and other organizations to promote local authority and funding sufficient to meet growing community needs.

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Western City, January 2014

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CONNECTING VETERANS WITH SERVICES

BENEFITS THE ENTIRE COMMUNITY by Carolyn Ballou

L

earning about state and federal veterans’ benefits is a good idea for city officials. In addition to improving the lives of veterans and their families, veterans’ benefits boost local economies and help improve neighborhoods and communities.

California is currently home to 1.8 million veterans. With the drawdown of troops and restructuring of the U.S. military, an additional 40,000 veterans are expected to return to the state every year for the next several years. Regardless of age, branch of service, post or assignment, veterans who served honorably are entitled to a host of state and federal benefits. The California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVet) works to connect veterans of every era with the benefits to which they are entitled for their service to our country. Veterans’ benefits bring hundreds of millions of dollars into California every year.

Disability compensation and pension benefits improve household incomes and put spending money into veterans’ pockets. Other benefits enable veterans to begin or resume their college education, get job training and find employment, access health care, start a business and buy or improve a home. Veterans may also qualify for free or reduced-fee licenses, passes to state parks, property tax exemptions, specialty license plates and other considerations. What’s more, qualified dependents of veterans with a service-connected disability can attend any California community college, state college or university tuition-free — making a college education a reality for many whose families could not have afforded it otherwise. Job training, vocational rehabilitation and other employment-related benefits reduce veteran unemployment. Housing,

employment, mental health services (including treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and military sexual trauma) and other benefits help reduce veteran homelessness. Veterans’ courts offer veterans accused of certain crimes more agreeable alternatives to incarceration. Educational benefits increase enrollment in California’s colleges and universities and prepare veteran students to become vital, productive, contributing members of their communities. These veteran’s benefits are something cities can easily tap into. CalVet offers simple, no-cost ways that you can help local veterans connect with the benefits and services to which they are entitled. To learn more, visit www.calvet.ca.gov/ Resources/Help.aspx. ■

Carolyn Ballou is communications director of the Veterans Services Division of the California Department of Veterans Affairs. She can be reached at Carolyn.Ballou@calvet.ca.gov.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

News from the Institute for Local Government

How Local Officials Can Support Citizenship and Civic Participation Approximately 2.5 million “lawful permanent residents” living in California are eligible to become U.S. citizens. Citizenship strengthens immigrants’ ties to their communities, increases their opportunities to participate in our democracy and builds their economic contributions with a typical 15 percent increase in spending power. As consumers and taxpayers, new citizens contribute significantly to local economies. Thus, increasing the number of immigrants who naturalize can be a boon to individuals and their communities. Despite these benefits, the naturalization process to become a U.S. citizen can be complicated and daunting. Naturalization applicants must apply to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), pay a fee, submit fingerprints, undergo background and security checks, and pass English and civics tests. They should also be wary of fraudulent practitioners. California’s local officials can leverage their leadership to encourage naturalization efforts and enhance civic engagement by new citizens, which strengthens their communities. This can be done in several ways, including the following. Host and speak at citizenship workshops to welcome and inspire potential applicants and provide a positive introduction to local government. For example, the mayors of Concord, Patterson, Riverbank and Woodland spoke to potential citizens at such workshops, and two of the mayors who had immigrant family backgrounds shared stories about their own paths to citizenship. Provide space and recruit volunteers to help with citizenship classes or application workshops as a signal to immigrants that they are welcome within the halls of local government. A volunteer-run citizenship class at Cupertino’s senior center has successfully prepared more than 1,000 new citizens. The City of Oakley partnered with community organizations, businesses and volunteers to assist immigrant attendees at Oakley’s second annual citizenship drive. Partner with community-based organizations, USCIS and philanthropic foundations to leverage expertise and resources and help residents better understand the naturalization process. Opportunities abound for such partnerships. The Office of Civic Engagement and Immigrant Affairs in San Francisco partnered with local foundations and communitybased organizations to establish the San Francisco Pathways to www.westerncity.com

Citizenship Initiative. More than 127,000 individuals began their citizenship journey in the Los Angeles Public Library’s “citizenship corners.” USCIS community relations officers act as a valuable resource for communities throughout the state, and cities can apply to USCIS for grants. Inform immigrant communities about naturalization efforts through ethnic media, which provide an invaluable connection between immigrants and public agencies. Univision’s partnership with the Ya es hora ¡Ciudadanía! campaign to educate and motivate eligible lawful permanent residents to apply for citizenship led to a dramatic increase in applications both in California and nationwide. Welcome new citizens or host a naturalization ceremony. Being sworn in as a U.S. citizen can be one of the most moving moments in an immigrant’s life. The vice mayor of Campbell served as the keynote speaker at a naturalization ceremony, and Redwood City welcomed new citizens at a city council meeting.

Helpful Resources The Institute for Local Government offers a number of resources to help local officials who are interested in encouraging lawful permanent residents to seek citizenship. Active Citizens, Stronger Communities: Helping Lawful Permanent Residents Become Citizens — Options for Local Officials (www.ca-ilg.org/immigrantcitizenship) is a free e-publication that covers understanding the process, hurdles and benefits; the economic impact of citizenship; and resources and case stories. Tools to help local agencies engage new citizens and immigrants can be found at www.ca-ilg.org/ engaging-immigrants-and-new-citizens. ■ Western City, January 2014

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2013 Money cures many things, including issues in the state Capitol. With voter approval of Proposition 30, which increased sales tax and income taxes, and Prop. 39, which ended a $1 billion corporate tax break, the cycle of multi-billion dollar state budget deficits finally ended — at least for the short term. The economy also improved. Unemployment decreased, the stock market rebounded and home equities increased. Democratic legislators obtained supermajority powers and

broader prospects — they could move legislation at will, place measures on the ballot and even override the governor. Yet these developments were tempered by more sobering realities. The adopted budget was balanced but had minimal reserves, and billions of dollars in unfunded pension and health care liabilities remained outstanding. Governor Jerry Brown resisted new spending and continued to prevail on most budget and policy matters.

In 2013 the League focused on sponsoring and supporting legislation to help develop new community and economic development tools and funding options for city services. These efforts included proposals developed by the League’s 2012 Task Force on the Next Generation of Economic Development Tools and legislation that focused on redevelopment dissolution, affordable housing, infrastructure development and reduced voter thresholds. While legislators were

Dan Carrigg is legislative director for the League and can be reached at dcarrigg@cacities.org.

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League of California Cities

www.cacities.org

LEGISLATIVE YEAR IN REVIEW

BY DAN CARRIGG

ready to move forward in these areas, the governor was not. Several helpful redevelopment agency dissolution bills made it through the process and were signed into law, but proposals for new tools and resources stalled or were held back from the governor’s desk. On other fronts, it was another busy year for defending local control on measures that would undercut local authority and revenues.

THE TOP-TWO PRIMARY WAS A VIABLE VEHICLE FOR UNSEATING INCUMBENTS, WHICH RARELY HAPPENED IN PRIOR YEARS.

continued

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Western City, January 2014

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2013 Legislative Year in Review, continued

NEW CAPITOL DYNAMICS: REDISTRICTING, TOP-TWO PRIMARY AND LONGER TERMS Other things changed in the Capitol besides an improved budget. The November 2012 elections produced the first class of legislators subject to independent redistricting, a top-two primary system and term limits extended to 12 years in one legislative house or a combination of both. Democrats also captured more than two-thirds of the seats in both houses. While it is too early to fully assess the results of these reforms, the following initial observations can be made. The theory behind redistricting was that having an independent commission — instead of politicians — draw district boundaries would ensure balance and produce representatives more focused on solving problems than waging partisan battles. The new legislators, however, have not yet fully made their mark. They voted with their predecessors to re-elect the Senate and Assembly leadership previously in place and, with few exceptions, followed it. Their actions in 2014 will be more revealing when they decide on replacements for the current term-limited Assembly speaker and Senate president pro tem, who will exit the Legislature. The top-two primary signaled change on Election Day when several incumbent Assembly Democrats backed by the speaker were defeated by challengers from within their own party. The election of Assembly Members Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica) and Marc Levine (D-San Rafael), both former council members, demonstrated that the top-two primary was a viable vehicle for unseating incumbents, which rarely happened in prior years. This is an improvement from a local accountability standpoint. Instead of being shielded by their party to protect their seats, legislators will need to be more attentive to district issues. This also increases the value of local endorsements. In addition, a visible change occurred with the prospect of longer legislative terms. Unlike their predecessors, the new class of legislators appeared less in a rush to introduce legislation and run for

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League of California Cities

the next office. Many seem genuinely interested in taking the time to develop policy expertise and build relations with each other, including across party lines. If this trend continues, a more policyfocused and deliberative mindset among legislators should improve receptiveness for issues raised by cities and other groups with a stake in policy matters.

ACTIONS OF THE SUPERMAJORITY As the session began, political observers speculated about what the Democrats would do with their new supermajority. Prop. 25 of 2010 had already addressed budget delays by reducing the vote threshold to a majority and cutting legislative pay for missed deadlines, so two-thirds control meant less than in past years. Still, a supermajority cemented the Democrats’ control over the Capitol, relegating Republicans to the role of political bystanders. Urgency measures could be adopted and procedural rules waived. Gutting and amending bills in the final hours of a session could reign unchecked. But for Democrats the real question was whether they would assert their authority as a counterweight to the governor’s power. They could place constitutional amendments on the state ballot without the governor’s signature and override vetoes. However, Democrats have done little yet to exercise their newly acquired powers. They have introduced several constitutional amendments, including proposals to lower local vote thresholds and change the initiative process, but little action has resulted. This could simply be a matter

of timing. The real deadlines to qualify measures for the November ballot come in mid-2014. As for an override, it appears there would have to be a significant level of tension and much to consider before any serious attempt to override would be initiated. The presence of a supermajority has not yet fundamentally altered the relationship between Democrats and the governor. During the first two years of his term, the governor led the state out of a $26 billion fiscal hole by first persuading the Legislature to accept significant cuts to social programs, eliminate redevelopment agencies and enact prison realignment, and then persuading voters to approve billions of dollars in additional temporary taxes with Prop. 30. The governor’s dominance continued in 2013. Employing wily experience from years in politics, he continued to set the agenda — shifting nearly $2 billion per year in additional funds for impoverished schools, borrowing capand-trade funds, eliminating enterprise zones and securing an appropriation to house thousands of state prisoners rather than agree to federal court-ordered reduction programs. Ironically, one of the most significant accomplishments of supermajority action so far was the approval of SCA 3 (Leno), which places a constitutional amendment on the June 2014 ballot to exempt the state from reimbursing local governments approximately $15 million for mandates required by the California Public Records Act (CPRA). Passage of this measure was inspired after newspapers criticized the governor and legislators over a related

ONE SIGNIFICANT, POSITIVE DEVELOPMENT WAS THE GOVERNOR’S SIGNING INTO LAW 85 PERCENT OF LEAGUE-SUPPORTED BILLS.

www.cacities.org

A quiet moment passes in the Senate chamber before legislators reconvene.

budget proposal seeking to avoid payment. The measure amends Prop. 59 of 2004, which incorporates the right of public access to information contained in the CPRA and other open meetings laws into the state Constitution. Yet when Prop. 59 was being drafted, the Legislature exempted its own operations from these provisions. Should SCA 3 pass, the lack of state reimbursement obligations and the need for the Legislature to adhere to similar standards may open the door for expanded mandates on local governments.

DEMOCRATIC CONSTITUENCY GROUPS GET AGGRESSIVE With the state budget issues temporarily resolved, many Democratic constituency groups — hoping that the governor had not forgotten their assistance with the passage of Prop. 30 — envisioned restored programs and the adoption of progressive legislation. While the governor resisted major new spending proposals affecting the budget, he was open to many policy proposals that made it to his

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desk, including increasing the minimum wage, expanding rights for same-sex couples, providing driver’s licenses to undocumented immigrants, reducing school testing requirements, expanding the application of prevailing wages, and imposing restrictions on guns and bullets. Other proposals introduced in the first year of a two-year session will continue to be debated in 2014. These include liberalizing marijuana policies, providing additional rights to the homeless and limiting the expansion of non-union grocery stores.

MIXED RESULTS ON SEVERAL REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY DISSOLUTION CLEANUP BILLS Numerous legislators carried bills supported or sponsored by the League to address aspects of redevelopment dissolution. Assembly Member Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) authored AB 440 to restore “Polanco Act” brownfields remediation authority to cities and counties. Senator Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo) helped respond

to a problem with advertising displays in former redevelopment areas by authoring League-sponsored SB 684. While Gov. Brown signed both bills, other helpful proposals failed to garner his approval. Another bill, AB 981 authored by Assembly Member Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica), would free up proceeds from post-2011 redevelopment agency bonds to be expended for projects but was held in the Appropriations Committee. Gov. Brown vetoed two other measures with messages that conveyed his desire to maintain state supervision over details of redevelopment dissolution disputes. AB 564 by Assembly Member Kevin Mullin (D-South San Francisco), sponsored by the League to provide certainty for cities receiving a Department of Finance (DOF) finding of completion by establishing a “one bite of the apple” policy for DOF reviews, made it through both houses without a single “no” vote. However, the governor vetoed the measure with a message stating the bill “would continued Western City, January 2014

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2013 Legislative Year in Review, continued

make policy changes that are contrary to the letter and intent of current law” and would “severely limit the state’s ability to ensure that successor agencies fulfill their obligation to wind down redevelopment affairs in an expeditious manner.” The governor also vetoed AB 662, a cleanup measure authored by Assembly Member Toni Atkins (D-San Diego). In his AB 662 veto message, the governor objected to language providing local agencies with flexibility to enter into new or amended contracts covering existing enforceable obligations.

EFFORTS STALL AROUND NEW TOOLS Legislators also focused on developing new post-redevelopment tools. Assembly Member Luis Alejo (D-Watsonville) worked closely with the League on AB 1080, a measure that would restore redevelopment authority for disadvantaged

communities. Senator Lois Wolk (D-Davis) continued her effort to make infrastructure financing district (IFD) law into a useful tool through her bill SB 33. Senate Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) authored SB 1, a financing tool for transit-oriented development. Other options for using IFDs came from Assembly Member Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento) in AB 243 and Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez (D-Los Angeles) in AB 229. All of these measures were held in the Legislature after the governor’s administration sent signals that it was not ready to consider them. Two other worthwhile proposals, AB 294 and AB 305, were held in committee. Assembly Member Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) authored AB 294, which would allow the State Infrastructure Bank to invest tax increment from the school share of property taxes in projects that match state and regional goals.

Assembly Member V. Manuel Pérez (D-Coachella) authored AB 305, which would assist economic development in disadvantaged areas with a California New Markets Tax Credit. Other legislators focused on filling the void in affordable housing funding. Senator Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord), who chairs the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee, crafted SB 391. This bill would provide an annual allocation of approximately $500 million for affordable housing funds derived from a tax on real estate transfer documents. The measure is pending in the Assembly after passing in the Senate. Assembly Member Toni Atkins authored AB 1229 to restore local inclusionary zoning authority for rental property. The governor vetoed that measure and indicated that he wanted to await the Supreme Court’s decision on a related pending case. On a positive note, the governor approved AB 639 by Assembly Speaker John A. Pérez, which will place before the voters a measure to provide flexibility for $600 million in unused veterans housing bond authority.

PLAYING DEFENSE TO PRESERVE EXISTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TOOLS While the League worked with many legislators to craft new economic development tools, it had to play defense as well.

Staff prepares for the start of session in the Assembly chamber.

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League of California Cities

Enterprise zones have long been the target of legislative criticism, whether it was the impact on the state budget, the types of businesses assisted or the activities of tax consultants who work with these businesses. The League has historically supported these zones because they are successful in bringing jobs to disadvantaged areas with high unemployment. Under this state program, local agencies had to compete for a zone designation and were also subject to 15-year terms and other accountability requirements. Despite the efforts of a coalition of affected businesses and cities, the governor succeeded in convincing legislators to accept his proposals, which eliminated enterprise zones as of Jan. 1, 2014, and included a phase-out of up to five years for hiring tax credits for employees hired before www.cacities.org

that date. Regarding replacement programs, the Legislature agreed to eliminate state sales tax on manufacturing equipment, provide authority to the governor’s Office of Economic Development (GO-Biz) to offer several hundred million dollars in tax incentives to businesses, and establish a narrow hiring tax credit program targeted toward higher-wage jobs. In other areas the League worked to protect local authority by opposing measures that would undermine local land-use authority and flexibility on economic development. The League opposed and helped defeat AB 667 (Hernandez). This measure would have singled out specific retailers (more than 90,000 square feet with 10,000 square feet for selling groceries) for an exhaustive economic impact report that would have made it very difficult to approve stores meeting these characteristics and would also have increased litigation. The League opposed this measure due to its interference with local land-use decisions. The measure was later held in the Senate Governance and Finance Committee.

League participated in a successful campaign to obtain major amendments to SB 594 (Hill), a gut-and-amend measure that would have restricted organizations like the League from advocating and spending non-public funds on ballot measures. The bill passed after amendments were made that local agencies found acceptable.

Protecting Municipal Affairs. For more than 100 years the California Constitution has authorized voters to adopt local charters that govern their local “municipal affairs.” The courts have interpreted this authority to provide charter cities a degree of insulation continued on page 20

THE STAGE IS NOW SET FOR BROADER ACTION ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INFRASTRUCTURE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING.

A similar but broader measure, SB 673 (DeSaulnier), would have created unnecessary delays and litigation by imposing a new analysis upon any commercial development if the project benefited substantially from any financial assistance such as a state or federal grant, low-interest loan, land donation or acquisition, remediation or environmental cleanup activity. This measure failed passage on the Senate floor. The League also opposed and requested a veto on AB 562 (Williams), which requires specific documentation of information on local economic development efforts. While the bill was signed, the League helped obtain amendments in the Senate to reduce the bill’s potential burdens.

ADVOCATING FOR CITY INTERESTS The League advocated for local control and city interests on numerous fronts in 2013. Preserving Ballot Advocacy Authority. In partnership with the California State Association of Counties (CSAC) and other local government organizations, the

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Western City, January 2014

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Students in the cities of Montclair and Ontario receive encouragement and an incentive to pursue a college education.

Montclair and Ontario Invest in

Future Workforce Located in San Bernardino County, the cities of Montclair and Ontario have a combined population of more than 203,600 residents. Like many cities throughout California, Montclair and Ontario are faced with breaking the cycle of low adult educational attainment, family poverty and workforce development hurdles. An innovative partnership, the Promise Scholars Initiative, reflects the cities’ commitment to business growth and employment success as one way to overcome these community challenges.

The Promise Scholars Initiative makes a promise to all students in the OntarioMontclair School District (OMSD) that if they stay in school and graduate, there will be a scholarship and a place for them in college. Every year this promise is made to all 5th-grade students in OMSD by the initiative’s partners, which include the cities of Montclair and Ontario; San Bernardino County; Chaffey Joint Union High School District; Chaffey Community College; California State University (CSU) Bakersfield; CSU San Bernardino; California State Polytechnic University, Pomona; Inland Empire United Way; local businesses and many others. These partners believe that education is not the sole province of schools, but is an economic development issue at the heart of a city’s success in attracting and

maintaining businesses. Higher paying jobs, a robust tax base and a better quality of life depend on a well-educated workforce. The Promise Scholar Initiative partners share a vision of increased educational attainment for all children in the community. “We’re making the promise to our Ontario youth that a college education is indeed in their future,” says Paul Leon, mayor of Ontario. “We believe this program can positively impact our future residents’ quality of life and the quality of our future workforce.”

The Initiative’s Origins The initiative is based on the “Online to College” program launched by the City of Montclair, OMSD and Chaffey Community College in 1999. continued on page 18

The cities of Ontario and Montclair won the CCS Partnership Intergovernmental Collaboration Award in the 2013 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more about the award program, visit www.helenputnam.org.

www.westerncity.com

Western City, January 2014

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Display Advertising

Western City magazine’s job opportunity section is the source for job seekers looking for positions in local government. When you place a job opportunity ad in Western City magazine, it will be posted at no additional charge on our website. For rates and deadlines, visit www.westerncity. com and click on the Advertise link.

Call Pam Maxwell-Blodgett at (800) 262-1801 to place a display (boxed) ad or for rate and deadline information, or email admanager@westerncity.com. Website Job Postings Display ads are posted on our website at no additional charge. But if you miss the deadline for getting your job opportunity ad into the magazine, you can post it on the Western City website right away. To post your job opportunity ad on our automated website, visit www.westerncity.com or contact Anita Lopez, administrative assistant; email: alopez@cacities.org; phone: (916) 658-8223.

Budget-Friendly Contract Staffing

Need temporary help in your Department, or in filling a vacancy?

MuniTemps has municipal professionals ready to work.

Getting temp help is easy as 1-2-3: 1. Email us job description of position. 2. Approve simple staffing agreement. 3. Approve bill rate and “best fit” candidate. “Your inquiry handled with utmost discretion”

CITY OF PORTOLA CITY MANAGER

Portola is seeking a dynamic, engaging City Manager. The successful candidate will be an experienced professional with demonstrated capability of managing a small city. Desirable qualifications include extensive experience with economic development and public relations, ability to communicate effectively, ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with government officials, community groups, contractors, and City staff, and experience with Federal and California State regulations. A Bachelor’s Degree in public administration or related field is required; Master’s Degree preferred. Salary negotiable and commensurate with experience and education. Visit cityofportola.com for more information. Closing: January 31, 2014

16

League of California Cities

Serving All Cities in California

1-866-406-6864

www.munitemps.com

Temporary staff help is just a phone call away! City Manager, City of Oxnard, CA The City of Oxnard (population exceeding 200,000) is located on the “Gold Coast” of sunny California approximately halfway between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara/ The City Council is seeking an experienced City Manager to oversee an operating budget of $364.7 million and a full-time staff of over 1,600 employees. The new City Manager will be expected to demonstrate and promote the highest standards of personal and professional conduct. Oxnard will value a candidate who practices an open style of management and works collaboratively with the Council, department heads and staff to foster a working environment that encourages individuals to excel in their areas of responsibility. The selected individual will have a strong community presence and open door policy for the Council, staff and general public. The ideal candidate will be a seasoned individual who can hit the ground running. Candidates should possess significant experience in municipal government. A Bachelor’s Degree in Public Administration, Business Administration, or a related field is required; a Master’s Degree is preferred. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Mr. Fred Freeman at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 24, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

www.cacities.org

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Director of Water and Sewer City of Greeley, Colorado

The City of Greeley has prospered as the education, trade, transportation, and marketing center of Weld County, one of the richest and most productive counties in the U.S. Greeley has an estimated population of 93,593, covers an area of 46.4 miles and is home to the University of Northern Colorado. The Director leads a department of 121 FTE’s who treat and distribute about 9 billion gallons per year with over 500 miles of pipeline, two drinking water plants, a wastewater treatment plant, three treated water reservoirs, six raw water reservoirs and a variety of pumping stations. The City’s legacy of foresight dates back over 100 years and consequently the city has one of the more robust water systems in the entire state. Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s preferred. Salary range is from $115,000 to $130,000 DOQE with competitive benefits.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is January 20, 2014.

Looking for Information?

Now recruiting for . . .

City Manager City of Poway

City Librarian

City of Santa Clara Teri Black • 310.377.2612 Carolyn Seeley • 949.487.7606

We Can Help!

Getting up to speed on city issues can be challenging. Western City magazine makes it easier to get a handle on the issues affecting your city. Our website gives you a way to easily locate recent articles that address:

» Community Services » Economic Development & Redevelopment

» Environment, Energy & Climate Change

» Governance, Legislation & Law

Photo/art credits Cover: Yvonne Hunter

Pages 8, 9, 11, 12: Yvonne Hunter

Pages 3 & 5: Yvonne Hunter

Pages 15 & 19: Courtesy of cities of Montclair and Ontario and League of California Cities

Page 6: Lev Radin/Shutterstock.com Page 7: Blend Images/Shutterstock.com

www.westerncity.com

» Municipal Finance » Land Use & Planning » Personnel » Public Safety » Public Trust & Ethics » Public Works & Infrastructure » Youth Visit www.westerncity.com and click on “Topics” to read helpful articles that give you both the big picture on statewide issues and detailed examples from cities throughout California.

Western City, January 2014

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Montclair and Ontario Invest in Future Workforce, continued from page 15

The Online to College program began by helping students in three Montclair elementary schools to achieve the dream of a free two-year college education at Chaffey College if they graduated from Montclair High School. Chaffey College’s Office of Research used a control group and tracked outcomes for the students in J

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the Online to College program. The research found that participants in Online to College had a college-enrollment rate of 60 percent, in contrast to the control group with a college-enrollment rate of 40 percent. Students in the program also performed better in terms of grade point averages, High School Exit Exam scores and school R

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www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Watch for these Upcoming Opportunities: • City of Vallejo, CA Deputy Water Superintendent

• City of Peoria, AZ Economic Development Manager • City of Lincoln, CA Community Development Director For more information and filing deadlines, please contact: Bob Murray and Associates, 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202, Roseville, CA 95661 Phone: (916) 784-9080, Fax: (916) 784-1985, E-mail: apply@bobmurrayassoc.com

Chief of Police

City of San Pablo, California

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League of California Cities

The Promise Scholars Initiative, now in its third year, is based on the Online to College model, but is much larger in scale. Expanding from a few schools to 35 and engaging many more institutional partners and businesses, Promise Scholars provides activities and information to all children and their families beginning in kindergarten. From elementary school through high school, the initiative reinforces the importance of college and technical training and assists all students in successfully navigating the educational path to college and a career.

Changing the Community Mindset on Education

• City of Vallejo, CA Assistant Public Works Director, Water

San Pablo is located in West Contra Costa County off Interstate 80, minutes away from the Bay Area cultural centers of Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco. Historically one of the oldest Spanish settlements in the region, this city of 29,720 diverse residents has become a thriving residential and business community. The Department is a full service agency with 54 sworn, 21 civilian, 3 part-time and 3 crossing guards. This agency is one of the best in the Bay Area and leads the region with a 92% closure rate in homicides due to its Patrol, Investigations, Support Services and Community Programs. Bachelor’s degree required, Master’s, FBI Academy, and/or Command College preferred. Salary range up to $15,500 monthly.

attendance. “Many students in our region dream of advancing their education, but often find their resources limited,” says Paul Eaton, mayor of Montclair. “It’s the city’s desire to help our youth achieve their educational dreams.”

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Phil McKenney at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com.

Filing deadline is January 21, 2014.

Unique because of its approach, the Promise Scholars Initiative seeks to change the culture of the schools, families and the larger community to a “collegebound” mindset where the expectation is that all students graduate from high school and go on to achieve some type of postsecondary certificate or college degree. This change in culture is not the schools’ sole responsibility but is borne by the entire community, which seeks to provide students with high expectations and support along the way. The initiative works to shift the entire education distribution curve forward so there are more high-school graduates and people with technical certificates and college degrees in the community. Realizing that schools can’t achieve this in isolation and that city and county government can’t implement innovative educational change alone, the partners have come to the table to make a commitment to create a higher level of “collective impact” over the long term. The cities of Montclair and Ontario are actively involved in all phases of Promise Scholars Initiative events and activities. Staff from both cities volunteer to participate in business and community leader presentations and speak about their own www.cacities.org

personal college and career paths. The city managers of both cities serve as board members for the Ontario-Montclair Schools Foundation, which was created to raise funds for the initiative and scholarships. In addition, city staff have helped identify and broker relationships with businesses for sponsorship and volunteer opportunities. The Promise Scholars Initiative enjoys support from regional government as well, with San Bernardino County providing funds for buses and t-shirts for college visits. The Inland Empire United Way plays an important role in this partnership of education, business and government. This nonprofit partner helps reach resources that are often unavailable to institutions or corporations by: • Coordinating the volunteer presenters; • Recruiting business leaders to make presentations to students; • Using AmeriCorps members to engage local high-school seniors in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) campaigns to increase financial aid application rates; and • Running employee-giving campaigns to raise funds for the initiative. In addition to conducting research, Chaffey College has provided the curriculum and activities for college visits for 5thgrade students. These visits introduce the 5th graders to the Promise Scholars program. The youth are given the promise of a scholarship to a partner college and the assurance that many adults will help them along the way. Chaffey College has provided key leadership and support as the program has grown to include other colleges and universities. “Every student should have the opportunity to go to college,” says Henry Shannon, Chaffey College president. “Sadly, we know that many students don’t consider college an option. Through the Promise Scholars Initiative we provide hope to these students and their families.” ■ Contact: Leslie Sorensen, resource development administrator, Ontario-Montclair School District; phone: (909) 418-6331; email: leslie.sorensen@omsd.k12.ca.us. www.westerncity.com

As part of the Promise Scholars Initiative, 5th-grade students visit Chaffey College. The college plays a central role in the program, which provides scholarships and support for youth to continue their education beyond high school.

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City of Monterey – Library Director

The City of Monterey is a historic and progressive coastal community with a resident population of approximately 30,000, and daily populations rising to 70,000. The Monterey Public Library, California’s first library, is the largest public library on the Monterey Peninsula, with an extensive collection of materials, innovative programming and outreach, and unique archival collections. The Library is a dynamic organization with a diverse range of community services and strong community support.

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The annual salary for the Library Director is $161,333, plus an attractive benefit package. Please visit the City of Monterey’s website at www.monterey.org for more information.

Under direction of the Library Board of Trustees, the Library Director is an Executive classification that will plan, organize, coordinate and direct operations and activities of the Monterey Public Library and the Museum and Cultural Arts division. Eight years of supervisory experience in professional public library administration and equivalency to a Master of Library Science Degree from a college or university accredited by the American Library Association is required.

First review of applications will begin on January 29, 2014.

City Treasurer/Financial Executive City of Roseville, CA The City of Roseville, CA (approximate population 124,000) is located in Placer County along the eastern edge of the Sacramento Valley, at the base of the Sierra Nevada foothills. Roseville is now seeking a City Treasurer/Financial Executive. This position reports to the City Manager and oversees a wide range of investment, financing mechanism, and banking/operations programs, as well as the departments of Human Resources, Finance, Central Services, Information Technology, and City Clerk. This position requires a level of knowledge regarding financial markets such that the selected candidate will be able to seek out appropriate finance and bond sources, both nationally and internationally. A typical candidate will have eight years of increasingly responsible public and private sector financing and debt structuring experience, including five years of administrative and management responsibility, and a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in accounting, business, public administration, finance, or a related field. The salary range for the City Treasurer/Financial Executive is $146,636-$196,506; placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Bob Murray at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 17, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

Western City, January 2014

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2013 Legislative Year in Review, continued from page 13

from state micromanagement. Not surprisingly, such independence does not sit well with legislators or groups who would prefer to dictate policies from the state Capitol. The League opposed two measures in 2013 that would limit local flexibility for charter cities: SB 311 (Padilla), which requires labor-related J

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charter amendments to be placed only on local ballots during a statewide general election; and SB 7 (Steinberg and Cannella), which would withhold all state funding from charter cities if they fail to impose state prevailing wages on local public works projects. Regrettably both of these measures passed into law, R

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City Attorney

City of Simi Valley, CA Located in Ventura County with a population approaching 127,000, Simi Valley has been ranked as one of the safest cities in America as well as one of the “Best Places to Live” in the country. Appointed by the Mayor and City Council of this General Law city, the City Attorney will oversee a staff of four and budget of $995,100. The Council and organization are seeking candidates with proven management and leadership skills who are self-confident, collaborative, approachable, and apolitical. JD from an accredited college or university and current membership in the State Bar of California is required, as well as at least 8-10 years’ increasingly responsible municipal law experience. Candidates with municipal experience in private sector firms are also encouraged to apply. Salary range is $162,168 – $210,816 DOQ with attractive management benefits package.

Please send your cover letter and resume electronically to:

Peckham & McKenney apply@peckhamandmckenney.com Resumes acknowledged within two business days. Call Bobbi Peckham at (866) 912-1919 for more information. A detailed brochure is available at www.peckhamandmckenney.com. Filing date is January 27, 2014.

Chief of Police, University of California, Davis The University of California, Davis (UC Davis) is a public teaching and research university with 34,000 students and a staff of over 23,000. UC Davis is now seeking a Chief of Police to oversee a Department of 53 sworn and 70 professional staff, as well as 112 student employees. All candidates must possess current management and advanced California POST certifications or eligibility to attain them within 12 months of hire and a Class C California Driver’s License upon date of hire. A typical candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university—with study in the areas of criminal justice administration, business administration, psychology, or a related field preferred—or an equivalent combination of education and Chief-level experience in an agency of similar size and complexity. The salary range for the Chief of Police is classified at the Manager and Senior Professional Level, Grade 5: $94,080-$169,344. Placement within this range depends upon the selected candidate’s qualifications and experience. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 31, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

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League of California Cities

but the courts may ultimately determine their legality. Cap-and-Trade and Prop. 39 Funds. Over the past several years, the League has been positioning for cities to receive funding generated from sales of carbon reduction credits at state cap-and-trade auctions. The League supported AB 416 (Gordon) and AB 574 (Lowenthal) as vehicles for these allocations. To the surprise of environmental groups, however, the governor borrowed approximately $500 million of these funds to help close the budget gap. The two bills stalled as a result but will likely be revisited this year because the “borrowed” funds will need to be repaid. A similar thing happened to the approximately $500 million per year made available for energy efficiency investments by the passage of Prop. 39 of 2012. The League supported SB 64 (Corbett), which would have allowed cities and other local agencies to compete for Prop. 39 funds. In the budget, however, the governor proposed to dedicate all the money to energy efficiency improvements to schools, with a primary advantage being that the funds could be scored as an offset to Prop. 98 school funding formulas. The Prop. 39 energy efficiency funds, however, will continue to flow for five years, so the potential remains for broader access to these funds in future budgets. California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Reform. While many expected CEQA reform to be a major issue in 2013, things changed when Senator Michael Rubio (D-Bakersfield), who was leading the effort, resigned to take a job in the private sector. The focus then shifted to SB 731 (Steinberg) as the vehicle. A League CEQA task force carefully reviewed the measure and made recommendations. The League successfully lobbied for the requested changes but the bill was held in committee at the end of session. Instead, the author moved SB 743, which streamlines CEQA for the Sacramento Kings arena and includes several statewide provisions that could be helpful in streamlining some development. The League also addressed CEQA issues associated with AB 52 (Gatto) affecting Native American sacred sites. www.cacities.org

Housing Elements. Throughout most of the year, the League and other local government groups opposed early versions of AB 325 (Alejo), which extended the statute of limitations to challenge lawfully adopted housing elements from the current one year and 150 days to more than four years. The League opposed this measure due to the lengthy exposure of cities to litigation. Later in the legislative session, prior to the bill being heard on the Senate floor, a compromise was reached with the author and sponsors and amendments were included that addressed local government concerns. The League took a neutral position on the final version of this measure. Marijuana Regulation. Many communities and public safety groups remain concerned over the chaotic marijuana regulatory environment, which includes a state voter-approved medical marijuana initiative that has been abused, federal prohibitions, court decisions and mixed local reactions. If an improved regulatory structure is to be developed, it needs to contain flexibility to address community impacts and public safety concerns. While the League assisted with the defeat of several bills, this issue will return in 2014, and cities need to be at the table in future discussions. Local Contracting and Employee Relations. In recent years, a variety of bills has been introduced seeking to limit local authority to contract for various services. The League opposed several bills in 2013 that would have undermined local authority. AB 1333 (Hernandez),

A VISIBLE CHANGE OCCURRED WITH THE PROSPECT OF LONGER LEGISLATIVE TERMS. www.westerncity.com

Future Transportation Revenues. The League has been working for more than a year with a group of transportation stakeholders to build the case for additional revenues devoted to transportation. These efforts include cap and trade

which would have imposed unreasonable conditions on local contracting for waste management, was among the bills that were defeated. Another bill, SB 556 (Corbett), which required contractors to post large lettering on their vehicles and uniforms stating that they were not government employees, was stalled. J

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CITY OF SAN MATEO The City of San Mateo is a scenic and dynamic San Francisco Peninsula community of over 99,000 residents ideally located with San Francisco to the north, San Jose to the South, Half Moon Bay to the west and the East Bay to the east. San Mateo is a diverse and vibrant regional hub that boasts a very high quality of life marked by its great neighborhoods and schools and outstanding libraries and parks. Downtown San Mateo offers a variety of exciting opportunities for shopping, dining and entertainment. The successful candidate will possess the ability to quickly grasp and embrace the values of San Mateo and be comfortable working in a fast-paced and sophisticated organization that is accustomed to high quality service and a tradition of civic engagement. He or she will possess a BA/BS (preferably a Master’s degree) and considerable experience as a City Manager, Assistant, Deputy or executive in a comparable agency. Salary is open, DOQ with an excellent benefit package.

CITY MANAGER

William Avery & Associates Management Consultants 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

For further information contact Bill Avery at 408-399-4424 or Ann Slate at 805-459-5132. To apply, submit your letter of interest, resume, current salary and a list of five work-related references (email preferred) to Avery Associates by January 24, 2014. A formal job announcement is available at http://www.averyassoc.net/jobs.

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA REGIONAL RAIL AUTHORITY The Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) is seeking a Director of Human Resources. Formed in 1991, the SCRRA operates Metrolink, a regional commuter rail system serving the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura. Metrolink has an operating budget of $196.1M and 246 full-time employees. The Director of Human Resources reports to the Chief Executive Officer and oversees a staff of six. The department is responsible for training, employee development, workers DIRECTOR OF compensation, employee benefits, regulatory compliance, compensation, HUMAN William Avery & Associates EEO and recruitment and retention. The RESOURCES Director will develop strategic human Management Consultants resources plans for the Agency that are reflective of current trends in the 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A public transportation industry and responsive to the goals and objectives Los Gatos, CA 95030 of the governing board. A minimum of five years experience as a human 408.399.4424 resources executive, preferably in a public agency, and BA in Human Fax: 408.399.4423 Resources or a related field is are required. An MBA with an emphasis email: jobs@averyassoc.net in Human Resources or Management or a related field and relevant HR www.averyassoc.net certifications highly desirable. The salary is currently under review. For further information contact Bill Avery at 408-399-4424 or Ann Slate at 805-459-5132. To apply, submit your letter of interest, resume, current salary and a list of five work-related references (email preferred) to Avery Associates by February 1, 2014. A formal job announcement is available at www.averyassoc.net.

Western City, January 2014

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2013 Legislative Year in Review, continued

THE NEW LEGISLATORS

(as mentioned earlier) and proposals from other groups. These efforts will continue in 2014 and likely beyond. In addition, the League is participating in a working group created by the governor’s January budget proposal. The group is reviewing the existing transportation funding system for potential opportunities to increase efficiencies.  

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Chief of Police, Stockton Unified School District Stockton Unified School District (SUSD) serves students in the central city of San Joaquin County in California’s heartland. SUSD is now seeking a Chief of Police to oversee a staff comprising 28 sworn and 7 professional personnel with a budget of $2.9 million. The chosen candidate will be visible in uniform in the District, accessible and responsive, and able to communicate effectively with diverse student, staff, faculty, and campus communities. Candidates for this position must possess the following: Bachelor’s Degree in Police Science, Criminal Justice Administration, or a related field; five (5) years of progressively responsible experience in police or security work; POST Basic certificate and ability to meet standards for supervisory and management positions as specified by POST; appropriate CA Driver’s License; and valid certificates in First Aid and CPR within 60 days from date of hire. The salary for the Chief of Police is Range 59: $103,417.00 to $125,704.00. Placement within the range is dependent upon qualifications. If you are interested in this outstanding opportunity, please apply online at www.bobmurrayassoc.com. Please contact Joel Bryden at (916) 784-9080 should you have any questions. Brochure available. Closing date January 10, 2014. phone 916•784•9080 fax 916•784•1985 www.bobmurrayassoc.com

BUILDING OFFICIAL

Salary $8,318 to $10,212/mo. +Excellent benefit package The City of Huntington Park is located southeast of downtown Los Angeles, with a population of 58,673. The City is seeking a proactive executive team member who is highly motivated, energetic and experienced to serve as its Building Official. Plans, directs, supervises and coordinates assigned functions and program areas of the Building & Safety Division to ensure compliance with federal, state and local building codes; housing and zoning ordinances; supervises the plan review, permit issuance, building inspection and customer service functions of the Division, including Encroachment Permits. Recommends and implements City policy concerning building safety; manages City capital improvement projects; coordinates assigned activities with others; performs related duties as required. Requires B.S. in Civil Engineering and 5 years experience in the plan review, permitting, and inspection of construction of public, commercial, industrial, and residential buildings, and 2 years supervisory level. Certification as plans examiner by ICBO or CABO as Building Official. Last day to file: January 16, 2014. To request an application packet please contact:

CITY OF HUNTINGTON PARK Human Resources Division • 6550 Miles Ave., Huntington Park, CA 90255 M-TH 7:00 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. (323) 584-6227 • mcastillo@huntingtonpark.org, or obtain materials via our website at: www.huntingtonpark.org EOE

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League of California Cities

PROGRESS ON LEAGUE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES The League leadership meets each year in November to develop the organization’s strategic priorities for the coming year. These priorities were identified for 2013: • Build Lasting Partnerships. Develop and strengthen long-term relationships and partnerships with new and returning state policy-makers and other stakeholders with common interests to better serve and enhance the quality of life for all Californians. • Expand Community and Economic Development Tools and Funding Options for City Services. Develop and advocate for new tools and funding options for community and economic development to support job creation, investment in public infrastructure, expansion of affordable housing, and increased funding for essential local services. • Continue Pension and Other PostEmployment Benefits (OPEB) Reform. Continue and expand upon recent efforts at pension and OPEB reform to ensure the long-term affordability and responsiveness of public services for city residents. • Implement an Effective League Branding Strategy. Develop and implement a marketing and branding strategy that effectively communicates the League’s identity along with the unique benefits that city officials, our partners and the public can expect from the League, its products and services. Here is a brief summary of League activities in these strategic areas.

www.cacities.org

Building Partnerships. After a major recession and several difficult years of statelocal relations, it was time to reinvest and rebuild. State and local budget conditions were improving. A new class of legislators, many from local government, began work at the Capitol with the ability to serve longer terms. League staff and city officials spent significant time connecting with these new legislators and working with them on legislation. Regional divisions hosted meetings and receptions. The League’s lobbyists and leadership also met individually with legislators in Sacramento. Relations with the League’s traditional partners in local government, business and other organizations were strengthened and paid off in collaborative legislative efforts.

League Branding. Research was conducted in this area with the assistance of a League board-appointed task force and a consultant, who concluded that the League retains a strong brand with local officials, policy-makers and the media. Suggestions primarily focused on ways to fine-tune the ways the organization communicates its brand, with its primary audience remaining city officials.

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west coast headquarters 1677 Eureka Road, Suite 202 Roseville, CA 95661 phone 916•784•9080

east coast 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway D4-242 Tallahassee, FL 32309 phone 850•391•0000

www.westerncity.com

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Looking ahead, 2014 should be a year of new opportunities. Barring an unforeseen reversal, the state budget should remain balanced, and the economy continues to slowly improve. State legislators have already put forward many ideas for tools to invest in infrastructure, transportation and affordable housing that can be pursued in the second year of the two-year legislative session. Discussions about a revised water bond and a new school bond are anticipated, along with potential revisions to local vote thresholds. As always, some new issues will also emerge.

Earlier in 2013, while explaining his thinking on the benefits of providing schools with additional flexibility, Gov. Brown spoke to the League board about the principle of “subsidiarity,” which translates into the more familiar “local control.” City officials were glad to hear the governor address this concept because it matches their beliefs and practical experience at the local level. Yet while the governor used these words, his philosophy was less apparent in light of his final decisions on bills affecting local government. One significant, positive development was the governor’s signing into law 85 percent of Leaguesupported bills. He deserves the thanks of city officials for this. On the League’s

Continuing Pension and OPEB Reform. Administrative implementation and minor legislative cleanup followed the legislative pension reform accomplishments of 2012. The League began working more closely with CalPERS by forming an advisory

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Expanding Community and Economic Development Tools. Activity on this critical priority is addressed extensively earlier in this article. Many legislators have been working with the League to advance this priority. The stage is now set for broader action on economic development, infrastructure and affordable housing. The effort ahead involves working with legislators and the governor’s administration on the next steps.

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veto requests, however, regarding bills that city officials opposed because they believed the measures undermined local control, his actions are more puzzling. The governor vetoed only 25 percent of League-opposed bills. Perhaps at some future point the governor may further clarify his philosophy on preserving local authority.

group of city officials to attend CalPERS meetings, comment on regulatory proposals and meet periodically with CalPERS leadership. An internal group of city managers continues discussing options on OPEB issues.

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William Avery & Associates, Inc. Labor Relations / Executive Search / Human Resources Consulting 31/2 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Suite A Los Gatos, CA 95030 408.399.4424 Fax: 408.399.4423 email: jobs@averyassoc.net www.averyassoc.net

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Whatever the new year brings, the League will continue exploring opportunities for improved partnerships with legislators, administration officials, other organizations and stakeholders. At the same time, the League will advocate for tools and resources that allow cities to improve their communities, expand economic development and address emerging issues in ways that preserve local control and flexibility. ■

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Bobbi C. Peckham • Phil McKenney

Peckham&McKenney “All About Fit” www.peckhamandmckenney.com Roseville, CA

866.912.1919

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There’s an Entire Team Behind Every Assignment

Specializes in Executive Search

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www.allianceRC.com http://twitter.com/Alliancerc facebook/Alliance Resource Consulting, LLC

Celebrating 20 Years!

“Your Virtual City Hall”

Budget Stabilization & Staffing Analysis Citywide/Department Management Studies S FIRE Staffing Deployment or Reduction Analysis FIRE Consolidation Studies & Master Plans Maximizing Human Capital Assets Capi Leadership Development

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Municipal Executive Coaching Services “facilitating excellence from within” FOR LOCAL GOVERNMENT MANAGERS

» HR Training & Support » Internal Coaches Training » Succession Planning » Leadership Development » Coaching Workshops » EQ Coaching & Assessment

Russ Carlsen, Municipal Coach West Coast Office | (360) 961-1300

municipalcoaching.com

Managing Tomorrow’s Resources Today Providing Consulting Services to Recycling, Solid Waste, Water and Wastewater Management for more than 20 Years

• Planning • Procurement • Management

Valerie Roberts

PO Box 16692 Beverly Hills, CA 90209 Telephone: (818) 783-7752 Email: robertsrcg@msn.com Web: www.robertsrcg.com

Working in Partnership with Local Communities

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Municipal Engineering Building Plan Review, Inspection & CASp Staff Augmentation Construction Management Fire Prevention Services Sustainability Programs Digital Plan Review Code Enforcement Planning Services

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San Mateo • Santa Ana • Sacramento • Salinas • Pleasanton • Newman

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Looking for budget Balancing tools?

Executive Recruitment for Senior Level Positions

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League of California Cities

Irvine (949) 251-8628

P O L I C Y · D E S I G N · S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y · S TA F F I N G

www.cacities.org

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Public Finance Public - Private Partnerships Green Finance Office: 415.785.2025 Fax: 415.506.3401

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Strategy. Innovation. Solutions. 4040 Civic Center Drive, Suite 200, San Rafael, CA 94903

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Offices in California, Texas, Illinois, Massachusetts & Washington

Management and operations studies Feasibility studies User fees and cost allocation Police • Fire • Public Works • Utilities Parks & Recreation • Administration Planning & Building

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1-888-522-7772 • www.compensationconsulting.com Offices in various major cities

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Transportation Planning & Engineering Traffic Engineering & Mobility Planning Structrual Water Resources

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Providers of Land Use Planning For a Better Community

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Contact: Allan Crecelius or Sandra Comrie

12707 High Bluff Dr., Ste 200 San Diego, CA 92130 Tel 858.259.3800 fax 858.792.7465 acrecelius@rewardstrategy.com

Co-sponsored by the League of California Cities

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Municipal Commercial Marinas Agricultural Residential Land Re-Use

www.schmitzandassociates.com

818.338.3636

Budget Strategies ∙ Service Sharing Organization Analysis ∙ Performance Management Process Improvement ∙ Strategic Planning Executive Recruitment ∙ Facilitation/Team Building

E XPERIENCE , T ALENT , COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC SERVICE San Jose ∙ Orange County ∙ Cincinnati ∙ 408-437-5400

Western City, January 2014

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Thank you to all of the 2014 League Partners

Platinum ($15,000+) 1,2

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BUILDING AMERICA®

Gold ($10,000+) Hanson Bridgett LLP1,2 Lewis Investment Company2 Liebert Cassidy Whitmore1

Meyers Nave1,2 Renne Sloan Holtzman Sakai LLP1,2

Silver ($5,000+)

Charles Abbott Associates California & Nevada IBEW/ NECA Labor-Management Cooperation Trust California Grocers Association2 DW Development2 Dart Container Corp.2

Goldfarb & Lipman LLP Greenwaste Recovery Inc. Interwest Consulting Group Inc. JPMorgan Chase & Co. Kronick Moskovitz Tiedemann & Girard1

Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin2 American Forest & Paper Association American Red Cross Best Way Disposal2 CMTC CalPortland2 Cerrell Associates Colantuono & Levin2 CORE Public Affairs2 Desert Valley Medical Group Inc./Prime Healthcare2

Edgewood Partners Insurance Center Fieldman Rolapp & Associates Fulbright & Jaworski GDQ Law2 Garaventa Enterprises2 Hill International2 Holliday Rock Company Jefferies LLC Library Systems & Services LLC

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AMR Accretive Realtors2 Amador Valley Industries2 Architects Orange2 Ashwood Construction Atkins Avery Associates2 Berliner Cohen Blue Line Transfer Inc.2 Bowlby Group Inc.2 CARE2 CR&R2 California Consulting2 California Debt and Investment Advisory Commission 2

Northrop Grumman The Olson Company2 Prometheus Real Estate Group Inc.2 San Manuel Band of Mission Indians2 Schiff Hardin LLP

Republic Services Inc.2 Willdan Young Homes2 ServPro2 Starbucks Tribal Alliance of Sovereign Indian Nations2 US Bank Union Bank2

Bronze ($3,000+)

California Hotel & Lodging Association California Refuse Recycling Council Calimesa Chamber of Commerce2 City Ventures2 Classic Communities2 Climatec2 Cost Control Associates Inc. Cunningham Davis2 Desert Valley Builders2 Diamond Hills Auto2 DiMare Van Vleck & Brown LLC Dokken Engineering2

Marin Sanitary Service2 Molycorp2 Bob Murray & Associates PARS/Phase II Pacific Rail2 Piper Jaffray2 Psomas2 James Ramos2 Recology2 Robson Homes LLC2

San Bernardino County Safety Employees2 San Bernardino Police Officers Association Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians2 Schneider Electric2 Seifel Consulting Inc. Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth SummerHill Homes2 TREH Development2

Basic ($1,000+) E&J Gallo Emanuels Jones and Associates Fard Engineers2 Fresno Police Officers Association GHD Inc.2 Gresham Savage Nolan & Tilden PC Innisfree Ventures2 J.R. Roberts/Deacon Inc. Jamboree Housing Corporation Jones Hall2 Jones & Mayer

Join the Partners Program Today! Contact Mike Egan | (916) 658-8271 | egan@cacities.org

Kasdan Simonds Riley & Vaughan LLP LaBarge Industries2 Lew Edwards Group2 Marchetti Construction Inc.2 Morley Brothers LLC2 Napa Recycling2 Potential Industries Rabobank2 Rancho San Gorgonio2 Riverside Construction2 San Mateo County Association of Realtors2 Santa Monica Police Officers Association

Severn Trent Environmental2 Sobrato Organization2 Specialty Solid Waste & Recycling2 Studio T SQ2 Swinerton Management UCLA Government & Community Relations Urban Futures2 Vali Cooper & Associates Inc. Waste Management2 West Builders2 Partial list as of 12/1/2013

1 – Institute for Local Government supporter 2 – CITIPAC supporter


Western City January Issue