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OSU-CASCADES

Bend PD lands nosy expert By Lily Raff McCaulou The Bulletin

The newest member of the Bend Police Department is a missing persons specialist who was laid off by the Polk County Sheriff’s Office last month due to budget cuts. Bend officials had been looking for a way to afford his exceptional expertise but figured it was too expensive to train someone from scratch. “It’s very unfortunate for Polk County,” Bend Sgt. Nick Parker said, “but very fortunate for us.” Bend’s new asset — Polk County’s

loss — is Ranger, a 2-year-old bloodhound. When the job of his handler, Deputy Patrick McConnell, was cut to trim the budget, Ranger was let go by default. Ranger had been the only bloodhound working in law enforcement in Oregon. Bend officers say the large blackand-tan canine will help locate runaways, missing children, Alzheimer’s patients who wander off, and fugitives on the lam. He could also help find missing evidence of crimes. See Dog / A4

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Ranger is the only bloodhound on patrol in Oregon, and he’s just been hired by the Bend Police Department. He spent Saturday afternoon resting at Drake Park, but he may need to report to work sometime soon.

CCC: THROUGH THE HEART OF BEND, TO THE FINAL STAGE

A diverse campus is coming • On the road to 4-year status, the branch is set for big change, in student body and recruiting By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — The Oregon State UniversityCascades student population is in many ways a reflection of Bend’s population. More than 80 percent of the students are from the area. On average, the students are white and older than traditional college students, and many attend school while working and raising families. That’s likely to change. In three years, with the proposed offering of lower-division courses, the student population is expected to grow by 1,000 students. By 2025, enrollment is expected to be closer to 5,000, and the branch campus will be a full-fledged fouryear university. And with that will come a shift in student demographics. The new students likely will be younger. And they will be more diverse, both geographically and ethnically. Recruiters are shifting their strategies and shaping the narrative to entice more out-of-state students. See Students / A4

Inside • Ethnicity, gender, age: Then and now, A4

ics OSU-Cascades demograph Gend Ethnicity 1 201 2007

cycling action right into downtown Bend. The start/finish line was on Wall Street; the pro women, pictured, raced

Before and after massacre, puzzles line suspect’s path

for 50 minutes, followed by the men, who raced for 75 minutes. The final stage — the Awbrey Butte Circuit Race

By Jack Healy and Serge F. Kovaleski

— starts this afternoon. For full coverage, including details on today’s race, see Sports, Page D1.

AURORA, Colo. — Killing a dozen people and wounding more than 50 others was apparently not enough for James Eagan Holmes, according to the police. Inside his otherwise ordinary apartment lay an intricate series of explosive booby traps, seemingly designed to kill anyone who entered while pursuing his trail. Holmes, 24, who the police say Holmes brought terror to a midnight movie screening in this Colorado community, also left behind a litany of questions, many of them focused on how and why a once-promising student could now stand accused of being the lone gunman behind the deadliest mass shooting in Colorado since the 1999 Columbine High School attacks. See Suspect / A3

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

The Cascade Cycling Classic entered Stage 4 on Saturday night — the Downtown Twilight Criterium brought the

TOP NEWS GENE THERAPY: Novel treatment nears regulatory approval in Europe, A2 DRUG WAR: U.S. expands fight into Africa, a newer hub for cartels, A7 TODAY’S WEATHER Mostly sunny High 79, Low 47 Page B6

INDEX Business Books Classified Community

G1-6 F4-6 E1-8 C1-8

Crosswords C7, E2 Dear Abby C3 Horoscope C3 Local News B1-6

Milestones C6 Obituaries B4-5 Opinion F1-3 Oregon News B3 Sports D1-6 Stocks G4-5 Sudoku C7 TV & Movies C2

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper Vol. 109, No. 204, 48 pages, 7 sections

SUNDAY

We use recycled newsprint

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In farm bill, benefits for tree farmers land in environmentally friendly ways. WASHINGTON — Despite bil“There are definitely cuts to lions of dollars in cuts to the ver- (conservation) programs,” said sions of the farm bill pendChristine Cadigan, pubing in the Senate and House lic affairs manager for the of Representatives, tree American Forest Foundafarmers in Central Oregon tion. “But the cuts are reacould benefit from added sonable. Although disapflexibility to conservation pointing, they are not as bad IN D.C. as they could be.” programs. In both versions, conThe current farm bill, servation efforts are cut by which passed in 2008, is $6 billion, or roughly 10 percent, set to expire later this year. This from previous levels. But with summer, lawmakers in Washingthe reductions, the proposed bills ton have been working to enact also make tree farmers eligible for a replacement to the law, which voluntary programs that provide sets American agricultural polifinancial incentives for managing cy and funding levels for the next

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

five years. Given the cost-cutting mindset in an increasingly deficit-conscious Congress, both versions of the new farm bill contain significant cuts. The Senate version, which passed last month, trims $24 billion, while the House version, which was approved by the House Agriculture Committee last month, cuts $35 billion. Both versions similarly reduce the number of conservation programs and funding by consolidating them into a few, bigger programs to make them more streamlined and efficient, Cadigan said. See Farm bill / A6

The changing story of AIDS By David Brown The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — AIDS has killed 35 million people. It’s caused physical pain and mental anguish for many who live with it. It’s created a generation of African orphans. It’s drained untold trillions of dollars from national economies and people’s pockets. There’s also another way to describe the AIDS saga. It’s a success story.

As the International AIDS Conference returns to the United States after 22 years, the saga of a disease that has killed 35 million people captures the turn of the millennium as a time of optimism as well as crisis. “We are entering a new era — an era of burden-sharing but also an era of ownership,” says UNAIDS head Michel Sidibe. See AIDS / A7

New York Times News Service

“What we are seeing here is evidence of some calculation and deliberation.” — Aurora Police Chief Daniel Oates, about the suspected gunman

A woman receives care at Joseph’s House, an AIDS and cancer hospice in Washington, in 2009. The district is hosting America’s first world AIDS conference in a generation. The Washington Post file photo

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

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Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, names in the news — things you need to know to start your day.

CUTTING EDGE

TODAY

Sign that gene therapy is legit: EU approval

It’s Sunday, July 22, the 204th day of 2012. There are 162 days left in the year.

By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

After more than two decades of dashed expectations, the field of gene therapy appears close to reaching a milestone: a regulatory approval. The European Medicines Agency, an arm of the European Union, has recommended approval of a gene therapy to treat a rare genetic disease, according to the agency’s website. If the European Commission follows the advice, as it usually does, this would be the first regulatory approval of a gene therapy drug in the Western world. That could give a boost to the field, which at times has struggled for credibility and financing. An approval “is really potentially going to change the way the field is looked at,” said Jeffrey Ostrove, chief executive of Ceregene, a gene therapy company in San Diego. Some pharmaceutical companies have been reluctant to invest in the field, he said, because “there are no approved products in the major markets they sell in.” Gene therapy involves providing the body with genes it needs, such as correct copies of defective genes that cause genetic disorders. Its use in the West so far has been confined to clinical trials. The therapy recommended for approval in Europe, called Glybera, was developed by uniQure, a Dutch company. It treats lipoprotein lipase deficiency, a disease that affects only several hundred people in the EU and a similar number in North America. People with the disease have a genetic mutation that prevents them from producing an enzyme needed to break down certain fat-carry-

What is gene therapy? Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. In the future, this technique may allow doctors to treat a disorder by inserting a gene into a patient’s cells instead of using drugs or surgery. Researchers are testing several approaches to gene therapy, including: • Replacing a mutated gene that causes disease with a healthy copy of the gene. • Inactivating, or “knocking out,” a mutated gene that is functioning improperly. Introducing a new gene into the body to help fight a disease. Although gene therapy is a promising treatment option for a number of diseases (including inherited disorders, some types of cancer, and certain viral infections), the technique remains risky and is still under study to make sure that it will be safe and effective. Gene therapy is currently only being tested for the treatment of diseases that have no other cures. Source: Genetics Home Reference, U.S. National Library of Medicine

ing particles that circulate in the bloodstream after meals. Without the enzyme, so much fat can accumulate that the blood looks white rather than red. “It’s the equivalent of having a 10 percent cream in your bloodstream,” said Dr. Daniel Gaudet, a professor of medicine at the University of Montreal, who led the clinical trials of the drug. People with the disease are prone to severe bouts of inflammation of the pancreas. There is no good treatment except an extremely low-fat diet. Glybera provides correct copies of the lipoprotein lipase gene, which allows patients to make some of the needed enzyme. A single treatment, consisting of injections into multiple spots on the leg muscles on the same day, is expected to last for several years, if not longer, said Joern Aldag, chief executive of uniQure. Aldag said the company hoped to apply for approval of the gene therapy in the United States eventually, but he was

not certain of the timing. Gene therapy has long been seen as promising way to treat numerous diseases. But hundreds of clinical trials have been conducted since 1990 and most have failed, in part because it has been difficult to deliver the genes and get them to work for a long time. The field has also been set back by some safety issues, particularly the death of a teenager in a 1999 clinical trial at the University of Pennsylvania. But researchers have been slowly overcoming the obstacles and in the last few years there have been reports of successes in attempts to treat cancer and hemophilia B, as well as certain immune diseases and a condition that causes blindness. “It didn’t occur as rapidly, I think, as people had kind of promised or suggested 15 or 20 years ago, but we are starting to see success,” said Dr. Mark Kay, a professor of pediatrics and genetics at Stanford. A gene therapy to treat cancer won approval in China in

2003. But some Western experts have questions about the rigor of the regulatory review in that country. How effective Glybera is might still be open to some question, in part because the company tested the drug in only 27 patients, and without rigorous controlled clinical trials. The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use, which recommends whether new drugs should be approved in Europe, rejected Glybera three times in the last year or so. After its third rejection, in April, the committee said that the company had “not provided sufficient evidence” that blood lipids were lowered in a persistent manner and that there was also insufficient evidence of a reduction of the incidence of pancreatitis, the inflammation of the pancreas. But the committee has now reversed itself. It said the approved population had been narrowed to those with the most severe disease and that the company would be required to monitor the outcomes of patients treated with Glybera and provide that data to regulators. Gaudet, who has been a paid adviser to uniQure, said the trials showed that after the treatment, patients had fewer bouts of pancreatitis and those bouts tended to be less intense and painful. The repeated setbacks took its toll on the company, which was once known as Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics. That company ran out of money this year and is now being liquidated. UniQure, which is privately held, was formed with new investment and took on the people and assets of Amsterdam Molecular.

HAPPENINGS • The 19th International AIDS Conference opens in Washington — its first time in the U.S. decades. A1 • President Barack Obama is in Aurora, Colo., to visit with shooting victims and their family members. A3

IN HISTORY Highlights: In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln presented to his Cabinet a preliminary draft of the Emancipation Proclamation. In 1934, bank robber John Dillinger was shot dead by federal agents outside Chicago’s Biograph Theater, where he had just seen the Clark Gable movie “Manhattan Melodrama.” In 1992, Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar escaped from his luxury prison near Medellin. (He was slain by security forces in December 1993.) Ten years ago: Factory worker Alejandro Avila was charged with murder and kidnapping in the abduction and slaying of 5-year-old Samantha Runnion of Stanton, Calif. (Avila was later convicted and sentenced to death.) Five years ago: A bus carrying Polish Catholic pilgrims from a holy site in the French Alps plunged off a steep mountain road, killing 26 people. One year ago: Anders Breivik, a right-wing extremist, massacred 69 people at a Norwegian island youth retreat after detonating a bomb in nearby Oslo that killed eight others in the nation’s worst violence since World War II. President Barack Obama formally signed off on ending the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military.

BIRTHDAYS

Computers simulate whole organism in lab experiment By John Markoff New York Times News Service

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Scientists at Stanford University and the J. Craig Venter Institute have developed the first software simulation of an entire organism, a humble single-cell bacterium that lives in the human genital and respiratory tracts. The scientists and other experts said the work was a giant step toward developing

BREAKTHROUGH computerized laboratories that could carry out complete experiments without the need for traditional instruments. For medical researchers and drug designers, cellular models will be able to supplant experiments during the early stages of screening for new compounds. And for molecular biologists, models that

are of sufficient accuracy will yield new understanding of basic biological principles. The simulation of the complete life cycle of the pathogen, Mycoplasma genitalium, was presented Friday in the journal Cell. The scientists called it a “first draft” but added that the effort was the first time an entire organism had been modeled in such detail. “Where I think our work is different is that we explicitly

include all of the genes and every known gene function,” the team’s leader, said Markus W. Covert, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford. “There’s no one else out there who has been able to include more than a handful of functions or more than, say, onethird of the genes.” The simulation, which runs on a cluster of 128 computers, models the life span of the cell at the molecular level.

Opera singer Licia Albanese is 99. Former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, R-Kan., is 89. Game show host Alex Trebek is 72. Singer George Clinton is 71. Actor-singer Bobby Sherman is 69. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, is 69. Actor Danny Glover is 66. Actor Willem Dafoe is 57. Actor John Leguizamo is 48. Actor Rhys Ifans is 45. Actor Colin Ferguson is 40. Singer Rufus Wainwright is 39. Actress Franka Potente is 38. Actress Selena Gomez is 20. — From wire reports

NEWS Q&A New French President Q: Francois Hollande wants to impose a 75 percent tax on all French citizens earning more than 1 million euros a year. How much is Hollande worth and how did he make his money? — William McKee Jr., Flowery Branch, Ga. Hollande, who was sworn in as president of France in May, is worth $1.51 million, according to Bloomberg. Hollande has declared that most of his worth is in a house in the French Riviera town of Mougins that he bought in 1986 and two partially owned flats in nearby Cannes. He also has 8,260 euros in bank accounts ($10,000), 3,550 euros ($4,300) of life insurance and 15,000 euros ($18,300) worth of furniture, according to the article. Hollande, who used to commute to work on a scooter and has described himself as “Mr. Normal,” doesn’t own a car. He is a career politician. Hollande’s net worth is “below the threshold that would make him liable to pay wealth tax in France,” Reuters reported.

A:

Do you have a question about nation or world news? Submit it to Cox News Service editors in Atlanta at q&a@ajc.com. Include name, phone and city.

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A3

T S COLORADO MASS SHOOTING

Victims become known, as do their final moments By Erica Goode and Dan Frosch New York Times News Service

AURORA, Colo. — Movie screen superheroes never die. But there were superheroes present in a darkened movie theater at the Town Center at Aurora mall, and some of them did die, like Matthew Robert McQuinn, who threw his body in front of his longtime girlfriend, Samantha Yowler, shielding her from the bullets that took his life. McQuinn, 27, was one of 12 people who were killed when a gunman opened fire at the theater early Friday, and like many of the other victims, he wasyoung enough to have limitless possibilities ahead of him. He and Yowler went to see the midnight premiere of the latest installment in the Batman series with her brother, Nick Yowler. He, too, leapt to protect his sister. He pulled her from the theater to safety, escaping uninjured. Jonathan Blunk, 26, a military veteran, died when he saved his girlfriend, Jansen Young. Veronica Moser-Sullivan went to the movie with her mother. She was 6, too young to know much about Batman, too inexperienced to know that in the ferocious uncertainty of life, a movie theater could, without warning, become one of the most dangerous places on Earth. Veronica died on the operating table after being wounded during the shooting, her 15year-old cousin, Katherine Young, said Saturday. “She was just a radiant, happy little girl,” Katherine said. “She was just so happy. She could brighten anyone’s day.” Katherine said that Veronica, who lived in Denver, had just started swimming and had fallen in love with it. “She was really good at it,” Katherine said. “I taught her to long-board, so she loved doing that too.” Veronica’s mother, Ashley

Hyoung Chang / The Denver Post

A photo of Alex Sullivan is placed Saturday at a memorial for those who died in Aurora, Colo. Sullivan was a huge comic book fan who was at the premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises” to celebrate his 27th birthday. “Oh man one hour till the movie and its going to be the best BIRTHDAY ever,” he wrote on Twitter shortly before he died.

Moser, was also seriously injured. She was shot twice in the abdomen and once in the neck and remained in the hospital, Katherine said. “They were just over for dinner on Tuesday,” she added quietly. Just after midnight, the gunman, armed with a small arsenal of weapons, opened fire in the theater, leaving an additional 58 people injured. By Saturday, officials had identified the 12 who died — 10 at the scene and two others later at hospitals. The Aurora theater, much like movie palaces everywhere, is a deeply American place where the bonds of popcorn and a refuge from daily cares unite people from all backgrounds. McQuinn and Yowler worked at Target, having moved to Colorado from Ohio to get a fresh start. On Friday morning, Yowler was shot in the knee, but she was recovering in the hospital, said a lawyer who is acting as a spokesman for the families. Blunk served in the Navy aboard the Nimitz and had always wanted to die a hero, his wife, Chantel Blunk, from

Suspect Continued from A1 Holmes had been a shy, awkward boy who once seemed quietly bound for big things. He was a science student from Southern California who won scholarships and internships, graduated “at the top of the top” from the University of California, Riverside, and moved to Colorado last year to take the next step: a doctoral program in neuroscience. Holmes had an appointment at the university under a oneyear Neuroscience Training Grant from the National Institutes of Health, a spokeswoman for the university said. The federal grant pays for six prethesis doctoral students in the university’s Neuroscience Program at the Anschutz Medical Campus. Such grants are usually quite difficult to obtain, going to only the top students. But Holmes struggled through his first academic year at the University of Colorado, Denver, and had dropped out by this spring. Neighbors from his gang-ridden neighborhood in Aurora described him as a solitary figure, recognizable as one of the few white residents of a largely Hispanic neighborhood, and always alone. Alone as he bought beer and liquor at neighborhood shops, as he ate burritos at La California restaurant or got his car fixed at the Grease Monkey auto shop. Alone as he rode his bicycle through the streets. He appears to have sought companionship through the website Adult Friend Finder, posting a photo of himself with bright orange hair and saying that he was “looking for a fling.” In an online profile, he described himself as a nice guy, or as nice as any man “who does these sorts of shenanigans,” though its authenticity could not be independently verified. Some nights, neighbors heard loud music throbbing in

Ed Andrieski / The Associated Press

Authorities broke the window into shooting suspect James Eagen Holmes’ apartment in Aurora, Colo. On Saturday, investigators spent hours removing explosive materials from inside the apartment, which was rigged with jars of liquids, explosives and chemicals that were booby-trapped to kill “whoever entered it,” according to the police chief.

his third-floor apartment, and often complained about it, or noticed a strange purple light in the windows. Sometimes, the windows were masked by newspaper, as if he wanted no one to see inside. On Saturday Aurora Police Chief Daniel Oates offered an explanation for why that might have been. When the police arrived after apprehending Holmes outside the theaters where the shootings had occurred, they found an apartment full of explosives and shells. For more than four months, Oates said, the suspect had been getting large mail-order deliveries both at his home and at his college. “What we are seeing here is evidence of some calculation and deliberation,” he said. After more than a day of efforts involving bomb-defusing robots and painstaking patience, law enforcement offi-

whom he was separated, told NBC News. Jansen Young, whose life he saved, said that is exactly what happened. “Jon just took a bullet for me,” she said on the “Today” show. Blunk moved to Colorado after leaving the service and worked here installing flooring, his father, Randall Blunk, said Saturday. He had a 4-year-old daughter and a 2-year-old son. Alex Sullivan was a huge comic book fan who was at the premiere to celebrate his 27th birthday. Alexander Boik, 18, known as A.J., graduated this year from Gateway High School, near the mall. He was recalled by a friend, Jakob Bolger, as “a very heartwarming, good-minded person.” “He’s hilarious,” said Bolger, who added that he had been friends with Boik since the two were in seventh grade. The first victim to be identified, Jessica Ghawi, 24, had narrowly escaped a mass shooting at the Eaton Center mall in Toronto. An aspiring sports broadcaster, she had written that the experience had convinced her that each

cers said they had defused the main threats inside the apartment by Saturday afternoon. They set off controlled detonations that could be heard from across the street. By the afternoon, teams of firefighters in heavy gear appeared to be entering the apartment — a place that may hold some hints about Holmes. Holmes’ background was science. Before dropping out he took a class that explored the biological origins of psychiatric and neurological disorders, and was scheduled to give a presentation on “MicroRNA Biomarkers,” according to a class schedule published online. The topic appears to demonstrate an interest in the genetic basis of mental illness. With his academic career in tatters, law enforcement officials say, Holmes began to assemble another plan. Over the last two months, he bought two handguns, a shotgun and an assault rifle from local gun dealers. He bought and stockpiled 6,000 rounds of ammunition online. The police said he began to receive large deliveries to his home and work. He outfitted himself with black body armor and a gas mask. And early Friday morning, the police said, he walked into a darkened multiplex here in Aurora — a sprawling city east of Denver — where a midnight showing of the new Batman movie had just begun, and began firing bullets at the families and teenagers packed into the sold-out auditorium. The police said that when he was arrested, he compared himself to the Joker character in the Batman movies. Twelve people were killed, and 58 were wounded, and the authorities said that 11 remained hospitalized in critical condition Saturday. Apart from a speeding ticket, Holmes had no previous encounters with the police in Aurora.

moment was precious. In this city of 325,000, where the military has had a strong presence for almost a century, the Batman sequel also drew in men schooled in combat but hoping, for a few hours, to forget about the business of war. Petty Officer 3rd Class John Larimer, 27, a Navy cryptologic technician stationed in Aurora since October, died of injuries sustained in the shooting. Staff Sgt. Jesse Childress, 29, from Thornton, Colo., was an Air Force reservist on active duty with the 310th Forces Support Squadron at Buckley Air Force Base, according to Air Force officials. Rebecca Wingo, 32, was a single mother with two daughters, a “lovely young woman,” her friend Gail Riffle said, who took classes at Aurora Community College. Micayla Medek, 23, worked at a Subway sandwich shop and was trying to figure out what to do with her life, her aunt, Jennifer Zakovich, said Saturday. The Arapahoe County Coroner’s Office also released the names of two other victims, Alexander Teves, 24, and Gordon Cowden, 51. Those who did not know the victims or their families mourned them as well. Friday night, candles appeared across the street from the mall. A sign read: “7/20 — Gone Not Forgotten.” President Barack Obama is traveling to Colorado today to visit with victims’ families.

To win in U.S., Romney heads to Europe, Israel By David Lightman McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — Mitt Romney, looking for a boost after being battered recently by President Barack Obama, heads abroad next week in a bid to portray himself as a wise statesman. The Republican presidential candidate leaves Tuesday on a six-day swing to the U.K., Israel and Poland. Each stop is carefully choreographed to help him gain stature in the eyes of the American public, not to mention the world. He hopes to create momentum that will continue through August, when he is expected to announce his vice-presidential choice and reintroduce himself to America at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. The trip is loaded with political risks as well. Most notably, he could be held to a nearly impossible standard: Obama’s triumphant visit to Berlin four Julys ago. It also could invite another comparison: Many of Romney’s foreign policy advisers are carryovers from the George W. Bush administration, intimately involved in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars that are now broadly unpopular. “It could be ‘son of Bush,’ the horror movie no one wants to see,” said John Hulsman, a Germany-based international political consultant. Romney’s campaign depicts the trip as “an opportunity for the governor to learn and listen,” said Lanhee Chen, the Romney campaign’s policy director. The first stop is London, where he’ll attend the Summer Olympics, hoping for a

spate of stories recalling his role in rescuing the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. He’ll also meet with current and former British leaders and raise campaign money. Then comes Israel, where Romney will visit Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, an old friend who has clashed frequently with Obama. Romney also will meet with Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Salam Fayyad. Poland follows, giving Romney a chance to emphasize Obama foreign policy turmoil. He’s been invited by former President Lech Walesa, the Gdansk shipyard worker whose clash with the communist government sparked the march to freedom for the Polish people. Walesa has had an icy relationship with Obama. Romney has little choice but to go right at one of Obama’s strengths, foreign policy. Obama ended American combat in Iraq, is about to end involvement in Afghanistan and had Osama bin Laden killed on his watch. Registered voters favor Obama over Romney on foreign policy by 48 percent to 40 percent, according to a June 28-July 9 Pew Research Center survey. Where Romney could gain is by appearing statesmanlike and showing he has the chops to stand on the world stage. “He wants to see what allies have to say, and they will have questions. They’re likely to be relatively basic questions,” said Ted Bromund, a senior research fellow at the Margaret Thatcher Center for Freedom, a conservative Washington-based group.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

“If you have a (poor) handler and a good dog, you’re screwed. It’s a team effort. If you’ve got a good handler and a good dog, you’re off to the races.” — Bob Stevens, Ranger’s breeder

Dog Continued from A1 A bloodhound is sometimes referred to as a nose with a dog attached. It has baggy skin and floppy ears, which trap scents and funnel them into its powerful sniffer. How powerful? Well, a typical human has about 5 million scent receptors. A Belgian malinois has about 225 million. A bloodhound has about 4 billion. Unlike other police dogs, bloodhounds are not aggressive. They are not trained to bite or hold down suspects. They simply sniff. And run. Like a fingerprint, each person’s scent is unique. Police dogs are sometimes trained using prisoners, who eat the same food, shower with the same soap and wear clothing laundered with the same detergent. Still, a trained dog can differentiate between individuals. Contrary to what is often shown on television, a bloodhound does not need a piece of clothing or personal item to “learn” a person’s scent. If four people are in a room and one leaves, a trained bloodhound can pick up and follow the scent of the person who’s already gone. A few dead skin cells that we all shed regularly, or microscopic beads of perspiration — that’s enough for a bloodhound. Bend has two other police dogs, Zlatan and Haras, both Belgian malinois. Both are trained to track scents. But in police dog parlance, a bloodhound like Ranger is not a tracking dog. Rather, he’s a trailing dog. “ ‘Tracking’ means following a person, footprint by footprint,” said Bob Stevens, Ranger’s breeder. “ ‘Trailing’ just means following a scent.” So if a suspect ducked behind a tree and made a 90degree turn, for example, a tracking dog would get to the tree and make the same turn. A trailing dog would cut the corner, sensing long before it reached the tree that the ribbon of scent veered in a different direction. “We’ve been interested for a while in expanding our K-9 program to include a bloodhound,” Parker said. “We were looking at getting a puppy and training it from the ground up, so this is saving us quite a bit of time and money.” Experts estimate that Ranger is worth about $14,000. The pooch doesn’t have a written résumé. But Bend officials said that if he did, it would show him to be wellqualified for the job. “This dog has already been able to (trail a scent) that was 24 hours old, for several miles,” Parker said. “We have patrol dogs that are able to track, but only for shorter distances. And it needs to be soon.” Bend officials have interviewed McConnell, Ranger’s handler from Polk County. And the dog was evaluated by a trainer from Arizona and a veterinarian, both of whom said Ranger appears capable and healthy.

A special dog Stevens, of Massachusetts, has spent the last 45 years breeding and training bloodhounds. He has donated more than 150 bloodhounds — including Ranger — to law enforcement agencies across the country. A good police dog, Stevens said, starts with good genes. Score one point for Ranger. He’s the offspring of two gainfully employed bloodhounds — one works for the FBI, the other for the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office in New

York. According to Stevens, Ranger distinguished himself as a police dog prospect while the rest of his litter tussled over a toy. “You want the one that just sits there and says, ‘OK, when you guys are all done, I’ll go in there and take it for myself,’ ” Stevens said. “You want the thinker.” Two points for Ranger. Stevens started working with the dog at the tender age of five weeks. At seven weeks, he flew the pup out to Oregon and began working with Ranger and his handler. Together, Ranger and McConnell excelled, according to Stevens. Three points for Ranger. But the move to Bend means that, in a way, Ranger is starting over. Stevens said Ranger’s success will depend largely on how well his new handler reads and responds to Ranger’s cues. “If you have a (poor) handler and a good dog, you’re screwed. It’s a team effort,” Stevens said. “If you’ve got a good handler and a good dog, you’re off to the races.” Stevens said he has spoken with McConnell, who could not be reached for this article, and the deputy is “heartbroken.” But, Stevens said, McConnell understands that the dog would rather work with someone else than not work at all. Parker says McConnell is looking for a job, too. “So often when you get a job with a new place, you can’t just come in and work a specialized assignment” such as K-9 handler, Parker added. Bend Police Officer Kyle Voll — whom Parker describes as a “veteran,” hired a couple of years ago from the Corvallis Police Department — was selected over one other officer who also expressed interest in being Ranger’s handler. “It’s a commitment for the life of the dog,” Parker said. “You can’t take a promotion or another assignment, because (a new handler) is not good for the dog.”

Getting ready for work On Thursday, Voll drove to Dallas, Ore., to pick up Ranger and bring him to Bend. Officials don’t know exactly when Ranger will report to work. First, he needs a vehicle. Zlatan and Haras are driven around in Crown Victoria police cars. Ranger, however, will use a sport utility vehicle, to allow room for both the dog and a suspect in custody. “It’s more cost-effective,” Parker said. Otherwise, “if we make an arrest, we can’t fit the dog and a (suspect) in the car, so it requires another officer to come out and get the (suspect). That takes two units off the street instead of one.” The department has budgeted about $40,000 to purchase and outfit the SUV and install a kennel at Voll’s home, where Ranger will live. Training will cost a couple of thousand dollars, according to Parker. “The dog is trained, but the handler is not,” he said. After these initial expenses, Ranger should cost the department about $3,500 per year in food, veterinary care, insurance and miscellaneous expenses, such as leashes and collars. The money is coming from private donations and a refinance of the police station. Bend Police Lt. Paul Kansky said there’s another, simpler benefit to having a bloodhound on the force: People love dogs. “It’s a connection to the community,” he said. — Reporter: 541-617-7836, lraff@bendbulletin.com

Gains surprise even Syria’s rebels Los Angeles Times If last week’s dramatic strike against Syria’s military command surprised the residents of Damascus, the capital, none may have been more shocked than the rebels themselves. They now face the daunting prospect of liberating a city that for the length of the Syrian uprising has been under a veneer of normality as the rest of the country broke out into an armed insurrection. In Aleppo, the country’s second-largest city and commer-

cial hub, clashes occurred in several neighborhoods late Friday and continued Saturday. Throughout much of the uprising, rebels with the Free Syrian Army, made up of army defectors and civilian volunteers, have been able to push regime forces out of areas, but they often don’t have the ability to maintain control. Now the question is how the rebels sustain their onslaught, with a shortage of weapons and a lack of unity among scores of different rebel groups.

OSU-Cascades demographics Ethnicity

2007

Gender

2011

78% . . . White . . . . . . . . . . 81% 16% . . Unknown . . . . . . . . . 8% 2% . . . Hispanic . . . . . . . . . . 5% 1% . . . Multiple. . . . . . . . . . 2% 1% . . . . Asian. . . . . . . . . . . . 1% 1% . Native/Alaskan . . . . . . . . 1%

2007

Age

2011

65% . . . Female . . . . . . . . . . 58% 35% . . . .Male . . . . . . . . . . . 41%

2007

6.5% . . 18-19. . . . . . . . . . . 6% 40% . . . 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . 31% 23.5% . 24-29 . . . . . . . . . . 23% 19.5% . . 30-39 . . . . . . . . . . 25% 7.5% . . . 40-49 . . . . . . . . . . 10% 3.5% . . 50-59 . . . . . . . . . . . 3% 0.5% . . . 60+ . . . . . . . . . . . . 1%

Source: Oregon State University-Cascades

Students Continued from A1 “Having students not from Central Oregon living in the community should be an overall positive for Bend,” said Jane Reynolds, the director of enrollment services for OSU-Cascades. There will be an impact, Reynolds said, whether it’s an “economic impact (or) cultural.” For the first time last year, OSU-Cascades’ recruiters started traveling to high schools across the state. Right now, about 70 percent of OSU-Cascades students are transfer students. The remainder are students with OSU advisers who are also taking courses at Central Oregon Community College; graduate students; and nondegree-seeking students. By 2025, that will switch to 70 percent entering as freshmen and the rest transferring in. The first pitch to students is: “ ‘Do you want to be part of something brand-new?’ ” Reynolds said. The recruiting strategies will change, Reynolds said, but so will the story of what OSU-Cascades has to offer. The groundwork is being laid to start attracting students who might be interested in a four-year degree from OSU but want to attend classes in a smaller setting.

2011

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

“OSU has 25,000 students on their main campus. For some kids that’s overwhelming. Part of our invitation to come here is, ‘Earn an OSU degree in a much smaller environment.’ ” — Jane Reynolds, director of enrollment services, OSU-Cascades

“OSU has 25,000 students on their main campus,” Reynolds said. “For some kids that’s overwhelming. Part of our invitation to come here is, ‘Earn an OSU degree in a much smaller environment.’ ” The branch campus will also differentiate itself by offering courses not available in Corvallis, such as its outdoor leadership and energy systems engineering degrees. The university recently added those programs and has already seen a minor shift in demographics, with a slight increase in male students. Areas with similarities to Bend will also be targeted. Currently, only about 6 percent of students come to OSUCascades from out of state. By 2025, the goal is to bump that to 15 percent. “We recruit in the border states, Washington, Idaho and Northern California,” Reynolds said. “And we go to the Salt Lake City area, Utah, Nevada, Colorado, for those who want a mountain experience, a place they are used to but is not home.” With overcrowding at California universities, Reynolds

said, it will be an “obvious place to go looking for out-ofstate students.” The branch campus will continue its partnership with the main OSU campus to recruit more international students. And Kate Peterson, the assistant provost for enrollment management at the main OSU campus, said the Corvallis location will continue to steer students toward the branch campus when it makes sense. “If the branch campus sounds like a good fit, whether academic program, or size, or the location, (OSU recruiters) will give them the information,” she said. “It’s not about one or the other. … The branch campus is very unique.” It’s not uncommon to see a branch campus start small and grow, often offering programs reflective of a need in the area and in an attempt to set itself apart from the main campus. Washington State University has seen several campuses sprout up that do just that. Darin Watkins, spokesman with WSU, said the Tri-Cities campus offers classes about the wine industry and grants nursing and engineering degrees,

which target the population in that area. In Spokane, he said, the WSU programs are geared toward health sciences. In Everett, the site of a Boeing airplane factory, there has been a call for engineering offerings. There is discussion of making WSU’s Vancouver campus a residential one, with dormitories and available housing. Each campus, he said, has grown organically. “They are born from regional leaders who see a need in their community for higher education and opportunities for students who aren’t necessarily getting that education,” Watkins said. And, like branch campuses across the state, each has its own identity, he said. “If you look at branch campuses on the East Coast, they’ve taken on a life of their own … with sports teams,” Watkins said. “Even though they are a branch campus, they are a separate entity.” Reynolds is looking forward to the recruiting process. There has already been much talk of luring students to the area with the idea they could study by the Deschutes River and head to Mount Bachelor after classes. There is a “good chunk of students (who) are not thinking about OSU-Cascades now but will see us an opportunity down the road,” Reynolds said. — Reporter: 541-554-1162, ldake@bendbulletin.com

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

The Associated Press

A blown-out bus is transported out of the airport in the quiet Black Sea resort city of Burgas, Bulgaria, on Thursday, a day after the suicide attack that targeted Israeli vacationers onboard.

ISRAEL AND IRAN

After attack on tourists, fears of an escalating ‘shadow war’ By Joby Warrick The Washington Post

The suicide bombing of a Bulgarian bus packed with Israeli tourists has stoked fears of a deadly new phase in the long-running “shadow war” between Iran and Israel, with ordinary civilians now apparently replacing diplomats as primary targets. U.S. and Israeli officials pointed to similarities between the Bulgarian attack and three recently foiled plots also aimed at civilians, including a nearly identical plan to kill vacationing Israelis in Cyprus. While the identity of the bomber in Wednesday’s attack remained unclear, the earlier attempts have been tied to Iran or Hezbollah, the Lebanon-based militia movement closely aligned with the Islamic republic. Even before the blast in Bulgaria, intelligence officials were seeing signs of a dangerous escalation in what had until recently been a campaign of covert, tit-for-tat strikes targeting diplomats and — inside Iran — nuclear scientists. Earlier this month, Kenyan authorities arrested two Iranian men in connection with a plot to bomb several Western and Israeli businesses in that East African country. The suspects, identified by Kenya as members of an elite Iranian military unit, had brought with them more than 220 pounds of RDX, a powerful military explosive strong enough to destroy a large hotel. As far back as January, the

Israeli government has sounded warnings about a growing terrorist threat in Bulgaria, a country whose Black Sea beaches have become a popular destination for thousands of Israelis each year. After Wednesday’s attack, Israeli officials were quick to blame Iran, but Israel did not release evidence linking Iran or Hezbollah to the incident. U.S. intelligence officials said they have not seen proof, though they did not dispute the link. A series of Iran-linked plots in the fall and winter had mostly targeted diplomats and embassies. Iranian nationals and Hezbollah operatives had been implicated in attempted assassinations of Israeli, U.S. and Saudi figures in five countries. In one incident, Iranian operatives allegedly sought to hire Mexican gang members in a foiled plan to kill Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Washington. The attacks paused for several months during the spring, a lull that coincided with preparations for nuclear talks between Iran and the United States and five other world powers. But as the negotiations faltered in June, new plots surfaced, this time with civilians as primary targets. In a plot eerily similar to Wednesday’s attack, authorities in Cyprus announced July 7 that they had detained a Lebanese man who confessed to entering the country to plan attacks on planes and buses used by Israeli tour groups. Matthew Levitt, a counter-

terrorism expert who is writing a book on Hezbollah-sponsored terrorism, said the new plots pointed to a tactical shift by Iran that suggested both a deliberate escalation and an acknowledgment of the difficulty of going after embassies and other heavily guarded installations. “They’re going after softer targets,” said Levitt, a researcher with the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, a think tank. The new plots “fit within the pattern of the shadow war” that pits Iran and its proxies against the West, he said. “But what is shocking is the fact that, while the modus operandi is the same, this time they succeeded.” U.S. officials have cautioned that there was, as yet, no firm evidence linking Iran or its allies to Wednesday’s attack in the Black Sea port of Burgas. In the latest incident, a suicide bomber managed to blend in with an Israeli tour group at the city’s airport before detonating his explosives, killing five Israelis as well as their Bulgarian bus driver and himself. Iran denied having any role in the Bulgarian attack, and its official media dismissed Israeli accusations as “ridiculous.” Both Iran and Hezbollah have publicly blamed Israel and the U.S. for the assassinations of nuclear scientists and of the militia’s former security director, Imad Fayez Mughniyeh, who was blown apart in Syria in 2008 by a car bomb detonated by remote control.

W  B Murdoch resigns from media boards LONDON — Media mogul Rupert Murdoch has resigned as a director of a number of News Corp. boards overseeing his Britain newspapers, a spokeswoman confirmed Saturday. He also quit from some of the media company’s subsidiary boards in the U.S. Murdoch stepped down as a director of NI Group, Times Newspaper Holdings and News Corp. Investments in the U.K.,

Farm bill Continued from A1 While there is less money available, eligibility for funding is broader, and more receptive to tree farmers, she said. Previously, forestry was only eligible for up to 10 percent of the 10 million acres of land authorized for the Conservation Security Program, under which farmers receive payments for voluntarily promising to improve soil and water quality. In both new versions, there is no cap on tree farmers. Additionally, the Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, another voluntary program that rewards farmers for creating and maintaining habitat for threatened and endangered species on their land, has been folded into the Environmental Quality Incentives Program. The habitat program, particularly attractive to Northwest tree farmers who could accommodate the endangered spotted owl, will receive 5 percent of the larger program’s $1.75 billion in funding.

said Daisy Dunlop, spokeswoman for News Corp.’s British arm, News International. It was not immediately clear which of News Corp.’s U.S. boards Murdoch had left. News International sought to play down the significance of the resignations.

Muslim Brotherhood denounced at funeral CAIRO, Egypt — Angry mourners denounced the Muslim Brotherhood on Saturday

The House version also included a fix that would include wood products in the Biobased Markets Program, an effort to bolster domestic agriculture by requiring the federal government to give preference to products that use renewable materials. “Historically, that meant everything but wood, but we’ve changed that,” said Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-Canby, who is a member of the House Agriculture Committee. Last week, Schrader and 78 other representatives wrote to the House leadership, urging them to bring the farm bill to the House floor for a vote. “We all share the goal of trying to give small businesses certainty in these challenging economic times. Agriculture supports nearly 16 million jobs nationwide,” the letter states. “The message from our constituents and rural America is clear: we need a farm bill now.” More generally, both versions of the farm bill eliminate direct payments to farmers, which sometimes resulted in

at the funeral for Omar Suleiman, Egypt’s longtime top spy, in a ceremony that encapsulated the odd political dissonance that governs this country, where a democratically elected president newly in office shares power with a stilldominant military council. That president, Mohammed Morsi, did not attend the rites for Suleiman, whose agents once arrested Morsi for his work on behalf of the Brotherhood. — From wire reports

farmers in other states being paid to grow nothing, Schrader said. Oregon farmers will benefit by reduced competition from these propped-up entities, he said. The farm bill also calls for improved disease and pest management in federal forests, which will result in healthier public and private forests overall, he said. “In general, I think it’s a pretty good bill,” Schrader said. “The 2008 farm bill was a big, big improvement, and this one is a big improvement on that.” Oregon contains more than 30 million forested acres, which accounts for almost half the state. In the 2nd Congressional District, which includes Bend, 2.9 million acres of forest are family-owned, while another 2.2 million acres of forest are privately owned industrial farms. Statewide, 141,000 family tree farms account for more than 4.2 million acres of forest. — Reporter: 202-662-7456, aclevenger@bendbulletin.com

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

AIDS Continued from A1 “I hope,� he continued, “that will be one message this week.� AIDS tells the story of mankind’s powers of observation, the capacity of science to figure things out, the importance of citizen movements, the globalization of problem-solving, the intolerance of extreme inequality, the impulse for generosity, the ability of government to do good. It captures everything that has made the turn of the millennium a time of optimism as well as crisis. “There is no other infectious disease in the last 100 years that has caused so much suffering and so much death and appeared so unexpectedly,� said Diane Havlir, an AIDS physician at the University of California at San Francisco and co-chair of this year’s International AIDS Conference. “Also no other disease where the benefits of the investment in science and response have been so great.� AIDS conferences are the stop-action frames of that narrative. The 19th International AIDS Conference opens today in Washington. It is in the United States for the first time in a generation. Its convening on American soil acknowledges the end of a long and controversial U.S. policy — a ban on known HIV-positive people from entering this country. As a result, 25,000 researchers, activists, clinicians, social scientists and journalists will be around town and underfoot this week. If by some chance there were a Rip Van Winkle character among them and he asked what had happened in the 22 years since an international AIDS conference was held in the United States, the answer would be simple. Just about everything. In 1990, when the meeting was held in San Francisco, AIDS was an almost uniformly fatal disease. The public and much of the medical profession feared it and its victims, mostly white homosexual men and intravenous-drug users. The one AIDS drug worked poorly. AIDS advocates waged angry and occasionally violent protests for more research and better drugs. Pharmaceutical companies and many scientists resented the meddling by “non-experts� (but eventually came to include them in decisions). Preventing infection required difficult changes in behavior. The biological workings of the infecting agent, human immunodeficiency virus, was mostly a mystery. In 2012, HIV infection is a dangerous but treatable disease. Many people will live with it for decades and die of other ailments. It is less feared and stigmatized, although many sufferers still live at society’s margins. There are now two-dozen drugs to fight the virus. They are expensive but available to nearly everyone who needs them in wealthy countries and taken by more than 8 million people in poor ones. A vaccine against AIDS remains elusive. But there are strategies afoot that may further quench the global epidemic, which peaked during two decades separating the 1990 conference and this one. And now there are phrases such as “AIDS-free generation� and “cure for AIDS� in the air. The public’s understanding of AIDS has also progressed. A new poll by The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation sketches a picture of the host country — a United States that understands the sea change in AIDS of the past two decades but is unaware of many details of the progress of recent years. International AIDS conferences — held since 1985, first annually and now every other year — are cacophonous, confusing, crowded, interesting and exhausting events. For a week, experts give plenary lectures updating listeners about the biology, epidemiology and treatment of HIV infection. New research is presented in 15-minute lectures, in poster sessions held in cavernous halls, and in late-afternoon symposiums. Activists meet, train and exhort. Drug and device companies show their wares. The famous and the unknown speak.-

The terms of success Look for the words “amplification� and “implementation� to be a big part of talk this week.

U.S. drug fight turns to Africa

6QEBUFPO"*%4FQJEFNJD A new UNAIDS report says the number of new HIV infections worldwide has dropped slightly, and more people than ever before are living with HIV as a result of antiretroviral drugs.

In 2011 • Total number of people living with HIV: 34.2 million • People newly infected with HIV: 2.5 million • AIDS-related deaths: 1.7 million • Access to antiretroviral therapy: 8 million (up 20% from 2010)

Living with HIV By world region North America 1.4 million

Western, Central Europe 860,000

Caribbean 230,000 Latin America 1.4 million

Eastern Europe, Central Asia 1.5 million

North Africa, Middle East 330,000 Sub-Saharan Africa 23.5 million

South, Southeast Asia 4.2 million

By Charlie Savage and Thom Shanker

East Asia 830,000

New York Times News Service

Oceania 53,000

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They are boring, polysyllabic words. Not like “sex,� “drugs� and “death,� which were the key words of some AIDS conferences. But they are words that signal success. The world today knows how HIV is transmitted, what can be done to prevent its spread and how to treat someone once it is diagnosed. The issue is no longer what to do but rather who to do it for, where, how quickly and at what cost. That’s where “amplification� and “implementation� come in. How much do we want to amplify our successes? What is the strategy for implementing our hard-earned knowledge? Those are the big questions. The greatest scientific achievement in the past 22 years is combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART), with wide usage beginning in 1996. A patient takes three drugs that block one or more steps in HIV’s replication. That drives the virus to undetectable levels in the bloodstream and allows the immune system to restore itself to health. Treatment is now a “done deal� in the eyes of John Bartlett, the 76-year-old former head of infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins Hospital and one of the first people to notice the appearance of rare infections in unlikely patients. In May 1981 he saw a Baltimore woman, a heroin addict, who had Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. A month later, physicians in Los Angeles published a report on a group of gay men with that same “opportunistic� infection seen most often in cancer patients with severely damaged immune systems. It was the first description of AIDS. In 1984, Bartlett set up the world’s second AIDS clinic at Hopkins. He has helped write the federal government’s treatment guidelines ever since. In a recent conversation, he conceded that there will be new and better HIV drugs to come. But with many patients achieving an undetectable “viral load� by taking one pill once a day, the therapy battle has been won. “We have the (pharmaceutical) armamentarium that will take care of all the patients that come to us — with the proviso they take the pills,� he said. “People who start now should almost always succeed.� There’s an added bonus. People with a virus that is “fully suppressed� rarely transmit it. In a study of African couples published last year, the risk of passing on the infection was cut 96 percent. That finding, long suspected, has led to the battle cry of “treatment as prevention,� which also will be a big part of this conference’s conversations. Expect to hear that the multibillion-dollar effort to get HIV medicines to the developing world needs to be increased by billions more because, short of a vaccine, AIDS drugs are the best tool for stifling the epidemic. For the American public, this news is just starting to sink in. In the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation poll of 1,524 adults done in midJune, only 49 percent of people say HIV treatment improves the lives of those who receive it “and also helps prevent the spread of the disease to others.� Forty-four percent say HIV treatment benefits patients but has no effect on transmission. The vast majority, however, know the central truth about AIDS in 2012. Eighty-nine percent say they agree with the statement, “It is possible for people with HIV to lead healthy, productive lives.� In fact, nearly half — 46 percent — say HIV infection is a “manageable chronic disease, similar to diabetes or high blood pressure.� While most patients and

physicians would argue with that second statement, it is an extraordinary change in public perception from the HIV-as-death-sentence view that held sway the last time an AIDS conference was here.

Progress, and its cost From the start, AIDS has been a global disease — a pandemic. The world is also a flatter, more intimate place than it was in 1990. So most of this week’s conversation will be about AIDS far from American shores. According to UNAIDS, the United Nations AIDS agency, there are 34.2 million people living with HIV around the world (a number that, as it happens, is close to the death toll of 35 million since the start of the epidemic). More than twothirds of those people — 23.5 million — live in sub-Saharan Africa, and more than 1 in 10 (4.2 million) in India or Southeast Asia. The effort to bring anti-retroviral therapy to people in those regions is the most important development since the emergence of the treatment strategy itself. Today, more than 8 million people in low- and middle-income countries are taking the medicines. That’s 54 percent of those who should be getting it, according to clinical guidelines drawn up by the World Health Organization. Coverage in sub-Saharan Africa is 56 percent. (That is the region targeted by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, the five-year, $15 billion program that George W. Bush announced to astonished listeners in his 2003 State of the Union speech.) Coverage is higher in Latin America (70 percent), lower in Asia (40 percent) and much lower in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (23 percent) and the Middle East and North Africa (13 percent). Less than 10 years ago, there were only 400,000 people in the developing world taking antiretroviral drugs. The 20-fold increase has occurred with astonishing speed. In Africa, the number of people on therapy jumped 20 percent — from 5.1 million to 6.2 million — in 2011 alone. The Obama administration announced last week that PEPFAR is now treating 4.5 million people, a half-million more than in December. Prevention is also making headway. In 2011, 2.5 million people acquired HIV — one-fifth fewer than a decade earlier. Last year, 57 percent of pregnant HIV-positive women got antiretroviral drugs to prevent transmitting the virus to their babies — a strategy that produced 24 percent fewer newborn infections than just two years earlier.

Perceptions News of these recent gains appears not to have reached most Americans. Nearly three-quarters in the Post-Kaiser poll say that most people in developing countries do not have access to HIV prevention services. Only 16 percent say that most do. However, when asked more generally about progress against AIDS, Americans are more up to date. Asked if “the world is making progress,� 58 percent say yes, a lot more than in 2002, when 35 percent gave that answer. Who’s paying for this progress? Countries of the developing world last year spent $8.6 billion on AIDS. Rich countries, philanthropies, the World Bank and U.N. agencies spent another $8.2 billion. Money from the U.S. government accounted for 48 percent of all international assistance. When only assistance from governments is considered, the U.S. share was even larger

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— 59 percent. A new entity , the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, has collected or been pledged $22.6 billion since its creation in 2002. It now provides AIDS treatment for 3.3 million people. This picture is changing, too. In the past five years, 81 countries increased the amount of money they spent on AIDS by more than 50 percent. Even some of the poorest, such as Haiti and Sierra Leone, more than doubled it. South Africa quadrupled it. “I am seeing a new narrative,� Sidibe, the UNAIDS director, who is originally from Mali, said last week — a narrative of “burden-sharing.� That is not going to muffle shouts that the United States is not spending enough money on AIDS, despite the fact that PEPFAR’s budget is $6.6 billion. Activists are particularly unhappy with the Obama administration’s plan to cut the program by 3.3 percent next year in the name of fiscal austerity. The president’s commitment “has been lukewarm at best,� said Tom Myers of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which helps care for people in 26 countries. “It may be better if he doesn’t attend the conference.� In fact, the White House announced that the president’s schedule will preclude him from coming. On the domestic front of the war on AIDS, a different debate about “amplification� and “implementation� is getting started. It involves prevention, not treatment. The question is how many people — and which ones — should use a new weapon called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. Several studies have shown that when HIV-negative people take anti-retroviral drugs they are less likely to acquire the virus if they have a sexual encounter with someone who is infected. The protection is far from absolute. But in people who take the medicines regularly, the strategy appears to reduce risk by at least 75 percent. This is true for homosexuals and heterosexuals. This month, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada, the brand name for a combination of emtricitabine and tenofovir, for this purpose. Is this the secret to ending the spread of the AIDS virus? Some think it will be a big help; others that it is a dangerous and expensive distraction. How much interest there is in PrEP is unknown. That is likely to be a topic of discussion at the conference this week.

WASHINGTON — In a significant expansion of the war on drugs, the United States has begun training an elite unit of counternarcotics police in Ghana and planning similar units in Nigeria and Kenya as part of an effort to combat the Latin American trafficking organizations that are increasingly using Africa to smuggle cocaine into Europe. The growing U.S. involvement in Africa follows an earlier escalation of anti-drug efforts in Central America, according to documents, congressional testimony and interviews with a range of officials at the State Department, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Pentagon. In both regions, U.S. officials are responding to fears that crackdowns in more direct staging points for smuggling — like Mexico and Spain — have prompted traffickers to move into smaller and weakly governed states, further corrupting and destabilizing them.

Playing catch-up The aggressive response by the U.S. is also a sign of how greater attention and resources have turned to efforts to fight drugs as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have wound down. “We see Africa as the new frontier in terms of counterterrorism and counternarcotics issues,� said Jeffrey Breeden, the chief of DEA’s Europe, Asia and Africa section. “It’s a place that we need to get ahead of — we’re already behind the curve in some ways.� The initiatives come amid a surge in successful interdictions in Honduras since May — but also as U.S. officials have been forced to defend their new tactics after a commando-style team of DEA agents participated in at least three lethal interdiction operations along-

side a squad of Honduran police officers. In one of those operations, in May, the Honduran police killed four people near the village of Ahuas, and in two others in the past month U.S. agents have shot and killed smuggling suspects. To date, officials say, the DEA commando team has not been deployed to work with the newly created elite police squads in Africa, where the effort to counter the drug traffickers is said to be about three years behind the one in Central America. The officials said that if Western security forces did come to play a more direct operational role in Africa, for historical reasons they might be European and not American.

Skepticism Some specialists have expressed skepticism about the approach. Bruce Bagley, a professor at the University of Miami who focuses on Latin America and counternarcotics, said that what had happened in West Africa over the past few years was the latest example of the “Whac-A-Moleâ€? problem, in which making trafficking more difficult in one place simply shifts it to another. “As they put on the pressure, they are going to detour routes, but they are not going to stop the flow, because the institutions are incredibly weak,â€? Bagley said. â€œâ€Ś You start killing people in foreign countries — whether criminals or not — and there is going to be fallout.â€? U.S. counternarcotics assistance for West Africa has totaled about $50 million for each of the past two years — up from just $7.5 million in 2009, according to the State Department. The DEA also is opening its first country office in Senegal, officials said, and the Pentagon has worked with Cape Verde to establish a regional center to detect drug-smuggling ships.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

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LOCALNEWS

State news, B3-6 Obituaries, B4-5

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

LOCAL BRIEFING Desert Museum awarded $47,000 The High Desert Museum has been awarded a grant of $47,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington, D.C. The museum will use the money to help develop a plan to refine its collection of art and artifacts. The museum is one of two in Oregon to receive a Museums for America Program Grant this year. — From staff reports

www.bendbulletin.com/local

County seeks to cut health costs • On-site pharmacy dispenses medications for employees, families By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Hoping to replicate the costsaving success of its on-site health care clinic, Deschutes County has opened a full-service pharmacy to supply county employees and their families with low-cost prescriptions. The county-run pharmacy opened in May with the goal of providing county health plan members low-cost prescriptions. Under the plan, employees can fill generic prescriptions at the pharmacy for free,

while name-brand drugs will be provided at a deep discount. Those discounts help employees who have seen medical plan payments rise in the past few years, but also come as a boon to the county. “Even with that reduction in copay we still save money,” said Dave Inbody, assistant to the county administrator. “We currently get drugs at 20 to 25 percent less than what we would pay for (prescriptions outside) the pharmacy.” Inbody said the county

Cost of doing business

spends $2.4 million in prescription costs for health plan members annually. The goal is to cut that number by at least $400,000. Original estimates forecast the savings would be reached in three years. That’s because to just break even, the county needs to get 70 percent of health plan prescriptions filled at the on-site pharmacy. It’s possible the savings could come sooner as response to the pharmacy has been better than anticipated. See County / B2

To run the on-site clinic the county pays Healthstat, a health care contractor, $662,000 per fiscal year in administrative fees and salaries. To run the pharmacy the county estimates it will pay Take Care Health Services, a pharmacy contractor, $344,000 per fiscal year in administrative fees and salaries.

See video on The Bulletin’s YouTube channel: youtube.com/bulletinwebmaster

WASHINGTON WEEK WASHINGTON — The House of Representatives on Thursday approved another year of funding for the Defense Department and military undertakings in Iraq and Afghanistan, authorizing $606 billion for 2013. This includes $518 billion for the Department of Defense, the same amount approved for the Pentagon in 2012. An additional $88 billion is authorized for what is termed “overseas contingency operations,” or foreign wars. The total remains $6 billion over the automatic limit on defense spending that went into effect after the Supercommittee, tasked with cutting the deficit, failed to reach a deal last summer on voluntary cuts. The measure passed by a vote of 326-90, with 225 Republicans and 101 Democrats voting yes and 11 Republicans and 79 Democrats voting no.

Balloon festival raises spirits of kids, parents

Clarification In a story headlined ���CEC executive fears governor’s energy plan will hurt data center,” which appeared Friday, July 20, on Page C1, the state’s stance on how to meet growing power demand was misrepresented. Although it plans to meet the state’s increase in power demand by conserving power and increasing efficiency, the state is not discouraging or prohibiting the building of new power resources or purchasing power on the market, said Scott Nelson, an adviser to Gov. John Kitzhaber.

By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

Central Oregonians living within reach of a possible wildfire should take time now to plan what they would do in case of an evacuation, fire prevention and emergency managers say. “We always encourage people to know two ways out of their neighborhood,” said Katie Lighthall, program director for Project Wildfire. They should have a “72-hour” kit — with enough food and water to last three days along with clothes and other items — packed in their car in case they are not home when a fire threatens, she said. And once wildfires are burning, she said people living near them should pay close attention to news reports to see if they could be forced to evacuate. Evacuations prompted by wildfires are a reality in Central Oregon. Just last summer, fires in the High Springs Complex caused the evacuation of about 70 homes on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. How residents are warned of such wildfire evacuations differs with where they live. See Evacuation / B4

To receive evacuation warnings on your cellphone in Deschutes County, register online at http://www. deschutes.org/9-11-Service-District/ Citizen-EmergencyNotification-System%28CENS%29.aspx.

• Defense authorization bill Walden (R) ...................Y Blumenauer (D) ...........N DeFazio (D)...................N Schrader (D) ................N

See Week / B2

Make plan to vacate if wildfire hits, officials say

Evacuation orders via cellphone

U.S. HOUSE VOTE

Tuesday, Senate Republicans blocked Democrats’ efforts to bring the Democracy Is Strengthened by Casting Light On Spending in Elections — or DISCLOSE — Act of 2012 to the floor for discussion. The measure would have required organizations, including super PACs and unions, to identify anyone who gave $10,000 during an election cycle in an attempt to prevent so-called “secret money” from influencing elections. In a strictly partisan vote of 53-45, Democrats failed to garner the 60 votes needed to override the Republican threat of a filibuster.

B

Weather, B6

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Ella Hogan, 5, of Bend, holds up a mirror to her mom, Angela, and little sister Maryn, 3, watches while Tessa Palmer, 18, of Redmond, paints Angela’s face during the Balloons Over Bend Children’s Festival on Saturday at Riverbend Park in Bend. By Holly Pablo The Bulletin

Flocks of screaming children and their parents ran to see the AirLink helicopter land at the Balloons Over Bend Children’s Festival on Saturday at Riverbend Park. The children had the chance to sit in the pilot’s seat, explore the inside of the helicopter and learn about the controls and equipment. Parents snapped plenty of photos. Bud Small, of Bend, couldn’t get his 6-year-old son out of the helicopter because the boy was too excited. They live near St. Charles Bend and see the helicopter fly by frequently, but have never been that close to it. “It’s a really big deal to him to see the inside of it,” Small said. “We fly (radio-controlled) helicopters in the living room. This is worthwhile.” Throughout the day, children jumped in the colorful arrays of bounce houses and obstacle courses lining the park. Many flocked to a large inflatable slide. The festival is the product of collaboration between the nonprofit Saving Grace and Lay It Out Events with Northwest Community Balloons Over Bend. The events had been separate. Beginning last year, the organizations have combined to bring the best of both events to Saving Grace’s annual festival, now in its 24th year. Balloons Over

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Three-year-old Charlie Stanford, of Bend and Eugene, slides down an inflatable water slide during the Balloons Over Bend Children’s Festival on Saturday at Riverbend Park in Bend.

Bend began in 2003. The two share the goal of bringing families together in a healthy and safe environment. The event had more than 20 activities, ranging from face painting, dunk tanks and fishing booths with prizes waiting to be hooked. A main stage featured performances ranging from martial arts to Irish dances.

As part of the Balloons Over Bend event, 10 hot air balloons took off from the park in the early morning. The flights lasted for 45 minutes. Friday’s flights were cancelled because of winds, but didn’t affect Friday’s opening Night Glow. Kate Mitchell, a representative of Lay It Out Events, said many children

and families came to watch the gas burners light up the balloons. “The kids were just starstruck,” Mitchell said. “The balloon glow is just beautiful.” Face painting was popular. Even with about a dozen volunteers working to quickly paint pictures of flowers, animals and sports-related images, there were always children in line. “It’s really hot out today, but it’s wonderful,” said Janet Harlan, of Bend, as she watched her children get their faces painted. “It’s a great thing for the kids.” Annette, 8, and Ethan, 5, stopped to show off their matching face paint. Both got Batman masks, which Ethan said made him feel powerful. The festival was free, but each activity booth cost one to three tickets, with each ticket costing $1. All of the proceeds benefit Saving Grace, which provides services for survivors of domestic violence. “Any kid here will be sleeping well tonight,” Mitchell said. “And hopefully if they’re wearing sunscreen right now, they’ll wake up well, too.” The balloons will again take flight over Bend at 6 a.m. today, followed by the Children’s Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Riverbend Park. — Reporter: 541-633-2160, hpablo@bendbulletin.com

YESTERDAY

1912 circus judged a success, despite fire Compiled by Don Hoiness from archived copies of The Bulletin at the Des Chutes Historical Museum.

100 YEARS AGO For the week ending July 21, 1912

Fire destroys Bend property During the last week Bend’s fire loss has been in excess of $29,000. Last Wednesday night buildings at the northwest corner Wall and Oregon streets, were totally destroyed. Sunday afternoon the Everson building on Greenwood, containing L.B. Misener’s grocery store, went up in flames. The first fire was discovered Wednesday night, while the carnival was in full swing and when people were just preparing to go to the play at Linster’s Hall. It apparently originated at or near the waterheating stove in the rear of Innes & Davidson’s barber shop. See Yesterday / B2

B2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

County Continued from C1 “We estimate the pharmacy is seeing 49 percent (of health plan prescriptions being filled) right now,” Inbody said. “Our target is to reach 65 percent by next May, but I think we will be well over that in just the next few months.” The pharmacy and the onsite health clinic that opened in February 2011 are unusual in how they alter a local government’s approach to employee health coverage. But the county is also in an unusual situation. The county is reliant on declining tax revenues and is among the region’s largest employers. Climbing health care costs bog down general fund revenues, while rising premiums can become sticking points in union negotiations. The decision was made that to cut costs, the county essentially had to become more

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Pharmacist Ruthie Black speaks to Terri Bilyeu, of Bend, about a prescription Thursday at the Deschutes County onsite pharmacy, run by Walgreens. The pharmacy opened in May to serve county employees and their families. involved. “It doesn’t make sense, right?” Inbody says, posing a common question in response to the program. “I mean, how long have we been dealing

with health care? Decades? And why wouldn’t we have been doing this long ago if it worked?” Inbody said when he first heard of the concept of a coun-

ty-run clinic, he thought it was “just garbage.” “I asked, ‘Where is the savings?’ ” he said. Health care costs have been on a steady rise in the county over the past decade. Inbody said since 2006, the average annual increase in cost has been around 13.8 percent. In the last fiscal year, which ended in June, the cost of all health care paid for by the county came in at just under $17 million. That still represents a rise in spending, but at the reduced rate of 9.2 percent. Inbody said most of that savings came as a result of the onsite clinic, which he believes saved the county $487,913. That number is based on the average cost per visit at the on-site clinic versus a typical trip to the doctor. Inbody said his numbers show employees also saved $248,283 thanks to the clinic. The savings come largely

from eliminating the per-visit cost of a visit to the doctor’s office. “Usually when you go to the doctor you are charged a bill,” Inbody said. “Here, we pay (doctors, nurses and staff) a salary. As this has gone on, we have seen that it is the way to go. We broke even the first eight months (of operating the clinic) and after that it was all savings.” County staffers hope the pharmacy turns into the next step in savings. “If you go to the pharmacy, it saves the county money, it saves you money,” said interim County Administrator Erik Kropp. “If you choose to use generic, it saves the county money, it saves you money. And an important thing to point out is that any time we save money, the county saves money, we can provide more services to county residents.” — Reporter: 541-617-7837 ehidle@bendbulletin.com

Week Continued from B1

U.S. SENATE VOTE • DISCLOSE Act Merkley (D) ..................Y Wyden (D) ....................Y Thursday, Senate Democrats were unable to advance the Bring Jobs Home Act, which would have offered a 20 percent tax credit to companies that repatriated jobs that had been previously outsourced overseas. It also proposed ending tax benefits for companies that shipped jobs abroad. Again, the Democrat majority was unable to secure 60 votes needed to overcome the threat of a Republican filibuster, and the measure failed, 56-42, with four Republicans voting in favor of the measure.

U.S. SENATE VOTE

Yesterday Continued from C1 Only by the hardest kind of work with all the hose that could be brought to bear were Lara’s store, across Wall street, and the building of the Deschutes Banking & Trust Co. saved. Bend again was “lucky,” for even with the fortunately wide streets and the excellent water pressure, the loss would have been disastrous had there been a breeze instead of the dead calm which prevailed.

Celebration successful “Have you seen V-i-o-l-a, the fat girl?” If you didn’t see her, or the elephants, or the balloon, or the pink lemonade man and all the rest of it, your chances are gone for this year, for the “three glorious days” are over, to the sorrow of all the kids who actually helped set up the tents of Bend’s first real circus, and perhaps the joy of business men who now have a chance to get down to tacks again. The celebration proved as big a success as the most optimistic predicted. Aside from the fire, there were no unfortunate incidents to mar the general good time. Although several special policemen were on duty, there was little or nothing for them to do, as the crowds were extremely orderly. The play which was to have been given Wednesday night, for the combined benefit of the Library and Commercial Club, had to be abandoned, as the fire came just as the show was about to start. The performance, however, will be given later, at a date to be announced next week. All tickets sold will be good later.

Roses thrive here Just to prove that there is nothing at all in the statement sometimes made that “roses can’t be grown in Bend”, Mrs. J.H. Wenandy last week displayed a lot of beautiful blossoms that are thriving at her home, including a large variety of roses.

75 YEARS AGO For the week ending July 21, 1937

Miss Earhart and Noonan are given up George Palmer Putnam, husband of Amelia Earhart, who with Navigator Captain Frederick Noonan has been given up for dead in the South seas, plans to continue the search for the missing pair in a chartered yacht, Arrigo Balboni, prominent in southern California aviation, said today. Balboni, operator of an airplane wrecking yard here, said: “Pilots and mechanics from Union Air Terminal said today that Putnam laid plans 10 days ago to charter a yacht and begin a search where the Navy left off, confident in the belief that his wife and Noonan are alive on some uncharted island along the route of their attempted flight from New Guinea to Howland Island. “Around the airports, pilots assert that Putnam, who has shunned making public announcements since Miss Earhart and her navigator disappeared more than two weeks ago, is convinced that Navy pilots might easily have missed sighting the stranded fliers. They are reported to have covered nearly 250,000 square miles in their search and Putnam is represented as convinced many atolls and islets could not have been checked in

the vast expanse of the South Pacific during that time. “Putnam also holds to the hope that, if the Earhart plane came down in the ocean, the fliers could have made land somewhere in their inflated rubber raft,” Balboni said.

Navy ends search Admiral Orrin G. Murfin, commander of the 14th naval district, announced the end of the greatest search the Navy ever conducted. An area the size of Texas was surveyed. Seven Navy ships, 63 airplanes and several thousand men participated. Admiral Murfin called off the expensive hunt yesterday evening when the pilots from the carrier Lexington ended their sixth day of searching with the usual “no trace” report. “We have covered all possible territory”, the Admiral said, “some of it we have been over as much as three times. I could not conceive of any other place where we might direct our search, and obviously we can’t keep it up indefinitely. “We used all the information that was available and some of which we believed to be accurate. For the most part, however, our search was based on conjecture. “The case, as it was, left us looking for a needle in a haystack.”

50 YEARS AGO For the week ending July 21, 1962

Plans take final shape for Mirror Pond Pageant A program for Bend’s 1962 Mirror Pond Pageant, to be presented on July 27, 28 and 29, was taking final shape today as the framework of a huge arch loomed over the fete scene, the Deschutes River. Through that arch, of entirely new design, will move floats that will depict “America’s Moments of Greatness,” from the time the Pilgrims landed until John Glenn orbited the earth. Pageant committeemen, headed by Dick Maudlin, said script for this year’s pageant is being prerecorded. Included will be Lincoln’s second inaugural address narrated by Richard Boone of “Have Gun, Will Travel” fame. John Stenkamp of KBND is writing the script. This year’s river fete is being prepared as a Pacific Northwest event, with travelers to and from the Seattle World’s Fair being invited to stop over to view a water fete considered unique on the continent. Floats to be presented in the pageant are being built by professional decorators, J.W. Huserik and Sons, Inc., Portland. Maudlin said outside groups taking part in the fete will include the colorful “Vikings” who seasonally present a Scandinavian festival in Junction City. Square dancing, American Legion baseball games, art exhibits, a gem and geology show, a buckaroo breakfast and a golf tournament will highlight this year’s program. The pet parade, one of the top features of the river fetes of former years when they were held over the Fourth of July holidays, will again be held this year on Saturday. Children of Central Oregon are being invited to groom their pets for this event, most colorful of all uptown attractions in connection with the pageant.

At last, he’ll get to see a pageant A Bend man who for some 30

years has played a major role in the presentation of Mirror Pond Pageants, but has never seen one, is going to take a good look this weekend. He is L.G. Bertram, electrician. He has served as technician in charge of illumination of the arch since the first span was used. Bertram’s work throughout the years has required his presence under the arch, where are located the batteries of switches and controls used in lighting and coloring the span. This year, on his own request, he is serving as technical advisor in charge of lighting. He will have opportunity to leave his old post under the span and take a view from the park. His connection with the pageant started with the first year of the fete in 1933.

25 YEARS AGO For the week ending July 21, 1987

Bend resident recalls life on rails It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. That literary phrase describes the experiences of Bend resident Donald Jackson during the Great Depression, when he rode the rails for thousands of miles and learned firsthand about the lifestyle of American hobos. “Conditions were tough back then, but we were all in it together, and riding the rails ended up being a great adventure for me,” said Jackson. Jackson, a retired engineering-astronomy professor who has lived in Bend for nine years, rode more than 30,000 miles on trains between 1930 and 1933 — and he never bought a single ticket. “In those days we were encouraged to ride the rails, because if people stayed in one place they got restless and started complaining about the government,” explained Jackson. Jackson started riding the rails during his junior year of high school because “it was the thing to do back then.” One of Jackson’s most memorable excursions involved riding the rails to Los Angeles to attend the 1932 Olympic Games. According to a journal Jackson kept during his travels, he took along $30 to finance the trip and managed to return to North Dakota with $15 in his pocket. “There were some rough moments,” he said. Jackson recalled one close call when he managed to survive a night spent on a boxcar with “some pretty bad characters.” He said he tried to catch some shut-eye, but “each time I woke up they were about two feet closer to me, until I finally had to pull a hunting knife to make them back off.” Although Jackson said he never rode a freight train through Bend back in the 30s, he did ride on top of a boxcar from Portland to Klamath Falls. “We had to tie ourselves onto the top of the train so we could sleep along the way, and of course it was vital to keep an eye out for tunnels,” he said. Jackson, who retired from his teaching post at the University of Minnesota in 1978 to relocate in Bend, said he stopped riding the rails by the mid 1930s when he started attending college. “Hopping freight trains matured me — it gave me a head start on learning about life,” he said.

P O

• Bring Jobs Home Act Merkley (D) ..................Y Wyden (D) ....................Y — Andrew Clevenger, The Bulletin

For The Bulletin’s full list, including federal, state, county and city levels, visit www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

DESCHUTES COUNTY 1300 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Web: www.deschutes.org Phone: 541-388-6571 Fax: 541-382-1692

County Court

Ken Fahlgren Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: ken.fahlgren@co.crook.or.us Seth Crawford Phone: 541-447-6555 Email: seth.crawford@co.crook.or.us

County Commission

Tammy Baney, R-Bend Phone: 541-388-6567 Email: Tammy_Baney@ co.deschutes.or.us Alan Unger, D-Redmond Phone: 541-388-6569 Email: Alan_Unger@ co.deschutes.or.us Tony DeBone, R-La Pine Phone: 541-388-6568 Email: Tony_DeBone@ co.deschutes.or.us

JEFFERSON COUNTY 66 S.E. D St. Madras, OR 97741 Phone: 541-475-2449 Fax: 541-475-4454 Web: www.co.jefferson.or.us County Commission

Mike Ahern, John Hatfield, Wayne Fording Phone: 541-475-2449 Email: commissioner@co. jefferson.or.us

CROOK COUNTY 300 N.E. Third St. Prineville, OR 97754 Phone: 541-447-6555 Fax: 541-416-3891 Email: administration@co.crook. or.us Web: co.crook.or.us

CITY OF BEND 710 N.W. Wall St. Bend, OR 97701 Phone: 541-388-5505 Web: www.ci.bend.or.us City Manager Eric King Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: citymanager@ci.bend.or.us City Council

Tom Greene Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: tgreene@ci.bend.or.us Jeff Eager Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jeager@ci.bend.or.us Kathie Eckman Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: keckman@ci.bend.or.us Jim Clinton Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jclinton@ci.bend.or.us Mark Capell Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: mcapell@ci.bend.or.us Jodie Barram Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: jbarram@ci.bend.or.us Scott Ramsay Phone: 541-388-5505 Email: sramsay@ci.bend.or.us

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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O N Woman arrested for not giving up dog in dispute The Associated Press PORTLAND — The custody battle for a dog named Chase — or Bear — is getting ugly. Police arrested an Oregon State University student who has refused to return a dog she found last year to its original owner. Meanwhile, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office has opened an investigation into whether the original owner abused the dog. Jordan Biggs, 20, was booked into a Corvallis jail on a theft charge Friday and later released. Biggs has said she found the dog earlier this year in Portland and then took him with her to Corvallis after failing to find its owner. She named the dog Bear and had it trained as a service animal to assist her when she has an asthma attack. When she returned to Portland for a visit in May, the original owner spotted the dog and asked for its return. The man, 30-year-old Sam Hanson-Fleming, filed a police report after Biggs declined. He also obtained a ruling from a Multnomah County animal control official supporting his ownership rights. Biggs, meanwhile, hired animal rights attorney Geordie Duckler, who has filed a civil suit asking a judge to grant custody to his client. Duckler described Biggs as “upset” Saturday and said the dog would remain at a Corvallis shelter while the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office investigates allegations that Hanson-Fleming abused the Siberian husky mix named Chase while under his care. Hanson-Fleming said the allegations are untrue. Duckler said a private investigation through his office — based on recorded statements, eyewitness testimony, private documents and court records — found Hanson-Fleming kicked, slapped, beat and urinated on Chase in order to show “who was in charge.” The lawyer also said Hanson-Fleming regularly kept the dog in a cage that was too small for lengthy periods of time and never had him seen

Amanda Cowan / The Corvallis Gazette-Times

Jordan Biggs kneels with the service dog she calls Bear in Corvallis. A Portland man said a 45-pound dog that leaped the fence of his house last year and vanished is named Chase. Biggs, an Oregon State University student, found a dog nearby and trained it to alert her when she’s about to have an asthma attack. An animal control official said that “Bear” is “Chase,” and that the Portland man should have his dog back.

by a veterinarian. Moreover, visitors to Hanson-Fleming’s apartment referred to the living conditions as a “pigsty,” and Hanson-Fleming regularly made the dog “inhale significant amounts of marijuana smoke in order to amuse himself and his friends, and to psychologically torment the dog,” according to Duckler. Hanson-Fleming told The Oregonian newspaper on Saturday that the allegations of animal abuse and neglect are false: “They’re just trying to turn the tables on me.” Hanson-Fleming told the newspaper he bit the dog on the cheek when he was a puppy, but that was to discipline him — using the same method

canine mothers do. “I’ve never hit Chase, I’ve never kicked him,” HansonFleming said. “The only thing I’ve done is swatted him with a rolled-up newspaper” to discipline him for chewing on shoes, he said. Multnomah County prosecutor Norm Frink wrote in an email that the allegations “have at least a superficial credibility.” Sgt. Pete Simpson, a Portland Police Bureau spokesman, confirmed authorities were investigating. Corvallis police and shelter officials referred all questions to the Benton County District Attorney’s Office, which would not speak about the controversy until Monday.

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Midwife indicted in baby’s death BANDON — A Coos County grand jury has indicted a Bandon midwife on charges of manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide in the death of an infant delivered last year. Marcene Rebeck, a lay midwife for 30 years, told The World newspaper of Coos Bay that the indictment was handed down last week, and she is trying to raise money to hire an attorney. The newspaper reports that the baby was a few days old when she died after a long labor and home birth. The cause of death was listed as sepsis, an illness in which the body has a severe response to bacteria or other germs. District Attorney R. Paul Frasier said he would not comment until the July 30 arraignment. Linda Cummins, the mother of Bethany Reed, the woman who lost the baby, said she and her daughter have been working with county medical examiner for the past year and the Coos County District Attorney’s Office has been reviewing the case since May. Reed now has a 2-month-old daughter. “We’re cooperative members of the community, and we don’t want to take a position other than to say that we have done what was requested of us and testified before the grand jury,” Cummins said. “We don’t wish any ill

will toward Marcene,” she added. Rebeck, who owns a coffee shop, runs a Montessori-based school and teaches Jazzercise classes, said she has delivered 300 babies during her career, with only one death and no other major incidents. Rebeck’s friends and supporters plan to protest the indictment and hold a fundraiser to raise money for her defense.

3 arrested in gang stabbing in Medford MEDFORD — Police arrested three people accused of taking part in a gang-related stabbing and riot two weeks ago. The suspects are a 16-yearold boy and two women, 18 and 22. They are held in custody on a variety of charges, including assault and rioting. The arrests stem from a large fight at the corner of Prune and Plum streets near downtown Medford that left a 27-year-old man with a stab wound. Police told the Mail Tribune that the riot started when several gang members outside a party began harassing the victim and his friend for not being in the gang. Police believe it was the 16-year-old who stabbed the victim in the torso. The cut missed vital organs, and the victim was treated and released from a hospital.

Roaming ferret ends up in suburban home WEST LINN — When Karen Park’s dog started barking as she cooked dinner in her suburban Portland home, she went to investigate — and found a ferret peering out from behind a cabinet. At first she thought it was a rat and says she “must have jumped a mile.” Then she shooed her dog and cat outside and placed an open cat carrier in the middle of the floor. When the ferret went inside the carrier, Park closed the door. She tells The Oregonian that she took the carrier and began a door-to-door search for the ferret’s owners. She found them around the corner about four houses away. Turns out the ferret’s name is Midge and her owners hadn’t even known she had gotten away. Park says she’s glad she was able to help Midge return home safely. — From wire reports

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Tourism campaign, weak dollar lure foreign vacationers to Oregon Coast By Lori Tobias The Oregonian

LINCOLN CITY — Not all visitors to Lincoln City will be able to read the new banners unfurled here this year. But it’s a safe bet they’ll get the message: Welcome. And visitors from Spain, Germany, Italy, China, Korea and Japan will see it in their native tongues. It’s all part of an effort to reach out to the increasing number of international travelers who are visiting the Oregon Coast. “We’re seeing a lot more of a mix of races and cultures than I’ve seen in some time,” said Sandy Pfaff, executive director of the Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau. “The travel from Canada has been incredible the last year and not just from British Columbia, but from Alberta, which is considerably farther away. “We have seen quite a bit of Germans and some increase in Asian visitors.” In Cannon Beach, hotels are hosting more guests from Japan and Germany, while Seaside recently hosted a group from Belarus. “They loved it,” said Jon Rahl, director of tourism marketing for the Seaside Visitors Bureau. “That being a pretty low, landlocked Eastern European country, for many of them it was the first time they saw the ocean. It kind of brings out the little kid in everyone.” China is also an emerging market, with recent changes in visa policies making it easier for the Chinese to travel,

Rahl said. In Newport, innkeeper Brendan Carmody has seen a surge in European visits to his new eco-friendly hotel, Greenstone Inn. He believes the increase may have something to do with the American dollar, which has been weaker than the euro. But he also notices that European visitors appreciate his environmentally friendly efforts. “What I’ve noticed is that European travelers are very aware and interested in green technology,” Carmody said. “We have card docking — when you go into a room you put the card in a docking station and that powers up the whole unit. When you leave you take your key out and that turns out the power in the unit. The Europeans are totally familiar with that. We had a lady from Macedonia who stayed a week in March, and it wasn’t her first stay.” The weak U.S. dollar may play a role in attracting Europeans, but Lorna Davis, executive director of the Newport Chamber of Commerce, says the bulk of the credit goes to Travel Oregon, the state tourism commission. “Travel Oregon is recognized as being one of the most innovative tourism bureaus in the whole of the USA,” Davis said. A 1 percent hotel occupancy tax that went into effect in 2004 and is dedicated to promoting state tourism is helping the commission do its job. The state has gone from being 47th in tourism budgets

to 26th, according to Teresa O’Neill, vice president of global sales for Travel Oregon. “That really put us ahead of the game,” O’Neill said. “Since that time, Washington has closed their tourism office, and other states have decreased their budgets. We’ve really risen in the ranks.” As part of the state campaign, Davis has visited about a half dozen countries to promote the central Oregon Coast. The travel agencies are already familiar with what Oregon has to offer. It’s up to people like Davis to come up with itineraries that fit their needs. “Newport offers an authenticity and natural beauty that make a visit here palatable,” Davis said. “Visitors want to see the aquarium, to walk on the Bayfront and shop in Nye Beach. The beach is something they enjoy. They are looking for nature and splendor, that ‘awww’ moment that Oregon has to offer.” Foreign visitors also stay longer and spend more than their domestic counterparts, Davis said. The increase in visitors, combined with their spending habits, has helped take the bite out of the recession-related losses in the travel market. And now, domestic travel is also picking up, giving business owners hope that the worst is behind them. “We’ve been comparing this year to last year, and our numbers are up about 25 percent,” said Sharon Visser, spokeswoman for the Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce.

Top 5 Reasons Why Families Choose Morning Star Christian School 1. Students develop a love for learning through small class sizes and one-on-one instruction. 2. A solid foundation in reading and mathematics is built through leveled classroom instruction. 3. An enriched education is provided with Spanish, German, music, art and outdoor electives including skiing, kayaking, rock climbing and mountain biking. 4. Students learn to engage their community through relevant field trips and impacting service projects. 5. We teach to the whole child through an innovative approach of instruction in academics, spirituality and creativity. We provide Bus Service, Early drop Off - 7:30, Late Pick Up - 5:30 • We use current research based best practices to instruct students according to their many different learning styles. • We use efficient interactive smart boards to keep our instruction relevant, flexible and excellent. • Teachers partner with parents to develop passionate learners in a safe and friendly classroom environment.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

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David Patton / Albany Democrat-Herald

Angie Tunnisen of Lebanon, a member of the Oregon Paralyzed Veterans Association, explains how the motorized ramp in her van, when extended, can be a mobility problem if people park too close.

Paralyzed vets push for better awareness By Steve Lathrop Albany Democrat-Herald

ALBANY — Angie Tunnissen thinks that Oregon and the midvalley in particular have come a long way in the last 30 years when it comes to recognizing the needs of people with disabilities. But that doesn’t mean things can’t get better. To get that message across, the Oregon Paralyzed Veterans of America, which includes Tunnissen on its board of directors, is contacting cities all over the state. “What the message is about isn’t to complain,” said Tunnissen, 56, who lives in Lebanon. “It’s to educate.” The OPVA is approaching cities with a resolution it has developed asking each one to observe July as Accessibility Awareness Month. Tangent was the first to sign on with the recognition. In late June the city approved the resolution after a presentation by the OPVA. Created by OPVA member Charles Keen of Salem, it calls for extra support for people with disabilities. Sidewalk improvements, entryways, ramps and rest-

room access are night and day compared to where they were 30 years ago, Tunnissen said. Still, little things can cause problems. Tunnissen said restroom doorways are often a struggle, particularly in restaurants. Her wheelchair doesn’t fit behind shopping carts very well, either. “I have to leave the cart to get groceries sometimes, and people have thought it was abandoned and put all my groceries away,” she said. Some sidewalks cause trouble, too. Tunnissen said even accessibility improvements are difficult to negotiate because of a slight lip that makes it tricky to maneuver her wheelchair. Tunnissen has used a wheelchair since she was in a motorcycle accident in 1983 near Camp Pendleton in San Diego. She had served as Marine sergeant and communications instructor on amphibious tractors. The crash changed that, leaving her with a severed spinal cord. “When I was first injured, getting around was a problem,” she said. “Stairs, doors, sidewalks ... everything was a barrier,” Tunnissen said.

Agnes Ann Berezo, of Bend

Karyn Rae Troupe, of Prineville

Mar. 5, 1930 - July 12, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Services will be held at a later date.

Sept. 7, 1942 - July 18, 2012 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no services will be held.

Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, Oregon, 97701

Carl Lee Sisco, of Terrebonne Aug. 6, 1943 - July 17, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals 541-504-9485 AutumnFunerals.net Services: A Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, July 28, 2012 at 2:00 P.M. at St. Thomas Catholic Church, Redmond, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Muscular Dystrophy Association, P.O. Box 78960, Phoenix, AZ 85062 or to www.MDA.org.

Continued from B1 In Deschutes County, they can register online to have warnings sent to a cellphone while emergency managers use reverse 911 systems, which call land lines, and house visits. In Crook and Jefferson County, emergency managers rely on reverse 911 systems and going door to door. Radio alerts are also used to warn of evacuations, said Jim Epley, emergency management coordinator for Jefferson County . “We have a lot of things in place that at least get people aware that they need to evacuate,” he said. While some people become stubborn when told to evacuate, they should heed the warnings, said Dave Dethman, emergency management officer for Crook County. “Life is more important than property,” he said. Dethman said residents should talk with family members about where to meet after evacuating. “It’s a good plan for fami-

Evacuation kit A 72-hour kit, or a collection of essentials and important items to have during a emergency like a wildfire evacuation, should include: • Water, one gallon per person per day • Nonperishable food, along with can opener • First Aid kit, as well as personal medications • Clothing and bedding • Flashlight and extra batteries • Important documents For detailed supply lists, go to www.ready.gov.

Eastside Church, 3174 NE 3RD St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Perry Strausbaugh, of La Pine June 21, 1932 - July 9, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, OR. 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, August 11, 2012, at 2:00 p.m., at the American Legion, located at 52532 Drafter Rd., in La Pine. Contributions may be made to:

Newberry Hospice, P.O. Box 1888, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-7399.

Gerald “Jerry” Lacroix, of La Pine Dec. 2, 1955 - July 18, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine - 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Public viewing/visitation with the family, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Sun., July 22, 2012, Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Road, in La Pine. Contributions may be made to:

American Heart Assn. 7272 Greenville Ave. Dallas, TX 75231 1-800-242-8721

Harold R. Angellotti, of Bend

Evacuation

Contributions may be made to:

July 13, 1916 - July 19, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: At his request, no services will be held.

Richard Allen Stevens, of Bend July 22, 1932 - July 16, 2012 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592;

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Services are being planned by his family and will be announced when scheduled. Contributions may be made to:

American Cancer Society, Partners-in-Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or Volunteer with an organization that serves our community.

Physicist Schram became an influential Mao scholar exhaustive volumes of Mao’s words. Stuart R. Schram was a To other China scholars, Minnesotan who made his Schram provided clear-eyed way to Paris, an Army nuclear analysis of Mao at a time when physicist who became an ex- many people were eager to pert in French political history, reduce him to either an evil and a mind wide awake in a dictator or a visionary hero. world remade by war and its Schram’s works, they say, are cold aftermath. touchstones in the study of By the late 1950s, having how Mao adapted Marxism worked on the Manhattan for consumption by one of the Project, published scholarly world’s oldest cultures. works in French and “He struck a middle German, and taught FEATURED ground between Cold himself Russian and OBITUARY War anti-Communism Japanese, he turned and armchair revoluhis considerable intionary paeans and tellect to a divisive and mys- praise,” said Timothy Cheek, a terious subject far across the China historian at the Univerglobe and accessible to the sity of British Columbia. West almost solely through Schram was working at the written works and transcripts: Institut d’Études Politiques de Mao Zedong. Paris, or Sciences Po, when he It was an ambitious and re- began learning Chinese. He warding move. Over the next soon became an authority on 50 years, Schram, who died China and Mao by using the July 8 in France at 88, com- principal source available: the pleted a seminal biography of written record. He completed Mao just before the disasters “The Political Thought of Mao of the Cultural Revolution, and Tse-tung” in 1963. Three years he spent much of the rest of his later, he produced the biogralife translating into English phy “Mao Tse-tung.” By William Yardley

New York Times News Service

Obituary policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825.

Deadlines: Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details.

Phone: 541-617-7825 Email: obits@bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

John Eggiman, Sr., of Bend Jan. 10,1935 - July 18, 2012 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend - 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private family gathering will be held at a later date.

John Lynwood Dollar, of Bend lies to practice,” Dethman said. While the sheriff’s offices in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties conduct the evacuations, it is usually fire officials with the U.S. Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management that make the call, Epley said. — Reporter: 541-617-7812, ddarling@bendbulletin.com

Oct. 5, 1934 - July 15, 2012 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: A memorial service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Alzheimers Association, 1650 NW Naito Parkway, Suite 190, Portland, OR 97209

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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Motorist charged in fatal crash

Kathy Harvey Wanker

Atha Eulala Panther Allen

James (Jim) Joseph McCartin

Olan Delbert Ford

April 28, 1966 - June 24, 2012

Dec. 17, 1917 - July 15, 2012

August 7, 1941 - July 12, 2012

October 23, 1933 - July 18, 2012

Kathy Harvey Wanker, 46 of Tacoma, WA, passed away on June 24, 2012, from injuries sustained in an ATV accident in the Deschutes National Forest on June 9, 2012. Kathy was born in Bellingham, WA, on April 28, 1966. She was a 1984 graduate of Nooksack Valley High School. Kathy married Bob Wanker on April 28, 2011. She is survived by her loving husband, Bob of Tacoma, WA; her mother, Doreen Harvey of Sumas, WA; brothers, Larry, Don and David Harvey; sisters, Linda Van Diest, Darlene Tuttle and Sue Harvey; and numerous other close relatives. A celebration of life is scheduled August 11, 2012, at 1:00 pm, at the Round Butte Overlook Park in Madras, OR. Going south through Madras, turn right on Hwy 361, continue approximately ½ mile, turn right on Belmont Lane, 6.8 miles to Mountain View Drive, turn left onto Mountain View Drive, go 1.7 miles to access road and sign to Round Butte Overlook Park. Turn right onto signed access road for 0.8 miles to Round Butte Overlook Park. Please bring your own lawn chairs for seating. A no-host gathering following the service, for those who would like to attend, will be held at Charlie's Pizza, in Madras.

Atha and her late husband, Virgil, moved to Terrebonne, OR, in 1959, from Salem, OR. She and Challis Virgil Allen were married in Salem, in February 1937. While living in Salem, Atha had worked for the McDonald Candy Company. Atha and Virgil had been partial owners and operators of the Redmond Auto Parts store. Atha was also employed as the secretaryaccountant for Pape’ Machinery of Redmond for about 20 years. Together Atha and Virgil were long time members of the Redmond Saddle Club. Both of them were passionate about hunting, fishing and enjoying the beautiful outdoors of Central Oregon. Her husband, Virgil, preceded her in death in 2000. She is survived by a son, Wilburn Virgil Allen of Fairbanks, Alaska; daughter, Trudy B. and her husband, Bill Langford of Terrebonne; three grandchildren, Bill Jay Allen, Amy Allen and Atha Dee Langford; and three greatgrandchildren. No public services will be held. "Atha was a very much loved wife, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother." Services were entrusted to Deschutes Memorial Chapel of Bend. To leave online condolences, please visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Jim passed away July 12, 2012, in Bend, OR, after a courageous four year battle with cancer. Jim was born in Lowell, MA, August 7, 1941, to James J. & Margaret M. McCartin. He grew up in Southern California, ReJim McCartin ceived his BS and MBA from the University of San Francisco. Married Maureen Fitzsimons in 1966, in Santa Rosa, CA. Served in the Coast Guard, including service in Vietnam, Washington DC, and retired in San Francisco as Commodore of Marine Investigations. Following his retirement, he pursued a career with American President Lines for 10 years. After APL, Jim became an international management trainer. Moved to Bend, OR, in 1999, to enjoy the outdoors and social activities. Jim loved his family, friends and garden. Jim is survived by Maureen, his wife of 46 years, younger brother, three sisters and extended family. He will be forever missed by the lives he touched. A private celebration of life will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to Partners In Care Hospice or Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, Inc. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral home is in charge of the arrangements.

Olan Delbert Ford was born on October 23, 1933, in Sand Springs, OK. He passed away at his home July 18, 2012, at the age of 78. Olan was in the restaurant business most of his adult life. He and his wife Carol Olan Ford owned the A&W in Prineville, OR, for 21 years, Sno Cap Drive-In and Mini Storage for 20 years. He retired in 2002, and they moved to Bend, OR. Olan had a great love for classic cars. When he wasn't watching sports on TV, you could always find him in the garage in his coveralls, cleaning tires, wiping down the chrome, paint job or organizing his car cleaning supplies. He enjoyed square dancing with Carol as members of The Bachelor Buttes. Olan was preceded in death by his father, Olan Ford, Sr.; and mother, Pauline Ford Mola; step-father, Lee Mola; and his beloved son, Steven Ford. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Carol Parrish Ford of Bend, OR; aunt, Mary Ford Hamilton of Klamath Falls, OR; step-brother, Hal Mola of Seattle, WA; daughter, Susan Ford Garrett of Beaverton, OR; sons, Terry Burgess of Sisters, OR; Tony Burgess of Reno, NV; seven grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. He will be greatly missed and loved always. A graveside service will be held at 10 am on Monday July 23, at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, OR. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking for donations to the Humane Society. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.

Audrey Jones Mar. 28, 1929 – July 14, 2012

Shirley Lee Swarens October 3, 1929 - July 18, 2012 Shirley Lee Swarens, resident of Central Oregon went to be with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Wednesday, July 18, 2012, in Bend, OR. Shirley was born in Glendale, CA, in 1929, to Luther and Mable Shirley Lee Pruet. Swarens She met and married her former husband, Arnie Swarens, later moving to Central Oregon in 1953. Shirley invested the majority of her time into her growing family. She was a member of the Bend Golf and Country Club. Shirley was preceded in death by parents, Luther and Mable Pruet; former husband, Arnie Swarens; and her grandson, Timothy Swarens. She is survived by daughter, Dawn Haffey of Redmond, OR; sons, Scott Swarens of Arlington, VA, and Craig Swarens of Bend, OR; grandchildren, Gino and Mario Pilato of Boise, ID, Megan Wood of New York, NY; and great grandchildren, Elijah Wood and Emily and Ella Kastning. She will be greatly missed by all those who knew and loved her. A private service will be held. Autumn Funerals of Redmond is in charge of arrangements.

Audrey Jones passed away comfortably in her sleep due to complications of congestive heart failure. She moved to Beaverton in 2010, for care by her daughter, after living 38 years in Bend. She was raised in the Midwest, then Southern CaliforAudrey Jones nia, where she met Bill Jones. They enjoyed 64 years together until his passing in 2010. Although she missed him terribly, she was comforted to know that when she left this life, she would reunite with him for eternity. Audrey attended Eastmont Church for over 20 years, and prior to failing health from a traumatic head injury in 2008, enjoyed bible study, gardening, crossword puzzles, and just being with Bill. She was buried with Bill at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, Oregon. She is survived by daughters, Lyn Jones of Bend and Abbie Layton of Beaverton; son-in-law, Terry Layton; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend, August 3, at 4:00 p.m., with remembrances to the church 541-382-5822. Arrangements entrusted to Springer & Son Funeral Home, 503-356-1000.

William ‘Bill’ Heisler October 23, 1931 - June 29, 2012 William Theodore Michael James Heisler, age 80, passed away peacefully in his home at Crooked River Ranch, Oregon, on June 29, 2012. William ‘Bill’ was born on October 23, 1931 in Portland, Oregon. Bill is Bill Heisler survived by his wife, Norma; sisters, Anita Takcas, Jean Lessard, Joan Liston; daughters, Lynn Hurrle, Denise Keaton, Teresa Disque, Stephanie Heisler; four grandsons, and three great-grandchildren. His interests included hunting, fishing, bowling, crossword puzzles, the outdoors, camping, and he was an active member of the Lion’s Club. His passions in life were gardening and golf. An intimate family gathering will be held to celebrate Bill’s life over the Labor Day weekend at his sister Anita Takcas’ property at Crooked River Ranch. Bill will be greatly missed and always loved.

D E  Deaths of note from around the world: Alexander Cockburn, 71: Acerbic left-wing journalist who, though born in Scotland, thrived in the political battlegrounds of the U.S. and was published in The Nation and the Wall Street Journal. Died of cancer Friday in Germany. Vincent R. Mancusi, 98: Warden of Attica Correctional Facility in New York when inmates rioted in 1971, resulting in 43 deaths. Died July 5 in Springfield, Va. Stephen Dwoskin, 73: Experimental filmmaker known for documentary “Pain is ...� whose work, which unflinchingly scrutinized the body and its myriad discontents, was rooted partly in his own long struggle with polio. Died June 28 in London.

Dale D. Schult died at his home on July 13, 2012, at the age of 77. He was born November 23, 1934, in Bertrand, Nebraska, to Albert and Ruth (Masske) Schult. At the age of 10, Dale and his family moved to Redmond, OR, where he grew up and attended school. Dale graduated from Redmond High School. On June 5, 1954, Dale married Jo Anne Chalfant in Corvallis, OR. Dale worked as a logger and professional tree feller. He attended Zion Lutheran Church in Redmond and enjoyed coaching Little League Baseball. Dale was a Life Time Alumni Sports Member, he loved attending and watching all of the local sporting events. He also enjoyed church, family, hunting, camping and wood cutting. Dale is survived by his wife, Jo Anne Schult; a son, Alan Schult of Prineville, OR; 2 daughters, Pam Pullen of Prairie Lea, TX and Laurie Baker of Redmond, OR; a sister, Vernell Whippo of Corvallis, OR; a brother, Earl Schult of Tacoma, WA; 8 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Mel Schult. A memorial Service will be held Wednesday, July 25, 2012, at 1 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church, Redmond, OR. Donations may be made to Zion Lutheran Church or Hospice of Redmond. Please sign our guestbook www.redmondmemorial.com.

BAKER CITY — Authorities have arrested a Baker City man whose pickup crashed into a pair of motorcyclists in late May, killing one and critically injuring another. Oregon State Police say Derrick Coates, 24, was taken into custody Saturday and lodged in the Baker County jail on a felony warrant charging him with manslaughter and assault. The warrant was issued Friday following a grand jury indictment. The crash southwest of Baker City killed 46-yearold Leta Louise Currey of Pendleton. A second woman, Joanne Mohrland of Walla Walla, Wash., survived critical injuries. She has been released from a Boise hospital and is recovering at home.

Obama visit won’t include public rally PORTLAND — President Barack Obama will not be holding a public event during a trip to Portland next week.

The president will meet supporters Tuesday at an invitation-only fundraiser at the Oregon Convention Center. A public event was announced earlier this week but no time or place was provided. A press release sent by the campaign Saturday says the event was canceled for scheduling reasons.

West Portland told to boil water PORTLAND — Portland residents who live on the west side of the Willamette River have been advised to boil their tap water before drinking it. A sample collected Thursday from reservoir 3 in Washington Park showed possible contamination. The reservoir was shut off and additional samples were collected. The Portland Water Bureau announced Saturday that one of the follow-up samples tested positive for bacteria, the presence of which indicates the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. — From wire reports

Funerals | Burials | Cremation | Pre-planning Monuments | Air Hearse

Redmond Memorial Chapel Ä‡Ä Ä‡TXĆUITUSFFUt3FENPOE

541.548.3219

www.redmondmemorial.com

Where Every Life is Celebrated Visit our website to view obituaries and leave condolence messages on our guestbook. Locally Family Owned & Operated We honor all pre-arranged plans including Neptune Society.

Locally Family Owned & Operated

We honor all pre-arranged plans including Neptune Society.

July 19, 1929 - July 18, 2012 Shirley was born in Redmond, Oregon, daughter of Thomas and Charlotta Maddron. A long time resident of Terrebonne, Oregon, Shirley was the wife of the late Dale Crawford and mother of daughter, Donna J. of Prineville, OR and son, Larry K. of Redmond, OR. She is also survived by three grandsons, Trace, Stacy and Travis; nine great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Shirley made the best ever doughnuts and maple bars in the Smith Rock CafĂŠ, which she owned and operated in Terrebonne, OR. She and husband, Dale, also owned and operated Crawford Well Drilling for many years. Blessed with powerful devotion, determination and ability to work hard, Shirley and Dale were able to enjoy the rewards of their endeavors, spending many years together and with good friends, hunting, fishing and traveling abroad. They were long-time members of the Terrebonne Horse Club and avid pinochle players. Family members wish to convey their sincere appreciation to Virginia Partridge of Redmond, for her gentle and devoted care of Shirley for the past two and one half years. The family has chosen to have a private memorial service. Interment will be at Redmond Memorial Cemetery. Autumn Funerals is in charge of arrangements.

Richard Allen Stevens

— From wire reports

July 22nd, 1932 thru

July 16th, 2012

April 4, 1912 – July 15, 2012 November 23, 1934 - July 13, 2012

B5

Mary R. Martin of Bend, Oregon, passed away peacefully with her family at her side on July 15, 2012. She was 100 years old. An Urn Committal Service will take place on Friday July 27, 2012 at 1:00 PM, at Lincoln Memorial Park, located at 10500 Mt. Scott Boulevard in Portland, Oregon Mary was born April 4, 1912, in Denzanovec, Yugoslavia, to Frank and Rosalie (Vanjek) Rada. She immigrated to the United States in 1920. In 1935, she married John C. Martin in Mill City, Oregon. Shortly thereafter, the couple moved to Hollywood, California, and then to the Portland area, where they raised their two daughters. Mary moved to Central Oregon in 2005 to be closer to family. Mary attended business school and worked part-time at Meier & Frank Company and then in real estate, but she found the most joy in raising her family. She enjoyed cooking and was passionate about gardening and was an active member of the Glendoveer Garden Club. She was proud of her Czech heritage and was an honorary member of both the Western Fraternal Life Association and the Czech Society of Oregon. Mary is survived by her daughter, Helen Bandy (husband Dick) of Powell Butte, Oregon; her brother Rudy Rada of Pendleton, Oregon; and six grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren and seven great-greatgrandchildren. She is preceded in death by her parents; her husband of 54 years, John C. Martin; her daughter, Gloria McDowell; and brother, Dr. Edward Rada. Memorial contributions in Mary’s memory may be sent to Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 Baird Funeral Home of Bend was honored to serve the family, (541) 382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com.

Richard (Dick) Allen Stevens passed away peacefully at the age of 79 after a long battle with cancer, with family members at his side. Dick was born and raised in Libby, Montana. He enlisted in the Navy in 1952, and married Marilyn Northover of Sumner, Washington in 1958. He was a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam wars. He retired from the Navy in 1973 to Bend, Oregon as a permanent home to raise his family. He worked at Willamette Industries in Bend, retiring in 1994 after 19 years of service. Second to his wife, family and friends, his passions in life included woodworking, hunting, fishing, RV camping, landscaping and helping others. He had a great sense of humor and never spoke a harsh word about anyone. He will be missed greatly by everyone whose life he has touched. He is survived by Marilyn, his wife of 54 years, three daughters, Tracy Scott (Howard) of Bend, Oregon, Glenda Hogue (Steve) of Bend, Oregon, and Shelly Adams (John) of Newark, California. Other survivors include his brother Robert Stevens of Umatilla, Oregon; and stepmother, Arlene McCall of Hermiston, Oregon; 10 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held on July 28th at 1:00 PM at the VFW Hall, 1503 NE 4th St., Bend, Oregon. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Partners in Care Hospice, Bend, Oregon, The American Cancer Society, your local VFW, or volunteer service of your choice. The family wishes to give special thanks to all those that helped in the care of Dick during his illness.

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

B6

W E AT H ER FOR EC A ST Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2012.

TODAY, JULY 22

MONDAY

Today: A few high level clouds, very comfortable.

HIGH

Tonight: Staying clear into the overnight hours.

LOW

79 Cannon Beach 58/52

Hillsboro Portland 71/55 71/51

Tillamook 66/51

Salem

63/51

81/58

Maupin

84/52

Corvallis Yachats

76/44

Prineville 78/48 Sisters Redmond Paulina 74/44 79/46 81/47 Sunriver Bend

63/53

Eugene

Florence

73/51

67/55

78/46

72/50

Coos Bay

77/44

Oakridge

Cottage Grove

Crescent

Roseburg

63/53

Gold Beach

101/66

Vale 101/65

100/59

92/49

Jordan Valley

Yesterday’s state extremes

Rome

• 95°

100/58

Rome

89/51

82/46

Klamath Falls 85/46

Ashland

63/58

93/59

Frenchglen 97/56

Chiloquin

91/55

Brookings

98/64

Juntura

79/45

Paisley

Medford

65/58

Ontario

90/53

87/47

87/42

Grants Pass 87/52

94/51

Unity

Burns Riley

80/46

Silver Lake

76/41

Port Orford 67/52

Baker City

Christmas Valley

Chemult

79/53

76/44

EAST Sunny to partly cloudy and warm.

80/43

John Day

CENTRAL Mostly sunny and warm.

Nyssa

Hampton

Fort Rock 79/45

76/42

71/37

Bandon

87/48

Brothers 78/43

La Pine 78/43

Crescent Lake

64/52

79/47

85/46

Union

Mitchell 80/49

82/50

Camp Sherman

74/51

84/43

Joseph

Granite Spray 87/48

Enterprise

Meacham 85/51

79/49

Madras

79/44

La Grande

Condon

Warm Springs

Wallowa

76/40

83/52

86/54

83/51

75/51

87/53

Ruggs

Willowdale

Albany

Newport

Pendleton

88/58

80/49

73/52

61/51

Hermiston 88/55

Arlington

Wasco

Sandy

Government Camp 61/43

71/53

Lincoln City

75/52

71/52

McMinnville

88/56

The Biggs Dalles 83/54

83/51

• 40°

Fields

Lakeview

McDermitt

98/60

88/51

Meacham

97/55

-30s

-20s

-10s

0s

Yesterday’s Vancouver extremes 68/57 (in the 48 contiguous states):

10s

Calgary 76/53

20s

30s

Saskatoon 83/62

40s

Winnipeg 87/63

50s

60s

Thunder Bay 85/63

70s

80s

90s

100s 110s

Quebec 81/64

Halifax 75/58 Portland To ronto Green Bay 80/65 89/65 Portland • 121° 86/71 Boston 71/55 Boise Death Valley, Calif. 83/68 Buffalo Rapid City St. Paul Detroit 98/64 87/71 New York 91/74 96/72 90/74 • 37° 84/71 Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus Stanley, Idaho Chicago 91/61 90/72 86/72 90/76 San Francisco Omaha Des Moines • 3.98” Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 101/77 103/77 69/53 City Hickory, N.C. 86/75 Las Denver Kansas City Louisville 96/74 Vegas 99/66 106/83 95/74 St. Louis 104/84 Charlotte 104/78 91/70 Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 93/70 Oklahoma City 73/65 91/72 Atlanta 103/76 98/76 Phoenix 92/74 103/82 Honolulu Birmingham 87/74 Dallas Tijuana 90/74 101/77 82/64 New Orleans 89/77 Orlando Houston 94/76 Chihuahua 92/77 92/67 Miami 87/79 Monterrey La Paz 103/70 98/75 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/79 59/52 Juneau 64/52 Bismarck 96/66

FRONTS

Health concerns spur some to pay dearly for pet food By Janet Eastman A shland Daily Tidings

ASHLAND — At the Ashland Market of Choice where Kate Fuller shops, she could buy a pound of Angus tri-tip steak, extra-large prawns or Oregon-raised lamb for the same price she pays for dog food. Three pounds of the raw beef, chicken or bison pet patties cost up to $22, but money doesn’t matter when it means making her boxer-lab healthy and happy. Fuller is in a minority of pet owners — about 2 percent in the U.S., says raw diet advocate and author Phil Klein — who buy natural, organic or what is called “super-premium” food for four-legged family members. Some owners buy the pet food because it is made by small-scale producers from locally raised ingredients. They see it as an extension of their locavore commitment. Echo Fields, the sociology program coordinator and associate professor at Southern Oregon University, understands this. Fields researches the growing importance of pets in our lives. “We come to believe that our pets — particularly dogs — are self-aware and conscious beings, with thoughts, feelings and souls of their own,” she says. “We have ‘humanized’ our pets.” Other owners buy natural pet food because they stopped trusting big brands when thousands of cats and dogs died of kidney failure before pet food made with contaminated gluten and rice protein from China was recalled five years ago. And still other owners are trying to solve their pets’ itchy skin, ear problems and recurring infections and allergies. After finding no relief from conventional medicine, they turn — with or without a vet’s consent — to nonprocessed food, either made fresh at home or purchased at stores. “Holistic vets strive to offer food that is as close as possible to what animals eat in nature,” says veterinarian An-

HIGH LOW

87 48

84 52

BEND ALMANAC

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . .6:46 a.m. . . . . . 8:35 p.m. Venus . . . . . .2:49 a.m. . . . . . 5:26 p.m. Mars. . . . . .11:53 a.m. . . . . 11:24 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . .1:57 a.m. . . . . . 4:57 p.m. Saturn. . . . .12:51 p.m. . . . . 12:07 a.m. Uranus . . . .11:15 p.m. . . . . 11:44 a.m.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend 24 hours ending 4 p.m.*. . 0.00” High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84/45 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . 0.08” Record high . . . . . . . 102 in 1938 Average month to date. . . 0.39” Record low. . . . . . . . . 30 in 1954 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.57” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Average year to date. . . . . 6.11” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.30.08 Record 24 hours . . .0.18 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:43 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:40 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:44 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:39 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:45 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:13 p.m.

Moon phases First

Full

July 26

Aug. 1

Last

New

Aug. 9 Aug. 17

OREGON CITIES

FIRE INDEX

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Precipitation values are 24-hour totals through 4 p.m.

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....High Bend, east of Hwy. 97....Mod. Redmond/Madras ......Mod.

Astoria . . . . . . . .68/58/0.00 Baker City . . . . . .84/45/0.00 Brookings . . . . . .64/53/0.00 Burns. . . . . . . . . .89/42/0.00 Eugene . . . . . . . .83/49/0.00 Klamath Falls . . .87/42/0.00 Lakeview. . . . . . .90/48/0.00 La Pine . . . . . . . .86/40/0.00 Medford . . . . . . .91/56/0.00 Newport . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 North Bend . . . . .66/55/0.00 Ontario . . . . . . . .94/63/0.00 Pendleton . . . . . .86/52/0.00 Portland . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 Prineville . . . . . . .83/44/0.00 Redmond. . . . . . .86/43/0.00 Roseburg. . . . . . .82/54/0.00 Salem . . . . . . . . .81/58/0.00 Sisters . . . . . . . . .87/44/0.00 The Dalles . . . . . .88/55/0.00

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

. . . . .64/55/c . . . . .64/55/pc . . . .94/51/pc . . . . . .79/46/s . . . . .63/58/s . . . . . .79/54/s . . . . .93/52/s . . . . . .84/49/s . . . . .73/51/s . . . . . .77/52/s . . . . .85/46/s . . . . . .84/46/s . . . . .88/51/s . . . . . .85/51/s . . . . .78/43/s . . . . . .78/38/s . . . . .91/55/s . . . . . .87/55/s . . . .61/51/pc . . . . .65/54/pc . . . .64/53/pc . . . . . .65/53/s . . . .101/66/s . . . . . .89/60/s . . . . .87/53/s . . . . . .83/52/s . . . .71/55/pc . . . . .73/57/pc . . . . .78/48/s . . . . . .82/45/s . . . . .83/44/s . . . . . .83/44/s . . . .79/53/pc . . . . .80/53/pc . . . .73/52/pc . . . . . .76/53/s . . . . .79/46/s . . . . . .78/42/s . . . . .81/58/s . . . . . .80/57/s

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT Sisters .............................Mod. La Pine..............................High Prineville.........................High

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . 39,218 . . . . . . 55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160,822 . . . . . 200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 77,861 . . . . . . 91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . 32,503 . . . . . . 47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122,182 . . . . . 153,777 The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . 488 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . 1,420 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . 145 LOW MEDIUM HIGH V.HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53.8 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . 2,058 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . 220 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . 15.8 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . 53.8 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 LOW MEDIUM HIGH or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

9

POLLEN COUNT

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Seattle 68/53

Billings 98/67

HIGH LOW

82 50

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS -40s

A few afternoon clouds, distant thunder.

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .102/77/0.01 102/74/pc 100/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . . 90/71/t . . .90/72/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . . 86/69/t . . .88/69/t Albuquerque. . . . .91/71/0.00 . . . 93/70/t . . .93/70/t Anchorage . . . . . .63/57/0.32 . . . 59/52/r . 61/53/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.05 . . . 92/74/t . 93/75/pc Atlantic City . . . . .76/66/0.00 . . .81/72/c . . .83/75/t Austin . . . . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . .97/72/pc . 94/72/pc Baltimore . . . . . . .70/64/0.71 . . . 85/73/t . . .91/78/t Billings . . . . . . . . .96/65/0.00 . . . 98/67/s . 98/64/pc Birmingham . . . . .88/77/0.00 . .90/74/pc . 94/74/pc Bismarck. . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . .96/66/pc . . 88/68/s Boise . . . . . . . . . . .96/61/0.00 . . . 98/64/t . . 86/54/s Boston. . . . . . . . . .74/61/0.00 . .83/68/pc . . .88/71/t Bridgeport, CT. . . .75/62/0.00 . .83/68/pc . . .87/70/t Buffalo . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . . 87/71/t . . .89/71/t Burlington, VT. . . .84/53/0.00 . . . 85/65/t . . .82/69/t Caribou, ME . . . . .79/47/0.00 . . . 80/60/t . . .81/65/t Charleston, SC . . .92/77/0.00 . . . 90/76/t . 89/76/pc Charlotte. . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . . 91/70/t . 93/73/pc Chattanooga. . . . .87/71/0.03 . .88/72/pc . 92/73/pc Cheyenne . . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . . 91/61/t . . .92/64/t Chicago. . . . . . . . .87/65/0.00 . .90/76/pc . 97/77/pc Cincinnati . . . . . . .85/59/0.00 . .93/69/pc . 92/74/pc Cleveland . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . . 87/74/t . 89/75/pc Colorado Springs .94/61/0.00 . .92/62/pc . 90/63/pc Columbia, MO . . .96/66/0.00 103/75/pc 105/78/pc Columbia, SC . . . .89/77/0.11 . . . 95/75/t . 94/74/pc Columbus, GA. . . .93/75/0.00 . .94/73/pc . 94/74/pc Columbus, OH. . . .85/65/0.00 . .90/72/pc . 91/73/pc Concord, NH. . . . .82/49/0.00 . . . 85/63/t . . .85/67/t Corpus Christi. . .100/73/0.00 . .95/75/pc . . .93/78/t Dallas Ft Worth. .107/76/0.00 101/77/pc . 98/78/pc Dayton . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . .93/72/pc . 93/74/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .102/68/0.00 . .99/66/pc . 98/66/pc Des Moines. . . . . .97/68/0.00 . .101/77/s . 100/77/s Detroit. . . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . .90/74/pc . 93/74/pc Duluth. . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . .87/70/pc . . 84/66/s El Paso. . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . .97/76/pc . 97/77/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . .63/55/0.03 . .70/52/pc . 67/53/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . .94/68/pc . 88/67/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . .80/58/0.00 . . . 81/57/t . . .80/59/t

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . . .87/60/0.00 . .91/72/pc . . .95/69/t Green Bay. . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . .86/71/pc . 92/68/pc Greensboro. . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . . 90/70/t . 92/72/pc Harrisburg. . . . . . .74/63/0.08 . . . 86/70/t . 91/75/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .80/61/0.00 . .86/67/pc . . .88/70/t Helena. . . . . . . . . .94/62/0.00 . .90/58/pc . 87/55/pc Honolulu. . . . . . . .83/70/0.00 . . . 87/74/s . 88/74/pc Houston . . . . . . . .95/80/0.00 . .92/77/pc . . .92/76/t Huntsville . . . . . . .88/73/0.05 . .90/71/pc . 93/71/pc Indianapolis . . . . .91/61/0.00 . .95/75/pc . 97/77/pc Jackson, MS . . . . .87/72/2.52 . .91/74/pc . 94/74/pc Jacksonville. . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . . 93/74/t . 93/74/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .64/52/pc . 63/52/sh Kansas City. . . . . .98/69/0.00 106/83/pc 106/81/pc Lansing . . . . . . . . .88/54/0.00 . .91/71/pc . . .96/69/t Las Vegas . . . . . .107/86/0.00 . . 104/84/t . 102/82/t Lexington . . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . .92/72/pc . 91/74/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .101/69/0.00 . .105/75/s 103/78/pc Little Rock. . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . .98/76/pc . 97/76/pc Los Angeles. . . . . .74/63/0.00 . .73/65/pc . 73/63/pc Louisville. . . . . . . .88/67/0.00 . .95/74/pc . 94/77/pc Madison, WI . . . . .87/64/0.00 . .91/73/pc . 98/72/pc Memphis. . . . . . . .97/80/0.00 . .96/77/pc . 96/78/pc Miami . . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . . 87/79/t . . .89/81/t Milwaukee . . . . . .87/67/0.00 . .90/74/pc . 95/75/pc Minneapolis . . . . .89/71/0.22 . .91/74/pc . 92/72/pc Nashville. . . . . . . .89/73/0.00 . .91/72/pc . 94/74/pc New Orleans. . . . .86/72/0.00 . . . 89/77/t . 90/77/pc New York . . . . . . .78/61/0.00 . .84/71/pc . . .89/75/t Newark, NJ . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . .85/71/pc . 89/74/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . . .81/73/0.71 . . . 86/73/t . . .93/75/t Oklahoma City . .104/79/0.00 103/76/pc 100/75/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . .103/77/s 102/77/pc Orlando. . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . . 94/76/t . . .92/76/t Palm Springs. . . .107/84/0.00 108/84/pc . 106/81/t Peoria . . . . . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . .99/76/pc 101/75/pc Philadelphia . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .86/72/c . . .90/74/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .108/85/0.00 . . 103/82/t . 102/83/t Pittsburgh . . . . . . .74/63/0.01 . . . 85/68/t . . .85/72/t Portland, ME. . . . .79/54/0.00 . . . 80/65/t . . .83/66/t Providence . . . . . .80/58/0.00 . .83/68/pc . . .86/72/t Raleigh . . . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . . . 93/72/t . 94/74/pc

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .96/67/0.00 . . . 96/72/t . 97/71/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . . .97/61/0.00 . .96/62/pc . . 94/60/s Richmond . . . . . . .81/72/0.12 . . . 87/73/t . . .94/75/t Rochester, NY . . . .83/57/0.00 . . . 89/71/t . . .90/70/t Sacramento. . . . .101/60/0.00 . .101/63/s . . 99/61/s St. Louis. . . . . . . . .94/70/0.00 104/78/pc 106/81/pc Salt Lake City . . . .99/72/0.00 . . . 96/74/t . . .95/74/t San Antonio . . . . .98/75/0.00 . .96/75/pc . 95/75/pc San Diego . . . . . . .75/67/0.00 . .75/66/pc . 74/65/pc San Francisco . . . .82/56/0.00 . . . 70/55/s . . 71/56/s San Jose . . . . . . . .92/61/0.00 . . . 83/59/s . . 84/60/s Santa Fe . . . . . . . .92/60/0.00 . .86/63/pc . 85/63/pc

Yesterday Sunday Monday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . . 91/76/t . 92/75/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . . .75/60/0.00 . . .68/53/c . 67/54/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .94/78/0.00 . .96/74/pc . 98/74/pc Spokane . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . .87/57/pc . 73/53/pc Springfield, MO . .98/69/0.00 101/73/pc . 101/74/s Tampa. . . . . . . . . .93/71/2.49 . . . 92/78/t . . .90/78/t Tucson. . . . . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . . 96/78/t . . .98/77/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .104/67/0.00 102/79/pc 101/77/pc Washington, DC . .71/67/0.20 . . . 86/75/t . . .91/78/t Wichita . . . . . . . .105/71/0.00 107/74/pc 106/77/pc Yakima . . . . . . . . .87/50/0.00 . . . 86/50/s . . 80/51/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .107/87/0.00 104/82/pc . 104/81/t

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .111/91/0.00 109/92/pc . 110/88/s Mexico City. . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . . 74/53/t . . .73/55/t Montreal. . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . . 88/69/t . . 87/70/c Moscow . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . . 72/55/t . 70/54/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . . 74/53/t . 75/55/pc Nassau . . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . . 89/80/t . . .85/79/t New Delhi. . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . 101/83/t . 102/87/t Osaka . . . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . .84/77/sh . . .87/75/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .61/52/sh . 65/55/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .94/62/c . . .90/64/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . . 75/57/s . . 77/60/s Rio de Janeiro. . . .77/63/0.00 . . . 79/67/s . 77/65/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . . 82/68/t . . .81/67/t Santiago . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .60/33/pc . 56/35/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . . 76/60/s . 73/57/sh Sapporo . . . . . . . .72/72/0.00 . .72/58/pc . 73/68/pc Seoul. . . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . .86/74/sh . . .86/75/t Shanghai. . . . . . . .93/84/0.00 . .86/76/pc . 87/79/pc Singapore . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . . 85/80/t . . .84/79/t Stockholm. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .73/53/pc . 69/57/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . .61/46/pc . . 60/45/c Taipei. . . . . . . . . . .95/84/0.00 . . . 95/81/s . . 96/78/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . . 91/76/s . . 92/77/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . . .80/75/c . 85/75/sh Toronto . . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . .89/65/pc . . .87/72/t Vancouver. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .68/57/sh . 66/57/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . .70/53/pc . 71/53/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .68/51/pc . 75/58/pc

Amsterdam. . . . . .64/50/0.00 . . . 69/55/s . . 74/59/s Athens. . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . . 98/78/s . . 89/76/s Auckland. . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . .61/52/sh . 63/53/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .118/86/0.00 . .121/88/s . 123/86/s Bangkok . . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . . . 96/76/t . . .91/76/t Beijing. . . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . . 90/74/t . . .97/74/t Beirut . . . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . . 87/78/s . . 85/77/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .66/50/pc . 75/53/pc Bogota . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .65/51/sh . 71/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 74/59/t . . 75/57/c Buenos Aires. . . . .61/48/0.00 . .57/43/pc . . 60/38/c Cabo San Lucas . .91/86/0.00 . . . 92/78/s . 94/77/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . . .93/77/0.00 . . . 95/79/s . . 98/76/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . . 76/53/s . 74/53/sh Cancun . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . . 88/79/t . . .88/80/t Dublin . . . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . .64/59/c . 64/52/sh Edinburgh. . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .65/60/c . 62/53/sh Geneva . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . . 74/54/s . . 75/52/s Harare. . . . . . . . . .73/39/0.00 . . . 72/44/s . . 72/42/s Hong Kong . . . . . .97/86/0.00 . . . 92/79/t . . 92/79/c Istanbul. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . . 89/78/s . 88/76/pc Jerusalem . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . . 89/67/s . . 90/66/s Johannesburg. . . .68/52/0.00 . . . 67/41/s . . 66/41/s Lima . . . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . . 74/65/s . . 72/64/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . . 82/65/s . 84/66/pc London . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . . 72/51/s . . 74/55/s Madrid . . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . . 95/65/s . . 98/66/s Manila. . . . . . . . . .77/75/0.00 . . . 87/77/t . . .85/77/t

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO O

61/55

Umatilla

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THURSDAY

Warming up even more, highs near 90s.

HIGH LOW

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Experience the Beltone Difference. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO O

64/55

WEDNESDAY More sunshine and warm temperatures.

80 49

WEST Mostly sunny south, mostly cloudy north.

Astoria

A sunny and nice day.

HIGH LOW

47

FORECAST: STATE Seaside

TUESDAY

• Beltone ... Serving Central Oregon for over 22 Years.

• Beltone ... over 1500 locations nationwide. • Beltone ... patient satisfaction in the 90th percentile.

Michael Underwood Your Beltone Hearing Aid Specialist

Julia Moore / Ashland Daily Tidings

Harry Fuller plays with his dog, Nora, outside of his Ashland home. Fuller buys natural, organic, “super-premium” food for Nora, because he and his wife, Kate, say it keeps their fourlegged family member healthy and happy.

ette Heaslet, who has a traditional and holistic practice at the Cheerful Vet in Ashland. Although she does not recommend raw diets for animals with suppressed immune systems, she says most medical conditions will improve with good nutrition. A sick puppy was the reason Fuller started to buy raw pet food. She and her husband, Harry, rescued a 10month-old boxador from the Phoenix animal shelter. Nora was extremely thin — 11 pounds underweight. Her coat was tinged brown from malnutrition, and she had chronic diarrhea and occasional vomiting. The Ashland couple adopted her on the day after Valentine’s Day in 2011 and brought her to their home near Lithia Park where they thought they could treat her with love and medical attention. “The pound is hard on dogs — harder on some more than others,” Kate Fuller recalls. “We needed to stop the digestive problems and put weight on her.” The Fullers — longtime dog owners who both grew up on farms — spent hundreds of dollars on special hypoallergenic diets and diagnostic tests, but “we still didn’t know

what was going on with her gut,” she says. “It was terrible to see her so thin. You could see every bone on her spine.” They tried home remedies. They fed Nora boiled rice and chicken broth and slippery elm, which looked like icky pudding. Nothing helped. Then a professional dog trainer suggested a raw diet. The Fullers admit they were hesitant, but they were also desperate. Two days later after they put her on a raw diet, Nora was better. Recently, Kate Fuller was walking Nora on Pioneer Trail near Lithia Park. Nora’s coat was black and shiny. She weighed a healthy 70 pounds and was doing well in agility training. She runs, Kate Fuller says proudly, “like a locomotive.” She says it costs $300 a month to buy Nora’s raw meat made without preservatives, artificial ingredients or cereals by Kristi’s All Natural Pet Food in Azalea. “This isn’t about being highfalutin and spending astronomical amounts of money on our dog,” she says. “It’s about a new dietary approach to common canine maladies. Her alimentary canal only functions normally if she’s on the raw diet. It saved her.”

From your very first screening through a lifetime of follow-up care, our practice will be there to give you support, advice and counseling that’s focused on you. We offer quality hearing aids at reasonable prices to fit your lifestyle.

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COMMUNITYLIFE A diner,

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

SPOTLIGHT

A night of books and baseball

The Deschutes Public Library and the Bend Elks are giving area residents a chance to learn about the library’s summer reading program, win free books, and see the Elks play the San Francisco Seals during a Library Night event at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend. Children under 12 can attend the event for free while people of other ages can get a discounted ticket for $3 by visiting www.ez ticketlive.com/library. Bicycle Resource of Bend will hold a raffle for kids’ bikes.

and

Contact us Have a story idea or event submission? Contact us! • Community events: Email event information to communitylife@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-3830351. — From staff reports

Celebrity says she conveys tidings of the dead

The Bulletin

tanding behind the old truck stop counter Monday morning in one of his signature Hawaiian shirts, Lyle Hicks prepared for one of his favorite moments of the week. Dozens of veterans in patriotic T-shirts and ball caps began streaming into Hicks’ restaurant, Jake’s Diner on Bend’s east side. They joked around, drank bottomless cups of coffee and ate breakfast. Then the mood became serious: After the Pledge of Allegiance and a prayer, the nearly 85 vets faced the American flag on a pole in the center of the diner, stood in military salute and thundered “God bless America!” “It sends shivers down my spine,” Lyle said. “This, in my mind, is the heart of Jake’s.” Members of the veterans group, called the Bend Band of Brothers, say it never would have grown to its present size of about 750 without the support of Lyle and his wife, Judy. The couple welcomed the group when others didn’t. They now block off most of the restaurant for the meeting — it can only include roughly 100 due to fire codes — and provide the food at cost. Friends say it’s typical for the Hickses. From giving to veterans causes to helping the homeless, the couple have made their business into much more than a restaurant; it’s a community center, and the people who come through its doors are like family. “Mr. Lyle and Judy Hicks have done such a good job taking care of the community and doing things for the community,” said Zin Watford, president of the Bend Band of Brothers. “Everybody loves them.” Other groups have found a home at Jake’s. Bible study meetings, the local Ford Model A club, the local ham radio club and others come every week for dinner plate-sized cinnamon rolls, four-egg omelettes and heaps of hospitality. See Jake’s / C7

S

Fund supports fire victims

Shepherd’s House is hoping to raise $40,000 from individual donors by Aug. 31 so it can qualify for a matching grant that’s being offered by a private organization. Donations can be made through the Bend-area homeless shelter’s website at www.myshepherds house.org or mailed directly to its offices at P.O. Box 5484, Bend, OR 97708. Over the past year, Shepherd’s House has served 50,000 meals and provided 10,000 shelter nights to people who needed its help.

• Jake’s Diner has evolved into a gathering place for community

By Heidi Hagemeier

The Des Chutes Historical Museum is seeking donations of gently used items for its annual yard sale taking place Aug. 18. The event is a fundraiser for the museum, which is operated by a nonprofit organization. Items sought for the sale include antiques, appliances, furniture, yard tools, cookware, craft supplies, picture frames, costume jewelry and more. The museum asks for items that aren’t broken and are in decent condition. The sale will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the lawn of the museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave. in Bend. Contact: info@ deschuteshistory.org or 541-389-1813.

Shepherd’s House is raising money

www.bendbulletin.com/community

‘so much more’

Museum seeks donations

The Oregon Cattlemen’s Association has created a fund to help ranchers whose lives have been impacted this summer by the devastating Frenchglen and Long Draw fires. To make a donation of cash, hay or other supplies, contact the association through its website www.orcattle. com/make-a-donation-ocsf.html, e-mail at kayteisl@orcattle.com or phone at 503-361-8941. The association is also looking for ranchers who can provide relocation services to cattle that are threatened by fires.

C

TV & Movies, C2 Calendar, C3 Horoscope, C3 Milestones, C6 Puzzles, C7

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Lyle and Judy Hicks, who bought and relocated Jake’s Diner about seven years ago, are well-known for caring for their customers and helping the community.

“He’s always had a great heart. I didn’t know he had so much to give to the community until he opened his own business.” Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

— Frank Patka, longtime friend of Lyle Hicks

Lyle Hicks, right, plays poker Monday night at Jake’s Diner in Bend. The weekly game, called Hold ’Em for Habitat, raises money for Habitat for Humanity.

By David Jasper The Bulletin

Spoiler alert: Suzane Northrop says that when she saw “The Sixth Sense,” the 1999 film starring Bruce Willis — in which the child Northrop psychologist he plays turns out to be one of the dead people seen by Haley Joel Osment — she saw the twist at the end coming a mile away. “I did, I did,” she said by phone Tuesday from New York, where she lives. “All the signs were there. Clearly, this man had been dead.” Then again, Northrop’s a medium. She doesn’t see dead people, but, she says, she communicates with them on a regular basis. Northrop will be in Bend on Tuesday (see “If you go”) for an event titled “Psychic Medium Demonstration and Gallery-Style Readings.” The event is open to the public and costs $50. “It’ll be my first time there, and, well, obviously I’m well-known at what I do, so it’s pretty exciting to have me come to your neck of the woods,” Northrop said. The first portion will involve answering people’s questions. “People have a lot of them,” she said. “The question most people want to know is, ‘Are their loved ones OK?’ ” (That’s “OK” relative to being dead.) “I think that honestly, the reason we want to know that is so we know we’re OK,” Northrop said. “It’s sort of like, if they’re OK, then that means, well, when we die, we’ll be OK.” See Northrop / C8

If you go What: Psychic Medium Demonstration and Gallery-Style Readings with Suzane Northrop When: 7-9 p.m. Tuesday Where: The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend Cost: $50 Contact: www.after lifeconference.com/ northrop.htm or 541549-4004

Glimpsing an ancient warrior culture in Mongolia • Visitors to the vast steppe see nomadic life, remarkable skills

A Mongolian man drives horses on horseback at Gorkhi-Terelj National Park in Mongolia.

By Ellen Barry New York Times News Service

It was our third day in Mongolia. We were just setting out on a trail ride across the hills — a lazy, ambling exercise designed for children and grandparents — when we witnessed our teenage guide turn into … well, I don’t know how else to describe it. A spirit. One of his family’s horses had gotten loose, jerking the heavy wooden pole he was tethered to out of the earth and

Shiho Fukada New York Times News Service

barreling in terror through a wire fence. This was shocking enough, but what happened after that was almost supernatural: The boy leapt onto his own horse and became a streak of color. He could not possibly have paused long enough to

make a decision. There were a handful of moments like that during our weeklong vacation in Mongolia, when we caught glimpses of an ancient people, remnants of a culture that by all rights should have vanished along

with most of the earth’s wild places. One day we were tooling around when we came across a horse race — three riders screaming at a high, warbling pitch as they thundered across the steppe, a cloud of dust rising up behind them. For a second or two we could understand the awe that greeted the Mongol armies as they descended on Russia’s princedoms in the 13th century. Were they even human? We hadn’t gone out in search of adventure. Our party included my two daughters, ages 11 months and 3 years, so we travel with vast stockpiles of Cheerios and moist

towelettes. Also along were my parents, who, at 75 and 76, had announced they were traveling by train from Beijing, where they were visiting, to Moscow, where we live. A tent camp in the Mongolian mountains emerged as the logical site for a midroute family reunion — or so my father endeavored to persuade me. The proposal was so ridiculous that we found it impossible to refuse. The funny thing is, some part of it felt familiar. Mongolia is one of the world’s most sparsely populated countries, with 2.8 million people scattered over an area the size of Western Europe. See Mongolia / C4

C2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

TV & M Athletes, fans gear up for Summer Olympics

L M T  FOR SUNDAY, JULY 22

BEND

actually has superfans. 8 p.m., ABC. MONDAY: As “Warehouse Don’t miss 13� opens its fourth season, The Summer Olympics — the team confronts the horIt’s game on as elite athletes rible reality of the Warefrom around the globe gather house’s destruction and the in London for what NBC tragic loss of Agent Jinks. hopes will be a jolly good The Season 2 opener of “Alshow. The network and its phas� follows. 9 p.m., Syfy. various cable platforms plan TUESDAY: Here’s an offer more than 5,500 hours of cov- we can’t refuse: “The Godfaerage — plus unther Legacy� is a precedented livetwo-hour special TV SPOTLIGHT streaming online. in which historiIt all begins with ans, scholars and the Opening Ceremony and others discuss the influence the traditional Parade of Na- the Corleone family has had tions. Oscar-winning director on American culture. 9 p.m., Danny Boyle (“Slumdog Mil- History Channel. WEDNESDAY: “The CLIOS: lionaire�) is the creative force behind the $126 million ex- World’s Best Commercials� is travaganza, which will have a celebration of the most intouches of British greats, novative, funny and offbeat including William Shake- TV ads from the U.S. and speare, the Beatles and James abroad. This is one time you Bond. In addition, Queen don’t want to skip past the Elizabeth II will be on hand sales pitches. 8 p.m., NBC. WEDNESDAY: “Top Chef to officially open the Games. Masters� returns for more 7:30 p.m. Friday, NBC. sizzling drama as 12 reOther bets nowned chefs convene in SUNDAY: Fairy tale or fi- Las Vegas for a culinary asco? On the season finale smackdown. In the opener, of “The Bachelorette,� Emily they play a card game to Maynard must choose be- score ingredients for a hightween her two final suitors in end buffet. 10 p.m., Bravo. THURSDAY: Fun-seeker hopes of securing a happilyever-after — or, more likely, Bert Kreischer has more sura short-lived engagement. 8 prises in store on “Flip Trip,� p.m., ABC. the show that convinces vacaSUNDAY: “Bar Rescue� tioning couples to ditch their returns with “nightlife con- itineraries and let him plan sultant� Jon Taffer looking some offbeat adventures. to save more failing taverns. Tonight, two tourists in CanBut, really, how do we be- cun enjoy cave rappelling, come nightlife consultants? Mexican wrestling and drivDo they offer a degree in ing a Ferrari. 9 p.m., Travel that? 9 p.m., Spike TV. Channel. MONDAY: “Bachelor Pad,� SATURDAY: “The Philathe spinoff dating series, re- delphia Experiment� is a turns for another raucous remake of a cult classic in season and this time the cast which a World War II experiincludes five “superfans.� ment is replicated with disasWho knew? This freak show trous results. 9 p.m., Syfy.

Regal Pilot Butte 6

By Chuck Barney

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

Contra Costa Times

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:45, 9:45 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 5:45, 9 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 3, 6:30, 10 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13) Noon, 2:30, 5:30, 8:45 SAVAGES (R) 12:30, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R) 12:45, 6 YOUR SISTER’S SISTER (R) 3:45, 9:30

Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (PG-13) 3:20, 9:45 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13) 12:40, 7:10 PROMETHEUS (R) 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:40 SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN (PG-13) 6:35, 9:40 TED (R) 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:55, 7:55, 10:30

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Open-captioned showtimes are bold. • There may be an additional fee for 3-D movies. • IMAX films are $15.50 for adults and $13 for children (ages 3 to 11) and seniors (ages 60 and older). • Movie times are subject to change after press time.

SISTERS Sisters Movie House

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER (R) 9:15 FERNGULLY: THE LAST RAINFOREST (G) 12:30 THE PRINCESS BRIDE (PG) 3 ROCK OF AGES (PG-13) 6 After 7 p.m., shows are 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG-13) 12:35, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3-D (PG-13) 1:10, 4:25, 7:45, 10:45 BRAVE (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:30 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 11:10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 2:15, 3:15, 3:50, 4:15, 5, 6:15, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:15, 10, 10:35 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES IMAX (PG13) 10:35 a.m., 2:20, 6:20, 10:10 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 11 a.m., 1:25, 3:55, 6:50, 9:20 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT 3-D (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50 KATY PERRY: PART OF ME 3-D (PG) 10:50 a.m. MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG) 10:40 a.m., 1:05, 3:40 MAGIC MIKE (R) 12:50, 4:05, 7:25, 10:20

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 11 a.m., 2:30, 6:05 , 9:30 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 TED (R) 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 7:30 THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13) 2:30, 5 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 3:30, 7 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 2:45, 5, 7:15 PEOPLE LIKE US (PG-13) 3 TED (R) 5:30, 7:45

MADRAS

Tin Pan Theater

Madras Cinema 5

869 N.W. Tin Pan Alley, Bend, 541-241-2271

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

KUMARÉ: THE TRUE STORY OF A FALSE PROPHET (no MPAA rating) 7:30 MARLEY (no MPAA rating) 4:20

REDMOND Redmond Cinemas 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

Pine Theater 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) Noon, 3:40, 7 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (UPSTAIRS — PG) 1, 3:30, 6, 8:10 Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13) 12:50, 3:40, 6:30 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (DIGITAL — PG-13) Noon, 3:30, 7 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG-13) 1:40, 5, 8:20 ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG) 12:50, 3, 5:10, 7:20 SAVAGES (R) 1:30, 4:10, 6:50

ZOEY

Weekly Arts & Entertainment

Zoey is a bright and loving cat looking for a home of her very own. Zoey is around 1.5 yrs old and was brought to HSCO after being part of an over crowded home. Zoey does well with other cats and children. She has lived with dogs but might be more timid than normal since she has previously been injured by one. Zoey is litterbox trained and is very lap loving. If you are looking for a torti beauty like Zoey, come down and adopt her today!

Every Friday In

DESCHUTES COUNTY

FAIR & RODEO Saturdays, June 30 - Sept. 22 | 10am-2pm NorthWest Crossing Neighborhood Center

Self Referrals Welcome

PRINEVILLE

HUMANE SOCIETY OF CENTRAL OREGON/SPCA 61170 S.E. 27th St.

BEND (541) 382-3537

ONLY 10 DAYS1 JULY 29-AUGUST UNTIL THE FAIR! Redmond, Oregon

541-706-6900

Sponsored by

Birkenstock of Bend

www.nwxfarmersmarket.com

L TV L   SUNDAY PRIME TIME 7/22/12

*In HD, these channels run three hours ahead. / Sports programming may vary. BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine

ALSO IN HD; ADD 600 TO CHANNEL No.

BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00

5:30

KATU News World News Grey’s Anatomy I Will Survive ‘14’ Light Relief Evening News Entertainment Tonight (N) ’ ‘PG’ NUMB3RS Power ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 at 5PM (N) Ă… (4:00) › “See Spot Runâ€? (2001) Cook’s Country Test Kitchen

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Ă… News Nightly News The Unit Flesh & Blood ‘14’ Ă… KEZI 9 News World News Bones ’ ‘14’ Ă… Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Nightly News Straight Talk King of Queens King of Queens Doc Martin Going Bodmin ’ ‘PG’

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

11:00

11:30

America’s Funniest Home Videos The Bachelorette Emily makes her final decision. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:05) The Bachelorette (N) ‘PG’ KATU News (11:35) Cars.TV Dateline NBC Extreme athletics; missing woman. (N) ’ Ă… America’s Got Talent Twelve of the top 48 acts perform. ‘PG’ Ă… News Love-Raymond 60 Minutes (N) ’ Ă… (8:01) Big Brother (N) ’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Ă… News Cold Case ‘14’ America’s Funniest Home Videos The Bachelorette Emily makes her final decision. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (10:05) The Bachelorette (N) ‘PG’ KEZI 9 News The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons Family Guy ‘14’ Teen Choice 2012 (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… News Two/Half Men Big Bang Big Bang Antiques Roadshow ’ ‘G’ Ă… Queen & Country Traveller (N) ‘G’ Masterpiece Mystery! (N) ’ ‘14’ Ă… (DVS) New Tricks The murder of a nightclub hostess. ’ Dateline NBC Extreme athletics; missing woman. (N) ’ Ă… America’s Got Talent Twelve of the top 48 acts perform. ‘PG’ Ă… NewsChannel 8 Sports Sunday Heartland The Starting Gate ‘PG’ ›› “I Spyâ€? (2002, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Owen Wilson. Ă… Meet, Browns Meet, Browns Troubadour, TX Premiere Concert Five Rivers Five Voices ‘G’ Ă… “Back to the Gardenâ€? Moyers & Company ’ ‘G’ Ă… Civilization: The West and the Rest With Niall Ferguson ‘PG’ BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

Criminal Minds JJ ’ ‘14’ Ă… Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… The Glades (N) ‘14’ Ă… Longmire (N) ‘14’ Ă… (11:01) Longmire ‘14’ Ă… *A&E 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Ă… › “Mission to Marsâ€? (2000, Science Fiction) Gary Sinise, Tim Robbins, Don Cheadle. A team (11:04) Small (11:35) Breaking ››› “District 9â€? (2009, Science Fiction) Sharlto Copley, Jason Cope. Premiere. South Africa as- Breaking Bad Madrigal Walt and *AMC 102 40 39 goes to Mars to recover an earlier expedition. Ă… signs a restricted area for extraterrestrial refugees. Ă… Jesse pursue a partner. (N) ‘14’ Town Security Bad ‘14’ Ă… Call of Wildman Call-Wildman Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Call of Wildman Call-Wildman Gator Boys ’ ‘PG’ Ă… *ANPL 68 50 26 38 Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Call of Wildman Gator Boys ’ ‘14’ Ă… Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ New Jersey Social (N) Housewives/NJ What Happens Housewives/NJ BRAVO 137 44 ›› “RVâ€? (2006) Robin Williams. A dysfunctional family goes on vacation. ’ Ă… ›› “Ace Ventura: When Nature Callsâ€? (1995) Jim Carrey. ’ Ă… ›› “RVâ€? (2006, Comedy) Robin Williams. ’ Ă… CMT 190 32 42 53 “Ace Ventura: Nature Callsâ€? The New Age of Wal-Mart American Greed Crime Inc. Counterfeit Goods Crime Inc. Human Trafficking American Greed Greatest Pillow! Paid Program CNBC 51 36 40 52 Cyber Espionage: Piers Morgan Tonight (N) CNN Newsroom (N) In Her Corner: Latino in Am-2 Piers Morgan Tonight CNN Newsroom In Her Corner: Latino in Am-2 CNN 52 38 35 48 In Her Corner: Latino in Am-2 (6:29) Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity ‘14’ Ă… › “Witless Protectionâ€? (2008) Larry the Cable Guy. Premiere. Ă… (10:02) Tosh.0 Futurama ‘14’ Workaholics The Daily Show COM 135 53 135 47 (4:28) › “Delta Farceâ€? (2007) Larry the Cable Guy. (4:30) City Club of Central Oregon Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Oregon Joy of Fishing Journal Get Outdoors Visions of NW The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Talk of the Town Local issues. COTV 11 Prime Minister Road to the White House Q&A Prime Minister Road to the White House Washington This Week CSPAN 58 20 12 11 Q & A Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ “Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2â€? (2011) ’ Ă… ›› “Underdogâ€? (2007) Voices of Jason Lee. ’ Jessie ‘G’ Ă… Good-Charlie Austin & Ally ’ Austin & Ally ’ *DIS 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked Lair of Giants (N) ’ ‘PG’ Ă… River Monsters: Unhooked ‘PG’ *DISC 156 21 16 37 River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Ă… (4:00) “She’s Out of My Leagueâ€? Opening Act ‘PG’ Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Keeping Up With the Kardashians Mrs. Eastwood & Company ‘PG’ Chelsea Lately The Soup ‘14’ *E! 136 25 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter Ă… SportsCenter Ă… ESPN 21 23 22 23 MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (N) (Live) 2012 Open Championship Best of the Final Round (N) Basketball Argentina vs. United States From Barcelona, Spain. (N) NASCAR Racing ESPN2 22 24 21 24 NHRA Drag Racing Unwind The Announcement Tennis 1977 Wimbledon Men’s Final -- Bjorn Borg vs. Jimmy Connors Tennis ESPNC 23 25 123 25 ›› “Kicking & Screamingâ€? (2005) Will Ferrell, Robert Duvall. SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. H-Lite Ex. ESPNN 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) (Live) Ă… ››› “Remember the Titansâ€? (2000, Drama) Denzel Washington, Will Patton. ››› “The Blind Sideâ€? (2009) Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do white couple adopts a homeless black teen. Beverly Hills Nannies ‘14’ Ă… FAM 67 29 19 41 Last Holiday Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren Huckabee Hannity On Record, Greta Van Susteren Fox News Sunday FNC 54 61 36 50 Huckabee (N) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Food Network Star ‘G’ Chopped Food Network Stars! (N) Food Network Star (N) ‘G’ Chopped (N) ‘G’ Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell *FOOD 177 62 98 44 Chef Wanted With Anne Burrell ›› “Spider-Man 3â€? (2007) Tobey Maguire. Peter Parker falls under the influence of his dark side. ››› “Batman Beginsâ€? (2005) Christian Bale. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark Knight. ››› “Batman Beginsâ€? (2005) FX 131 Yard - Disney House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Ă… HGTV 176 49 33 43 Yard Crashers Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Ă… Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Ice Road Truckers ‘PG’ Ă… Ice Road Truckers (N) ‘PG’ Ă… (10:01) Great Lake Warriors ‘14’ (11:01) Shark Wranglers (N) ‘14’ *HIST 155 42 41 36 Ancient Aliens The Greys ‘PG’ “An Officer and a Murdererâ€? (2012, Docudrama) Gary Cole. ‘14’ Ă… Drop Dead Diva Road Trip ‘PG’ Army Wives Baby Steps (N) ‘PG’ “An Officer and a Murdererâ€? ‘14’ LIFE 138 39 20 31 “The Craigslist Killerâ€? (2011, Docudrama) Jake McDorman. ‘PG’ Ă… Trafficked: Slavery in America Sex Slaves: Motor City Lockup Inside Stateville Lockup The Criminal Mind Lockup Riverbend Meet the Press ‘G’ Ă… MSNBC 56 59 128 51 Caught on Camera (5:46) 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Ă… (6:53) 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Ă… Teen Mom Homecoming ’ ‘PG’ Teen Mom Temper Tantrums ‘PG’ Snooki Snooki Awkward. ‘14’ Awkward. ‘14’ MTV 192 22 38 57 (4:39) 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Ă… Victorious ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob My Wife-Kids My Wife & Kids George Lopez George Lopez Yes, Dear ‘G’ Yes, Dear ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ NICK 82 46 24 40 Victorious ‘G’ Oprah Builds a Network ’ ‘PG’ Oprah Builds a Network ’ ‘PG’ Oprah’s Next Chapter Jackie Joyner Kersee and Al Joyner. (N) ‘PG’ Culture Shock (N) ’ ‘14’ Oprah’s Next Chapter ’ ‘PG’ OWN 161 103 31 103 Oprah’s Lifeclass ’ ‘PG’ Ă… Bensinger Bull Riding CBR George Paul Memorial, Night 2 Ocean Race Planet X London 2012 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. ROOT 20 45 28* 26 Golden Age ›› “Walking Tallâ€? (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville. ’ Bar Rescue ’ ‘PG’ Flip Men ‘PG’ Flip Men ‘PG’ ›› “The Butterfly Effectâ€? ’ SPIKE 132 31 34 46 ›› “Walking Tallâ€? (2004, Action) The Rock, Johnny Knoxville. ’ ›› “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skullâ€? (2008) Harrison Ford, Cate Blanchett. › “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobraâ€? (2009, Action) Channing Tatum. Premiere. Ă… Resident Evil SYFY 133 35 133 45 (3:30) “Raiders of the Lost Arkâ€? Joel Osteen Kerry Shook BelieverVoice Creflo Dollar ››› “Davidâ€? (1997, Drama) Nathaniel Parker. Based on the biblical tale of the youth who slew Goliath. Secrets of Bible Secrets Daniel O’Donnell Songs of Faith TBN 205 60 130 (5:45) ›› “The Heartbreak Kidâ€? (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan. Ă… ›› “Meet the Fockersâ€? (2004) Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller. Ă… ›› “Meet the Fockersâ€? (2004) Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller. Ă… *TBS 16 27 11 28 College Road ›››› “The Great Escapeâ€? (1963, War) Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough. Allied POWs stage a ›› “The Blobâ€? (1958) Steven McQueen. A man-eating ›› “The Mating Callâ€? (1928, Drama) Thomas Meighan, ››› “The Leopardâ€? (1963) Burt LanTCM 101 44 101 29 daring escape from a Nazi prison camp. Ă… mass of space slime terrorizes a small town. Evelyn Brent, RenĂŠe AdorĂŠe. caster, Claudia Cardinale. Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Ă… Hoarding: Buried Alive (N) ‘PG’ Strange Sex (N) Strange Sex (N) Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Ă… *TLC 178 34 32 34 Untold Stories of the E.R. ’ ‘14’ Leverage The Blue Line Job ‘PG’ Falling Skies Molon Labe (N) ‘14’ The Great Escape (N) ‘14’ Ă… Falling Skies Molon Labe ‘14’ *TNT 17 26 15 27 American Gang ›› “The Book of Eliâ€? (2010, Action) Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman. Ă… Regular Show Regular Show ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballsâ€? (2009), Anna Faris Regular Show Regular Show Venture Bros. King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Ă… Black Dynamite *TOON 84 Food Paradise: London ‘G’ Ă… Top Spot ‘PG’ Top Spot ‘PG’ Waterparks Waterparks Coaster Wars Coaster Wars Trip Flip ‘PG’ Trip Flip ‘PG’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ *TRAV 179 51 45 42 Bourdain: No Reservations Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond King of Queens TVLND 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith NCIS Faith ’ ‘PG’ Ă… NCIS Flesh and Blood ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Mother’s Day ’ ‘14’ Ă… NCIS Double Identity ‘PG’ Ă… Political Animals (N) ‘PG’ Ă… (11:01) Necessary Roughness USA 15 30 23 30 NCIS Outlaws and In-Laws ‘PG’ Single Ladies Eat, Play, Love ‘14’ Single Ladies Is This Love? ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago (N) ’ ‘14’ Big Ang (N) ‘14’ Hollywood Exes ’ ‘14’ Big Ang ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives Chicago ’ ‘14’ VH1 191 48 37 54 Single Ladies Deuces ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(5:50) ›› “Phenomenonâ€? 1996, Drama John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “GoldenEyeâ€? 1995, Action Pierce Brosnan. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… (10:15) › “Grown Upsâ€? 2010 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:00) ›› “Soul Surferâ€? 2011 FXM Presents › “Dude, Where’s My Car?â€? 2000 Ashton Kutcher. FXM Presents › “Dude, Where’s My Car?â€? 2000 Ashton Kutcher. FXM Presents › “Epic Movieâ€? 2007 Kal Penn. ‘PG-13’ Ă… FXM Presents FMC 104 204 104 120 › Epic Movie Motorcycle Racing The Ultimate Fighter Brazil ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter Brazil (N) UFC 149: Faber vs. Barao - Prelims UFC Tonight UFC Roundtable The Ultimate Fighter Brazil ‘14’ FUEL 34 Live From Live From Live From Live From Live From Live From Live From PGA Tour Golf True South Classic, Final Round From Madison, Miss. GOLF 28 301 27 301 Live From ››› “Straight From the Heartâ€? (2003) Teri Polo. ‘G’ Ă… “How to Fall in Loveâ€? (2012) Eric Mabius, Brooke D’Orsay. ‘G’ Ă… Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 “Accidentally in Loveâ€? (2010, Drama) Jennie Garth. ‘PG’ Ă… ››› “Game Changeâ€? 2012 Julianne Moore, Ed Harris. Gov. Sarah Palin (7:05) ››› “Contagionâ€? 2011, Suspense Marion Cotillard. Doctors try to con- True Blood Sookie considers life as a The Newsroom Amen The team True Blood Sookie considers life as a HBO 425 501 425 501 becomes Sen. John McCain’s running mate in 2008. ’ Ă… tain the spread of a lethal virus. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… human. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Ă… learns about a protest. (N) ‘MA’ human. ’ ‘MA’ Ă… (4:00) The Gate (5:45) ›› “The Forbidden Kingdomâ€? 2008, Action Jackie Chan, Jet Li. ‘PG-13’ Comedy Bang! Bunk ‘14’ ›› “Saw IIâ€? 2005, Horror Donnie Wahlberg, Tobin Bell. ‘R’ ›› “The Forbidden Kingdomâ€? IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›››› “Titanicâ€? 1997, Historical Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane. A (7:45) ››› “Bridesmaidsâ€? 2011, Comedy Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne. A maid of ›› “Horrible Bossesâ€? 2011, Comedy Jason Bateman, Charlie Day. Three opMAX 400 508 508 woman falls for an artist aboard the ill-fated ship. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… honor’s life unravels as the big day approaches. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… pressed workers plot against their employers. ’ ‘NR’ Ă… Taboo Strange Behavior ‘14’ Taboo Beauty ‘14’ Taboo Ugly (N) ‘14’ Chasing UFOs ‘14’ Taboo Ugly ‘14’ Taboo Strange Behavior ‘14’ Taboo Fat ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. Avatar: Air. SpongeBob SpongeBob Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ’ Invader ZIM ’ NTOON 89 115 189 115 Avatar: Air. Realtree Road Truth Hunting Bushman Show Bone Collector Craig Morgan Red Arrow Hunt Adventure Realtree Road Live 2 Hunt Wildgame Ntn Ult. Adventures The Season OUTD 37 307 43 307 Hunt Adventure Wildgame Ntn (4:30) ››› “The Helpâ€? 2011, Drama Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Episodes ’ Dexter Smokey and the Bandit A se- Homeland Clean Skin The Brody fam- Weeds (N) ’ Episodes (N) ’ Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Ă… Episodes ’ SHO 500 500 the experiences of black women. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… rial killer reappears. ‘MA’ Ă… ily prepares. ’ ‘14’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… ‘MA’ Ă… Formula One Racing Grand Prix of Germany (N) Car Crazy ‘G’ Guys Garage Motorcycle Racing Motorcycle Racing Lucas Oil Off Road Racing SPEED 35 303 125 303 Wind Tunnel With Dave Despain (6:40) ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tidesâ€? 2011 Johnny Depp. ‘PG-13’ ››› “The Ides of Marchâ€? 2011 Ryan Gosling. (10:45) ›› “Colombianaâ€? 2011 Zoe Saldana. Ă… STARZ 300 408 300 408 (5:10) ›› “When a Stranger Callsâ€? 2006 ‘PG-13’ (4:45) “I Do & I Don’tâ€? 2007 Jane (6:15) › “Abandonâ€? 2002, Suspense Katie Holmes, Benjamin Bratt. A college ›› “Scream 4â€? 2011, Horror Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox. The Ghostface ››› “Screamâ€? 1996, Horror Neve Campbell, David Arquette. A psychopath TMC 525 525 Lynch, Bryan Callen. ’ ‘R’ Ă… student’s long-missing boyfriend stalks her. ’ ‘PG-13’ Ă… Killer returns to claim new victims. ’ ‘R’ Ă… stalks the teens of a sleepy California town. ’ ‘R’ 2012 Tour de France Stage 20 From Rambouillet to Paris. Motorcycle Racing 2012 Tour de France Stage 20 From Rambouillet to Paris. NBCSN 27 58 30 209 2012 Tour de France Stage 20 From Rambouillet to Paris. Bridezillas Ashanti & Liza ‘14’ Bridezillas Liza & Brittany (N) ‘14’ Bridezillas Rochelle & Ashanti ‘14’ Bridezillas Ashanti & Liza ‘14’ Bridezillas Liza & Brittany ‘14’ Big Easy Brides ‘14’ *WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Rochelle & Ashanti ‘14’

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

A  & A  

Wife dresses sexy for work, not for dates with husband Dear Abby: I’m married to the love of my life. My wife is a beautiful woman, 50 years old, in great shape and she looks 35. My problem is whenever we go out, if I ask her to wear something sexy for me, she always says, “I’m too old to dress like that� and refuses. However, when she dresses for work, she spends hours on her appearance and dresses very sexy. I have told her it bothers me, but she says I’m being silly and she just wants to look good for her management job. She’s constantly buying new outfits for work. This morning she left wearing a sexy short miniskirt and boots. She is an independent woman who does what she wants. I don’t spend my time trying to control her by any means. I trust her and seriously doubt there’s another man. But I feel this is a matter of her not respecting my feelings as her husband. Am I wrong? Is there something else going on here? I need your help. — Likes Her Sexy in Connecticut Dear Likes Her Sexy: There’s something sad about the fact that your wife doesn’t want to put the same amount of effort into looking as good when she goes out with you as she does when she leaves for work. Rather than turning this into a power struggle, the next time you want to take her out looking sexy, ask her to just “throw on something she would wear to the office� and see if you have better luck. Dear Abby: I am 18 and will be graduating in May of next year. Because I have always done well in school, my family expects me to go right off to a big-league college. Abby, I want to go to college, but not right away. (I am also not too fond of staying in dorms.) I want to be a zoologist, and plan on going to school for it, but I feel that my family is rushing me into college because they expect it of

DEAR A B B Y There’s something sad about the fact that your wife doesn’t want to put the same amount of effort into looking as good when she goes out with you as she does when she leaves for work.

me. When I tell them my other interest is hairstyling, and I may want to take a year off to do that to save up money, they put me down and compare me to my successful college cousins. I want my family to be proud of me because I have worked hard in school. I only wish they would be just as proud of me if I maintained a nice job for a few years and then went to college. (I have been told if I choose that path, I will never go to college and I’ll never make good money.) They also blame my not wanting to go to college right away on my boyfriend of two years. I assure you, that is not the reason. I want to attend an in-state college, and I would still be able to see him. Do you have any advice? — Schooled-out in Colorado Dear Schooled-out: The longer you delay college, the more distractions there will be and the harder it will be for you to go back. Yes, people do it. But juggling a job and going to school is more difficult than going to school full time, and it takes longer to get the degree. I urge you to listen to your parents. They have your best interests at heart. — Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Horoscope: Happy Birthday for Sunday, July 22, 2012 By Jacqueline Bigar Your ability to understand others is enhanced. Your sixth sense often points to the right direction. You will have the ability to enhance your stability and build a stronger financial and emotional base. If you are single, your appeal attracts many suitors. You have a lot of choices. If you are attached, the two of you naturally feed each other’s energy and perspective. A fellow LEO could challenge you to the utmost. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You move away from being concerned with your immediate environment and a potential domestic change. Suddenly, you turn into a kid who is ready to romp the day away. Wherever you are, much fun occurs. Tonight: Let the good times roll. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You might really need some time to clear up paperwork, return calls and enjoy some R and R. You must give yourself this time in order to stay fully functional. Be sure to touch base with an older relative during the day. Tonight: Happy at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Make phone calls to friends you have not stayed in contact with but who you think of often. Making plans together in the near future might feel very good. Visit a friend for a late movie and munchies later. Tonight: Hang out. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH You might want to indulge someone, but there are limits to what you can do. Also, be aware that you do not need to spend money to let this person know how much you care. Use your imagination, and both of you could be delighted. Tonight: Don’t forget to treat yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You feel great and decide to approach others. You quickly could discover that others are unusually responsive. Seize the moment. A child or loved one delights in your company. Tonight: Whatever you want. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH If you want to, take a lazy day.

Feeding your mind and catching up on some R and R could be healthy, as you typically push yourself very hard. A conversation with a loved one is positive. Both of you will want to celebrate. Why not? Tonight: Play it low-key. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Join friends, especially if they are involved in some group sport or activity. Playing a game of softball or just sunbathing could be fun. You have an important conversation with a loved one that allows you to understand him or her better. Tonight: Where the action is. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Return calls and get together with family. Someone in this group seems to need all the attention. Let this person have it, and don’t make a big deal of it. Let a loved one know how much you think of him or her. Tonight: Forget tomorrow. Live now. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH A day trip could provide you with a lot of R and R and help you gain perspective on a situation. If you choose to go with someone, this escape also will help your bond. You might be amazed at how different someone is out of his or her normal setting. Tonight: Hang out as long as you can. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH A partner makes a request that you might not want to say “no� to. Adjust your day accordingly. The two of you bond and have a great time together. A conversation between you makes a big difference in how you relate. Tonight: Let relaxing happen. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Others come forward with great ideas; some have to do with plans, others about a situation in your life. You always value your friends, but especially at the present moment. Tonight: You pick the “how, where and when.� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Complete a project rather than begin a new one. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening, but maintain your focus. You have a way about you that helps a partner open up. This person senses your caring. Tonight: Do for you. Š 2011 by King Features Syndicate

C3

C C  Please email event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

TODAY BALLOONS OVER BEND CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: Balloons launch over Bend, weather permitting; followed by a festival with activities, food, crafts and more; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; free, fees for activities; 6 a.m. launch, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. festival; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-3230964 or www.balloonsoverbend. com. OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS I: A class AA hunterjumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541610-5826, agow@jbarj.org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. ANTIQUES IN THE PARK: Vendors sell antiques, with live music and a barbecue; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Creekside Park, U.S. Highway 20 and Jefferson Avenue, Sisters; 541-420-0279 or centraloregonshows@gmail.com. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring self-guided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.541-389-1058 or www.coba.org. WAKEBOARD AND WATERSKI CONTEST: With water skiing, an awards ceremony and barbecue for contestants; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Sundance WaterSports Club; $25 or $30, free for spectators; 8:30 a.m. registration, 10:30 a.m. start; Lake Billy Chinook, Crooked River Bridge and Jordan Road, Culver; 541-480-0410 or http:// sundancewatersports.com. BATS!: Meet live bats and learn about their survival and their role in the ecosystem; $10 or $5 ages 2-11 (plus museum admission), $7 or $4 ages 2-11 for museum members; free ages 1 and younger; 12:30 and 3:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. BILL COSBY: The legendary comedian and actor performs; $32-$54; 1 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; www.c3events.com. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 83- or 67-mile Awbrey Butte Circuit Race begins and ends at Summit High School; followed by a kids race for ages 2-16; free for spectators; 1 p.m., kids race 1:30 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www. cascade-classic.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3:30 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-447-7395. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: The roots band Farewell Drifters performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open at noon; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383 or www.bendconcerts.com. SUMMER BELLY DANCE SHOWCASE: The High Desert Bellydance Guild performs belly dances in a variety of styles; preceded by a drumming workshop; free; 6 p.m., workshop at 4:30 p.m.; Mirror Pond plaza, eastern end of Drake Park, Bend; 541-410-4614 or www.highdesertbellydance.org. EMMYLOU HARRIS: The Americana icon performs, with Amber Rubarth; $45; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-382-3940 or www. c3events.com. MOONDOG MATINEE: The Nevada-based roots-rock band performs; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

MONDAY “STAR TREK, THE NEXT GENERATION ANNIVERSARY EVENT�: A screening of two episodes from the show, with introductions from Star Trek experts; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347 or www. fathomevents.com.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 2-6:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-

Submitted photo

Americana icon Emmylou Harris will perform tonight at the Athletic Club of Bend. 0066 or redmondfarmersmarket1@ hotmail.com. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. SUZANE NORTHROP: The psychic medium performs gallery-style readings and delivers messages from the deceased; registration recommended; $50; 7-9 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-549-4004 or www. afterlifeconference.com/northrop. htm. “THE WHO — QUADROPHENIA�: A screening of the film about The Who as they created their 1973 album; $12.50; 8 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347 or www.fathomevents.com. TROPICAL PUNK: The Nashville, Tenn.-based garage rock band performs; free; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541-7280879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand. JOHN NEMETH AND HIS BAND: The California-based blues act performs; donations accepted; 9-11 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Brasada Ranch, 16986 S.W. Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte; 866-373-4882.

WEDNESDAY OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunter-jumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@jbarj. org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The annual event features exhibits, a talent show, dance, and a rodeo; free admission, $6 in advance or $7 at the door for rodeo; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Brooks Alley, between Northwest Franklin Avenue and Northwest Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by Americana act the Shook Twins; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; free; 4-7 p.m. demonstrations, 7-10 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. ALIVE AFTER FIVE: Featuring a performance by jazz act Laila Biali, with the Marna Larsen Quartet; located off of northern Powerhouse Drive; free; 5-8:30 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www. c3events.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring rock music by the Soul Benders; vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or http://visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a jazz performance by 234th Army Band; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DER ROSENKAVALIER�: Starring Renee Fleming, Susan Graham and Kristin Sigmundsson in an encore presentation of Strauss’ masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $12.50; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

LIBRARY NIGHT WITH THE BEND ELKS: Learn about the library’s summer reading program and watch the Bend Elks play the San Francisco Seals; $3 via website, free ages 12 and younger with adult; 6:30 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-617-7050 or www.ezticketlive. com/LIBRARY. THE LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss “Before I Go to Sleep� by S.J. Watson; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. RICHARD GREEN: The singersongwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. WINDY HILL: The bluegrass act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

Pan Alley, Bend; 541-241-2271.

THURSDAY

SLAUGHTER DAUGHTERS: The Kansas-based Americana band performs, with Wild Eye Revolvers and Avery James & The Hillandales; $5; 8 p.m.; The Horned Hand, 507 N.W. Colorado Ave., Bend; 541728-0879 or www.reverbnation. com/venue/thehornedhand.

OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunter-jumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@jbarj. org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The annual event features exhibits, a talent show, dance, and a rodeo; free admission, $6 in advance or $7 at the door for rodeo; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. TREEHOUSE PUPPETS IN THE PARK: With a performance of “Blow the Whistle!�; followed by a coordinated activity; free; 11 a.m.-noon; Quail Park, 2755 N.W. Regency St., Bend; 541-389-7275 or www.bendparksandrec.org. DOG AGILITY SHOW: Dogstar Sports presents dogs performing agility tricks; free; 3-4 p.m.; Summit Assisted Living Center, 127 S.E. Wilson Ave., Bend; 541-317-3544 or activities@thesummital.com. INDIGENOUS SOLIDARITY SPEAKING TOUR: Learn about a proposed pipeline which is being blockaded by clans from the Wetsu’wet’en First Nation; donations of food accepted; free; 4 p.m.; Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W. Tin

MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by rock ‘n’ roll act Igor & the Red Elvises, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www. munchandmusic.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan talks about his book “100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades�; with a slide show; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. RICHARD GREEN: The singersongwriter performs; free; 7 p.m.; Niblick and Greene’s, 7535 Falcon Crest Drive #100, Redmond; 541-548-4220. OTTMAR LIEBERT: The rock, jazz and flamenco guitarist performs; $29 or $39, plus fees; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

SPL: The Portland-based bass musician performs, with VTRN, DJ Ph3r and DJ bPollen; $5; 10 p.m.; Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116. IGOR & RED ELVISES: The campy Russian rock ‘n’ roll group performs; $10; 10:30 p.m., doors open 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-3892558 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY OREGON HIGH DESERT CLASSICS II: A class AA hunter-jumper equestrian competition; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-610-5826, agow@jbarj. org or www.jbarj.org/ohdc. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the St. Thomas Altar Society; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Center Gym, 1755 N.W. Maple Ave., Redmond; 541-923-3390.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

If you go GETTING THERE From the train station or airport in Ulan Bator, it is about a 40-mile drive to GorkhiTerelj National Park, part of a vast and virtually uninhabited protected area with rock formations straight out of “The Lord of the Rings.” A southern section of the park is developed for tourists, with scattered ger camps that serve as a retreat for Mongolian families and foreign travelers alike. Family businesses rent camels and horses, and tour guides can arrange visits to a mountainside Buddhist monastery, nomadic families or traditional horse races.

WHERE TO STAY

Photos by Shiho Fukada / New York Times News Service

Tourist gers, also known as yurts, sit on hill at Gorkhi-Terelj National Park in Mongolia.

We booked our trip through Discover Mongolia (discovermongolia.mn), which arranged a three-day tour of the park and the capital city for $420 per person, including all meals, lodging and transportation. But when we arrived at the camp the first night, we were so enchanted that we rearranged our plans to stay longer. Our ger had four beds, lacquered in a vivid shade of

vermilion and built to fit the curve of the tent. It was heated by a wood stove that our hosts stoked quietly during the night. The package included three heaping Western-style meals per day, served in a central hall that also offered a bathroom with flush toilets and showers. We paid $5 an hour to ride horses, with a guide included. There are dozens of similar ger camps in the park, some of which cost considerably less. Terelj Lodge (tereljlodge.com) rents standard gers for $20 a night per person, or $62 with three meals included. A deluxe ger with meals runs $110 a night. ChinggisGer Camp (chinggisgercamp.com) offers three-meal packages for $45 per night.

WHEN TO GO The months of June through September are temperate in Mongolia, with daytime highs in the 60s and 70s. A seasonal highlight is the summer festival of Naadam, held in mid-July, which centers on “the three games of men” — archery, horse racing and wrestling. Another favorite pastime is shagai, a game in which players toss or flick the ankle bones of sheep at nearby targets.

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Every Friday ABOVE: Horses rest in a stable at Gorkhi-Terelj National Park in Mongolia. LEFT: Biibish Damba, right, eats a meal in a ger. Visitors to camps are served hearty meals three times a day.

Mongolia Continued from C1 It has the flavor of a frontier, and the frontier strikes a chord in an American. We had just hauled our suitcases into our ger — the cylindrical tent also known as a yurt — when hooves pounded on the other side of the thick felt wall. Our hosts were driving their small herd of horses home from the pasture. My mother had worked as a hand at a dude ranch in Montana in the 1950s, and she felt right at home; Mongolia, she said, reminded her of Big Sky. It is not unusual for well-off Mongolian families to vacation in tents in the mountains, and we could understand why. Hearty meals — warm beef salad, savory egg drop soup with pickles, liver with a haystack of french fries — were served three times a day in a central building. Our ger, its floor lined with vinyl mats, had the fresh smell of earth after rain; when thunderstorms rolled through the valley we sat in our “little round house,” as my daughter called it, and listened to rain thrumming on the roof. At dusk, the valley grew dark except for the lights from a few ger camps glowing like strings of pearls. We walked to the top of a ridge near our camp and came upon shaggy Bactrian camels grazing in the moonlight. At bedtime our hosts built fires in the wood stove at the center of the ger, and we laid on our backs watching golden light playing on the striated ceiling above us.

A whiff of danger But even in the middle of all that summer ease, there

were whiffs of something dangerous. We kept stumbling across the bleached skulls of animals that had not survived the winter. In the worst times, when temperatures can fall to 40 below zero, livestock in Mongolia sometimes freeze to death in a standing position; the herders’ families then tramp through the snow and gather the bodies together into a miserable heap. There is a word for this kind of disaster — dzud. A white dzud buries the life-giving grass under heavy snows; an iron dzud seals it under a glaze of ice. The snows continue until April, when the animals are so weakened by their ordeal that they shudder in the wind and stop searching for grass. A black dzud comes after a dry summer, when the ground is scoured bare and winter means slow starvation. I brought the subject up with Tumuruu, a jovial and mostly toothless herdsman who, on the afternoon we visited, was monitoring his yaks through high-resolution binoculars. Tumuruu had been serving us green tea with yak milk so rich that chunks of cream floated on the surface. When I asked about the dzud it was if a curtain came down over his face. “It’s not a thing people like to talk about,” he said. “Springtime is the most dangerous. That’s when people get lost and die. In the morning they think the weather is nice.” That was all he wanted to say about it. It was a conversation that could have occurred in this century, or in the 19th or 18th. Tumuruu has awakened at

6 a.m. every day of his adult life to oversee milking before 7, when the flies come out. Between a third and a half of Mongolia’s population is still nomadic, living more or less the way their ancestors did, down to the prescribed arrangement of vermilion lacquered furniture inside their gers. They live without bank accounts — for that matter, without money. The herd is the source of everything that matters. Tumuruu’s grandchildren will not keep animals, he told us with some satisfaction, as he set my daughter on top of a yak.

Culture on the wane There are several reasons Mongolia’s nomadic tradition may be on the wane, not least that the country is on the brink of a monster boom. It sits on huge reserves of copper, gold, uranium and coal, and Chinese demand is fueling major mining projects. The gold-rush environment of the capital city of Ulan Bator has attracted such local color as Burberry, Hugo Boss and Emporio Armani. Some of this was going through my mind that afternoon when I watched the young boy ride headlong after a fear-mad horse. With the tall wooden pole bouncing behind him, the horse blew through the wire fence as if it were made of tissue and headed for a wooded area. The animal was in such a desperate state that it seemed it might kill itself in the next few minutes by lodging the pole between trees and breaking its leg or neck. We set off in nervous silence — especially my ranch-hand mother — wondering how the

rider would get close enough to calm the horse without endangering his own life. I had arrived in Mongolia with a mystery lodged in the back of my mind: how this apparently peace-loving people had taken Baghdad and Beijing and Moscow, the fortress city where I now live. I found some technical answers. The horsemen protected themselves by wearing silk underwear, which snagged the tips of arrows as they pierced the body. Leather armor was lacquered with fish glue, so that it was impenetrable but light. What must have been most terrifying to their Western adversaries was the way Mongolian warriors stood in their stirrups at a full gallop, their upper bodies perfectly steady so they could aim with extraordinary precision. They would release their arrows in the fraction of a second when all four of the horse’s hooves were in the air. But the best answer came when our teenage guide trotted up behind us, now riding the rogue dun-colored horse we had seen streaking into the woods. The boy looked like a mortal again in his polyester track pants and baseball cap. The horse looked as if it had been hypnotized. I can’t say that the secrets of one of human history’s largest empires were revealed that afternoon. But I felt lucky to get a glimpse of them just once in my life.

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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A colorful geological marvel in southern Utah • Kodachrome Basin State Park is overshadowed by famous neighbors By Bob Downing Akron Beacon Journal

CANNONVILLE, Utah — There’s a very colorful state park in southern Utah that gets overlooked, despite its distinctive rock chimneys from longdead petrified geysers. Kodachrome Basin State Park gets little respect, lost amid the glitter of its more famous neighboring national parks: Bryce, Zion, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands and Arches. It is also surrounded by Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument that covers 1.9 million acres. But Kodachrome Basin is a desert gem. At an elevation of 5,800 feet, the park lies 22 miles east of Bryce Canyon National Park and nine miles south of Cannonville. It is in the heart of Utah’s “color country.”

Photos by Bob Downing / Akron Beacon Journal / MCT

Hikers can visit Utah’s Upper Calf Creek Falls, an 88-foot drop. It is four miles round trip over rocks where cairns mark the route.

Contact Kodachrome Basin State Park at 435-6798562. Camping reservations: 800-322-3770. Cabin rentals: 435-679-8536.

Beyond Kodachrome

What’s in a name? Kodachrome Basin offers remoteness, desert solitude and reddish cliffs, along with its distinguishing features: 67 rare, whitish monolithic limestone towers. The tallest chimney or sand pipe is 170 feet high and the shortest is 6 feet. They appear to stand as rock sentries towering above the park. Most are 30 to 50 feet tall and are more than a little surreal. The basin has more spires of its kind that any other place in the world. The views of the rock formations change with the sunlight, as does the contrast. Some jut upward from the valley floor. Others tower above surrounding cliffs and outcrops. Geologists believe that the spires formed when liquefied sand hardened inside ancient geysers. That may have resulted from earthquakes or the remnants of ancient springs. The calcite and feldspar inside the geysers’ pipes remained after softer exterior rocks of Entrada sandstone eroded away. Kodachrome Basin is believed to have been very similar to Yellowstone National Park — with hot springs, geysers and boiling mud pots. Visitors from the National Geographic Society in 1948 suggested naming the 2,241acre park for the color film. The society led a photo tour via automobiles in 1947 into the little-known Escalante Lands of southern Utah. Society members suggested changing the name of Thorley’s Basin or Thorny Pasture, as the place was locally known, because of the contrasting colors in the pretty little valley. The film had been introduced commercially in 1935 and was first used in the society’s famous magazine in 1936. Eastman Kodak in Rochester, N.Y., proudly agreed to the name change in 1949. Kodachrome Basin became a state park in 1963. The park’s green color comes from the dominant juniper, plus pinion pine.

Hiking options It features eight short hiking trails. They include a half-mile nature trail and Panorama Trail, a three-mile loop that is the longest in the park. Panorama Trail includes a second loop of two miles and several side trails. It leads to Panorama Point.

Distinctive rock chimneys from long-dead geysers are a big attraction at Utah’s Kodachrome Basin State Park. It features 67 of the rare limestone towers.

The Panorama Trail takes you to Ballerina Slipper spire, the wide-brimmed pedestals of Hat Shop and Secret Pass, a narrow passage between redrocked walls. It also takes you past a rock spire that looks like cartoon and film character Fred Flintstone. Mountain bikes are permitted on the Panorama Trail and on park roads. The Grand Parade Trail stretches 1.7 miles on the canyon floor and past two box canyons, and Cool Cave Trail is two miles long with stops at Big Bear Geyser and Cool Cave. Eagle’s View Trail climbs a quarter-mile via a steep, narrow path to provide an up-high look at the park. Shakespeare Arch is 20 feet across and 90 feet high in a small out-of-the-way cove. It is a one-mile round trip to get there. Angels Place Trail is a one-mile loop that offers great park vistas from atop a butte. The Nature Trail offers a look at rock formations and desert plants. The park is classified as semidesert in the Upper Sonoran Zone, with plants and animals that must adapt to drought as well as extreme heat and cold. Animals include mule deer, mountain lions, coyotes, bobcats, gray foxes, black-tailed jack and cottontail rabbits, rock squirrels and chipmunks, along with birds, snakes and lizards. Kodachrome Basin is not big or fancy. It offers 27 tent and recreation vehicle sites with restrooms, showers and a sewage disposal station. The campground is open from April through September. A park concessionaire, the Trail Head Station, rents cabins in the heart of the park, sells supplies and offers guided horseback and stagecoach rides in season. The cabins include full baths and showers and air conditioning. Call 435679-8536 or 435-679-8787 for information. The park charges $6 admission for day use. The overnight camping fee is $15.

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One nearby attraction is Grosvenor Arch, a double arch 10 miles south of Kodachrome Basin off Cottonwood Canyon Road. It is one of the largest arches in Utah and is found in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. State Route 12 is a major route through southern Utah, a land that is a geological playground. It is a National Scenic Byway, one of 120 in the United States. It is also an AllAmerican Road, one of only 31 so designated by the Federal Highway Administration. The federal designation stretches 124 miles between U.S. 89 in the west and Torrey in the east at Capitol Reef National Park. Its most striking feature may be the Hogback, a narrow ridge with steep drops on both sides of the road between Escalante and Boulder. There are turnoffs for motorists to stop and admire the sandstone Escalante Canyons carved by the Escalante River and its tributaries. Nearby are Upper and Lower Calf Creek Falls. You can hike to Upper Calf Creek Falls. It is a slickrock round-trip hike of four miles. The trail is marked by stone cairns. It is a hot, scrubby, exposed landscape. It leads to the 88-foot-high cascade in a shaded, green alcove at the head of the canyon. The Escalante River and its tributaries were the last streams in the United States to be discovered, named and mapped. Lower Calf Creek Falls, where the stream drops 126 feet into a green pool in a cliffbound canyon, attracts more visitors. It is at the end of a 3.1mile one-way hike. At its western end, the highway bisects the popular Red Canyon in Dixie National Forest, a one-time hideout of outlaw Butch Cassidy. There are 14 trails that stretch 34 miles in that 41,400-acre tract.

Must-see neighbor park It skirts must-see Bryce Canyon National Park, a beautiful place with thousands of hoodoos, the eyepopping red-orange spires

The Kodachrome Basin, at 5,800 feet elevation, east of Bryce Canyon National Park, features surreal rock chimneys. The tallest is 170 feet high and the shortest is 6 feet high. Most are 30 to 50 feet tall.

or pillars of rock that are the park’s most defining feature. The 35,835-acre park offers a spectacular badlands landscape that is bewitching. You can admire the park’s distinctive rock formations from an 18-mile scenic drive on Rim Road off state Route 12 — with dozens of overlooks. You can also hike into the hoodoos. The powerful blend of rock and color shifts with the light. What you see in the morning is different from what you will see in late afternoon or at twilight. There are warm yellows, browns, oranges, pinks, reds, greens, whites and purples that spill from the bizarrely shaped spires, monoliths, fins, mazes, fluted walls, sculptured pinnacles and deep ravines. Early settler Ebenezer Bryce said of the oddly shaped terrain: “It’s a helluva place to lose a cow.” Bryce visitors will agree. The park offers a visitors center, lodge with three suites, one studio, 70 motel rooms and 40 cabins (open April through October), two campgrounds, restaurant and general store. Admission is $20 per car. For information, call 435-

834-5322 or see www.nps.gov/ brca. The lodge is managed by Xanterra. Call 303-297-2757 or 888-297-2757 for reservations and information. See www .xanterra.com and www.bryce canyonlodge.com. From Bryce, Route 12 then runs along the northern edge of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. You can get off Route 12 onto dirt roads that are designated scenic backways; these will take you to less traveled scenic areas. That includes Hole-inthe-Rock Scenic Backway and

Burr Trail Scenic Backway. Grand Staircase-Escalante has visitors centers in Cannonville, Escalante and Boulder. Willis Creek Narrows is another attraction. The stream narrows to 4 feet with cliffs more than 200 feet high. It is a colorful world of rock, water and shadows. It is one of many slot canyons in the national monument. For information, contact the Cannonville Visitor Center, 435-679-8981, www.ut.blm .gov/monument.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

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Milestones guidelines and forms are available at The Bulletin, or send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Milestones, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. To ensure timely publication, The Bulletin requests that notice forms and photos be submitted within one month of the celebration.

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Travis Ralls and Katie Klann

Klann — Ralls Kenneth Horn and Jessi Johnson Sandra (Lakin) and Lee Garl

Garl Lee and Sandra (Lakin) Garl, of Bend, will celebrate their 40th anniversary with a driving trip in Oregon and Washington. The couple were married July 22, 1972, at Starlite Chapel in Reno, Nev., with their families present. The couple met while each was fishing

Johnson — Horn in Loreto, Baja, Mexico; they were married 75 days later. They have two daughters; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Mr. Garl retired from Angelus Business Systems in 1991. Mrs. Garl retired from the Oregon State Highway Department in 1972. They have lived in Central Oregon for more than 21 years.

studied medical billing. She works as the office manager for Mountain View Acupuncture in Bend. The future groom is the son of Jim and Nancidee Horn, of Brookings. He is a graduate of Brookings Harbor High School and a 2008 graduate of Portland State University, where he studied history. He works as the assistant manager at Fred Meyer in Bend.

Jessi Johnson and Kenneth Horn, both of Bend, plan to marry Aug. 25 at Stack Park in Redmond. The future bride is the daughter of Tim and Terri Johnson, of Bend. She is a graduate of Kent Meridian High School in Kent, Wash., and a 2009 graduate of Everest College, where she

Katie Klann, of Madras, and Travis Ralls, of Redmond, were married May 19 at Luelling Homestead in Madras, with a reception following. The bride is the daughter of Brad and Debbie Klann, of Madras. She is a 2005 graduate of Madras High School and a 2010 graduate of Oregon State University, where she studied interior design and housing studies. She works as the education

program designer for Central Oregon Agriculture Research Center in Madras. The groom is the son of Jerry and Charlotte Ralls, of Redmond. He is a 2004 graduate of Redmond High School and a 2008 graduate of Southern Oregon University, where he studied video production. He is self-employed as a videographer and also works at Klann Farms in Madras. The couple honeymooned in Costa Rica. They will settle in Madras.

B Delivered at St. Charles Bend

ounces, June 21. Ross Phinney and Amber Steinborn, Brooklyn Bailey Phinney, 6 pounds, 5 ounces, June 22.

Thomas and Kimberly Gregan, a girl, Teiliyana Elizabeth Mary Gregan, 5 pounds, 12 ounces, June 27.

Levi and Lacey Mickle, a girl, Claire Lee Mickle, 8 pounds, 4 ounces, June 21.

Steve and Susan Maple, a girl, Kaylee Brynn Maple, 6 pounds, 12 ounces, July 11.

Jeremy and Shawna Henkemeyer, a boy, Jaycob Alan Henkemeyer, 8 pounds, 1 ounce, June 19.

Noah and Tracy Fadness, a girl, Evelyn Leota Fadness, 7 pounds, 10

Annie (Jones) and Bill Rubertus

Rubertus Bill and Annie (Jones) Rubertus, of Bend, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary June 29. The couple were married June 29, 1972, in a through-themail proxy wedding while Mr. Rubertus was serving in the U.S. Air Force in Saigon and Mrs. Rubertus was living in Utah. The proxy ceremony took place

in Colorado, the closest state to Utah that accepts proxy marriages. The couple met when he was in Utah for mountainous helicopter training before being stationed in Vietnam. Mr. Rubertus is a professional musician. Mrs. Rubertus was a professional musician prior to her retirement due to multiple sclerosis. They have lived in Central Oregon for 36 years.

Skow Tom and Janette (Piper) Skow, of Redmond, celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary June 12 with a trip to the Oregon Coast. The couple were married June 12, 1982, at the United Methodist Church in Heppner. They have two children, Kristen, of Portland, and Michael,

of Bend. Mr. Skow is the warehouse manager for Consolidated Supply Co. in Bend. Mrs. Skow is the oncology patient advocate for St. Charles Cancer Center in Bend. The couple enjoy their home, family, and entertaining friends. They have lived in Central Oregon for 26 years.

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Sawyer Lance Skinner, 7 pounds, 11 ounces, June 9.

Delivered at St. Charles Redmond

Bruce and Jamie Nash, a boy, Eli Beau Nash, 6 pounds, 15 ounces, June 19. Darryl and Sarah Koerschgen, a girl, Melissa Joleen Koerschgen, 6 pounds, 7 ounces, June 24. Lance and Nicole Skinner, a boy,

Catherine Birdwell, a girl, Serenity Alesandra Birdwell, 8 pounds, 3 ounces, June 20. Josh and Jony Werner, a boy, Bradley Micah Werner, 8 pounds, 2 ounces, June 20.

Celebrity haunts can be vacation locales nis Quaid to the recent arrival of singer John Mayer, Montana offers a chance to unplug from a pressure-filled existence and enjoy the wide open spaces. Local guest ranches, such as Mountain Sky in vista-rich Paradise Valley, treat all their guests like celebrities, according to general manager Yancy Arterburn. Contact: www.visitmontana .com; 1-800-548-3392; www .mtnsky.com

By Lynn O’Rourke Hayes The Dallas Morning News

When it comes to valuing getaways, celebrity parents are no different than the rest of us. Here are five places, inspired by the travels of the rich and famous, where any family can deepen their bonds: The GalĂĄpagos Islands. The Jolie-Pitt clan is often on the move. While private jets, nannies and security teams take some of the hassle out of traveling with six kids, these high-profile parents seem determined to show their children the world. Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt and the children recently stopped in the GalĂĄpagos Islands, a World Heritage site off the coast of Ecuador. It was reported the family divided its time between a luxury yacht and a landbased resort. Contact: www.royal palmgalapagos.com; www .rowadventures.com

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Janette (Piper) and Tom Skow

Chase Townsend and Sarah Spaniol, a boy, Kendrick Henry Townsend, 8 pounds, June 20.

The Hawaiian Islands. Ce3. lebs such as Julia Roberts, Britney Spears and Reese Witherspoon regularly make the hop from Los Angeles to the Hawaiian Islands with their tots in tow. President Barack Obama and the first family chose to enjoy the tropical breezes of the commander-in-chief’s home state when they carved out time for a family getaway. With a slew of full-service resorts, all-inclusives and cozy bungalows on the beach, our 50th state offers holiday opportunities for families of all

2.

The mountains of Montana. High-profile families flock to Big Sky Country where there are more buffalo than paparazzi. From Ted Turner and Den-

Aspen, Colo. While ac4. tress Kate Hudson was recently spotted in Paris on a shopping trip with her son, Ryder, fans are more likely to catch a glimpse of her and the extended family in Aspen. Long a popular haunt of Hollywood families, this Rocky Mountain ski town offers a trendsetting mix of art and music, fly fishing, hiking, horseback riding, festivals and culinary adventure amid striking natural beauty. Contact: 1-888-649-5982; www.stayaspensnowmass.com

for some royal relaxation during a recent tour honoring his grandmother Queen Elizabeth II’s 60 years on the throne. Families seeking a holiday off the beaten path enjoy time at this eco lodge for its wealth of natural beauty. There’s also the chance to ride horses, paddle a canoe on the Macal River, visit the butterfly hatchery, bird-watch and trek to nearby Mayan ruins. Guests stay in palm-thatched cottages or a treetop suite within a private 365-acre reserve. Contact: 1-877-709-8708; www.chaacreek.com

San Ignacio, Belize. 5. Prince Harry stopped by the Lodge at Chaa Creek Change your mind. Change your life.

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

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SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

SUDOKU SOLUTION IS ON C8

JUMBLE SOLUTION IS ON C8

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Judy Hicks delivers heavy plates of food to Ford Model A group members Wednesday morning at Jake’s Diner.

Starting at Jake’s Lyle, 59, believed his future lay beyond Central Oregon while growing up in Gilchrist. He left to join the Navy in 1971 and while stationed in San Diego met Judy, now 58, an Australian making a California stop on a worldwide trip. The first meeting, a blind date, could easily have been their last. “On the second date he invited me to a concert I wanted to see,” Judy said. “So I went, and I liked him this time.” Judy continued on her journey, but the two courted through letters for a year. She returned to the U.S. on a visa and the two married. They moved to Australia for three years and had two of their three children there. Then they returned to the U.S. in 1980. But jobs had dried up in early 1980s California. Uncertain what to do next, Hicks brought his family north to Oregon. He started classes at Central Oregon Community College and sought any type of job on the side to keep the family afloat. Jake’s Diner and Truck Stop in south Bend, which at the time served the highway traffic that rumbled down Third Street, was willing to accommodate his class schedule. The couple that owned the business, Jake and Virginia Wolfe, quickly learned Lyle was studying accounting and had other skills. They added responsibilities to his plate until he became the diner’s manager. He stayed for 23 years. Then a decade ago, rising fuel prices, the advent of the Parkway diverting traffic from Third Street and other pressures began making Jake’s less profitable. In 2004, the family

‘A great heart’ As the Hickses sat down for a bite after the lunch rush recently — he tackled a salad, she a couple of small tacos — a waitress stopped by the table. “There are two new tables here,” she informed them, the cue to at some point stop by to say hi. Word of mouth remains important at Jake’s. “We’re off the beaten path, so if they come by, somebody told them about us,” Lyle said. If they return a few times, Lyle and Judy will soon greet them by name. The duo have met many of their closest friends at the restaurant. That’s what happened to Wayne “Speedy” Morgan, a Sunriver resident who started dropping by the diner years ago. He is vice president of the High Desert A’s, a Ford Model A club. Club members felt like a nuisance at the establishment where they had been meeting. So Morgan suggested Jake’s Diner. “We found a home there, and it ended up that Lyle would join us for breakfast,” Morgan said. “Soon he bought a Model A pickup and joined our club.” The friendship extends beyond the diner doors. When Morgan received a hip replacement several years ago, Lyle visited him every day in the hospital. Longtime friend Frank Patka, who met the Hickses through church in the late 1980s, said Lyle shows empa-

DAILY BRIDGE CLUB

thy to nearly everyone. Lyle will talk with other vets about what they had experienced in wars or share his life through his blog, which he posts on the Jake’s Diner website. They range from details of vacations to struggles with his health. “He does take on the cares of the world,” Patka said. “The good thing is he does something about it. He’s a guy who puts action to his concerns.” Patka also knows the Hickses as people who like to have fun. Judy, although quieter, jokes with patrons. Lyle, Patka said, is a walking jukebox with a baritone voice. The two used to surprise friends on their anniversaries: They would arrive unannounced and sing something they wrote especially for the couple, Patka playing guitar. “He’s always had a great heart,” Patka said. “I didn’t know he had so much to give to the community until he opened his own business.”

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Jake’s Continued from C1 Throughout the year, the diner’s calendar is filled with charitable events. Monday night poker brings in donations for Habitat for Humanity. A Fourth of July barbecue benefits the Vietnam Veterans of America. On Thanksgiving, Jake’s prepares a full dinner for seniors. Less obvious efforts include the winter clothing and gear drive. Jake’s Diner brings roughly two boxes a week of supplies to Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, which helps homeless veterans. The Hickses also regularly extend a hand to individuals down on their luck. “They have a lot of concern and caring for those who are less fortunate,” said Chuck Hemingway, COVO’s executive director. “A lot of their efforts are done very quietly with no expectation of recognition or reward.” The Hickses say this is just how they believe business should be done. Giving back is part of a commitment to their Christian faith and their community. “They’ve supported me,” Lyle said, “so I give back.”

announced it would shut the business down and sell the land. “We had no idea what we were going to do,” Lyle said. “I thought, ‘Man, I’m 50 years old.’ ” Friends urged him to go out on his own. Needing to come up with the money within a matter of weeks, the Hickses put their house and savings behind the effort. Then they had to find a location and move within months. The only building they could afford, obscured behind a car dealership, had housed a string of failed restaurants. “I said, ‘Why would you want to go there? That’s the worst location in town,’ ” Lyle recalled. “Everyone gave us six months at most.” Lyle remembers the transition as a time of anxiety. Friends pitched in to crunch numbers, assist with renovations and move equipment to the new locale. Some contractors refused to be paid, saying they would wait for the business to turn a profit. The new Jake’s opened on an afternoon in April 2005. Lyle and Judy couldn’t believe it as the seats filled up. “At 5:30, that restaurant was full just by word of mouth,” Lyle said. “It stayed strong until the bills got paid. This is a story of redemption; we just were on the ride.”

Honored as heroes Since 2005, Jake’s has been the scene of family celebrations and funeral services. Photos of stars or musical acts that have passed through line the walls. A wedding between one of the Band of Brothers and a woman who volunteered to serve them coffee happened not long ago. “They got married right there in front of the coffee pot,” Judy said. Jake’s Diner has been recognized a number of times now by organizations for its community efforts, most recently in March by the Oregon Mountain River Chapter of the American Red Cross at its annual Heroes’ Breakfast. They’ve been struck by what just a bit of effort can accomplish. For instance, a weekly Hold ’Em for Habitat poker night that requests $5 donations has raised about $35,000 for Habitat for Humanity since 2006. Their reputation for good deeds is now as much a part of the establishment as the food. Lyle said customers will regularly hand him cash to put toward one of his efforts. “Where that gets me is that they trust me,” he said. Not that the restaurant life is always smooth. It has long hours, and the Hickses do hope at some point to retire and potentially turn the diner over to one of their sons who works at the diner. All of their children live in Bend, and Lyle and Judy have one grandchild. “Every once in awhile on a Sunday, when it’s so busy,” Judy said, “I sometimes turn to him and say, ‘We should have owned a flower shop.’ ” But the Hickses say that right now, they’re supposed to be running Jake’s. “I didn’t understand what it was going to end up being,” Lyle said, “but it ended up being so much more than a business.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES SUNDAY CROSSWORD

— Reporter: 541-617-7828, hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com

Ford Model A’s are parked in front of Jake’s Diner Wednesday morning. Members of the High Desert A’s of Central Oregon meet at Jake’s Diner every week for breakfast and camaraderie.

CROSSWORD SOLUTION IS ON C8

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

GEOCACHING TOURS

Treasure hunters lured to tourist destinations By Johanna Somers The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Historical sightseeing may never be the same again. Now parents can tell their children to bring their smartphones with them for a nature walk, and national parks may want tourists to leave something behind. Geocaching, a form of hightech treasure hunting that utilizes clues from a GPS device, is being harnessed by tourist destinations as a new way to draw visitors and encourage them to explore. Five locations from Washington, D.C., to Park County, Colo., recently launched tours created by Seattle-based com-

Northrop Continued from C1 That Q&A will be followed by an hour or so of giving messages with the audience. Northrop, who’s been doing this sort of work all of her adult life and starred in 2008 on a Canadian TV show called “The Afterlife with Suzane Northrop,” said that most people — up to 70 to 80 percent of people — believe we are contacted by the deceased. “A lot of times, even though people know they’ve been contacted, they need validation that it did in fact happen,” she said. So she’ll be discussing ways that contact happens. “The number one way is dreams,” she said. But other things — lights turning on and off unassisted, TVs going on and off, phones ringing, significant songs on the radio — all can mean someone on the other side is knocking, according to Northrop. “It’s interesting, because when I talk about this, it’s always quite fascinating. You’ll see people light up in the audience and they’ll go, ‘Wow. That did happen to me when my mom died.’ ” This is not random dead people making contact, she said. “Random dead people have no reason to make connections with you. It’s the people that we know, that we’ve lost. Ultimately, it’s all based, really, in the power of love.” While she does not mean the Huey Lewis song “Power of Love,” Northrop does use the radio as a metaphor for the messages she receives. “All of us, me included, you included, we’re all like radio sets,” she said. “We’re receiving impressions all the time.” Her radio began tuning into dead people when she was a young girl, Northrop said. “What happens is, somehow, I’m able to link my consciousness, or my radio set, with people who are in the nonphysical realm. And they come to me through lots of

pany Groundspeak, which runs the Geocaching.com website. One geocaching tour is centered on Cache Creek, British Columbia; it weaves through the region’s Gold Rush country and will have 144 caches by the end of the summer. Several more tour locations are in the works. “What those destinations want to do is attract visitors,” said Groundspeak Vice President Mark Sherman, who engineered the tours. The company estimates every $1 spent by a tourist destination on geocaching will result in about $20 spent by tourists on hotels, restaurants

different ways. They’ll identify who they’re connected to in the family, their names, how they passed, other people they may be connected to.” Northrop also said that childhood imaginary friends are not really imaginary. It’s just that most of us turn off the part of our brains, our tuners, as we age. When people ask what the other side is like, “My response is that I haven’t been there in a while. I can’t tell you exactly what it is,” Northrop said. Whatever it looks like, departed pets have been known to drop by. “Animals come in my sessions as well,” she said. “For many people they’re part of our family. It’s very reassuring to people. “People that are not animal people, they don’t get it. But people that are animal people, they really get it. I’ve had men on my couch that were obviously deeply upset when their mom died, or their dad died. But when their dog comes up, let me tell you, they lose it. That was their best friend.” And what message might the animal have for their people who are still here? “Obviously, communication with animals is different from communication with people. I just think the message that they come through is very heartwarming for that person to know, that ‘My God, my dog that I loved so deeply is OK.’ ” Sometimes they show up with a loved one. Sometimes two people who didn’t like each other in life will appear together. “What’s always so interesting to me is somebody will show up in a session, and somebody’s response is like, ‘Well, that person didn’t like that person, and now they’re showing up together.’ “I go, ‘Well, it’s a little different program when you’re not here anymore.’ You get rid of what I call the B.S.” — Reporter: 541-383-0349, djasper@bendbulletin.com

SOLUTION TO TODAY’S SUDOKU

ANSWER TO TODAY’S JUMBLE

SUDOKU IS ON C7

JUMBLE IS ON C7

ANSWER TO TODAY’S LAT CROSSWORD

CROSSWORD IS ON C7

and the like. Vesta Giles, 46, from Kamloops, B.C., is one of the 5 million people geocaching around the world. She has found 522 caches, or treasurefilled containers hidden by other enthusiasts. There are now over 6,500 geocaches in the Seattle area and approximately 1.8 million worldwide, according to Groundspeak. Seattle doesn’t have an organized geocaching tour yet, however. Geocaching.com was created in 2000 in Seattle by Jeremy Irish after the U.S. government made more accurate GPS signals available to the

public, enabling civilian GPS users to more precisely pinpoint locations. He founded Groundspeak with partners Elias Alvord and Bryan Roth to operate Geocaching.com and other outdoor-activity websites. Today Groundspeak employs 70 people who run the website and database, list geocaches online, and work with geocachers in the community. It’s those geocachers who create and hide the caches, typically containers with trinkets such as balls, pins and coins. They also put a notebook in the container for geocachers to leave messages. Geocachers can also post messages online

Ken Lambert / Seattle Times / MCT

Geocaches are often hidden in logs. Seattle-based Groundspeak promotes geocaching tours.

through their smartphone app or computer. Groundspeak has made a business out of this electronic hide-and-seek game. It offers a free app that shows three

nearby caches, a $9.99 app with advanced features and more than 1,750,000 caches, and a $30 annual subscription with additional capabilities such as geocache challenges.

S P ORTS

Scoreboard, D2 Olympics, D3 MLB, D4

D

Cycling, D5 Golf, D6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC

WCL BASEBALL

GOLF COMMENTARY

Elks suffer third straight loss BELLINGHAM, Wash. — Andrew Ely belted a home run in the sixth inning to break a scoreless tie as Bellingham shut out Bend 2-0 in West Coast League baseball on Saturday night. It marked the third consecutive loss for the Elks, who moved to 1919 and into a two-way tie for second place in the West Division with Klamath Falls. Both teams are two games behind first-place Corvallis. Bellingham also scored a run in the eighth inning when Johnny Farrington scored off a Nathaniel Causey single on Saturday. Bo Walter led the Elks at the plate with two singles. Bend concludes its three-game series with Bellingham today with first pitch slated for 6:05 p.m. The Elks will be off until Wednesday when they head to Kitsap to take on the BlueJackets for a four-game series. The Elks return home to take on Cowlitz starting Tuesday, July 31. — Bulletin staff report

CYCLING

ZACK HALL

Finding the right golf ball can be tricky Photos by Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Colombian Carlos Alzate celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win the Downtown Twilight Criterium on Saturday in Bend.

Downtown dazzle • Carlos Alzate the fourth international rider to win a stage in pro men’s race

CCC at a glance A look at what’s happening in the Cascade Cycling Classic, a five-stage cycling race held in Central Oregon:

By Mark Morical

Wiggins

Tour de France at a Glance CHARTRES, France — A brief look at Saturday’s 19th stage of the 99th Tour de France: Stage: A 33-mile time trial from Bonneval to Chartres won by Bradley Wiggins. The 32-yearold former Olympic track champion asserted his authority on the Tour, beating his Sky teammate Christopher Froome by 1 minute, 16 seconds. Luis Leon Sanchez of Spain was third, 1:50 back. Yellow Jersey: Wiggins increased his overall lead over Froome to 3:21 and is poised to become the first British champion after Sunday’s largely ceremonial ride onto the ChampsElysees in Paris for the finale of the three-week race. Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali sits in third place, 6:19 behind. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner, riding for RadioShackNissan, finished in 44th place on Saturday. Horner is in 13th place overall, 19:55 behind Wiggins heading to today’s final stage. Stat of the day: 52 — Cadel Evans’ placing in the time trial, 5:54 behind Wiggins. The defending champion dropped to seventh overall, 15:51 off the pace. Today’s stage: The 20th and final stage takes the peloton from Rambouillet to Paris on a 74-mile trek. Mark Cavendish will try to win the sprint on the Champs-Elysees for a fourth consecutive time with the help of the Sky team. For a related story, see D5. — The Associated Press

The Bulletin

SATURDAY

Another pro men’s stage, another victory for an international rider. Colombian Carlos Alzate won a thrilling field sprint before a raucous crowd to claim the Downtown Twilight Criterium of the Bend Memorial Clinic Cascade Cycling Classic Saturday night in Bend. Alzate (Team Exergy) edged second-place Alex Candelario (Optum) to the Wall Street finish line as the sun set in downtown Bend. Belgian Jasper Stuyven (Bontrager Livestrong) finished third. Alzate, 29, is the fourth consecutive international rider to win a stage at Cascade. U.S.born riders have yielded the top spot on the podium in all four stages — to a Spaniard, a Cuban, a Belgian and now a Colombian. The last corner coming into the finish line is always chaotic in the Bend criterium. Alzate found himself with some work to do as he turned right from Idaho Avenue onto Wall Street at about 35 mph. “It was a pretty fast lap, and I got to the last turn in sixth place, so I had to do a pretty big effort through all six riders,” Alzate said, as translated by his teammate Andres Diaz. “Freddie Rodriguez (a teammate) helped me in the last two laps. We have been looking for a victory, and this is pretty good for me, to win it for the team.”

Stage 4 for the pro men and women, the Downtown Twilight Criterium, brought the cycling action into the heart of Bend. The start/finish line was located on Wall Street between Oregon and Minnesota avenues. Each lap included four 90-degree turns as the fields zoomed around Wall Street, Oregon Avenue, Bond Street and Idaho Avenue. The women raced for 50 minutes, followed by the men, who raced for 75 minutes.

TODAY The final stage is the Awbrey Butte Circuit Race. This hilly, looping stage starts and finishes at Summit High School in west Bend. The course passes by both Shevlin Park and Tumalo State Park and includes a steep climb up Archie Briggs Road — where moves are typically made — toward the end of each circuit. Pro men: 1 p.m. start, five laps, 83 miles Pro women: 1:05 p.m. start, three laps, 51 miles • For a map of today’s stage, see D5

No breakaway stuck until about 40 minutes into the 75minute race. See Men / D5

Carmen Small, right, wins the pro women’s Downtown Twilight Criterium on Saturday in Bend.

• A shakeup takes place at the top of the women’s CCC as Kristin Armstrong leaves early to gear up for the Olympics By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

Carmen Small got the win. Alison Powers got the yellow jersey. Kristin Armstrong decided to get to London. Optum’s Small fought off Exergy Twenty12’s Theresa Cliff-Ryan at the finish line on Friday evening to win the Downtown Twilight Criterium, the fourth stage of the pro women’s race in the Cascade Cycling Classic. What matters now is four seconds. That is the razor-thin advantage that Powers (NOW and Novartis for MS) holds over Small in the general classification standings heading into this afternoon’s CCC-concluding stage, the Awbrey Butte Circuit Race. Those seconds matter because Armstrong

— who held a lead of 2 minutes, 23 seconds, over the then-second-place Powers after Friday’s Cascade Lakes Road Race — elected to end her CCC early so she could fly to London and ready herself for the 2012 Olympic Games. The reigning Olympic gold medalist in the time trial, Armstrong is slated to compete in the road race on July 29 and in her specialty on Aug. 1. “She really wanted to stay for the whole race and at least the criterium because it’s such a fun event,“ said Nicola Cranmer, Exergy Twenty12 general manager and co-owner (along with Armstrong). “And she really wanted to be here for the fans that wanted to see her off for the Olympics, but it was a last-minute decision.” See Women / D5

P

GA Tour golfers wear the logo of the ball they play, and for good reason. Manufacturers have loads of golf balls to sell, and the hats worn by the best players in the world make for fine billboards. Look across the shelf of balls at any golf retailer and you see more variance in the color of boxes than in the items in Ian Poulter’s wardrobe closet. Dick’s Sporting Goods in Bend, for instance, sells 110 varieties of golf balls. Trying to determine which is the best golf ball to play for an average golfer can be a mind-numbing chore. And hard as it is to believe, even this golf writer does not have all the answers. (Maybe that’s not THAT hard to believe.) Some do have the answers, and even they can sympathize with a golfer’s plight when shopping for a ball. “There is no question (it is confusing),” says Andy Heinly, co-owner of Pro Golf of Bend and a veteran golf professional. “If you really want to have (golf balls) make a difference, then definitely ask the right questions where you are buying golf balls.” The best-selling golf ball in the U.S. for more than 10 years has been the Titleist Pro-V1. But it might not be the best golf ball for an everyday hacker. Not that a Titleist Pro-V1 is not a great golf ball. It is. The Pro-V1 has revolutionized the sport’s most basic equipment. But the advantages of hitting Pro-V1 are best utilized by elite golfers with swings like lightning bolts. Most recreational golfers do not come close to the nearly 113 miles per hour that was in 2011 the average PGA Tour swing speed. (According to the PGA of America, men’s swing speeds average about 85 mph. Women average about 65 mph.) See Golf / D6

HIGH DESERT CLASSICS

Oregon City rider wins Grand Prix By Emily Oller The Bulletin

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

Megan Jordan riding Lolita won the jumpoff and the $25,000 purse of the High Desert Classics Grand Prix competition.

Megan Jordan and her mount, Lolita, posted two clear rounds Saturday night to win in the jumper competition of the $25,000 Oxford Hotel Group Grand Prix. Jordan competed with three different horses posting in the top 12 with all three at the Grand Prix, part of the annual High Desert Classics at J Bar J Ranch in Bend. It was with Lolita, a 12-year-old Hanoverian mare, that Jordan cleared the first-round course with no faults to

place first in a field of 24 amateur and professional riders. And in the jumpoff round, where Jordan faced off with four riders, came out faultless while recording the fastest time of 36.245 seconds. “(Lolita) has been showing for about four years at the grand prix level. She is incredibly careful and fast and aggressive,” Jordan said. “She’s extremely competitive and she’s hard to beat when she leaves all of the jumps up.” Jordan’s success Saturday should come as no surprise. See Rider / D5

D2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

SCOREBOARD CYCLING Cascade Cycling Classic In Bend Pro Men Saturday’s Downtown Twilight Criterium (top 25) — 1, Carlos Alzate, Team Exergy. 2, Alex Candelario, Optum. 3, Jasper Stuyven, Bontrager Livestrong. 4, Andy Jacques-Maynes, Kenda. 5, Lawson Craddock, Bontrager Livestrong. 6, Michael Friedman, Optum. 7, Freddie Rodriguez, Team Exergy. 8, Ty Magner, BMC. 9, Luis Amaran, Jamis Sutter Home. 10, Kristofer Dahl, Team H&R Block. 11, Ben Jacques-Maynes, Bissell. 12, Phil Gaimon, Kenda. 13, Jeremy Vennell, Bissell. 14, Francisco Mancebo, Competitive Cyclist. 15, Alejandro Borrajo, Jamis Sutter Home. 16, Andrew Dahlheim, Bissell. 17, Fabrizio Von Nacher, Quality Post. 18, Ricky Escuela, Full Circle Cycling. 19, Tim Rugg, Champion System. 20, Andres Diaz, Team Exergy. 21, Mat Stephens, Elbowz Racing. 22, Carter Jones, Bissell. 23, Tom Zirbel, Optum. 24, Stephen Leece, Cal Giant. 25, Tyler Wren, Jamis Sutter Home. Overall standings (top 25) — 1, Francisco Mancebo, Competitive Cyclist, 8 hours, 6 minutes, 3 seconds. 2, Carter Jones, Bissell, :22 back. 3, Lawson Craddock, Bontrager Livestrong, :31. 4, Phil Gaimon, Kenda, :35. 5, Nate English, Kenda, :37. 6, Jeremy Vennell, Bissell, :50. 7, Chris Baldwin, Bissell, :51. 8, Michael Creed, Optum, :52. 9, Tom Zirbel, Optum, 1:11. 10, Luis Amaran, Jamis Sutter Home, 1:15. 11, Joe Dombrowski, Bontrager Livestrong, 1:20. 12, Rob Britton, H&R Block, 1:22. 13, Ian Boswell, Bontrager Livestrong, 1:23. 14, Stephen Leece, Cal Giant, 1:24. 15, Jasper Stuyven, Bontrager Livestrong, 1:22. 16, Ben Jacques-Maynes, Bissell, 1:39. 17, Andy Jacques-Maynes, Kenda, 1:46. 18, Matthew Cooke, Team Exergy, 1:54. 19, Freddie Rodriguez, Team Exergy, 2:02. 20, Peter Van Dijk, Jamis Sutter Home, 2:05. 21, James Oram, Bontrager Livestrong, 2:06. 22, Max Jenkins, Competitive Cyclist, 2:11. 23, Joshua Atkins, Bontrager Livestrong, 2:22. 24, Jesse Anthony, Optum, 2:44. 25, Carson Miller, Jamis Sutter Home, 2:54. Pro Women Saturday’s Downtown Twilight Criterium (top 25) — 1, Carmen Small, Optum. 2, Theresa Cliff-Ryan, Exergy Twenty12. 3, Loren Rowney, Stevens Bikes. 4, Christina Gokey-Smith, NOW and Novartis for MS. 5, Megan Guarnier, Team Tibco. 6, Jade Wilcoxson, Optum. 7, Lauren Hall, Team Tibco. 8, Heather Logan-Sprenger, Exergy Twenty12. 9, Emilly Collins, Vanderkitten-Focus. 10, Liza Rachetto, Primal. 11, Flavia Oliveira, Stevens Bikes. 12, Ruth Winder, Vanderkitten-Focus. 13, Jenny Rios, SC Velo. 14, Alison Powers, NOW and Novartis for MS. 15, Amanda Miller, Team Tibco. 16, Brianna Walle, Ironclad. 17, Robin Farina, NOW and Novartis for MS. 18, Kimberley Turner, BMC Total Care Racing. 19, Anne Samplonius, NOW and Novartis for MS. 20, Joy McCulloch, FCS|Rouse. 21, Lorena Vargas Villamil, unattached. 22, Samantha Schneider, Team Tibco. 23, Beatrice Rodriquez, SC Velo. 24, Andrea Dvorak, Exergy Twenty12. 25, Amy McGuire, FCS|Rouse. Overall standings (top 25) — 1, Alison Powers, NOW and Novartis for MS, 7 hours, 42 minutes, 14 seconds. 2, Carmen Small, Optum, :04 back. 3, Megan Guarnier, Team Tibco, :18. 4, Jade Wilcoxson, Optum, :36. 5, Amanda Miller, Team Tibco, 1:17. 6, Andrea Dvorak, Exergy Twenty12, 1:24. 7, Kristin McGrath, Exergy Twenty12, 1:31. 8, Lex Albrecht, Optum, 2:42. 9, Robin Farina, NOW and Novartis for MS, 3:32. 10, Miranda Griffiths, Optum, 4:10. 11, Katheryn Mattis, Vanderkitten-Focus, 4:28. 12, Lauren Stephens, FCS|Rouse, 4:31. 13, Lauren Hall, Team Tibco, 4:33. 14, Veronique Fortin, Team Tibco, 5:21. 15, Flavia Oliveira, Stevens Bikes, 5:24. 16, Meredith Miller, Team Tibco, 5:35. 17, Kathryn Donovan, FCS|Rouse, 5:52. 18, Jessica Cutler, Primal, 5:57. 19, Anna Sanders, FCS|Rouse, 6:12. 20, Lorena Vargas Villamil, unattached, 6:26. 21, Janel Holcomb, Optum, 6:30. 22, Lindsay Myers, Team Tibco, 6:38. 23, Kelly Crowley, Primal, 7:00. 24, Nicole Justice, Stevens Bikes, 7:11. 25, Anne Samplonius, NOW and Novartis for MS, 8:06.

Tour de France Saturday At Chartres, France 19th Stage A 33.1-mile individual time trial from Bonneval to Chartres 1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 1 hour, 4 minutes, 13 seconds. 2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 1 minute, 16 seconds behind. 3. Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabobank, 1:50. 4. Peter Velits, Slovakia, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, 2:02. 5. Richie Porte, Australia, Sky Procycling, 2:25. 6. Patrick Gretsch, Germany, Argos-Shimano, 2:28. 7. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, 2:34. 8. Vasili Kiryienka, Belarus, Movistar, 2:46. 9. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, 2:50. 10. Jeremy Roy, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 3:05. 11. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 3:12. 12. Matthieu Sprick, France, Argos-Shimano, 3:20. 13. Ruben Plaza, Spain, Movistar, 3:24. 14. Daniel Oss, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 3:27. 15. Anthony Roux, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 3:34. 16. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 3:38. 17. Christian Vande Velde, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 3:40. 18. Bert Grabsch, Germany, Omega Pharma-QuickStep, 3:43. 19. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nissan, 3:49. 20. Jens Voigt, Germany, RadioShack-Nissan, same time. Also 26. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, 4:22. 34. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing, 4:57. 44. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShackNissan, 5:33. 52. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 5:54. 141. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega PharmaQuickStep, 9:41. 151. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 10:56. Overall Standings (After 19 of 20 stages) 1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 84 hours, 26 minutes, 31 seconds. 2. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 3:21. 3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 6:19. 4. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol, 10:15. 5. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Racing, 11:04. 6. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nissan, 15:43. 7. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 15:51. 8. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar, 16:31. 9. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 16:38. 10. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat, 17:17. 11. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nissan, 17:54. 12. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 19:33. 13. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioShackNissan, 19:55. 14. Chris Anker Sorensen, Denmark, Team Saxo BankTinkoff Bank, 25:27. 15. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, 27:22. 16. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan, 28:30. 17. Egoi Martinez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 31:46. 18. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 37:03. 19. Eduard Vorganov, Russia, Katusha, 38:16. 20. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 42:26. Also 32. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega PharmaQuickStep, 1:16:29. 38. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing, 1:30:38. 60. Christian Vande Velde, United States, GarminSharp-Barracuda, 1:58:40. 100. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-SharpBarracuda, 2:52:38. 151. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-Barracuda, 3:54:54. 2012 Tour de France Stages June 30 — Prologue: Liege, Belgium, 6.4 kilometers (4 miles) (Stage: Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland; Yellow Jersey: Cancellara) July 1 — First Stage: Liege to Seraing, Belgium, plain, 198 (123) (Peter Sagan, Slovakia; Cancellara) July 2 — Second Stage: Vise, Belgium to Tournai, Belgium, plain, 207.5 (128.9) (Mark Cavendish, Britain; Cancellara) July 3 — Third Stage: Orchies, France to Boulogne-

sur-Mer, medium mountains, 197 (122.4) (Sagan; Cancellara) July 4 — Fourth Stage: Abbeville to Rouen, plain, 214.5 (133.3) (Andre Greipel, Germany; Cancellara) July 5 — Fifth Stage: Rouen to Saint-Quentin, plain, 196.5 (122.1) (Greipel; Cancellara) July 6 — Sixth Stage: Epernay to Metz, plain, 205 (127.4) (Sagan; Cancellara) July 7 — Seventh Stage: Tomblaine to La Planche des Belles Filles, medium mountains, 199 (123.7) (Chris Froome, Britain; Bradley Wiggins, Britain) July 8 — Eighth Stage: Belfort to Porrentruy, medium mountains, 157.5 (97.9) (Thibaut Pinot, France; Wiggins) July 9 — Ninth Stage: Arc-et-Senans to Besancon, individual time trial, 41.5 (25.8) (Wiggins; Wiggins) July 10 — Rest Day: Macon July 11 — 10th Stage: Macon to Bellgarde-sur-Valserine, high mountains, 194.5 (120.9) (Thomas Voeckler, France; Wiggins) July 12 — 11th Stage: Albertville to La Toussuire-Les Sybelles, high mountains, 148 (92) (Pierre Rolland, France; Wiggins) July 13 — 12th Stage: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne to Annonay Davezieux, medium mountains, 226 (140.4) (David Millar, Britain; Wiggins) July 14 — 13th Stage: Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux to Le Cap d’Agde, plain, 217 (134.8) (Greipel; Wiggins) July 15 — 14th Stage: Limoux to Foix, high mountains, 191 (118.7) (Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain; Wiggins) July 16 — 15th Stage: Samatan to Pau, plain, 158.5 (98.5) (Pierrick Fedrigo, France; Wiggins) July 17 — Rest Day: Pau July 18 — 16th Stage: Pau to Bagneres-de-Luchon, high mountains, 197 (122.4) (Voeckler; Wiggins) July 19 — 17th Stage: Bagneres-de-Luchon to Peyragudes, high mountains, 143.5 (89.2) (Alejandro Valverde, Spain; Wiggins) July 20 — 18th Stage: Blagnac to Brive-la-Gaillarde, plain, 222.5 (138.3) (Cavendish; Wiggins) July 21 — 19th Stage: Bonneval to Chartres, individual time trial, 53.5 (33.1) (Wiggins; Wiggins) July 22 — 20th Stage: Rambouillet to Champs-Elysees, Paris, plain, 120 (74.6) Total — 3494.4 kilometers (2171.4 miles)

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 26 Bellingham Bells 23 Kelowna Falcons 24 Walla Walla Sweets 15 West Division W Corvallis Knights 23 Bend Elks 19 Klamath Falls Gems 19 Cowlitz Black Bears 18 Kitsap BlueJackets 10 ——— Saturday’s Games Corvallis 4, Kelowna 2 Kelowna 3, Corvallis 1 Cowlitz 2, Wenatchee 1 Bellingham 2, Bend 0 Klamath Falls at Walla Walla, score not available Today’s Games Wenatchee at Cowlitz, 5:05 p.m. Klamath Falls at Walla Walla, 5:05 p.m. Bend at Bellingham, 6:05 p.m.

L 12 15 17 23 L 19 18 19 21 33

GOLF The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-3850831, emailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Local Club Results ——— AWBREY GLEN Wednesday Men’s Sweeps, July 18 Two Net Best Balls 1, Hiram Becker/David Quattrone/Larry Haas/Earle Honnen, 123. 2, Ed Hagstrom/Larry Hinkle/Jay Linehan/blind draw, 124. BLACK BUTTE RANCH Men’s Club, July 18 at Big Meadow Three Net Best Balls 1, Larry dawson/Rich Elliott/Marv Hoff/Gary Briney, 186. 2, Ed Seabloom/Keith Kaneko/Jerry Lawhun/Tom Hedford, 195. BROKEN TOP Ladies 18 Hole Play, July 19 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Phyllis Marr/Judy Cochran, 88. 2 (scorecard playoff), Mary Erbe/Julie Seneker, 90. 3, Lucy Stack/Norma Dubois, 90. Net: 1, Phyllis Marr/ Judy Cochran, 61. 2, Charlene Moeckel/Patty Felton, 67. 3 (tie), Mary Erbe/Julie Seneker, 70; Sarah Gray/ Karen Whittemore, 70. Sweeps — Phyllis Marr/Judy Cochran. Charlene Moeckel/Patty Felton. Sarah Gray/Karen Whittemore. Mary Erbe/Julie Seneker. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Golf Club, July 17 Stroke Play A Flight (11 and under handicaps) — Gross: 1, Sean Remer, 64. 2, Mac Kilgo, 75. 3, Tim Johnson, 77. Net: 1, Paul Nemitz, 62. 2, Al Kellogg, 67. 3, Gary Olds, 68. B Flight (12-18 handicaps) — Gross: 1, Herb Parker, 78. 2 (tie), Wylie Harrell, 80; Ron Aker, 80. Net: 1, Monty Modrell, 65. 2, Jim Platz, 66. 3 (tie), Lamar Long, 68; Guy Crapper, 68. C Flight (19-23) — Gross: 1 (tie), Jim Lester, 84; Romano Romani, 84. 3 (tie), Neil Rice, 85; Jack Martin, 85. Net: 1 (tie), Ron Nelson, 64; Michael Kimberlin, 64. 3, Ron Mahood, 65. D Flight (24-33) — Gross: 1, Doug Wyant, 87. 2, Eddie Maroney, 94. 3, David Wilot, 98. Net: 1, Terry Rodgers, 64. 2, Gene Ressler, 70. 3, Hal Jamison, 72. EAGLE CREST Women’s Golf Group, July 17 at Ridge Course Net Stroke Play A Flight — 1, Joey Dupuis, 65. 2, Bette Chappron, 71. 3 (tie), Kathie Johnson, 78; Patricia Perkins, 78. B Flight — 1, Adrienne Nickel, 72. 2, Joan Mathews, 77. 3, Bette Wald, 78.

Saturday’s summary

Bells 2, Elks 0 Bend 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Bellingham 000 001 01X — 2 8 0 Bunda, Grazzini (7), Snyder (8), Dingilian (8) and Guinn. Carma, Engel (4) and Causey. W — Engel. L — Bunda. HR — Bellingham: Ely.

TENNIS Professional Mercury Insurance Open Saturday At La Costa Resort and Spa Carlsbad, Calif. Purse: $740,000 (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Dominika Cibulkova (2), Slovakia, def. Nadia Petrova (4), Russia, 7-6 (8), 6-1. Marion Bartoli (1), France, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. Atlanta Open Saturday At The Atlanta Athletic Club Norcross, Ga. Purse: $546,900 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Go Soeda (8), Japan, 6-4, 6-3. Andy Roddick (4), United States, def. John Isner (1), United States, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4. German Tennis Championships Saturday At Rothenbaum Sport GmbH Hamburg, Germany Purse: $1.24 million (WT500) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Juan Monaco (3), Argentina, def. Nicolas Almagro (1), Spain, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Marin Cilic (4), Croatia, 7-6 (7), 6-0. Swedish Open Saturday At Bastad Tennis Stadiun Bastad, Sweden Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Mathilde Johansson, Sweden, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-4, 6-4. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-1, 6-3. Swiss Open Saturday At Roy Emerson Arena Gstaad, Switzerland Purse: $502,300 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Semifinals Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5). Janko Tipsarevic (1), Serbia, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 7-6 (10), 6-3.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L T Pts GF New York 11 5 5 38 37 Sporting Kansas City 11 6 4 37 26 Houston 9 5 7 34 31 D.C. 10 7 3 33 34 Chicago 9 7 4 31 22 Columbus 7 7 4 25 18 Montreal 7 13 3 24 30 New England 6 9 5 23 25 Philadelphia 6 10 2 20 20 Toronto FC 5 11 4 19 24 Western Conference W L T Pts GF San Jose 13 4 4 43 43 Real Salt Lake 12 7 3 39 33 Seattle 8 5 7 31 25 Vancouver 8 6 7 31 23 Los Angeles 9 10 3 30 38 Chivas USA 6 8 5 23 13 Colorado 7 13 1 22 27 FC Dallas 5 10 7 22 25 Portland 5 11 4 19 19 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ———

Saturday’s Games New York 2, Philadelphia 0 Columbus 1, D.C. United 0 Sporting Kansas City 0, New England 0, tie Houston 3, Montreal 0 FC Dallas 5, Portland 0 Los Angeles 3, Chivas USA 1 Real Salt Lake 2, Colorado 0 Today’s Game San Jose at Vancouver, 4 p.m.

GA 29 19 25 27 22 19 42 25 21 36 GA 25 26 21 25 35 21 30 30 35

THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ladies of the Greens, July 17 Tee to Green A Flight — 1, Lois Morris, 13.5. 2, Janie Adams, 17. 3, Hazel Blackmore, 18. 4, Diane Miyauchi, 18.5. B Flight — 1, Kay Webb, 16.5. 2, Lynne Ekman, 17.5. 3, Judy Thorgiersson, 18.5. 4, Lonie Bibler, 19.5. C Flight — 1, Evelyn Kakuska, 18.5. 2, Dorothy fuller, 20.5. 3, Julie Fountain, 22. Fewest Putts — Diane Miyauchi, 13. Golfer of the Week — Kay Webb, Evelyn Kakuska. JUNIPER Men’s Club, July 19 Three Low Net 1, Elton Gregory/Rod Cooper/Mike Ricketts/Jim Flaherty, 197. 2, Dave King/Ken Carl/Dick Kane/Bob Babcock, 198. 3, Paul Klotz/Dale Carver/Bruce Humphreys/Hank Weldon, 200. 4, Johnny McDaniel/David Hancock/Ed Allumbaugh/Tom DeHart. KPs — Tom Majchrowski, No. 3; Elton Gregory, No. 8; Alan Stewart, No. 13; dave King, No. 16. MEADOW LAKES Men’s League, July 18 Best Ball Gross: 1 (tie), Dustin Conklin/Curtis Scofield, 34; Patrick Andrade/Zach Lampert, 34. Net: 1, Jake Shinkle/Ken Husseman, 29. 2 (tie), JW Miller/Hank Simmons, 30; Larry Conklin/Les Bryan, 30; Jordie Simmons/Steve Spangler, 30; Britton Coffer/John McCulloch, 30. KPs — A Flight: Clay Smith, No. 13; Jim Montgomery, No. 17. B Flight: Steve Reynolds, No. 13; Steve Kidder, No. 17. Ladies of the Lakes, July 19 Low Putts 1, Betty Smith, 30. 2 (tie), Kathy Koon, 33; Lee Miller, 33. QUAIL RUN Men’s Club, July 18 Stroke Play First Flight — Gross: 1, Josh Day, 75. Net: 1, Don Banducci, 69. 2, Joseph Maes, 70. Second Flight — Gross: 1, Galen Bridge, 93. Net: 1, Al Wakefield, 72. 2, Dennis Haniford, 73. Third Flight — Gross: 1, Rick Bauman, 100. Net: 1, Dick Johnson, 70. 2, Al Rice, 73. KPs — Chuck Towner, No. 8. Don Banducci, No. 10. Women’s Club, July 19 Low Gross, Two Low Net Flight A — Gross: 1, Linda Morrow, 93. Net: 1, Darlene Toten, 71. 2, Sandy Haniford, 73. Flight B — Gross: 1, Linda Bauman, 117. Net: 1, Barb Heilman, 77. 2, Brenda Rollandi, 80. SUNRIVER RESORT Partnership Tournament, July 18 Net Team Stroke Play First Flight — 1, Suzy Carver/Alice Holloway, 123. 2, Marianne Martin/Adele Johansen, 127. Second Flight — 1, Joanne Yutani and Karen Padrick, 119. 2, Midge Thomas/Dolly Mealey, 126. Chip-in — Joanne Yutani, Nos. 5, 12; Susan Gilbreth, No. 10; Jan Bull, No. 14. Birdies — Mary Condy Nos. 2, 4; Deb Coulter, No. 6; Roxie Oglesby, Nos. 9, 13; Midge Thomas, No. 13. WIDGI CREEK Women’s Club, July 18 Three-Blind Mice First Flight — 1, Janet Knowlton, 49.25. 2, Pam Chase, 55.5. 3, Elly Cashel, 56.75. Second Flight — 1, Pam Brooks, 50.25. 2, Kathy Madrigal, 53. 3, Janet Campbell, 59.25. Third Flight — 1, Sue Sherrer, 49.25. 2, Linda Barnett, 53. 3, Kathi Loring, 55.25. KPs — First Flight: Sherry Deetz. Third Flight: Demy Schleicher. Men’s Club, July 18 Bruiser Shootout Blue Tees — Gross: 1, Greg Watt, 75. 2, Gary Hoagland, 78. 3, Mitch Cloninger, 79. Net: 1, Dave Black, 66. 2, Daryl Hjeresen, 67. 3, Jim Wellock, 68. White Tees — 1, Rich Friscia, 65. 2 (tie), Ray Horgen, 66; Don Kramer, 66; Ron Stassens, 66. 5, Russell Struve, 67. 6, Tony Lord, 68. 7, Roger Bergeson, 70. KPs — Ron Stassens, No. 5; CJ Ferrari, No. 11.

Hole-In-One Report July 11 JUNIPER Carol Ann Thurston, Bend No. 13. . . . . . . . . . . . 81 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron July 18 THE GREENS AT REDMOND David McNaughton, Bend No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . 135 yards . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron July 19 KAH-NEE-TA Jim Ayers, Metolius No. 1. . . . . . . . . . . . 125 yards . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron July 20 EAGLE CREST RIDGE Joe Morrone, Parsippany, N.J.

No. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . 134 yards . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron

Professional British Open Saturday At Royal Lytham & St. Annes Lytham St. Annes, England Purse: $7.75 million Yardage: 7,086; Par: 70 Third Round Adam Scott 64-67-68—199 Graeme McDowell 67-69-67—203 Brandt Snedeker 66-64-73—203 Tiger Woods 67-67-70—204 Zach Johnson 65-74-66—205 Ernie Els 67-70-68—205 Thorbjorn Olesen 69-66-71—206 Bill Haas 71-68-68—207 Thomas Aiken 68-68-71—207 Bubba Watson 67-73-68—208 Louis Oosthuizen 72-68-68—208 Mark Calcavecchia 71-68-69—208 Matt Kuchar 69-67-72—208 Dustin Johnson 73-68-71—209 Kyle Stanley 70-69-70—209 Luke Donald 70-68-71—209 Jason Dufner 70-66-73—209 Vijay Singh 70-72-68—210 Nick Watney 71-70-69—210 Anirban Lahiri 68-72-70—210 Simon Khan 70-69-71—210 Greg Chalmers 71-68-71—210 James Morrison 68-70-72—210 Steven Alker 69-69-72—210 Keegan Bradley 71-72-68—211 Matthew Baldwin 69-73-69—211 Justin Hicks 68-74-69—211 Alexander Noren 71-71-69—211 Hunter Mahan 70-71-70—211 Thomas Bjorn 70-69-72—211 Peter Hanson 67-72-72—211 Steve Stricker 67-71-73—211 Joost Luiten 73-70-69—212 Padraig Harrington 70-72-70—212 Harris English 71-71-70—212 Francesco Molinari 69-72-71—212 Dale Whitnell 71-69-72—212 Jamie Donaldson 68-72-72—212 Garth Mulroy 71-69-72—212 Simon Dyson 72-67-73—212 Carl Pettersson 71-68-73—212 Paul Lawrie 65-71-76—212 Rickie Fowler 71-72-70—213 Gary Woodland 73-70-70—213 Troy Matteson 70-72-71—213 Rafael Echenique 73-69-71—213 Jim Furyk 72-70-71—213 Branden Grace 73-69-71—213 Greg Owen 71-71-71—213 Ian Poulter 71-69-73—213 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-69-73—213 Geoff Ogilvy 72-68-73—213 Toshinori Muto 67-72-74—213 Lee Westwood 73-70-71—214 Adilson Da Silva 69-74-71—214 Sang-moon Bae 72-71-71—214 K.J. Choi 70-73-71—214 Pablo Larrazabal 73-70-71—214 Nicolas Colsaerts 65-77-72—214 Gonzalo Fernadez-Castano 71-71-72—214 Yoshinori Fujimoto 71-70-73—214 Thongchai Jaidee 69-71—74—214 Ted Potter Jr. 69-71—74—214 Brendan Jones 69-74-72—215 Fredrik Jacobson 69-73-73—215 Rory McIlroy 67-75-73—215 Richard Sterne 69-73-73—215 Bob Estes 69-72-74—215 Retief Goosen 70-70-75—215 Juvic Pagunsan 71-72-73—216 Aaron Baddeley 71-71-74—216 Warren Bennett 71-70-75—216 John Senden 70-71-75—216 Lee Slattery 69-72-75—216 Andres Romero 70-69-77—216 Chad Campbell 73-70-74—217 Ross Fisher 72-71-74—217 Charles Howell III 72-71-74—217 Rafael Cabrera-Bello 70-71-76—217 Jeev Milkha Singh 70-71-76—217 Tom Watson 71-72-76—219 John Daly 72-71-77—220 Martin Laird 70-69-82—221 British Open Tee Times At Royal Lytham & St. Annes Lytham St. Annes, England Purse: $7.75 million Yardage: 7,060; Par: 70 All Times PDT (a-amateur) Late Saturday, Today 11:20 p.m. — Martin Laird 11:30 p.m. — John Daly, Tom Watson 11:40 p.m. — Jeev Milkha Singh, Rafael CabreraBello 11:50 p.m. — Charles Howell III, Ross Fisher midnight — Chad Campbell, Andres Romero 12:10 a.m. — Lee Slattery, John Senden 12:20 a.m. — Warren Bennett, Aaron Baddeley 12:30 a.m. — Juvic Pagunsan, Retief Goosen 12:40 a.m. — Bob Estes, Richard Sterne 12:55 a.m. — Rory McIlroy, Fredrik Jacobson 1:05 a.m. — Brendan Jones, Ted Potter Jr. 1:15 a.m. — Thongchai Jaidee, Yoshinori Fujimoto 1:25 a.m. — Gonzalo Fernadez-Castano, Nicolas Colsaerts 1:35 a.m. — Pablo Larrazabal, K.J. Choi 1:45 a.m. — Sang-moon Bae, Adilson Da Silva 1:55 a.m. — Lee Westwood, Toshinori Muto 2:05 a.m. — Geoff Ogilvy, Miguel Angel Jimenez 2:15 a.m. — Ian Poulter, Greg Owen 2:30 a.m. — Branden Grace, Jim Furyk 2:40 a.m. — Rafael Echenique, Troy Matteson 2:50 a.m. — Gary Woodland, Rickie Fowler 3 a.m. — Paul Lawrie, Carl Pettersson 3:10 a.m. — Simon Dyson, Garth Mulroy 3:20 a.m. — Jamie Donaldson, Dale Whitnell 3:30 a.m. — Francesco Molinari, Harris English 3:40 a.m. — Padraig Harrington, Joost Luiten 3:55 a.m. — Steve Stricker, Peter Hanson 4:05 a.m. — Thomas Bjorn, Hunter Mahan 4:15 a.m. — Alexander Noren, Justin Hicks 4:25 a.m. — Matthew Baldwin, Keegan Bradley 4:35 a.m. — Steven Alker, James Morrison 4:45 a.m. — Greg Chalmers, Simon Khan 4:55 a.m. — Anirban Lahiri, Nick Watney 5:05 a.m. — Vijay Singh, Jason Dufner 5:20 a.m. — Luke Donald, Kyle Stanley 5:30 a.m. — Dustin Johnson, Matt Kuchar 5:40 a.m. — Mark Calcavecchia, Louis Oosthuizen 5:50 a.m. — Bubba Watson, Thomas Aiken 6 a.m. — Bill Haas, Thorbjorn Olesen 6:10 a.m. — Ernie Els, Zach Johnson 6:20 a.m. — Tiger Woods, Brandt Snedeker 6:30 a.m. — Graeme McDowell, Adam Scott True South Classic Saturday At Annandale Golf CLub Madison, Miss. Purse: $3 million Yardage: 7,202; Par 72 Partial Third Round Note: Third round will be completed today William McGirt 70-69-64—203 Woody Austin 71-67-66—204 Tommy Gainey 70-68-66—204 Patrick Reed 73-65-66—204 Scott Brown 72-66-67—205 Chris Couch 69-69-67—205 Jerry Kelly 69-69-68—206 Shane Bertsch 68-71-69—208 Vaughn Taylor 72-67-69—208 Russell Knox 67-71-71—209 Marco Dawson 67-71-72—210 Robert Gamez 68-71-71—210 ——— Leaderboard at time of suspended play SCORE THRU 1. Scott Stallings -18 9 2. Heath Slocum -14 12 2. Billy Horschel -14 9 2. Jason Bohn -14 9 5. William McGirt -13 16 6. Guy Boros -12 16 6. Tommy Gainey -12 F 6. Woody Austin -12 F 6. Jonathan Randolph -12 13 6. Luke Guthrie -12 10 6. Bud Cauley -12 9 12. Chris Couch -11 F 12. Scott Brown -11 F 12. Ryuji Imada -11 15 12. Hunter Hamrick -11 14 12. Jason Gore -11 10 12. J.J. Killeen -11 10 12. Steven Bowditch -11 9

MOTOR SPORTS IndyCar

Edmonton Indy Lineup After Saturday qualifying; race today At Edmonton City Centre Airport Edmonton, Canada Lap length: 2.224 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.664. 2. (10) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 103.65. 3. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.41. 4. (15) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 103.238. 5. (98) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 103.157. 6. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.122. 7. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Chevrolet, 91.432. 8. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 91.293. 9. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 91.147. 10. (8) Rubens Barrichello, Dallara-Chevrolet, 90.722. 11. (38) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 90.291. 12. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Chevrolet, 90.222. 13. (18) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 104.496. 14. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Chevrolet, 104.013. 15. (67) Josef Newgarden, Dallara-Honda, 104.313. 16. (19) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 103.993. 17. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.995. 18. (5) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.99. 19. (83) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 103.969. 20. (22) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.454. 21. (4) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.27. 22. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.25. 23. (78) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Lotus, 102.674. 24. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Chevrolet, 103.053. 25. (14) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 101.503.

Formula 1 German Grand Prix Lineup After Saturday qualifying; race today At Hockenheimring Hockenheim, Germany Lap length: 2.842 miles Third Session 1. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 1 minute, 40.621 seconds. 2. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 1:41.026. 3. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 1:42.459. 4. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Force India, 1:43.501. 5. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 1:43.950. 6. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 1:44.113. 7. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 1:44.186. 8. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 1:41.496. 9. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 1:44.889. 10. Kimi Raikkonen, Finland, Lotus, 1:45.811. Eliminated after second session 11. Daniel Ricciardo, Australia, Toro Rosso, 1:39.789. 12. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, 1:39.985. 13. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 1:40.212. 14. Bruno Senna, Brazil, Williams, 1:40.752. Eliminated after first session 15. Jean-Eric Vergne, France, Toro Rosso, 1:16.741. 16. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Caterham, 1:17.620. 17. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Sauber, 1:39.933. 18. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Caterham, 1:18.531. 19. Romain Grosjean, France, Lotus, 1:40.574. 20. Charles Pic, France, Marussia, 1:19.220. 21. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 1:41.551. 22. Timo Glock, Germany, Marussia, 1:19.291. 23. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, HRT, 1:19.912. 24. Narain Karthikeyan, India, HRT, 1:20.230.

NHRA National Hot Rod Association Saturday At Mopar Mile-High Morrison, Colo. Pairings based on results in qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings. Top Fuel 1. Spencer Massey, 3.914 seconds, 318.02 mph vs. 16. Steven Chrisman, 6.006, 137.62. 2. Antron Brown, 3.923, 305.98 vs. 15. Rob Passey, 5.804, 127.94. 3. Doug Kalitta, 3.925, 308.14 vs. 14. Clay Millican, 5.447, 179.76. 4. Terry McMillen, 3.930, 314.75 vs. 13. Scott Palmer, 4.184, 276.52. 5. Brandon Bernstein, 3.947, 285.83 vs. 12. David Grubnic, 4.101, 275.34. 6. Shawn Langdon, 3.957, 303.03 vs. 11. Steve Torrence, 4.091, 294.24. 7. Morgan Lucas, 4.002, 279.27 vs. 10. Bob Vandergriff, 4.035, 296.96. 8. Tony Schumacher, 4.013, 297.42 vs. 9. Khalid alBalooshi, 4.021, 303.57. Funny Car 1. Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 4.131, 304.05 vs. 16. Todd Simpson, Chevy Camaro, 4.951, 229.27. 2. Robert Hight, Ford Mustang, 4.135, 304.53 vs. 15. Jeff Diehl, Chevy Monte Carlo, 4.905, 276.69. 3. Ron Capps, Charger, 4.137, 301.54 vs. 14. Alexis DeJoria, Toyota Camry, 4.631, 220.76. 4. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.165, 297.02 vs. 13. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.386, 275.28. 5. John Force, Mustang, 4.188, 302.82 vs. 12. Tony Pedregon, Camry, 4.381, 264.34. 6. Mike Neff, Mustang, 4.208, 301.20 vs. 11. Johnny Gray, Charger, 4.313, 283.97. 7. Courtney Force, Mustang, 4.212, 297.94 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.237, 280.54. 8. Jeff Arend, Camry, 4.218, 298.40 vs. 9. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.224, 288.15. Did Not Qualify: 17. Todd Lesenko, 5.088, 176.53. Pro Stock 1. Allen Johnson, Dodge Avenger, 6.951, 198.29 vs. 16. Paul Pittman, Chevy Cobalt, 13.844, 81.21. 2. Mike Edwards, Pontiac GXP, 6.966, 197.80 vs. 15. Steve Kalkowski, Pontiac GTO, 7.130, 192.93. 3. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.968, 197.88 vs. 14. Kurt Johnson, GXP, 7.067, 195.19. 4. Ron Krisher, GXP, 6.973, 197.77 vs. 13. Shane Gray, Chevy Camaro, 7.065, 194.69. 5. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.988, 197.10 vs. 12. Deric Kramer, Avenger, 7.060, 194.80. 6. Erica Enders, Cobalt, 6.989, 196.39 vs. 11. Larry Morgan, Ford Mustang, 7.046, 196.07. 7. Vincent Nobile, Avenger, 6.998, 197.42 vs. 10. Warren Johnson, GXP, 7.037, 195.22. 8. Jeg Coughlin, Avenger, 7.010, 196.90 vs. 9. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 7.011, 196.44. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 7.238, 184.57 vs. 16. Angie Smith, Buell, 7.434, 178.38. 2. Hector Arana, Buell, 7.243, 184.04 vs. 15. Matt Guidera, Buell, 7.429, 178.50. 3. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 7.283, 183.52 vs. 14. Michael Phillips, Suzuki, 7.388, 182.30. 4. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 7.298, 183.42 vs. 13. Shawn Gann, Buell, 7.375, 181.15. 5. Jerry Savoie, Buell, 7.300, 180.69 vs. 12. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 7.361, 182.18. 6. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 7.313, 181.76 vs. 11. Scotty Pollacheck, Buell, 7.359, 180.00. 7. Matt Smith, Buell, 7.321, 182.21 vs. 10. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 7.351, 180.96. 8. Mike Berry, Buell, 7.321, 181.40 vs. 9. Michael Ray, Buell, 7.347, 180.74. Did Not Qualify: 17. John Hall, 7.450, 177.84. 18. James Surber, 7.451, 176.24. 19. Katie Sullivan, 7.478, 177.09. 20. Charles Sullivan, 7.701, 170.92.

OLYMPICS Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Wednesday, July 25 Soccer Women At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales Britain vs. New Zealand, 8 a.m. Cameroon vs. Brazil, 10:45 a.m. At City of Coventry Stadium Japan vs. Canada, 9 a.m. Sweden vs. South Africa, 11:45 a.m. At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland United States vs. France, 9 a.m. Colombia vs. North Korea, 11:45 a.m. ——— Thursday, July 26 Soccer Men At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland Honduras vs. Morocco, 4 a.m. Spain vs. Japan, 6:45 a.m. At St James’ Park, Newcastle Mexico vs. South Korea, 6:30 a.m. Gabon vs. Switzerland, 9:15 a.m. At Old Trafford, Manchester United Arab Emirates vs. Uruguay, 9 a.m. Britain vs. Senegal, noon At City of Coventry Stadium Belarus vs. New Zealand, 11:45 a.m. At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales Brazil vs. Egypt, 11:45 a.m. ——— Friday, July 27 Archery At Lord’s Cricket Ground Men’s Individual ranking round, 1 a.m. Women’s Individual ranking round, 5 a.m. ——— Saturday, July 28 Archery At Lord’s Cricket Ground Men’s Team 1/8 eliminations, 1 a.m. Men’s Team quarterfinals, semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 7 a.m. Badminton At Wembley Arena Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 12:30 a.m.

Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 4:30 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Singles, Doubles and Mixed Doubles Prelims, 10:30 a.m. Basketball At Olympic Park-Basketball Arena Women China vs. Czech Republic, 1 a.m. Canada vs. Russia, 3:15 a.m. Turkey vs. Angola, 6:30 a.m. United States vs. Croatia, 8:45 a.m. Brazil vs. France, noon Australia vs. Britain, 2:15 p.m. Beach Volleyball At Horse Guards Parade Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 1 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), 6:30 a.m. Men’s and women’s Prelims (4 matches), noon Boxing At ExCeL Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 5:30 a.m. Men’s Bantamweight (56kg) and Men’s Middleweight (75kg) round of 32, 12:30 p.m. Cycling (Road) At The Mall Men’s Road Race, 2 a.m. Equestrian (Eventing) At Greenwich Park Individual & Team Eventing: dressage, day 1, 2 a.m. Fencing At ExCeL Women’s Individual Foil round of 64, round of 32, round of 16, quarterfinals, 2:30 a.m. Women’s Individual Foil semifinals, bronze and gold medal matches, 10 a.m. Gymnastics At Artistic North Greenwich Arena Men’s qualification, 3 a.m. Men’s qualification, 7:30 a.m. Men’s qualification, noon Judo At ExCeL Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg elimination rounds, quarterfinals, 1:30 a.m. Men’s -60kg and Women’s -48kg repechages, semifinal contests, bronze and gold medal contests, 6 a.m. Rowing At Eton Dorney, Buckinghamshire Men’s Pairs, Lightweight Fours, Eights, Single Sculls, Double Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats; Women’s Pairs, Single Sculls, Quadruple Sculls heats, 1:30 a.m. Shooting At The Royal Artillery Barracks Men’s 10-Meter Air Pistol qualification and final; Women’s 10-Meter Air Rifle qualification and final, 3:15 a.m. Soccer Women At City of Coventry Stadium Japan vs. Sweden, 4 a.m. Canada vs. South Africa, 6:45 a.m. At Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, Wales New Zealand vs. Brazil, 6:30 a.m. Britain vs. Cameroon, 9:15 a.m. At Hampden Park, Glasgow, Scotland United States vs. Colombia, Noon France vs. North Korea, 2:45 p.m. Swimming At Olympic Park-Aquatics Centre Men’s 100 Breaststroke, 400 Freestyle, 400 Individual Medley heats; Women’s 100 Butterfly, 400 Individual Medley, 4X100 Freestyle Relay heats, 2 a.m. Men’s 100 Breaststroke semifinals, 400 Freestyle final, 400 Individual Medley; Women’s 100 Butterfly semifinals, 400 Individual Medley final, 4X100 Freestyle Relay final, 11:30 a.m. Table Tennis At ExCeL Men’s Singles Prelims; Women’s Singles Prelims, first round, 1 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 6:30 a.m. Men’s Singles and Women’s Singles first round, 11 a.m. Team Handball Women At Copper Box Russia vs. Angola, 1:30 a.m. Spain vs. South Korea, 3:15 a.m. Croatia vs. Brazil, 6:30 a.m. Denmark vs. Sweden, 8:15 a.m. Montenegro vs. Britain, 11:30 a.m. Norway vs. France, 1:15 p.m. Tennis At Wimbledon Men’s and women’s Singles first round; Men’s and women’s Doubles first round, 3:30 a.m. Volleyball At Earls Court Women Algeria vs. Japan, 1:30 a.m. China vs. Serbia, 3:30 a.m. Britain vs. Russia, 6:45 a.m. Italy vs. Dominican Republic, 8:45 a.m. United States vs. South Korea, noon Brazil vs. Turkey, 2 p.m. Weightlifting At ExCeL Women’s 48kg group A (medal), 7:30 a.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Cleveland RHP Roberto Hernandez three weeks for engaging in age and identity fraud. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Added INF Omar Quintanilla to the roster. Designated OF Steve Pearce for assignment. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Acquired RHP Brett Myers and cash considerations from Houston for RHP Matt Heidenreich and LHP Blair Walters and a player to be named. Optioned RHP Brian Omogrosso and RHP Dylan Axelrod to Charlotte (IL). Reinstated RHP Jesse Crain from the 15-day DL. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Signed LHP JC Romero to a minor league contract and assigned him to Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned LHP Francisley Bueno to Omaha (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed 1B Justin Morneau on the paternity list. Recalled 1B Chris Parmelee from Rochester (IL). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Placed DH Luke Scott on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Cesar Ramos from Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Announced C Yorvit Torrealba was reinstated from restricted list. Optioned C Luis Martinez to Round Rock (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Placed RHP Jason Frasor on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 17. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Reinstated RHP Takashi Saito from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Jonathan Albaladejo to Reno (PCL). ATLANTA BRAVES—Placed OF Matt Diaz on the 15-day DL. Activated LHP Jonny Venters from the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Randall Delgado from Gwinnett (IL). NEW YORK METS—Placed LHP Johan Santana on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Jeremy Hefner from Buffalo (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Recalled RHP Evan Meek from Indianapolis (IL). Placed RHP Juan Cruz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 18. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Recalled LHP John Lannan from Syracuse (IL). Reinstated OF Xavier Nady from the 15-day DL and designated him for assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DALLAS MAVERICKS—Signed G Jared Cunningham. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES—Signed C Greg Stiemsma to an offer sheet. SOCCER Major League Soccer NEW YORK RED BULLS—Acquired a conditional draft pick from Toronto FC for F Quincy Amarikwa.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 599 133 3,585 1,653 McNary 776 89 840 362 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Friday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 234,609 18,455 48,869 21,369 The Dalles 178,969 15,567 21,615 10,124 John Day 160,569 15,266 13,388 6,608 McNary 157,560 8,730 13,097 6,608

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

OLYMPICS

T E L E VI S I ON Today GOLF 3 a.m.: British Open, third round, ESPN. Noon: American Century Championship, final round, NBC. Noon: PGA Tour, True South Classic, final round, Golf Channel. 6 p.m.: British Open, final round (same-day tape), ESPN2. CYCLING 5 a.m.: Tour de France, Stage 20, NBC Sports Network. MOTOR SPORTS 8:30 a.m.: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, STP 300, qualifying, ESPN2. 9 a.m.: Formula One, Grand Prix of Germany (same-day tape), Fox. 9:30 a.m.: IndyCar, Firestone Indy Lights Edmonton, NBC Sports Network. 10 a.m.: American Le Mans Series, Grand Prix of Mosport, ESPN2. 11 a.m.: IndyCar, Edmonton Indy, NBC Sports Network. Noon: NASCAR, Nationwide Series, STP 300, ESPN.

Baseball • Bend South falls in opener: Bend South’s 11-to 12-year-old baseball team suffered a 1-0 loss to Sprague in Gresham on Saturday, dropping its opener of a double-elimination state tournament. Bend South gave up just two hits on the day, and one was a key home run that gave Sprague the one-run victory. Bend South will take on Ashland at 5 p.m. today in the losers bracket. • Indians’ Hernandez gets visa, suspended 3 weeks: The Cleveland Indians say pitcher Roberto Hernandez has received a visa to return to the United States and will serve a threeweek suspension for age and identity fraud from Major League Baseball before he can rejoin the team. Indians general manager announced Saturday that Hernandez will report to Progressive Field today and address the media. He would be eligible to rejoin the Indians on Aug. 11. Hernandez, formerly known as Fausto Carmona, was arrested in the Dominican Republic in January outside the U.S. consulate, where he had gone to renew his visa. It was discovered that Hernandez is 31 years old, three years older than his listed age.

Soccer • FC Dallas routs Timbers: Jackson had a goal and two assists to help FC Dallas get a season high in scoring in a 5-0 victory over the Portland Timbers on Saturday night. Andrew Jacobson, Scott Sealy, Ruben Luna also scored for Dallas (510-7). David Ferreira also had two assists and Dallas benefited from an own goal by Portland’s Hanyer Mosquera. The Timbers (5-11-4) lost their fourth straight. Portland remained winless in 10 road games (0-8-2) while being outscored 20-2.

Motor sports • IndyCar leader wins pole, but will start 11th: Ryan Hunter-Reay bounced back from a rough opening day at Edmonton by winning the pole in Saturday’s qualifying. But the IndyCar Series points leader will start 11th because he’ll be penalized for an unapproved engine change. The penalty is 10 spots on the starting grid for today’s race. Dario Franchitti will start first because of Hunter-Reay’s penalty. • Alonso gains pole in wet qualifying for German GP: Championship leader Fernando Alonso of Ferrari set the fastest lap in wet conditions to secure pole position for today’s German Grand Prix in Hockenheim, Germany. The Spaniard edged two-time defending champion Sebastian Vettel of Germany and his Red Bull teammate Mark Webber of Australia. Michael Schumacher of Germany was fourth in a Mercedes during qualifying Saturday.

Tennis • Roddick holds off No. 1 seed Isner: No. 4 seed Andy Roddick beat top-seeded John Isner 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-4 in the semifinals of the Atlanta Open on Saturday night. Roddick will

Akron Beacon Journal

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BASEBALL 5 p.m.: MLB, Boston Red Sox at Texas Rangers, ESPN. 7 p.m.: MLB, New York Yankees at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. Nirmaendu Majumdar / AP File Photo

play Luxembourg’s Gilles Muller, who knocked off No. 8 Go Soeda of Japan 6-4, 6-3, for his 32nd ATP World Tour title today. • Top seed Bartoli advances to finals at Carlsbad: Top-seeded Marion Bartoli rebounded from a poor first set for a 1-6, 63, 6-3 victory over qualifier Chan Yung-Jan that sent her to the finals of the Mercury Insurance Open on Saturday night in Carlsbad, Calif. The Frenchwoman will face second-seeded Dominika Cibulkova, a 7-6 (8), 6-1 winner over Russia’s Nadia Petrova in the other semifinal.

Basketball • Bird’s back and U.S. women rout Croatia 109-55: Sylvia Fowles scored 15 points and Candace Parker added 14 to lead a balanced U.S. offense in the Americans’ 109-55 win over Croatia in an exhibition game Saturday in Istanbul. The contest marked the return of Sue Bird to the team. She left the women’s basketball squad after the death of her stepfather and missed the team’s exhibition wins over Brazil and Britain. • Mavs sign 1st-round pick Cunningham: The Dallas Mavericks have signed first-round draft pick Jared Cunningham. Terms were not disclosed. Cunningham was the 24th overall selection in the NBA draft by the Cleveland Cavaliers. He was acquired by the Mavericks last month, along with the draft rights to Bernard James, the 33rd overall pick, and 34th overall pick Jae Crowder, in exchange for guard Kelenna Azubuike and the draft rights to the 17th overall pick in the draft, Tyler Zeller. Cunningham was selected first-team All-Pac 12 as a junior when he averaged 17.9 points, 3.8 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.5 steals per game for Oregon State.

Horse racing • Belmont winner Union Rags retires: Belmont Stakes winner Union Rags has been retired because of a tendon injury in his left front leg. The announcement on Saturday came a week after the colt’s veterinarian had said he would be out with the injury but that his prognosis was “excellent” for a return to the races next year. Russell Jones, bloodstock adviser to the colt’s owner Phyllis Wyeth, says Union Rags is “a pretty attractive stallion prospect” and that there has been a high level of interest in the horse with his retirement.

Olympics • Rogge again rules out minute of silence for Israelis: IOC President Jacques Rogge won’t budge: There will be no minute’s silence for the Israeli victims of the 1972 Munich massacre at the opening ceremony of the London Olympics. Rogge rejected the latest calls Saturday for a special observance to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of 11 Israeli athletes and coaches by Palestinian gunmen at the Munich Games. “We feel that the opening ceremony is an atmosphere that is not fit to remember such a tragic incident,” Rogge said. — From staff and wire reports

Team USA’s gold at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and the Redeem Team’s march to gold in ’08, the culture inside the NBA began to change. Players were no longer adversaries, they were merely business associates forced to play in different cities — for the time being. After the bronze-medal debacle in Greece in ’04, Jerry Colangelo was brought on to overhaul Team USA basketball and he did a magnificent job. He immediately sought long-term commitments from the NBA’s top stars. If they wanted to play in the Olympics, they had to prove it first with participation in events like FIBA’s World Championship. All of it has become a breeding ground for more collusion, more opportunities for players to destroy the small markets across the league. Perhaps this was the underlying reasoning to NBA Commissioner David Stern’s proposal to adopt an under23 rule, which would prohibit Olympic play for anyone over the age of 23. Bryant lashed back that the idea is “stupid,” but a 23and-under team this summer would still feature NBA stars such as Russell Westbrook, Kevin Durant, Kevin Love and Blake Griffin (prior to the knee injury). It would also most assuredly include the Cavs’ Kyrie Irving. Players 23 and under, coincidentally, are typically still locked into their rookie contracts and under their NBA team’s control for a few more years. The idea already has been met with enough resistance to probably keep it from happening, but if Stern pushed through the new rule, it could be just the first step. An under-23 team could evolve into an under-21 model, eventually making Team USA rosters more resemble the team of college amateurs from the 1980s. A significant amount of the time spent renegotiating the league’s collective bargaining agreement was devoted to making it more difficult for stars to leave their current teams and pair up with other stars in new markets. What couldn’t be bargained was the impact the Olympics make on players’ thinking. That isn’t going away as long as the league’s elite stars gather together every couple of years for a month at a time. The Americans should win another gold medal next month, but what will be the price of victory? The fallout and repercussions could be felt across the league for the next four years and beyond.

By Jason Lloyd

Monday

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COMMENTARY

Olympic gold ruining NBA

4 p.m.: NHRA, Mile-High Nationals (same-day tape), ESPN2. BASEBALL 10 a.m.: MLB, Los Angeles Dodgers at New York Mets, TBS. 10:30 a.m.: MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, Root Sports. 5 p.m.: MLB, Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels, ESPN. TENNIS Noon: ATP, Atlanta Open, final, ESPN2. 2 p.m.: WTA, Mercury Insurance Open, final, ESPN2. RODEO 6 p.m.: Bull riding, George Paul Memorial, Root Sports (taped). BASKETBALL 9 p.m.: Men, Argentina vs. United States (same-day tape), ESPN2.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

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In this 2008 file photo, Iowa State’s Guor Marial (175) competes against Colorado’s Jordan Kyle (162) and Texas A& M’s Shadrack Songok (268) during the Big 12 cross country meet at Iowa State’s Cross Country Course in Ames, Iowa. Marial attended high school in Concord, N.H., after fleeing his war-torn birth country. His hometown is now part of South Sudan, but that nation doesn’t have an Olympic team. He qualified for the Olympic marathon, but can’t compete for the United States because he’s not yet a citizen.

Runner without country to compete The Associated Press LONDON — Guor Marial ran for his life to escape a Sudanese child labor camp. Now he will get to run at the Olympics. Marial’s heartwarming rise from a fearful kid who hid in a cave, fled his war-torn homeland and finally arrived in the United States as a refugee took another incredible turn Saturday. Despite having no passport and officially no country — and at one time very little hope — the 28-year-old marathoner was cleared by the IOC to compete at the London Games under the Olympic flag. “The voice of South Sudan has been heard,” Marial told The Associated Press from his home in Flagtaff, Ariz. “The South Sudan has finally got a spot in the world community. Even though I will not carry their flag in this Olympic Games, the country itself is there. “The dream has come true. The hope of South Sudan is alive.” Marial — who was born in what is now South Sudan, a newly independent African country that doesn’t yet have a national Olympic body — was one of four competitors let in at the London Games as independent athletes. Three others from Netherlands Antilles also were allowed to take part under the Olympic flag, but the case of Marial was the first of its kind at the Olympics, IOC spokesman Mark Adams said. “He’s actually running times I’m told wouldn’t get him a medal but could get him in the top 10 to 20,” Adams said. “He’s come from out of nowhere. He’s done two times, one of 2:14 and one of 2:12. Amazing.” Marial posted the Olympic qualifying time in his first ever marathon last year after being a cross-country runner at Iowa State University. He will get a chance to test himself against the best in the world in the Olympic marathon on Aug. 12, the last day of the games. But Marial has less than a week to get to London so he can march at the opening ceremony at the Olympic Stadium and be part of the first day. “I think they (his entourage and backers in the U.S.) will move heaven and earth for him to get here for the ceremony,” Adams said. The IOC’s executive board gave Marial a chance after he didn’t qualify for Sudan, South Sudan or the United States under its rules. He’s a permanent resident of the U.S. after arriving as a refugee when he was a kid, but doesn’t yet have American citizenship. He was ready to head out to

train when he heard he could go to the Olympics. “I was getting ready to go for a run,” Marial said. “Wow. This is so exciting. It’s hard to describe. I’m speechless. The body temperature is up. I have to train like an Olympian now.” He told AP he didn’t want to represent Sudan because he lost 28 family members to violence or disease during the civil unrest that left the country devastated and eventually led to the south splitting from Sudan last year. Marial said he’d ask his father — who still lives in South Sudan — to travel to the nearest city to watch him on TV if he got to compete at the Olympics. Two decades ago, Marial escaped from the labor camp in Sudan when he was 8, running away under darkness with another child about a week after he was kidnapped by gunmen and forced to work. The pair hid in a cave until dawn, he said, and then followed the path of the sun. Marial lived in Egypt before eventually reaching the United States. “I used to hate running. I was running back home to save my life,” he told the AP in an interview Friday. But he was good at it, grew to like it, and now loves it. At 16, Marial joined the Concord High School track team in New Hampshire after encouragement from a gym teacher who saw he never got winded during any sports activities. “I think there’s something that can make you tired,” he said the teacher told him. He earned an athletic scholarship to Iowa State, becoming an All-American in crosscountry in his junior year. Marial qualified, amazingly, for the Olympics in his first 26.2-mile event, running 2 hours, 14 minutes, 32 seconds at the 2011 Twin Cities marathon — inside the Olympic qualifying time. He has since run faster. But despite obvious natural ability, he still needed help to go to the Olympics. On Friday, a U.S. senator from New Hampshire lent support to his bid. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen sent a letter to the International Olympic Committee appealing for Marial to compete under the Olympic flag. “When you hear about his amazing personal story, what he has overcome, you just feel like the Olympic committee ought to look at his situation and figure out a way to accommodate him,” Shaheen said. They did, and Marial can now run at the Olympics in London — and run as fast as he can for the right reasons.

e had finished interviews with Team USA players, wrote our stories for the day and were picking over a latenight dinner at the hotel bar two blocks east of the Las Vegas strip last week when a prominent New York writer first mentioned it. “The Olympics,” he said, “are ruining the NBA.” Upon further review, he’s right. The formation of the NBA’s superpower teams can inevitably be traced back to the Olympics, where superstars from across the league gather in hotels for about a month — with plenty of down time involved to hatch these plans of some day playing together on the same team. It has been established that LeBron James, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade first created the idea of one day playing together during the march of the Americans’ “Redeem Team” to gold at Beijing in 2008. Now Deron Williams is conceding he and Dwight Howard held similar discussions in Beijing. They would’ve pulled it off and could’ve been teammates next season in Brooklyn, but Howard inexplicably waived his right to free agency this summer at the NBA’s trade deadline in March. Now as the Americans prepare for the London Olympics, it’s fair to wonder who is whispering in whose ear now? Who is recruiting Chris Paul? One of the five best point guards in the NBA will be a free agent next summer. Think Carmelo Anthony and Tyson Chandler have mentioned how good he’d look in a Knicks uniform? When FIBA changed its rules in 1989 and opened Olympic competition to professionals, no one could have predicted this. The 1992 Dream Team was the most beautiful collection of basketball talent ever assembled on a single roster — despite Kobe Bryant’s delusional belief that this summer’s version could actually beat that one. This team couldn’t come within 20 points of Michael Jordan, Larry Bird and Magic Johnson, but that’s a debate for later. What made the Dream Team so unique was how they didn’t particularly like one another — going so far as to keep Isaiah Thomas off the team because if they could agree on anything, it’s that no one could stand him. This was a team that practiced harder than they played, a team of legends who couldn’t bear the idea of getting shown up in practice against one another for fear of the damage it would cause to their pride and street cred. But somewhere between

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

AL Boxscores Rangers 9, Angels 2 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton lf Beltre 3b Mi.Young 1b N.Cruz rf Napoli dh Torrealba c Gentry cf Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 4 42

R 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 2 9

H 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 15

BI 3 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 9

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2

American League SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .274 .292 .298 .319 .268 .263 .236 .225 .344

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Trout cf-lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .354 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .267 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .278 Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Trumbo lf-1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .303 K.Morales dh 4 0 1 0 0 3 .277 Callaspo 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .252 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .273 Aybar ss 2 1 0 0 1 1 .257 M.Izturis ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Hester c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .217 a-Calhoun ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Bo.Wilson c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Totals 30 2 4 2 4 13 Texas 151 000 020 — 9 15 0 Los Angeles 001 010 000 — 2 4 0 a-grounded out for Hester in the 7th. LOB—Texas 8, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Kinsler (27), Torrealba (8), Gentry (10). HR—Napoli (13), off E.Santana; Torrealba (3), off E.Santana; Beltre (18), off E.Santana; Napoli (14), off D.Carpenter; Kinsler (11), off Takahashi. SB—N.Cruz (7), Trout (31), H.Kendrick (7). Texas Darvish W, 11-6 Ogando Nathan Los Angeles E.Santana L, 4-10 D.Carpenter Hawkins Takahashi

IP 7 1 1 IP 1 2-3 4 1 1-3 2

H 3 0 1 H 8 3 2 2

R 2 0 0 R 6 1 0 2

ER BB SO NP ERA 2 4 11 117 3.88 0 0 2 12 2.17 0 0 0 20 2.11 ER BB SO NP ERA 6 0 0 47 6.00 1 0 2 52 3.55 0 1 1 31 1.90 2 1 0 29 4.37

Orioles 3, Indians 1 Baltimore Markakis rf Hardy ss Thome dh Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Betemit 3b C.Davis lf En.Chavez lf Mar.Reynolds 1b Flaherty 2b Quintanilla 2b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 3 0 32

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

H 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 9

Avg. .273 .217 .275 .291 .249 .251 .261 .176 .208 .200 ---

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .296 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .276 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Brantley cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295 C.Santana c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .225 Hafner dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Damon lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Kotchman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Hannahan 3b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .247 Totals 34 1 7 1 1 4 Baltimore 000 000 210 — 3 6 0 Cleveland 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 LOB—Baltimore 3, Cleveland 7. 2B—Wieters (16), C.Santana (14). HR—Thome (2), off McAllister; Flaherty (4), off McAllister; Choo (11), off Tillman. Baltimore Tillman W, 2-1 Patton H, 7 Strop H, 16 Johnson S, 29-31 Cleveland McAllister L, 4-2 Sipp Pestano

IP 6 2-3 1-3 1 1 IP 7 2-3 1-3 1

H 6 0 0 1 H 5 1 0

R 1 0 0 0 R 3 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 1 1 4 116 1.15 0 0 0 2 3.19 0 0 0 14 1.47 0 0 0 15 2.38 ER BB SO NP ERA 3 0 6 95 3.21 0 1 1 10 5.46 0 0 2 9 1.56

Athletics 2, Yankees 1 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Teixeira 1b Ibanez lf a-An.Jones ph Er.Chavez dh R.Martin c Wise rf Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 1 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 8

Avg. .311 .246 .273 .318 .256 .243 .231 .279 .180 .263

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .243 J.Weeks 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Reddick dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Cespedes lf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .306 Moss rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Carter 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .313 Inge 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .200 Sogard ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .145 D.Norris c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .169 Totals 26 2 4 2 2 6 New York 000 100 000 — 1 6 0 Oakland 000 100 01x — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Ibanez in the 9th. LOB—New York 5, Oakland 2. HR—Cespedes (13), off P.Hughes; Inge (9), off P.Hughes. SB— Al.Rodriguez (11), D.Norris (3). DP—New York 1; Oakland 1. New York P.Hughes L, 9-8 Logan Oakland J.Parker W, 7-4 Doolittle S, 1-2

IP 7 2-3 1-3 IP 8 1

H 4 0 H 5 1

R 2 0 R 1 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 2 2 6 117 4.09 0 0 0 4 3.55 ER BB SO NP ERA 1 1 5 101 3.00 0 0 3 21 1.86

Tigers 7, White Sox 1 Chicago De Aza cf Youkilis 3b A.Dunn dh Konerko 1b Rios rf Pierzynski c Viciedo lf Al.Ramirez ss Beckham 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .280 .251 .202 .321 .311 .286 .257 .266 .234

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 5 0 2 4 0 1 .317 Raburn lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .172 Mi.Cabrera 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .328 Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .307 D.Young dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Jh.Peralta ss 3 2 2 0 1 0 .275 Boesch rf 3 1 1 3 0 2 .251 D.Kelly rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Laird c 3 2 2 0 1 0 .299 Worth 2b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .215 Totals 33 7 10 7 5 7 Chicago 000 010 000 — 1 5 0 Detroit 000 023 02x — 7 10 0 LOB—Chicago 2, Detroit 7. 2B—A.Jackson (18), Raburn (13). HR—Boesch (10), off Sale. SB— Mi.Cabrera (4). Chicago Sale L, 11-3 Axelrod Detroit Porcello W, 7-5 Benoit

IP 7 1 IP 8 1

H 7 3 H 5 0

R 5 2 R 1 0

ER BB SO NP 5 4 6 90 2 1 1 29 ER BB SO NP 1 0 4 94 0 0 1 10

ERA 2.37 5.63 ERA 4.40 3.00

Royals 7, Twins 3 Minnesota Span cf Mastroianni rf Revere rf-cf Mauer c Willingham dh Doumit lf Parmelee 1b Dozier ss A.Casilla 2b J.Carroll 3b Totals

AB 4 0 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 31

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

H 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 8

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 5

Avg. .276 .276 .311 .334 .279 .284 .206 .235 .229 .237

Kansas City A.Gordon lf A.Escobar ss Butler dh

AB 5 5 5

R 2 1 1

H 3 2 2

BI 1 0 0

BB 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0

Avg. .292 .314 .294

New York Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Toronto

W 57 50 49 48 47

L 37 44 46 47 47

Detroit Chicago Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota

W 51 50 47 40 39

L 44 44 47 53 55

Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 56 51 50 41

L 37 44 44 55

East Division Pct GB WCGB .606 — — .532 7 — .516 8½ 1½ .505 9½ 2½ .500 10 3 Central Division Pct GB WCGB .537 — — .532 ½ — .500 3½ 3 .430 10 9½ .415 11½ 11 West Division Pct GB WCGB .602 — — .537 6 — .532 6½ — .427 16½ 10

Saturday’s Games Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 1 Texas 9, L.A. Angels 2 Baltimore 3, Cleveland 1 Kansas City 7, Minnesota 3 Seattle 2, Tampa Bay 1 Toronto 7, Boston 3 Oakland 2, N.Y. Yankees 1

National League

L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 5-5 5-5

Str Home Away L-3 30-17 27-20 W-4 23-22 27-22 L-1 28-24 21-22 L-2 25-27 23-20 W-2 25-20 22-27

L10 8-2 3-7 3-7 3-7 3-7

Str Home Away W-4 27-21 24-23 L-4 24-22 26-22 L-3 24-23 23-24 W-1 17-29 23-24 L-1 19-30 20-25

L10 6-4 4-6 8-2 5-5

Str Home Away W-1 29-16 27-21 L-1 26-19 25-25 W-4 28-21 22-23 W-1 17-27 24-28

Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Humber 4-4) at Detroit (Ja.Turner 0-1), 10:05 a.m. Toronto (H.Alvarez 5-7) at Boston (Lester 5-7), 10:35 a.m. Seattle (Beavan 4-6) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore 6-6), 10:40 a.m. Minnesota (Deduno 0-0) at Kansas City (Guthrie 0-0), 11:10 a.m. Baltimore (Britton 0-0) at Cleveland (Tomlin 5-6),12:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 10-3) at Oakland (B.Colon 6-8), 1:05 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 12-4) at L.A. Angels (Haren 6-8), 5:05 p.m.

Washington Atlanta New York Miami Philadelphia

W 54 52 47 44 41

L 39 42 47 50 54

Cincinnati Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Houston

W 54 53 49 44 38 34

L 40 40 45 49 55 61

San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado

W 53 51 46 40 36

L 41 44 48 56 57

East Division Pct GB WCGB .581 — — .553 2½ — .500 7½ 5 .468 10½ 8 .432 14 11½ Central Division Pct GB WCGB .574 — — .570 ½ — .521 5 3 .473 9½ 7½ .409 15½ 13½ .358 20½ 18½ West Division Pct GB WCGB .564 — — .537 2½ 1½ .489 7 6 .417 14 13 .387 16½ 15½

Saturday’s Games Atlanta 4, Washington 0, 1st game L.A. Dodgers 8, N.Y. Mets 5 San Francisco 6, Philadelphia 5, 10 innings Washington 5, Atlanta 2, 2nd game Pittsburgh 5, Miami 1 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 2 St. Louis 12, Chicago Cubs 0 Arizona 12, Houston 3 Colorado 8, San Diego 6, 12 innings

L10 5-5 7-3 2-8 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-1 27-19 27-20 L-1 24-24 28-18 L-2 26-22 21-25 L-4 24-24 20-26 L-3 17-29 24-25

L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 6-4 1-9

Str Home Away W-3 30-18 24-22 W-4 31-14 22-26 W-2 25-20 24-25 L-2 26-23 18-26 L-2 24-21 14-34 L-5 24-21 10-40

L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 29-16 24-25 W-3 29-20 22-24 W-2 25-21 21-27 L-1 21-29 19-27 W-1 20-29 16-28

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-6) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-4), 10:10 a.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 3-3) at Cincinnati (Cueto 11-5), 10:10 a.m. Atlanta (Jurrjens 3-3) at Washington (Detwiler 4-3), 10:35 a.m. Miami (A.Sanchez 5-6) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-2), 10:35 a.m. San Francisco (Zito 8-6) at Philadelphia (Blanton 8-8), 10:35 a.m. Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 4-4) at St. Louis (Lynn 11-4), 11:15 a.m. Colorado (Friedrich 5-7) at San Diego (Ohlendorf 3-0), 1:05 p.m. Houston (Lyles 2-6) at Arizona (Collmenter 1-2), 1:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Tigers 7, White Sox 1: DETROIT — Rick Porcello pitched brilliantly into the ninth inning, and Detroit took over first place in the AL Central with a victory over Chicago. • Athletics 2, Yankees 1: OAKLAND, Calif. — Brandon Inge and Yoenis Cespedes homered, Jarrod Parker shut down one of baseball’s best lineups for eight innings and Oakland beat the New York for the Athletics’ fourth straight win. • Rangers 9, Angels 2: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mike Napoli homered twice against his former team, Yu Darvish struck out 11 over seven strong innings, and Texas battered struggling Los Angeles starter Ervin Santana in the victory. • Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 3: BOSTON — Edwin Encarnacion tied the game with a two-run homer in the sixth, then J.P. Arencibia gave Toronto the lead with a seventh-inning solo shot and the Blue Jays beat Boston. • Royals 7, Twins 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Lorenzo Cain drove in three runs and Alex Gordon had three hits and scored two runs as Kansas City beat Minnesota. Cain delivered run-producing singles in the first and fifth innings and he had an RBI double in the seventh. Cain’s three RBIs matched a career high. • Mariners 2, Rays 1: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jason Vargas took a shutout into the seventh inning, Michael Saunders had two RBIs and Seattle beat Tampa Bay. • Orioles 3, Indians 1: CLEVELAND — Jim Thome’s two-run homer in the seventh inning led Baltimore to its fourth straight victory. Thome, who passed Sammy Sosa for seventh place on the career list Friday, hit his 611th and second with Baltimore since being acquired from Philadelphia on July 1 off Zach McAllister.

• Giants 6, Phillies 5: PHILADELPHIA — Gregor Blanco drove in the tiebreaking run with a drag bunt single in the 10th and San Francisco beat Philadelphia in a game where All-Star pitchers Cole Hamels and Matt Cain hit homers in the same inning. • Braves 4-2, Nationals 0-5: WASHINGTON — Bryce Harper returned from an ankle injury to single and score as a pinch-hitter, and Roger Bernadina had a tiebreaking hit in the seventh inning as Washington earned a split of the day-night doubleheader. • Dodgers 8, Mets 5: NEW YORK — Juan Uribe broke out of a long slump with a homer and four RBIs for Los Angeles and Chris Capuano pitched seven solid innings against his former team. • Reds 6, Brewers 2: CINCINNATI — Ryan Ludwick and Brandon Phillips hit two-run homers to lead Cincinnati over Milwaukee. • Cardinals 12, Cubs 0: ST. LOUIS — Jake Westbrook allowed three hits over seven innings and St. Louis backed him by tying a 76-year-old major league record with seven doubles. • Pirates 5, Marlins 1: PITTSBURGH — A.J. Burnett remained undefeated at home by pitching 72⁄3 strong innings and Pittsburgh matched a season high with its fourth consecutive win. • Diamondbacks 12, Astros 3: PHOENIX — Jason Kubel became the seventh player in Diamondbacks’ history to homer three times in a game, driving in six runs as Arizona dominated Houston for the second straight game. • Rockies 8, Padres 6: SAN DIEGO — Jordan Pacheco drove in four runs, including the go-ahead score in the 12th inning, and Michael Cuddyer tied a career high with four hits as Colorado outlasted San Diego.

L.Cain cf 4 0 3 3 0 0 .326 1-J.Dyson pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .249 S.Perez c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .355 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .269 Francoeur rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .226 Y.Betancourt 2b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .241 2-Getz pr-2b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .297 Totals 37 7 16 7 2 2 Minnesota 000 200 100 — 3 8 2 Kansas City 110 020 12x — 7 16 0 1-ran for L.Cain in the 7th. 2-ran for Y.Betancourt in the 8th. E—A.Casilla (6), Parmelee (2). LOB—Minnesota 5, Kansas City 8. 2B—J.Carroll (12), L.Cain (3), Francoeur (16), Y.Betancourt (13). 3B—Revere (3). DP—Minnesota 5; Kansas City 3. Minnesota Diamond L, 8-4 Gray Duensing Al.Burnett Kansas City Mendoza W, 4-6 Mijares H, 11 Crow S, 2-6

IP 6 2-3 2-3 2-3 IP 6 1-3 2-3 2

H 10 2 3 1 H 7 1 0

R 4 1 2 0 R 3 0 0

ER BB SO NP 4 2 2 96 1 0 0 16 2 0 0 17 0 0 0 8 ER BB SO NP 3 2 4 93 0 0 0 19 0 0 1 15

ERA 3.16 4.73 5.26 3.11 ERA 4.31 1.72 3.89

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 3 Toronto Gose rf a-R.Davis ph-rf Lawrie 3b Rasmus cf Encarnacion 1b Lind dh Arencibia c K.Johnson 2b Y.Escobar ss Snider lf Totals

AB 3 1 3 3 3 5 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 7

H 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 7

BI 0 0 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 5

Avg. .091 .249 .278 .245 .296 .233 .238 .239 .249 .286

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Nava rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .255 C.Crawford lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .318 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .294 C.Ross dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .274 Saltalamacchia c 4 1 1 3 0 1 .228 Middlebrooks 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .285 Sweeney cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Ciriaco ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .364 Totals 32 3 5 3 2 7 Toronto 001 002 301 — 7 7 1 Boston 030 000 000 — 3 5 2 a-walked for Gose in the 7th. E—Y.Escobar (9), Ciriaco (1), Middlebrooks (9). LOB—Toronto 7, Boston 4. 2B—R.Davis (10), K.Johnson (10), Y.Escobar (12), C.Ross (17). HR—Encarnacion (26), off A.Cook; Arencibia (14), off A.Cook; Saltalamacchia (18), off Villanueva. SB— R.Davis (25), Y.Escobar (3), Ciriaco (4). Toronto Villanueva W, 5-0 Happ H, 1 Oliver H, 11 Lyon Boston A.Cook L, 2-3 F.Morales Albers A.Miller Padilla Tazawa

IP 6 1-3 2-3 1 1 IP 6 1-3 1-3 0 1-3 1 1

H 4 0 1 0 H 4 0 1 0 1 1

R 3 0 0 0 R 5 1 0 0 0 1

ER BB SO NP ERA 3 2 5 101 2.86 0 0 0 5 0.00 0 0 1 16 1.23 0 0 1 11 0.00 ER BB SO NP ERA 3 1 1 86 3.50 1 1 1 10 3.25 0 2 0 18 2.21 0 0 1 3 2.74 0 0 2 16 3.60 1 1 0 19 1.46

Mariners 2, Rays 1 Seattle Ackley 2b I.Suzuki rf C.Wells lf Jaso c Seager 3b M.Saunders cf Smoak 1b Peguero dh Kawasaki ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 8

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2

BB 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 2 2 1 1 1 3 2 1 15

Avg. .226 .264 .261 .287 .243 .260 .192 .238 .200

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Upton cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .250 C.Pena 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .193 Zobrist 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .252 Keppinger 3b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .325 Joyce rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Matsui dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .149 De.Jennings lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .238 Lobaton c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .224 S.Rodriguez ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 31 1 7 0 3 9 Seattle 200 000 000 — 2 8 1 Tampa Bay 000 000 100 — 1 7 0 E—I.Suzuki (1). LOB—Seattle 10, Tampa Bay 7. DP—Seattle 2. Seattle IP Vargas W, 10-7 6 Kelley H, 4 2-3 O.Perez H, 1 2-3 League H, 4 2-3 Wilhelmsen S, 9-11 1 Tampa Bay IP Cobb L, 4-7 2 C.Ramos 4 Badenhop 1 Jo.Peralta 1 W.Davis 1

H 7 0 0 0 0 H 3 2 1 0 2

R 1 0 0 0 0 R 2 0 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 3 5 108 3.91 0 0 0 2 3.54 0 0 2 8 3.00 0 0 0 8 2.98 0 0 2 14 2.40 ER BB SO NP ERA 2 2 3 52 5.05 0 0 6 42 1.46 0 1 1 15 3.54 0 0 3 14 4.26 0 1 2 30 2.70

NL Boxscores Giants 6, Phillies 5 (10 innings) San Francisco Schierholtz rf Theriot 2b Me.Cabrera lf Posey c Sandoval 3b Pagan cf G.Blanco cf Arias ss Belt 1b M.Cain p a-B.Crawford ph Ja.Lopez p Romo p b-Christian ph S.Casilla p Totals

AB 5 4 3 5 5 3 1 4 5 3 1 0 0 1 0 40

R 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

H 1 0 2 4 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12

BI 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .248 .274 .357 .314 .296 .282 .249 .250 .237 .156 .239 ----.172 .000

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 1 0 0 1 1 .255 Victorino cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Utley 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .233 Howard 1b 4 1 1 3 0 0 .207 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .347 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .272 Pierre lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .305 Mayberry lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Fontenot 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .301 Polanco 3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Hamels p 3 1 1 1 0 0 .268 Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Totals 33 5 5 5 3 5 San Francisco 003 010 010 1 — 6 12 0 Philadelphia 101 003 000 0 — 5 5 0 a-popped out for M.Cain in the 9th. b-struck out for Romo in the 10th. c-struck out for Papelbon in the 10th. LOB—San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 2. 2B—Schierholtz (3), Posey (20), Pagan (16). HR—M.Cain (1), off Hamels; Posey (12), off Hamels; Me.Cabrera (10), off Hamels; Utley (3), off M.Cain; Hamels (1), off M.Cain; Howard (3), off M.Cain. SB—Theriot (10). DP—San Francisco 2; Philadelphia 1. San Francisco IP M.Cain 8 Ja.Lopez 1-3 Romo W, 3-1 2-3 S.Casilla S, 24-30 1 Philadelphia IP Hamels 7 2-3 Bastardo 1-3 Papelbon L, 2-4 2

H 5 0 0 0 H 10 0 2

R 5 0 0 0 R 5 0 1

ER BB SO NP ERA 5 2 4 97 2.74 0 0 0 7 3.66 0 0 0 7 0.64 0 1 1 14 3.25 ER BB SO NP ERA 5 3 6 128 3.23 0 0 0 4 4.99 1 1 2 36 3.46

Dodgers 8, Mets 5 Los Angeles Abreu lf Gwynn Jr. lf A.Kennedy 2b Kemp cf Ethier rf Loney 1b Uribe 3b L.Cruz ss Treanor c Capuano p b-J.Rivera ph Belisario p Jansen p Totals

AB 4 1 4 4 4 5 3 4 4 3 1 0 0 37

R 0 0 2 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 0 0 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 1 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .253 .239 .239 .362 .295 .248 .196 .250 .203 .094 .259 -----

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .313 An.Torres cf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .222 D.Wright 3b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .346 Hairston rf-lf 5 1 2 1 0 2 .256 Bay lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .196 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Dan.Murphy ph-2b1 1 1 1 0 0 .299 I.Davis 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .207 R.Cedeno 2b 3 1 2 1 0 1 .266 d-Nieuwenhuis ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .259 Dickey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Nickeas c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .173 e-Thole ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Batista p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Valdespin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .293 Hefner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Duda rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Totals 36 5 10 5 3 10 Los Angeles 103 110 002 — 8 11 0 New York 002 001 020 — 5 10 0 a-singled for Batista in the 3rd. b-singled for Capuano in the 8th. c-tripled for Byrdak in the 8th. dgrounded out for R.Cedeno in the 8th. e-grounded out for Nickeas in the 8th. LOB—Los Angeles 8, New York 8. 2B—Uribe (9), Treanor (3), R.Cedeno (6). 3B—Kemp (2), Dan. Murphy (3). HR—Uribe (2), off Dickey; R.Cedeno (2), off Capuano. Los Angeles Capuano W, 10-5 Belisario H, 15 Jansen S, 18-23 New York Batista L, 1-3 Hefner Edgin Byrdak Dickey

IP 7 1 1 IP 3 2 2 1 1

H 8 2 0 H 5 2 1 1 2

R 3 2 0 R 4 2 0 0 2

ER BB SO NP 3 1 9 98 2 0 0 13 0 2 1 22 ER BB SO NP 4 3 2 81 2 2 1 46 0 1 3 35 0 0 2 12 2 0 0 15

ERA 2.81 2.57 1.97 ERA 4.82 5.85 5.06 4.05 2.84

Braves 4, Nationals 0 First Game Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Heyward rf F.Freeman 1b McCann c Uggla 2b J.Francisco 3b Janish ss Sheets p a-Hinske ph Medlen p c-C.Jones ph Durbin p Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 2 4 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 34

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

H 2 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3

BB 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 1 1 0 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .305 .308 .269 .276 .244 .220 .227 .182 .000 .210 .200 .313 ---

Washington Lombardozzi lf Harper cf Bernadina cf Zimmerman 3b Morse rf LaRoche 1b Desmond ss Espinosa 2b Flores c E.Jackson p

AB 4 1 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 2

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 1

Avg. .273 .268 .264 .265 .297 .255 .288 .243 .227 .161

b-T.Moore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .302 H.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 0 6 0 3 8 Atlanta 010 000 012 — 4 9 1 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-grounded out for Sheets in the 7th. b-grounded out for E.Jackson in the 7th. c-homered for Medlen in the 9th. E—McCann (2). LOB—Atlanta 8, Washington 6. HR—McCann (16), off E.Jackson; C.Jones (9), off Mattheus. SB—Bourn 2 (28), Prado (12), Bernadina (10), Desmond (15). Atlanta Sheets W, 2-0 Medlen H, 7 Durbin Washington E.Jackson L, 5-6 H.Rodriguez Mattheus Mic.Gonzalez

IP 6 2 1 IP 7 0 1 2-3 1-3

H 5 1 0 H 5 1 3 0

R 0 0 0 R 1 1 2 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 3 6 91 0.00 0 0 1 21 2.68 0 0 1 11 3.58 ER BB SO NP ERA 1 2 9 111 3.73 1 2 0 18 4.85 2 1 1 30 2.14 0 0 0 3 2.20

Nationals 5, Braves 2 Second Game Atlanta Bourn cf Prado lf Heyward rf C.Jones 3b F.Freeman 1b Uggla 2b D.Ross c Janish ss d-Hinske ph Delgado p a-J.Francisco ph C.Martinez p Varvaro p e-McCann ph Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 2 3 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 30

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .304 .305 .266 .313 .279 .219 .279 .200 .208 .240 .225 .000 --.243

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lombardozzi lf-2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Bernadina cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .278 Zimmerman 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .268 Morse rf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .291 LaRoche 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Desmond ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 .286 S.Burnett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Harper ph-rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .270 Espinosa 2b-ss 3 2 1 1 1 1 .244 Leon c 3 1 2 0 0 0 .444 Lannan p 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 b-DeRosa ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 5 10 3 1 5 Atlanta 200 000 000 — 2 5 1 Washington 000 011 12x — 5 10 0 a-struck out for Delgado in the 7th. b-sacrificed for Lannan in the 7th. c-singled for S.Burnett in the 8th. d-flied out for Janish in the 9th. e-struck out for Varvaro in the 9th. E—Janish (1). LOB—Atlanta 7, Washington 8. 2B—C.Jones (12), Janish (2). SB—Harper (12). Atlanta Delgado C.Martinez L, 4-2 Varvaro Washington Lannan W, 1-0 S.Burnett H, 20 Clippard S, 16-19

IP 6 1 2-3 1-3 IP 7 1 1

H 6 4 0 H 5 0 0

R 2 3 0 R 2 0 0

ER BB SO NP 2 1 4 99 2 0 1 39 0 0 0 17 ER BB SO NP 2 2 3 98 0 0 2 20 0 1 1 21

ERA 4.42 4.21 5.17 ERA 2.57 2.21 3.12

Cardinals 12, Cubs 0 Chicago AB R DeJesus cf 3 0 d-Campana ph-cf 0 0 S.Castro ss 4 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 A.Soriano lf 3 0 e-Clevenger ph 1 0 LaHair rf 3 0 Soto c 4 0 Barney 2b 3 0 Dolis p 0 0 Valbuena 3b-2b 1 0 c-Je.Baker ph-2b 1 0 Garza p 1 0 Germano p 0 0 Russell p 0 0 Corpas p 0 0 Mather 3b 1 0 Totals 29 0

H 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .268 .270 .282 .329 .272 .265 .279 .186 .265 --.223 .289 .067 --.000 --.230

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 4 2 2 1 1 0 .279 Descalso ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .225 Schumaker 2b-rf 4 2 2 3 0 0 .321 Holliday lf 3 1 1 2 2 1 .319 Browning p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --V.Marte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Beltran rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .293 1-Greene pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Y.Molina c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .306 b-T.Cruz ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Berkman 1b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Freese 3b 5 2 3 2 0 1 .304 Jay cf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .289 Westbrook p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .188 a-Craig ph 2 2 2 1 0 0 .305 M.Carpenter lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Totals 39 12 16 12 5 6 Chicago 000 000 0 00 — 0 4 1 St. Louis 000 000 (12)0x — 12 16 0 a-doubled for Westbrook in the 7th. b-struck out for Y.Molina in the 7th. c-fouled out for Valbuena in the 8th. d-walked for DeJesus in the 8th. e-flied out for A.Soriano in the 9th. E—S.Castro (14). LOB—Chicago 6, St. Louis 9. 2B—Schumaker (11), Holliday (23), Beltran (13), Berkman (7), Freese 2 (17), Jay (7), Craig 2 (16). 3B—Schumaker (3). SB—Berkman (2). Chicago Garza Germano L, 0-1 Russell Corpas Dolis St. Louis Westbrook W, 8-8 Browning V.Marte Rosenthal

IP 3 3 2-3 0 1 1-3 IP 7 2-3 1-3 1

H 2 4 4 3 3 H 3 0 0 1

R 0 1 6 4 1 R 0 0 0 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 0 2 3 33 3.91 1 0 1 43 3.00 6 2 0 25 3.63 4 1 0 16 3.50 1 0 2 29 6.44 ER BB SO NP ERA 0 2 5 100 3.60 0 1 0 8 2.45 0 0 0 1 4.50 0 0 0 10 0.00

Reds 6, Brewers 2 Milwaukee Aoki cf-rf Ishikawa 1b c-C.Gomez ph-cf Braun lf Ar.Ramirez 3b Hart rf-1b R.Weeks 2b M.Maldonado c Bianchi ss Gallardo p Axford p b-C.Izturis ph Veras p L.Hernandez p Totals

AB 4 3 1 4 4 3 3 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .283 .241 .233 .310 .274 .260 .194 .273 .000 .075 --.232 --.000

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Cozart ss 3 2 1 0 1 0 .246 B.Phillips 2b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .289 Bruce rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .247 Rolen 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .209 Ludwick lf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .237 Frazier 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .278 Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hanigan c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .271 Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .182 a-Paul ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cairo 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .137 Totals 32 6 10 6 2 3 Milwaukee 000 101 000 — 2 6 1 Cincinnati 400 000 20x — 6 10 0 a-grounded out for Arroyo in the 6th. b-singled for Axford in the 7th. c-grounded out for Ishikawa in the 8th. E—M.Maldonado (3). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 5. 2B—Ishikawa 2 (7), Ar.Ramirez (30), Bruce (24). 3B—Rolen (1). HR—Ludwick (15), off Gallardo; B.Phillips (12), off Veras. SB—Bruce (6). Milwaukee Gallardo L, 8-7 Axford

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 5 2-3 9 4 4 0 1 111 3.72 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 5.12

Veras L.Hernandez Cincinnati Arroyo W, 5-6 Arredondo H, 7 Marshall H, 13 LeCure Ondrusek

1 1 IP 6 2-3 2-3 2-3 1

1 0 H 5 1 0 0 0

2 0 R 2 0 0 0 0

2 1 1 25 0 0 1 9 ER BB SO NP 2 2 6 86 0 0 1 13 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 11

4.69 5.13 ERA 3.98 2.29 2.78 3.41 2.78

Pirates 5, Marlins 1 Miami Reyes ss Bonifacio cf Ca.Lee 1b Morrison lf Ruggiano rf Dobbs 3b Infante 2b J.Buck c Zambrano p Gaudin p a-Cousins ph H.Bell p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 1 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .268 .271 .279 .242 .364 .305 .289 .179 .161 .000 .174 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Presley lf 3 2 0 0 2 0 .234 Walker 2b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .301 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .371 G.Jones rf 2 0 0 2 2 0 .270 G.Hernandez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 McGehee 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .241 P.Alvarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Barajas c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .215 Barmes ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .207 Lincoln p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 A.J.Burnett p 0 1 0 0 1 0 .069 Mercer ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Totals 26 5 5 4 8 8 Miami 010 000 000 — 1 9 1 Pittsburgh 100 400 00x — 5 5 0 a-grounded out for Gaudin in the 8th. E—J.Buck (6). LOB—Miami 7, Pittsburgh 10. 2B—Reyes (19), Morrison (15), Walker (22). 3B—Mercer (1). HR—Ruggiano (7), off A.J.Burnett. SB—Bonifacio (25). Miami Zambrano L, 5-8 Gaudin H.Bell Pittsburgh Burnett W, 11-3 Lincoln S, 1-2

IP 3 1-3 3 2-3 1 IP 7 2-3 1 1-3

H 3 1 1 H 8 1

R 5 0 0 R 1 0

ER BB SO NP ERA 4 6 2 97 4.42 0 1 5 50 4.87 0 1 1 15 6.05 ER BB SO NP ERA 1 1 3 104 3.59 0 0 3 17 2.86

Diamondbacks 12, Astros 3 Houston AB R Altuve 2b 4 1 Bixler ss 5 0 Maxwell cf 4 1 J.D.Martinez lf 3 0 B.Francisco rf 4 0 M.Downs 1b 4 0 C.Johnson 3b 4 1 C.Snyder c 3 0 Keuchel p 2 0 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 Del Rosario p 0 0 a-Ma.Gonzalez ph 1 0 W.Lopez p 0 0 R.Cruz p 0 0 c-Corporan ph 1 0 Totals 35 3

H 2 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 2 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .289 .198 .228 .239 .200 .206 .265 .175 .000 ----.287 ----.364

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 4 0 3 3 0 0 .304 A.Hill 2b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .309 b-R.Wheeler ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Kubel lf 5 3 3 6 0 2 .294 Goldschmidt 1b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .297 J.Upton rf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .274 G.Parra rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 M.Montero c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268 H.Blanco c 1 1 1 1 0 0 .207 C.Young cf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .212 R.Roberts 3b-2b 3 2 1 0 2 0 .249 Miley p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .306 Saito p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Breslow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 12 14 12 8 3 Houston 000 100 011 — 3 8 1 Arizona 200 521 02x — 12 14 1 a-grounded out for Del Rosario in the 7th. bgrounded out for A.Hill in the 7th. c-singled for R.Cruz in the 9th. E—Keuchel (1), H.Blanco (2). LOB—Houston 8, Arizona 8. 2B—Altuve (22), Maxwell (7), C.Johnson (18), Goldschmidt (29), H.Blanco (3), C.Young 2 (14). 3B—J.Upton (3). HR—Kubel 2 (19), off Keuchel 2; Kubel (20), off Del Rosario. SB—C.Young 2 (5), R.Roberts 2 (6). Houston Keuchel L, 1-2 Fe.Rodriguez Del Rosario W.Lopez R.Cruz Arizona Miley W, 11-5 Saito Breslow

IP 3 1-3 1 2-3 1 1 1 IP 7 1 1

H 7 2 1 1 3 H 4 1 3

R 7 2 1 0 2 R 1 1 1

ER BB SO NP ERA 6 4 1 79 4.03 2 2 0 29 6.38 1 2 0 29 6.57 0 0 1 11 2.23 2 0 1 20 7.16 ER BB SO NP ERA 1 2 9 107 3.02 0 1 0 23 0.00 1 0 1 30 2.90

Rockies 8, Padres 6 (12 innings) Colorado Fowler cf Scutaro 2b C.Gonzalez lf Cuddyer 1b-rf Colvin rf C.Torres p R.Betancourt p Pacheco 3b-1b Ra.Hernandez c Rutledge ss Francis p a-E.Young ph Ottavino p Brothers p c-A.Brown ph Belisle p LeMahieu 3b Totals

AB 6 6 6 5 5 0 0 6 6 6 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 51

R 0 0 1 3 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

H 1 1 1 4 2 0 0 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .298 .275 .331 .266 .294 .000 --.306 .200 .367 .000 .253 .000 .000 .300 .000 .200

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .299 Brach p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Jo.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Forsythe 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .287 Headley 3b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .267 Quentin lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 1-Maybin pr-cf 1 1 0 0 0 1 .221 Grandal c 4 0 1 1 1 0 .286 Alonso 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .266 Guzman rf-lf 3 2 2 1 0 0 .240 d-Venable ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Ev.Cabrera ss 5 1 3 1 0 1 .239 K.Wells p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Vincent p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hinshaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Amarista ph-cf-rf-lf3 0 1 0 0 2 .291 Totals 45 6 13 6 1 10 Colorado 000 420 000 002 — 8 16 0 San Diego 210 020 010 000 — 6 13 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Francis in the 6th. b-struck out for Hinshaw in the 7th. c-flied out for Brothers in the 8th. d-grounded out for Guzman in the 9th. e-flied into a double play for Street in the 9th. f-grounded out for Thatcher in the 12th. 1-ran for Quentin in the 8th. E—Forsythe (7). LOB—Colorado 9, San Diego 4. 2B—Cuddyer (28), Pacheco (11), Forsythe (5), Quentin (8), Ev.Cabrera (11). 3B—Guzman (2). HR—Guzman (4), off Francis. SB—Fowler (8), Ev.Cabrera (18). Colorado IP Francis 5 Ottavino H, 4 1 1-3 Brothers H, 10 2-3 Belisle BS, 4-4 2 C.Torres W, 1-0 2 Betancourt S, 16-201 San Diego IP K.Wells 4 2-3 Vincent 1 1-3 Hinshaw 1 Brach 1 Street 1 Gregerson 2 Thatcher L, 0-3 1

H 8 1 0 4 0 0 H 8 2 1 0 0 2 3

R 5 0 0 1 0 0 R 6 0 0 0 0 0 2

ER BB SO NP 5 0 5 80 0 1 0 19 0 0 2 9 1 0 0 40 0 0 2 24 0 0 1 12 ER BB SO NP 5 1 4 89 0 0 1 25 0 0 0 12 0 0 1 11 0 0 1 6 0 0 0 20 2 0 0 22

ERA 5.24 4.59 3.65 2.29 2.19 3.09 ERA 4.00 4.50 4.57 3.82 0.99 3.12 3.12

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Rider

Megan Jordan riding Lolita won the jumpoff and the $25,000 purse of the High Desert Classics Grand Prix competition.

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

Continued from D1 The owner and trainer at Venture Farm in Oregon City, Jordan has won numerous titles since beginning to compete in grand prix events seven years ago. And she won $10,000 at last week’s Country Classic in Wilsonville. Jordan outpaced two-time defending champion Michelle Fellers, wife of Olympian Rich Fellers. Fellers, riding Revenge, placed third with a clear first round and one fault in the jumpoff and a time of 36.684 seconds. Matthew Wildung of Maplewood Stables in Reno, Nev., finished second while riding Cartouche Z. Widlung finished the first round with a clean ride and the jumpoff round, with a time of 37.474 seconds. Seattle amateur Emily Hilton, riding Tattoo, finished in fourth place and was the first rider of the night with a clean first round and was the only amateur to advance to the jumpoff. Several competitors, including Jordan and Wildung, used more than one horse during the event. Last night’s Grand Prix course — which was designed by New Jersey’s Nancy Wallis and Paul Jewell, who are both United States Equestrian Federation course designers — included 13 jumping obstacles on a 500-meter track that riders had to complete before a one-minute, 26-second cap. The 300-meter jumpoff course featured eight obstacles and a 52-second cap.

Alex McDougall / The Bulletin

— Reporter: eoller@bendbulletin.com

Women

could be a scintillating final stage. The hilly, 51-mile race is scheduled to start at 1:05 p.m. at Summit High School in west Bend. Powers, who finished 14th in the criterium as part of a large pack that was credited with the same time as Small, leads the overall standings at 7 hours, 42 minutes, 14 seconds. In addition to Small, five other riders are within two minutes of the yellow jersey

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

second lead over third-place Lawson Craddock (Bontrager Livestrong). Phil Gaimon of the Kenda team is in fourth (:35 back) and Nate English,

Wiggins on cusp of tour victory By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

CHARTRES, France — For Bradley Wiggins, the champagne on the Champs-Elysees is about to flow. He all but locked up the Tour de France title with a tour-de-force performance to win the final time trial — putting him on the cusp of becoming the first Briton to win cycling’s showpiece race. Wiggins blew away the field in Saturday’s race against the clock in Stage 19, his second Tour victory this year in a time trial, his specialty. “I really wanted to go out there and finish with a bang, and fortunately I was able to do that,” said Wiggins, noting he realized the breadth of emotion when he spotted his mechanic in tears. Even before the Tour started, Wiggins was the favorite. The 32-year-old rider took the yellow jersey in Stage 7. Then came questions about the unity of his Sky Team, pre-race preparations and his ability to get up mountains — all of which he put to rest. There was also the absence of two-time Tour champion and cycling superstar Alberto Contador, who is serving a doping ban. That led many to wonder whether Wiggins was really the sport’s best. Wiggins has been vocal in his criticism of doping in cycling and said the sport may be changing after the sport’s governing body put tough controls in place. “I think the Tour is a lot more human now with everything the UCI is doing,” he said, suggesting that dopers — and their intermittently astonishing performances — are being driven from the sport. Wiggins is a three-time Olympic track champion who made the difficult transition to road racing. He crashed out the Tour a year ago with a broken collarbone. He envied Australia’s Cadel Evans, who had the elation of winning the yellow jersey. “That was my motivation: I want to feel what he’s feeling,” Wiggins said. The Team Sky leader obliterated the pack in the 33-mile ride from Bonneval to Chartres. Today’s ride to the finish on Paris’ Champs-Elysees will be largely ceremonial — Wiggins is too far ahead for any competitor to erase his lead over the 75-mile ride from Rambouillet. After Saturday’s stage, with victory secure, Wig-

also of Kenda, is fifth (:37 back). In today’s grueling Awbrey Butte Circuit Race, Mancebo will look to secure the over-

(541) 728-0505 www.neurofloat.com

Laurent Rebours / The Associated Press

Bradley Wiggins strains in the last meters of the 19th stage of the Tour de France in Chartres, France, Saturday.

gins sighed and looked skyward as he hoisted the winner’s bouquet. “I have a lot of emotion right now,” he said. “It’s the stuff of dreams to win the final time trial and seal the Tour.” Wiggins was timed in 1 hour, 4 minutes, 13 seconds. Countryman and teammate Christopher Froome was second, 1:16 behind. Luis Leon Sanchez of Spain was third, 1:50 back. Overall, Wiggins has a 3:21 lead over Froome, who is second. Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali is third, 6:19 back. Riders set off one-by-one in the race against the clock in reverse order of the standings, and Wiggins’ dominance was evident from the first time check. He was 12 seconds ahead of Froome after 8 ½ miles. Wiggins had a formidable lead coming into the stage. His only threat of any kind was from Froome, a successful time-trial rider, and less so from Nibali, who is not quite as strong in this discipline. Despite rumblings about behind-the-scenes competition between them, Froome proved a faithful teammate to the end. “As we saw today, he’s stronger than me,” Froome told French TV, after hugging Wiggins. “I’m very happy. The (Sky) goal this year was to win the Tour with Bradley. To be second (for me) is an added plus.” The big question mark concerned the riders below them: Whether young American Tejay Van Garderen could overtake Jurgen Van Den Broeck for fourth — he didn’t. Or whether Frenchman Pierre Rolland, a strong climber but not a time trailer, would stay in the top 10 — he did. Providing unparalled service across a variety of industries since 1983.

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Cooley Rd.

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— Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com

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in the GC standings. Team Tibco’s Megan Guarnier is just 18 seconds back of Powers. Wilcoxson (36 seconds), Team Tibco’s Amanda Miller (1:17), Exergy Twenty12’s Andrea Dvorak (1:24) and Kristin McGrath (1:31) are all within shouting distance. Said Powers: “The race tomorrow — holy crap — it’s going to be hard and exciting.”

all victory. He will likely face attacks on the Archie Briggs Road climb from teams such as Bissell, Bontrager Livestrong and Kenda, which all have riders placed high in the overall standings.

Tumalo Reservoir Rd. Tyler Rd.

Continued from D1 A group of six riders, which included Alzate’s teammate Diaz and Candelario’s teammate Jesse Anthony, held a 25-second lead with about 25 minutes left. But those riders were caught with 15 minutes to go. The Optum team moved to the front of the field with three laps left, setting up Candelario for the sprint to the finish. “The guys did a great job taking over with three laps to go,” said 37-year-old Candelario, of Reno, Nev. “We had a pretty good lead-out there. We just couldn’t hold off the Exergy guys.” Candelario said he might have started his sprint too early. “(Alzate) was going quite a bit quicker than I was at the end,” Candelario said. “I went quite a bit early. I just figured I might as well go a little earlier than wait, but it didn’t work out too well.” Still, Candelario, who has raced in the Cascade for years, said the energetic crowd gave him some motivation. “The Bend crowd is always amazing, especially at the Twilight crit,” he said. “You can’t beat this setting. Everyone is super amped, and it’s such a great adrenaline rush those last five laps with the whole crowd cheering.” Saturday night’s race had no effect on the overall standings of the Cascade Cycling Classic pro men’s race. Spaniard Francisco Mancebo (Competitive Cyclist) maintained his 22-second lead over second-place Carter Jones (Bissell) and his 31-

when I saw (Jacquelyn) Crowell, the Exergy (rider) coming up on my side, and I was like, ‘Well, I got to go,’” Small said. “And it wasn’t until the very end that I felt Theresa coming up. And she actually, I think, at one point was ahead of me, and I got a little extra oomph. It’s a long sprint, so it kind of suited more to nonpure sprinters.” It also put Small near the front of the field for what

hn

Men

Joe Kline / The Bulletin

Women’s pro cyclists round a turn during the Downtown Twilight Criterium on Saturday in Bend.

Jo

Continued from D1 And likely a sound one because, as Cranmer noted, criteriums can be hazardous for participants. Several riders were caught up in at least one crash during the men’s criterium race that immediately followed the women’s event. “We’ve seen a lot of crashes here, and it’s just not worth the risk,” Cranmer said. “The team is sad to see her go, but also happy that her next race will be the Olympics.” Enter an opportunity for Small, who said she was not aware of Armstrong’s exit from the race going into Saturday’s stage. In the 50minute criterium, she held at bay Cliff-Ryan, one of Armstrong’s teammates and the 2012 criterium national champion, and third-place finisher Loren Rowney of Stevens Bikes. Small said her Optum teammate Jade Wilcoxson — who holds a two-point lead over Small for the best sprinter’s green jersey entering today’s stage — led her out on the course’s long final stretch, which spans from Idaho Avenue nearly to Oregon Avenue on Wall Street in downtown Bend. The rest was up to Small. “I was trying to wait as long as possible because I know it’s a long sprint, but then I went

D5

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D6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

GOLF

Stallings takes PGA Tour lead By David Brandt The Associated Press

Peter Morrison / The Associated Press

Adam Scott plays a shot off the 11th tee at Royal Lytham & St. Annes golf club during the third round of the British Open Golf Championship at Lytham St. Annes, England, Saturday.

Scott takes lead into British Open final round By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England — The ball tumbled over the edge of a pot bunker and appeared to put Adam Scott in the worst spot he had been all day at the British Open. All he saw was opportunity. From the wet sand right of the 17th green, Scott had to clear two more pot bunkers to reach the green, with the flag only five paces from the edge. Scott was thinking about birdie, not trying to save par, so he confidently told caddie Steve Williams, “I can handle this.” The shot came out pure, trickled by the cup and settled a foot away. The more relevant questions are one round away. Can he handle a four-shot lead, knowing this is a year when no lead appears safe? Can he handle a leaderboard with four major champions among the top six names, including Tiger Woods? Can he handle the wind that is expected to finally arrive at Royal Lytham & St. Annes? “I’m just happy to be in this position,” Scott said. “To be honest, I’m really excited about tomorrow.” Scott has never had a better chance to end his long wait for a major — and he owes much of that to his long putter. He stayed in the game early with two key par saves, pulled away with three birdies around the turn and was solid at the end Saturday for a 2under 68 and a four-shot lead over Graeme McDowell and Brandt Snedeker. It’s the fourth time in the past nine majors that a player had a four-shot lead with one round to go. Rory McIlroy at the 2011 Masters is the only player who didn’t win. Scott has been so steady all week that he has put himself in position to become

only the fourth Open champion with all rounds in the 60s. “It was all pretty solid stuff, considering the circumstances and how much trouble there is on this golf course,” Scott said. Scott narrowly missed a 20-foot birdie putt on the final hole that would have given him a share of the 54-hole Open scoring record. He settled for 11-under 199 and will play in the final group with McDowell, who had a 67 to get into the final group for the second straight time at a major. Snedeker, who went from a one-shot lead to a six-shot deficit in seven holes, birdied two of his last three holes to salvage a 73. Right behind them were three major champions, starting with the guy who has won 14 of them. Woods recovered from a sloppy start and was within three shots of the lead on the front nine until Scott pulled away. Woods missed a short par putt on the 15th and didn’t give himself many good looks at birdie on the back nine for a 70, leaving him five shots behind. Woods has never won a major when trailing going into the last round. Three-time major champion Ernie Els was solid in his round of 68 and was six back, along with former Masters champion Zach Johnson, who had a 66. Even so, the biggest challenge might be the weather. If the forecast holds true — and there’s been no reason to believe that — the greatest defense of links golf could finally arrive with wind projected to gust up to 25 mph. “It will be in Adam’s hands tomorrow if the conditions are as straightforward as they have been the last few days,” McDowell said. “Throw a bit of wind across this course like

perhaps they are forecasting, he will have to go and work a lot harder, and he will have to go win it. “He’s going to have to go win it anyway, for sure.” McDowell was seven shots behind as he walked up to the 13th green and found three birdies coming in to get into the last group, just as he was at Olympic Club last month in the U.S. Open, where he was one putt away from forcing a playoff. Snedeker opened this championship by playing 40 holes without a bogey, and then he couldn’t buy a par. He had to blast backward out of a bunker, chunked a pitch shot from the fairway, missed short putts and was reeling. Snedeker rolled in a birdie on the 16th and stretched out his arms in mock wonder, and then finished with a birdie that could bode well for today. “It’s just one of those things where you’ve got to find out if you have some guts or don’t,” he said. “I could have packed up and gone home today, but I didn’t.” Scott was becoming a forgotten star until he switched to the long putter in February of last year, and it has been the biggest reason for the turnaround — his runner-up at the Masters last year, winning his first World Golf Championship at Firestone, and now on the cusp of his first major. Showing nerves on the opening tee, he hit into a bunker and played a beautiful shot from the back of the wet sand to 8 feet, holing the putt for par. Scott made another par putt from the same distance on the third hole. And in the middle of his run of birdies — including a 30-foot putt on the eighth — he escaped with par on the 10th hole by making one from 18 feet.

MADISON, Miss. — Scott Stallings trudged back to the clubhouse after making par on the 10th hole, his third round suspended because of the darkness that enveloped Annandale Golf Club. It almost felt as if the course was trying to hide from him. Stallings shot a blazing 6 under through the first 10 holes of the third round on Saturday at the True South Classic, and will have a fourstroke lead when play resumes today at 5 a.m. PDT. It’s a terrific opportunity for the 27-yearold, who has struggled for much of the season because of rib and back injuries. “We’ve got a lot of golf (remaining),” Stallings said. “I’m just happy to be playing. All the birdies and stuff are great, but at the end of the day, just to be out here and be competitive — that’s all I’m really focused on.” Stallings made four birdies and an eagle before the air horns sounded just past 8 p.m. CDT. He’s at 18 under for the tournament and trying for his second career PGA Tour victory. Second-round leader Billy Horschel, Heath

Golf Continued from D1 “It’s not a ball that’s designed for everybody,” says Todd Kruse, a PGA professional at Dick’s Sporting Goods in Bend. “The majority of people aren’t swinging fast enough to get that ball to actually compress and do what it is designed to do.” Kruse puts golf balls in three categories: tour performance balls ($40 or higher), lessexpensive sport balls ($20-$40), and least-expensive value balls (less than $20). What’s the difference? The tour performance balls (such as ProV1s, Callaway Hex Tours, Nike 20XI, and TaylorMade Pentas) generally are made with urethane covers and use more layers to increase the spin rates, Kruse says. Sport balls (such as Bridgestone E6s, Srixon Q-Star and Titleist NXTs) use a blended cover and are generally more durable, but will not spin as much. And value balls are often a two-piece ball with a harder feel and a Surlyn cover and cost less than $20 a dozen. Many golfers buy the most expensive balls, such as Pro-V1s. Others go for the cheapest. But Kruse says the majority of golfers might be best served by playing a sport ball somewhere in the middle. “Those are balls that are designed for slower swing speeds that have a slower spin rate,” Kruse says. And that helps the average golfer hit the ball a touch farther, and more important, it helps golfers control their shots a bit better. (A helpful hint: The more layers, such as a fivepiece ball, the higher the spin rate of the ball.) Shopping for the right fit takes some knowledge, Heinly says. He says most pros will ask a golfer about their clubhead speed, how far they hit a certain shot, and whether they are searching for more feel around the green or more distance. Golfers with faster clubhead speed will be better suited for a high-compression golf ball, Heinly says. A senior golfer might find a low-

Slocum and Jason Bohn are tied for second place at 14 under. The tournament has been plagued by heavy rain, with one weather-related delay during each of the first three days, including a 3½hour setback on Saturday. Only a handful of players finished their third round, including William McGirt, who shot an 8-under 64 and was five strokes back. Stallings started his round one shot behind Horschel, but vaulted into the lead after an impressive birdie, birdie, eagle run on the third, fourth and fifth holes. He also made birdie on No. 7 and 8. Stallings’ scorching run through Annandale was a reminder how good he can be. He won the Greenbrier Classic last year in his rookie season and finished 41st on the money list by winning nearly $2 million. But he hasn’t had the same success in 2012, making the cut in just five of 18 events before Annandale. Stallings said that’s mainly due to a rash of injuries, including torn cartilage in his ribs and two herniated disks in his lower back. He tried to play through the pain, but the results were mediocre. Now he’s healthy, and he’ll be the man to beat today.

er-compression ball more to his or her liking, he adds. “It does make a difference,” Heinly says of finding the right ball. “They wouldn’t put all that engineering into it if it didn’t. You will see a different ball flight and you will feel it differently.” Golfers often put too much emphasis on distance off the tee. Instead, Kruse suggests thinking about play around the green when selecting a golf ball, and working back to the tee from there. Is a softer feel on the green preferred over a hard ball designed for distance? If so, Kruse suggests opting for the softer feel regardless of how the ball plays off the tee. “You are not going to see a huge variance in distance,” Kruse says. “Spin characteristics, that’s where you are going to see a huge difference. And feel.” Most important is understanding your own golf swing. If you tend to slice, a high-spin ball is probably not going to help with that banana-shaped shot. And if a golfer can execute a high-arcing shot that stops dead on the green, a hard-as-a-rock distance ball likely won’t do. Knowing your own tendencies is exponentially more important than a brand name. “If you did a blind test over three or four balls that have all the same general properties, you would have a hard time telling the difference.” Heinly says. Adds Kruse: “Whether it’s Titleist, Callaway, TaylorMade … they’re all making a great ball.” That insight probably does not make finding the perfect fit any easier. It is enough to make a golfer miss the days of choosing between a balata ball or a white, dimpled rock. But like always, choosing a golf ball comes down to preference and feel garnered only by experience. It is just that there is much more science involved, and a ton more options. — Reporter: 541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com.

2012-2013 SCHOOL DIRECTORY REACH more than 70,000 Central Oregon adults in this special publication that will remain in households for months. The 2012-2013 School Directory contains comprehensive information on Central Oregon schools. This magazine is also distributed by the Chamber of Commerce and C.O. Visitor’s Association.

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Publishes: Wednesday, August 15, 2012

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Food Saver vacuum pkg sys, seals bags & more, like new, $45. 541-504-9651

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold/Silver.I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist Elizabeth,541-633-7006 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily WANTED: Portable Oxygen Concentrator. 6L or more, 541-420-6780

Clover (photo), Yogi & Willa, nice abandoned senior cats, need sponsors/good homes. All were emaciated & matted when rescued & Willa had a tumor removed from her face. With care & good food they are doing well, but need quiet homes to spend the rest of their years. Adoption fee waived for right homes. Donations for initial vet care & surgery greatly appreciated, tax-deductible. CRAFT, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708. To visit, call 541-389-8420. www.craftcats.org

BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area’s most comprehensive listing of classiied advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classiieds appear every day in the print or on line. Dachshund puppies! 8 wks, shorthair males Call 541-385-5809 $250; females $300; www.bendbulletin.com parents on site. 1st shots, and wormed. (541) 508-2167 205

Items for Free Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570. Donated vet services or sponsors needed for 208 Nora, Hannah (photo), Pets & Supplies Kittle, Winnie & Amy, sweet cats rescued after their owner died The Bulletin recom& they had nowhere mends extra caution to go. All need some when purchasdental work to be ing products or seradoptable & shortvices from out of the term foster care. If area. Sending cash, you can help, please checks, or credit incontact CRAFT, PO formation may be Box 6441, Bend subjected to fraud. 97708. To visit them For more informaor the sanctuary, call tion about an adver541-389-8420 or see tiser, you may call www.craftcats.org. the Oregon State Attorney General’s Donate your deposit Office Consumer cans/bottles to a local Protection hotline at rescue group! Non1-877-877-9392. profit, no-kill, all volunteer Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team isn't supported by your tax dollars like other groups. Take donations of cans, cat food & litter to Smith Sign Co. off Olney; the sanctuary, 65480 78th St,, or we'll pick Australian Shepherds up, 541-389-8420. It Reg. minis born 5/12/12. all helps. Thanks! Champ lines & health www.craftcats.org clearances. True structure & temperament. DO YOU HAVE 2 left! $800 each. 541-639-6263 SOMETHING TO SELL Barn/shop cats FREE, FOR $500 OR some tame, some not LESS? so much. We deliver! Non-commercial Fixed, shots.389-8420 advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines, $12 or 2 weeks, $20! Border Collie Ad must include Adult male free to price of single item loving home. Sweet, of $500 or less, or loyal dog needs adult multiple items home, preferably no whose total does other dogs. Loves to not exceed $500. walk, excellent with voice commands. Call Call Classifieds at /text 541-777-0704. 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Fix Bend Meow! $10 CAT SPAY/NEUTER! 97702 ZIP CODE The Bend Spay & Neuter Project is ofBoxer/English Bulldog fering cat spay and (Valley Bulldog) puppies, neuter surgeries for CKC Reg’d, brindles & only $10! Offer is fawns, 1st shots. $500good for ONE cat $700. 541-325-3376 (adult or kitten), living in the 97702 zip code area. PLEASE CALL OUR CLINIC TODAY 541-617-1010 or VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT Cavachon Pups! Calm, www.bendsnip.org very friendly, loving,smart & get along great w/kids! Foster kittens ready for female $895, male $695, homes! Fixed, shots, 541-323-1069 ID chip, more. 8950 Hwy 97, Redmond, 2 Chihuahua(3/4)/Sheltie mi. N of Tumalo Rd (1/4) cross, 6 mos, black overpass. Adoption & tan. 1 male, $200; 1 fee & application reqd. female, $225. Shots & 541-788-4170 for info. wormed. 541-410-8907

Hound, 10-week old male Pet carrier, Sof-Krate w/ GENERATE SOME exTreadmill Proform pup, great bloodlines, #635CW, $75. bed, 26x21x18, colcitement in your well mannered, $150. Call 541-382-1358 lapses into carry case, neighborhood! Plan a Call 541-447-1323 $50. 541-504-9651 garage sale and don't 245 forget to advertise in Poodle puppy, toy pureGolf Equipment classified! bred, black/white/brown 541-385-5809. female, 3 months, Golf bag carrier, readorable! $350. Call Love Seat Rocker, Flomote controlled, $200, ral Earth tones, $45, 541-317-8687 541-382-9211. 541-678-5605 Kate, her shoulder Golf balls, excellent & Mattress & Frame, King shattered by a bullet, clean, 100 for $10. size, $200, now has 3 legs & is 541-383-2155 541-475-3697. very scared of people Golf clubs, with bag and & needs a safe, quiet NEED TO CANCEL cart. $125. Call home so she can Poodle pups, toy, for YOUR AD? 541-279-1930. learn to trust again. The Bulletin SALE. Also Rescued Amputation & other Motorized Golf Caddy, Classifieds has an Poodle Adults for vet costs are a big hit MGI, Attn: Golf Walk"After Hours" Line adoption, to loving for a small non-profit. ers, 6 yrs., exc. cond., Call 541-383-2371 homes. 541-475-3889 No vets will donate $195, 541-923-0445. 24 hrs. to cancel these services. Our Queensland Heelers your ad! 246 standard & mini,$150 & thanks if you are able up. 541-280-1537 http:// Range, Tappan 30” elecGuns, Hunting to help. Tax-deductible. CRAFT, PO Box rightwayranch.wordpress.com tric, exc cond $100. & Fishing 6441, Bend 97708, Scottish Terrier AKC Roper washer $50. Hotpoint dryer $50. $150/all 541-389-8420, visit pups, 2 female, 1 male, 3. 541-389-2989 Berreta AL391 20ga www.craftcats.org. shots, dewclaws, 28" barrel like new wormed, $400 ea., will Recliners (2), FlexKittens/cats avail. thru cond hard case & deliver, 541-447-1304. rescue group. Tame, steel, faux leather in extras $950 shots, altered, ID chip, Shih Tzu male puppy, 5 cream, mid size 541-388-4230 more. Sat/Sun 1-5, mos, pet home only, very good cond. other days by appt. gold & white, $475. $300 541-504-5982 Boito 12g o/u, dbl trigPhotos at 65480 78th, Bend, ger shotgun, 28” bbl, 389-8420, 788-4170, www.oregonshihtzu.com TV, flat screen, 14”, $200. 541-647-8931 541-788-0090 visit www.craftcats.org exc. cond., w/remote. for photos & more. Carry concealed in 33 Shih-Tzu mix, 12-wks $25. 541-548-9358 states. Sat. July 28th, 8 male, rescued, $200. Lab pups, AKC, 5 left; 8 am,Redmond Comfort 503-310-2514. wks old. Master hunter The Bulletin Suites.Qualify For Your sired. 541-447-7972 r ecommends extra Concealed Handgun caution when purLab Pups AKC, black Permit. OR/UT permit chasing products or & yellow, Master classes, $50 for OR, services from out of Hunter sired, perfor$60 for UT, $100/ both. the area. Sending mance pedigree, OFA www.PistolCraft.com cash, checks, or cert hips & elbows, Call Lanny at Sponsors needed for credit information Call 541-771-2330 541-281-GUNS (4867) tiny Caden, rescued www.kinnamanretrievers.com may be subjected to to Pre-Register. from a farm where the FRAUD. For more Labradoodles - Mini & cats were being shot CASH!! information about an med size, several colors & starved. Vets could For Guns, Ammo & advertiser, you may 541-504-2662 not save his badly inReloading Supplies. call the Oregon www.alpen-ridge.com jured eyes. He's re541-408-6900. State Attorney covering but needs a General’s Office special home later DO YOU HAVE Consumer Protecsince he is blind. Bills SOMETHING TO tion hotline at for vet visits & surSELL 1-877-877-9392. gery were a lot for a FOR $500 OR small non-profit resLESS? cue to handle. No vets Maltese, AKC female Non-commercial will donate these ser$1000, male, $900advertisers may 212 vices. Many thanks if non-shedding/hypo-all place an ad you are able to help. ergenic 541-233-3534 with our Antiques & www.maiasminisupremes.com Tax-ded. CRAFT, PO "QUICK CASH Collectibles Box 6441, Bend SPECIAL" Maltese-Poodle puppies, 97708, 541-389-8420, 1 week 3 lines $12 cream & rust, no shed1916 Victor Victrola, great www.craftcats.org. or ding. Males $250; fecond., includes records, 2 weeks $20! males, $300, cash. Wolf-Husky Pups, very $500. 541-280-2892 Ad must 541-546-7909 friendly and healthy, Look at: include price of $400. 541-977-7019 Maltese Toy AKC (1), single item of $500 Bendhomes.com Champ bloodlines, 1.75 Yard sale items needed for Complete Listings of or less, or multiple lb, $795. 541-420-1577 for fundraiser for local items whose total rescue group! Non- Area Real Estate for Sale does not exceed profit, no-kill, all vol- 19th Century Scandina$500. unteer Cat Rescue, vian upright spinning Adoption & Foster wheel, excellent cond, Call Classifieds at Team is not sup- $500. 541-815-7775 541-385-5809 ported by your tax www.bendbulletin.com dollars like other Antique Hutch - 6’x3’ Manx/Scottish Fold 100 yrs + $200 OBO groups & needs dokittens, very friendly, SAFETY for info. 541-388-5696 HANDGUN nations of quality 10 wks, $75 -$200. CLASS for concealed items of all kinds! Tax Antiques wanted: tools, 541-241-4914 license. NRA, Police deductible & all profurn., fishing, marbles, Firearms Instructor, ceeds benefit the old sports gear, radios, Mike Kidwell. Wed. animals. Call 1st & early stereo gear. July 25th, 6:30-10:30 take to 8950 Hwy 97, Call 541-389-1578 pm. Call Kevin CentRedmond or we can wise, for reservations pick up, 541-788-4170 $40. 541-548-4422 or 389-8420. Sale is July 28-29 but we Misha is a rescued, have room to store sweet but very shy your items now. Visit our HUGE Siamese mix needing Thanks for your help! home decor a quiet home. Shots, www.craftcats.org consignment store. spayed, ID chip, New items more. Adoption fee Yorkie AKC male pup, arrive daily! LEARN TO SHOOT health guar., shots, sowaived for seniors 930 SE Textron, cialized, potty trained, LIKE THE COPS plus 50+. Visit Sat/Sun Bend 541-318-1501 $750. 541-316-0005. Utah Permit class. 1-5. CRAFT, 65480 www.redeuxbend.com $99. Sisters, 1:00 pm 78th St., Bend, call Yorkie Puppies, ready Sunday 7/29. 541-389-8420 or see now, 2 male,1 female, Call 817-789-5395 Red Wing crocks, www.craftcats.org. $600, 541-536-3108 or 503-585-5000. churns & lids. Call for reacttrainingsystems.com appt. 541-548-9939. 210 Furniture & Appliances Snow Village, DepartOregon’s ment 56 Collection, Largest 3 Day houses, accessories, A1 Washers&Dryers call 925-550-1515 GUN & KNIFE $150 ea. Full warNeptune has the bigSHOW ranty. Free Del. Also The Bulletin reserves gest blue eyes & July 27-28-29 wanted, used W/D’s the right to publish all sweet personality, but 541-280-7355 Portland Expo ads from The Bulletin is very shy & needs a newspaper onto The Center quiet home. Shots, Bed, captain, Special Guests – Bulletin Internet webtwin, neutered, ID chip, Oregon Military site. solid wood, 3 drawers more. Adoption fee Vehicle Collectors $200. 541-548-9358 waived for seniors Club of Oregon 50+. Visit Sat/Sun Bed Frame, white I-5 exit #306B 1-5. CRAFT, 65480 metal, good cond., Admission $9 240 78th St., Bend, call $20. 541-548-9358 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Crafts & Hobbies 541-389-8420 or see Sun.10-4 Desk, 4 drawers, $50. www.craftcats.org. 1-800-659-3440 All wood, exc. cond. RC plane, 52” wingCollectorsWest.com $50. 541-548-9358 PEOPLE giving pets span, ready to go! OS away are advised to Desk Chairs, $25 each, 46, $95. 541-923-8086 RELOADER BULLETS: be selective about the please call 241 3 boxes SPEER 150 new owners. For the 541-678-5605 gr SPTZ $20 each; 1 protection of the aniBicycles & box NOSLER 165 gr mal, a personal visit to Dishwasher, works great, Accessories Partition $25 or $80 the animal's new GE, $50. 541-382-1358 for all. 541-604-5115 home is recom- or 541-419-3047 Mtn Bike Canyon Pass mended. File Cabinet, 4 drawer, street cruiser, very good Remington 270 bolt accream colored, $50, cond, $50. tion rifle, syn. stock, 541-408-4528 541-678-5605 $200. 541-647-8931

Remington 30-06 Woodsmaster 742 semi-auto, RH, raised cheek rest, Simons tinted 3x9 scope, see thru mounts, 98%, 100 rnds ammo. $850 541-318-2219 Ruger LC9 with laser, 9mm, light carry, NIB, $410. 541-788-6365 Smith&Wesson 44 mag. 629 classic revolver. $550. 541-604-4738. Snake Avoidance Training - Teach your dog to avoid poisonous snakes. 541-410-2667 Tree stand, light & portable, $40. 541-408-4528 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 Winchester Model 88 308 lever action, pre-64 with case & original owner’s manual, like new, $775. Browning 9mm, like new, $425. Marlin 22 single, like new, $125. Shotgun, $150. Misc ammo, hunting/fishing supplies too! Call 503-830-6564 (Sunriver) 247

Sporting Goods - Misc. 10.5' x 10.5' canvas Russian wooden stake wall tent. Unopened from Army Surplus in Bend, never used. $350 OBO Call 541-420-0794 for pics. 249

Art, Jewelry & Furs

Cash for Gold Douglas Fine Jewelry 541-389-2901 255

Computers

Mattel 35-pc construction toy collection, $30. 541-923-0619 Paintball Helmet, med sized. Never used. $15. 541-504-9651. POOL TABLE, awesome USA made, heavy slate, alder wood, 3½’x 7’, perfect for family, complete w/accys, $1999. Call 541-389-2530 or 503-260-7637 Quik-set pool, 15’ round, 4’ deep, pump, ladder, etc. $40. 541-233-6890 Silverware, service for 8, $10. Please call 541-923-0619 Stand-up Ms. Pacman machine, needs work, $100. 541-382-1358

Dry Lodgepole: $175 cord rounds; $210 cord split.1½ Cord Minimum 37 yrs service to Cent. Ore. 541-350-2859 Dry seasoned Tamarack red fir, $165/cord rnds; $185/cord split. Call 541-977-4500 or 541-416-3677 269

Table lamps, 2 beautiful, older, 8” base, 15” tall, $35. 541-504-9651

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

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Need to get an ad in ASAP? Wanted- paying cash You can place it for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, online at: JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, San- www.bendbulletin.com sui, Carver, NAD, etc. 541-385-5809 Call 541-261-1808 261

Medical Equipment

Honda push mower& bag starts 1 pull, exc cond, $180. 541-408-4528

OPEN DURING TOUR OF HOMES™ SAT & SUN 11AM– 4PM

SAT. & SUN. NOON–4PM

61182 Hilmer Creek Directions: South on 15th St, turn east on Ferguson. Right on Sage Creek Drive, left onto Hilmer Creek Drive.

$379,000

This exquisite, award winning custom home offers awesome vistas of the Cascades. The home tells a dramatic story… much built with reclaimed 15141 SW Hope Vista, barn wood, stone fireplace, Brasada Ranch travertine floors, slab granite, fabulous decks, Directions: Hwy. 20 to outdoor kitchen, wine Powell Butte Hwy. Right on cellar & one-of-a-kind SW Alfalfa Rd. water tower loft.

Hosted & Listed by:

BUILDER

SANDY & JOHN KOHLMOOS

541-480-2547

541-408-4309

Hosted & Listed by:

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection. • A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

WANTED: Portable Prompt Delivery THE BULLETIN reOxygen Concentrator. Rock, Sand & Gravel quires computer ad6L or more, Multiple Colors, Sizes vertisers with multiple 541-420-6780 Instant Landscaping Co. ad schedules or those 541-389-9663 selling multiple sys262 tems/ software, to disSUPER TOP SOIL Commercial/Ofice www.hersheysoilandbark.com close the name of the Equipment & Fixtures Screened, soil & combusiness or the term post mixed, no "dealer" in their ads. rocks/clods. High huPrivate party advertis- 4-drawer file cabinet, $50. 541-382-1358 or mus level, exc. for ers are defined as 541-419-3047 flower beds, lawns, those who sell one gardens, straight computer. Ice Cream case, 16 tub, screened top soil. 2008, w/all access., 257 Bark. Clean fill. Demust sell! $1500 obo. liver/you haul. Musical Instruments Moffit convection 541-548-3949. oven, $750 obo. Terry Yamaha keyboard/elect. 541-408-6869 270 piano YPT-300, vg cond, 263 Lost & Found $75. 541-771-3971 Tools 258 Found Bike, Farewell Bend Park, 7/17, call Travel/Tickets Over-the-bed truck tool to ID, 541-647-3043 box, polished alum., DUCK TICKETS (2), $250. 541-279-9013 LOST Arabian horse great seats, $100 & full tack still on, 7/14 265 up. 541-573-1100. 8 a.m. at Corral Flat Building Materials in the Ochocos. Call 260 541-848-1842 or Misc. Items Bend Habitat 541-385-1084 RESTORE 2 Cedar chaise lounges, Building Supply Resale Lost: Black Lab female, 2 exlnt cond, $150 both, yrs, China Hat/Sunriver/ Quality at LOW obo. 541-504-3833 LaPine area. “Gray” PRICES may still have collar on. 740 NE 1st Auto buffer/polisher, 10” 541-410-5822; 541-312-6709 MVP Superline & case, 541-593-2298 Open to the public. like new, $25. 541-420-5312 541-504-9651 266 Lost: Cross Necklace, Boxes,great for moving Heating & Stoves 7/16, Bend or LaPine, or storage, $25 cash., very sentimental value, 541-318- 4577 NOTICE TO reward, 541-280-5722 ADVERTISER Buying Diamonds Since September 29, Lost Jack Russell Terrier, /Gold for Cash 1991, advertising for all white w/brown ears, Saxon’s Fine Jewelers collar used woodstoves has male, turquoise 541-389-6655 been limited to mod- “Toby” Widgi Creek GC 7/13. Generous BUYING els which have been area, reward. 1-503-560-6885 Lionel/American Flyer certified by the Ortrains, accessories. egon Department of Lost: Mens’ Gold Chain 541-408-2191. Environmental Qual& Silver Star, Bend, ity (DEQ) and the fed7/14, 541-598-5850. BUYING & SELLING eral Environmental All gold jewelry, silver Lost prescription glass Protection Agency and gold coins, bars, at Cline Falls, Red(EPA) as having met rounds, wedding sets, mond. 541-923-0317. smoke emission stanclass rings, sterling sildards. A certified ver, coin collect, vinREMEMBER: If you tage watches, dental woodstove may be have lost an animal, gold. Bill Fleming, identified by its certifidon't forget to check 541-382-9419. cation label, which is The Humane Society permanently attached in Bend 541-382-3537 Casket, handcrafted, to the stove. The BulRedmond, Alder wood, 6’6” x 2’, letin will not know541-923-0882 white satin lined with ingly accept advertisPrineville, pillow, locks, handles, ing for the sale of 541-447-7178; corner pcs, beautiful uncertified OR Craft Cats, workmanship, $1000 woodstoves. 541-389-8420. obo. 541-420-6780

NEW MULTI-GENERATIONAL HOME A 4 bedroom, 3 bath home designed for a family that wants to live together, yet enjoy separation and p r i v a c y . We l l s u i t e d for taking care of an elderly parent or other family transitions. Great neighborhood, large lot, mountain views and exceptional quality.

GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Brokers, Resort Specialists

$1,699,000

E2 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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Hay, Grain & Feed

Poultry, Rabbits, & Supplies

Employment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

10 laying hens, 5-9 eggs /day, $50 all. Also beautiful bantys. Please call 541-815-7402.

400

PUBLIC AUCTION •CARS •TRUCKS •EQUIPMENT

July 28, 2012,

10 a.m. Preview 11 a.m. Auction

No Reserve!!

63360 Nels Anderson Pl., Bend, OR 97701

Bailer Twine

Most Common Sizes Quarry Ave. Hay & Feed

541-923-2400 www.quarryfeed.com

Clean Timothy Grass Hay, by the ton, $220. 345 Call 541-408-6662 af- Livestock & Equipment ter 4:00 p.m.

Orchard 1999 Mercedes E300 - Premium Grass, big bales, Vin #913810, 1997 $100/bale, Chevy Corvette - vin 541-419-2713. #109596, 2001 Isuzu Box Truck with lift Want to buy Alfalfa gate - vin #700921, standing, in Central 1977 14' Blake Trailer, Freestanding automorefurbished by Ore. 541-419-2713 tive lift, Toyota ForkFrenchglen Blacklift, tires. Much more! smiths, a Classy ClasWheat Straw: Certified & sic. Great design for Bedding Straw & Garden multiple uses. OverStraw;Compost.546-6171 head tack box (bunkFarm house) with side and Find exactly what Market easy pickup bed acyou are looking for in the cess; manger with left side access, windows CLASSIFIEDS and head divider. Toyo radial tires & spare; new floor with mats; Looking for your center partition panel; next employee? bed liner coated in key Place a Bulletin areas, 6.5 K torsion 308 help wanted ad axles with electric Farm Equipment today and brakes, and new paint, & Machinery $10,500. Call John at reach over 541-589-0777. 60,000 readers Wanted Used Farm each week. Equipment & MachinYour classified ad ery. Looking to buy, or 358 will also consign of good used appear on Farmers Column quality equipment. bendbulletin.com Deschutes Valley which currently Want to buy Alfalfa Equipment standing, in Central receives over 541-548-8385 Ore. 541-419-2713 1.5 million page

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Hay, Grain & Feed 3A Livestock Supplies •Panels •Gates •Feeders Now galvanized! •6-Rail 12’ panels, $101 •6-Rail 16’ panels, $117 Custom sizes available 541-475-1255

views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 541-385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Where can you ind a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it’s all here in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Caregivers

- Part time & 24 hrs caregivers. Home Instead Senior Care is currently seeking male & female Car421 egivers to provide in-home care to our Schools & Training seniors. Candidates must be able to lift, TRUCK SCHOOL transfer, provide perwww.IITR.net sonal care & assist in Redmond Campus various home duties. Student Loans/Job Alzheimer / Dementia/ Waiting Toll Free ALS experience a 1-888-438-2235 needed. Must have ability to pass back476 ground checks & have Employment valid ODL & insurance. Training provided. Call Opportunities 541-330-6400, or fax resume to: Caregiver needed for 541-330-7362. AFH, 24-hr shift, weekends. Must be exp’d & COMMUNICATIONS pass criminal bkgrnd First Presbyterian check. 541-382-1284 Church of Bend is hiring a Communication Director to work closely Call a Pro with leaders to develop & Whether you need a execute a communication plan that supports fence ixed, hedges the church's mission trimmed or a house serving our congregation & community. Partbuilt, you’ll ind time, 20 hrs/week. Does professional help in not include benefits. ExThe Bulletin’s “Call a perience in computer, web-based marketing, Service Professional” social media & commuDirectory nications. Will report to Church Administrator. 541-385-5809 Applicants send resume to blevet@bendfp.org Caregiver Needed: Must have 3 yrs. exp. COMMUNICATIONS Call Christina First Presbyterian 541-279-9492 to apChurch of Bend is hiring a Communicaply. tion Assistant to work closely with CommuniCAREGIVERScations Director fulfilling At Home Care communication plan for Group is hiring! church, supporting pasIf you want a career tors, & helping church that makes a real serve congregation & difference, apply community. 30-hours a online at: www.ath- week with benefits. Must have computer & omecaregroup.com Must be 18 or over with web-based marketing & reliable transportation. communications experiBackground check & ence. Will report to Administrator. drug test required. Church Phone: 541-312-0051 Applicants send resume to blevet@bendfp.org Crook County Library

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Sales Northeast Bend

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CROOK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Eagl e Crest Moving Sale! 665 Nutcracker Dr., Fri-Sat-Sun, 8-3. Furniture, misc, + husband - make offer!

Crook County Library Library Associate- Youth Services $23,912- $25,004 DOE Full time w/benefits Closes: August 15, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.

Items needed for upcoming nonprofit animal rescue group yard sale! If your items do not sell, donate to CRAFT, tax-deductible! Call 788-4170 for drop-off locations or we can pick up. www.craftcats.org

Crook County Library seeks full time Youth Services Associate. Associate’s degree in related field and two years library experience with children and teens preferred. Varied schedule includes evening and weekend hours. Applications and full job description can be found at www.co.crook.or.us .

Look What I Found! You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or email

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $2.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!”

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT at

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Large Garage Sale: FriSun 8-5, 2422 SW Fissure Lp N., household, furniture, games, toys, misc., 541-923-3729

classified@bendbulletin.com

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Sales Southwest Bend 60847 Cultus Drive, Sat 8-4, Sun 8-1. HALF-OFF on Sunday! Lots of treasures! 286

Sales Northeast Bend Emptied Storage Unit! Collectible toys, skis, snowboards, household, etc. 7/21-22, 9-2. No early sales; cash only. 1622 NE Parkridge Dr.

NE Redmond, 720 NE Negus Place. East over Walmart bridge. Garage Sale: Harley Friday, Saturday 9:00 equp., baby/kids toys a.m. & Sunday after& clothes,fishing gear, noon. 541-728-4932. tools, lots more! Sat. 9-4, Sun. 9-2, 705 NE 292 Providence Dr Sales Other Areas HUGE Garage Sale Sat-Sun, 8am - 3pm, Estate Sale: Fri, Sat, & 20676 Overton Sun, 9-4, 56540 SoPlace, off Boyd Acres. lar Dr, in Deschutes 288 River Rec., near Sunriver, clothes, kitchSales Southeast Bend enware, film & audio equip from 40’s & Moving sale, Everyday, 50’s, knick knacks, antique furniture, something for everyelectronics, computone! No early birds. ers.Call 541-771-0957

Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd St., Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554. Crook County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Candidates with bilingual Spanish/English skills are encouraged to apply.

Concrete Construction

Roger Langeliers Construction has openings for experienced Concrete Finishers & Laborers. Veterans are encouraged to apply. Mostly public wage work with full benefit package. RLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer and drug-free company. Call 541-948-0829 or 541-948-0315 for interview & application.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW?

Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day!

541-385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at:

www.bendbulletin.com

Get your business

G

GROWIN

with an ad in The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Driver READY MIX DRIVER - TEMPORARY, PART-TIME

Crook County/ Central Oregon Health Board Crook County and the Central Oregon Health Board are seeking qualified candidates for the following positions: • Executive Director • System of Care Utilization Coordinator • Finance Manager • Operations Coordinator Applications and full job descriptions can be found at www.co.crook.or.us . Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd St., Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554.

$ $

10 - 3 lines, 7 days 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

(Private Party ads only)

Experienced Ready Mix Truck Driver. Will be working with a team of high quality professionals. Successful candidate will excel in professionalism and have 2 years previous Ready Mix Truck Driving experience. Requirements include maintaining a positive, service oriented attitude while performing in a fast, safe, efficient manner. Acceptable DMV record required. This position will be part-time (most likely short days) and will run for approximately 90 days. EOE/AAE. Fax resume to 541-749-2024 or email cmcginley@hookercreek.net.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Driver

CIRCULATION SINGLE COPY UTILITY DRIVER We are looking for a Single Copy Utility Driver for the Bulletin Newspaper. • Must have ability to work independently with little or no supervision and monitor own time/results. • Serve as sales person for various promotions including events and other single copy promotions. • Serves as the point person for sales and deliveries. • Must assume financial responsibility for all rack collections. • Assist in maintaining current vehicle maintenance. • Perform special newspaper and promotional deliveries as assigned. • Schedules may change periodically and may require both day and night shifts and/or split shifts, as needed. • Perform all other duties assigned by management.

Please email resume to: lkeith@bendbulletin.com EOE/Drug Free Workplace

General

CROOK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Food Service Experienced servers needed for a busy breakfast restaurant. Must be available weekends & holidays. Apply in person at Westside Cafe and Bakery, 1005 NW Galveston Ave.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $ 500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for:

Customer Service Representative. Immediate opening in the Circulation Dept. for an entry level Customer Service Rep. Looking for someone to assist our subscribers and delivery carriers with subscription transactions, account questions and delivery concerns. Essential: positive attitude, strong service/team orientation, and problem solving skills. Must have accurate typing, phone skills and computer entry experience. Most work is done via telephone so strong communication skills and the ability to multi-task in a fast-paced environment is a must. Work shift hours are Monday Through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Occasional weekends and holidays are required. Please send resume to PO Box 6020, Bend OR 97708, attn: Circulation Office Manager or e-mail ahusted@bendbulletin.com E.O.E./Drug Free workplace.

Electrician General Journeyman

Warm Springs Composite Products is looking for an individual to help a growing innovative light manufacturing plant. Basic Duties: Assist in troubleshooting and repairs of plant equipment. Install, repair and maintain all electrical and electronic equipment. Able to read and revise electrical schematics, Must be able to perform both electrical and mechanical preventive maintenance requirements and report, PLC experience. Minimum Skills: A minimum of 5 years in the industrial maintenance field with a valid Oregon State Electricians License in Manufacturing. A strong mechanical aptitude with the ability to perform light welding and fabrication duties. Successful applicant shall supply the normal hand tools required for both electrical and mechanical maintenance. Benefits: Full Family Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, Disability, Salary Incentives, Company Bonuses, Pension and 401K w/Company Matching and Above Pay Rate Scale. Please remit resume to: Warm Springs Composite Products PO Box 906, Warm Springs, OR 97761 Phone: 541-553-1143, Fax: 541-553-1145 Attn: Mac Coombs, mcoombs@wscp.com

DESCHUTES COUNTY CAREER OPPORTUNITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERVISOR I, Business Office Supervisor (2012-00045) – Health Services Division. Full-time position $3,693 - $4,961 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. Deadline: SUNDAY, 08/5/12. BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SPECIALIST II – Older Adult Behavioral Health Specialist (2012-00029) – Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $4,057 - $5,553 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED WITH WEEKLY REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS. BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SUPERVISER - Child & Family Programs (previously B.H. Specialist III, title change only) (2012-00023) – Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $4,851 - $6,517 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED. CLINICAL PROGRAM SUPERVISOR – School Based Health Centers (2012-00043) – Public Health Division. Full-time position $5,075 - $6,818 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED. DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PROGRAM MANAGER (2012-00010) Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $6,105 - $8,201 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE DATE EXTENDED, OPEN UNTIL FILLED WITH NEXT REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS ON FRIDAY, 7/27/12. PSYCHIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER (201200024) – Behavioral Health Division. Full-time position $6,303 - $8,626 per month for a 172.67 hour work month. DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED. TO APPLY ONLINE FOR THE ABOVE LISTED POSITIONS, PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.deschutes.org/jobs Deschutes County Personnel Dept., 1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 201, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 388-6553. Deschutes County provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. This material will be furnished in alternative format if needed. For hearing impaired, please call TTY/TDD 711. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Food Service Touchmark at Mount Bachelor Village, Bend's premier retirement resort is seeking a Sous Chef for our resort style kitchen and dining services. This position will assist the Executive Chef with maintaining high standards for food quality, service and health, safety and sanitation of the kitchen. The ideal candidate for this position will have four years of cooking experience, a strong work ethic, and experience working with seniors. A valid ODL, food handlers' permit, a high school diploma or equivalent and the ability to work weekends is required. To apply for this position e-mail resume to TBORJobs@touchmark.com or apply in person at 19800 SW Touchmark Way. Visit our website at touchmarkbend.com for more information.

Good classiied ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller’s. Convert the facts into beneits. Show the reader how the item will help them in some way.

Positions available for the Deschutes County Fair. OLCC, DPSST, Certified Flaggers and Event staff. Contact Express Employment Professionals for more information. 541-389-1505 Accounting positions available. Experienced with A/P, A/R and Collections. Email resumes to jobs.bendor@ expresspros.com Janitorial/Cleaning candidates needed for immediate openings. Night shift. $9/hr. to start. Email resumes to: corie.pelcher@ expresspros.com Administrative Assistant-strong computer and organizational skills with good work history needed. Interested candidates please submit resume for consideration to: Jobs.bendor@ expresspros.com

Teaching

Sales Join our team of Rock Stars! Food Services of America has an opening for a District Sales Representative for Bend/Redmond. Please apply at: www.fsafood.com

EOE Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6408. School Psychologist Half-time school psych, OR license required. $18,500 $29,700, partial benefits. Send appl, resume & cover letter to Lake Co. ESD 357 N. L St., Lakeview OR 97630 or dgoss@lakeesd.k12.or.us

Powersports Tech needed in Bend. Dealership exp. preferred, drug free work environment. Ken 541-647-5151 Take care of your investments with the help from The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory

Housekeeper (12 hrs/mo) - Seeking a meticulous, reliable, and team oriented individual with depend- Remember.... able transportation. Add your web adMust be able to stand, dress to your ad and with intermittent perireaders on The ods of walking, stair Bulletin' s web site climbing, and lifting up will be able to click to 50 lbs. Clean drug through automatically test, driving record, to your site. and background check. $15/hour. Mail Sales resume to PO Box Are you Sports 7564, Bend, OR Minded? 97708 One who will take personal interest in my MEDICAL RECORDS local business. If Specialty medical pracyou’re willing to work, tice seeking experifollow instructions and enced Medical Records can live on an averTechnician. Generous age of $3,000 per benefits. Send cover month until your skills letter & resume to Box improve, I will TRAIN 20166790 c/o The Bulleyou; train you well. tin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. PAY you; pay you well and provide adMotorsports salesvancement limited person needed. only to your own abilDrug free work enviity. We offer $60k ronment, 401(k), $80k 1st year potenmedical, dental avail. tial. Cash Bonuses, Ken 541-647-5151 Incredible Incentives, 2 retirement proJust too many grams. If you are coachable and driven, collectibles? we will match this career against anySell them in thing you see in this The Bulletin Classiieds paper. Call Jerry Rump, 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 541-385-5809 503-784-7879. General

Central Oregon Community College has openings listed below. Go to https://jobs.cocc.edu to view details & apply online. Human Resources, Metolius Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend OR 97701; (541)383 7216. For hearing/ speech impaired, Oregon Relay Services number is 7-1-1. COCC is an AA/EO employer. Administrative Assistant, Foundation Provide office management and support services to the COCC Foundation. Includes database management, grant research and proposals, and coordinating fundraising events. $2,549-3,034. Update Closes July 22. Latino College Preparation Program Coordinator (Part Time) Serve as program coordinator to establish the goals and objectives of the program; recruit and advise students interested in participating in the program; and teach college courses for high school students enrolled in the program. Masters with 2yrs exp. or equiv. $19.32-$23.00 30hr/wk. Open Until Filled. First application review date July 20. Student Module Manager Serve as primary functional analyst for Banner student module. Provide collaborative service support, training, technical development, process documentation, and implement functionality with baseline Banner design. Bachelors + 3yrs exp. $3,781-$4,502/mo. Closes Aug 6. Curriculum and Workforce Data Coordinator Perform administrative functions related to curriculum format (degrees, certificates, and courses). Collaborate with Deans, Dept. Chairs, Admissions & Records on new programs, degrees, academic affairs, and catalog production. Bachelor’s + 3yr exp. $3,558-$4,235/mo. Closes July 30. Audio Visual Engineer Responsible for the audio visual technology systems and services at COCC. Operate and train student, staff, and faculty on AV and computer equipment supporting multimedia and smart classroom needs. AAS degree + 4yr exp. $2,788-$3,321/mo. Closes July 27. Maintenance Specialist – Plumber Troubleshoot, repair and maintain all plumbing systems and fixtures in College buildings. Maintain inventory, oversee projects, and perform general maintenance tasks. $2,788-$3,321/mo. Open Until Filled. First application review date July 23. ________________________________________ Adjunct Instructor of Computer & Information Systems Provide instruction in Computer and Information Systems courses such as Introduction to Computers, Computer Concepts, Software Applications, Programming, and Operating Systems. Start Fall 2012. Open Until Filled Part-Time Instructors COCC is always looking for talented individuals to teach part-time in a variety of disciplines. Check our web site for instructor needs. All positions pay $500 per load unit (1 LU = 1 class credit), with additional perks.

We are looking for experienced part time instructors to develop curriculum and teach A+, Network+ and Linux+ Certification classes, along with classes on Windows Server and MCSA Certifications. There are immediately openings. Pay is commensurate with experience, between $20 and $40 per hour. Please contact Paul Stennett at pstennett@cocc.edu or 541-318-3748. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Security

See our website for available Security sitions, along with 42 reasons to join team!

our Veterinary Technician poLicensed, Full-time the The Colorado Cat Clinic our is seeking an experienced LVT who is detail www.securityprosbend.com oriented and has a great attitude. Must work very well with others, but also be able to self-motivate and take initiative. ConSOCIAL SERVICES Quality Management sistency & positive communication skills necesCoordinator sary. Salary commensuLutheran Community rate with experience. We Services, NW offer great benefits for Full-time w/benefits full time employees: Closing: until filled Lutheran Community holiday pay, PTO, mediServices, NW is seek- cal + dental after 90 ing an experienced days. Please bring cover Quality Management letter, resume & referCoordinator. The suc- ences to clinic (655 NW Dr) or send e-mail cessful candidate must York catclinic@bendbroadband.com have a Master’s degree NO CALLS PLEASE. in social services and be licensed or license eligible in the State of Or- Looking for your next employee? egon, have three years post licensure or certifi- Place a Bulletin help cation experience in wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 psychiatric and subreaders each week. stance abuse health Your classified ad care, knowledge of nawill also appear on tional healthcare stanbendbulletin.com dards, and experience in managing a quality which currently management program. receives over 1.5 Experience managing million page views quality management every month at services in an HMO enno extra cost. vironment preferred. Bulletin Classifieds Send resume w/cover Get Results! letter to: Lutheran Call 385-5809 Community Services, or place 365 NE Court St., your ad on-line at Prineville, OR 97754 bendbulletin.com or Fax to: 541-447-6694. or email crookcounty@lcsnw.org Garage Sales Spiritual Care Provider Heart 'n Home Hospice & Palliative Care is looking for a Spiritual Care Provider for our NEW Bend office. For more information and to apply for this rewarding career, go to www.gohospice.com and click on the "Careers" tab.

Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809

Survey Administrator -Temporary Employment

Oregon State University – Cascades in Bend is seeking applicants for a full time (six

days on, two days off) temporary position as survey administrator August 1 through September 30, 2012 within the McKenzie River Corridor, near the town of McKenzie Bridge.

The salary rate is $12 per hour and private vehicle mileage within the study area will be reimbursed. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, inviting recreationists to complete surveys at Forest Service trailheads and river take-out sites. Required qualifications include a friendly and courteous personality, the ability to work effectively with limited supervision, valid driver’s license, reliable vehicle and attention to detail. Preferred qualifications include experience administering surveys or similar engagement with customers or the general public. The closing date is 7/27/12. To be considered for this temp employment opportunity, complete the job application found at http://oregonstate.edu/admin/hristeam/forms/TS901.doc

and fax it to Kreg @ 541-382-7053 by noon on Friday 7/27/12. For specific questions about this employment opportunity, e-mail kreg.lindberg@osucascades.edu prior to the closing date. OSU is an AA/EOE.

Web Developer

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Finance & Business

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Loans & Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. LOCAL MONEY:We buy secured trust deeds & note,some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 ext.13. 573

Business Opportunities WARNING The Bulletin recommends that you investigate every phase of investment opportunities, especially those from out-of-state or offered by a person doing business out of a local motel or hotel. Investment offerings must be registered with the Oregon Department of Finance. We suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-503-378-4320, 8:30-noon, Mon.-Fri. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Our busy media company that publishes numerous web and mobile sites seeks a great developer who is also a smart thinker, creative problem solver, excellent communicator, and self-motivated professional. Fluency with PHP is a must. Experience with javascript and integrating third-party solutions and social media applications required. Desired experience includes: HTML5, jQuery (and/or experience in client side javascript frameworks), MySQL, Python, Django, Joomla. Experience in Google App Engine is a plus. Top-notch skills with user interface and graphic design a big plus. Background in media desired but not required. This is a full-time position with benefits. If you've got what it takes, e-mail a cover letter, resume, and portfolio/work sample links and/or repository (GitHub) links to resume@wescompapers.com. This posting is also on the web at www.bendbulletin.com/developer. EOE/Drug Free Workplace

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line. Call 541-383-2371 24 hours to cancel your ad! 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend Luxury Home, 2450 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, office, 3 car garage, mtn views., avail 7/20. 2641 NE Jill Ct. $1650/mo. + dep. 541-420-3557.

PUZZLE IS ON PAGE E2

Real Estate For Sale

700 738

Multiplexes for Sale Duplex by Pilot Butte, (1) 3/2.5, (1) 2/2.5, 2856 sq.ft, single garages, great rental history. $235,000 Dana Furlan, Principal Broker Bend Premier Real Estate. 541-771-8761 The Bulletin’s “Call A Service Professional” Directory is all about meeting your needs. Call on one of the professionals today!

Need to get an ad

745

773

Homes for Sale

Acreages

NOTICE:

***

All real estate adver- CHECK YOUR AD tised here in is sub- Please check your ad on the first day it runs ject to the Federal to make sure it is corFair Housing Act, rect. Sometimes inwhich makes it illegal structions over the to advertise any prefphone are misundererence, limitation or stood and an error discrimination based can occur in your ad. on race, color, reliIf this happens to your gion, sex, handicap, ad, please contact us familial status or nathe first day your ad tional origin, or intenappears and we will tion to make any such be happy to fix it as preferences, limitasoon as we can. tions or discrimination. Deadlines are: WeekWe will not knowingly days 11:00 noon for accept any advertisnext day, Sat. 11:00 ing for real estate a.m. for Sunday and which is in violation of Monday. this law. All persons 541-385-5809 are hereby informed Thank you! that all dwellings adThe Bulletin Classified vertised are available *** on an equal opportunity basis. The BullePowell Butte 6 acres, tin Classified 360 views, great horse property, 10223 HousReal Estate ton Lake Rd. $99,900. 541-350-4684 Auction

Single Level NE Duplex Nominal Opening 775 Live in one side & rent Bid: $10,000 the other side out. 2 -------------------Manufactured/ bdrm units, single ga52495 Ammon Mobile Homes rages. Gas fireplace, Fax it to 541-322-7253 Road, La Pine built 2003. $234,800. 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath New 3 bed homes start Dana Furlan, The Bulletin Classiieds Sells: 8:15 a.m., at $34,160 delivered Principal Broker Wed., Aug. 1 and set up J&M Bend Premier Real on site Homes 541-548-5511 When buying a home, Estate. 541-771-8761 ------------------www.JandMHomes.com 83% of Central williamsauction.com In mfd. section. Oregonians turn to 740 800-801-8003 Tick, Tock Many properties now Very nice, well maint, Condo/Townhomes Tick, Tock... available for online 2/2, near Costco/Fofor Sale bidding! rum, Senior Park ...don’t let time get Call 541-385-5809 to w/pool, $39,500, call A Buyer’s Premium Westside Terrace cotplace your owner, 541-280-0955. (Buyer's Fee in WI) away. Hire a tage, 2 bdrm,1.5 bath, Real Estate ad. may apply. professional out 1100 approx sq.ft.,den/ Williams & Williams office, gas fireplace, 9 of The Bulletin’s OR Broker: Looking for your next yrs. old, townhouse JUDSON GLEN Boats & RV’s employee? “Call A Service $195,000541-680-9699 VANNOY, Place a Bulletin help Professional” Williams & Williams wanted ad today and 744 Worldwide Real Directory today! reach over 60,000 Open Houses Estate, LLC. readers each week. Lic.# 200507303. Your classified ad Open House Sun. 1-4, will also appear on Modoc #18, Sunriver, bendbulletin.com, Rentals 746 Spectacular Home currently receiving 850 with (3) full master Northwest Bend Homes over 1.5 million page Snowmobiles suites, complete reviews, every month NW CROSSING: model of whole downat no extra cost. stairs, too many up- Lovely 4 bdrm, 3 bath Polaris 2003, 4 cycle, Bulletin Classifieds fuel inj, elec start, rehome w/ great room, grades to mention. A Get Results! verse, 2-up seat, master suite, loft Must See ! $474,500. Call 541-385-5809 or cover, 4900 mi, $2500 family area. Susan Pitarro, Broker, place your ad on-line obo. 541-280-0514 605 OPEN Sat. & Sun 1-4, Hunter Properties, at 2361 NW Lemhi Pass Roommate Wanted 541-389-7910 bendbulletin.com 860 Dr, $523,800, Motorcycles & Accessories 541-550-0333. Share cozy mobile home TOUR OF HOMES 652 in Terrebonne, $300 + 750 Open 10-6 Baja SC150 Scooter, utilities. 1-503-679-7496 Houses for Rent 325 miles $1150. 1346 NW Elgin Redmond Homes NW Bend 630 541-647-0566 or Ave. 541-647-0565 Superb New Home Rooms for Rent Amazing views on Looking for your next on West Side 15th fairway of Rivers CRAMPED FOR employee? Erin Campbell, Mt. Bachelor Motel has Edge. 4250 Sq.ft., CASH? Place a Bulletin help Broker rooms, starting $150/ 4/3.5, $2450/mo. Use classified to sell wanted ad today and 541-410-0872 week or $35/nt. Incl Appt. 541-480-0612. those items you no reach over 60,000 guest laundry, cable & longer need. readers each week. WiFi. 541-382-6365 Secluded 2 Bdrm 2 bath, Call 541-385-5809 Your classified ad W/D, 2 decks, elec heat will also appear on + woodstove, no smkg/ Say “goodbuy” bendbulletin.com pets. $625/mo. $1000 which currently reto that unused dep. 541-382-0007 ceives over Harley Davidson Softitem by placing it in 1.5 million page Tail Deluxe 2007, 654 views every month white/cobalt, w/pasThe Bulletin Classiieds Houses for Rent at no extra cost. senger kit, Vance & SE Bend Bulletin Classifieds Hines muffler system 541-385-5809 Get Results! & kit, 1045 mi., exc. RENT OWN, $850/mo, Call 385-5809 or cond, $19,999, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, fresh place your ad on-line 541-389-9188. Studios & Kitchenettes TOUR OF HOMES paint, new carpet, at Furnished room, TV w/ Open 10-6 nice, easy qualify, Harley Heritage bendbulletin.com cable, micro & fridge. 19151 Chiloquin Softail, 2003 $34,900, $2000 down, Utils & linens. New Dr. $5,000+ in extras, Call 541-548-5511 owners.$145-$165/wk BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS $2000 paint job, Big Single Level 541-382-1885 30K mi. 1 owner, 659 Search the area’s most in Shevlin Pines For more information comprehensive listing of 634 Shelley Griffin, Houses for Rent please call classiied advertising... Broker Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Sunriver 541-385-8090 real estate to automotive, 541-280-3804 or 209-605-5537 merchandise to sporting CHECK OUT THIS 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, energy goods. Bulletin Classiieds HOT DEAL! efficient appl., storage appear every day in the HD FAT BOY $299 1st month’s rent! * bldg., covered deck, print or on line. 2 bdrm, 1 bath paved rd., 55750 Snow 1996 Call 541-385-5809 $530 & 540 Goose Rd, no smoking, Completely rebuilt/ www.bendbulletin.com Carports & A/C incl! pets ?, $695+dep, must customized, low Fox Hollow Apts. see, 541-593-3546 or miles. Accepting of541-550-6097 (541) 383-3152 fers. 541-548-4807 in ASAP?

800

600

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co *Upstairs only with lease*

Call for Specials!

Are you a technical star who can also communicate effectively with non-technical executives, employees, customers? Would you like to work hard, play hard in beautiful Bend, OR, the recreation capital of the state? Then we’d like to talk to you.

Houses for Rent General

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E3 THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWER

Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 & 3 bdrms w/d hookups, patios or decks. Mountain Glen 541-383-9313

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. 636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Fully furnished loft Apt

What are you You’ll ind it in The Bulletin Classiieds

541-385-5809 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, home in Sunriver, Dbl. garage, W/S incl., $850/mo+ dep,no smoking, avail. 8/1, 503-651-1142.

on Wall Street in VILLAGE PROPERTIES Bend, with parking. All Sunriver, Three Rivers, utilities paid. Call La Pine. Great 541-389-2389 for appt Selection. Prices range $425 - $2000/mo. View our full Want to impress the inventory online at relatives? Remodel Village-Properties.com your home with the 1-866-931-1061 help of a professional Advertise your car! from The Bulletin’s Add A Picture! “Call A Service Reach thousands of readers! Professional” Directory Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds 638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

753

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

A sharp, clean 2Bdrm, 1½ bath apt, NEW CARPETS, neutral col- Warehouse - Industrial unit for rent. 5600 ors, great storage, prisq.ft., $2250/month, vate patio, no pets/ near Bend High. smkg. $535 incl w/s/g. Call 541-633-0663 541-389-8794.

HD Heritage Classic 2003, 100 yr. Anniv. model. 10,905 Miles, CHARMING COTTAGE new tires, battery, Fenced yard with sprinloaded w/ custom exkler system; across from tras, exhaust & park. By owner, chrome. Hard/soft $207,000. 541-549-1446 bags & much more. $11,995, 762 541-306-6505 or Homes with Acreage 503-819-8100. Sisters Homes

looking for?

TOUR OF HOMES Open 10-6 2334 NW Frazer Lane Zero Energy Home In NorthWest Crossing Alison Mata, Broker

541-280-6250

1592 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 865 bath, site-built, 2 car ATVs garage, 24x36 shop w/10’ ceilings & 220V power, all on 1.22 treed Gokart, 110 CC, 3 spd forward + reverse, good acre lot in CRR. cond., $675, call $195,000. http://bend.craigslist.org/ 541-306-9138 reo/3069581828.html Call 541-633- 9613 764

Farms & Ranches 35-Acre irrigated farm Polaris Predator 500 close to Prineville, sport quad 2004. Runs presently in hay, cattle Homes for Sale & rides great. $2800/ & onions. Price reobo. 541-647-8931 duced to $298,000! 4270 sq ft, 6 bdrm, 6 ba, Yamaha Grizzly 700 FI 541-410-3425. 4-car, corner, .83 acre 2009, 543 mi, 2WD/ mtn view, by owner. 4WD, black w/EPS, $590,000 541-390-0886 WANTED: Ranch, will fuel injection, indepenwork trade for finSee: bloomkey.com/8779 dent rear suspension ished, Mt./Columbia winch w/handle conRiver View, gated, BANK OWNED HOMES! trols & remote, ps, residential developFREE List w/Pics! auto, large racks, exc. ment in the Columbia www.BendRepos.com cond., $7850, River Gorge, bend and beyond real estate 541-322-0215 509-767-1539. 20967 yeoman, bend or 745

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E4 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN 870

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Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Canopies & Campers

Antique & Classic Autos

Pickups

12’ Sea King Trailer, 541-385-6202.

Boat/ $750,

announcements Oregon Duck Football Parking, Season Passes available for cars and RV's. Call to reserve your spot today! 541-521-3086

12’ Smoker Craft, 5hp motor, located in Sunriver. Now $775 obo. 503-319-5745.

17’ 1984 Chris Craft - Scorpion, 140 HP inboard/outboard, 2 depth finders, trolling motor, full cover, EZ - Load trailer, $3500 OBO. 541-382-3728.

18.5’ ‘05 Reinell 185, V-6 Volvo Penta, 270HP, low hrs., must see, $17,500, 541-330-3939 19.5’ 1988 373V Ranger Bass Boat, Mercury 115 Motor, Ranger trailer, trolling elec. motor, fish finder & sonor, 2 live wells & all accessories, new batteries & tires, great cond., $6500. 541-923-6555.

personals I, Robert O. Heater, am no longer responsible for any debts other than my own, effective July 17, 2012.

17’

Seaswirl,

175HP in/ outboard, open bow, new upholster, $2900, 541-389-9684.

19.5’ Ski Nautique 1995, mint cond., custom stereo, tandem trailer, $11,750, 541-420-9670

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Building/Contracting

Handyman

Landscaping/Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Computer/Cabling Install

Kelly Kerfoot Construction

28 yrs experience in Central Oregon!

• Senior Discounts • Licensed, Bonded, Insured • CCB#47120

541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422 Landscaping/Yard Care

More Than Service Peace of Mind

Fire Protection Fuels Reduction •Tall Grass •Low Limbs •Brush and Debris Protect your home with defensible space

Landscape Maintenance

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding Sprinkler Adjustments

Fertilizer included with monthly program USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! Door-to-door selling with fast results! It’s the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classiied

541-385-5809 Electrical Services

Its not too late for a beautiful landscape

•Lawn Restoration •Weed Free Beds •Bark Installation EXPERIENCED

Commercial & Residential

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Handyman

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Used out-drive parts - Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Home Improvement

Quality & Honesty From carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering installations/removal.

Debris Removal

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

www.hirealicensedcontractor. com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

19-ft Mastercraft ProStar 190 inboard, 1987, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000 obo. 541-231-8709

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Landscape Construction which includes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-features, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be licensed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be included in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before contracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Itasca Sun Cruiser 1997, 460 Ford, Class A, 26K mi., 37’, living room slide, new awnings, new fridge, 8 new tires, 2 A/C, 6.5 Onan Gen., new batteries, tow pkg., rear towing TV, 2 tv’s, new hydraulic jack springs, tandem axel, $15,000, 541-385-1782

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C,

6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $49,900, 541-480-8648

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com 882

Fifth Wheels

Monaco Dynasty 2004, loaded, 3 slides, diesel, Reduced - now $129,900, 541-9238572 or 541-749-0037

National Sea Breeze 2004 M-1341 35’, gas, 2 power slides, upgraded queen mattress, hyd. leveling system, rear camera & monitor, only 6k mi. A steal at $43,000! 541-480-0617 RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work, You Keep The Cash, On-Site Credit Approval Team, Web Site Presence, We Take Trade-Ins. Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend 541-330-2495

Alfa Ideal 2001, 31’, 3 slides, island kitchen, AC/heat pump, generator, satellite system, 2 flatscreen TVs, hitch & awning incl. $16,000. (Dodge 3500 1 ton also available) 541-388-1529;408-4877 Alpenlite 36’ 2002, all weather, 3 slides, king bed, side-byside fridge, non smoking, king dome, Onan gen. & much more. $19,000. 541-914-5372

Arctic Fox Model 860 2003 truck camper, 37 hrs on generator, solar panel, air, Magic fan, 541-647-2822 slide-out. Like new, Chev Corvair Monza conHertzBend.com $12,500. 541-548-3818 vertible,1964, new top & or 541-480-9069 tranny, runs great, exlnt Ford F350 2003 Superduty, 4x4. $22,995. Canopy, Full Size Gem cruising car! $5500 obo. Top Workman, ladder 541-420-5205 rack, $200, 325-6416 Chevy 1954, 5 window, 350 V-8, auto/ps, Lance 835 needs minor meCamper, 2000 chanical work, exte- #B94423 541-598-3750 Great cond, used very rior good, new paint; aaaoregonautosource.com little, bathroom with needs some gauges, shower, plus outside gun metal grey, $6100 shower & awning. Easy obo. 503-504-2764, loading electric jacks. CRR. New tags! $9000 obo. 541-420-9110

Lance-Legend 990 Ford F250 2011 Super 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, Duty Lariat Edition exc. cond., generator, QUIET diesel, low solar-cell, large refrig, mileage with 5th AC, micro., magic fan, Chevy Wagon 1957, wheel hitch, toolbox 4-dr., complete, bathroom shower, and tonneau cover. $15,000 OBO, trades, removable carpet, Available for showing please call custom windows, outin Bend. $40,000 541-420-5453. door shower/awning OBO (317) 966-2189. set-up for winterizing, Chrysler 300 Coupe Ford F250 XLT ‘95, 4WD elec. jacks, CD/ste1967, 440 engine, auto, long bed, 3/4 ton, reo/4’ stinger. $7500. auto. trans, ps, air, 8600 GVW, white,178K Bend, 541.279.0458 frame on rebuild, remi, AC, pw, pdl, Sirius, painted original blue, Lance Squire Camper. tow pkg., bedliner, bed original blue interior, 1993 Fully self-conrail caps, rear slide original hub caps, exc. tained. Perfect huntwindow, new tires, rachrome, asking $9000 ing/fishing rig. Cab diator, water pump, or make offer. -over; 8' bed length. hoses, brakes, more, 541-385-9350. $3900. 541-923-2593. $5200, 541-322-0215

Autos & Transportation Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $9750 OBO/trade for small trailer, 541-923-3417

900

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

908

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Redmond: 541-548-5254

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, fireplace, 2 flat screen TVs. $60,000. 541-480-3923

Dodge Dakota 2002, Quad cab, 4X4. VIN#715579. $9,995

FIAT 1800 1978, 5-spd, door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard 1/3 interest in Columtop, Reduced! $5,500. bia 400, located at 541-317-9319 or Sunriver. $138,500. 541-647-8483 Call 541-647-3718

Ford F-350 XLT 2003, 4X4, 6L diesel, 6-spd manual, Super Cab, short box, 12K Warn winch, custom bumper & canopy, running boards, 2 sets tires, wheels & chains, many extras, perfect, ONLY 29,800 miles, $27,500 OBO, 541-504-8316. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford Ranger XLT 1998 X-cab

2.5L 4-cyl engine, 5-spd standard trans, long bed, newer motor & paint, new clutch & tires, excellent condition, clean, $4500. Call 541-447-6552

Southwind 35.5’ Triton, 2008,V10, 2 slides, Dupont UV coat, 7500 mi. 1/3 interest in wellAvg NADA ret.114,343; equipped IFR Beech Ads published in "Waasking $99,000. Bonanza A36, lotercraft" include: KayCall 541-923-2774 cated KBDN. $55,000. aks, rafts and motor541-419-9510 ized personal Tow Dolly, 2010 Stehl, Ford Galaxie 500 1963, watercrafts. For surge brakes, new Executive Hangar 2 dr. hardtop,fastback, "boats" please see straps, tongue wheel, at Bend Airport 390 v8,auto, pwr. steer & Ford Super Duty F-250 Class 870. aux. lights & ramps, Fleetwood Wilderness 2001, 4X4, very good radio (orig),541-419-4989 (KBDN) 36’, 2005, 4 slides, exc. cond., $850, shape, V10 engine, 541-385-5809 rear bdrm, fireplace, 60’ wide x 50’ deep, Ford Mustang Coupe 541-480-6992. $9800, 541-815-9939 w/55’ wide x 17’ high AC, W/D hkup beau1966, original owner, bi-fold door. Natural Winnebago Itasca Class tiful unit! $30,500. V8, automatic, great gas heat, office, bathC 1999, 31,135 orig. 541-815-2380 shape, $9000 OBO. room. Parking for 6 miles, great condition, 530-515-8199 cars. Adjacent to Queen rear bed, two GMC ½-ton Pickup, TVs, microwave, autoFrontage Rd; great 1972, LWB, 350hi Ford Mustang GT steps, sleeps 5, outvisibility for aviation motor, mechanically Kayak, Eddyline Convertible - 1987 side shower, exterior bus. 1jetjock@q.com A-1, interior great; Sandpiper, 12’, like V8, 5-spd, leather, TV plug & radio, gen541-948-2126 body needs some new, $975, CD player, maroon erator, $14,900. TLC. $4000 OBO. Montana 3400RL 2008, 4 541-420-3277. paint, excellent cond, 760-702-6254 Call 541-382-9441 slides, no smokers or low miles, $7500. pets, limited usage, Call 541-504-4981 5500 watt Onan gen, solar panel, fireplace, dual A/C, central vac, elect. awning w/sun- ONLY 2 OWNERSHIP International Flat screen arctic pkg, rear Bed Pickup 1963, 1 SHARES LEFT! Winnebago Outlook receiver, alum wheels, 2 Sea Kayaks - His & ton dually, 4 spd. Economical flying in 32’ 2008, Ford V10 TVs, many extras. Hers, Eddyline Wind trans., great MPG, your own Cessna $35,500. 541-416-8087 engine, Wineguard Dancers,17’, fiberglass could be exc. wood 172/180 HP for only GMC ½ ton 1971, Only sat, TV, surround boats, all equip incl., hauler, runs great, $10,000! Based at $19,700! Original low sound stereo + more. paddles, personal floMontana 34’ 2003, new brakes, $1950. BDN. Call Gabe at mile, exceptional, 3rd tation devices,dry bags, Reduced to $49,000. 2 slides, exc. cond. 541-419-5480. Professional Air! owner. 951-699-7171 541-526-1622 or spray skirts,roof rack w/ throughout, arctic 541-388-0019 541-728-6793 towers & cradles -- Just winter pkg., new Nissan Frontier 2011 add water, $1250/boat Redmond large exec. 10-ply tires, W/D Crewcab , $27,988 881 Firm. 541-504-8557. hangar for lease: #425533 ready, $18,000, Travel Trailers Mercury Monterrey Pvt. bath, heat, office, 880 541-390-6531 1965, Exc. All original, lights. Call Ben, Motorhomes 541-350-9729 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 916 Bounder Freightliner High Compression 1999,Cummings Turbo engine, new tires & liTrucks & 541-598-3750 Diesel, 43K mi., new cense, reduced to aaaoregonautosource.com Heavy Equipment tires, 1 owner, W/D, ice $2850, 541-410-3425. maker, 1 slide, 2 TV’s, Cardinal 33’ 2007, year CD, DVD player, die- round living, 8’ closet, 2 MONTANA 3585 2008, Freightliner 2000, sel gen, very clean, slides, 2 TVs, surround exc. cond., 3 slides, 24’ van box, 8.3L $22,800. In $39,000, 541-526-1099 sound, king bed, lrg LR, Arc210 HP eng. in THE BETTER WAY (10-5) or 503-442-3966 Prineville, 509-521-0369 tic insulation, all opgood cond. $9000, TO BUY A CAR! tions $37,500. 541-749-0724. 541-420-3250 Coachmen Call a Pro Plymouth Barracuda ‘00 Chevy Suburban Freelander, 2011 Open Road 37' 2004 1966, original car! 300 Great people mover $ Whether you need a 27’, queen bed, 1 3 slides, W/D hookup, hp, 360 V8, center- #105428 ................ 6,741 fence ixed, hedges slide, HDTV, DVD, large LR w/rear winlines, (Original 273 ‘79 Jeep CJ-7 4000w generator, ditrimmed or a house Painting/Wall Covering dow. Desk area. eng & wheels incl.) Rare Find 6-Cyl nette, couch, 450 #836691 ................ $8,995 Asking $19,750 OBO 541-593-2597 built, you’ll ind Hyster H25E, runs Ford V10, 28K miles, ‘00 Chevy Silverado Call (541) 280-7879 well, 2982 Hours, professional help in like new, $48,000. 933 Very Clean visit rvt.com $3500, call 541-923-9754 #284990 ............... $9,057 The Bulletin’s “Call a Pickups ad#104243920 541-749-0724 ‘02 Dodge Dakota for pics Service Professional” Quad Cab 4x4 *** Directory #715579 ................ $9,995 CHECK YOUR AD ‘10 Chevy Cobalt 541-385-5809 Please check your ad #110478A .......... $12,995 on the first day it runs ‘08 Ford Fusion to make sure it is cor29 MPG! rect. Sometimes in#183344 ............. $13,890 Country Coach Intrigue Peterbilt 359 potable structions over the Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th ‘10 Dodge Journey Fleetwood 28’ Pioneer 2002, 40' Tag axle. water truck, 1990, phone are miswheel, 1 slide, AC, 400hp Cummins Die- 2003, 13’ slide, sleeps 3200 gal. tank, 5hp understood and an error Deal Of The Week $ #232806 ............. 13,995 TV,full awning, excelsel. Two slide-outs. 6, walk-around bed with pump, 4-3" hoses, can occur in your ad. ‘10 Toyota Corolla lent shape, $23,900. camlocks, $25,000. If this happens to your 41,000 miles. Most new mattress; power 34 MPG! 541-350-8629 very clean 541-820-3724 options. $110,000 hitch, ad, please contact us #395121 ............. $13,995 $11,500. Please call OBO 541-678-5712 the first day your ad ‘11 Nissan Versa 925 541-548-4284. appears and we will 32 MPG! Utility Trailers CAN’T BEAT THIS! #461150 ............. $13,995 be happy to fix it Look before you ‘11 Suzuki SX-4 as soon as we can. buy, below market 33 MPG! Deadlines are: Weekvalue ! Size & mile#302264 ............. $15,995 days 12:00 noon for Regal Prowler AX6 Exage DOES matter, ‘10 Nissan Altima next day, Sat. 11:00 Big Tex Landscaptreme Edition 38’ ‘05, Class A 32’ HurriHybrid a.m. for Sunday; Sat. ing/ ATV Trailer, 4 slides,2 fireplaces, all 33 MPG! cane by Four Winds, Springdale 29’ 2007, 12:00 for Monday. If dual axle flatbed, #114849A .......... $17,299 maple cabs, king bed/ 2007. 12,500 mi, all we can assist you, slide,Bunkhouse style, bdrm separated w/slide 7’x16’, 7000 lb. ‘11 Nissan Cube amenities, Ford V10, please call us: sleeps 7-8, excellent Room Galore! glass dr,loaded,always GVW, all steel, lthr, cherry, slides, 541-385-5809 condition, $16,900, #208360 ............. $17,495 garaged,lived in only 3 like new! New low $1400. The Bulletin Classified 541-390-2504 mo,brand new $54,000, ‘10 Chrysler Town & price, $54,900. 541-382-4115, or *** Country still like new, $28,500, 541-548-5216 541-280-7024. Quad Seating will deliver,see rvt.com, #232518 ............. $18,027 ad#4957646 for pics. Gulfstream Scenic Pickup box trailer, 60’s ‘11 Subaru Impreza Cory, 541-580-7334 Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Chevy, heavy duty, Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4, AWD Cummins 330 hp die$200, 541-325-6416 1995, extended cab, #511600A .......... $18,477 SPRINTER 36’ 5th sel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 long box, grill guard, ‘07 Mini Cooper “S” wheel, 2005, dual in. kitchen slide out, Sprinter 272RLS, 2009 931 running boards, bed Turbo slides, queen bed new tires,under cover, rails & canopy, 178K #T81224 ............. $18,995 29’, weatherized, like Automotive Parts, air mattress, fold out hwy. miles only,4 door miles, $4800 obo. ‘06 Lexus IS 350 new, furnished & couch. $10,500 obo. Service & Accessories fridge/freezer iceVery Clean 208-301-3321 (Bend) ready to go, incl Wine541-382-0865, #001824 ............. $22,886 maker, W/D combo, Just bought a new boat? gard Satellite dish, leave message! Chevy Silverado 1998, Custom Toyota Tundra ‘06 Dodge 2500 Interbath tub & Sell your old one in the $26,995. 541-420-9964 side bed tool box, black and silver, pro Quad Cab 4x4, Nice Lift! classiieds! Ask about our shower, 50 amp prolifted, loaded, new 33” front hitch, tailgate #288175 ............. $28,995 Super Seller rates! pane gen & more! step, weather tech tires, aluminum slot ‘12 Jeep Wrangler 541-385-5809 $55,000. floor mats, $700. Tim wheels, tow pkg., drop Rubicon 541-948-2310 Viking Tent trailer hitch, diamond plate 6-Spd Hard Top 360-771-7774 2008, clean, self Just bought a new boat? tool box, $12,000, or #164879 ............. $30,995 Jeep wheels (4) & stud contained, sleep 5, Sell your old one in the possible trade for newer ‘10 Volvo XC60 AWD Taurus 27.5’ 1988 tires, upgraded alumi- Tacoma. 541-460-9127 classiieds! Ask about our easy to tow, great Hard To Find! Everything works, num wheels, 255/55RSuper Seller rates! #L124659 ........... $33,995 cond. $6500. $1750/partial trade for Dodge 1500 2001, 4x4 17MS, $275. 541-385-5809 ‘11 Chevy Silverado 541-383-7150. car. 541-460-9127 sport, red, loaded, Call 541-389-2530 or 1500 Crew-Cab, rollbar, AND 2011 503-260-7637 Low Miles Moped Trike used 3 #212567 ............. $34,688 Tires, (4), P25/70R15, months, street legal. Through 7/23/12 Hunter’s Delight! Pack80% tread, off Chrysler All vehicles subject to prior sale, does call 541-433-2384 age deal! 1988 Winnot include tax, license or title and Van, $100, 923-3631 registration processing fee of $100. Dodge 2500 2006, nebago Super Chief, We Buy Junk Quad cab, 4X4, nice lift. Vin#’s posted at dealership. See Hertz 38K miles, great Weekend Warrior Toy Car Sales of Bend for details. Cars & Trucks! VIN#288175. $28,995 Hauler 28’ 2007,Gen, Wilderness Advantage shape; 1988 Bronco II Cash paid for junk fuel station, exc cond. 31’, 2004. 2 slides, 2 4x4 to tow, 130K vehicles, batteries & sleeps 8, black/gray TVs, micro, solar sys, mostly towed miles, 541-647-2822 541-280-9081 catalytic converters. interior, used 3X, $17,950. (Also avail: nice rig! $15,000 both. 535 NE Savannah Dr, Bend Serving all of C.O.! 541-647-2822 $24,999. 541-382-3964, leave 2003 Ford F250 Diesel CCB# 194351 HertzBend.com HertzBend.com 541-389-9188 msg. X-cab.) 541-385-5077 Call 541-408-1090 875

Watercraft

Picasso Painting

Affordable Reliable Quality Work Call

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E5

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Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

REDUCED! Ford 1978 truck, $1800 obo. V8 4 spd, runs good, new battery, spark plugs, rebuilt carb. Ex U-Haul,

Chevy Trailblazer 2005, gold, LS 4X4, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, pdl, new tires, keyless entry, 66K mi., exc. cond. $9,399. 541-598-5111

Chevy Astro Cargo Van 2001,

AUDI QUATTRO CABRIOLET 2004, extra nice, low mileage, heated seats, new Michelins, all wheel drive, $12,995 503-635-9494.

541-548-7171 Toyota Tacoma 2002, SR5, 2wd, auto OD, Xtra cab, canopy, bed liner, one owner, garaged, records, looks and runs like new. 151K mi., $6950. 541-593-5868 or 1-541-274-1006. 935

Sport Utility Vehicles

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005, low miles., good tires, new brakes, moonroof Reduced to $15,750 541-389-5016.

Jeep Willys 1947,custom, small block Chevy, PS, OD,mags+ trailer.Swap for backhoe.No am calls please. 541-389-6990

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $19,900, call 541-923-0231. Nissan Murano SL-AWD 2004, 75k, all-weather tires, tow pkg, gold metallic, beige leather int., moonroof, $14,990. 541-317-5693

GMC Denali 2003

loaded with options. Exc. cond., snow tires and rims included. 130k hwy miles. $12,000. 541-419-4890.

Jeep Cherokee 1990, Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac, dealer 4WD, 3 sets rims & maint’d, loaded, now tires, exlnt set snow $17000. 503-459-1580 tires, great 1st car! $1800. 541-633-5149

Chevy Tahoe LS 2001 4x4. 120K mi, Power seats, Tow Pkg, 3rd row seating, extra tires, CD, privacy tinting, upgraded rims. Fantastic cond. $7995 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4x4, 2000, exc cond, Contact Timm at 541-408-2393 for info 150K, new tires, studs, tow hitch, $5500 obo. or to view vehicle. 541-788-0117

pw, pdl, great cond., business car, well maint, regular oil changes, $4500, please call 541-633-5149

Honda Odyssey 2000, 1 owner, granny’s car! Very clean, V6, 135K miles. New: catalytic converter, battery, brakes & windshield; Maint. records, garaged, only $5500, SE Bend, 541-508-8784. Honda Odyssey 2006 EX-L, 2nd owner; 84K miles; Very good cond.; leather, heated seats; 6-CD player; $14,900 OBO; Dean at 541-678-2881 NISSAN QUEST 1996, 3-seat mini van, extra nice in and out $3,900. Sold my Windstar, need another van! 541-318-9999, ask for Bob. Ask about free trip to D.C. for WWII vets. 975

Automobiles Toyota 4-Runner 4x4 Ltd, 2006, Salsa Red pearl, 49,990 miles, exlnt cond, Audi Quattro 2004 A6 professionally detailed, AWD, 73k mi., $11,900 obo. 541-318-1009 $26,595. 541-390-7649

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BMW 525i 2004,

New body style, Steptronic auto., cold-weather package, premium package, heated seats, extra nice. $14,995. 503-635-9494. Buicks Galore! No junk! LeSabres, LaCrosse & Lucernes priced $3000-$8500 for serious buyers only. All are ‘98’s and newer. 541-318-9999. Ask about Free Trip to Washington, D.C. for WWII Veterans.

*** Mini Cooper “S” 2007, Turbo CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad VIN#T81224. $18,995 Toyota Camry 1999 on the first day it runs 4-dr sedan, below norto make sure it is cormal miles, great cond, rect. Sometimes inwell maintained. structions over the 541-647-2822 $4900 obo. phone are misunderHertzBend.com Call 541-923-0231 or stood and an error 541-923-2582 can occur in your ad. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl If this happens to your white, very low mi. Toyota Camry Solara SE ad, please contact us $9500. 541-788-8218. Sport Cpe, 2004, 4-cyl, the first day your ad auto, sunroof, chrome appears and we will wheels, clear coat black, Need to sell a be happy to fix it as 32mpg, 30K mi, like new! Vehicle? soon as we can. $10,795. 541-388-8887 Call The Bulletin Deadlines are: Weekand place an ad todays 12:00 noon for day! next day, Sat. 11:00 Ask about our a.m. for Sunday; Sat. "Wheel Deal"! 12:00 for Monday. If for private party we can assist you, advertisers please call us: Volvo 740 ‘87, 4-cyl,auto 541-385-5809 86k on eng.,exc. maint. The Bulletin Classified $2895, 541-301-1185. 541-385-5809 Ford Thunderbird 1988, 3.8 V-6, 35K actual mi., new hoses, belts, tires, battery, pb, ps, cruise, A/C, CD, exc. cond. in & out, 2nd owner, maint. records, must see & drive! Reduced! Now $3500, obo. 541-330-0733

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to FRAUD. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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www.youtu.be/yc0n6zVIbAc

Nissan Versa 2011, 32 MPG! VIN#461150. $13,995

541-647-2822 HertzBend.com PORSCHE 914 1974, Roller (no engine), lowered, full roll cage, 5-pt harnesses, racing seats, 911 dash & instruments, decent shape, very cool! $1699. 541-678-3249

Mercedes E320 2004, 71K miles, silver/silver, exc. cond, below Blue Find exactly what Book, $14,700 Call you are looking for in the 541-788-4229 CL AS S I F I E DS

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7023.101422 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by ALAN D ADAMS AND MARLENE B ADAMS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as File No. 7037.92920 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by John L. Ayres, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Washington grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of Mutual Bank, F.A., as beneficiary, dated 03/03/08, recorded 03/07/08, in SELECT LENDING SERVICES, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 03/05/08, rethe mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-10447, covcorded 03/11/08, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Orering the following described real property situated in said county and egon, as 2008-10908 and subsequently assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, state, to wit: N.A. SBM to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. by Assignment recorded as 2008-48878, covering the following described real property situated in PARCEL 1: The part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter said county and state, to wit: of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW1/4 NW1/4 NE 1/4 NW 1/4) of Section Twenty-Seven (27), LOT FOUR (4) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF KIWA MEADOWS SUBDIVISION, Township Twenty-Two (22) South, Range Ten (10), east of the CITY OF BEND, RECORDED JULY 31, 1980, IN CABINET B, PAGE 766, Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPT THE WEST 2.75 FEET Beginning at the Northeast corner of said SW 1/4 NW 1/4 NE 1/4 NW 1/4; THEREOF. thence Southwesterly 360.00 feet to an intersection with the Easterly right-of-way line of the Fremont Highway; thence Northwesterly PROPERTY ADDRESS: along the Easterly right-of-way line of the Fremont Highway to the West line 1435 SE LOSTINE CIRCLE BEND, OR 97702 of said SW 1/4 NW 1/4 NE 1/4 NW 1/4; Thence North Along the West line of Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to said SW1/4 NW1/4 NE1/4 NW1/4 to the Northwest Corner of said SW1/4 NW1/4 NE1/4 NW1/4; thence East along the North line of said satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the SW 1/4 NW 1/4 NE 1/4 NW 1/4 to the Northeast corner of said 1/4 NW 1/4 NE 1/4 NW 1/4, being the point of beginning. Also, starting at the West default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when one-sixteenth (1/16) corner between Section Twenty-Seven (27) and due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,245.45 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $53.03 each month beginning 08/16/11; Section Twenty-Two (22), Township Twenty-Two (22) South, Range Ten (10), East of the Willamette Meridian, thence East, 330.00 feet; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $230.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees in- thence South, 330.00 feet; thence West. 330.00 feet; thence North 330.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 2: That portion of the Northwest curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the One-Quarter of the Northwest One-Quarter (NW 1/4 NW 1/4) of Section beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its Twenty-Seven (27), Township Twenty-Two (22) South, Range Ten (10), interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying North and East of the Fremont Highway described as follows: Beginning at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $163,190.08 with interest thereon at the intersection of the East boundary of the NW 1/4 NW 1/4 of said Section and rate of 6.375 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of the Easterly right-of-way boundary of the Fremont Highway, thence North $53.03 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late along said East boundary to a point which is 160.00 feet South of the North boundary of Section 27; thence Westerly to a point on the Easterly charges of $0.00; plus advances of $230.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said right-of-way boundary of the Fremont Highway, which point is 170.00 feet Southeasterly as measured along the Easterly boundary of the highway default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of from the North boundary of Section 27; thence continuing Southeasterly the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayalong the said highway boundary to the point of beginning. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on PROPERTY ADDRESS: October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the 50770 Highway 31 La Pine, OR 97739 standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at pub- Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default lic auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,103.01 beginning grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of 09/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11; plus the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the prior accrued late charges of $467.50; plus advances of $14.00; together costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a for the protection of the above described real property and its interest written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in sums being the following, to wit: $191,000.00 with interest thereon at the this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive $0.00 each month beginning 09/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid charges of $467.50; plus advances of $14.00; together with title expense, information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestcosts, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said trustee.com. default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have penalties/premiums, if applicable. this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inand by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforauction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of ORS 86.753. the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes recosts and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inrequested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. For further information, please contact: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Kathy Taggart at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by P.O. Box 997 payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) (425)586-1900 and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of ADAMS, ALAN D. and MARLENE B. being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or (TS# 7023.101422) 1002.219141-File No. trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 andAug. 5, 2012 1002.219141 expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Ayers, John L. (TS# 7037.92920) 1002.218031-File No.

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Publication Dates: July 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2012. 1002.218031 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7763.10809 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by R. Douglas Voderberg and Janie Voderberg, husband and wife, as grantor, to AmeriTitle, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as beneficiary, dated 03/08/07, recorded 03/19/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-16141 and subsequently assigned to by Assignment recorded as , covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Description of a parcel of land situated in a portion of the West half of the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter (W1/2SW1/4NW1/4SE1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a 5/8" rebar monumenting the South quarter corner of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, the initial point; thence North 00 degrees 07'13" East along the West line of the SE 1/4 of said Section 4, 1322.37 feet to a 1/2" rebar per County survey C.S. 04226 on the South line of the NW1/4 of said SE1/4; thence North 89 degrees 56'18" East along the South line of said NW1/4SE1/4, 329.47 feet to a 5/8" rebar on the East line of the W 1/2 SW 1/4 of said NW 1/4 SE 1/4 per C.S. 12885; thence North 00 degrees 02'21" East along said East line, 660.46 feet to a 5/8" rebar on the North line of said W 1/2 SW 1/4 NW 1/4 SE 1/4 per said C.S. 12885; thence South 89 degrees 54'55" West along said North line, 285.98 feet the West easement line of Central Oregon Irrigation District's (C.O.I.D) lateral D-3, being 15.00 feet from the centerline of said lateral; thence along said lateral D-3 easement line as follows: South 14.84 feet; thence 95.56 feet along the arc of a 365.00 foot radius curve (concave East), forming a central angle of 15 degrees 00'00" and a long chord bearing South 07 degrees 30'00" East, 95.28 feet; thence South 15 degrees 00'00" East, 79.58 feet; thence 80.63 feet along the arc of a 110.00 foot radius curve (concave West), forming a central angle of 42 degrees 00'00" and a long chord bearing South 06 degrees 00'00" West, 78.84 feet; thence South 27 degrees 00'00" west, 65.53 feet; thence 131.87 feet along the arc of a 315.00 foot radius curve (concave East), forming a central angle of 23 degrees 59'12" and a long chord bearing South 15 degrees 00'24" West, 130.91 feet; thence South 03 degrees 00'48" West, 93.53 feet to the West line of said NW 1/4 SE 1/4, thus ending this boundary along said easement; thence South 00 degrees 04'54" West along said West line, 117.57 feet to the true point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 61754 Harmony Lane Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,630.15 beginning 10/01/10; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 10/16/10; plus prior accrued late charges of $360.27; plus advances of ($423.61); together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $364,190.92 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5 percent per annum beginning 09/01/10; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 10/16/10 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $360.27; plus advances of ($423.61); together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Voderberg, R. Douglas, & Janie (TS# 7763.10809) 1002.219142-File No Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219142

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES. In the Matter of the Estate of: TWYLA LEORA WILSON, Deceased. Case No. 12 PB 0068. NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed as Co-Personal Representatives. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with proper vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative in care of Max Merrill of Merrill O’Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way. Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702, within four (4) months after the date of first publication of This notice, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may he affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Co-Personal Representatives, or the attorney for the Co-Personal Representatives at the address shown below. Dated and first published July 22, 2012. Gary Robert Wilson, Co-Personal Representative and Jimmy Dean Wilson, Co-Personal Representative. Co-Personal Representatives: Gary Robert Wilson, 65320 Tweed Road, Bend, OR 97701, (541) 389-1211 and Jimmy Dean Wilson, 21575 McGilvary Road, Bend, OR 97702, (541) 480-4744. Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: Max Merrill, OSB #71002, Merrill O’Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702, Phone: (541) 389-1770, Fax: (541) 389-1777, Email:

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS. DANIEL J. VADER has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of VIRGINIA LEE VADER, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 12 PB 0070. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following named attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: July 22, 2012. HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP, 716 NW HARRIMAN, BEND, OR 97701, 541-382-4980. PUBLIC NOTICE AUCTION NOTICE On Friday Aug. 3, 2012 at 1:00 p.m., there will be a foreclosure sale of personal property, at Storage Solutions, 2669 NE Twin Knolls Dr., Bend, Oregon. The contents of these units will be sold unless payment in full is made prior to the time of sale. CASH ONLY NO CHECKS NO CREDIT CARDS. Units to be sold are: Butterfield Unit 1115 & 1324, Mauldin Unit 622, Nelson Unit 309, Hickman Unit 415, Harrison Unit 1538, Zalac Unit 345, Roberts Unit 420, Pearson Unit 442, Schweitzer Unit 219, Eggiman Unit 115, Hinziman Unit 1103, Levison Unit 547.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF ELECTION FOR DISTRICT DIRECTORS OF THE DESCHUTES SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that on November 6, 2012, an election will be held for the purpose of electing board director(s) to the following positions for the Deschutes Soil and Water Conservation District. Positions: Zones 2, 3, 4, 5 and At-Large Position 1. Zone boundaries, eligibility requirements,and copies of the required elections forms may be obtained at the SWCD office located at the USDA Service Center, 625 SE Salmon Ave., Suite 7, Redmond OR 97756. Phone: 541-923-2204. Election forms and information may also be found at: http://oregon.gov/O DA/SWCD/services. shtml Each candidate must file a Declaration of Candidacy and a petition for Nomination for Office with the Oregon Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Division. The filing deadline is 5:00 p.m. on August 28, 2012.

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PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7023.101187 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by James R. MacKereth and Lynn D. MacKereth, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 09/19/07, recorded 09/25/07, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-51698 and re-recorded 5/22/12 as 2012-019613, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 4, REDSIDE, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 340 Northwest 27th Court Redmond, OR 97756-7216

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Lot 21 of Chestnut Park, Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County Oregon. File No. 7228.22598 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Steven Ray Gonzalez, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as PROPERTY ADDRESS: trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYS20378 SHETLAND LOOP BEND, OR 97701-8919 TEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC, as beneficiary, dated 05/14/07, recorded 05/29/07, in the mortgage Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-30018 and subsequently satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default assigned to Aurora Bank FSB by Assignment, covering the following dehas been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,594.09 beginning A PORTION OF LOT ONE (NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE 02/01/12; plus late charges of $68.63 each month beginning 02/16/12; NORTHEAST QUARTER) OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 18, SOUTH, plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $55.00; toRANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inDESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS LOCATED 25.21 FEET WEST beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its AND 24.86 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. SECTION 2; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 40'35" WEST 199.95 FEET; By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 26'43" WEST, 400.00 FEET; THENCE obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said SOUTH 89 DEGREES 40'35" EAST 199.72 FEET; THENCE NORTH sums being the following, to wit: $244,000.00 with interest thereon at the 0 DEGREES 28'25" EAST 400.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. rate of 6.75 percent per annum beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION CONVEYED TO $68.63 each month beginning 02/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late DESCHUTES COUNTY BY DEED RECORDED JULY 3, 1990, IN charges of $0.00; plus advances of $55.00; together with title expense, BOOK 212, PAGE 2385, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS. costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of PROPERTY ADDRESS: the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay21589 BEAR CREEK RD BEND, OR 97701 ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to October 5, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stansatisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,109.09 beginning auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real 10/01/11; plus late charges of $105.45 each month beginning 10/16/11; property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $98.00; toexecution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees ingrantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's sums being the following, to wit: $361,558.84 with interest thereon at the "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physirate of 7 percent per annum beginning 09/01/11; plus late charges of cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt $105.45 each month beginning 10/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in charges of $0.00; plus advances of $98.00; together with title expense, this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestment penalties/premiums, if applicable. trustee.com. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, September 28, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inthis foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforgrantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested ORS 86.753. pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes rewritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physihonored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" ininformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpotrustee.com. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by For further information, please contact: payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such Kathy Taggart portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or FRANK, DAVID MICHAEL and BROWN, MELANIE LYNN trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfor(TS# 7023.101111) 1002.217775-File No. mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with Publication Dates: July 8, 15, 22 and 29, 2012. 1002.217775 trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be PUBLIC NOTICE honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which File No. 7037.91284 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by James L. Dodge and Correna S. Dodge, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inFirst American Title, as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, F.A., clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of as beneficiary, dated 04/03/07, recorded 05/04/07, in the mortgage auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporecords of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-25659, covering the folrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northlowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 GONZALEZ, STEVEN RAY (TS# 7228.22598) 1002.217465-File No.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Publication Dates: July 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2012. 1002.217465 default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,342.26 beginning 11/01/11 and $1,344.21 beginning 3/01/12; plus late charges of $58.12 each month beginning 11/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $100.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $179,059.27 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 10/01/11; plus late charges of $58.12 each month beginning 11/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $100.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 MACKERETH, JAMES R. and LYNN D. (TS# 7023.101187) 1002.219140-File No. Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219140

File No. 7023.101111 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by David Michael Frank, a Single Person and Melanie Lynn Brown, a Single Person., as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 04/11/07, recorded 04/13/07, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2007-21292, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit:

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

Lot 1, Block 1, Canyon Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2901 Northeast Shepard Road Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,544.57 beginning 08/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 08/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $259.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $203,819.61 with interest thereon at the rate of 6 percent per annum beginning 07/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 08/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $259.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Dodge, James L. & Correna S. (TS# 7037.91284) 1002.219112-File No. Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219112

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 E7 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7763.10762 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7763.10189 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Clifford R Peck and Karlene F Peck, As Tenants by the Entirety, as David N. Telfer, an unmarried man, as grantor, to First American Title Ins. grantor, to Western Title and Escrow Company, a OR corporation, as Co., as trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as beneficiary, trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, Washington corporation, as dated 04/03/07, recorded 04/05/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes beneficiary, dated 07/11/03, recorded 07/18/03, in the mortgage records of County, Oregon, as 2007-19809 and subsequently assigned to Oregon Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2003-48355, covering the following deHousing & Community Services by Assignment recorded as 2007-20956, scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 14, Stonehedge West Phase One, Deschutes County, Oregon. Lot 4 of Carly Meadows, Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon PROPERTY ADDRESS: 833 Southwest 24th Court Redmond, OR 97756 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3164 Southwest Peridot Avenue Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,045.35 beginning default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when 05/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 05/16/11; plus due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,680.35 beginning prior accrued late charges of $477.34; plus advances of $0.00; together 02/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 02/16/11; plus with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein prior accrued late charges of $261.64; plus advances of $0.00; together by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein for the protection of the above described real property and its interest by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. for the protection of the above described real property and its interest By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $137,744.91 with interest thereon at the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 4.625 percent per annum beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $212,448.33 with interest thereon at the $0.00 each month beginning 05/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 01/01/11; plus late charges of charges of $477.34; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, $0.00 each month beginning 02/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said charges of $261.64; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaydefault; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayWHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inOctober 1, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the stanside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, dard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physiwritten request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physirequested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid trustee.com. information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestNotice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, trustee.com. at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforbeing cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforactually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with ORS 86.753. trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reORS 86.753. ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes rehonored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inas well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoclude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpowesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith For further information, please contact: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Heather L. Smith P.O. Box 997 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 (425)586-1900 Telfer, David N. Peck, Clifford R. & Karlene F. (TS# 7763.10189) 1002.218090-File No. (TS# 7763.10762) 1002.202346-File No. Publication Dates: July 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2012. 1002.218090 Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.202346

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7037.93490 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Barney A Lerten, Debra Ann Lerten, husband and wife, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 09/09/05, recorded 09/16/05, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2005-62442, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot one hundred twenty (120), Foxborough-Phase 2, Deschutes County, Oregon PROPERTY ADDRESS: 20627 Jayhawk Lane Bend, OR 97702

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7023.101382 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Paul A Devito and Amy Devito, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 12/16/11, recorded 12/23/11, in the mortgage records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2011-045635, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 212, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top-Phase 10, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 583 Northwest Flagline Drive Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2,149.29 beginning 03/01/12; plus late charges of $87.07 each month beginning 03/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $140.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $244,521.35 with interest thereon at the rate of 3.375 percent per annum beginning 02/01/12; plus late charges of $87.07 each month beginning 03/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $140.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 DEVITO, PAUL A. and AMY (TS# 7023.101382) 1002.219681-File No. Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.219681

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7777.18061 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 7023.100560 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Michael Boyle and Lori Boyle, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to FiDale E. Benzel and Lynn Benzel, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to delity National Title Ins Co, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Financial Oregon, Inc., as as beneficiary, dated 10/11/10, recorded 11/04/10, in the mortgage beneficiary, dated 12/08/07, recorded 12/14/07, in the mortgage records of records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, as 2010-44201, covering the Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-64058, covering the following defollowing described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: scribed real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot Six (6), Block Twenty-three (23), Tall Pines Fifth Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 53190 WOODSTOCK DR LA PINE, OR 97739

Lot Five, Block One, Paladin Ranch Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon Excepting Therefrom that portion deeded to State of Oregon, by and through its Department of Transportation, Highway Division by instrument recorded May 6, 1992, in Book 264, Page 1521, Official Records. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 66932 SAGEBRUSH LANE BEND, OR 97701-9292

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,584.95 beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $199.65; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $204,589.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $199.65; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 16, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,447.87 beginning 06/13/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 06/28/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $941.07; plus advances of $1,440.67 that represent balance of payment; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $138,402.65 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.88 percent per annum beginning 05/13/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 06/28/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $941.07; plus advances of $1,440.67 that represent balance of payment; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property nd its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 17, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,424.41 beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of $59.54 each month beginning 01/16/12; plus prior accrued late charges of $349.53; plus advances of $195.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $227,621.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 4.625 percent per annum beginning 12/01/11; plus late charges of $59.54 each month beginning 01/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $349.53; plus advances of $195.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com.

For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Lerten, Barney and Debra (TS# 7037.93490) 1002.219600-File No.

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 BENZEL, DALE and LYNN (TS# 7777.18061) 1002.219133-File No.

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 BOYLE, MICHAEL and LORI (TS# 7023.100560) 1002.219680-File No.

Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219600

Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219133

Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.219680

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED • 541-385-5809

E8 SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

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Legal Notices

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File No. 7777.18149 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by PUBLIC NOTICE Eric Fogel and Cynthia Fogel as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Stewart Title of Oregon, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Financial Oregon, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 05/30/07, recorded 06/04/07, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-31631, covering the File No. 8510.20031 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Stephen C. Cartmill and Debrah K. Cartmill, as tenants by the entirety, as following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of ING Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 10/29/08, recorded 11/05/08, in the mortgage records of DesLot Twelve (12) in Block Twenty-two (22) of Tall Pines - Fourth Addition, chutes County, Oregon, as 2008-44541, covering the following described Deschutes County Oregon. real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PROPERTY ADDRESS: Lot Seven (7) in Block One (1), of Mt. Vista First Addition, 15962 FALCON LN LA PINE, OR 97739 recorded March 30, 1989, in Cabinet C, Page 301, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default PROPERTY ADDRESS: has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the 21065 Lost Valley Court Bend, OR 97702 default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,221.18 beginning 11/10/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 11/25/11; plus Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default prior accrued late charges of $427.35; plus advances of $61.05; together has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,276.98 beginning for the protection of the above described real property and its interest 03/01/11; plus late charges of $63.85 each month beginning 03/16/11; therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. plus advances of $3,006.91; together with title expense, costs, trustee's By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above sums being the following, to wit: $167,090.99 with interest thereon at the described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment rate of 6.75 percent per annum beginning 10/10/11; plus late charges of penalties/premiums, if applicable. $0.00 each month beginning 11/25/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the charges of $427.35; plus advances of $61.05; together with title expense, obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said sums being the following, to wit: $273,686.08 with interest thereon at the default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 02/01/11; plus late charges of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay$63.85 each month beginning 03/16/11 until paid; plus advances of ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. $3,006.91; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inand its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 11, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inproperty which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physirecord legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestthis notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no trustee.com. record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestthis foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by trustee.com. payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforportion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforORS 86.753. mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes reactually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms ORS 86.753. of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inof the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoas well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoFor further information, please contact: rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northKathy Taggart westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 For further information, please contact: Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Nanci Lambert (425)586-1900 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. FOGEL, CYNTHIA L. and ERIC R. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 (TS# 7777.18149) 1002.219672-File No. Cartmill, Stephen C. and Debrah K. (TS# 8510.20031) 1002.201418-File No. Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.219672 Publication Dates: July 8, 15, 22 and 29, 2012. 1002.201418 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE File No. 7037.79510 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gary K Johansen, Married, Jill E Johansen, Married, as grantor, to Non designated, as trustee, in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 04/28/08, recorded 04/30/08, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-19015 , covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: The West 73 feet of Lot 4, Block 16, Park Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon; PROPERTY ADDRESS: 152 & 156 Northwest Jefferson Place Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,287.41 beginning 04/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 04/16/11; plus prior accrued late charges of $168.60; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $182,826.01 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875 percent per annum beginning 03/01/11; plus late charges of $0.00 each month beginning 04/16/11 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $168.60; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 10, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Heather L. Smith Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Johansen, Gary K and Jill E (TS# 7037.79510) 1002.218975-File No. Publication Dates: July 8, 15, 22 and 29, 2012. 1002.218975 PUBLIC NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

File No. 7301.24127 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 8308.20208 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by File No. 8119.20034 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Joseph C. Pickett, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of MortJoshua A Pleasant and SueAnn P. Pleasant as tenants by the entirety, as Vernon A. Cooper and Sandra Cooper, Husband and Wife, as grantor, to gage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Wealthgrantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Bank of The Cascades MortPacific Northwest Title Company of Oregon, Inc., as trustee, in favor of bridge Mortgage Corp., as beneficiary, dated 05/25/07, recorded 06/04/07, gage Center, as beneficiary, dated 02/13/08, recorded 02/21/08, in the Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2007-31481 mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2008-07742 and subQuicken Loans, Inc., as beneficiary, dated 04/18/11, recorded 04/29/11, in and subsequently assigned to CitiMortgage, Inc. by Assignment recorded sequently assigned to Pennymac Loan Services, LLC. by Assignment rethe mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2011-15944 and as 2008-39110, covering the following described real property situated in corded as 2010-24674, covering the following described real property subsequently assigned to Quicken Loans, Inc. by Assignment, covering said county and state, to wit: situated in said county and state, to wit: the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lots Seven (7) and Eight (8) in Block Twenty-Three (23), Lot twenty-two (22), South Village, recorded October 13, 2004, DAVIDSON ADDITION TO SISTERS, in Cabinet G, Page 469, Deschutes County, Oregon. Lot Five (5), Block Three (3), of Alpine Meadows, Deschutes County, Oregon Subdivision according to the Official Plat thereof on file with the Deschutes County Clerk. PROPERTY ADDRESS: PROPERTY ADDRESS: 61012 Borden Dr Bend, OR 97702 364 SOUTH OAK STREET SISTERS, OR 97759 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 52970 Sundown Drive La Pine, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,214.08 beginning default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,324.35 beginning 06/01/10; plus late charges of $52.67 each month beginning 06/16/10; due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,261.96 beginning 09/01/08 and monthly payments of $1,250.41 beginning 01/01/12; plus plus prior accrued late charges of ($526.70); plus advances of $4,321.09; 02/01/12; plus late charges of $54.14 each month beginning 02/16/12; late charges of $55.23 each month beginning 09/16/08; plus prior accrued together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inplus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $25.00; tolate charges of $0.00; plus advances of $3,691.80; together with title excurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees inpense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its curred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the prointerest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its tection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the sums being the following, to wit: $177,602.92 with interest thereon at the By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said rate of 5.625 percent per annum beginning 05/01/10; plus late charges of sums being the following, to wit: $194,272.66 with interest thereon at the sums being the following, to wit: $154,991.06 with interest thereon at the $52.67 each month beginning 06/16/10 until paid; plus prior accrued late rate of 5.25 percent per annum beginning 01/01/12; plus late charges of rate of 7.5 percent per annum beginning 08/01/08; plus late charges of charges of ($526.70); plus advances of $4,321.09; together with title ex$54.14 each month beginning 02/16/12 until paid; plus prior accrued late $55.23 each month beginning 09/16/08 until paid; plus prior accrued late pense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason charges of $0.00; plus advances of $25.00; together with title expense, charges of $0.00; plus advances of $3,691.80; together with title expense, of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said he protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepaythe above described real property and its interest therein; and prepay- WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. ment penalties/premiums, if applicable. October 15, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the October 19, 2012 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: instandard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inBond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, side the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physi"Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physioffices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt cal offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestinformation is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwestwww.northwesttrustee.com. trustee.com. trustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perfortrust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the perforperformance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses mance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said provided by said ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes rereceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be ceived less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" inis secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" in"trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of clude their respective successors in interest, if any. The trustee's rules of if any. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpoauction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorpowww.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You rated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northrated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northmay also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. westtrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. www.USA-Foreclosure.com. For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 PICKETT, JOSEPH C. & BERG, AMY I (TS# 7301.24127) 1002.99178-File No. Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.99178

For further information, please contact: Claire Swazey Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 Pleasant, Joshua and SueAnn (TS# 8308.20208) 1002.219353-File No. Publication Dates: July 15, 22, 29 and Aug. 5, 2012 1002.219353

For further information, please contact: Kathy Taggart Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425)586-1900 COOPER, VERNON A. and SANDRA (TS# 8119.20034) 1002.219678-File No. Publication Dates: July 22, 29, Aug. 5 and 12, 2012 1002.219678

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

Where Obama truly excels

I

t won’t help him win many votes this year, but it should be noted that Barack Obama has been a good foreign policy president. He, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary Hillary Clinton and the rest of his team have created a style of policymaking that is flexible, incremental and well adapted to the specific circumstances of this moment. Following a foreign policy hedgehog, Obama’s been a pretty effective fox. Some eras call for bold doctrines, new global architecture and “Present at the Creation” moments. This is not one of those eras. Today, the world is like a cocktail party at which everybody is suffering from indigestion or some other internal ailment. People are interacting with each other, but they’re mostly focused on the godawful stuff going on inside. Europe has the euro mess. The Middle East has the Arab Spring. The U.S. has the economic stagnation and the debt. The Chinese have their perpetual growth and stability issues. It’s not multi-polarity; it’s multiproblemarity. As a result, this is more of an age of anxiety than of straightup conflict. There are more circumstances in which nations are ambiguously attached. In this environment, you don’t need big, bold visionaries. You need leaders who will pay minute attention to the unique details and fleeting properties of each region’s specific circumstances. You need people who can improvise, shift and play it by ear. Obama, Clinton and the rest are well suited to these sorts of tasks. Obama has shown a good ability to combine a realist, power-politics mindset with a warm appreciation of democracy and human rights. Early in his term, he responded poorly to the street marches in Tehran. But his administration has embraced a freedom agenda more aggressively since then, responding fairly well to the Arab Spring, rejecting those who wanted to stand by the collapsing dictatorships and using American power in a mostly successful humanitarian intervention in Libya. Obama has also shown an impressive ability to learn along the way. He came into office trying to dialogue with dictators in Iran and North Korea. When that didn’t work, he learned his lesson and has been much more confrontational since. Early in his term, he tried nation-building in Afghanistan. When that, unfortunately, didn’t work, he scaled back that effort. Obama has managed ambiguity well. This is most important in the case of China. When the Chinese military was overly aggressive, he stood up to China and reasserted America’s permanent presence in the Pacific. At the same time, it’s misleading to say there is a single China policy. Obama has also dealt with uncertainty pretty well. No one knows what will happen if Israel or the U.S. strikes Iran’s nuclear facilities. Confronted with that shroud of ignorance, Obama has properly pushed back the moment of decision-making for as long as possible, just in case anything positive turns up. There have been failures on Obama’s watch, of course. Some of these flow from executive hubris. Obama believed that he could help resolve the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. He proceeded clumsily, pushed everybody into a corner and now peace is farther away than ever. Some failures flow from excessive politicization. An inexcusable blunder by Obama was to announce the withdrawal date from Afghanistan at the same time he announced the surge into Afghanistan. Overall, though, the record is impressive. Obama has moved more aggressively both to defeat enemies and to champion democracy. He has demonstrated that talk of American decline is hooey. The U.S. is still responsible for maintaining global order, for keeping people, goods and ideas moving freely. And, partly as a result of his efforts, the world of foreign affairs is relatively uncontentious right now. Foreign policy is not a hot campaign issue. Mitt Romney is having a great deal of trouble identifying profound disagreements. If that’s not a sign of success, I don’t know what is. — David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times. John Costa’s column will return.

www.bendbulletin.com/opinion

Divided by

‘I do’ • Married parents can give their children profound developmental and economic advantages over the kids of single moms By Jason DeParle New York Times News Service

ANN ARBOR, Mich. —

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essica Schairer has so much in common with her boss, Chris Faulkner, that a visitor to the day care center they run

might get them confused.

They are both friendly stable marriages. white women from modest Faulkner goes home Midwestern backgrounds to a trim subdivision and who left for college with weekends crowded with conventional hopes children’s events. of marriage, moth- ANALYSIS Schairer’s rent conerhood and career. sumes more than They both have half her income, children in elementary and she scrapes by on food school. They pass their stamps. days in similar ways: jug“I see Chris’ kids gling toddlers, coaching — they’re in swimming teachers and swapping and karate and baseball small secrets that mark and Boy Scouts, and it them as friends. They seems like it’s always her even got tattoos together. or her husband who’s able While Faulkner, as the to make it there,” Schairer boss, earns more money, said. “That’s something the difference is a gap, not I wish I could do for my a chasm. kids. But number one, that But a friendship that stuff costs a lot of money evokes parity by day beand, two, I just don’t have comes a study of inequality the time.” at night and a testament to The economic storms of the way family structure recent years have raised deepens class divides. concerns about growing Faulkner is married and inequality and questions living on two paychecks, about a core national faith, while Schairer is raising that even Americans of her children by herself. humble backgrounds have That gives the Faulkner a good chance of getting family a profound advanahead. Most of the discustage in income and nurtur- sion has focused on labor ing time, and makes their market forces like falling children statistically more blue-collar wages and lavlikely to finish college, ish Wall Street pay. find good jobs and form See Inequality / F5

Illustration by Scott Steussy / The Bulletin

DAVID BROOKS

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BOOKS INSIDE PUBLISHING: Universities mull closing presses, F4

‘WONDERFUL’: Tragedy strikes in small town, F4

LINCOLN: ‘Impeachment’ gets lost in muddled plot, F6

‘HARBOR’: Thriller author’s pacing is excellent, F6

F2 THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

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Oregon transit proposal raises a few red flags

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hat will transportation be like in Oregon in 2050? You may be disappointed there are no jet-

packs, no hovercars. In fact, you might want to plan on staying home.

Transportation goal The state is considering a transportation goal of encouraging people to bike, walk or take transit for trips of 3 miles or less. The circle below indicates the 3-mile range from downtown Bend.

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The state’s proposed vision for transportation 2050 includes making the travel most people do today more difficult. It will be slower. There is a call to lower speed limits on highways. It will be harder to find parking. The vision urges that less parking be available. It says policymakers should consider caps on off-street parking in urban areas. Not only should parking be harder to find, it should cost more. Parking rates should be tripled. The state wants people to ride, bike or take transit for round trips of six miles or less. We provided the map at right as a general guide for downtown Bend. The plan urges new fees to charge the full “social costs� in freight movement. How exactly do you calculate full social costs? What would that do to the cost of a gallon of milk? Even taking a trip on an airplane should be more expensive. The vision advocates the state should support new carbon fees for airline travel. This is all part of an effort called the Draft Oregon Statewide Transportation Strategy. The state is trying to identify policies that might reduce greenhouse gas emissions and man-made impact on climate change. Bend City Councilor Mark Capell was on the policy committee that developed the recommendations. “I am really looking forward to Phase 2, to doing something on the ground,� Capell is quoted as saying in the report’s executive summary. The recommendations are not intended to be mere musings about

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the future. The recommendations are slated to be approved by the Oregon Transportation Commission and become guideposts for transportation policy in Oregon. We highlighted things in the report to get your attention. Our concern with this — as with any grandiose government scheme to reshape the way we live — is this: Are we all going to feel like victims of change? Should we just lie down now and outline our bodies with chalk? How much is it going to cost? To use the language of the report, what will be the full social cost? The legislators voters pick this November will be the ones making such transportation decisions. Ask them about the 2050 transportation vision, then choose well.

Bend council should act on support for university

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end’s City Council members made clear the city’s support for Oregon State University-Cascades at their meeting Wednesday; now they must put that support into concrete action. Councilors are correct in their belief that a four-year university will be good for Bend’s economy. While OSU-Cascades is unlikely to become the city’s major employer, its presence makes the entire region more attractive to new business. It offers other benefits, as well.

There are several levels on which the city can help. Most visibly, if it has the money, it can make a direct donation to the university’s community fundraising effort. OSU-Cascades needs to come up with a total of $4 million in donations from Central Oregon, and it is more than halfway there. It can also chip in valuable services. And, the city can add its voice to those in support of a four-year campus here. That support is critical to the effort.

‘Obamacare’ not the answer T

By Paul deWitt he ongoing debate about the Affordable Health Care Act — aka “Obamacare� — has elicited much comment by readers of this paper. Those who support the act argue that health care is a “right,� with the government responsible for ensuring that anyone without insurance or the means to pay for it must be provided coverage at taxpayer expense. Those opposed believe there is a better way to provide greater access to health care without bankrupting the country with another expensive entitlement. We who make the latter argument typically have our positions on the issue distorted and misrepresented by liberals who advocate a universal right to health care. They routinely treat Republicans and conservatives as the “enemy� and use invective and falsehoods to demean the motives of anyone who dares to disagree with them. Case in point is the way the media have treated tea party rallies, alleging that the tea party is racist for opposing Barack Obama’s policies on health care and excessive government spending. President Obama has followed a practice of sidelining and marginalizing his opponents since he began running for public office. That practice continues with his smear campaign against presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Demeaning political opponents, engaging in class warfare, pandering

IN MY VIEW

to unions and interest groups, expanding dependency on the federal government, and inciting envy and even hatred of the country’s most productive and successful people are right out of “Rules for Radicals� — the playbook of Chicago-based community organizer Saul Alinsky — and part of the Democrat strategy to maintain control of government. With the implementation of “Obamacare,� the country is heading down the road of fiscal ruin. The unfortunate Supreme Court decision upholding the act under Congress’ taxing power will only accelerate this path to fiscal insolvency. California should be a warning for those who think the country has enough money to pay for all the entitlement programs. California is $16 billion in debt. That amount, multiplied by one thousand, represents the federal debt. Gov. Jerry Brown, following Obama’s lead, wants to increase taxes on the rich, saying, like Willie Sutton when asked why he robbed banks, “That’s where the money is.� Taxing the rich for all of their assets would put barely a dent in the debt, either at the state or national level. California, with its excessive regulations, bloated bureaucracy, powerful labor unions and onerous pension liabilities, is the canary in the national coal mine. At least the federal government

is able to print more money. We can continue to float more debt as long as countries like China are willing to buy our bonds. The time will come when China and other debt holders will demand higher interest rates on bonds before they will buy them. At that point interest on the national debt will increase to staggering levels, with consequences too dire to contemplate — higher mortgage rates, inflation and another recession that will make the one from which we are so slowly emerging seem like a minor blip in the history of national economic downturns. Republicans in Congress, led by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, recognize that the country must be put on a more sustainable fiscal footing to avoid eventual bankruptcy. Adding another entitlement, i.e., “Obamacare,� is a recipe for disaster. Republicans acknowledge the need to assist the most disadvantaged in society. The best way to do this is to make reasonable changes to Social Security and Medicare to ensure those programs will be available to future generations and to provide those without health insurance an affordable means of obtaining health care — e.g., federal vouchers for individuals and grants to the states for catastrophic insurance. The wrong way to do it is for the president and his allies to demonize their political opponents and create greater societal rifts in order to maximize their hold on the reins of power. — Paul deWitt lives in Bend.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel’s Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

America must address culture of cheating, in and out of schools By Victor Dorff For the Los Angeles Times

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heating was, is and probably always will be a fact of life. Recently, technology has provided new ways to cheat, but advanced electronics can’t be blamed for our increasing willingness to tolerate it. Once upon a time, being an honorable person included the notion that your word was your bond, and integrity was a crucial element in establishing a good reputation. At least, that was part of the narrative that made up our social compact. My teaching experience tells me, however, that lying and cheating are seen by a lot of kids today as a crucial part of any path to success. The only shame is in getting caught. Students tell me that math is the easiest course in which to cheat because they can program calculators before a test and cheat undetected. An English teacher told me she no longer counts her vocabulary quiz-

zes in her students’ grades because she hasn’t found a way to stop them from copying the answers. And our school’s not-uncommon policy is basically to forgive a first offense and to enter it into the permanent record only if the student is caught again. Compounding the problem is the fact that many students aren’t fully aware of what constitutes cheating. While teaching at a university a few years ago, I was surprised when a student I had accused of plagiarizing by copying and pasting text from a website denied having cheated. He indignantly argued that he would never copy and paste — he had retyped the entire thing. A few weeks ago, a student took my final exam in the morning and gave the answers to someone who was taking it that afternoon. The second student didn’t notice that the question on his test was slightly different, and the answer was now wrong. When confronted, he professed not

to understand that he had cheated. He thought that getting a test answer from another student in advance was no different than studying with a partner. A few days later, when his mother came in to find out why her son had failed, she too said she couldn’t understand the difference. In a survey of students last month, I asked what they thought of the idea of requiring next semester’s students to sign a pledge that said, simply, “I will not lie, cheat or steal.� Most thought it was a great idea, but they didn’t think the pledge would change anything. As for the proposed penalties, they thought that giving an F on an assignment was OK, giving an F on the report card was acceptable but harsh, and that putting the names of the cheaters on a public “wall of shame� would be going too far. That implies that students put a value on their public reputation, so a wall of shame might be an effec-

tive threat. But the idea didn’t fly any better with my colleagues than it did with my students. One compared it to cutting off the hands of a thief as a deterrent to crime. Another went so far as to say that it would be the same as taking the offending students outside and having the class throw things at them. Instead of focusing on the penalty for cheating, she said, we should be addressing the pressures that make students feel they need to cheat to succeed. She has a point. It’s easy to see how students these days end up feeling that cheating is an accepted part of success. They hear every day about people borrowing money they had no way of paying back, and banks falsifying forms to enable the borrowing, and Wall Street brokers knowingly selling worthless housing securities based on those loans. And no one was punished for that, except for those who happened to be holding the bag when someone noticed it was empty.

Today’s vice president of the United States was caught having plagiarized his stump speech in the 1980s. At the time, many thought that would be the end of his political career, but in today’s world, it’s just one of those things. Students, parents, teachers and administrators complain that there is too much cheating going on in our schools, but they tend to point at each other when asked who should be responsible for fixing the problem. That’s not how change will happen — but something has to change. Cheating needs to be addressed as part of a cultural problem. It is up to us to make it unacceptable not only in schools but also throughout society. Every time we accept it as unavoidable or tolerable, we help ensure that the culture of cheating is passed on to the next generation. — Victor Dorff, a former attorney and journalist, teaches math at Palisades Charter High School in California.

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

C Green zealots harm our posterity I

n the Arabic media, there are reports that Muslim clerics — energized by the sudden emergence of Egypt’s new president, Muhammad Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood — are now agitating to demolish the Egyptian pyramids. According to agitated imams, the pharaohs’ monuments represent “symbols of paganism” from Egypt’s pre-Islamic past and therefore must vanish. Don’t dismiss such insanity so easily. Mali Islamists are currently destroying the centuries-old mausoleums of Sufi-Muslim saints in the city of Timbuktu, the historic site of early Islamic scholarship and jurisprudence. But perhaps the most recent regrettable Islamist attack on the past was the Taliban’s 2001 dynamiting and shelling of the huge twin 6th-century A.D. statues of Buddha carved into a cliff at Bamiyan in Afghanistan. “We are destroying the statues,” Taliban spokesmen at the time bragged, “in accordance with Islamic law, and it is purely a religious issue.” Ideologically driven and historically ignorant violence is not just an Islamist monopoly. Sometimes postmodern, politically correct Westerners can be every bit as zealous — and as potentially destructive of the past — as premodern Islamists. One of the joys of visiting California’s Yosemite Valley is a series of historic arched bridges that span the Merced River on the valley floor. One,

V IC TOR DAVIS HANSON the 80-year-old Stoneman Bridge, is an architectural masterpiece and a tribute to Depression-era ingenuity and artistic elegance, while the sister Ahwahnee Bridge and the Sugar Pine Bridge were likewise designed to combine functionalism and beauty. All are used daily, appreciated by thousands of visitors each summer, and now are listed as endangered treasures by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Environmental zealots in the National Park Service are now proposing to demolish all three bridges, motivated by their pie-in-the-sky dreams of allowing the flood-prone Merced River to be freed to find its original course, without human contamination. To paraphrase the Taliban, these green fundamentalists would probably believe that the bridges are “symbols of humanism” and their destruction is “purely an environmental issue.” Again, don’t laugh. A petition circulated by an environmental group is forcing the city of San Francisco — in a state currently struggling with a $16 billion budget shortfall — to hold a November referendum on a proposal to blow up the historic O’Shaughnessy Dam that holds back

the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. That brilliantly engineered early-20thcentury water and power project still supplies San Francisco and the South Bay with as much as 85 percent of its water — while providing the city with 400 megawatts of clean electrical power, and providing Central Valley farms and towns with irrigation and flood control. Where the billions of dollars would come from to dynamite the vast dam, penstocks, pipelines and powerhouse complex and to clean up the ensuing mess, how the green electricity would be replaced, and how the Bay Area’s millions of residents would find their daily water are questions that matter little to ideologues who believe the aboriginal valley of Hetch Hetchy can be reborn without man’s baleful touch. What do these contemporary wars against the past have in common? One shared trait is the power of ideological zealotry, whether religious or environmental, to trump all questions of practicality, historical preservation and reverence for prior generations. The zealot’s version of purity, and only his version, matters. Modern affluence and leisure also explain both the ability and desire to destroy monuments of the past. Twenty-first-century technology allows premodern Islamists to have the weaponry, and the leisure time, for such destruction. If the statutes at Bamiyan are pagan, then so are

the explosives that the Taliban used to obliterate them. And it is only because water so easily flows from San Francisco faucets, and power is a matter of flicking a switch — both impossible in 1913, when a growing San Francisco was short on clean water and newfound electricity — that today’s green imams have the latitude to dream of their own version of a pure and uncontaminated paradise. A general historical ignorance among the public at large plays a role, too. Just as fundamentalist madrassas pound dogma into the heads of students without any historical appreciation of the richness and variety of all religions in the early Middle East, so too have politically driven courses in our own universities crowded out broad classes in history. Students in our own versions of the madrassas can recite all the commandments of their own sacred green texts, but they know very little about the nation’s past — and almost nothing about the constant poverty, physical ordeal and, yes, early death that our forefathers struggled against to ensure that we might not. Beware of the wages of professed purity, whether religious or environmental — whether it targets a mausoleum in Timbuktu or a stone arched bridge in Yosemite. — Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist and historian at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

We must preserve our historic lunar sites By Beth O’Leary Special to The Washington Post

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riday was the 43rd anniversary of the landing of the Apollo 11 Eagle on the moon at Tranquility Base. Backed by decades of work by 60,000 researchers, scientists and engineers worldwide, and supported by the leaders of 72 countries, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to explore several acres of desolate lunar landscape. In essence, all of humanity landed on the moon that day in 1969. More than 100 artifacts remain untouched on the surface of Tranquility Base. The moon has many other heritage sites from the Cold War era, when people explored it for the first time. It is critical to develop a historic preservation framework for these sites, including international agreements on how to protect the significant cultural resources. The success of the SpaceX Dragon mission in May has laid the groundwork to transport visitors to the moon, escorted by private-sector companies. Today, for as little as a $20,000 deposit, a prospective tourist can book a space flight on Virgin Galactic. The reality of imminent commercial space tourism is exciting — and threatening. The temptation for tourists to visit Tranquility Base, to walk in Armstrong’s footsteps or to pocket some small treasure as a keepsake may be too strong to resist. Artifacts too small to notice may be trampled. Those too large to move may be vandalized. The three-dimensional relationship of these objects — which tells the story of the Apollo 11 crew’s activities and makes the site so significant — could be destroyed. The integrity of this historical site could be irreparably damaged. It is imperative that these artifacts be protected in their current positions. The problem is that the objects at Tranquility Base lie in a legal gray area. By treaty, nations retain ownership to the property they leave on the

moon, but no person and no country can own the lunar surface. So NASA retains ownership of its objects that are off Earth. Recently, NASA recognized the need to protect the lunar landing sites. It received a virtually unprecedented request from Google Lunar X Prize contestants to explore how to visit the six Apollo landing sites and several unmanned Surveyor spacecraft from the 1960s. Last year, a team of senior NASA engineers, researchers and lunar scientists as well as external experts in historic preservation drafted recommendations for any group or nation interested in visiting U.S. lunar sites. The paper, “NASA’s Recommendations to Space-Faring Entities: How to Protect and Preserve the Historic and Scientific Value of U.S. Government Lunar Artifacts,” recognizes the sig-

nificance of the sites and takes an important first step toward protecting them. It defines excluded areas within the historic sites, identifies concerns, and makes recommendations associated with descent and landing, surface mobility and contamination. Google Lunar X Prize announced in May, during a news conference with NASA, that it intended to honor the NASA recommendations when judging teams’ mobility plans. But Google is not legally bound to this pledge, and no one is required to observe the NASA proposals. The legal requirement to preserve American history is embedded in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, which created the National Register of Historic Places. Some properties on the list are exceptionally important to our heritage and become national historic landmarks. Tranquility Base meets that criterion. Once a property is such a landmark, it can be nominated by the United States for inclusion on UNESCO’s World Heritage List, which recognizes properties around the globe that are of universal significance. Following the lead of California and New Mexico, which listed the lunar landing sites on their respective state historical registers in 2010, we have worked with Rep. Dan Lungren, R-Calif., and his staff to draft legislation to make Tranquility Base a national historic landmark. On this anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, we urge the leaders of our nation, which launched the most ambitious dream on Earth and made it happen, to again take the lead in bringing nations together — this time to protect humanity’s extraordinary lunar heritage. We must ensure that our shared history is not trampled when people revisit the moon. We did the right thing in 1969, and we can honor that achievement by working together again to protect these sites for future generations. — Beth O’Leary is an associate professor of anthropology at New Mexico State University.

Renaissance friar led the way to modern accounting By Jane Gleeson-White Bloomberg News

Consider some recent headlines: China’s gross domestic product slowed to a three-year low of 7.6 percent in the latest quarter. The International Monetary Fund cut its global growth forecasts to 3.9 percent for 2013. And Citigroup’s net income was down 12 percent. The system that generates these 21st-century accounting figures, the numbers that run our nations and corporations, was first codified by a Renaissance friar, Fra Luca Bartolomeo de Pacioli. Pacioli is remembered today, if he’s remembered at all, as the father of accounting. He wrote the first mathematical encyclopedia of Europe, which made critical contributions to modern science and commerce. As his encyclopedia was going to press in Venice in 1494, Pacioli added a 27-page summary of a new form of accounting that had first emerged in Italy around 1300 and been perfected by the merchants of Venice. He called the addition a “special treatise which is much needed” to help merchants keep their accounts in an orderly way. Known in the 15th century as accounting “alla Veneziana,” double-en-

try bookkeeping is standard practice throughout the world. In 1494, it was exceptional — and in his treatise Pacioli recommended it above all others. In their ledgers, Venetian merchants separated debits and credits, dividing them into two columns. Pacioli’s system was revolutionary because it allowed merchants to calculate increases and decreases in their wealth, recorded in their capital account. In other words, it allowed them to determine that driver of capitalism: profit (or loss). Because Pacioli used the recently invented printing press to record and disseminate Venetian double entry, the system swept across Europe during the next two centuries and then to the United States. It was in the economic heart of the Industrial Age — Great Britain — that Venetian bookkeeping came into its own. The rise of factories and the flourishing of the joint-stock company transformed double-entry bookkeeping into a brand-new profession: accounting. The huge amounts of capital expenditure required to build railways — raised from private investors on stock exchanges and managed by joint-stock companies — brought new issues of accounting and ac-

countability. By the 1860s, accountants were legally required in Britain at every phase of a company’s life: at its formation, during its operation and at its liquidation. Although financial statements had been an incidental product of a company’s bookkeeping in 1800, they had become its raison d’etre by 1900. Venetian bookkeeping proved the perfect mechanism for generating these financial statements. It could accurately record capital and income as required by law and investors; it could distinguish between private expenses and corporate costs; and it could produce data that helped evaluate past investment decisions. In the 20th century, it became equally essential to the nation state. With the 1929 crash of the New York Stock Exchange and the Great Depression that followed, the laissezfaire principles that had previously informed government approaches to economic affairs suddenly seemed insufficient. Soon after Franklin D. Roosevelt began the New Deal, British economist John Maynard Keynes traveled to the U.S. to see the policies in action. In Washington, Keynes said, “Here, not in Moscow, is the economic laboratory of the world.”

This signified a momentous change in government practice, and in economic theory. If Roosevelt’s response to the Depression was the New Deal, then Keynes’ was his “theory of effective demand.” Published in 1936, it provided a theoretical basis for the measurement of national income, consumption, investment and savings. Both Roosevelt’s program and Keynes’ theory entailed the creation of national accounting systems, a massive undertaking that was carried out using the principles of double-entry bookkeeping. The first British accounts were made during World War II. Following the war, national accounts were created in countries across Europe as part of the Marshall Plan. And under the aegis of the newly created United Nations, national accounts were adopted by almost every nation on Earth. Today, we depend on the numbers generated by the accounts of nations and corporations to direct our governments, businesses and societies. And so it happened that a medieval Italian accounting system codified by a friar in 1494 now governs the global economy. — Jane Gleeson-White is the author of “Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance.”

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Technology could help fight cartels By Eric Schmidt Special to The Washington Post

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couple of months ago, we visited Juarez, Mexico, a city right across our border — yet so far away. The scene was almost surreal: We got off the plane and were met on the tarmac by a convoy of armored cars and open-back trucks swarming with police. The officers were “policía federal.” They hung off the backs of their trucks, alert, constantly swiveling as they surveyed the landscape. They were looking for violent criminals. Meanwhile, everyone we met with — civil society leaders, nonprofit activists, private-sector officials and young people — was looking for answers. Their city has been overwhelmed by crime, their lives overcome with fear. They felt defeated, disillusioned and a little helpless. They asked us: What can we do? To us, at least part of the answer was obvious: technology. We know that technology can be used for good. As more people around the globe become connected, they can see, read and hear more. Greater access leads to stronger demands for accountability. We believe the spread of modern devices and access for those most threatened will create a virtual, albeit nascent, counterweight against the world’s worst criminals. Yet connectivity will not, on its own, disrupt illicit networks. People tend to assume that “name and shame” will fix things — as though, once a video of wrongdoing is uploaded, the world will pressure the bad guys. It’s clear that external pressure seldom fixes weak or corrupt institutions. As we watch violence unfold in Syria, more than video is clearly needed. The pressure has to be internal, from those who are directly affected and have the incentives and mechanisms to fundamentally reshape the world they live in. Consider an all-too-familiar situation in Juarez: A man cooperates with law enforcement — or is believed to have cooperated — and his wife is subsequently targeted. Many people are aware of such occurrences but do not report them, thinking: Why take the risk when the chance of meaningful change is so low? Victims find individuals or institutions to confide in. Sometimes those are online, but the basic interaction model is telephonic or broadcast. The model relies on central authorities with trustworthy track records, broad distribution, charismatic leaders, technical sophistication and staffs that balance discretion and distribution. Simply put, these criteria do not scale. The system breaks down in environments where retribution is common. Now, consider a network like the Internet, where law enforcement sources send out their messages in little pieces — or packets — each labeled with the address of their destination. Intermediate nodes forward the packets onward, and they are reassembled at the destination. Each link in the network may not have the full message. The transmitter and receiver don’t need to communicate directly or at the same time. They don’t need to know each other’s location. There’s no single point of failure, no rigid hierarchy. Technology can help intermediate this exchange, like servers passing packets on the Internet. Sources don’t need to pierce their anonymity. They don’t need to trust a single person or institution. Why can’t they simply throw encrypted packets into the network and let the tools move information to the right destinations? In a sense, we are talking about dual crowdsourcing: Citizens crowdsource incident awareness up, and responders crowdsource justice down, nearly in real time. The trick is that anonymity is provided to everyone, although such a system would know a unique ID for every user to maintain records and provide rewards. This bare-bones model could take many forms: official and nonprofit first responders, investigative journalists, whistleblowers, neighborhood watches. Technology is just a tool. The residents of Juarez told us they desperately want technologies that, when used in the right way by the right people, would make a difference. There will be real consequences of trial and error, but we cannot let fear prevent us from innovating. In a world where cartels and criminals are masters of innovation, technology companies can tip the scales over the long run, helping to provide an innovation advantage to those who need it most. — Eric Schmidt is the executive chairman of Google and a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

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BOOKS THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/books

Stranger’s arrival sets trouble in motion in ‘Wonderful’

Infamous work of R. Crumb on display in Paris

THE FUTURE OF BOOK PUBLISHING

“Heading Out to Wonderful” by Robert Goolrick (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 292 pgs., $24.95)

By Jorg von Uthmann Bloomberg News

By Lisa Mclendon McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Charlie Beale, a stranger from parts unknown, arrives one day in the small town of Brownsburg, Va. He has a suitcase full of his things — which include a set of high-quality butcher knives — and a suitcase full of cash. He’s looking for a place to settle down, though he is warned that “before you get to wonderful, you’re going to have to pass through all right” — and Brownsburg is all right. Goolrick makes sure it’s not an idealized small town — it’s segregated, some men beat their wives, and there’s plenty of sin for the hellfire-and-damnation preachers to rail against. But he also imbues the novel with a strong sense of place in both the town and the surrounding countryside of mountains and valleys, rivers and farms, the breeze and the winding roads and the old mountain songs; it’s easy to see how the natural beauty of the land could be taken for “wonderful.” But always lurking, as in Goolrick’s previous novel, “A Reliable Wife,” is the dark undercurrent of suspense, as we hurtle toward finding out what happens. And we do hurtle — the book is hard to put down. Don’t let the idyllic cover fool you: “Heading Out to Wonderful” is as sad and mournful as the mountain songs of Virginia. But it’s a beautifully told story of human failings and yearnings, and redemption sought but never quite attained.

B- Publishers Weekly ranks the bestsellers for week ending July 14. Hardcover fiction 1. “Shadow of Night” by Deborah E. Harkness (Viking) 2. “I, Michael Bennett” by Patterson/Ledwidge (Little, Brown) 3. “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn (Crown) 4. “Backfire” by Catherine Coulter (Putnam) 5. “The Next Best Thing” by Jennifer Weiner (Atria) 6. “Wicked Business” by Janet Evanovich (Bantam) 7. “The Great Escape” by Susan Elizabeth Phillips (William Morrow) 8. “Batman: Earth One” by Geoff Johns (DC Comics) 9. “A Dance With Dragons” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 10. “The Prisoner of Heaven” by Carlos Ruiz Zafón (Harper) Hardcover nonfiction 1. “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed (Knopf) 2. “The Amateur” by Edward Klein (Regnery Publishing) 3. “Killing Lincoln” by Bill O’Reilly (Henry Holt) 4. “Dream Team” by Jack McCallum (Ballantine) 5. “The Skinny Rules” by Bob Harper (Ballantine Books) 6. “Cowards” by Glenn Beck (Threshold Editions) 7. “The Great Destroyer” by David Limbaugh (Regnery Publishing) 8. “It Worked for Me” by Colin Powell (Harper) 9. “Cupcakes and Cashmere” by Emily Schuman Abrams (Image) 10. “Mick” by Christopher Andersen (Gallery Books) — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

August Kryger / New York Times News Service

Volumes of books at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo. The backlash of the decision to close the university’s press has raised questions over where academic presses fall in the future of publishing.

University presses strain to survive By John Eligon New York Times News Service

COLUMBIA, Mo. — A tide of anger has been swelling here since May after the new University of Missouri president, Timothy Wolfe, disclosed plans to close the university’s publishing house, stoking arguments over the institution’s priorities and fueling an escalating national debate over the necessity of university presses and their future in the digital world. For more than five decades, Missouri’s press has printed prized academic titles including “The Collected Works of Langston Hughes,” “The Complete Sermons of Ralph Waldo Emerson” and “Mark Twain and His Circle.” Word that it was shutting down after losing its $400,000 annual subsidy drew outrage from professors, students, authors and alumni, and from the son of former President Dwight D. Eisenhower and black historian John Hope Franklin. A news release that the university circulated this week announcing plans for a new publishing operation seemed to only intensify the venom. Such disagreements are playing out on campuses around the country, as tightening budgets have complicated efforts by university presses to keep up with the changing publishing marketplace. Half a dozen universities have closed or suspended their presses over the past three years. Utah State’s press had to join a consortium of university presses in Colorado to survive. Another press, at Louisiana State, was spared after cutting staff and making other organizational changes.

“I really wish that universities would step up and say these presses are essential, we should fund them 100 percent. I think that most presidents would tend to agree, but given the budgetary climate and situation, they have to make choices, and unfortunately the choices have not favored university presses.” — Richard Clement, dean of libraries, Utah State University

“I really wish that universities would step up and say these presses are essential, we should fund them 100 percent,” said Richard Clement, the dean of libraries at Utah State. “I think that most presidents would tend to agree, but given the budgetary climate and situation, they have to make choices, and unfortunately the choices have not favored university presses.” Scholars argue that university presses are vital for academic discourse. They publish erudite texts that commercial presses do not, giving scholars a forum to share and further research. Professors often rely on them to publish the works they need for tenure and promotion. But they are usually money-losing operations. The presses at the University of Chicago, Oxford and Cambridge are the only ones widely believed to be profitable. Some universities have taken steps to revolutionize their publishing systems. Project Muse, which has published academic journals online as part of Johns Hopkins University Press since 1995, began publishing full-length digital books in January. After closing its press in the mid-1990s, Rice University

Publisher sexing up classics for e-readers The Associated Press NEW YORK — Now we know how Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson really felt about each other. British e-publisher Clandestine Classics is releasing sexedup editions of Sherlock Holmes, “Pride and Prejudice” and other classics, with erotic passages woven into the traditional texts. That means Mr. Darcy “buried inside the depths” of Elizabeth Bennet in “Pride and Prejudice” and Dr. Watson declaring his “joy of knowing

other men.” Cla nde s t i ne managing director Claire Siemaszkiewicz says she has always been drawn to “the underlying sexual tension” in older novels. The new editions were started before the “Fifty Shades of Grey” phenomenon, but the release date was moved up to July 30 in hopes of attracting fans of E.L. James’ erotic trilogy.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

reopened a digital-only operation in 2006 but shut that down after four years. Rice’s example revealed a difficult truth about digital scholarly publishing: It’s still expensive. Most of the cost in producing scholarly writings comes before anything is printed on paper, through expenses like hiring people for peer review. Under the University of Missouri’s new plan, the more than 2,000 books already published by the existing press operation, which will make way for the new one after production of its fall books, will be digitized and promoted by university libraries, a news release said. The new press will publish about 25 titles a year in hard copy, slightly less than the current output of 30, and digital format, although most will be in print initially, according to Brian Foster, provost of the university’s Columbia campus. The university also will honor the contracts of authors signed to upcoming works and plans to publish the titles on its spring list, Wolfe said. Administrators do not know exactly how much the new model will cost, Foster said. “One of the things that I believe is, if in fact we come up

with a model that is more effective at disseminating scholarly work,” Wolfe said in an interview last week, “the other presses are going to have to look at this model and say, ‘Can we do what the University of Missouri is doing?’ ” Wolfe acknowledged that he had never spoken to or consulted employees of the current press, and they were not involved in the creation of the new model. Many critics said the plan was vague and full of corporate language. They were concerned with the prospect that under the new plan students would be handling much of the work. “Will established scholars be willing to work with such a haphazardly staffed press?” Bruce Joshua Miller, a sales representative for university publishers, and Ned Stuckey-French, a professor at Florida State who has published with the Missouri press, wrote in a more than 1,500-word news release responding to the university’s announcement. The administration seemed unaware that the press already was doing the supposedly new things described in the plan, Clair Willcox, the current editor of the press, said. The press, for instance, already publishes e-books, he said. “The staff was enraged,” Willcox said of when his colleagues saw the details of the plan. “They were looking at descriptions of what they already did. It suggests that somehow they weren’t doing a good enough job over here.”

PARIS — From the drug dens of Haight-Ashbury to the temple of modern art in Paris’ posh 16th arrondissement, Robert Crumb has made it. The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris has mounted a monster exhibition for the U.S. comic artist, who became famous — some people say notorious — as the epitome of California’s counterculture in the late 1960s. Crumb’s cultural consecration doesn’t lack irony: He has always refused to be part of the official art scene and has never hidden his contempt for the avant-garde. His drawings are neither thin nor abstract. Delineated with forceful strokes, they look like etchings. In etchings, though, you would hardly find speech bubbles with exclamations such as “Gotcha!” “Whoop!” or “Aaaarghh!” Crumb was born in 1943 in Philadelphia and has been living since the early 1990s in the south of France. He made his name with Fritz the Cat, Whiteman, Devil Girl, Mr. Natural and other raucously irreverent characters. Because his books, unlike mainstream comics, didn’t shy away from depicting drugs, sex and violence, Crumb called them “comix,” the X indicating that they were for adults. Yet Crumb also published “Kafka for Beginners” and an illustrated version of the Book of Genesis with personal annotations, a work that kept him busy for four years. The museum presents it complete in a separate room — an odd contrast to the defiantly lowbrow rest. His disdainful attitude toward modern art notwithstanding, the show has had respectful reviews in French newspapers.

Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris

An excerpt from “The Book of Genesis” (2005-2009) by Robert Crumb.

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

Unmarried households are increasingly the norm . . .

. . . and may affect the future incomes of children

The share of births that occur outside of marriage has risen for all women since 1990, but white women with less than a four-year college degree have seen the greatest percentage increases.

Children in middle-income households have become much less likely than those in upper-income households to have married parents.

A study that tracked children who were 12 to 14 years old at the start of 1996 shows that those who didn’t live with both parents were less likely to have moved up to a higher income group 12 years later as adults.

Percentage of births occurring outside of marriage

Percentage of households in each income group with married parents

1990-2009, among adult women with each education level Blacks Less than 82% high school

Hispanics

96% 95%

Whites

Lived with both parents Income of parents

Top third

81

71%

Bottom third

44

41%

41% 30

32 22

Bottom third 17

18 10

6

In 2010, the top third reported they earned more than $89,122, and the bottom third reported they earned less than $41,940.

3

’09

Between $40,726 and 76,022

38%

12

’90

Top

Middle

Bottom

’90

’09

’90

’09

’68

’80

’90

’00

’10

Income of parents

43% Top third

35%

30%

15%

27%

35%

30%

39%

36%

25%

34%

23%

18%

35%

26%

More than $76,022

Middle third

Middle third 47

23

More than $76,022 for a family of four

60%

58% 55

32

Bachelor’s degree or more

Middle third

68

Some 49 college/ associate’s degree

Income of child 12 years later

Top third 77%

High school 67 or GED

Did not live with both parents

50%

88%

86%

F5

Between $40,726 and 76,022

Bottom third

Less than $40,726

Less than $40,726

42%

56%

Notes: Incomes are shown in 2011 dollars. Income level breaks 12 years later for a family of four were less than $48,908 for the bottom third, between $48,908 and $93,008 for the middle and greater than $93,008 for the top.

Sources: Child Trends’s analysis of birth data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Vital Statistics System; Analysis of Current Population Survey data by Bruce Western and Tracey Shollenberger, Harvard University; Analysis of National Longitudinal Survey data by Scott Winship, Brookings Institution Alicia Parlapiano / New York Times News Service

Inequality Continued from F1 But striking changes in family structure have also broadened income gaps and posed new barriers to upward mobility. College-educated Americans like the Faulkners are increasingly likely to marry one another, compounding their growing advantages in pay. Less-educated women like Schairer, who left college without finishing her degree, are growing less likely to marry at all, raising children on pinched paychecks that come in ones, not twos. Estimates vary widely, but scholars have said that changes in marriage patterns — as opposed to changes in individual earnings — may account for as much as 40 percent of the growth in certain measures of inequality. Long a nation of economic extremes, the United States is also becoming a society of family haves and family have-nots, with marriage and its rewards ever more confined to the fortunate classes. “It is the privileged Americans who are marrying, and marrying helps them stay privileged,” said Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University. About 41 percent of births in the U.S. occur outside marriage, up sharply from 17 percent three decades ago. But equally sharp are the educational divides, according to an analysis by Child Trends, a Washington research group. Less than 10 percent of the births to collegeeducated women occur outside marriage, while for women with high school diplomas or less the figure is nearly 60 percent. Long concentrated among minorities, motherhood outside marriage now varies by class about as much as it does by race. It is growing fastest in the lower reaches of the white middle class — among women like Schairer who have some postsecondary schooling but no four-year degree. Schairer’s life offers a vivid example of how rapidly norms have changed. She grew up in a small town outside Ann Arbor, where her life revolved around church and school and everyone she knew was married. “I thought, ‘I’ll meet someone, and we’ll marry and have kids and the house and the white picket fence,’ ” she said. “That’s what I wanted. That’s what I still want.” She got pregnant during her first year of college, left school and stayed in a troubled relationship that left her with three children when it finally collapsed six years ago. She has had little contact with the children’s father and receives no child support. With an annual income of just under $25,000, Schairer barely lifts her children out of poverty, but she is not one to complain. “I’m in this position because of decisions I made,” she said. She buys generic cereal at about half the brand-name price, takes the children to church every week and posts their happy moments on her Facebook page. Inequality is a word she rarely uses, though her family life is a showcase of its broadening reach. “Two incomes would certainly help with the bills,” she said. “But it’s parenting, too. I wish I could say, ‘Call your dad.’ ”

Path to single motherhood The van with the cracked windshield arrived on a recent day at 7:30 a.m., and three people emerged, the smallest stifling yawns. Several days a week, Schairer opens the child care center 45 minutes before she can send her two youngest children to school. Bored children in work spaces make mornings tense. Savannah, 7, crossed the play area on stilts. Steavon, 10, threw a ball. As parents with infants and toddlers hurried past, Schairer chided the two to stay out of the way. “They’re really not supposed to be here,” she said. Steavon has Asperger’s syndrome, a mild form of autism that can lead to sharp mood swings. He slumped on her desk, wanting $2 to buy a bagel at school. Schairer does not carry cash — one way not to spend it — and handed him pretzels from home. “I don’t like those!” he said, shoving them away. Schairer is known for a spotless desk. Steavon found a leaky pen. “I’m ready for you to go,” she said. Time away is money lost — Schairer punched a clock by the door — so she hurried the children to school and returned with a look of relief. A stop in Faulkner’s office brought a bit of rejuvenating gossip: Two teachers were having a tiff. Adult diversions are absent at home. “I talk to myself a lot,” Schairer said. Although she grew up in the 1990s, Schairer’s small-town childhood had a 1950s feel. Her father drove a beer truck, her mother served as church trustee and her grandparents lived next door. She knew no one rich, no one poor and no one raising children outside of marriage. “It was just the way it was,” she said. William Penn University, eight hours away in Iowa, offered a taste of independence and a spot on the basketball team. Her first thought when she got pregnant was “My mother’s going to kill me.” Abortion crossed her mind, but her boyfriend, a student from Arkansas, said they should start a family. They agreed that marriage should wait until they could afford a big reception and a long gown. Their odds were not particularly good: Nearly half the unmarried parents living together at a child’s birth split up within five years, according to Child Trends. Schairer has trouble explaining, even to herself, why she stayed so long with a man who she said earned little, berated her often and did no parenting. They lived with family (his and hers) and worked off and on while she hoped things would change. “I wanted him to love me,” she said. She was 25 when the breakup made it official: She was raising three children on her own.

A broadening gap Despite the egalitarian trappings of her youth, Schairer was born (in 1981) as a tidal surge of inequality was remaking American life. Incomes at the top soared, progress in the middle stalled and the paychecks of the poor fell sharply.

Four decades ago, households with children at the 90th percentile of incomes received five times as much as those at the 10th percentile, according to Bruce Western and Tracey Shollenberger of the Harvard sociology department. Now they have 10 times as much. The gaps have widened even more further up the income scale. The reasons are manifold: the growing premium a college education commands, technological change that favors mind over muscle, the growth of the financial sector, the loss of manufacturing jobs to automation and foreign competitors, and the decline of labor unions. But marriage also shapes the story in complex ways. Economic woes speed marital decline, as women see fewer “marriageable men.” The opposite also holds true: Marital decline compounds economic woes, since it leaves the needy to struggle alone. “The people who need to stick together for economic reasons don’t,” said Christopher Jencks, a Harvard sociologist. “And the people who least need to stick together do.” Changes in family structure do not explain the gains of the very rich — the muchdiscussed “1 percent” and the richest among them. That story largely spills from Wall Street trading floors and corporate boardrooms. But for inequality more broadly, Western found that the growth in single parenthood in recent decades accounted for 15-25 percent of the widening income gaps. Forty years ago, the top and middle income thirds had virtually identical family patterns: More than 95 percent of households with children in either tier had two parents in the home. Since then the groups have diverged, according to Western and Shollenberger: 88 percent at the top have two parents, but just 71 percent do in the middle. “Things remained extremely stable in the top third,” Western said. “The middle is increasingly suffering some of the same disadvantages as the bottom.” That is the essence is the story of Faulkner and Schairer. What most separates them is not the impact of globalization on their wages, but a 6foot-8-inch man named Kevin.

School trips and Scouting Kevin Faulkner works the sunrise shift twice a week, leaving home at 5:30 a.m. for a computer programming job so he can leave work in time to take his sons to swim practice. Jeremy, 12, is serious and quiet. Justin, 10, is less driven but more openly affectionate. The couple’s life together has unfolded in to-do-list style. They did not inherit wealth or connections or rise on rare talent. They just did standard things in standard order: high school, college, job, marriage and children. “I don’t think I could have done it any more by the books,” Chris Faulkner said. The result is a three-bedroom house, two busy boys and an annual Disney cruise. The secret to their success resides in part in old-fashioned math: strength in numbers. Together, the Faulkners earn nearly three times as much as what Chris Faulkner earns alone. Their high five-figure

income ranks them near the 75th percentile — hardly rich, but better off than nearly 3 of 4 families with children. For Schairer, the logic works in reverse. Her individual income of $24,500 puts her at the 49th percentile among parents: smack in the middle. But with only one paycheck, her family income falls to the 19th percentile, lagging more than 4 out of 5. The Faulkners built a house in Livingston County because of the good schools. Schairer cares about education, too. But with Ann Arbor rents wreaking havoc on her budget, she is considering a move to a neighboring town where the school system lags. She shops at discount grocery stores and tells Savannah to keep away a friend who raids the cabinets. Jeremy Faulkner plays tennis and takes karate. Justin plays soccer and baseball. They both swim and participate in Boy Scouts, including a weeklong summer camp that brings the annual activities bill to about $3,500. Boy Scouts has been especially important, offering the boys leadership opportunities and time with their father, who helps manage the troop and rarely misses a weekly meeting or monthly camping trip. Jeremy started as a shy boy terrified of public speaking. Now he leads the singalong and is racing to make Eagle Scout. “He’s just blossomed through Boy Scouts,” Chris Faulkner said. “I could do the Scouting with them, because we have single moms who play that role. But they have different experiences with their dad.

Kevin makes good money, but he’s an awesome dad.” Schairer tells an opposite story: Constraints in time and money limit her children to one sports season a year. That compounds Steavon’s isolation, she said, and reduces her chances to network on his behalf. When she invited his classmates to a park on his birthday a few months ago, no one came. “He cried and cried and cried,” she said. “I tried the parents I had numbers for, but they didn’t respond.” Researchers have found that extracurricular activities can enhance academic performance, and scholars cite a growing activities gap to help explain why affluent children tend to do so much better than others in school.

End of the day Left to do the showing up alone, Schairer makes big efforts. She rarely misses a weekend of church with the children, and she sacrificed a day’s pay this spring to chaperone field day at Steavon and Savannah’s school. “They were both saying, ‘This is my mom, my mom is here!’ ” she said. In February, she received $7,000 of refundable tax credits, the low-wage worker’s annual bonus. She prepaid her rent for six months and bought plane tickets to Orlando, Fla. After years of seeing pictures of Chris Faulkner’s vacations, she wanted to give her children one of their own. “Do you think we’ll see Jesus?” Savannah asked on the flight. “I hope the plane doesn’t run him over.” They stayed with Schairer’s brother, visited SeaWorld and

Gatorland, and brought back happy memories. But the trip soon began to seem long ago, more a break from their life than an embodiment of it. Schairer sank into the couch on a recent Friday night and half-watched a rerun of “Friends.” Steavon retreated to his room to watch “Superman” alone, and Savannah went out to play with a friend. Kirsten, 11, was in her pajamas at 7 o’clock. They had few weekend plans. Thirty miles away, Troop 395 was pitching tents beside a rural airstrip, where the next day the boys would take glider rides and earn aviation badges. The fields and barns looked as tidy as cartoons, and an extravagant sunset painted them pomegranate. The clipboard in Justin Faulkner’s hands called for an early reveille. “I’m the patrol leader,” he said, beaming. Thirty minutes later, a rope appeared. Boys started to boast. Kevin Faulkner snapped on his tug-of-war gloves, only to discover that Justin had disappeared. He found him sitting in the grass nearby, fighting back tears. “I want to go home,” Justin said. Kevin Faulkner did not say much. Jeremy used to get homesick, too. Now he is halfway to Eagle Scout. After a while Faulkner asked, “Are you sure you don’t want to do a tug of war against me?” Justin watched the other boys tumble. “When?” he said. “We can do it right now,” Faulkner said. It was not much of a contest. Justin fell face first and bumped through the cool grass — a laughing tenderfoot pulled along by his dad.

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THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

‘Impeachment’: Great premise lost in improbable plot French’s ‘Harbor’ starts slow, then roars to its finish “The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln” by Stephen L. Carter (Knopf, 528 pgs., $26.95)

By Mike Fischer

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Imagine that Abraham Lincoln survived that infamous night in Ford’s The-

atre, only to eventually meet the same fate that awaited Andrew Johnson: impeachment for alleged high crimes and misdemeanors. That’s the set-up in Stephen Carter’s “The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln,” allowing Carter to pick up in fictional form where he left off

in “The Violence of Peace” (2011), his provocative meditation on the meaning and relevance of just war theory. It’s a great premise for a novel, potentially allowing one of Carter’s prototypically

many-sided explorations of some big questions, as relevant after 2001 as they were in 1861. But Carter doesn’t get around to plumbing this topic before his novel is hijacked by an improbable and poorly written melodrama filled with cloak-and dagger games,

cracking ciphers, hunting down incriminating letters, foiling burglaries and fighting off would-be rapists and murderers. To top it off, Carter’s plot is improbable and convoluted. The characters and plotlines are too interchangeable to invest in.

“Broken Harbor” By Tana French (Viking, 450 pgs., $27.95)

BIG COUNTRY RV

By Janet Maslin

BRINGS YOU THE

New York Times News Service

What a pretty picture: an Irish seaside community of 250 new houses built for lucky, happy families. In the evenings the aroma of home -cooked dinners fills the air. Commuters return from work. Gleaming cars fill driveways. Children play in the glow of streetlights. Husbands and wives talk in privacy, because these houses are wellbuilt. How could neighbors overhear them through such solid walls? This community, called Brianstown, is at the heart of Tana French’s devious, deeply felt psychological chiller “Broken Harbor.” A picture is all that it is. Brianstown is actually a half-built ghost town that bears scant resemblance to its idealized version in sales brochures — a grim monument to an Irish housing boom gone bust. Everything about it is dishonest, even the name. The place was called Broken Harbor before somebody decided Brianstown sounded better. According to Scorcher Kennedy, the novel’s hard-charging main character, “Broken” is derived from “breacadh,” the Gaelic word for dawn. But we know what it really means. In three earlier books (“In the Woods,” “The Likeness” and the best of the bunch, “Faithful Place”) French created haunting, damaged characters who have been hurt by some cataclysm. So it is here too. The author uses the nifty trick of extracting a secondary character from each book to narrate the one that follows. Scorcher appeared in “Faithful Place” as a colleague of its main character, a fellow Dublin detective named Frank Mackey. “He wore his swagger as part of his El Snazzo suit,” French wrote of Scorcher then. But his bravado is put to the test by the events “Broken Harbor” has in store. “Feast your eyes, old son,” Scorcher says, blasting his way into the investigation of a very odd and vicious crime. In the middle of the night in Brianstown somebody attacked Jenny and Pat Spain and their two young children. Father and children are dead; Jenny is in no shape to talk to investigators. Scorcher sifts through the details of this calamity while ostensibly teaching his smart young partner, Richie Curran, the tricks of their trade. This may sound like a routine police procedural. But like Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl,” this summer’s other daggersharp display of mind games, “Broken Harbor” is something more. It’s true that French takes readers to all the familiar way stations of a murder investigation, but she has urgent points to make about the social and economic underpinnings of the Spain family murders. And she has irresistibly sly ways of toying with readers’ expectations. French’s books all give the same first impression. They start slowly and seem to need tighter editing. But as in “Faithful Place,” she patiently lays her groundwork, then moves into full page-turner mode. It takes a while for Scorcher and Richie to nail their possible culprit. Even then this person’s arrival in the story raises many more questions than it answers. Scorcher is both the book’s narrator and conscience. He truly believes that he keeps the basic, feral side of human nature at bay. About the bad gamble that the Spains made on real estate, Scorcher says, “It can scour away at a lifetime of mild, peaceful decency until all that’s left is teeth and claws and terror.” He will experience this firsthand before “Broken Harbor” is over.

FREE

2012 DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR

RIDES • ANIMALS • EXHIBITS • FOOD • GAMES • MORE

AT THE HOOKER CREEK EVENT CENTER PRESENTED BY:

SUPPORTED BY: GRUN UNER GR GARY CHEVROLET

GMC

BUICK DR D RIV IVEE AA LITTLE, IV LOTT!! LO LITTLE, SAVE SAVE AA LO SAVE LITTLE,

Enjoy old-fashioned fun Every Day at the Fair!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL CENTRAL OREGON MCDONALDS RESTAURANTS EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 2 PM TIL 7 PM • BEGINNING JULY 4 While supplies last, no purchase necessary

CHRIS YOUNG 7 pm Wednesday, August 1st

August 1 through August 5 Come and enjoy the old-fashioned American tradition of your county fair. Look for a wide variety of fun activities and booths: from The Bulletin Family Fun Zone presented by Bend Urology to the rodeo, animals, 4-H and open class exhibits, carnival games, plus food, food, food! New this year—a Zip Line! Live Butterfly Adventures exhibit! Wake Attack!— an interactive Bungee/Harness Attraction! Paint Ball and Lazer Tag Shooting Range!

UNCLE KRACKER 7 pm Thursday, August 2nd

FREE RODEO

WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY! With Fair Admission

BAD COMPANY

BUCKAROO BREAKFAST

Let’s Stirrup Some Memories

former lead singer

Brian Howe 7 pm, Friday, August 3rd

Sunday, August 5th, 6-10 am

FREE SHUTTLE RIDES

HOT CHELLE RAE

Round Trip from Bend, Redmond, Sisters to the Fair - see The Bulletin or www.expo.deschutes.org for a detailed schedule.

7 pm Saturday, August 4th

Celebrating over 44 years of supporting the

DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR & RODEO.

SPECIAL FAIR DAYS PEPSI DAY Wednesday, August 1 Fair Hours: 10 am – 10 pm

30% Off All Carnival Rides! NO COUPON REQUIRED ALL DAY FROM 11 AM TIL 10 PM Rodeo - gates open at 5 pm, performance starts at 6:30 pm. Rodeo Free with Fair admission. Seniors 62+ Admitted FREE!

NEWS CHANNEL 21 & FOX DAY Thursday, August 2 Fair Hours: 10 am – 10 pm Ages 12 and under are admitted to the Fair for FREE! *One FREE Carnival Ride Ticket* Visit www.events.ktvz.com for details! One free ticket per person. Rodeo - gates open at 5 pm, performance starts at 6:30 pm. Rodeo Free with Fair admission.

Admission Prices: Adult Children 6-12 Children 0-5 Sr. Citizen 62+

DAILY: SEASON: $10 $19 $6 $11 FREE FREE $6 $11

THE BULLETIN & MID OREGON Saturday, August 4 CREDIT UNION DAY Fair Hours: Friday, August 3 10 am – 11 pm Fair Hours: 10 am – 11 pm Rodeo - gates open at 5:30 pm, performance starts at 7:00 pm. FREE with Fair admission. Chute #9 rodeo dance to follow.

Parade – 10 am, Downtown Redmond

KOHD TV DAY Sunday, August 5 Fair Hours: 10 am – 5 pm $5 Admission for everyone. CARNIVAL WRISTBAND DAY

Rodeo - gates open at 5:30 pm, performance starts at 7:30 pm. FREE with Fair admission. Chute #9 rodeo dance to follow.

Visit www.kohd.com for voucher. $25 wristband buys all the rides you can ride from 11 am to 5 pm.

4H/FFA Livestock Auction – Jr. Livestock Buyers BBQ 11 am Beef Auction at noon, All animals to be auctioned in Swine Ring

FAMILY FUN ZONE PRESENTED BY:

SPONSORED BY:

Seniors Admitted for Free on Wednesday! Sunday $5 Admission for everyone!

Day and Season Passes available at all Les Schwab Tire Centers and the TICKET MILL in the Old Mill District.

Old-fashioned, affordable family fun Every day. Located near the North entrance. From pie and watermelon eating contests to sack races, dunk tank, free pony rides, free petting zoo, Northwest Challenge Xtreme Air Dogs presented by: Cash Prizes! Carnival Tickets! Watch The Bulletin for a detailed schedule.

BUSIN E SS

G

News of Record, G2 Stocks/mutual funds, G4-5 Sunday Driver, G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

www.bendbulletin.com/business

Boyd Acres at a crossroads 4

Signs of life in the remodel market in Bend • Some contractors are noticing a slight uptick in calls for repair work this summer By Elon Glucklich The Bulletin

Building activity is on the rise in Bend. But not enough for some local contractors, who are still struggling to find work. The city of Bend issued 165 permits for residential and commercial additions and remodeling work through the first half of 2012. While that’s up from 136 during the same time span in 2011, it hasn’t been enough for contractors like Doug Hull of Hulls Construction to rehire some of the workers he’s had to lay off since the market crash. In the first half of 2008, as the real estate boom raced toward a meltdown, the city issued 239 permits for additions or remodels in Bend. Even in 2009, as the market came to a virtual standstill, Hulls Construction employed nine people. Today, it’s just Hull and his son, Trevor. Total sales at Hulls dropped from about $2.2 million in 2008, to $1.5 million in 2009, to $800,000 in 2010. If not for a new home he helped build at Black Butte Ranch last year, Hull would have

3 2

1

Largest employers on Boyd Acres Road, 1965-2006 1

Jeld-Wen plant. Employment peak: 1,400

2

Former Beaver Coaches plant. Employment peak: 500

3

Former Fuqua Homes plant. Employment peak: 330

4

Former Marus Dental International plant. Employment peak: At least 250 Sources: Economic Development for Central Oregon, Bulletin archives, Bulletin staff research

• Big employers have left, but some smaller ones are showing bright spots

Researcher reaps data on seniors by staying at retirement community By Kevin C Keller The Denver Post

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

t shift change, traffic used to back up for 15 minutes or a half-hour on the industrial segment of Northeast Boyd Acres Road in Bend. Fuqua Homes Inc., Beaver Coaches Inc. and the former Pozzi Window Co. employed hundreds, so they staggered their shift-changing times in the 1990s and early 2000s to minimize the congestion. “Everybody hurried to the parking lot to beat the Pozzi people, because they got out at 3:30,” said Jim Sizemore, who worked at Beaver Coaches and now owns RV Outfitters Inc., which customizes recreational vehicles, on Boyd Acres. The traffic jams don’t happen anymore. See Boyd Acres / G2

A

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Dave Hogue, president of Host Industries Inc., stands on the company’s manufacturing floor as two workers assemble a recreational vehicle behind him.

finished 2011 with about $400,000 in sales. “Honestly, I’m sinking,” Hull said. “There are some people looking (at possible remodel work) and that type of thing. But the market is still really poor right now.” Not everyone is having as tough a go in Central Oregon. At Structure Development Northwest, calls for maintenance needs — such as bathroom, kitchen and floor repairs — have picked up this summer, said co-owner Scott Houck. There’s not much of the new-home activity that drove the company until the market crash. In fact, Structure wasn’t even in the remodel market until 2010. It specialized in new-home construction until then. “What we’re starting to find now is that a lot of people do have the money” for new remodel projects, Houck said. A lot of those projects were needed years ago. But homeowners have waited. Many didn’t have the equity in their homes to obtain loans to finance the work. See Remodel / G2

BOULDER, Colo. — Senior citizens are quickly becoming the largest segment of consumers, so marketing company Varsity Branding wanted to get an insider’s view of how members of this group spend their money. The Harrisburg, Penn.based firm sent a market researcher to live for a month in the Frasier Meadows Retirement Community in Boulder. Early results suggest that today’s seniors are doing more research prior to buying than past generations, are more comfortable with technology and are less brand loyal. They also are looking for tech-friendly retirement communities with stimulating activities.

“I’m surprised at the level of activity done at such an advanced age,” said Varsity researcher Cheryl Slavinsky. “I was amazed. People were on the bus (at) 86, 87, doing their grocery shopping for the week.” Slavinsky, 57, said Frasier Meadows residents treated her like a welcomed house guest during Varsity’s Project Looking Glass II. Project Looking Glass II is the follow-up to a project done five years ago in which researchers moved into a retirement community in Pennsylvania for a month. Word-of-mouth reputation is still crucial to seniors making purchases, said John Bassounas, Varsity’s director of client services. See Seniors / G3

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Morals drive some to pay off underwater homes By Hudson Sangree and Phillip Reese

“The people who have found a way to stay have great resolve.”

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The streets of Gretchen Lancero’s neighborhood in Sacramento’s North Natomas area have names like Dreamy, Charm and Celebration, reminders of the heady days of the housing boom when people lined up to buy new houses here. Today, North Natomas epitomizes the nation’s housing bust. And on Celebration Street, Lancero and her family are among a handful of the original buyers still clinging to their homes. Many people on Celebration Street and elsewhere in North Natomas lost their homes because they could not pay. Others who could pay chose not to stay chained to houses worth much less than they owed, and either got their

— Angelique Ashby, Sacramento city councilwoman

Jose Luis Villegas / Sacramento Bee

Gretchen Lancero sits with her dogs, Frito and Brutas, in front of the family home on Celebration Street in the Natomas neighborhood of Sacramento, Calif. The Lanceros are one of three original homeowners from 2005 who still live there today.

lender to agree to a short sale, or simply walked away and allowed the home to go into foreclosure. Bankers have coined a term for this: “strategic default.” The practice has become common,

with some financial experts urging people to do it if they have little chance of recouping their investment. “All of our friends are doing it,” Lancero said. “Good, moral people are doing it. I’ve talked

to people in the mortgage business. They say, ‘It’s morally fine. Just do it.’ But if we can, we really want to do the right thing.” What happened on Celebration Street has played out on streets all over North Natomas and other newly minted communities in the Sacramento region. Entire neighborhoods turned over in the space of a few years as home values fell by half. In each of these places, however, there are people who have stuck it out in the face of overwhelming financial reasons to leave. See Homes / G3

G2

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

N  R DEEDS Deschutes County

Beneficial Oregon Inc. to Cindy Wilson, Kings Forest Second Addition, Lot 31, Block 5, $210,000 John W. and Suzanne Grant trustees for Grant Family Revocable Trust to Nicholas J. and Cheryl P. Milo, Township 15, Range 11, Section 31, $270,000 Karen C. and Lawrence A. Soto to Eric M., Megan S., Paul J. and Jancie O. Davis, Neal Addition, Lot 4, Block 1, $179,987 Federal National Mortgage Association to Daniel E. Mooney and Emily K. Souza, Canyon Rim Village, Phase 5, Lot 117, $157,000 Eric and Jo Anne Bradley to Joey and Stacy Pickavance, NorthWest Crossing, Phases 7 and 11, Lot 326, $490,000 Development Holdings LLC to Navigata U.S.A. Inc., Shevlin Center, Lot 2, Block 5, $1,800,000 Carey H. and Carrie E. Meerdink to Marlene C. Schneider, Westbrook Village, Phase 2, Lot 20, $164,000 Bank of America N.A. to Ryan Lang, Madison, Phases 1, 2 and 3, Lot 1, $247,900 Barbara Price, Mary P. Burton and Kristen E. Storey to Michael D. and Barbara B. Proctor, Golf Course Homesite Section Twelfth Addition, Lot 204, $485,000 Peter Schwarzenberger to Allister D. Schwarzenberger, Sundance East, Phase 1, Lot 6, Block 6, $200,000 Stephen M. and Julie A. T. Floyd to Ryan Rebarcak trustee for GRSW Stewart Real Estate Trust, Lava Ridges, Phase 5, Lot 155, $301,000 Ryan Rebarcak trustee for GRSW Stewart Real Estate Trust to Catherine E. Petersen, Lava Ridges, Phase 5, Lot 155, $301,000 Gary K. Weeks trustee for Gary K. Weeks Trust and Emma DiazWeeks trustee for Emma DiazWeeks Trust to Dena J. Draxton and Kim Barnett, Ridge at Eagle Crest 57, Lot 184, $189,000 Mathieu Federspiel to Gerald W. Ward and Alison R. Meyer, Township 18, Range 12, Section 24, $290,000 Stephen A. and Nicole R. Oliver to David J. Slavensky, Partition Plat 2004-83, Parcel 1, $379,900 Charles W. Brisson and Mildred H. Harman-Brisson to David C. Stewart, Ladera Ridge P.U.D., Lot 10, $345,000 Tyee Development Inc. to David J. and Kathryn M. Myers, Yardley Estates, Phase 4, Lot 92, $239,900 Dustin and Katherine Piggott to Cathy Swensen, Cascade Peaks, Phase 1, Lot 14, $160,000 Marilyn Jack to Carl L. Shadburn, Sun Mountain Ranches, First Addition, Lot 1, Block 2, $189,000 Louise T. Montgomery to Joe N. Marvel Jr. and Pamela J. Marvel, River Village 2, Lot 7, Block 5, $171,500 Amberyn and Cyrenna Amey and Hollie M. Mercado for the Estate of John E. Amey to Bradley W. and Cherie M. Goeman, Sterling Pointe, Phase 2, Lot 49, $199,900 Charles R. and Eileen M. Seelye to Loren and Laura K. Bailey, Sun Meadow, Lot 27, $320,000 Kathleen Combs to Philip D. Chadwick, Aubrey Heights, Lot 3, Block 9, $172,600 Keanco LLC to Shari L. Telgen and William F. Wellard, Pine Meadow Village, Phase 2, Lot 69, $315,000 Harold Brainerd trustee for Brainerd Family Revocable Trust to Curly Holdings LLC, Eastside Business and Industrial Park, Lot 4, Block 4, $595,000 Lisa L. Cook-Keyte, who acquired title as Lisa L. Cook, and Stuart Keyte to David E. Green, Township 14, Range 13, Section 30, $251,000 Bank of the Cascades to Stone Bridge Homes N.W. LLC, Shevlin Ridge, Phase 5, Lots 101 and 124, $182,000 Sandra D. Schones to Gerald P. Gilmour and Patricia J. Burson, Second Addition to Bend Park, Lots 3 and 4, Block 153, $240,000

Boyd Acres Continued from G1 At least two factories and three office buildings now sit empty, adding more than 210,000 square feet to the supply of open industrial buildings in Bend, including the vacant Cessna airplane factory at Bend Municipal Airport and the mostly undeveloped Juniper Ridge. Monaco Coach Corp., which had bought Beaver Coaches, stopped making motorhomes in Bend in 2005. Fuqua Homes quit its manufactured-home construction last year, after trimming its workforce from a high of 330 in 2006. Klamath Falls-based JeldWen, which bought Pozzi Window, has shed employees every year since 2007, leaving 419 this year, according to data from Economic Development for Central Oregon. With the erosion or closure of the road’s largest companies, some smaller ones have also closed. A few have stuck around. But some employees don’t think the hustle and bustle of years past will return anytime soon. Bend natives and people who still work on Boyd Acres have seen the road change. They don’t hesitate to talk about the transformation. “It’s sad, now, to look at this, because this was a thriving little city in itself,” said Kim Hogue, business manager of Host Industries Inc., a manufacturer of campers and motorhomes that has decreased employee count from around 90 to 12 in recent years. The city of Bend would like to help bring manufacturing jobs back to Bend, said Eric King, the city manager. “Those are traditional traded-sector jobs that have kind of a ripple effect throughout the economy,” he said. Toward that end, the city’s enterprise zone covers Boyd Acres Road, and the city offers forgivable loans to foster job creation. To learn more about the properties, Jon Skidmore, assistant city manager, took a tour of the former Fuqua Homes site Thursday, now that it’s up for sale, King said.

Bare land The industrial area that stretches from the Pilot Butte and North Unit irrigation canals to Empire Avenue used to be bare land — a place where Sizemore remembers drinking beers with friends. It was north and east of the city limits. Empire Avenue was not there yet. Fuqua Homes opened in Bend in 1968, according to The Bulletin’s archives. Beaver Coaches moved to Bend from Corvallis that same year, after signing a deal with Oscar Murray, cofounder of Murray & Holt Motors and the man behind the Bend Industrial Development Corp. The deal was

Remodel Continued from G1 And as homeowners held off on maintenance needs and home building dried up, construction work in Central Oregon took a huge hit. Deschutes County reported 3,260 jobs in construction, mining and logging in May, down from an average 8,200 in 2006 and 2007, according to data from the Oregon Employment Department. But some companies are cautiously optimistic that the building market is turning a corner this summer. Mike Davis, owner of TMT Home Remodelers in Redmond, has fielded calls this month from three homeowners asking about kitchen and bathroom remodels. That wouldn’t have been much to jump for joy about in 2006. But this is a far different market, Davis said, and any work is good work. “Actually, until about the last couple of weeks, we looked really, really bad,” said Davis, who laid off two of his four builders in March. “But the phone has started ringing, which is somewhat encouraging.” Lower costs for construc-

“It’s sad, now, to look at this, because this was a thriving little city in itself.” — Kim Hogue, business manager of Host Industries Inc.

ing Inc. of Bend now uses the Marus building. The company doesn’t make anything, though — it sandblasts and paints other companies’ products, General Manager Tracy Huettl said.

The future

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Host Industries Inc. builds campers and motorhomes on Murray Road, off Northeast Boyd Acres Road. It has seen new demand from other countries in recent months.

A truck on Northeast Boyd Acres Road in Bend passes by Murray Road, where Host Industries Inc. has a manufacturing facility.

worth a quarter-million dollars, The Bulletin reported at the time. “How many acres you boys want? A hundred?” Murray asked Jim Hogue, Beaver’s then-president, recalled Hogue’s son, Dave, who went on to work at the Beaver plant. Beaver aimed to bring “12 key men to Bend from their Corvallis plant,” The Bulletin reported. “The remaining 60 persons the plant will employ initially will be hired locally.” It would grow to 500 by 2005, when the company that acquired it, Monaco Coach, closed the Bend production facility and consolidated in Coburg. The Bend Millwork Co. plant began operating in 1965, under the name Lee Millwork Corp. Fewer than 100 people worked there when Arthur Pozzi acquired it in 1968, said his son Randall Pozzi, who is now Host’s general manager. Affiliated window and entry-door divisions opened in subsequent decades. By around 1985, employment was at 1,400 in Bend alone, with 300 more in 13 other states, Randall Pozzi said. Jeld-Wen acquired Bend Millwork in 1992.

tion and labor are driving an uptick in building activity this year, according to Andy High, vice president of government affairs for the Central Oregon Builders Association. But much of that pickup is being driven by small projects, like new kitchen cabinets or floor tiles. Those jobs don’t provide nearly the same revenue that building home and office additions can bring to contractors. “I’m hearing from people who were going to sell three or four years ago, but the market tanked,” High said. “So now, instead of selling, people are deciding to go ahead and invest in a remodel.” Still, Davis of TMT Remodelers isn’t seeing major remodel jobs just yet. Uncertainty over where home prices will go later this year seems to have people looking for new home projects, but not going as far as committing to them, he said. “We’re definitely seeing positive signs. A lot more people are thinking about remodeling, so I’m hoping things will continue to get better,” Davis said. But “hoping and expecting are two different things.” —Reporter: 541-617-7820 eglucklich@bendbulletin.com

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With so many workers traveling to the plant, the city of Bend installed a traffic light at Pozzi Window, Sizemore said. By the mid-1970s, with Fuqua, Beaver Coaches and Bend Millwork running together, the area was called the Bend Industrial Park. The companies included that name in Bulletin classified ads for job openings.

One big plant remains These days, Boyd Acres still hosts some manufacturing. Of the big three employers from

previous decades, the former Pozzi plant is the only one going. Some remaining manufacturing companies, such as Bend Cabinet & Fixtures Inc. and Driving Force Graphics, have held onto a small number of employees through the recession — not in the hundreds. At other companies, employment has shrunk. Months after the Beaver Coaches plant closed, Host Industries, established in 2000, moved in, turning out one vehicle per week. But demand declined. Last year it moved across Murray Road — named for Oscar Murray — to a facility a quarter of its size. Now it produces one motorhome a month. In other cases, manufacturing has given way to other kinds of operations. Marus Dental International, which moved to Bend from Minnesota in 1979, once paid more than 250 people to make dental chairs and other equipment on Builders Street, off Boyd Acres. Jobs were cut and transferred elsewhere in 1999 and 2000, according to The Bulletin’s archives. Commercial Powder Coat-

What will the future hold for Boyd Acres? For an answer, look to the vacant manufacturing facilities. The Beaver Coaches warehouse and office building — 62,750 and 9,179 square feet, respectively — are for lease, at 25 cents per square foot per month. And the Fuqua Homes site went up for sale earlier this month, for $5.25 million. Brian Fratzke, founder and principal broker of Bend’s Fratzke Commercial Real Estate, said his company’s agents have been reaching out to CEOs of local businesses, to give them first dibs on the 14.5acre property with a 125,000square-foot building and three other structures. If a local company couldn’t swing an expansion to such a large facility, perhaps one from outside the area could come in and create jobs in Bend, Fratzke said. Some businesses still operating on Boyd Acres could expand further. Dave Hogue, president of Host Industries, would like to get his company back to the old Beaver Coaches plant. The company is seeing new demand from customers in Germany, New Zealand, China and other countries. Commercial Powder Coating, on the other end of the Boyd Acres industrial corridor, is hitting record employment levels, with 33 employees, Huettl said. Nevertheless, he doesn’t expect heavy traffic on the road in the next several years, even though it has gotten busier in the last two or three years, he said. “What I’m seeing are small businesses expanding (with) one or two employees,” he said. — Reporter: 541-633-2117, jnovet@bendbulletin.com

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Homes Continued from G1 “The people who have found a way to stay have great resolve,” said Sacramento City Councilwoman Angelique Ashby, who represents North Natomas and lives there in an underwater house, meaning she owes more on her mortgage than her house is worth. In this sprawling community of 55,000 that rose from a floodplain in less than a decade, about two out of every five homes has received a foreclosure notice since 2006. Nearly the same proportion of homes has changed hands since December 2007, a McClatchy Newspapers review of foreclosure data and property records shows. Lenders sent out nearly 7,500 foreclosure notices in the past six years, though some homeowners received more than one notice. On Celebration Street, only three of the 15 homeowners who bought new houses in 2005 remain. Two homes are being rented out by the original owners. Four homes were lost to foreclosure. Others were unloaded in short sales, where the bank agrees to accept less than what is owed. Families who have stuck it out say a sense of moral obligation to pay their debts and a desire to give their children stability are among the reasons they stay in homes so deeply underwater. “We gave our word. We signed the documents. We try to have integrity in everything we do,” said Lancero, a mother of three who cited her Christian values as one reason her family has stayed put.

Sacrifice She and her husband, Jeff, a state worker, sold their SUV and took in a boarder to help pay their mortgage. They stopped driving their children to school in Davis, Calif., and began homeschooling them instead. The couple are refinancing under HARP, a federal program that allows many underwater homeowners who are current on their mortgage payments to get a lower interest rate. The Lanceros paid $447,500 for their 2,000-square-foot home in October 2005 and put $100,000 down from the sale of another Natomas home. It’s now worth about $218,000, the tracking firm Zillow estimates. That’s typical for the neighborhood. Homebuilding giant Lennar built the three- to five-bed-

would have considered walking away from the house and dealing with the consequences of foreclosure rather than having to absorb such huge losses. “My advice is: Why stick with it?” he said. The decision to stay or walk away often comes down to a person’s sense of obligation, said Tess Wilkinson-Ryan, a psychologist and law professor at the University of Pennsylvania who studies how people think about contractual obligations, including mortgages. Traditionally, she said, foreclosure was a stigmatizing event and something to avoid at all costs. Not only would it wreck a borrower’s credit rating for years, but many borrowers felt a personal sense of obligation to lenders that were often local institutions. Jose Luis Villegas / Sacramento Bee

Mason Lancero rides his bike on “Pokey Mountain,” a vacant lot in front of his family’s home on Celebration Street in Sacramento, Calif. Developers won approval from the city to build three dozen homes on the empty school site, but those plans remain wishful thinking.

room homes on Celebration Street on ample lots between 2004 and 2006. Prices ranged from $350,000 to more than $450,000. All the homes sit along the west side of the street. Buyers were originally told a school would go on the east side, but it never materialized. Developers won approval from the city to build three dozen homes on the empty school site, but those plans remain wishful thinking. For now, neighborhood children play in the vacant lot, which they call “pokey mountain” because of the weedy prickers that grow on the mound of earth there, residents said. The high turnover has led to some crime problems. Neighbors said that in March 2007 police busted a house where marijuana was being grown. They arrived home to find officers dragging out pot plants. “It’s been so many people in and out,” Lancero said. Nevertheless, she said, “As long as we can afford it, we’re going to do this. This is where we want to be. This is our forever home.” Lancero said her family likes the large size of the lot and has grown close to the two other families that have stayed. Even the vacant lot across the street is a good place for the kids to play. Two other original families — the Hongs and the Chernows — remain on Celebration Street. The three families’ homes are grouped together in the middle of the block. “We’re happy with the

Starb u cksop en in g 3n ewju icestores By Candice Choi T he Associated Press

NEW YORK — Starbucks Corp. already conquered the coffee market. Now it wants to mix it up with fresh juices. The Seattle-based company on Friday will announce the opening of three more Evolution Fresh Inc. juice stores, in addition to the one it opened earlier this year. Starbucks is also expanding distribution of ready-to-drink bottles of Evolution juice in supermarkets and other stores to capitalize on the rapidly growing market for premium juices. The move is just Starbucks’ latest push to move beyond its cafes at a time when the company is facing growing competition from fast food chains that serve specialty coffees. The ready-to-serve premium juice market has been a bright spot in the broader U.S. beverage market. Volume of premium juices was up 25 percent in the second quarter, according to the industry tracker Beverage Digest, with brands such as Bolthouse, Naked and Odwalla seeing significant gains. “It’s clearly part of the American lifestyle at this point,” said Arthur Rubinfeld, president of global development for Starbucks and Evolution Fresh retail. Starbucks purchased the Evolution Fresh brand late last year for $30 million. The California-based company uses fresh fruits and a process called high-pressure pasteurization to make the juice without heating it. Starbucks says that gives Evolution juices an advantage

The first Evolution store opened in March in Bellevue, Wash., and also sells food such as wraps, salads and vegetarian and vegan offerings. Another store will open Friday in downtown Seattle. A second Seattle location and a San Francisco location will open this fall. over competitors, since more of the nutrients are preserved. The first Evolution store opened in March in Bellevue, Wash. and also sells food such as wraps, salads and vegetarian and vegan offerings. Another store will open Friday in downtown Seattle. A second Seattle location and a San Francisco location will open this fall. Around the same time, Starbucks also plans to open its first Tazo tea shop, which will offer more than 80 varieties of tea drinks, as well as packaged chocolates, infused sugars and honeys, near its headquarters in Seattle. Additionally, the company in June bought a San Franciscobased bakery chain, La Boulange, that will start replacing the baked goods and pastries sold at Starbucks cafes. The company plans to make the bakery more of a national chain in the years ahead.

schools,” said Derek Chernow. “We’re happy with the nucleus of folks who have stayed. We’re vested now. We want to see this community do well.” Former Celebration Street homeowners who were foreclosed upon either hung up or did not return phone calls. Some who left via short sales said they were glad to escape to better circumstances. “It wasn’t what you hoped it would be,” said Rhonda Elliott of her family’s five years on Celebration Street. She and her husband, Spencer, executed a short sale on their Natomas house and moved to a more stable neighborhood in Davis. They were lucky. Many who exit via short sales have to wait at least two years to repair their credit rating. Elliott and her husband were able to buy again quickly because the Natomas house was in his name alone, so she emerged with intact credit.

Opportunity When they bought on Celebration Street in 2005, the couple were renting and saw home prices climbing higher each week. “We thought, ‘Oh, my gosh, if we don’t get into a house now we’re never going to,’ ” she said. They paid $394,000 for the house in 2005. It sold last year for $177,000, according to Zillow. The atmosphere remained “generally positive” on Celebration Street through the plummet in home prices, Elliott said. A Neighborhood

Seniors Continued from G1 Bassounas and Slavinsky said Boulder is a highly educated and active community, even for seniors, but the project still provides perspective on the mature market as a whole. Researchers join shopalongs, record journals and interview residents. “It’s tough to market to someone unless you’ve walked a mile in their shoes,” Bassounas said. “The world has changed. This is about 2017 as much as 2012. We’re trying to understand where the market is headed.” One-third of the U.S. population will be over 50 by 2016. Today’s mature market controls 75 percent of the nation’s wealth and 70 percent of its disposable income, according to U.S. Census data. When moving into a retirement community, seniors now dig into the facility’s ins and outs, instead of settling into the nicest campus. “One night I went to a nanotech lecture,” Slavinsky said. “There were 80 to 90 people there, and they all were asking questions. Most residents have computers, many have iPads, and they expect there to be Wi-Fi where they go.” Seniors now use tools such as naccra.com, which lists questions to ask a community one is considering moving into. Al LeBlang, 83, said he didn’t use online tools when he moved into Fraiser Meadows 10 years ago, but he finds them helpful today. “I did not use the site because I didn’t know about it,” he said. “By these people

Watch formed, and neighbors had regular block parties. But the constant turnover undermined their vision of a stable neighborhood of long-term residents. “Had the market not done what it did, we probably would have stayed,” Elliott said. Jaime Boseman, a sergeant in the Army, said he and his wife sold their house on Celebration Street a few years ago for less than what they owed. A military program made up the difference. Now they live in Houston. The mortgage on their 3,600square-foot home, built in 2005, costs about $1,700 a month with taxes and insurance, Boseman said. They were paying $2,500 a month for a 1,350-square-foot home on Celebration Street that they bought in 2005 for $372,000. It sold in 2010 for $196,000, and is now worth about $158,000, Zillow estimates. Back when they bought the Natomas house, “it was like a lottery,” Boseman recalled. He drove from the San Francisco Bay Area every weekend for a chance at snagging a piece of the North Natomas dream. “They were going to release so many homes and call 10 families, and we were No. 11. The next weekend it was like $10,000 more,” he said. “When we finally got in, we thought it was OK because in a couple of years it would be worth twice that. That didn’t happen.” Boseman said he was grateful for the military program that let him leave with his credit intact. But he said he

A promise Those feelings are still deeply ingrained among some homeowners, she said. “Many people are unwilling to breach a contract even when it would be profitable for them. There’s this promise you’ve made to pay your mortgage, and (by breaking it) you’re imposing a loss on someone else — the bank.” But the severity of the fall in home prices, and the breadth of the housing crisis, has created a new normal in which defaults or short sales are more acceptable, she said. “It’s hard for something to be so stigmatizing when it’s happening to so many people.” Mortgage banks, meanwhile, are distant entities that people perceive as engaging in deceptive lending practices and other bad behavior. The rationale, Wilkinson-Ryan said, is, “If you’re going to take these kinds of risks, why shouldn’t I?” In some ways, people have come to see a foreclosure or a short sale — both of which hurt the borrower’s credit — as optional penalties built into the mortgage contract, like the early termination fee for switching cellphone providers. Behavioral economists call it a “weak sanction,” WilkinsonRyan said. “When people see a weak sanction (they start) thinking about costs and benefits instead of moral norms,” she said. For Gretchen Lancero, however, the choice to stay on Celebration Street remains a moral one. “If a grave catastrophe happened, we’d think about leaving,” she said. “But we’ve been able to stay afloat. We’re very grateful.”

Find It All Online

looking at what others are doing, they can make sure they get what they want.” As for living with a researcher for a month, LeBlang said he was surprised at how hard Slavinsky worked. “I thought she was great,” LeBlang said. “She surprised everyone and is very vivacious. She has taken on a big project, and I think she did a good job.”

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Saddle Up! Stick Horse Barrel Racing at the

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SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

G3

G4 THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

Mutual funds m

%

%

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Name

AQR Funds:

CRM Funds:

DivArb I n 11.04 +.01 +1.5 +11.1 MgdFutSt I n 9.91 +.13 +0.9 NS AcadEm n 16.90 +.04 -16.2 +28.6

MidCapValI

Alger Funds A: SpectraN

13.26 +.12 +1.3 +60.1

Alger Funds I: CapApprI SmCapGrI

21.92 +.19 +1.0 +50.8 27.34 -.07 -5.8 +51.6

AllianceBernstein : IntDurInstl

16.35 +.07 +7.0 +30.4

AllianceBern A: GloblBdA r 8.60 GroIncA p 3.76 HighIncoA p 9.09 LgCapGrA p 27.42

+.05 +.02 +.03 +1.06

+5.9 +5.2 +6.5 +2.9

+30.7 +48.2 +60.4 +49.7

AllianceBern Adv: HiIncm Adv

9.10 +.03 +6.8 +61.8

AllianceBern C: HighIncoC p

9.19 +.03 +5.7 +56.6

Allianz Admin MMS: NFJSmCpVl t 28.38 -.11 -4.0 +54.4

Allianz Fds Instl: NFJDivVal SmCpVl n

11.98 +.08 +2.9 +47.8 29.86 -.11 -3.7 +55.6

Allianz Funds A: NFJDivVal t SmCpV A

11.89 +.08 +2.5 +46.3 28.40 -.11 -4.1 +53.7

Alpine Funds: TaxOptInco 10.05 ... +1.3 +4.8 AmanaGrth n 25.95 +.09 +1.4 +42.6 AmanaInco n 32.66 +.40 -0.8 +35.6

Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst SmCapInst

20.23 -.07 +3.1 +46.5 20.01 -.20 -4.0 +57.4

Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv

19.18 -.06 +2.8 +45.0

Ameri Century 1st: Growth

27.25 +.15 +2.2 +50.7

Amer Century Adv: EqtyIncA p HeritageA p

7.67 +.01 +6.0 +40.2 20.87 -.24 -6.7 +58.3

Amer Century Inst: EqInc

7.68 +.02 +6.6 +42.0

Amer Century Inv: AllCapGr CAIntTF DivBond n DivBond EqGroInv n EqInco GNMAI GovtBd GrowthI HeritageI IncGro InfAdjBond IntTF IntTF n IntlGroI MdCapVal NT DivrBd n SelectI Ultra n ValueInv Vista

29.53 11.95 11.30 11.30 23.26 7.68 11.29 11.68 27.00 21.52 26.15 13.36 11.70 11.70 10.01 12.36 11.21 42.32 24.93 5.98 16.69

-.06 +.03 +.05 +.05 +.09 +.02 +.01 +.02 +.15 -.25 +.10 +.05 +.03 +.03 +.06 -.02 +.05 +.34 +.16 -.01 -.17

-2.1 +9.4 +8.7 +8.4 +4.7 +6.4 +5.7 +7.1 +2.0 -6.6 +3.7 +11.5 +8.3 +8.5 -12.2 +2.8 +8.7 +1.7 +0.2 +3.8 -7.6

+57.1 +22.7 +23.9 +23.1 +51.7 +41.4 +19.1 +18.3 +49.9 +59.5 +46.3 +32.7 +20.6 +21.4 +23.2 +54.5 +23.6 +50.6 +52.5 +43.4 +42.2

American Funds A: AmcapFA p AmMutlA p BalA p BondFdA p CapInBldA p CapWGrA p CapWldA p EupacA p FundInvA p GlblBalA GovtA p GwthFdA p HI TrstA p HiIncMuniA IncoFdA p IntBdA p IntlGrIncA p InvCoAA p LtdTEBdA p NwEconA p NewPerA p NewWorldA STBFA p SmCpWA p TaxExA p TxExCAA p WshMutA p

20.26 27.48 19.52 12.94 51.66 33.79 21.18 36.71 37.83 25.43 14.64 31.42 11.00 15.09 17.47 13.79 27.66 29.17 16.34 26.59 28.34 48.86 10.10 36.66 13.05 17.49 30.27

+.04 +.19 +.10 +.05 +.12 +.06 +.14 +.09 +.23 +.04 +.03 +.12 +.03 +.07 +.06 +.02 +.03 +.15 +.03 -.09 +.17 +.17 +.01 -.14 +.05 +.05 +.15

+2.1 +6.2 +6.4 +7.7 +5.2 -4.2 +3.4 -12.2 +0.2 +0.9 +7.1 -0.9 +4.1 +14.8 +6.0 +3.6 -8.9 +3.3 +6.1 -0.5 -3.4 -10.1 +1.0 -7.9 +11.6 +13.0 +6.6

+46.1 +47.8 +44.0 +27.2 +35.5 +26.4 +21.9 +16.5 +42.3 NS +18.1 +35.5 +49.2 +37.7 +47.6 +13.8 +22.1 +38.1 +18.4 +39.1 +34.9 +26.3 +5.0 +46.5 +26.3 +32.2 +54.0

American Funds B: BalanB p CapInBldB p CapWGrB t GrowthB t IncomeB p

19.45 51.71 33.62 30.38 17.35

+40.7 +32.5 +23.6 +32.6 +44.3

+.09 +.12 +.06 +.12 +.06

Arbitrage I n 13.05 -.02 +1.6 ArbitrageR p 12.81 -.01 +1.4

+9.4 +8.7

Arbitrage Funds: Ariel Investments: 41.45 +.01 -8.3 +61.3 45.98 +.38 -9.5 +63.6

Artio Global Funds: GlbHiInco t GlbHiIncI r IntlEqI r IntlEqA IntlEqII I r TotRet I

10.07 9.62 23.00 22.44 9.78 14.01

+.04 +.04 -.03 -.03 ... +.09

+1.6 +1.9 -22.9 -23.1 -21.2 +8.6

+41.1 +42.1 -0.5 -1.3 +1.4 +28.9

+.12 +.12 +.15 +.15 -.10 -.10 +.18 -.10

-3.1 -2.8 -4.9 -4.7 NA NA 0.0 -9.0

+29.5 +30.4 +37.8 +38.5 NA NA +49.8 +40.7

Artisan Funds: Intl IntlInstl IntlValu r IntlValInstl MidCap MidCapInstl MidCapVal SmCapVal

21.78 21.92 26.26 26.32 36.09 37.43 20.12 14.98

Aston Funds: FairMidCpN M&CGroN

30.95 +.16 -4.1 +64.7 24.90 +.21 +5.0 +39.5

BBH Funds: BdMktN CoreSelN

10.37 +.01 +1.6 +9.7 16.66 +.23 +9.2 +60.3

BNY Mellon Funds: BondFund EmgMkts IntmBdFd LrgCapStk MidCapStk NatlIntMuni NtlShTrmMu

13.73 9.07 13.27 8.79 11.23 13.98 13.00

+.07 +.01 +.04 +.04 -.06 +.04 ...

+6.8 -18.5 +4.7 -2.3 -12.0 +8.4 +1.6

+20.5 +16.1 +15.5 +44.6 +46.7 +21.4 +6.3

Baird Funds: AggBdInst 11.02 +.06 +9.3 +30.7 CoreBdInst 11.22 +.06 +8.8 +35.0 IntMuBdInst 12.06 +.03 +6.3 +16.0 ShtTBdInst 9.73 +.02 +2.7 +13.2

Baron Fds Instl: Growth SmallCap

55.61 -.30 -0.2 +59.0 24.64 -.19 -6.4 +56.3

Baron Funds: Asset n Growth SmallCap

48.55 +.06 -4.6 +49.8 55.16 -.30 -0.5 +57.8 24.44 -.20 -6.7 +55.0

Bernstein Fds: IntDur Ca Mu DivMun NYMun TxMgdIntl IntlPort EmgMkts

14.20 14.89 14.90 14.63 12.43 12.36 24.82

+.06 +.02 +.02 +.02 -.01 ... -.05

+6.9 +6.0 +5.6 +5.4 -18.2 -18.4 -20.9

+29.6 +17.5 +15.6 +15.2 +0.5 +0.2 +14.0

Berwyn Funds: Income

13.02 -.01 +2.3 +30.7

BlackRock A: BasValA p CapAppr p EqtyDivid x GlbAlA rx HlthSciOpp HiYdInvA InflProBdA NatMuniA TotRetA

25.32 22.39 19.28 18.70 31.58 7.77 12.07 11.07 11.64

+.14 +.27 -.02 -.07 -.09 +.02 +.05 +.05 +.07

-1.5 -6.0 +5.8 -4.3 +5.2 +6.4 +10.9 +13.9 +7.8

+36.3 +37.6 +49.4 +22.9 +50.8 +60.9 +30.8 +30.8 +29.9

BlackRock B&C: EquityDivC x GlobAlC tx

18.87 +.01 +5.0 +46.2 17.42 ... -5.0 +20.1

BlackRock Fds Blrk: CapAppr p

23.31 +.29 -5.7 +39.2

BlackRock Instl: InflProtBd US Opps BasValI CoreBond EquityDiv x GlbAlloc rx CapAppr p HiYldBond NatlMuni S&P500 x SCapGrI

12.20 34.86 25.51 9.72 19.32 18.79 23.27 7.77 11.07 16.81 23.83

+.05 +.08 +.15 +.04 -.03 -.09 +.29 +.02 +.06 +.07 -.01

+11.2 -9.7 -1.2 +7.6 +6.1 -4.0 -5.8 +6.7 +14.2 +4.8 -6.2

+32.2 +41.3 +37.6 +26.6 +50.7 +23.9 NS +62.5 +31.7 +51.3 +46.6

BlackRock R: GlblAlloc rx

18.09 -.03 -4.5 +21.6

Brandywine Fds: Brandywine

23.18 -.14 -19.2 +15.6

Brown Advisory Fds: GroEqInst 13.72 +.21 -1.0 +63.9 BrownSmCoIns 46.33 -.81 -6.4 +58.5

Buffalo Funds: SmallCap

28.11 +.22 +2.9 +42.2

CGM Funds: FocusFd n Realty n

25.50 -.46 -22.3 +0.5 29.69 -.43 0.0 +102.9

Footnotes F

E S

CoreFxInco LgGrw LgVal n

n

m m

CommRet t

w

m

NS NS -13.3 +13.8 +3.5 NS +3.4 +54.0 +8.0 NS

Fidelity Spart Adv: ExtMktAdv r 500IdxAdv 500Index I IntlAdv r IntlIdx Inst TotlMktAdv r USBond I

38.01 48.32 48.32 30.39 30.40 39.40 12.05

-.22 +.23 +.23 -.04 -.04 +.11 +.05

-3.1 +5.0 +5.1 -13.3 NS +3.5 +7.9

+62.4 +52.3 NS +13.9 NS +54.2 NS

+.11 +.07 -.19 +.02

-1.7 -7.1 -25.8 +3.7

+39.8 +31.0 +19.5 +41.4

First Eagle: GlobalA OverseasA SoGenGold p US ValuA t

46.98 21.00 24.78 17.44

First Investors A GroIncA p

15.76 +.17 +2.9 +50.0

Forum Funds: AbsolStratI r

11.27 +.02 +4.1 +17.0

Frank/Temp Frnk A: AdjUS p AZ TFA p BalInv p CAHYBd p CalInsA p CalTFrA p EqIncA px FedInterm p FedTxFrA p FlexCapGrA FlRtDA p FL TFA p FoundFAl p GoldPrM A GrowthA p HY TFA p HiIncoA IncoSerA p InsTFA p MichTFA p MO TFA p NJTFA p NY TFA p NC TFA p OhioITFA p ORTFA p PA TFA p RisDivA p SMCpGrA StratInc p TotlRtnA p USGovA p

8.90 11.50 39.63 10.51 12.91 7.50 17.38 12.54 12.70 47.00 9.02 12.01 10.31 27.25 47.78 10.88 2.02 2.16 12.59 12.33 12.78 12.67 12.18 12.98 13.13 12.63 10.95 36.21 34.86 10.51 10.43 6.92

... +.05 -.54 +.05 +.07 +.03 +.02 +.04 +.07 -.10 +.01 +.04 +.04 -.17 +.26 +.06 +.01 +.01 +.05 +.04 +.06 +.05 +.06 +.06 +.07 +.06 +.05 -.03 +.03 +.06 +.05 +.02

+2.1 +12.9 -6.7 +19.9 +13.9 +14.6 +2.7 +10.4 +12.8 -3.9 +3.0 +10.4 -1.2 -40.2 +1.7 +14.5 +7.4 +3.6 +11.7 +8.7 +11.6 +11.2 +10.5 +11.7 +11.1 +11.1 +12.1 +3.6 -8.3 +4.6 +6.6 +5.2

+5.9 +25.7 +39.7 +47.4 +28.5 +30.9 +47.4 +24.3 +27.8 +41.5 +22.3 +23.7 +35.4 +6.9 +49.9 +38.1 +48.2 +45.6 +24.5 +19.7 +25.3 +24.5 +22.3 +25.1 +20.7 +25.1 +25.7 +52.4 +52.7 +33.7 +30.7 +17.8

GrEqGS4 IntlEqGS4

20.84 +.21 +2.6 +57.7 11.44 ... -15.6 +14.0

Harbor Funds: Bond CpAppInv p CapAppInst n HiYBdInst r IntlInv t IntlAdmin p IntlGr nr Intl nr

12.84 39.93 40.53 11.00 54.65 54.82 10.86 55.24

+.08 +.13 +.14 +.05 +.26 +.26 +.10 +.26

+6.7 -0.5 -0.2 +6.9 -10.3 -10.2 -10.5 -9.9

+25.8 +44.8 +46.5 +41.7 +27.4 +27.8 +14.3 +28.8

Harding Loevner: EmgMkts r IntlEqty

45.72 +.22 -8.4 +30.0 14.07 +.15 -8.7 +35.0

Hartford Fds A: CapAppA p Chks&Bal p DivGthA p EqtyInc t FltRateA px MidCapA p

30.49 9.54 20.02 14.25 8.83 19.70

-.30 +.01 +.10 +.08 +.01 +.01

-8.7 +1.3 +3.0 +8.7 +4.6 -2.4

+20.7 +30.7 +42.3 +53.7 +31.4 +49.7

Hartford Fds C: CapAppC t FltRateC tx

26.95 -.27 -9.4 +18.2 8.82 +.01 +3.9 +28.6

Hartford Fds I: DivGthI n

19.95 +.09 +3.3 +43.5 33.18 30.53 20.31 8.83 11.26

-.33 -.30 +.10 ... +.06

-8.3 -8.5 +3.4 +4.8 +8.8

+22.3 +21.7 +44.2 +32.4 +27.2

39.64 20.73 27.89 20.66 44.18 11.37 26.65 18.89 12.26

+.04 +.45 +.03 +.38 -1.09 +.08 -.18 +.22 +.01 +.99

-.09 +.10 +.21 +.15 +.14 +.04 +.02 -.11 +.08

-6.8 +3.4 +0.3 +4.3 +4.5 -9.2 -2.1 -4.8 +9.0

+33.7 +45.0 +51.6 +41.0 +52.4 +22.3 +51.7 +57.8 +28.5

QualGrowth I 28.15 +.04 +1.2 +42.3 QualityGrthJ 28.15 +.05 +0.9 +41.1

John Hancock A: BondA p LgCpEqA StrIncA p

16.13 +.06 +7.8 +42.9 25.71 +.03 -2.1 +31.8 6.62 +.03 +3.3 +40.9

John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggress LSBalance LS Conserv LSGrowth LS Moder

12.00 12.95 13.20 12.74 12.92

+.01 +.03 +.05 +.02 +.04

-4.8 -0.1 +4.9 -2.7 +3.0

+37.7 +37.8 +34.0 +37.8 +37.8

Keeley Funds:

18.14 +.17 -10.4 +33.8

Lazard Open: CBEqBldrA 14.26 CBAggGr p 123.09 CBAppr p 15.29 CBFdAllCV A 13.27 WAIntTmMu 6.77 WAMgMuA p 17.08

+.04 +9.8 +1.80 +2.5 +.15 +6.8 +.13 -3.8 +.02 +10.5 +.08 +14.2

Legg Mason C:

Henderson Glbl Fds:

Intl I

IntlOppA p

Longleaf Partners:

12.30 -.01 +1.3 +14.5 11.44 -.01 -5.9 -13.7

+46.4 +67.7 +45.6 +34.2 +23.1 +30.0

6.78 +.02 +9.9 +20.9 17.09 +.08 +13.6 +27.8 39.14 +.24 -0.5 +26.1 131.78 +1.94 +3.0 +69.7

Litman Gregory Fds: 12.65 +.08 -17.6 +12.1

Partners Intl n SmCap

28.39 -.27 -5.4 +48.9 11.55 -.16 -23.7 +1.6 28.55 -.08 +1.2 +81.9

+19.7 +58.3 +57.1 +49.5

29.74 -.09 -2.8 +59.8

12.65 12.50 9.85 11.46 11.05 10.10

PIMCO Funds A:

MdCpCGrY n 30.46 -.09 -2.5 +61.0

AllAstAuth t All Asset p CommodRR p HiYldA LowDurA RealRetA p ShortTrmA p TotRtA

Mutual Series: BeaconZ EuropZ GblDiscovA GlbDiscC GlbDiscZ QuestZ SharesZ

12.56 19.89 28.62 28.30 29.01 17.19 21.42

+.04 +.08 +.02 ... +.02 +.05 +.05

+1.2 -4.7 -0.6 -1.4 -0.3 0.0 +1.8

+38.3 +21.6 +25.4 +22.8 +26.6 +28.5 +39.2

Nationwide Instl: IntIdx I n 6.35 -.03 -13.8 +12.7 NwBdIdxI n 11.93 +.04 +7.7 +21.9 S&P500Instl n 11.36 +.05 +4.9 +51.7

Nationwide Serv: IDModAgg

9.17 -.01 -1.5 +34.4

Neuberger&Berm Fds: 11.52 11.56 34.33 48.24 15.12 9.31 25.27

+.07 +.08 -.12 -.17 +.10 +.05 -.09

+3.5 +3.9 -2.3 -2.2 -2.7 +6.3 -10.3

+56.3 +58.1 +55.8 +56.7 +43.7 +53.6 +30.3

50.00 -.18 -2.4 +55.4

Nicholas Group: 45.36 +.49 +2.5 +55.2

Northern Funds: BondIdx EmgMEqIdx FixIn n HiYFxInc n IntTaxEx n IntlEqIdx r MMEmMkt r MMGlbRE r MMIntlEq r MMMidCap ShIntTaxFr SmlCapVal n StockIdx n TxExpt n

11.14 10.60 10.78 7.30 10.94 9.12 16.94 17.61 8.49 11.51 10.67 15.74 16.91 11.24

+.04 +.03 +.06 +.02 +.04 -.03 +.06 -.07 +.02 +.02 ... -.21 +.08 +.06

+7.9 NA +8.6 +6.1 +9.1 -13.6 -13.5 +0.1 NA -5.8 +2.2 -1.8 NA +11.8

+21.6 NA +23.9 +45.0 +19.4 +12.1 +30.0 +58.5 NA +55.6 +7.2 +55.2 NA +24.4

Nuveen Cl A:

Loomis Sayles:

HYldMuBd p 16.74 +.10 +20.0 +54.9 AAMuB p 11.60 +.06 +15.0 +38.2 LtdMBA p 11.24 +.01 +4.6 +14.4

GlbBdR t

Nuveen Cl C:

16.79 +.09 +1.9 +26.3

RealReturn RealRetInstl ShortT TotRet n TR II n TRIII n

Munder Funds Y:

Nicholas n

CBAggGrI t

Hussman Funds:

MdCpCGr t

Genesis n

Legg Mason A:

-6.6 -13.9 -14.2 -2.6

Munder Funds A:

Neuberger&Berm Tr:

IntlMsterS r 17.41 +.06 -11.6 +36.3 USLgCapGr r 13.71 +.11 +0.6 +57.0

Legg Mason I:

25.18 -.34 +1.8 +79.6

+.01 -.16 -.16 -.04

EmgMktI

24.79 -.19 -8.0 +48.4 13.90 -.02 -0.5 +42.6

ValueInv 39.72 -.67 -12.7 +46.1 ValPlusInv p 28.99 -.42 -7.4 +49.7

Hotchkis & Wiley:

12.99 34.01 32.76 13.70

Lazard Instl:

SmCpValA p LSV ValEq n

Heartland Fds:

18.75 +.17 -14.4 +5.5

IntlEqI n MCapGrI n MCapGrP p SmlCoGrI n

EqIncA EqIncInst Genesis n GenesInstl Guardn n HiIncBdInst LgCapV Inv n

CapApprec p 39.27 -.09 -7.1 +32.7

StrTotRet r StrGrowth

+29.1 +36.1 +49.0 +37.1 -8.6 +35.8 +40.1 +48.7 +10.8 +29.2

Jensen Funds:

WAIntTMuC WAMgMuC CMValTr p

Hartford HLS IB:

MidCpVal

+8.5 +1.1 +6.0 -0.2 -29.4 -4.2 -5.7 -2.2 +2.1 +3.3

EmgMktOp p 18.54 +.17 -10.7 +32.5

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp Div&Grwth GrwthOpp Balanced Stock IntlOpp MidCap SmallCo TotalRetBd

10.98 32.61 9.07 30.21 29.62 20.89 20.84 30.18 3.10 58.72

Laudus Funds:

Hartford Fds Y: CapAppY n CapAppI n DivGrowthY n FltRateI x TotRetBdY nx

FlexBondT Grw&IncT n HiYldT r Janus T OverseasT r PerkMCVal T PerkSCVal T ResearchT n ShTmBdT Twenty T

10.72 12.11 6.83 9.36 10.57 12.50 9.85 11.46

+.10 +.05 +.02 +.06 +.05 +.05

+24.8 +12.1 +1.7 +8.0 +7.8 +7.1

+65.9 +38.7 +7.2 +29.0 +26.1 +28.6

+.11 +.11 +.27 +.03 +.03 +.05 +.02 +.06

NA NA -7.0 +6.3 +3.3 +11.7 +1.5 +7.6

NA NA +49.2 +52.3 +15.6 +36.9 +6.2 +27.4

+.11 +.10 +.03 +.05 +.06

NA NA NA NA +3.0 +14.5 +11.1 +34.9 +6.8 +24.6

+.27 +.03 +.05 +.06

-7.0 +3.3 +11.7 +7.7

+49.3 +15.9 +37.1 +27.9

+.11 +.11 +.28 +.12 +.03 +.05 +.06

NA NA -6.6 +1.0 +3.5 +12.0 +7.9

NA NA +51.0 +37.7 +16.5 +38.3 +28.6

PIMCO Funds C: AllAstAut t AllAssetC t LwDurC nt RealRetC p TotRtC t

10.60 11.95 10.57 12.50 11.46

PIMCO Funds D: CommodRR p LowDurat p RealRtn p TotlRtn p

6.85 10.57 12.50 11.46

PIMCO Funds P: AllAsset AstAllAuthP CommdtyRR EmgLocalP LowDurP RealRtnP TotRtnP

12.21 10.78 6.96 10.66 10.57 12.50 11.46

7.19 +.04 +7.4 +41.7 46.82 +.01 -4.1 +39.6

Pioneer Funds A: FundamVal HighYldA p PionFdA p StratIncA p ValueA p

18.03 9.91 40.05 11.04 11.49

+.06 +.06 +.14 +.05 +.06

-1.8 -0.1 -4.2 +5.8 +1.1

+28.7 +51.8 +36.3 +36.8 +31.4

Pioneer Funds C: PioneerFdY StratIncC t

40.18 +.13 -3.9 +38.0 10.80 +.05 +5.1 +34.0

Pioneer Fds Y: FundamVal GlbHiYld

HiDivEqI nr

18.10 +.06 -1.4 +30.2 9.61 +.02 +0.6 +54.4

+32.2 +15.8 +54.2 +53.9

34.10 33.95 4.83 9.47 8.94

-.33 +.16 +.02 +.04 +.01

-8.2 +2.7 +6.8 +11.3 +5.1

+37.9 +41.4 +48.9 +26.4 +19.2

GrowthZ MidCapGrZ SmallCoZ

20.70 +.08 -0.1 +47.3 31.53 -.01 +2.2 +59.8 21.71 -.11 -5.9 +54.4

Putnam Funds A: AAGthA p CATxA p DvrInA px EqInA p GeoBalA GrInA p HiYdA p InvA p MultiCpGr NYTxA p TxExA p TFHYA USGvA px VoyA p

12.69 8.32 7.52 15.80 12.75 13.47 7.71 13.73 52.29 8.97 9.06 12.63 13.71 20.42

SmMCap SmMCpInst

33.61 +.12 -7.2 +54.5 34.57 +.13 -6.9 +55.7

GScUltShBdI HighYldI IntmBondI InvGrTEBI n LgCpValEqI MdCValEqI SmCpValI TotRetBd I

10.18 9.75 10.64 12.78 13.04 10.35 12.98 11.07

LowPrSkSvc r PennMuI rn PremierI nr SpeclEqInv r TotRetI r ValPlusSvc

13.79 11.07 18.68 20.91 13.14 12.54 16.64 8.21 27.10 37.23 11.37 28.62 31.97

MgdFutStr n CoreFxInA n EmMktDbt n HiYld n IntMuniA IntlEqA n LgCGroA n LgCValA n S&P500E n TaxMgdLC n

CoreEqty DivEqtySel FunUSLInst r IntlSS r 1000Inv r S&P Sel n SmCapSel TotBond TSM Sel r

33.32 +.03 -1.7 +31.6

Davis Funds Y: 35.06 +.03 -0.6 +35.8

-.03 -.20 -.03 -.06 +.05 +.04 +.01 -.03 -.01 -.37 -.08 +.01 +.01 -.26 -.18 -.27 -.35 -.01 -.03 -.18 +.05 +.01 +.02 +.04 +.05 -.13 -.12 +.05 +.05 -.04 -.27 -.11 -.01 +.06 +.01 -.31

-17.2 +27.0 -21.5 +18.2 +5.6 +94.3 -18.1 +18.0 +5.1 +52.2 +3.0 +14.7 +1.4 +5.5 -17.0 +17.4 -0.8 +54.1 -3.5 +55.9 -3.7 +54.1 -1.7 +53.1 -1.6 +53.8 -2.6 +60.8 -6.1 +56.2 -3.6 +63.5 -6.0 +59.5 -16.1 +27.3 -6.6 +40.0 -17.9 +39.0 -14.9 +27.5 +0.8 +3.0 +2.5 +10.5 +9.0 +22.7 -0.1 +56.1 -20.2 +6.6 -20.0 +7.3 +12.3 +36.6 +4.5 +16.6 -13.9 +13.9 -5.4 +58.2 -19.7 +6.4 -1.0 +55.2 +3.2 +51.6 +1.0 +4.1 +9.6 +131.3

+.59 +.02 +.08 -.08 +1.03

+2.1 -7.6 +6.7 -15.1 +0.6

Dodge&Cox: Balanced n GblStock IncomeFd Intl Stk Stock

72.17 8.08 13.79 29.63 110.11

+39.7 +32.3 +26.7 +17.2 +43.4

DoubleLine Funds: CoreFxdInc I TRBd I TRBd N p

11.34 +.04 NA 11.31 +.05 NA 11.30 +.05 NA

NS NS NS

Dreyfus: Aprec BasicS&P BondMktInv p CalAMTMuZ Dreyfus DreyMid r Drey500In t IntmTIncA Interm nr IntlStkI MunBd r NY Tax nr OppMCVal A SmlCpStk r DreihsAcInc

43.13 28.03 11.16 15.44 9.26 27.81 37.59 14.07 14.27 13.17 11.88 15.59 28.05 21.21 10.39

+.10 +.12 +.04 +.06 +.06 -.08 +.17 +.06 +.04 +.16 +.04 +.06 +.02 -.18 ...

+5.8 +4.9 +7.5 +12.1 -1.1 -3.3 +4.6 +7.8 +8.3 -6.8 +10.8 +10.3 -7.1 0.0 -1.7

+54.8 +51.8 +20.9 +26.6 +45.0 +61.6 +50.5 +32.6 +21.1 +27.1 +25.0 +23.6 +57.0 +62.6 +12.3

Dupree Mutual: KYTF EVPTxMEmI

8.09 +.04 +9.6 +20.4 43.78 -.05 -13.2 +31.1

Eaton Vance A: GblMacAbR p 9.83 FloatRate 9.31 IncBosA 5.84 LgCpVal 18.41 NatlMunInc 10.03 Strat Income Cl A8.03

+.01 +.01 +.02 +.01 +.06 +.02

+0.5 +4.0 +6.5 +1.1 +15.1 +2.8

+11.1 +29.5 +52.5 +34.1 +34.4 +23.8

Eaton Vance C: NatlMunInc

10.03 +.07 +14.2 +31.5

Eaton Vance I: AtlCapSMID FltgRt GblMacAbR IncBost LgCapVal ParStEmMkt EdgwdGInst n

17.05 9.01 9.82 5.85 18.46 13.43 12.82

-.05 +.01 +.01 +.02 +.01 -.02 +.04

+4.3 +4.2 +0.8 +7.0 +1.4 -14.2 +4.2

+66.6 +30.4 +12.0 +54.2 +35.1 +26.9 +37.4

FMI Funds: CommonStk LargeCap p

24.96 -.16 +1.7 +52.9 16.59 +.07 +3.8 +45.3

FPA Funds: Capit NewInco n FPACres n Fairholme

41.42 10.62 27.48 27.63

+.87 -.01 +.05 -.67

-8.1 +53.0 +1.7 +7.9 +2.2 +35.1 -8.2 +19.4

Federated A: KaufmA p MuniUltshA StrValDiv p TtlRtBd p

5.14 +.01 -6.1 +32.4 10.05 ... +1.2 +4.2 5.06 -.01 +12.8 +58.4 11.57 +.04 +6.8 +23.9

Federated Funds: MidCapI Svc 21.47 -.06 -3.2 +61.8 TtlRtnBdSvc 11.57 +.04 +7.1 +24.8

Federated Instl: 10.00 +.03 +9.4 +53.8 5.14 ... -6.1 +32.1 10.05 ... +0.7 +2.8 11.57 +.04 +7.4 +25.9 9.20 +.01 +1.7 +9.4 5.08 ... +13.0 +59.7 9.85 12.22 12.24 34.14 17.10 21.85 21.33 12.51

+.01 +.08 +.09 -.12 +.05 +.10 -.14 +.05

+3.5 -0.6 -1.9 -4.3 -5.5 +3.2 -13.0 +5.3

EqGrI n FltRateI n GroIncI LgCapI n MidCpII I n NewInsightI SmallCapI StrInI

63.37 9.83 19.07 20.12 17.37 22.14 22.53 12.66

+.28 +.01 +.07 +.07 +.05 +.10 -.14 +.05

0.0 +3.8 +7.1 +3.7 -5.3 +3.5 -12.7 +5.6

-22.3 -8.3 -8.9 +2.3 -3.2 -11.0

+33.3 +47.3 +48.6 +44.2 +48.8 +31.6

+.03 +.03 -.05 -.12 +.06 +.16 +.12

-15.5 -10.9 -14.6 +0.4 +7.6 -0.7 +2.9

+27.0 +27.8 +9.9 +82.5 +35.2 +40.7 +49.3

11.23 +.06 +7.6 +35.4

10.29 +.04 -2.6 +30.7 22.19 +.41 -11.6 -16.6 11.54 11.71 7.44 11.80 7.60 24.04 16.79 37.49 12.99

+.05 +.12 +.02 +.03 +.03 +.19 +.07 +.17 +.05

+9.1 +9.0 +6.4 +8.3 -14.4 +2.8 +0.7 +4.9 +2.4

+37.2 +52.5 +62.8 +21.8 +14.0 +50.9 +44.3 +52.1 +46.2

18.44 +.06 -17.7 +22.0 22.41 +.10 +5.2 +52.0

Schwab Funds:

34.65 +.02 -0.9 +34.6

EmMkCrEq n 17.84 EmgMktVal 26.48 GlbRESec n 9.06 IntSmVa n 13.68 LargeCo 10.76 STExtQual n 10.94 STMuniBd n 10.31 TAWexUSCr n 7.85 TAUSCorEq2 9.22 TM USSm 23.71 USVectrEq n 10.88 USLgVa n 20.44 USLgVa3 n 15.65 US Micro n 14.17 US TgdVal 16.12 US Small n 21.98 US SmVal 24.84 IntlSmCo n 13.98 GlbEqInst 12.81 EmgMktSCp n 18.88 EmgMkt n 24.47 Fixd n 10.35 ST Govt n 10.88 IntGvFxIn n 13.19 IntlREst 5.13 IntVa n 14.14 IntVa3 n 13.22 InflProSecs 12.82 Glb5FxInc 11.27 LrgCapInt n 16.83 TM USTgtV 21.25 TM IntlValue 11.64 TMMktwdeV 15.40 TMUSEq 14.58 2YGlFxd n 10.13 DFARlEst n 26.54

-.07 -.08 -.12 -.02 -.09 -.12

SEI Portfolios:

Davis Funds C:

Dimensional Fds:

+6.0 +43.8 +17.0 +22.3 +44.3 +55.4 +57.3 +24.5

Rydex Investor:

Davis Funds A:

LongShortI n 17.42 +.13 +3.0 +19.3

+1.8 +4.5 +5.8 +9.4 +0.3 -5.6 -4.9 +10.0

10.37 +.04 -1.8 +33.7

EmgMkt SP500 n

Diamond Hill Fds:

+.01 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.05 +.02 -.11 +.04

Royce Funds:

SSgA Funds:

Diver Inc p 9.48 +.06 +7.5 +34.8 SMIDCapGr 24.06 -.03 -1.5 +92.8 LtdTrmDvrA 9.02 +.03 +3.4 +15.3

NA +31.6 +40.7 +40.7 +37.0 +38.2 +48.8 +46.5 +43.4 +25.8 +28.9 +43.8 NA +28.7

Russell LfePts C:

154.82 +.72 +4.9 +52.0

NYVenY

NA +13.7 +0.1 +1.5 +4.7 -1.2 +5.2 +3.0 -3.1 +11.1 +12.4 +15.2 NA -12.9

RidgeWorth Funds:

CoreEqtyS 16.85 -.11 -3.1 +44.9 GNMA S 15.60 +.01 +5.1 +19.1 HiYldTx n 12.92 +.05 +13.6 +35.9 MgdMuni S 9.49 +.04 +11.6 +27.0 ShtDurPlusS 9.31 +.02 +1.6 +12.2

NYVen C

+.05 +.04 +.03 +.06 +.03 +.01 +.04 +.06 +.46 +.03 +.04 +.06 -.05 +.05

RS Funds:

DWS Invest S:

NYVen A

+46.0 +51.9 +58.5 +18.0 +16.3 +53.1 +33.3 +60.7

Russell LfePts A:

DWS Invest Instl: Eqty500IL

+.07 +.01 -.01 +.84 +.03 -.11 +.16 +.06

Prudential Fds Z&I:

BalStrat -1.8 -16.4 +0.6 -0.8

19.85 5.54 30.37 42.24 11.53 20.73 15.26 11.63

Russell Instl I:

DWS Invest A: DSmCaVal EqtyDivdA HiIncA MgdMuni p StrGovSecA

GrowthA HiYldA p MidCpGrA NatResA STCorpBdA SmallCoA p 2020FocA UtilityA

BalStrat p +.01 -.04 +.01 -.02

-0.5 +6.8 +1.9 -28.2 +3.5 -6.3 -8.2 +8.5

Prudential Fds A:

EmerMkts GlobEq IntlDevMkt RESec StratBd USCoreEq USQuan

13.81 +.07 +11.0 +52.9 12.77 9.20 11.55 11.33

+55.5 +76.3 +56.5 +38.2 +40.9

Russell Funds S:

DFA Funds: Glb6040Ins IntlCoreEq n USCoreEq1 n USCoreEq2 n

+7.4 -1.7 -4.8 +2.2 +0.7

Rainier Inv Mgt:

Perm Port Funds: Permanent

+.06 -.05 -.12 +.04 +.05

22.59 +.19 -2.1 +27.5

Paydenfunds: HiInc

10.18 11.13 9.66 13.26 14.15

28.29 +.28 +4.6 +45.2

Pax World: Balanced

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

CoreEqVIP 36.39 +.13 -4.2 +31.9 RSNatRes np 35.11 +.83 -12.6 +41.6 RSPartners 30.99 -.13 -5.0 +49.8

Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n

PreSecs In SGI In SmCV2 In SAMBalA SAMGrA p

StratBd

Fidelity Advisor I:

NA

-.04 -.04 +.11 +.11 +.05

Cullen Funds:

NwInsghts tn 20.63 +.09 +2.4 StratIncC nt 12.48 +.05 +4.6

NS F

+48.4 +36.1 +39.1 +26.6 +42.6 +43.2 +60.9 +62.0 +61.7 +27.6 +21.1 +63.3 +64.1 +49.8 +60.1 +10.0 +52.7 +53.3 +41.0 +33.0 +33.9 +16.7

30.40 30.38 39.41 39.40 12.05

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

8.38 +.29 -12.3 +20.6

Fidelity Advisor C:

B F NE D NN F

+1.3 +1.8 -0.6 +4.1 +4.4 +4.6 -0.8 -0.5 -0.6 +11.9 -16.8 +6.7 +6.8 -3.6 +1.2 -16.1 +4.0 +4.2 -8.6 -0.7 -0.5 -11.6

+24.4 +33.7 +34.1 +34.4 +34.7 +34.9 +37.5 +38.1 +38.0 +38.4 +39.2 +38.8 +39.2 +39.7 +38.5 +39.7 +39.2 +39.0 +39.7 +39.1 +39.8 +39.0 +39.6 +24.0 +23.8

IntlIdx Inst IntlIndxInv TotMkIdxF r TotMktIndInv USBond I

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Credit Suisse Comm:

FltRateA r FF2030A p FF2040A p LevCoStA p MidCpIIA p NwInsghts p SmallCapA p StrInA

N

p F

R

+2.6 +1.3 +1.4 +1.3 +1.1 +1.4 +0.6 +0.5 +0.7 -0.3 -0.3 -0.2 -0.6 -0.6 -1.9 -1.9 -1.8 -2.1 -1.9 -2.3 -2.2 -2.8 -2.6 +2.7 +2.8

+58.7 +71.9 +48.2 +29.6 +36.1

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

8.87 +.05 +8.6 +30.2 15.70 +.13 +0.1 +48.9 9.13 +.06 +0.9 +43.9

Fidelity Advisor A:

P n

-0.5 +2.8 +2.9 -13.1 +5.3

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

CG Cap Mkt Fds:

HighYldBd r KaufmanR MunULA p TotRetBond UltShortBd StaValDivIS

T M

Fidelity Advisor T:

28.58 +.20 -4.8 +37.9 EqGrT p 59.18 +.25 GrOppT 39.64 +.30 GlbGr&IncI 10.68 +.12 -3.8 +31.3 NwInsghts p 21.53 +.10 Gr&IncC t 31.90 +.31 -3.2 +32.1 SmlCapT p 20.47 -.13 12.50 +.05 Grth&IncA p 31.78 +.31 -2.5 +35.1 StrInT Grwth&IncoI 31.07 +.31 -2.2 +36.1 Fidelity Freedom: GrowthA p 49.15 +.72 -9.8 +41.5 FF2000 n 12.32 +.04 GrowthC t 43.98 +.64 -10.5 +38.4 FF2010 n 13.86 +.08 Growth I 53.95 +.80 -9.6 +42.6 FF2010K 12.70 +.08 MktNeutI r 12.42 +.06 +4.0 +19.8 FF2015 n 11.58 +.07 MktNeutA p 12.54 +.05 +3.6 +18.8 FF2015A 11.74 +.06 FF2015K 12.75 +.07 Calvert Invest: 13.97 +.09 Inco p 16.39 +.09 +4.8 +25.9 FF2020 n 12.19 +.07 ShDurIncA t 16.26 +.05 +2.5 +13.0 FF2020A 13.12 +.09 SocEqA p 36.04 +.13 -3.9 +45.1 FF2020K FF2025 n 11.58 +.08 Causeway Intl: 11.68 +.07 Institutnl nr 11.54 +.04 -9.2 +29.7 FF2025A 13.19 +.09 Clipper 65.18 -.32 -1.2 +47.7 FF2025K FF2030 n 13.77 +.10 Cohen & Steers: 13.31 +.09 InsltRlty n 44.24 -.54 +5.1 +123.0 FF2030K FF2035 n 11.35 +.09 RltyShrs n 68.34 -.83 +5.1 +121.6 FF2035A 11.47 +.08 Columbia Class A: 13.33 +.10 Acorn t 28.31 -.11 -4.4 +57.9 FF2035K 7.91 +.06 AcornIntlA t 36.91 -.02 -9.8 +35.4 FF2040 n 13.37 +.11 BldModAgg p 10.61 +.05 -0.2 +38.4 FF2040K 9.35 +.07 DivEqInc A 10.06 +.01 -2.0 +43.4 FF2045 n 13.49 +.11 DivrBd 5.21 +.02 +8.6 +27.0 FF2045K FF2050 n 9.20 +.07 DiviIncoA 14.57 +.06 +9.2 +50.8 13.50 +.11 DivOpptyA 8.51 +.05 +7.1 +64.9 FF2050K FreeIncK 11.64 +.04 FocusEqA t 22.35 -.20 +0.5 +48.0 HiYldBond 2.87 +.02 +8.4 +49.1 IncomeFd n 11.63 +.04 LgCapGrA t 25.39 +.26 +1.3 +49.7 Fidelity Invest: 12.36 +.09 LgCorQA p 6.27 +.01 +7.2 +59.6 AllSectEq 15.85 +.06 MidCpValA 13.56 +.08 -4.0 +52.7 AMgr50 n PBModA p 10.90 +.05 +1.5 +36.5 AMgr70 nr 16.58 +.07 SelLgCpGr t 12.48 +.16 -11.1 +49.3 AMgr20 nr 13.21 +.04 19.50 +.13 StrtIncA 6.31 +.05 +8.0 +35.2 Balanc TxExA p 14.24 +.06 +12.3 +28.7 BalancedK 19.50 +.13 SelComm A 42.25 +.31 -3.8 +36.8 BlueChipGr 46.96 +.42 BluChpGrF n 47.08 +.42 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.35 -.11 -4.2 +59.3 BluChpGrK 47.03 +.42 12.88 +.05 AcornIntl Z 37.01 -.02 -9.4 +36.8 CA Mun n 50.43 +.31 AcornUSA 29.11 -.22 -5.3 +58.8 Canada n 28.42 -.04 Bond 9.68 +.04 +8.8 +24.6 CapApp n 28.47 -.04 DiviIncomeZ 14.58 +.06 +9.4 +52.0 CapApprK IntmBdZ n 9.54 +.04 +8.6 +31.4 CapDevelO 11.15 +.05 9.14 +.03 IntmTEBd n 11.00 +.03 +8.6 +21.5 CapInco nr LgCapGr 12.62 +.16 -10.9 +50.4 ChinaReg r 26.17 +.03 74.97 +.32 LgCapIdxZ 26.50 +.13 +4.9 +51.9 Contra n 74.97 +.33 MarsGrPrZ 22.27 +.11 +0.1 +52.2 ContraK 23.43 -.16 MidCapGr Z 26.29 +.08 -8.7 +62.3 CnvSec 23.32 +.16 MidCpIdxZ 11.26 -.04 -2.9 +63.2 DisEq n 23.31 +.16 MdCpVal p 13.58 +.09 -3.7 +53.9 DiscEqF 26.90 +.12 STIncoZ 9.96 +.01 +1.7 +10.6 DiverIntl n STMunZ 10.55 ... +1.6 +5.7 SmlCapIdxZ n 17.01 -.15 0.0 +62.7 SmCapVal 42.27 -.39 -7.2 +43.2 SCValuIIZ 14.13 -.25 -4.2 +56.5 ValRestr n 46.56 +.17 -8.6 +39.3 CRAQlInv np 11.29 +.02 +6.7 +17.5

Calamos Funds:

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

Delaware Invest A: +5.5 +4.4 -4.9 -1.6 +5.3

Apprec Ariel n

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt Name

“109 Ways to Discover Central Oregon” wi not just te readers about what this region has to offer; it wi show them how to fu y experience Centra Oregon, ensuring their visit to the area is as unique as it is unforgettab e.

18.15 14.13 10.10 14.94 38.62 21.45 20.47 9.78 24.74

+.05 +.06 -.01 -.05 +.16 +.10 -.24 +.04 +.07

+1.6 +5.3 +1.6 -13.3 +3.7 +5.1 -3.0 +7.6 +3.6

+41.6 +47.8 +60.2 +13.0 +52.0 +52.1 +63.1 +21.2 +54.2

Scout Funds:

Pick up a copy at these locations:

Intl MidCap r

29.13 +.19 -10.6 +25.8 13.11 -.02 -7.1 +66.8

Selected Funds:

The Bulletin • Chambers of Commerce Central Oregon Visitor s Association Oregon Border Kiosks • Bend Visitor and Convention Bureau • Deschutes County Expo Center • Other Points of Interest

AmerShsD AmShsS p

42.12 +.05 -0.1 +37.3 42.07 +.04 -0.4 +35.9

Sentinel Group: ComStk A p 33.09 +.25 +2.0 +44.3 SmCoA p 7.53 -.03 -5.9 +52.9 Sequoia n 155.35 +.70 +7.5 +59.3

Sit Funds: US Gov n

11.38

...

+2.2 +12.7

Sound Shore: SoundShore n 31.55 +.03 -1.1 +29.5

St FarmAssoc: Balan n Gwth n

55.57 +.18 +2.7 +27.9 54.30 +.24 +0.8 +35.8

Sun Capital Adv: GSShDurItl 10.27 +.03 +1.3 +6.2 IbbotsBalSv p 12.17 +.02 -1.2 +30.6 IbbotsModSv p12.02 +.04 +1.4 +27.8

TARGET:

IN COOPERATION WITH

SmCapVal n

20.56 -.12 -3.3 +54.1

TCW Funds: EmMktInc SmlCapGr TotlRetBdI

ALSO PUBLISHED ONLINE AT

www.bendbu et n.com

and Centra Oregon Area Chambers of Commerce

9.02 +.10 +7.5 +60.1 25.80 +.04 -16.6 +32.5 10.02 +.06 +7.9 +34.3

+.12 -11.4 +17.4 +.07 +4.0 +60.2 +.18 -4.0 +51.0 +.18 -4.2 +50.1 +.15 -15.4 +23.5 +.08 -20.5 +19.5 +.14 +0.8 +43.0 +.11 +2.9 +43.7 +.15 +0.9 +43.6 +.18 +2.1 +42.5 +.21 +1.1 +43.3 +.01 +3.8 +21.8 +.03 +7.7 +43.1 +.05 -0.1 +38.6 ... +6.4 +21.7 +.02 +7.4 +18.3 +.96 +1.3 +64.9 +.07 +7.0 +49.9 +.96 +1.4 +65.9 +.96 +1.4 +65.7 +.08 -11.9 +44.9 +.03 +6.7 +51.2 +.08 -9.2 +47.9 +.05 +11.3 +32.5 +.03 +5.9 +25.4 +.02 +4.6 +13.9 +.02 +7.7 +18.4 +.13 -11.8 +17.6 +.04 +8.5 +27.6 +.03 +8.6 +31.1 +.03 -3.3 +31.7 +.02 -13.5 +26.4 -.10 -4.1 +55.3 -.01 -1.3 +54.3 -.01 -1.2 +54.9 +.42 -4.7 +28.9 +.42 -4.6 +29.4 +.04 +11.1 +24.3 +.04 +7.5 +53.7 -.18 -1.2 +64.4 -.17 -1.0 +65.3 +.05 +11.3 +26.0 +.13 +14.7 +52.0 -.07 +3.5 +61.2 +.06 +10.0 +23.0 +1.03 -5.1 +54.0 +1.04 -5.0 +54.7 +.06 +7.9 +49.9 +.12 -11.9 +10.6 +.09 +3.7 +43.1 +.08 +3.8 +43.6 +.03 +10.0 +66.7 -.39 +9.7 +148.2 +.09 +1.5 +49.3 +.37 -11.7 NS +.38 -11.5 NS +.06 -15.3 +24.5 +.06 -15.2 +25.4 +.10 -5.8 NS +.10 -5.5 NS +.07 -6.9 NS -.04 -15.7 NS -.04 -15.6 NS +.04 +8.7 +27.9 +.01 +3.4 +10.3 +.01 +1.8 +11.4 +.01 +1.7 +11.0 -.32 +1.7 +73.9 -.19 -5.4 +58.0 -.09 -5.6 +71.0 -.04 -12.1 +39.2 -.27 +1.0 +56.1 +.12 -0.5 +45.9 -.15 -5.6 +61.9 +.04 +7.3 +65.4 +.05 +5.6 +36.8 +.05 +11.8 +25.9 +.04 +8.3 +31.2 +.49 -0.2 +61.7 +.04 +7.9 NS +.04 +7.8 +22.5 +.11 +12.3 +62.9 -.06 -2.3 +55.4 +.11 -5.6 +38.1

+20.7 +40.2 +40.3 +54.9 Fidelity Selects: +40.2 Biotech n 107.34 +.19 +30.8 +49.3 ConStaple 79.17 -.19 +13.3 +30.4 Electr n 44.60 +.92 -9.0 +36.1 Energy n 48.81 +1.43 -17.1 EngSvc n 63.31 +2.53 -26.7 +46.0 Gold rn 33.77 -.50 -33.3 +33.1 Health n 135.63 -.04 +7.0 Materials 65.90 +1.09 -6.9 +61.2 MedEqSys n 27.32 -.33 -6.4 30.19 +.81 -21.2 +21.5 NatRes rn 82.42 +1.63 +6.0 +49.5 Softwr n 95.90 +1.44 -3.2 +57.0 Tech n +41.3 Fidelity Spartan: +50.5 ExtMktIndInv 38.00 -.22 -3.1 +31.6 500IdxInv n 48.31 +.22 +5.0 +37.1 500Idx I 48.32 +.23 +5.1

+87.9 +57.3 +32.3 +36.0 +30.5 +3.9 +73.9 +64.1 +43.1 +30.6 +71.4 +60.1 +62.2 +52.1 NS

UtilitiesA p

14.30 +.09 +18.6 +57.7

Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: FdTF Adv GlbBdAdv nx GrAdv t HiIncAdv p HY TF Adv IncomeAdv RisingDiv r TGlbTRAdv x TtlRtAdv USGovAdv p

12.71 12.97 47.86 2.02 10.92 2.15 36.20 12.97 10.45 6.94

+.07 +.07 +.27 +.01 +.07 +.01 -.03 +.09 +.05 +.02

7.49 12.70 10.17 11.04 2.18 35.63 10.51 6.87

+.03 +.08 +.04 +.06 +.01 -.03 +.06 +.01

+12.9 +0.3 +2.0 +7.5 +14.7 +4.2 +3.8 +1.4 +6.8 +5.3

+28.1 +29.5 +51.1 +48.7 +38.7 +46.6 +53.5 +38.0 +31.6 +18.3

+14.0 +11.9 -1.9 +13.9 +3.0 +2.8 +4.2 +4.5

+28.8 +25.4 +32.4 +36.0 +43.7 +49.0 +32.1 +15.8

Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: BeaconA SharesA

12.47 +.05 +0.9 +37.2 21.23 +.05 +1.6 +37.9

Frank/Temp Mtl C: SharesC t

20.98 +.05 +0.9 +35.1

Frank/Temp Temp A: DevMktA p ForeignA p GlBondA px GrowthA p WorldA p

21.34 5.79 13.01 16.89 14.19

+.18 +.01 +.07 +.07 +.08

-16.4 -18.7 0.0 -8.7 -7.0

+26.2 +10.8 +28.5 +24.1 +25.1

Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: FlexCpGr FrgnAv GrthAv

47.94 -.11 -3.7 +42.5 5.73 +.01 -18.5 +11.6 16.90 +.07 -8.5 +25.0

Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC px

13.04 +.08 -0.4 +26.9

Franklin Mutual Ser: QuestA

17.03 +.05 -0.3 +27.4

Franklin Templ: TgtModA p

14.06 +.05 -1.8 +28.4

GE Elfun S&S: S&S Income n TaxEx Trusts n US Eqty n

12.09 12.36 45.79 42.17

+.06 +.06 +.46 +.23

+9.0 +11.3 +6.6 +1.3

+29.5 +24.7 +47.9 +35.5

GE Instl Funds: IntlEq n SmCpEqI

27.70 -.30 -3.1 +51.5

ING Funds Cl A:

Frank/Temp Frnk C: CalTFC t FdTxFC t FoundFAl p HY TFC t IncomeC t RisDvC t StratIncC p USGovC t

ICM SmlCo

9.83 +.05 -14.1 +6.8 15.98 -.09 -0.7 +63.0

GlbR E p

16.95 -.05 +0.1 +55.1

IVA Funds: Intl I r WorldwideA t WorldwideC t Worldwide I r

15.03 15.41 15.27 15.43

-.05 +.01 +.01 +.01

IntlGrow

26.86 +.31 -7.2 +30.1

Invesco Fds Invest: DivrsDiv p

12.86

...

+4.0 +47.3

+.12 +.21 +.08 +.20 +.05 -.01 +.06 -.03 +.12 +.01 +.03 +.31 +.07 -.10 +.05 -.34 -.14 +.02

+12.1 +48.1 -0.9 +33.3 +1.3 +48.1 -8.6 +27.7 -5.1 +40.3 +3.8 +47.0 +2.2 +38.7 -13.0 +10.2 +1.6 +43.9 +6.9 +51.5 +16.0 +43.4 -7.6 +28.5 -8.4 +26.1 -10.5 +50.3 +12.6 +31.8 +8.3 +109.7 -4.0 +47.5 +7.5 +19.7

Invesco Funds A: BalRiskA Chart p CmstkA Constl p DevMkt p DivrsDiv p EqtyIncA GlbCoreEq p GrIncA p HiYld p HYMuA IntlGrow MidCpCEq p MidCGth p MuniInA RealEst p SmCpValA t TF IntA p

12.73 16.89 16.33 22.66 30.56 12.86 8.83 11.44 19.83 4.25 10.00 26.48 21.49 26.27 13.89 26.01 16.54 11.85

Invesco Funds C: BalRiskC EqIncC HYMuC

12.47 +.11 +11.3 +44.9 8.70 +.05 +1.4 +35.8 9.99 +.04 +15.3 +40.3

Invesco Funds P: SummitP p

12.20 +.09 -3.3 +34.7

Invesco Funds Y: BalRiskY

12.81 +.12 +12.4 +49.2

Ivy Funds: AssetSC t AssetStrA p AssetStrY p AssetStrI r GlNatRsA p HiIncC t HighIncoA p HiIncI r LgCapGrA p LtdTrmA p

22.86 23.62 23.66 23.85 15.90 8.38 8.38 8.38 14.04 11.23

+.21 +.22 +.22 +.23 +.38 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.02 +.02

JPMorgan A Class:

TRFd1 TRFd3 p

Core Bond A HighYld p Inv Bal p InvCon p InvGr&InA p InvGrwth p LgCpGrA p MdCpVal p

GMO Trust: ShtDurColl r USTreas x

5.04 +.04 NE 25.00 ... 0.0

NE +0.3

GMO Trust II: EmergMkt r

10.55 -.01 -18.1

NS

GMO Trust III: CHIE EmgMk r IntlIntrVal Quality

21.35 10.57 18.27 22.84

EmgCnDt EmerMkt IntlCoreEq IntlGrEq IntlIntrVal Quality QualityV

9.78 10.50 25.12 22.00 18.25 22.86 22.85 10.50 16.79 25.09 22.84 16.34 13.39

+13.1 +25.7 +6.4 +49.1

JPMorgan C Class:

+.09 ... -.24 +.09 -.28 +.13 +.12

+14.8 -18.0 -14.4 -7.2 -16.7 +12.7 +12.7

+89.8 +26.0 +14.3 +30.4 +6.6 +49.3 +49.3

JPMorgan R Cl:

-.01 -.54 -.24 +.12 +.07 +.08

-18.1 -12.7 -14.4 +12.7 NA +9.5

+26.2 -6.4 +14.4 +49.5 NA +51.9

+.20 +.08 -.16 +.03

-0.9 +0.9 -4.4 +2.7

+55.2 +49.1 +49.7 +43.1

Gabelli Funds: Asset EqInc p SmCapG n Util A p

50.37 21.51 33.39 5.84

Gateway Funds: GatewayA

27.14 +.11 +3.7 +18.9

Goldman Sachs A: GrthOppsA 22.69 +.01 +1.1 +56.2 MidCapVA p 35.80 +.14 -4.1 +52.3

Goldman Sachs Inst: CoreFxc GrthOppt HiYield HYMuni n MidCapVal SD Gov ShrtDurTF n SmCapVal

10.67 24.31 7.20 9.27 36.11 10.28 10.66 43.89

+.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.03 +.02 +.03 +.17

-6.3 -18.2 -16.7 +12.6

GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r FlexEqVI IntlCoreEq Quality StrFixInco USCoreEq

12.13 7.93 12.57 11.53 13.17 13.82 23.34 26.09

-.26 -.01 -.27 +.12

GMO Trust IV:

+.05 +.01 +.03 +.05 +.14 +.01 +.01 -.45

+8.5 +1.5 +6.5 +15.3 -3.7 +1.0 +2.9 +0.4

+30.6 +58.1 +50.2 +47.7 +54.1 +5.6 +9.4 +65.1

+29.5 +27.8 +24.9 +28.7

Invesco Fds Instl:

GE Investments: 16.68 +.08 -0.1 +26.2 16.61 +.08 -0.4 +25.2

-6.0 -6.1 -6.7 -5.8

-11.3 -10.6 -10.6 -10.4 -30.8 +9.3 +10.0 +10.3 +0.1 +2.8

+19.4 +22.1 +22.1 +23.0 +5.1 +50.2 +53.3 +54.6 +40.3 +11.4

+7.4 +5.5 +1.4 +2.8 +0.4 -1.5 +2.1 +6.5

+23.9 +48.0 +30.2 +25.9 +35.1 +37.1 +67.6 +69.0

CoreBond pn 12.19 +.05 +6.7 +21.7

JP Morgan Instl: IntTxFrIn n 11.40 +.04 +6.8 +16.4 MidCapVal n 26.55 +.19 +7.1 +71.5 CoreBond n DiscEqty HighYld r MtgBacked ShtDurBond

12.14 17.51 7.96 11.62 11.02

+.05 +.12 +.04 +.03 +.02

+7.9 +5.2 +5.8 +6.2 +1.9

+25.4 +53.6 +49.5 +27.7 +9.0

JPMorgan Select:

LSBondI LSGlblBdI StrInc C LSBondR StrIncA ValueY n

14.61 16.95 14.93 14.55 14.85 19.39

+4.1 +2.2 +1.2 +3.8 +1.9 +1.8

+46.1 +27.4 +41.3 +44.8 +44.6 +39.4

HYMunBd t

+.08 +.08 +.08 +.09

+5.9 +5.0 +6.1 +5.2

+37.7 +34.7 +38.8 +45.5

Nuveen Cl Y:

+.01 +.03 +.01 +.02 +.08 +.01 +.03 +.06 +.02 +.06 +.01 +.08 -.15 +.08 +.09

+4.4 +9.3 +2.9 -3.1 -5.6 -2.3 +4.9 -6.3 +8.7 +12.9 +4.6 -7.7 -8.3 +15.1 +1.6

+24.7 +23.4 +9.6 +30.9 +40.3 +32.7 +44.3 +72.8 +39.0 +38.0 +19.2 +52.8 +47.6 +35.4 +41.6

+.09 +.09 +.05 +.09 +.05 +.07

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p InvGrBdC p InvGrBdY LSFxdInc

12.46 12.36 12.47 14.27

Lord Abbett A: FloatRt p IntrTaxFr ShDurTxFr AffiliatdA p FundlEq BalanStratA BondDebA p DevGthA p IncomeA HYMunBd p ShDurIncoA p MidCapA p RsSmCpA TaxFrA p CapStruct p

9.23 10.94 15.94 11.20 12.54 10.24 7.89 21.20 2.98 11.84 4.61 16.34 30.57 11.42 12.10

Lord Abbett C: BdDbC p 7.91 +.03 +4.3 +41.5 ShDurIncoC t 4.64 +.01 +3.9 +16.8

Lord Abbett F: BondDeb ShtDurInco

7.88 +.03 +5.2 +45.4 4.61 +.01 +4.7 +19.8

Lord Abbett I: ShtDurInc p SmCapVal

4.61 +.01 +4.8 +20.1 32.47 -.16 -8.0 +48.9

MFS Funds A: IntlDiverA MITA MIGA BondA EmGrA GvScA GrAllA IntNwDA IntlValA ModAllA MuHiA t ResBondA RschA ReschIntA TotRA UtilA ValueA

12.74 20.40 16.61 14.12 45.55 10.60 14.28 21.50 25.11 13.91 8.18 11.03 26.91 13.63 14.68 17.70 23.99

+.06 +.16 +.13 +.10 +.41 +.02 +.08 +.17 +.03 +.07 +.03 +.05 +.18 +.01 +.03 ... +.02

JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBond n CorePlusBd n EmMkEqSl EqtyInc EqIndx HighYld IntmdTFBd n IntlValSel IntrdAmer LgCapGr MkExpIdx n MtgBckdSl n ShtDurBdSel TxAwRRet n TxAwRRetI n USLCCrPls n

ResrchBdI n ReInT ValueI

11.04 +.06 +7.9 +31.7 14.06 +.01 -12.7 +19.9 24.10 +.02 +3.4 +38.4

MFS Funds Instl: IntlEqty n

16.67 +.10 -9.5 +27.8

MainStay Funds A: HiYldBdA LgCpGrA p

5.99 +.03 +7.8 +45.0 7.41 +.08 -1.2 +46.9

MainStay Funds I: EpochGlb r ICAP Eqty MnStMAP I ICAP SelEq S&P500Idx

15.79 37.37 33.00 35.51 31.75

+.08 +.16 +.24 +.20 +.14

8.50 21.08 10.11 30.96 7.96 11.41 11.32 24.87 23.31 10.35 11.61 11.01 10.42 10.44 21.47

+.03 +.05 +.09 +.14 +.04 +.03 -.08 +.12 +.03 -.06 +.02 +.01 +.02 +.03 +.12

+7.4 -12.1 +9.0 +4.9 +5.8 +6.7 -15.5 +1.7 +2.3 -2.7 +6.0 +1.5 +3.7 +3.9 +0.6

+31.2 +23.1 +64.8 +51.6 +49.1 +16.2 +13.1 +50.0 +68.5 +60.1 +27.1 +8.2 +15.0 +15.6 +42.7

21.15 +.10 +4.0 +32.6

Janus S Shrs: Forty Overseas t

+47.1 +42.6 +42.7 +39.3 +51.0

Mairs & Power: Growth n

78.40 +.43 +7.6 +53.5

PimcoBond n Yacktman p YacktFocus Bond n

11.04 18.35 19.78 27.26

+.06 -.02 -.03 +.19

+7.4 +5.8 +5.9 +7.0

+27.4 +58.0 +54.8 +41.2

35.60 +.54 +3.8 +30.5 29.44 -1.09 -29.6 -9.3

ProBConS n 13.33 +.07 +3.8 +24.9 WorldOppA n 6.87 +.04 -16.6 +15.4

Marsico Funds: Focus p

19.25 -.16 +0.6 +49.5

Matthews Asian: AsiaDivInv r AsianG&IInv China Inv PacTigerInv MergerFd n

13.46 16.60 21.09 21.44 15.82

-.05 +.02 -.52 -.22 ...

Growth

+43.9 +35.5 +8.7 +35.9 +10.7

44.42 -.17 +2.9 +66.9

Metro West Fds: HiYldBdM p LowDurBd TotRetBd TotalRetBondI MontagGr I

10.10 8.63 10.82 10.82 25.04

+.02 +.03 +.05 +.05 +.22

+2.8 +3.2 +8.7 +8.9 +5.2

+42.9 +28.4 +37.1 +38.0 +40.6

Morgan Stanley A: FocusGroA

36.46 +.23 -8.3 +64.8

Janus T Shrs:

MorganStanley Inst:

BalAllo GS4

BalancedT n

EmMktI n

26.13 +.30 +3.6 +32.1

-3.2 -2.1 -19.5 -11.6 +0.7

Meridian Funds:

GuideStone Funds: 12.51 +.06 +2.5 +36.1

+4.1 +1.5 +0.1 +0.6 +4.8

12.13 +.05 +7.7 +24.7 Manning&Napier Fds:

James Adv Fds: BalGldnRbw

+27.1 +40.5 +49.6 +41.0 +50.8 +16.8 +43.7 +47.9 +30.7 +40.3 +42.1 +31.0 +49.2 +19.2 +31.5 +50.6 +37.4

MFS Funds I:

26.31 +.18 +6.8 +70.3 Managers Funds:

MdCpValu SmCap 39.30 -.25 +3.7 +64.0 USEquity n 10.71 +.04 +1.9 +45.3 USREstate n 18.34 -.20 +7.6 +128.9

-8.4 +1.7 +1.9 +8.9 +2.5 +6.4 -0.3 -4.7 -2.0 +1.9 +15.6 +7.8 +3.1 -12.9 +3.7 +3.4 +3.1

22.89 +.02 -13.0 +22.5

16.73 +.10 +19.4 +52.4

StratIncY p

11.04 +.05 +6.1 +38.1

Nuveen Cl I:

Price Funds Adv:

DivValueI

BlChipGr n EqtyInc n Growth pn HiYld n MidCapGro n R2020A p R2030Adv np R2040A pn SmCpValA n TF Income pn

14.18 +.07 +5.2 +51.4

Nuveen Cl R: IntmDurMuBd 9.35 +.02 +7.9 +21.5 HYMuniBd 16.74 +.10 +20.3 +55.7 LtdTermR 11.18 +.01 +4.8 +15.1 RealEst

21.73 -.21 +9.4 +129.9

Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r GlobalI r Intl I r IntlSmCp r Oakmark Select

28.02 20.65 16.92 12.28 45.75 30.45

+.06 -.01 +.05 +.03 +.06 +.32

-1.5 -8.9 -13.0 -13.5 +5.1 +3.0

+29.1 +28.9 +26.6 +34.4 +53.8 +55.1

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp GlbSMdCap LgCapStrat MuniBond pn RealReturn

7.18 13.92 9.19 12.29 9.32

+.04 +.09 +.01 +.02 +.16

-6.2 -8.6 -12.7 +5.4 -13.5

+29.7 +38.8 +18.8 +14.5 +15.8

+.05 +.05 +.07 +.03 +.51 +.04 ... +.15 +.08 +.02 +.43 +.03 -.09 +.02 -.32 +.05 +.10 +.35 +.05 +.17 +.08 -.12 +.11 ... +.15

+21.8 +18.2 -3.8 +19.8 -0.1 +5.8 -9.3 -2.7 -2.1 -2.7 -10.6 -10.1 -6.2 NA -39.7 +1.0 -11.2 -8.0 +9.4 +6.3 +6.2 -1.4 +1.5 +3.4 -14.3

+60.2 +50.7 +33.0 +62.4 +38.0 +40.3 +38.1 +74.4 +36.8 +51.6 +29.3 +24.5 +39.1 NA +20.0 +22.0 +24.2 +32.4 +26.3 +47.7 +44.3 +51.6 +39.8 +37.5 +29.0

Oppenheimer A: AMTFrMuA AMTFrNY ActiveAllA CAMuniA p CapAppA p CapIncA p DevMktA p DiscFd p Equity A EqIncA p GlobalA p GblAllocA GlblOppA GblStrIncoA Gold p IntlBdA p IntlDivA IntGrow p LtdTrmMu MnStFdA MainStrOpA p MnStSCpA p RisingDivA SenFltRtA S&MdCpVlA

7.16 12.20 9.38 8.71 46.46 9.06 31.33 60.55 9.08 23.93 55.75 13.97 28.45 4.25 27.89 6.44 10.67 27.06 15.09 35.33 13.56 21.59 16.60 8.19 29.17

Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.02 +.10 +0.6 +36.1 S&MdCpVlB 24.70 +.12 -15.0 +25.9

Oppenheimer C&M: DevMktC t 30.02 +.01 -9.9 +35.3 GblStrIncoC 4.24 +.02 NA NA IntlBondC 6.42 +.06 +0.3 +19.5 LtdTmMuC t 15.02 +.04 +8.5 +23.4 RisingDivC p 14.96 +.10 +0.8 +36.7 SenFltRtC 8.20 ... +2.9 +35.8

Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p LtdNYC t RoNtMuC t RoMu A p RoMu C p RcNtlMuA

3.40 3.38 7.45 16.97 16.94 7.47

+.01 +.01 +.05 +.07 +.07 +.05

+8.7 +7.9 +15.7 +16.0 +15.1 +16.5

+24.9 +22.2 +56.7 +48.2 +44.4 +60.4

+.54 +.01 +.06 +.36 +.11 +.13

+0.3 -9.0 +1.3 -7.6 +1.6 -4.0

+39.8 +39.5 +23.0 +34.4 +41.0 +35.5

Oppenheimer Y: CapApprecY DevMktY IntlBdY IntlGrowY RisingDivY ValueY

48.65 31.02 6.44 26.95 16.98 22.00

Optimum Fds Instl: Fixed Inc

10.03 +.05 +8.2 +38.5

Osterweis Funds: OsterweisFd n 27.35 +.06 -1.0 +32.0 StratIncome 11.55 +.02 +4.9 +32.2

PACE Funds P: LgGrEqtyP LgVEqtyP

19.66 +.09 +1.4 +50.5 17.10 +.04 -0.4 +40.3

PIMCO Admin PIMS: RelRetAd p ShtTmAd p TotRetAd n

12.50 +.05 +11.9 +37.7 9.85 +.02 +1.5 +6.4 11.46 +.06 +7.8 +28.0

PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAssetAut r AllAsset CommodRR DiverInco EmgMktCur EmMktsBd FltgInc r FrgnBdUnd r FrgnBd n HiYld n InvGradeCp LowDur n ModDur n RERRStg r

10.79 12.21 6.97 12.03 10.18 12.06 8.65 11.03 11.04 9.36 11.12 10.57 11.05 5.60

+.11 +.11 +.28 +.07 +.02 +.09 +.03 +.09 +.06 +.03 +.07 +.03 +.05 -.04

NA NA NA NA -6.5 +51.5 +9.1 +48.1 -6.3 +13.6 +11.8 +47.9 +1.1 +24.6 +3.9 +37.7 +10.3 +35.3 +6.7 +53.9 +11.7 +44.3 +3.6 +16.9 +6.4 +26.7 +27.6 +247.0

43.23 24.71 35.53 6.73 54.85 16.93 17.67 17.72 36.64 10.54

+.34 +.12 +.15 +.02 -.06 +.05 +.05 +.04 -.60 +.04

+4.3 +3.4 +3.8 +5.7 -2.0 +0.3 -1.1 -1.8 -0.5 +11.5

+55.5 +47.3 +55.4 +48.7 +61.6 +40.6 +42.8 +43.0 +56.6 +24.7

Price Funds R Cl: Ret2020R p Ret2030R n

16.79 +.05 +0.1 +39.5 17.55 +.04 -1.3 +41.7

Price Funds: Balance n BlueChipG n CapApr n DivGro n EmMktB n EmMktS n EqInc n EqIdx n GNM n Growth n GwthIn n HlthSci n HiYld n InstlCpGr n InstHiYld n InstlFltRt n MCEqGr n IntlBd n IntlDis n IntlGr&Inc n IntStk n LatAm n MdTxFr n MediaTl n MidCap n MCapVal n NewAm n N Asia n NewEra n NwHrzn n NewInco n OverSea SF n PSBal n PSGrow n PSInco n RealAssets r RealEst n R2005 n R2010 n R2015 Retire2020 n R2025 R2030 n R2035 n R2040 n R2045 n Ret Income n SciTch n ST Bd n SmCapStk n SmCapVal n SpecGr SpecIn n SumMuInt n TxFree n TxFrHY n TxFrSI n R2050 n VA TF n Value n

19.99 43.37 22.12 25.09 13.70 29.67 24.76 36.74 10.17 35.93 21.47 41.26 6.75 17.83 9.52 10.09 28.60 9.82 41.02 11.73 12.85 37.86 11.08 53.81 56.00 23.10 33.85 15.02 40.60 34.49 9.93 7.59 19.74 23.82 16.55 10.42 20.95 11.84 15.97 12.36 17.05 12.44 17.81 12.56 17.85 11.89 13.51 25.44 4.85 34.25 36.91 18.21 12.77 11.94 10.53 11.73 5.71 9.96 12.30 24.27

+.07 +.35 +.01 +.09 +.12 +.08 +.12 +.17 +.02 +.15 +.08 +.08 +.02 +.23 +.03 +.02 -.01 +.06 -.12 ... +.06 +.28 +.04 +.51 -.06 +.05 +.18 -.07 +.88 -.17 +.05 +.01 +.07 +.08 +.06 ... -.28 +.04 +.05 +.04 +.05 +.04 +.05 +.03 +.04 +.03 +.04 +.20 +.01 -.32 -.60 +.06 +.06 +.03 +.04 +.06 ... +.02 +.05 +.06

+2.1 +38.1 +4.6 +56.6 +4.2 +43.9 +5.4 +46.6 +9.6 +47.2 -15.3 +24.4 +3.6 +48.3 +4.8 +51.2 +5.8 +19.5 +4.0 +56.4 +2.3 +43.9 +17.3 +96.7 +6.1 +49.9 +1.7 +53.7 +5.7 +48.9 +3.9 +28.0 -1.8 +65.4 -1.1 +14.7 -9.8 +35.6 -13.5 +18.7 -10.5 +25.9 -19.9 +16.8 +11.1 +25.5 +4.6 +86.8 -1.8 +62.8 -2.7 +49.0 -0.8 +48.9 -8.6 +42.1 -21.6 +20.8 +5.1 +93.2 +7.6 +24.6 -11.1 +21.6 +1.4 +39.8 -0.3 +43.5 +2.4 +33.6 -16.0 NS +8.1 +134.4 +2.5 +34.4 +1.9 +37.1 +1.2 +39.7 +0.6 +41.7 -0.3 +42.8 -0.7 +43.9 -1.4 +44.2 -1.5 +44.0 -1.5 +44.1 +2.1 +30.0 -11.1 +36.9 +2.0 +9.6 -0.2 +77.6 -0.2 +57.8 -1.6 +45.8 +6.0 +32.5 +8.0 +20.1 +11.9 +25.9 +15.5 +40.9 +3.6 +11.4 -1.5 +44.1 +10.7 +24.1 +0.7 +46.8

Primecap Odyssey : AggGrwth r Growth r Stock r

18.75 -.06 +5.3 +79.9 16.46 +.19 +0.5 +50.1 15.16 +.16 +2.8 +44.7

Principal Inv: BdMtgInstl DivIntlInst HighYldA p HiYld In Intl I Inst LgCGr2In LgLGI In LgCV1 In LgGrIn LgCpIndxI LgCValIn LT2010In LfTm2020In LT2030In LT2040In LfTm2050I MidCpBldA MidCGIII In MidCV1 In

11.03 9.22 7.68 10.96 9.98 8.36 9.73 11.17 8.57 9.62 10.21 11.75 12.12 11.90 12.00 11.46 14.55 10.63 13.38

+.05 +.02 +.03 +.06 +.02 +.06 +.12 +.05 +.03 +.04 +.09 +.05 +.05 +.04 +.05 +.04 ... +.03 +.01

+7.8 -10.7 +6.2 +6.5 -15.1 +3.5 +1.1 +1.7 0.0 +4.8 +3.6 +2.6 +0.7 -0.6 -1.5 -2.1 +5.0 -9.1 -2.1

+38.1 +23.0 +45.2 +53.2 +13.2 +46.9 +58.5 +41.0 +45.5 +51.5 +48.5 +41.8 +42.9 +43.3 +42.7 +42.7 +70.7 +57.0 +59.6

+.01 +.16 +.08 +.05 +.21 +.34 +.05 +.05 +.05 +.78 -.23 +.04 -1.10 +.01 +.02 ... +.01 +.02 -.34 -.25 -.31 +.24 +.28 +.04 +.10 +.02 +.41 +.32 +.32 +.21 -.04 -.24

DivrEq n 21.78 CAIT n 11.68 CapOpp n 31.23 Convt n 12.51 DivAppInv n 22.94 DividendGro 16.27 Energy 57.59 EqInc n 23.30 Explorer n 75.48 GNMA n 11.10 GlobEq n 16.99 GroInc n 29.02 HYCorp n 5.94 HiDvdYld n 19.20 HlthCare n 141.40 InflaPro n 14.86 IntlExplr n 13.29 IntlGr 16.99 IntlVal n 27.26 ITI Grade 10.37 ITTsry n 11.86 LIFECon n 16.90 LIFEGro n 22.33 LIFEInc n 14.61 LIFEMod n 20.12 LTInGrade n 11.11 LTTsry n 14.05 MidCapGro 20.29 MATaxEx 10.92 Morgan n 19.14 MuHY n 11.20 MuInt n 14.34 MuLtd n 11.18 MuLong n 11.75 MuShrt n 15.93 OHLTTxE n 12.67 PrecMtlsMin r 14.75 PrmCpCore rn 14.25 Prmcp r 65.96 SelValu r 19.69 STAR n 19.81 STIGrade 10.80 STFed n 10.88 STTsry n 10.79 StratEq n 19.80 TgtRetInc 12.03 TgtRet2010 23.72 TgtRet2015 13.03 TgtRet2020 23.02 TgtRet2025 13.05 TgRet2030 22.30 TgtRet2035 13.36 TgtRe2040 21.91 TgtRet2050 n 21.82 TgtRe2045 n 13.76 USGro n 19.95 Wellsly n 24.12 Welltn n 33.12 Wndsr n 13.79 WndsII n 27.84

+.08 +1.3 +.03 +9.5 +.16 -2.6 +.08 -2.8 +.17 +3.9 +.06 +8.6 +1.33 -14.7 +.12 +10.0 -.23 -5.3 +.02 +5.9 -.02 -7.6 +.16 +5.4 +.02 +9.4 +.09 +10.7 +.23 +6.9 +.06 +11.7 +.05 -17.2 +.07 -13.4 -.04 -13.4 +.06 +9.3 +.03 +8.1 +.05 +2.7 +.05 -1.0 +.05 +4.5 +.05 +1.2 +.16 +23.3 +.08 +33.9 -.07 -0.8 +.04 +10.4 +.10 -0.9 +.05 +12.3 +.04 +8.7 +.01 +2.7 +.05 +11.3 ... +1.2 +.05 +10.5 +.02 -39.0 +.18 -0.7 +.75 -0.1 +.04 +0.9 +.11 +2.6 +.02 +2.8 +.01 +2.1 +.01 +1.3 -.05 -2.4 +.04 +5.7 +.07 +4.1 +.04 +2.7 +.06 +1.7 +.03 +0.8 +.04 0.0 +.02 -1.0 +.04 -1.2 +.04 -1.1 +.03 -1.1 +.12 +1.3 +.17 +11.0 +.18 +6.0 +.09 +1.9 +.11 +5.6

DevMkInPl nr 89.72 EmMkInPl nr 82.84 ExtMkt I n 105.03 FTAllWIPl nr 84.23 MidCpIstPl n 103.57 STBdInstPls 10.67 SmCapInPl n 104.47 TotIntAdm nr 22.36 TotIntlInst nr 89.42 TotIntlIP nr 89.44 TotIntSig nr 26.82 500 n 125.72 Balanced n 23.11 DevMkt n 8.68 EMkt n 24.90 Extend n 42.52 Growth n 35.11 ITBond n 12.18 LTBond n 14.90 MidCap 20.93 REIT r 21.91 SmCap n 36.14 SmlCpGrow 23.26 SmlCapVal 16.29 STBond n 10.67 TotBond n 11.22 TotlIntl n 13.36 TotStk n 33.91 Value n 21.79

-.34 +.09 -.58 -.12 +.23 +.02 -.99 -.03 -.12 -.12 -.03 +.58 +.08 -.03 +.03 -.23 +.28 +.06 +.17 +.04 -.26 -.35 -.20 -.18 +.02 +.04 -.02 +.10 +.02

BalInst n 23.11 DevMktInst n 8.61 EmMktInst n 24.90 ExtIn n 42.55 FTAllWldI r 79.53 GrowthInstl 35.11 InfProtInst n 11.88 InstIdx n 124.92 InsPl n 124.93 InstTStIdx n 30.69 InstTStPlus 30.70 LTBdInst n 14.90 MidCapInstl n 21.00 REITInst r 14.47 STBondIdx n 10.67 STIGrInst 10.80 SmCpIn n 36.19 SmlCapGrI n 23.32 TBIst n 11.22 TSInst n 33.92 ValueInstl n 21.79

15.11 -.01 -0.2 +16.8

TIAA-CREF Funds: BdIdxInst BondInst EnLCGInst r EnLCVInst r EqIdxInst Gr&IncInst HighYldInst InfLkdBdInst IntlEqIInst IntlEqInst LgCGrInst LgCVl Inst MdCVlRet RealSecInst S&P500IInst

11.06 10.88 9.45 8.18 10.38 10.02 10.11 12.48 14.38 7.90 11.28 13.28 17.71 17.80 15.40

+.05 +.06 +.05 +.01 +.02 +.05 +.04 +.05 -.06 ... +.11 +.06 +.05 +.05 +.07

+7.9 +8.5 +3.7 +1.8 +3.3 +4.3 +8.3 +11.5 -13.2 -18.7 +2.2 +0.3 -1.6 -1.4 +5.0

NS +24.2 +56.4 +45.5 +53.2 +49.0 +48.7 +33.0 +13.4 +16.9 +47.9 +43.8 +53.2 +54.2 +52.1

Templeton Class A: TGlbTRA x

12.95 +.08 +1.0 +36.9 17.00 +.08 -13.7 +10.6

Third Avenue Fds: IntlValInst r REValInst r ValueInst

14.94 +.16 -13.1 +14.5 24.39 -.04 +1.5 +51.2 44.93 -.06 -10.3 +19.7

Thompson Plumb: Bond

11.64 +.03 +4.2 +26.7

Thornburg Fds C: IntValuC t

23.34 +.32 -13.5 +15.7

Thornburg Fds: IntlValA p IncBuildA t IncBuildC p IntlValue I LtdMunA p LtTMuniI ValueI

24.86 18.30 18.30 25.42 14.66 14.66 29.46

+.34 +.08 +.08 +.36 +.02 +.02 -.19

-12.9 +1.2 +0.5 -12.5 +5.1 +5.4 -18.6

+18.3 +41.8 +39.0 +19.8 +16.0 +17.1 +12.2

Thrivent Fds A: LgCapStock MuniBd

+.08 -.03 +.02 -.24 -.12 +.28 +.04 +.57 +.58 +.09 +.09 +.17 +.05 -.17 +.02 +.02 -.34 -.20 +.04 +.09 +.02

-13.3 NS -15.9 NS -3.4 NS -14.5 NS -3.1 NS NS NS -2.5 NS -14.7 NS -14.6 NS -14.6 NS -14.7 NS +4.9 +51.9 +5.7 +42.1 -13.4 +13.5 -16.1 +22.1 -3.6 +61.3 +5.0 +56.2 +10.9 +33.7 +27.1 +56.6 -3.3 +63.2 +9.5 +130.9 -2.7 +64.2 -3.9 +68.1 -1.4 +60.0 +2.3 +10.4 +7.8 +22.5 -14.7 +14.8 +3.3 +53.9 +3.1 +48.1 +5.8 +42.8 -13.3 NS -15.9 +22.7 -3.5 +62.1 -14.5 +16.1 +5.2 +57.1 +11.8 +34.1 +5.1 +52.5 +5.1 +52.6 +3.5 +54.5 +3.5 +54.7 +27.3 +57.3 -3.1 +64.2 +9.7 +132.1 NS NS +2.9 +15.7 -2.5 +65.1 -3.7 +69.0 +7.9 +23.1 +3.5 +54.4 +3.2 +48.8

Vanguard Signal:

Templeton Instit: ForEqS

+49.8 +23.2 +32.7 +38.2 +48.6 +52.0 +26.4 +61.2 +56.7 +20.1 +34.6 +52.4 +48.5 +62.1 +53.1 +33.7 +20.5 +22.8 +9.7 +36.1 +22.5 +30.9 +39.0 +26.6 +35.8 +57.6 +53.5 +61.6 +21.8 +50.0 +30.2 +20.8 +9.2 +25.3 +4.3 +22.8 +10.8 +42.7 +40.9 +55.2 +36.5 +15.3 +8.4 +6.1 +61.4 +30.9 +35.8 +36.7 +37.6 +38.9 +40.1 +41.0 +40.7 +40.8 +40.8 +43.8 +44.5 +40.3 +45.0 +48.2

Vanguard Idx Fds:

Vanguard Instl Fds:

10.35 +.05 +7.6 +33.1

+2.8 +9.4 +23.4 +58.1 +34.1 +54.0 +11.3 +25.6 -3.2 +64.0 -0.7 +50.7 +12.4 +30.5 +10.9 +22.7 +10.2 +23.1 0.0 +41.3 -11.1 +16.2 +10.2 +22.8 +9.7 +131.9 +1.4 +6.4 +2.4 +10.8 +1.3 +4.6 +2.2 +8.8 +2.9 +15.6 -2.5 +64.9 NS NS NS NS +3.5 +52.1 +5.0 +52.0 +7.9 +23.0 +3.5 +54.4 +3.2 +48.7 +11.0 +44.8 +6.1 +40.7 +2.0 +45.5 +5.7 +48.6 -13.7 +13.0 +0.3 +63.5

Vanguard Fds:

TotRtBdN p MktNeutral r 26.88 16.16 28.25 28.24 26.32 20.78 44.52 18.87 44.51 22.92 34.77 9.84 9.26 27.71 11.98 10.97 91.29 19.96 91.28 91.27 19.44 9.07 23.60 13.46 11.11 11.10 10.65 29.22 12.05 7.98 10.73 48.47 28.13 38.39 38.38 69.60 69.55 12.73 11.17 28.22 28.22 13.51 17.19 31.40 13.70 57.69 58.09 9.79 28.71 19.08 19.07 11.22 31.75 12.37 9.28 9.31 15.10 15.14 10.85 10.88 11.40 8.34 8.36 12.05 10.88 8.57 8.57 21.37 16.00 10.88 16.97 15.02 26.69 18.87 11.94 11.20 11.66 11.28 74.45 12.04 12.05 18.74 68.76 18.64

LtdTrmAdm 11.18 LTGrAdml 11.11 LTsryAdml 14.05 LT Adml n 11.75 MCpAdml n 95.06 MorgAdm 59.39 MuHYAdml n 11.20 NJLTAd n 12.33 NYLTAd m 11.77 PrmCap r 68.46 PacifAdml 60.84 PALTAdm n 11.70 REITAdml r 93.50 STsryAdml 10.79 STBdAdml n 10.67 ShtTrmAdm 15.93 STFedAdm 10.88 STIGrAdm 10.80 SmlCapAdml n 36.19 SmCapGrth 29.11 SmCapVal 29.23 TxMCap r 68.11 TxMGrInc r 61.14 TtlBdAdml n 11.22 TotStkAdm n 33.92 ValueAdml n 21.79 WellslAdm n 58.43 WelltnAdm n 57.21 WindsorAdm n 46.52 WdsrIIAdm 49.42 TaxMngdIntl rn 9.97 TaxMgdSC r 29.31

TCW Funds N: TFS Funds:

DiversIntK r DivStkO n DivGrowK DivGth n Emerg Asia r EmrgMkt n EqutInc n EQII n EqIncK Export n FidelFd FltRateHi r FocHiInco r FourInOne n GNMA n GovtInc n GroCo n GroInc GrowCoF GrowthCoK GrStrat nr HighInc rn Indepndnce n InProBnd IntBd n IntGov IntmMuni n IntlDisc n InvGrBd n InvGB n LgCapVal n LatAm n LevCoStock LowPr rn LowPriStkK r Magellan n MagellanK MA Muni n MegaCpStk n MidCap n MidCapK r MuniInc n NewMkt nr NewMill n NY Mun n OTC OTC K 100Index Ovrsea n Puritan PuritanK RealEInc r RealEst n SrAllSecEqF SCmdtyStrt n SCmdtyStrF n SrsEmrgMkt SrEmgMktF SrsIntGrw SerIntlGrF SrsIntSmCp SrsIntVal SerIntlValF SrsInvGrdF ShtIntMu n STBondF STBF n SmCapDisc n SmCpGrth r SmCapOpp SmallCapS nr SmCapValu r StkSlcACap n StkSelSmCap StratDivInc StratInc n TaxFreeB r TotalBond n Trend n USBdIdxF USBI n Utility n Value n Wrldwde n

1 yr 3 yr NAV Chg %rt %rt

22.58 +.21 -2.2 +32.1 11.91 +.05 +11.3 +23.3

BalancSgl n ExtMktSgl n 500Sgl n GroSig n ITBdSig n MidCapIdx n REITSig r STBdIdx n SmCapSig n TotalBdSgl n TotStkSgnl n ValueSig n

22.86 36.56 103.85 32.51 12.18 30.00 24.96 10.67 32.60 11.22 32.74 22.67

+5.8 +42.7 -3.5 +62.0 +5.1 +52.4 +5.1 +56.9 +11.1 +34.1 -3.2 +64.0 +9.7 +131.9 +2.4 +10.8 -2.5 +64.9 +7.9 +23.0 +3.5 +54.4 +3.2 +48.7

Vantagepoint Fds: AggrOpp n EqtyInc n Growth n Grow&Inc n Intl n MPLgTmGr n MPTradGrth n

9.96 8.84 9.03 10.32 8.65 21.52 22.69

Tocqueville Fds:

Victory Funds:

Delafield Gold t

Virtus Funds:

28.55 +.10 -4.4 +54.5 58.54 -1.40 -33.6 +43.7

+.08 -.21 +.48 +.26 +.06 +.07 -.29 +.02 -.31 +.04 +.10 +.02

DvsStkA

-.03 +.01 +.06 +.05 -.01 +.04 +.05

-6.7 -0.1 -0.8 +2.1 -10.3 -1.0 +0.4

+42.8 +46.6 +39.6 +46.9 +19.7 +34.8 +31.3

15.51 +.16 -0.7 +30.5

Touchstone Family:

EmgMktI

SandsCpGY n 12.11 +.23 +6.8 +92.8 SandsCapGrI 16.82 +.31 +7.1 +95.6 SelGrowth 11.87 +.21 +6.5 +91.5

Virtus Funds A: MulSStA p

Transamerica A:

IntlGrwth

AsAlModGr p 11.93 +.05 -2.5 +32.0

WM Blair Mtl Fds:

Transamerica C:

IntlGrowthI r 20.72 +.19 -8.1 +30.2

AsAlModGr t 11.88 +.06 -3.0 +29.7

Waddell & Reed Adv:

TA IDEX C:

Accumultiv Asset

AsAlMod t

11.86 +.05 -0.8 +29.1

9.41 +.01 -0.2 +57.9 4.86 +.02 +4.5 +32.1

WM Blair Fds Inst: 13.46 +.12 -7.4 +31.1

7.85 -.02 -2.0 +40.8

Tweedy Browne: GblValue

23.77 +.19 +2.7 +45.5

USAA Group: CornstStr n Grwth n Gr&Inc n HYldInco n IncStk n Income n IntTerBd n Intl n PrecMM S&P Idx n S&P Rewrd ShtTBnd n TxEIT n TxELT n TxESh n

22.02 15.50 15.33 8.40 13.15 13.44 10.76 22.61 24.46 20.42 20.42 9.23 13.67 13.84 10.84

+.04 +.20 +.14 +.03 +.02 +.05 +.04 +.13 -.41 +.10 +.09 +.02 +.03 +.04 ...

-4.5 +0.2 -1.2 +4.4 +3.5 +7.2 +7.2 -9.5 -36.3 +4.8 +5.0 +3.1 +9.6 +13.3 +3.2

+34.7 +43.1 +43.4 +57.0 +50.1 +30.3 +45.3 +26.0 +12.5 +51.4 +52.1 +15.0 +25.9 +31.7 +12.0

VALIC : MidCapIdx StockIndex

20.07 -.07 -3.1 +63.0 25.53 +.11 +4.7 +51.4

W m

W m

W

A

A

W

A

A

W

A

C

W

A

Van Eck Funds: GlHardA

40.98 +.95 -26.2 +19.2

M

Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 23.11 CAITAdm n 11.68 CALTAdm 11.92 CpOpAdl n 72.14 DevMktsAd 24.97 EM Adm nr 32.73 Energy n 108.15 EqIncAdml 48.85 EuropAdml 52.43 ExplAdml 70.27 ExntdAdm n 42.56 FTAllWxUS 25.09 500Adml n 125.72 GNMA Adm n 11.10 GroIncAdm 47.38 GrwthAdml n 35.11 HlthCare n 59.67 HiYldCp n 5.94 InflProAd n 29.18 ITBondAdml 12.18 ITsryAdml n 11.86 IntlGrAdml 54.08 ITAdml n 14.34 ITCoAdmrl 10.37

+.08 +5.8 +.03 +9.6 +.05 +12.3 +.37 -2.5 -.10 NS +.03 -16.0 +2.50 -14.6 +.27 +10.2 -.21 -14.5 -.22 -5.1 -.23 -3.5 -.03 NS +.57 +5.1 +.02 +6.0 +.26 +5.6 +.28 +5.1 +.10 +6.9 +.02 +9.5 +.11 +11.7 +.06 +11.1 +.03 +8.2 +.24 -13.3 +.04 +8.8 +.06 +9.4

+42.7 +23.5 +27.8 +33.0 NS +22.5 +26.7 +61.7 +12.8 +57.5 +62.0 NS +52.4 +20.5 +53.0 +56.9 +53.3 +49.0 +34.0 +34.1 +22.9 +23.3 +21.1 +36.6

M

W

A

M

W

A m

W M

W W

A

W

mB

W

N

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012 • THE BULLETIN

G5

Benefit managers seen as a threat to small drugstores By Joan Verdon The (Hackensack, N.J.) Record

HACKENSACK, N.J. — In Palisades Park, N.J., Michael and Louis Giannantonio are trying to keep their 57-yearold family-owned drugstore healthy with a recipe their father taught them: friendliness and service. In Cresskill, N.J., Sree and Satish Vattimilli are hoping home deliveries and consultations and greeting customers by name will immunize their store from the competition. In Haworth, N.J., Bill and Denise Hayes are counting on a dose of high-tech innovation mixed with an old-fashioned mom-and-pop style of doing business to keep their pharmacy alive. Independent drugstores fill hundreds of prescriptions a day for ailments such as diabetes, migraines and ear infections. But store owners say they won’t be able to continue doing that unless they find a remedy for the intense pressure they are feeling from a system that squeezes their profits and gives new competitors an unfair advantage. They’re not so much worried about the proliferation of chain drugstores or the bigbox discounters as they are the pharmacy benefit manager companies that were born about 30 years ago to process prescription claims for insurers and have grown into giant corporations that control what drugstores can charge. Sometimes, they even compete with pharmacies through their own mail-order operations. “We lose patients every day to mail order, specialty pharmacy, restricted networks and other methods that the PBMs use to drive prescriptions to their own businesses,” said Matt Kopacki, owner of Rock Ridge Pharmacy in Glen Rock, N.J. “The system is stacked against the local pharmacy, and in some cases, even against the national chain drugstores.” “One of the elements of unfairness of these prescription benefit programs is that the same companies who design the programs own the mailorder pharmacies to which patients are directed,” said Daniel Hussar, a professor at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and author of “The Pharmacist Activist” newsletter. Some patients, particularly

those using expensive medicines for chronic conditions, are told their only option is to have the drugs delivered by mail. Others are urged to switch to mail order to be eligible for a lower co-payment. The recent merger of two of the largest pharmacy benefit managers — Express Scripts in St. Louis and Medco in Franklin Lakes, N.J., — and the 2006 merger of the drugstore chain CVS with the pharmacy and benefits manager Caremark have focused attention on the role of these companies. Lawmakers in a number of states, including New Jersey, have proposed legislation to limit or regulate PBMs. Laurie Clark, a lobbyist for the New Jersey Pharmacists Association and the Garden State Pharmacy Owners, said those groups support a bill introduced by Linda Stender, which among other things would prohibit pharmacy benefit managers from requiring someone to fill their prescription at a specific retail pharmacy or at a mail-order pharmacy. “It’s one thing if a patient wants to go to mail order,” Clark said, but many patients are told their prescriptions can be filled only by mail order. “They lose access to their local pharmacist,” Clark added. “Having that access is something we feel is very important to health care.” The National Community Pharmacists Association, a Virginia-based lobbying group, on Wednesday kicked off an attack on the benefit management companies with a website (whorunsmydrugplan.com) and a video intended to mobilize sentiment against them. Brian Henry, a spokesman for the Express Scripts, noted that PBMs save their clients — the employers and insurers — money on their prescription drug plans. “We believe we have a very good relationship with pharmacies, with independents and chains and every other type of pharmacy,” Henry said. “We think we offer very fair reimbursement.” Since 1990, the number of independent drugstores in the United States has declined 28 percent, to 23,064 from 31,879. The number of chain drugstores has increased 11.6 percent in the period, to 20,804 from 18,638.

Fernando Salazar / The Wichita (Kansas) Eagle via The Associated Press

Wheat harvesters work on a field near Clearwater, Kan., on May 28. Some Midwest farmers are planting secondary crops in fields cleared of much-earlier-than-usual winter wheat in hopes of turning the crops into a feed source for cows.

Farmers get creative to ease burden of Midwest drought By Karen Herzog Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

BELGIUM, Wis. — While many Wisconsin dairy farmers worry they won’t have enough feed for their cows this winter if the severe drought doesn’t break soon, Matt Winker has a plan. “A plan and a prayer,” the 31-year-old Ozaukee County, Wis., dairy farmer said last week. “I’ll either look like a hero or a fool.” Some farmers likely will be forced to sell off cows they can’t feed or buy expensive hay and corn from elsewhere. But Winker is gambling on an opportunity created by another crop that’s actually thriving in Wisconsin this summer: winter wheat — the amber waves of grain that summer vacationers see aplenty while driving across the arid Plains states of Kansas, North Dakota and Montana. A mild spring and a little rain at the right time in June made for an early and bountiful winter wheat harvest in Wisconsin, perhaps the best in decades. The early harvest gives Winker and other farmers an extra few weeks of growing season to do something virtually unheard of in this part of the state. Winker is planting soybeans in mid-July on 100 acres of fields cleared last week of much-earlier-thanusual winter wheat in hopes

of turning it into a feed source for his cows. Harvested winter wheat fields generally are left empty until they’re replanted the next spring in a crop rotation with alfalfa, corn or soybeans. In Wisconsin, winter wheat is grown mostly for straw bedding to keep dairy cows comfortable. Winker figures he’s gambling about $6,000 with the extra soybean crop, including seed and labor. Other farmers are devising their own drought plans, planting oats and peas over harvested wheat fields or over withered, immature cornfields cut midway through the growing season for use as cattle feed because the plants won’t reach maturity now, even if it rains soon, local agriculture specialists said. “We’re getting a lot of calls about land where corn was bad and it was harvested early, so they want to plant a second crop, or the wheat ground is open to do some seeding,” said Randy Shaver, a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor and UW Extension dairy nutritionist. Fall oats and peas may be the most common second crops planted in hopes of getting something off the land to feed cows, Shaver said. “People have also looked at short-season corn to plant as silage,” he said. “The real

challenge is having a crystal ball to tell you whether you’ll get moisture or not so the new crop will grow.” If his alfalfa and cornfields don’t produce enough feed for his 160 milking cows, Winker hopes to have an extra 100 acres of soybeans he could harvest as forage — assuming it rains in the coming months. If the drought breaks soon, then he could have an extra 100 acres of soybeans to sell as grain. “You can’t wait until December and say, ‘I don’t have enough feed,’ ” said his father, Tom Winker. “You have to be proactive.” Cows may turn up their noses at eating soybeans, but beans harvested as forage can be mixed with corn and hay so cows will eat it. “If you mix it all together, they don’t know they’re getting carrots,” Matt Winker said, likening it to outfoxing a child who’s a picky eater. Supplements will allow farmers to mix nutritional rations for their cattle, even under the least favorable conditions,

Shaver said. It’s ironic that winter wheat may be a savior in Wisconsin. Wisconsin was the nation’s top grower of wheat in the mid19th century, producing about a sixth of the wheat grown in the United States. But wheat rapidly depleted nutrients in the soil, especially nitrogen, and was vulnerable to insects, bad weather and wheat leaf rust. In the 1860s, chinch bugs arrived in Wisconsin and damaged wheat across the state. As the soil lost its quality and prices dropped, wheat farming moved west. Some Wisconsin farmers experimented with crop rotation and other methods to restore the soil’s fertility, and a large number turned to alternatives to wheat. That’s when the dairy industry emerged and Wisconsin became America’s Dairyland.

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Kevin R. Wexler / The (Hackensack, N.J.) Record

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Louis and Michael Giannantonio work at the pharmacy in Palisades Park, N.J., that was started by their father in 1957.

615 SE Glenwood Drive, Suite 100 Bend, OR 97702

Northwest stocks Name AlaskAir s Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeBcp CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedID Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div PE ... 1.16 .04 .44 1.76 ... 1.40 .88 1.10f ... .28 .53 .22 .90f .20 .46 ... ... .67 ... .80

15 17 8 39 13 ... 9 19 27 15 14 7 ... 11 8 21 8 ... 21 14 11

YTD Last Chg %Chg 35.82 -.67 -4.6 27.60 +.12 +7.2 7.07 -.19 +27.2 20.85 -.61 +4.5 73.89 -.97 +.7 5.50 -.06 +25.6 46.79 -.62 -.8 52.97 -.17 +13.8 95.61 -.34 +14.8 8.46 -.06 +40.5 19.13 -.34 -23.7 18.61 -.49 -27.8 10.01 +.03 -3.8 25.52 -.54 +5.2 7.89 -.03 +2.5 21.47 -.12 -11.4 3.48 -.10 -41.4 10.87 +.18 +34.7 22.77 -.11 +6.1 14.91 -.04 +9.9 30.12 -.55 +16.0

Name

Div PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstBcp Weyerhsr

1.44 1.08 1.78 ... .80 ... 1.68 .12 .70f .75f 1.56 .89f .68 ... .36f .78 .32 .88 ... .60

Market recap YTD Last Chg %Chg

20 93.08 -2.18 -3.4 16 52.44 -.84 +5.5 21 49.15 +.89 +2.5 15 4.55 -.10 +.2 11 37.22 -.53 -.7 ... 1.60 ... -16.2 35 39.96 -.50 +9.3 20 165.02 -3.32 +.1 9 15.59 -.21 -25.9 12 28.94 -.65 -31.6 26 131.57 -.86 +47.4 10 31.33 -.62 -14.7 30 51.96 -2.24 +12.9 22 5.14 -.19 +5.4 16 12.79 -.05 +3.2 12 33.60 -.20 +24.2 13 15.92 -.02 +13.8 11 33.81 -.34 +22.7 12 19.83 -.15 +27.1 35 23.06 -.01 +23.5

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1584.50 $1582.50 $27.279

• Bath Vanities • Mirrors • Ceiling Fans

NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec Pfizer SPDR Fncl

1551280 1274913 1127204 929142 536371

7.07 -.19 136.47 -1.26 19.87 +.07 23.70 -.10 14.38 -.22

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

NwOriEd s DoleFood Edenor MexEqt pf WhitingTr

12.91 +1.71 +15.3 10.15 +1.32 +14.9 2.60 +.28 +11.9 16.71 +1.70 +11.3 10.09 +.98 +10.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Chipotle 316.98 -86.88 -21.5 AMD 4.22 -.64 -13.2 MdbkIns 7.49 -1.10 -12.8 Valhi s 11.37 -1.30 -10.3 BadgerMtr 35.91 -3.57 -9.0

Amex

$1581.00 $1580.10 $27.194

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more)

Most Active ($1 or more)

Name

Name

CheniereEn GoldResrc Rentech Vringo NovaGld g

Vol (00)

Last Chg

40843 13.78 -.05 38283 17.50 -7.72 30909 2.02 -.03 27465 3.57 -.13 26992 5.66 -.17

Gainers ($2 or more)

Microsoft Intel MicronT Kraft SiriusXM

Last Chg

564903 30.12 -.55 445724 25.52 -.54 441912 5.83 +.05 441443 40.16 -.04 434823 2.10 -.01

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

WizrdSft rs Glowpoint ASpecRlty EntGmg rs MeetMe

2.65 2.22 3.67 2.21 2.01

+.30 +12.8 +.14 +6.7 +.17 +4.9 +.09 +4.2 +.07 +3.6

FidBcPA AstexPhm OnyxPh PacSunwr SanDisk

21.09 +8.31 +65.0 2.52 +.30 +13.5 76.38 +7.98 +11.7 2.21 +.23 +11.6 38.70 +3.62 +10.3

Losers ($2 or more) Last

GoldResrc VirnetX USAntimny Medgen wt AdmRsc

17.50 -7.72 -30.6 35.25 -3.53 -9.1 3.06 -.30 -8.9 6.47 -.58 -8.2 42.77 -3.32 -7.2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

StaarSur Cepheid Rambus UnivFor BldrFstSrc

6.00 -2.08 -25.7 36.01 -7.72 -17.7 4.30 -.92 -17.5 33.99 -6.45 -15.9 4.11 -.77 -15.8

Diary 1,016 2,010 118 3,144 130 39

Vol (00)

Name

Diary Pvs Day

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Diary 179 238 39 456 12 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

634 1,812 124 2,570 42 49

52-Week High Low 13,338.66 10,404.49 5,487.74 3,950.66 488.43 381.99 8,423.05 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 847.92 601.71

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last

Net Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

52-wk %Chg

12,822.57 5,072.20 489.34 7,759.59 2,380.72 2,925.30 1,362.66 14,257.71 791.54

-120.79 -114.69 +1.36 -90.16 -34.95 -40.60 -13.85 -146.28 -10.63

-.93 -2.21 +.28 -1.15 -1.45 -1.37 -1.01 -1.02 -1.33

+4.95 +1.05 +5.31 +3.78 +4.49 +12.29 +8.35 +8.10 +6.83

+1.12 -6.56 +11.41 -7.71 -2.83 +2.33 +1.31 -.23 -5.97

World markets

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market Close % Change

Key currency exchange rates Friday compared with late Thursday in New York. Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

319.75 2,249.84 3,193.89 5,651.77 6,630.02 19,640.80 40,806.34 13,067.22 3,463.70 8,669.87 1,822.93 3,015.53 4,230.56 5,823.89

-.85 -1.89 -2.14 -1.09 -1.90 +.42 +.13 -4.39 -.63 -1.43 ... -.44 -.14 -.63

t t t t t s s t t t t t t

1.0373 1.5617 .9879 .002049 .1568 1.2159 .1289 .012746 .075002 .0312 .000876 .1441 1.0125 .0333

1.0428 1.5720 .9927 .002061 .1569 1.2278 .1289 .012725 .075608 .0314 .000878 .1445 1.0223 .0333

G6

THE BULLETIN • SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2012

S D  Infiniti packs wagon with beauty, luxury Saturn owner should

shop around for part

The Warren Brown Special to The Washington Post

It is a beautiful wagon, fluid in exterior design, with jewellike grille and headlamps. You are forced to look at it, an elegant motorized homage to affluence, or at least to the desire for same. Yet there is nothing ostentatious about it. The wagon’s richness is in its execution — for example, the way its exterior door handles blend neatly, unobtrusively into side-panels, the way the fluid motion of it all ends in the rear in the manner of a cresting wave. Step inside of this week’s subject vehicle, the 2013 Infiniti JX35 all-wheel-drive, which I prefer to call a wagon because, in actual design and intended use, that is what it is. There are seats for seven people, with 60-40 split middle seats that easily slide and fold forward, allowing access to third-row seats in the rear. Those middle seats also do a good job of accommodating child-safety seats. Hint: Check with local fire and safety officials to get the best information on which seats are suitable for the JX35. Why do that? As first responders to vehicle crashes, fire and safety people have determined which child-safety seats do and don’t work well in the vehicles in which they are installed. Take advantage of their expertise. And enjoy the JX35’s perforated premium leather seats. They are part of a concept that Infiniti’s designers liken to “kasane washi,” a term most appropriately used in the Japanese craft of layering parchment paper to produce fine artwork, but here employed to speak to a layering of materi-

By Paul Brand The Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

My 2000 Saturn SL1 runs well at 130,000 Q : miles, but it has a problem

Courtesy Infiniti

The 2013 Infiniti JX35 all-wheel-drive is an excellent people hauler for families seeking a midsize wagon with comfort, safety, style and all available entertainment amenities.

2013 Infiniti JX35 all-wheel-drive Base price: $42,050 As tested: $54,800 Type: Front-engine, allwheel-drive, midsize, “entry-level” luxury wagon Engine: 3.5-liter, 24-valve double-overhead-cam V-6 engine with variable valve timing linked to an electronically controlled continuously variable transmission Mileage: 18 mpg city, 23 mpg highway

als, shapes and colors to create cabin of singular beauty. The JX35 driven for this column, for example, came with optional maple-wood veneer accents that gave the car a richness and warmth far beyond that found in most “entry-level” luxury wagon/crossover/ sport utility vehicles. And those seats — I keep

mentioning them because they definition of a high-perforare spectacular. The stitch- mance vehicle. So what? The ing for the backs and bottoms people buying it are usually of those mobile thrones are parents in need of a comfortwaved, flowing, as opposed to able, safe midsize wagon to the strictly vertical-horizon- get them and their families tal stitching found in many from one place to another. luxury automobiles. It may The 2013 JX35 all-wheel-drive have been my imagination, so model driven for this column overwhelmed was I by handled those chores their beauty, but I also R E V I E W quite well. thought the JX35’s seats By contrast, the peo(eight-way power driver ple usually criticizing and six-way power passenger) the JX35’s performance are were among the most comfort- young, single, unmarried and able I’ve ever used. overwhelmingly male. They The JX35 is equipped with believe that everything should one of the best V-6 engines in go fast and “take curves” at the business, Nissan’s famed high speeds, which is silly in a 3.5-liter V-6 (265 horsepower, world of crowded, super-regu248 foot-pounds of torque). lated streets and highways — But it is no surprise to me that often running through finanInfiniti’s choice of that engine cially distressed jurisdictions is under attack by “automotive desperate to enhance revenue enthusiasts” for its applica- through traffic fines. tion in a vehicle with a factory The JX35 all-wheel-drive weight — weight absent pas- gets the job done. I only wish sengers and cargo — of 4,419 that it would do it using less pounds. fuel. Eighteen miles per galIn truth, the 2013 JX35, lon in the city and 23 on the available with all-wheel or highway are nothing to brag front-wheel drive, fits nobody’s about.

$20M worth of ‘very important’ Ferraris on the block By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — A rare collection of four Ferrari cars is expected to sell for a combined $20 million or more at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance next month. Santa Monica auction house Gooding & Co. landed the Ferrari collection, which was

the property of Sherman Wolf, a Boston paging service and amphitheater entrepreneur who died earlier this year. “It is a very important collection of cars,” said David Kinney, publisher of the Hagerty Price Guide for collector cars. “This is causing heartburn for some of the other auction companies that Gooding has

grabbed this very important collection.” The rarest vehicle in the collection is a 1960 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Alloy California Spider Competizione. Gooding & Co. said it is one of only nine alloy-bodied LWB — long wheel base — California Spiders ever built and is expected to sell for $7 million to $9 million.

The other cars include a 1953 Ferrari 340 MM Competition Spider, a 1957 Ferrari 500 TRC and a 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO. “The Gooding sales have always been high-end and they seem to bring the right buyers to the room,” Kinney said. “The estate of Mr. Wolf will do very well.”

with the air conditioning. The mechanic tells me that the compressor is shot and there is a small leak that could be easy to fix. The problem is that he cannot find a used compressor, and a new one costs close to $900. Adding the install, patch of the leak and the refill, it will end up near $1,200. If we put $1,200 in addition to the $500 we recently spent on tires and a battery, it will exceed the value of the car. Can a compressor be repaired? Or, where can I find a used compressor that will keep me on a