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WSU Health & Wellness Services, Vol. 2/ No. 1 | August/ Spetember 2013

contents

EDITOR’S LETTER

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

pg15 Yoga, Mindfullness and Living in the present

pgaffect Media 17DoesBodytheImage?

Around this time of year, I always get nostalgic for July—when the days are consistently sunny, the nights quite warm, and the stress of studying is far off in a dista t land called late August. However, late August hits and Winona is full of life again. Campus is buzzing, downtown is a bit less deserted, and there is a feeling of anticipation in the air. New classes, new freshmen, and in the decaying leaves of fall, everyone has a chance to start fresh. For me, this new beginning came in the form of a job offer—Editor of Wellzine. My favorite part of magazines has always been the Editors letter and now it’s crazy to think that I get to write my own! I couldn’t be more excited.

wellzine | September 2013

However ecstatic I get about new opportunities, I always feel unprepared for the homework, exams, and projects that pile up in the blink of an eye. One day you’re sprawled out for hours on the beach and the next, you’re studying for the hours in the library. There’s really no easing into it. It’s so easy to get caught up in the stress of a new school year. It’s a good thing this month’s Wellzine has 5 great tips to help you avoid the mayhem of college life.

c S Kim

This month’s issue of Wellzine also informs you about those nifty Photoshop secrets the media uses and how that affects your body image. We’ve also touched base with the Health and Wellness Services about their new Gender Based Violence helpline on campus. As the school year progresses and continues to stress you, go ahead and let Wellzine be a monthly indulgence. We’ll do our best to keep you and your many dimensions in perfect health.

r e d i hne

pg11

7 DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

EVERY ISSUE

09 11 13 15 17 19 21

03 05 06 07 23 25 27

INTELLECTUAL

Active Minds: Removing the Stigma that Surrounds Mental Health Issues

SPIRITUAL

Yoga, Mindfulness, and Living in the Present

EMOTIONAL

We Are Here For You: The New Gender Based Violence Helpline

ENVIRONMENTAL

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

SOCIAL

Does the Media affect Body Image?

OCCUPATIONAL

Gain Real-World Experience Prior to Graduation

PHYSICAL

Splishin’ and a Splashin’: Health Benefits of Taking a Swim

& HEALTH& WELLNESS SERVICES

CALENDAR CREDITS September 2013

Health & Wellness Services Laboratory

&

SE TECH FRESHMEN NEWS

S.O.A.R & S.A.F.E.

STUDENT GROUPS

S.H.A.G. and Advocates announcements

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES

Apple Banana ‘Baked’ Oatmeal in a Mug

BULLETINS

September Bulletins

FIVE TIPS

Five Tips to Avoid Mayhem

contents

EDITOR’S LETTER

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

pg15 Yoga, Mindfullness and Living in the present

pgaffect Media 17DoesBodytheImage?

Around this time of year, I always get nostalgic for July—when the days are consistently sunny, the nights quite warm, and the stress of studying is far off in a dista t land called late August. However, late August hits and Winona is full of life again. Campus is buzzing, downtown is a bit less deserted, and there is a feeling of anticipation in the air. New classes, new freshmen, and in the decaying leaves of fall, everyone has a chance to start fresh. For me, this new beginning came in the form of a job offer—Editor of Wellzine. My favorite part of magazines has always been the Editors letter and now it’s crazy to think that I get to write my own! I couldn’t be more excited.

wellzine | September 2013

However ecstatic I get about new opportunities, I always feel unprepared for the homework, exams, and projects that pile up in the blink of an eye. One day you’re sprawled out for hours on the beach and the next, you’re studying for the hours in the library. There’s really no easing into it. It’s so easy to get caught up in the stress of a new school year. It’s a good thing this month’s Wellzine has 5 great tips to help you avoid the mayhem of college life.

c S Kim

This month’s issue of Wellzine also informs you about those nifty Photoshop secrets the media uses and how that affects your body image. We’ve also touched base with the Health and Wellness Services about their new Gender Based Violence helpline on campus. As the school year progresses and continues to stress you, go ahead and let Wellzine be a monthly indulgence. We’ll do our best to keep you and your many dimensions in perfect health.

r e d i hne

pg11

7 DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

EVERY ISSUE

09 11 13 15 17 19 21

03 05 06 07 23 25 27

INTELLECTUAL

Active Minds: Removing the Stigma that Surrounds Mental Health Issues

SPIRITUAL

Yoga, Mindfulness, and Living in the Present

EMOTIONAL

We Are Here For You: The New Gender Based Violence Helpline

ENVIRONMENTAL

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

SOCIAL

Does the Media affect Body Image?

OCCUPATIONAL

Gain Real-World Experience Prior to Graduation

PHYSICAL

Splishin’ and a Splashin’: Health Benefits of Taking a Swim

& HEALTH& WELLNESS SERVICES

CALENDAR CREDITS September 2013

Health & Wellness Services Laboratory

&

SE TECH FRESHMEN NEWS

S.O.A.R & S.A.F.E.

STUDENT GROUPS

S.H.A.G. and Advocates announcements

HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES

Apple Banana ‘Baked’ Oatmeal in a Mug

BULLETINS

September Bulletins

FIVE TIPS

Five Tips to Avoid Mayhem

s

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

September

SATURDAY

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

19

20

21

27

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PUBLISHERS Shawnessy Mohawk

Kimberly Schneider

FRIDAY

1

credits EDITOR IN CHIEF

THURSDAY

15

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138 Well Cafe: Healthy Birthday Parties, 4pm, IWC 143

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

16

17

18

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

Cam Neely COVER PHOTO CREDIT Cam Neely

September Observances

22

Health & Wellness Advocate Launch Week 23

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138

National Campus Safety Month College Savings Month Fruit & Veggies - More Matters Month National Yoga Month Whole Grains Month

wellzine | September 2013

29

30

Healthy Mondays 7pm IWC 138

24

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

25

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

26

s

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

September

SATURDAY

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

19

20

21

27

28

PUBLISHERS Shawnessy Mohawk

Kimberly Schneider

FRIDAY

1

credits EDITOR IN CHIEF

THURSDAY

15

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138 Well Cafe: Healthy Birthday Parties, 4pm, IWC 143

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

16

17

18

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

Cam Neely COVER PHOTO CREDIT Cam Neely

September Observances

22

Health & Wellness Advocate Launch Week 23

Healthy Mondays 7pm, IWC 138

National Campus Safety Month College Savings Month Fruit & Veggies - More Matters Month National Yoga Month Whole Grains Month

wellzine | September 2013

29

30

Healthy Mondays 7pm IWC 138

24

Fit Stop 11am, IWC 138

25

Wellness Wednesday 3pm, IWC 138

26

Dear WSU Freshmen, Clinic IWC 222 Hours: Mon-Fri: 7:30 - 5 p.m.

Health & Wellness Services Laboratory: Recognized for quality laboratory services Health & Wellness Services Laboratory at Winona State University has met all the criteria for Laboratory Accreditation by COLA, a national healthcare accreditation organization.

Pharmacy IWC 130 Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Accreditation is given only to laboratories that apply rigid standards of quality in day-to-day operations, demonstrate continued accuracy in the performance of proficiency testing, and pass a rigorous on-site laboratory survey. Health & Wellness Services Laboratory has earned COLA accreditation as a result of a long-term commitment to provide quality service to the Winona State University Students. COLA is a nonprofit, physician-directed organization that promotes quality and excellence in medicine and patient care through programs of voluntary education, achievement, and accreditation. COLA is approved by the federal government and sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, and the American College of Physicians.

Southeast Tech On Tuesday, September 10 in Winona, and Thursda , September 12 in Red Wing, we are getting ready to S.O.A.R.! Plus, the Student Senate is sponsoring our annual WELCOME BACK picnic – plan to join us for a free lunch in the commons. What does S.O.A.R. stand for? Student Opportunities And Readiness. We want to offer ou the opportunity to make the most of your college experience, so we have put together a series of breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help you get off to a g eat start as the new school year begins. The b eakout sessions run from 10:30 a.m. to noon and 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 pm. Each session is about 25 minutes long and is repeated six times so you can fit the sessions in among other activi ties. Attend at least one breakout session and sign up to win three free credits! To help you get more connected to resources that can help you as a student, we also have “Community Connections” set up in the commons area during the day. Area organizations will have displays and representatives to explain their programs. Plan on attending breakout sessions, learning about community resources and enjoying a great lunch as we S.O.A.R. to Success! Casie Johnson Assistant to the President 507.453.2663 Email

For questions about external scholarships, contact:

The deadline for S.A. .E. Part Two is fast approaching. Part two is required to complete and is a follow-up to the original questions you answered in Part One prior to the start of this school year. Part Two will be sent to your WSU Email by mid-September and you will have approximately two and a half weeks to complete. Be sure to check your email around then and if you have any questions, please contact Carla Stenulson. WSU S.A.F.E is an online, non-opinionated alcohol and drug educational program. Whether you drink or not, this program will help you make well-informed decisions about alcohol and better manage the drinking behavior that may occur around you. The niversity cares for your health and safety. We promote responsible decision making by our students, so all incoming freshmen are required to complete WSU S.A.F.E. Winona State University is deeply committed to the health, welfare, and ultimate success and happiness of all members of our community. We hope that you find the course helpful and inst uctive on this important journey. Career Services, Maxwell 314 Student Union, Kryzsko Commons Warrior Hub, Maxwell 222 Tutoring Services, Darrell Krueger Library 220

Freshmen News

Gale Lanning Director of Admissions 507.453.1443 Email

health & wellness services

06

Dear WSU Freshmen, Clinic IWC 222 Hours: Mon-Fri: 7:30 - 5 p.m.

Health & Wellness Services Laboratory: Recognized for quality laboratory services Health & Wellness Services Laboratory at Winona State University has met all the criteria for Laboratory Accreditation by COLA, a national healthcare accreditation organization.

Pharmacy IWC 130 Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Accreditation is given only to laboratories that apply rigid standards of quality in day-to-day operations, demonstrate continued accuracy in the performance of proficiency test ing, and pass a rigorous on-site laboratory survey. Health & Wellness Services Laboratory has earned COLA accreditation as a result of a long-term commitment to provide quality service to the Winona State University Students. COLA is a nonprofit, physician-di ected organization that promotes quality and excellence in medicine and patient care through programs of voluntary education, achievement, and accreditation. COLA is approved by the federal government and sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, and the American College of Physicians.

Southeast Tech

On Tuesday, September 10 in Winona, and Thursday, September 12 in Red Wing, we are getting ready to S.O.A.R.! Plus, the Student Senate is sponsoring our annual WELCOME BACK picnic – plan to join us for a free lunch in the commons. What does S.O.A.R. stand for? Student Opportunities And Readiness. We want to offer you the opportunity to make the most of your college experience, so we have put together a series of breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help you get off to a great start as the new school year begins. The breakout sessions run from 10:30 a.m. to noon and 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 pm. Each session is about 25 minutes long and is repeated six times so you can fit the sessions in among other activities. Attend at least one breakout session and sign up to win three free credits! To help you get more connected to resources that can help you as a student, we also have “Community Connections” set up in the commons area during the day. Area organizations will have displays and representatives to explain their pro-grams. Plan on attending breakout sessions, learning about community resources and enjoying a great lunch as we S.O.A.R. to Success!

Casie Johnson Assistant to the President 507.453.2663 Email

For questions about external scholarships, contact:

The deadline for S.A.F.E. Part Two is fast approaching. Part two is required to complete and is a follow-up to the original questions you answered in Part One prior to the start of this school year. Part Two will be sent to your WSU Email by mid-September and you will have approximately two and a half weeks to complete. Be sure to check your email around then and if you have any questions, please contact Carla Stenulson. WSU S.A.F.E is an online, non-opinionated alcohol and drug educational program. Whether you drink or not, this program will help you make well-informed decisions about alcohol and better manage the drinking behavior that may occur around you. The University cares for your health and safety. We promote responsible decision mak-ing by our students, so all incoming freshmen are required to complete WSU S.A.F.E. Winona State University is deeply committed to the health, welfare, and ultimate success and happiness of all members of our community. We hope that you find the course helpful and instructive on this important journey. Career Services, Maxwell 314 Student Union, Kryzsko Commons Warrior Hub, Maxwell 222 Tutoring Services, Darrell Krueger Library 220

Freshmen News

Gale Lanning Director of Admissions 507.453.1443 Email

health & wellness services

06

Health & Wellness

ABOUT

Winona State University’s Health & Wellness Services collaborates with a variety of wellnessfocused clubs and organizations on campus to promote holistic wellness for Winona State students and Southeast Technical College students. These groups focus on peer-to-peer education on specific wellness related topics in order promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. If you are interested in working with Health & Wellness Services to join a Student-2-Student Communicator Group, please contact the Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant Shawnessy Mohawk. Email

Advocates The ealth & Wellness Advocate Club is hosting their third annual Family Weekend 5k Run/Walk on Sept. 21, 2013 at Lake Lodge in Winona, Minnesota. This e ent is held by Winona State’s wellness-based club as a healthy, fun activity for students and their families to participate in during Family Weekend at WSU. Since this event is held early in the day at the “big lake” near campus, families can enjoy the beautiful scenery of the Winona lakes and get some fresh air and exercise before participating in the remainder of the many other Family Weekend events. Event Details: - 5k Run/Walk -

$20 per participant

-

Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013

Sexual Health Awareness Group

-

Same-day Registration available at 8 a.m.

-

Packet pick-up and sign-in 8 – 8:45a.m.

Th oughout life, we make a series of choices, including sexual choices. Along the way, all of us need information, knowledge, and skills that will help us make sexual choices that support our values and beliefs. Semcac Clinic and SHAG are hosting a Get Talkin’ 1/2k Run/Walk focusing on the importance of getting conversations started, not only for our sexual health but our overall well-being. Join us on Sept. 14, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. at Winona State University’s Gazebo as we raise awareness of the importance of communication in all aspects of life! Shirts and raffle prizes are available for all participants.

-

Run/Walk begins at 9 a.m.

-

Registrants get a WSU Health & Wellness t-shirt

-

“Goodies” offe ed to all participants

SHAG

Registration is available online at: Semcac Website

Check out the event on Facebook: Facebook Event

- Runners, walkers, strollers and all family members welcome! Registration for the 5k is now open! Registration forms and more information can be found on our current events section on our website Heatlh Services

In 2012, every single person who signed up for the 5k attended the event, with nearly 100 additional same-day registration participants than we had anticipated! The e were several families who participated as a group, mother/daughter participants, father/son participants, and even a few canine family members as well! The ealth & Wellness Advocate Program is comprised of approximately 40 WSU and SE Tech students committed to promoting wellness and healthy lifestyles by modeling healthy choices to their peers. The Health & Wellness Advocates act as a resource for campus and community through educative events and presentations as well as weekly service hours conducted in The WELL. *Registration by Sept. 3 will guarantee a t-shirt. All registration forms received after Sept. 3 are not guaranteed a t-shirt, and t-shirts will be given on a first come first s ve basis on same day registration. For questions, please email healthpromotionga@winona.edu We look forward to seeing you during Family Weekend! Email

health & wellness services

Health & Wellness

ABOUT

Winona State University’s Health & Wellness Services collaborates with a variety of wellnessfocused clubs and organizations on campus to promote holistic wellness for Winona State students and Southeast Technical College students. These groups focus on peer-to-peer education on specific wellness related topics in order promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. If you are interested in working with Health & Wellness Services to join a Student-2-Student Communicator Group, please contact the Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant Shawnessy Mohawk. Email

Advocates The ealth & Wellness Advocate Club is hosting their third annual Family Weekend 5k Run/Walk on Sept. 21, 2013 at Lake Lodge in Winona, Minnesota. This e ent is held by Winona State’s wellness-based club as a healthy, fun activity for students and their families to participate in during Family Weekend at WSU. Since this event is held early in the day at the “big lake” near campus, families can enjoy the beautiful scenery of the Winona lakes and get some fresh air and exercise before participating in the remainder of the many other Family Weekend events. Event Details: - 5k Run/Walk

SHAG

- $20 per participant - Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013

Sexual Health Awareness Group

- Same-day Registration available at 8 a.m.

Th oughout life, we make a series of choices, including sexual choices. Along the way, all of us need information, knowledge, and skills that will help us make sexual choices that support our values and beliefs. Semcac Clinic and SHAG are hosting a Get Talkin’ 1/2k Run/Walk focusing on the importance of getting conversations started, not only for our sexual health but our overall well-being. Join us on Sept. 14, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. at Winona State University’s Gazebo as we raise awareness of the importance of communication in all aspects of life! Shirts and raffle pr es are available for all participants.

- Run/Walk begins at 9 a.m.

Registration is available online at: Semcac Website

Check out the event on Facebook: Facebook Event

- Packet pick-up and sign-in 8 – 8:45a.m.

- Registrants get a WSU Health & Wellness t-shirt - “Goodies” offe ed to all participants - Runners, walkers, strollers and all family members welcome! Registration for the 5k is now open! Registration forms and more information can be found on our current events section on our website Heatlh Services

In 2012, every single person who signed up for the 5k attended the event, with nearly 100 additional same-day registration participants than we had anticipated! The e were several families who participated as a group, mother/daughter participants, father/son participants, and even a few canine family members as well! The ealth & Wellness Advocate Program is comprised of approximately 40 WSU and SE Tech students committed to promoting wellness and healthy lifestyles by modeling healthy choices to their peers. The Health & Wellness Advocates act as a resource for campus and community through educative events and presentations as well as weekly service hours conducted in The WELL. *Registration by Sept. 3 will guarantee a t-shirt. All registration forms received after Sept. 3 are not guaranteed a t-shirt, and t-shirts will be given on a first come first s ve basis on same day registration. For questions, please email healthpromotionga@winona.edu We look forward to seeing you during Family Weekend! Email

health & wellness services

Intellectual

Shawnessy Mohawk, WSU Graduate Student, Organization Leadership

Active Minds:

Removing the Stigma that Surrounds Mental Health Issues Originating at the University of Pennsylvania, the Active Minds organization was founded in 2003 to promote dialogue and increase awareness about mental health on college campuses nation-wide. A Pledge of Non-Silence The creation Active Minds was inspired by Alison Malmon, junior at the University of Pennsylvania, after her older brother, Brian took his life. Brian was also a college student, who appeared very successful and actively involved on campus but had been facing depression and psychosis for several years. Concealed from his friends and family, many were not aware of the struggles that Brian had been facing. During the year prior to his suicide, Brian finally sought help and received treatment for his diagnosis. Although he battled mental illness, Brian was not able to find relief from his depression and ended his life. Alison recognized that discussing mental health issues was not common among her peers. Therefore, she pledged to change the conversation around mental health and encourage students everywhere to seek help when needed. Active Minds was then established and within the last ten years, nearly four hundred chapters have been created on campuses nationwide, with twelve on Minnesota campuses so far. WSU’s need for Active Minds Chapter In a recent American College Health Association survey published in Fall 2012, 44.6 percent of students felt that things were hopeless in the last 12 months while 59.5 percent felt very sad during that time frame. During the first year of college, many students encounter several of these feelings as they embark on a new journey in their lives. The transition is often accompanied by feelings of being overwhelmed, exhaustion, and loneliness, which may be carried throughout their academic career.

Wellzine

September 2013

In the United States, suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. With that being said, only 6.9 percent of students reported seriously considering suicide while 1.2 percent attempted suicide in the last 12 months. Although those numbers sound relatively low, Active Minds organization recognizes that there is a stigma around mental health and many students are not openly discussing these issues. With the support of Winona State University’s Counseling and Wellness Services, WSU students Claire Stephens, Lauren Allen, and several others took charge in early April 2013 to begin the process of creating an Active Minds Chapter here at Winona State. “When I heard about this [Active Minds], it really inspired me to get involved and make a difference on our campus”, Stephens said. “Active Minds is something that I am very supportive of, and some of my past experiences and friendships have made me want to advocate for mental health”. Meetings were held, ideas were shared, and a Facebook group called “Active Minds WSU Chapter” was created to raise interest in the topic. Stephens and Allen actively encouraged students to become involved in this student run chapter on campus and to change the way they think about mental health. “Students shouldn’t feel scared or ashamed to ask for help and that is what I hope Active Minds will do on this campus,” Allen said. The Active Minds WSU Chapter is now in the final stages of becoming an official campus club and the already have 42 members. Soon Winona State will join hundreds of other universities across the nation by having a student-led mental health awareness group dedicated to: raising awareness about mental health, promoting

positive mental health and wellness, educating students and administrators about the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders and encouraging students who are struggling to reach out and seek help. If you are interested in expanding your intellectual wellness and utilize creativity to open students’ perception of mental health, contact the Active Minds WSU Chapter club President, Claire Stephens. Their first eeting is Monday, September 9 at 6 p.m., in the Integrated Wellness Complex Room 145. A letter from our WSU Counselor, Mick Lynch In my 17 years as a mental health professional, I have had the privilege of working in numerous mental health settings with many amazing individuals. But amongst all the positive and empowering things I have encountered, I have also witnessed the derogatory comments, labels, misunderstandings and myths. I have seen what this does to individuals, families, and communities… and this hurts. Yet I have much hope! As a psychologist on this campus, and more importantly a person who cares, it is my goal to help remove any barrier that may get in the way

of students being socially, academically, and personally successful. Lack of awareness and understanding, subtle or obvious stigma and discrimination, and a culture of silence are all barriers for individuals with mental illness. I am committed to the success of all students and therefore passionately make it my personal and professional quest to be a voice for and with those with mental illness and to change the negative culture and attitudes surrounding it. And that is why I am genuinely excited, extraordinarily proud, and extremely optimistic about the start of Active Minds here at WSU, and I strongly encourage everyone to get involved. For far too long I have imagined the changes that an organization like this can make. It’s time to stop imagining, get to work, and create something extraordinary! And finall , to individuals coping with mental illness, to those who support and encourage them, and to all of those dedicated to advocacy, I look to you with respect, admiration, and unremitting hope…and I give you thanks!

Out of the Darkness Community Walk

Sponsored by Winona State University’s Counseling and Wellness Services September 29, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. Lake Lodge, Winona, MN The Out of the Darkness Community Walks are three to five mile walks taking place in hundreds of communities across the country this year with the proceeds benefiting the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. By walking in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk, you will be walking with thousands of other walkers nationwide to raise money for AFSP’s vital research and education programs to prevent suicide, increase national awareness about

depression and suicide, and provide support for survivors of suicide loss. In deciding to walk you are taking us a step closer to making suicide prevention a national priority. Registration is available online until September 27th, at 1:00 pm. If you have any questions about the walk or registration please contact Kelly Kirby, WSU Counselor.

health & wellness services

Intellectual

Shawnessy Mohawk, WSU Graduate Student, Organization Leadership

Active Minds:

Removing the Stigma that Surrounds Mental Health Issues Originating at the University of Pennsylvania, the Active Minds organization was founded in 2003 to promote dialogue and increase awareness about mental health on college campuses nation-wide. A Pledge of Non-Silence The c eation Active Minds was inspired by Alison Malmon, junior at the University of Pennsylvania, after her older brother, Brian took his life. Brian was also a college student, who appeared very successful and actively involved on campus but had been facing depression and psychosis for several years. Concealed from his friends and family, many were not aware of the struggles that Brian had been facing. During the year prior to his suicide, Brian finally sought help and eceived treatment for his diagnosis. Although he battled mental illness, Brian was not able to find elief from his depression and ended his life. Alison recognized that discussing mental health issues was not common among her peers. The efore, she pledged to change the conversation around mental health and encourage students everywhere to seek help when needed. Active Minds was then established and within the last ten years, nearly four hundred chapters have been created on campuses nationwide, with twelve on Minnesota campuses so far. WSU’s need for Active Minds Chapter In a recent American College Health Association survey published in Fall 2012, 44.6 percent of students felt that things were hopeless in the last 12 months while 59.5 percent felt very sad during that time frame. During the first ear of college, many students encounter several of these feelings as they embark on a new journey in their lives. The transition is often accompanied y feelings of being overwhelmed, exhaustion, and loneliness, which may be carried throughout their academic career.

Wellzine

September 2013

In the United States, suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. With that being said, only 6.9 percent of students reported seriously considering suicide while 1.2 percent attempted suicide in the last 12 months. Although those numbers sound relatively low, Active Minds organization recognizes that there is a stigma around mental health and many students are not openly discussing these issues. With the support of Winona State University’s Counseling and Wellness Services, WSU students Claire Stephens, Lauren Allen, and several others took charge in early April 2013 to begin the process of creating an Active Minds Chapter here at Winona State. “When I heard about this [Active Minds], it really inspired me to get involved and make a diffe ence on our campus”, Stephens said. “Active Minds is something that I am very supportive of, and some of my past experiences and friendships have made me want to advocate for mental health”. Meetings were held, ideas were shared, and a Facebook group called “Active Minds WSU Chapter” was created to raise interest in the topic. Stephens and Allen actively encouraged students to become involved in this student run chapter on campus and to change the way they think about mental health. “Students shouldn’t feel scared or ashamed to ask for help and that is what I hope Active Minds will do on this campus,” Allen said. The ctive Minds WSU Chapter is now in the final stages of becoming an official campus club and the already have 42 members. Soon Winona State will join hundreds of other universities across the nation by having a student-led mental health awareness group dedicated to: raising awareness about mental health, promoting

positive mental health and wellness, educating students and administrators about the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders and encouraging students who are struggling to reach out and seek help. If you are interested in expanding your intellectual wellness and utilize creativity to open students’ perception of mental health, contact the Active Minds WSU Chapter club President, Claire Stephens. Their first Meeting is Monday, September 9 at 6 p.m., in the Integrated Wellness Complex Room 145. A letter from our WSU Counselor, Mick Lynch In my 17 years as a mental health professional, I have had the privilege of working in numerous mental health settings with many amazing individuals. But amongst all the positive and empowering things I have encountered, I have also witnessed the derogatory comments, labels, misunderstandings and myths. I have seen what this does to individuals, families, and communities… and this hurts. Yet I have much hope! As a psychologist on this campus, and more importantly a person who cares, it is my goal to help remove any barrier that may get in the way

of students being socially, academically, and personally successful. Lack of awareness and understanding, subtle or obvious stigma and discrimination, and a culture of silence are all barriers for individuals with mental illness. I am committed to the success of all students and therefore passionately make it my personal and professional quest to be a voice for and with those with mental illness and to change the negative culture and attitudes surrounding it. And that is why I am genuinely excited, extraordinarily proud, and extremely optimistic about the start of Active Minds here at WSU, and I strongly encourage everyone to get involved. For far too long Ihave imagined the changes that an organization like this can make. It’s time to stop imagining, get to work, and create something extraordinary! And finall , to individuals coping with mental illness, to those who support and encourage them, and to all of those dedicated to advocacy, I look to you with respect, admiration, and unremitting hope…and I give you thanks!

Out of the Darkness Community Walk

Sponsored by Winona State University’s Counseling and Wellness Services September 29, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. Lake Lodge, Winona, MN The Out of the Darkness Community Walks are three to five mile walks taking place in hundreds of communities across the country this year with the proceeds benefiting the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. By walking in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk, you will be walking with thousands of other walkers nationwide to raise money for AFSP’s vital research and education programs to prevent suicide, increase national awareness about

depression and suicide, and provide support for survivors of suicide loss. In deciding to walk you are taking us a step closer to making suicide prevention a national priority. Registration is available online until September 27th, at 1:00 pm. If you have any questions about the walk or registration please contact Kelly Kirby, WSU Counselor.

health & wellness services

Kim Schneider, WSUSophmore, Mass Communications Photojournalism and English

Yoga, Mindfulness, & Living in the Present

Starting Monday, September 9 the Mindfulness Meditation Group begins in Memorial Hall, Room 300. The group meets Noon-12:50 p.m. and is instructed by Gretchen Cohenour. Each session focuses on mindfulness meditation and includes both sitting and walking meditation. This individual time is followed by a guided group practice. Stop in Memorial Hall and give it a try!

“Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.” -Buddha Many first timers at oga class wonder the same things: What’s with all this deep breathing? What is chaturanga and why does it hurt my arms so much? Am I supposed to be that flexible At first yoga can be confusing, a bit painful, and hard to follow. However, yoga teaches concepts like mindfulness, meditation, and the importance of a connection between the body and the mind. Yoga offers two concepts pa ticularly useful for college students—the ideas of mindfulness and being present. In college it is incredibly easy to worry about the future with approaching project deadlines, exams, and trying to build your resume for a dream job. Although it’s important to consider your future, living like this isn’t always healthy and can increase anxiety and stress.

The ogic concept of living in the present forces your brain to focus on the here and now with each inhale, exhale, and warrior pose. Slowing down your heart rate and concentrating on each minor movement brings your mind into the present. All those other stressful obligations fade into the background. Similarly, many people use meditation for relaxation. In fact, Mayo clinic suggests that meditation may prevent disease as well as help conditions such as: allergies, binge eating, fatigue, high blood pressure, sleep problems, and substance abuse. Mindfulness is a concept practiced in yoga that is helpful for college students who are under a lot of stress.

To be mindful means to be completely present in the moment, not caught up in worry, anticipation, or daydreams. It is also about the recognition of the interconnection between mind and body. Mindfulness is a teaching that goes back to ancient Buddhist practices. In Buddhism, mindfulness is seen as a path to enlightenment. The e are four types: mindfulness of the body, sensations, mental processes, and mental objects. These things help ou become fully aware of the body and mind.

On Mondays and Wednesdays at 4 p.m. Yogilates is offered in the IWC, room 127. Yogilates is a combination of yoga and Pilates designed to strengthen the mind and body by focusing on core. Yoga Sculpt is a class more focused on increasing physical strength through yogabased moves. For more information, pick up a Fitness class schedule at the IWC desk next to the gym entrance.

Mindfulness yoga combines the physical aspect of yoga and the emotional aspect of meditation.

Spiritual

It works to develop awareness, attention, and concentration to oneself and our personal needs. These a e easy to forget about when you get caught up in a busy college schedule. Focusing on your inner well being once and a while helps your mind to accurately assess daily issues.

Wellzine

Want to give yoga a go? The ntegrated Wellness Center offers two oga-based classes.

September 2013

health & wellness services

Kim Schneider, WSUSophmore, Mass Communications Photojournalism and English

Yoga, Mindfulness, & Living in the Present

Starting Monday, September 9 the Mindfulness Meditation Group begins in Memorial Hall, Room 300. The group meets Noon-12:50 p.m. and is instructed by Gretchen Cohenour. Each session focuses on mindfulness meditation and includes both sitting and walking meditation. This individual time is followed by a guided group practice. Stop in Memorial Hall and give it a try!

“Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.” -Buddha Many first timers at oga class wonder the same things: What’s with all this deep breathing? What is chaturanga and why does it hurt my arms so much? Am I supposed to be that flexible At first oga can be confusing, a bit painful, and hard to follow. However, yoga teaches concepts like mindfulness, meditation, and the importance of a connection between the body and the mind. Yoga offers two concepts pa ticularly useful for college students—the ideas of mindfulness and being present. In college it is incredibly easy to worry about the future with approaching project deadlines, exams, and trying to build your resume for a dream job. Although it’s important to consider your future, living like this isn’t always healthy and can increase anxiety and stress.

The ogic concept of living in the present forces your brain to focus on the here and now with each inhale, exhale, and warrior pose. Slowing down your heart rate and concentrating on each minor movement brings your mind into the present. All those other stressful obligations fade into the background. Similarly, many people use meditation for relaxation. In fact, Mayo clinic suggests that meditation may prevent disease as well as help conditions such as: allergies, binge eating, fatigue, high blood pressure, sleep problems, and substance abuse. Mindfulness is a concept practiced in yoga that is helpful for college students who are under a lot of stress.

To be mindful means to be completely present in the moment, not caught up in worry, anticipation, or daydreams. It is also about the recognition of the interconnection between mind and body. Mindfulness is a teaching that goes back to ancient Buddhist practices. In Buddhism, mindfulness is seen as a path to enlightenment. There are four types: mindfulness of the body, sensations, mental processes, and mental objects. These things help you become fully aware of the body and mind.

On Mondays and Wednesdays at 4 p.m. Yogilates is offered in the IWC, room 127. Yogilates is a combination of yoga and Pilates designed to strengthen the mind and body by focusing on core. Yoga Sculpt is a class more focused on increasing physical strength through yoga-based moves. For more information, pick up a Fitness class schedule at the IWC desk next to the gym entrance.

Mindfulness yoga combines the physical aspect of yoga and the emotional aspect of meditation.

Spiritual

It works to develop awareness, attention, and concentration to oneself and our personal needs. These are easy to forget about when you get caught up in a busy college schedule. Focusing on your inner well being once and a while helps your mind to accurately assess daily issues. Want to give yoga a go? The ntegrated Wellness Center offers two oga-based classes.

Wellzine

September 2013

health & wellness services

Emotional

Nicole Lundgren, WSU Alumni, Health Promotion

We are here for you: The New Gender Based Violence Helpline

“So this last weekend I saw this girl at market, I thought she was hot, so I followed her to Erbs and Gerbs and sat with her like a creep. She was too wasted to realize she had no idea who I was, so she started talking to me like we were friends. She was so drunk that when I asked if she wanted to come home with me she said yes, so I took her home with me. This girl was such a freak that she asked me to tie her up, and I did, with my tie. We were both so drunk that we did some pretty freaky stuff and when I woke up in the morning she was gone…and so was my wallet.” A student wrote this quote anonymously on a confessions page. The student blatantly stated that they were being a creep and followed the girl, who was obviously impaired by alcohol. Although the girl agreed to go home with the student, it is important to note that if you are drunk you cannot legally give consent. Winona State University’s Health and Wellness Services have handled several sexual assaults in the past few years. For instances like this, WSU created a 24-hour helpline in January of 2013 for those affected y Gender Based Violence. Gender Based Violence is defined as violence that encompasses physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and verbal abuse. This includes: domestic violence, sexual abuse, traditional

Wellzine

September 2013

practices harmful to women such as honor killings, and genital mutilation targeted towards a person because of his or her socially constructed gender role.

Although gender based violence includes all of these, it generally focuses on those who have experienced domestic violence, sexual assault, or those who have been stalked. The sto y above is a great example of every day encounters that might lead to sexual assault. However, many people do not recognize these situations as sexual assault because most people think of it as a stranger jumping out of a dark alley and raping you. Although stranger rapes are a stereotype of sexual assault, they are least likely to occur. Most often the predator is someone you know, a close friend, acquaintance, or even a boyfriend. As a community, it is important to address Gender Based Violence because it can be a very traumatic experience. Victims can undergo physical, psychological, and emotional trauma. In fact, according to the World Health Organization, Gender Based Violence can lead to depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, sleep difficulties, eating disorders, emotional distress, and suicide attempts.

In order to adequately help victims of Gender Based Violence certified ad ocates, who have had 40 hours of training, will answer the helpline. Advocates can give options for what to do next, where to go, and who to see. The Integrated Wellness Center has a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner, who can do a sexual assault examination right in the clinic on campus.

WSU wants to create a safer community of learners. If you are out with friends, keep an eye on each other—watch for things like the story above. If you notice someone who is really intoxicated and someone else is trying to take him or her home, speak up.

The WRC is also tied to the Gender Based Violence helpline. If someone were to call and the advocate couldn’t pick up, their call would be directed to the Women’s Resource Center where one of their advocates could help.

Please don’t be afraid to speak out or call for help. All of WSU’s staff and ad ocates want the best for students and they encourage the use of the helpline. The ender Based Violence helpline can be reached at: (507)-457-5610.

Want to get more involved? Join Embrace, a student organization “If you notice someone who is really that promotes knowlWSU is also closely intoxicated and someone else is trying to edge and awareness partnered with the about Gender Based Women’s Resource take him or her home, speak up.” Violence. Or maybe the Center, located at 77 Women’s Resource Center is more your cup of East Fifth Street. Their mission is to c eate a tea—they are always looking for more volunsafer community by eliminating sexual and domestic violence. They a e available to anyone teers. After all, it takes a community to create a more respectful environment. who has experienced these kinds of violence.

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® Winona on Oct. 5th! The walk is an International Men’s March to End Rape, Sexual Assault, and Gender Violence. Hosted by Winona’s Women’s Resource Center, the Walk is a great opportunity to create awareness and rally the community to prevent violence. All proceeds from the march will help local victims and survivors of sexual and domestic violence served by Women’s Resource Center. Ask your friends, family, and coworkers to help you end the cycle of violence by making a pledge and/or joining the walk. Event details and registration can be found on Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® Official Facebook Page.

health & wellness services

Emotional

Nicole Lundgren, WSU Alumni, Health Promotion

We are here for you: The New Gender Based Violence Helpline

“So this last weekend I saw this girl at market, I thought she was hot, so I followed her to Erbs and Gerbs and sat with her like a creep. She was too wasted to realize she had no idea who I was, so she started talking to me like we were friends. She was so drunk that when I asked if she wanted to come home with me she said yes, so I took her home with me. This girl was such a freak that she asked me to tie her up, and I did, with my tie. We were both so drunk that we did some pretty freaky stuff and when I woke up in the morning she was gone…and so was my wallet.” A student wrote this quote anonymously on a confessions page. The student blatantly stated that they were being a creep and followed the girl, who was obviously impaired by alcohol. Although the girl agreed to go home with the student, it is important to note that if you are drunk you cannot legally give consent. Winona State University’s Health and Wellness Services have handled several sexual assaults in the past few years. For instances like this, WSU created a 24-hour helpline in January of 2013 for those affected y Gender Based Violence. Gender Based Violence is defined as violence that encompasses physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and verbal abuse. This includes: domestic violence, sexual abuse, traditional

Wellzine

September 2013

practices harmful to women such as honor killings, and genital mutilation targeted towards a person because of his or her socially constructed gender role. Although gender based violence includes all of these, it generally focuses on those who have experienced domestic violence, sexual assault, or those who have been stalked. The sto y above is a great example of every day encounters that might lead to sexual assault. However, many people do not recognize these situations as sexual assault because most people think of it as a stranger jumping out of a dark alley and raping you. Although stranger rapes are a stereotype of sexual assault, they are least likely to occur. Most often the predator is someone you know, a close friend, acquaintance, or even a boyfriend. As a community, it is important to address Gender Based Violence because it can be a very traumatic experience. Victims can undergo physical, psychological, and emotional trauma. In fact, according to the World Health Organization, Gender Based Violence can lead to depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep difficulties, eating dis ders, emotional distress, and suicide attempts. For more information visit their website: (http://who.int/mediacentre/ factsheets/fs239/en/index.html)

In order to adequately help victims of Gender Based Violence certified advocates, who have had 40 hours of training, will answer the helpline. Advocates can give options for what to do next, where to go, and who to see. The Integrated Wellness Center has a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner, who can do a sexual assault examination right in the clinic on campus.

WSU wants to create a safer community of learners. If you are out with friends, keep an eye on each other—watch for things like the story above. If you notice someone who is really intoxicated and someone else is trying to take him or her home, speak up.

The WRC is also tied to the Gender Based Violence helpline. If someone were to call and the advocate couldn’t pick up, their call would be directed to the Women’s Resource Center where one of their advocates could help.

Please don’t be afraid to speak out or call for help. All of WSU’s staff and ad ocates want the best for students and they encourage the use of the helpline. The ender Based Violence helpline can be reached at: (507)-457-5610.

Want to get more involved? Join Embrace, a student organization “If you notice someone who is really that promotes knowlWSU is also closely intoxicated and someone else is trying to edge and awareness partnered with the about Gender Based Women’s Resource take him or her home, speak up.” Violence. Or maybe the Center, located at 77 Women’s Resource Center is more your cup of East Fifth Street. Their mission is to c eate a tea—they are always looking for more volunsafer community by eliminating sexual and domestic violence. They a e available to anyone teers. After all, it takes a community to create a more respectful environment. who has experienced these kinds of violence.

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® Winona on Oct. 5th! The walk is an International Men’s March to End Rape, Sexual Assault, and Gender Violence. Hosted by Winona’s Women’s Resource Center, the Walk is a great opportunity to create awareness and rally the community to prevent violence. All proceeds from the march will help local victims and survivors of sexual and domestic violence served by Women’s Resource Center. Ask your friends, family, and coworkers to help you end the cycle of violence by making a pledge and/or joining the walk. Event details and registration can be found on Walk a Mile in Her Shoes® Official Facebook Page.

health & wellness services

Environmental

Kim Schneider, WSUSophmore, Mass Communications Photojournalism and English

Not only is the produce healthier for you, but buying from farmers markets also helps support local farmers.

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

On a humid August morning, no one wants to venture too far away from air conditioning. However, many people do this every weekend at the Winona Farmers Market, where the scents of flowers, baked goods, vegetables, and fruits can be smelled upon arrival. The farmers market, located on Second Street and Main Street North, meets every Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to noon and Wednesday’s 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. from early May to the end of October. Each week, 44 local growers make a trek to the farmers market in order to sell produce. Produce ranges from: fruits, veggies, nuts, herbs, eggs, honey, syrups, baked goods, meats, flowers, bedding, and house plants. Although it may seem easier to make a run to Walmart or Hy-Vee, shopping at farmers markets has many benefits for your body, local producers, and the local economy. Products at farmers markets are produced differently from those at the grocery store. For instance, items like fruits and vegetables at grocery stores are bought in bulk from commercial farms.

Wellzine

Commercial farms often use chemical fertilizer, insecticides, and chemical herbicides in order to promote growth and kill pests. Local farmers tend to use natural fertilizers; therefore, you do not ingest those harmful chemicals used by commercial farmers when consuming produce from a farmers market. Farmers markets also guarantee product freshness. Produce in grocery stores has often been shipped for days at a time in order to get to their shelves.

Since local farmers grow, pick, and sell their own food, there is no middleman. In this way, farmers are able to set prices that are fair to both them and the consumer. Farmers markets also stimulate the local economy. Since they occur regularly in the same place, farmers markets attract consumers into a certain area of the community. In doing so, they bring business to local shops and companies in the surrounding area. It’s a win-win situation for everyone. Take a walk downtown this Saturday morning or Wednesday evening. Maybe buy red potatoes for tonight’s meal or a bouquet of fl wers for your sweetheart. Either way, you are helping your community and your local farmers will appreciate it.

For more information on farmers markets, visit: http://farmersmarketcoalition.org

According to the Farmers Market Coalition, 85 percent of vendors at farmers markets travel less than 50 miles in order to sell their produce. Food loses nutritional value during that travel time between harvest and reaching grocery stores. Since farmers are local, that waiting period is much less and therefore, your body gets more nutritional value out of their produce. Furthermore, when you buy nonorganic eggs from the store, they have come from chickens that have been given antibiotics and growth hormones. This is another downside of commercial farming. When you consume eggs from a local farm, these chickens have been feed with natural food so that when you digest these eggs, you are not also consuming those things you didn’t sign up for—antibiotics and growth hormones. Above: Sophmore Grace Pesch Shops for jam.

September 2013

health & wellness services

Environmental

Kim Schneider, WSUSophmore, Mass Communications Photojournalism and English

Not only is the produce healthier for you, but buying from farmers markets also helps support local farmers.

Winona Farmers Market: Better Food for Thought

On a humid August morning, no one wants to venture too far away from air conditioning. However, many people do this every weekend at the Winona Farmers Market, where the scents of fl wers, baked goods, vegetables, and fruits can be smelled upon arrival. The farmers ma ket, located on Second Street and Main Street North, meets every Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to noon and Wednesday’s 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. from early May to the end of October. Each week, 44 local growers make a trek to the farmers market in order to sell produce. Produce ranges from: fruits, veggies, nuts, herbs, eggs, honey, syrups, baked goods, meats, fl wers, bedding, and house plants. Although it may seem easier to make a run to Walmart or Hy-Vee, shopping at farmers markets has many benefits for our body, local producers, and the local economy. Products at farmers markets are produced diffe ently from those at the grocery store. For instance, items like fruits and vegetables at grocery stores are bought in bulk from commercial farms. Com-

Wellzine

mercial farms often use chemical fertilizer, insecticides, and chemical herbicides in order to promote growth and kill pests. Local farmers tend to use natural fertilizers; therefore, you do not ingest those harmful chemicals used by commercial farmers when consuming produce from a farmers market. Farmers markets also guarantee product freshness. Produce in grocery stores has often been shipped for days at a time in order to get to their shelves.

Since local farmers grow, pick, and sell their own food, there is no middleman. In this way, farmers are able to set prices that are fair to both them and the consumer. Farmers markets also stimulate the local economy. Since they occur regularly in the same place, farmers markets attract consumers into a certain area of the community. In doing so, they bring business to local shops and companies in the surrounding area. It’s a win-win situation for everyone. Take a walk downtown this Saturday morning or Wednesday evening. Maybe buy red potatoes for tonight’s meal or a bouquet of flowers for your sweetheart. Either way, you are helping your community and your local farmers will appreciate it.

For more information on farmers markets, visit: http://farmersmarketcoalition.org

According to the Farmers Market Coalition, 85 percent of vendors at farmers markets travel less than 50 miles in order to sell their produce. Food loses nutritional value during that travel time between harvest and reaching grocery stores. Since farmers are local, that waiting period is much less and therefore, your body gets more nutritional value out of their produce. Furthermore, when you buy nonorganic eggs from the store, they have come from chickens that have been given antibiotics and growth hormones. This is another d wnside of commercial farming. When you consume eggs from a local farm, these chickens have been feed with natural food so that when you digest these eggs, you are not also consuming those things you didn’t sign up for—antibiotics and growth hormones. Above: Sophmore Grace Pesch Shops for jam.

September 2013

health & wellness services

Does the Media affect

Body Image?

We are exposed to the media every single day and it influences us in many ways. If you pick up a magazine, you will see hundreds of ads: some feature cars, beauty products, but most feature people. Body image is an issue that we are faced with everyday. Whether we confront this issue through advertisements, admiring others, or examining our own body, the media feeds on the idea of the ideal body image. This idea regularly highlights handsome men, beautiful women, and what it means to be successful in our society.

Jamie Hayes, WSU Senior, Nursing

Many men are influenced to look like the men that they see in advertisements—the thin but muscularly built man. Similarly, many women are influenced to look like the images that they see of extremely thin models, even if they are of average size, shape, and build. In order for these companies to warp our self-image, they create unrealistic images using Photoshop. Photoshop is a popular and commonly used tool in the media. This tool is used to edit “flaws” or “faults” in a photograph. Danielle Barck, a Winona State University alumnus, was struck by the way media influences us. In particular, she was drawn to the Dove Campaign.

Social

“I grew up more quickly than girls around me, and at a very young age I was constantly comparing myself to others believing that I was overweight etc… Throughout my life as well, seeing models with “perfect” bodies never helped my self-esteem.  Sadly, even after learning just how much images of people are altered to look perfect, I still catch myself and other women comparing ourselves to something that isn’t even real.  I wanted to inspire girls to see just how unrealistic our expectations can be,” Barck said.

Wellzine

Barck did this project to demonstrate that natural beauty is beyond what the media portrays. “We don’t realize just how beautiful we really are,” said Barck. Barck began taking pictures of herself and others; she then used Photoshop to edit the original images in ways that are used daily by the media. “I asked myself and other girls: ‘what would you change about yourself?’ I then Photo-shopped the photos to fit their description of how they would perfect their flaws.  In the end, the photo looks nothing like that person and so unreal that people would look at them and think ‘that’s just unnatural’,” Barck said. Opposite: Images from Barck’s series Top another before and after Below: Barck included herself in the series

“Often times we idolize images of “perfect” men and women to the point that we start believing we are inferior. Nobody is perfect; there is literally no such thing.  Cherish who you are because the world believes you are more beautiful than you even realize,” said Barck. To see more of Barck’s work visit her Facebook Page

As a response to the Dove Campaign, Barck decided to utilize this approach to reveal how much the media changes an original image in order to portray beauty. September 2013

health & wellness services

Does the Media affect

Body Image?

We are exposed to the media every single day and it influences us in many ways. f you pick up a magazine, you will see hundreds of ads: some feature cars, beauty products, but most feature people. Body image is an issue that we are faced with everyday. Whether we confront this issue through advertisements, admiring others, or examining our own body, the media feeds on the idea of the ideal body image. This idea regularly highlights handsome men, beautiful women, and what it means to be successful in our society.

Jamie Hayes, WSU Senior, Nursing

Many men are influenced to look like the men that they see in advertisements—the thin but muscularly built man. Similarly, many women are influenced to look like the images that they see of extremely thin models, even if they are of average size, shape, and build. In order for these companies to warp our self-image, they create unrealistic images using Photoshop. Photoshop is a popular and commonly used tool in the media. This tool is used to edit “fla ” or “faults” in a photograph. Danielle Barck, a Winona State University alumnus, was struck by the way media influences us. n particular, she was drawn to the Dove Campaign.

Social

“I grew up more quickly than girls around me, and at a very young age I was constantly comparing myself to others believing that I was overweight etc… Th oughout my life as well, seeing models with “perfect” bodies never helped my self-esteem.  Sadly, even after learning just how much images of people are altered to look perfect, I still catch myself and other women comparing ourselves to something that isn’t even real.  I wanted to inspire girls to see just how unrealistic our expectations can be,” Barck said.

Wellzine

Barck did this project to demonstrate that natural beauty is beyond what the media portrays. “We don’t realize just how beautiful we really are,” said Barck. Barck began taking pictures of herself and others; she then used Photoshop to edit the original images in ways that are used daily by the media. “I asked myself and other girls: ‘what would you change about yourself?’ I then Photo-shopped the photos to fit their description of how they would perfect their flaws.  In the end, the photo looks nothing like that person and so unreal that people would look at them and think ‘that’s just unnatural’,” Barck said. Opposite: Images from Barck’s series Top another before and after Below: Barck included herself in the series

“Often times we idolize images of “perfect” men and women to the point that we start believing we are inferior. Nobody is perfect; there is literally no such thing.  Cherish who you are because the world believes you are more beautiful than you even realize,” said Barck. To see more of Barck’s work visit her Facebook Page

As a response to the Dove Campaign, Barck decided to utilize this approach to reveal how much the media changes an original image in order to portray beauty. September 2013

health & wellness services

Shawnessy Mohawk, WSU Graduate Student, Organization Leadership

Occupational

Gain Real-World Experience Prior to Graduation Internships, practicums, and on-campus jobs are typical ways for students to gain practical experience prior to entering the workforce. They provide hands-on opportunities for students to hone in on required skill sets for prospective occupations.

during college. Winona State University recognizes that hands-on experience is vital to the future success of students. WSU is dedicated to providing students with numerous opportunities to attain important traits and skills in today’s business environments.

However, students usually obtain these positions toward the end of their academic careers. Required qualifications and trainings may not be met when applying for positions following graduation. According to a recent article in The Wall Street Journal, the Association of American Colleges and Universities found that “Only one in four employers think that twoand four-year colleges are doing a good job preparing students for the global economy”.

WSU’s Warrior Success Center supports students in this endeavor with advising, career and access services. They actively collaborate with WSU Departments, programs and outside community partners to provide free acces-sible services and resources for student success. In addition, WSU has over 180 clubs and student organizations available for students with some areas focused in advocacy, culture and diversity, and special interests. All student clubs and organizations give students an op-portunity to connect and network with others, develop their leadership skills and improve key communication skills.

While many academic degrees and courses address hypothetical situations and may require internships and practicums, students may not be presented with the practical experience needed for potential jobs. AAC&U suggests that areas for improvement for students include all of the following; written and oral communication, critical thinking and analytic reasoning, the application of knowledge and skills in real-world settings, complex problem solving, ethical decision making, and teamwork skills. The ealm of real–world experience is vast, especially

Wellzine

September 2013

Above: Image from the Well, a wellness conference at held at WSU in July, 2013. Opposite: More images from the Well conference

Alumni Whitney Sizer. ”I was also able to grow as a leader and a role model on campus!” The e are many other opportunities for students to gain experience and skills at WSU that include but are not limited to: Warrior Leads, Community Impact Program, and Camp Wellstone. In the upcoming year nearly 200 U.S. colleges and universities will be taking a new assessment, the Collegiate Learning Assessment, to reveal how prepared students are following college.

The test is administe ed as part of a nation-wide movement to assess skills of recent graduates. Institutions can decide whether or not to participate in the performance assessment. In addition, The Wall Street Journal states that President Barack Obama wants the federal government to develop a similar assessment to address student outcomes based on respective college performance. Depending on your professional goals and aspirations, gaining experience prior to graduation sounds like it is becoming a national expectation. Whether you are a first year or a super senior, your time to get involved is now!

These are available for student membership starting freshman year, where practical skills can be acquired throughout a student’s four or five years with WSU. Many clubs and organizations are opening membership to students at Southeast Technical College as well. “[The Health & Wellness Advocate Club] provided me with so many great opportunities to network with the WSU staff and my peers” said WSU health & wellness services

Shawnessy Mohawk, WSU Graduate Student, Organization Leadership

Occupational

Gain Real-World Experience Prior to Graduation Internships, practicums, and on-campus jobs are typical ways for students to gain practical experience prior to entering the workforce. They p ovide hands-on opportunities for students to hone in on required skill sets for prospective occupations.

during college. Winona State University recognizes that hands-on experience is vital to the future success of students. WSU is dedicated to providing students with numerous opportunities to attain important traits and skills in today’s business environments.

However, students usually obtain these positions toward the end of their academic careers. Required qualifica tions and trainings may not be met when applying for positions following graduation. According to a recent article in The Wall Street Journal, the Association of American Colleges and Universities found that “Only one in four employers think that twoand four-year colleges are doing a good job preparing students for the global economy”.

WSU’s Warrior Success Center supports students in this endeavor with advising, career and access services. They actively collaborate with WSU Departments, programs and outside community partners to provide free accessible services and resources for student success.

While many academic degrees and courses address hypothetical situations and may require internships and practicums, students may not be presented with the practical experience needed for potential jobs. AAC&U suggests that areas for improvement for students include all of the following; written and oral communication, critical thinking and analytic reasoning, the application of knowledge and skills in real-world settings, complex problem solving, ethical decision making, and teamwork skills. The ealm of real–world experience is vast, especially

Wellzine

September 2013

In addition, WSU has over 180 clubs and student organizations available for students with some areas focused in advocacy, culture and diversity, and special interests. All student clubs and organizations give students an opportunity to connect and network with others, develop their leadership skills and improve key communication skills.

Above: Image from the Well, a wellness conference at held at WSU in July, 2013. Opposite: More images from the Well conference

Alumni Whitney Sizer. ”I was also able to grow as a leader and a role model on campus!” The e are many other opportunities for students to gain experience and skills at WSU that include but are not limited to: Warrior Leads, Community Impact Program, and Camp Wellstone. In the upcoming year nearly 200 U.S. colleges and universities will be taking a new assessment, the Collegiate Learning Assessment, to reveal how prepared students are following college.

The test is administered as part of a nation-wide movement to assess skills of recent graduates. Institutions can decide whether or not to participate in the performance assessment. In addition, The Wall Street Journal states that President Barack Obama wants the federal government to develop a similar assessment to address student outcomes based on respective college performance. Depending on your professional goals and aspirations, gaining experience prior to graduation sounds like it is becoming a national expectation. Whether you are a first year or a super senior, your time to get involved is now!

These a e available for student membership starting freshman year, where practical skills can be acquired throughout a student’s four or fi e years with WSU. Many clubs and organizations are opening membership to students at Southeast Technical College as well. “[The ealth & Wellness Advocate Club] provided me with so many great opportunities to network with the WSU staff and my peers” said WSU health & wellness services

Splishin’

and a

Carla Stenulson, Health & Wellness Promotion Graduate Assistant

Splashin’:

Health Benefits of Taking a Swim With the summer approaching its end, your opportunity to hop into a lake, river, or outdoor pool to enjoy some swimming is dwindling. However, you don’t need to let the approaching cool weather keep you from swimming! On Main Campus, the first floor of emorial Hall has a swimming pool free to all students for both lap swim and open swim year round. Likewise, West Campus has a swimming pool located in Lourdes hall, open during the academic year.

Memorial Pool Open Swim - Mon-Thurs 7:30-9:30P

Along with the far-reaching physical benefits of aerobic exercise, swimming also improves psychological wellness by promoting lower stress and higher spirits. Additionally, swimming can be a meditative form of exercise like yoga. While swimming is a cool, fun and relaxing experience, it also provides a plethora of benefits and is a great form of exercise. Take a dip in the pool and give it a try. Just stop by Memorial Hall with your official WSU ID during the designated swim times. There is a locker room and shower available for use as well. Additionally there are water aerobics classes, and private swimming lessons offered. Contact swimwsupool@yahoo.com with any questions!

- Friday 6-8PM - Saturday 2-5PM - Sunday 6-9PM Memorial Pool Lap Swim - Mon-Wed & Friday -11-2PM - Thursday- 11A

Physical

While many students utilize the Integrated Wellness Center’s workout facility to run, cycle, or lift their way to wellness, many forget about swimming as another route to improved physical health. Swimming offers a unique benefit that no other aerobic activity can do—exercise without the harsh impact to your skeletal system. When a person is submerged in water up to their neck, they only bear 10 percent of the bodies weight and the water is responsible for the other 90 percent. That being said, this low to no impact form of exercise is the best work out for those who are overweight or suffering from arthritis.

Swimming is the perfect exercise in resistance, which is a fabulous way to increase muscle tone and strength. Imagine a runner jogging around a track—there is little resistance. However with swimming, the water itself provides friction, so that every movement is a resistance exercise. Swimming is also a great way to improve flexibility. While exercise equipment in a gym attempts to isolate and work on one body part at a time, swimming puts the body through a broad range of motion. Although swimming naturally improves flexibility, it is also a great place to work on any tricky stretches. The support of the water will help you maintain balance longer for stretching positions that involve balance.

Lourdes Hall Pool Hours - Monday-Thursday 3-9P

Wellzine

- Saturday & Sunday 11-3PM

September 2013

Not only can swimming visibly improve your physical health by toning muscles and burning fat, it is also a great way to improve the most important muscle that we have—our heart! The American Heart Association reports that just 30 minutes of exercise per day can reduce blood pressure and the risk of coronary heart disease by 30-40 percent.

Reference: http://health.howstuffworks.com/ wellness/aging/retirement/10-health-benefits-ofswimming.htm

health & wellness services

Splishin’

and a

Carla Stenulson, Health & Wellness Promotion Graduate Assistant

Splashin’:

Health Benefits of Taking a Swim With the summer approaching its end, your opportunity to hop into a lake, river, or outdoor pool to enjoy some swimming is dwindling. However, you don’t need to let the approaching cool weather keep you from swimming! On Main Campus, the first floor of emorial Hall has a swimming pool free to all students for both lap swim and open swim year round. Likewise, West Campus has a swimming pool located in Lourdes hall, open during the academic year.

Memorial Pool Open Swim - Mon-Thurs 7:30-9:30P

Along with the far-reaching physical benefits of aerobic exercise, swimming also improves psychological wellness by promoting lower stress and higher spirits. Additionally, swimming can be a meditative form of exercise like yoga. While swimming is a cool, fun and relaxing experience, it also provides a plethora of benefits and is a great form of exercise. Take a dip in the pool and give it a try. Just stop by Memorial Hall with your official WSU ID during the designated swim times. There is a locker room and shower available for use as well. Additionally there are water aerobics classes, and private swimming lessons offered. Contact swimwsupool@yahoo.com with any questions

- Friday 6-8PM - Saturday 2-5PM - Sunday 6-9PM Memorial Pool Lap Swim - Mon-Wed & Friday -11-2PM - Thursday- 11A

Physical

While many students utilize the Integrated Wellness Center’s workout facility to run, cycle, or lift their way to wellness, many forget about swimming as another route to improved physical health. Swimming offers a unique benefit that no othe aerobic activity can do—exercise without the harsh impact to your skeletal system. When a person is submerged in water up to their neck, they only bear 10 percent of the bodies weight and the water is responsible for the other 90 percent. That being said, this low to no impact form of exercise is the best work out for those who are overweight or suffering from arthritis.

Swimming is the perfect exercise in resistance, which is a fabulous way to increase muscle tone and strength. Imagine a runner jogging around a track—there is little resistance. However with swimming, the water itself provides friction, so that every movement is a resistance exercise. Swimming is also a great way to improve flexibility. While exercise equipment in a gym attempts to isolate and work on one body part at a time, swimming puts the body through a broad range of motion. Although swimming naturally improves flexibility, it is also a great place to work on any tricky stretches. The support of the water will help you maintain balance longer for stretching positions that involve balance.

Lourdes Hall Pool Hours - Monday-Thursday 3-9P

Wellzine

- Saturday & Sunday 11-3PM

September 2013

Not only can swimming visibly improve your physical health by toning muscles and burning fat, it is also a great way to improve the most important muscle that we have—our heart! The American Heart Association reports that just 30 minutes of exercise per day can reduce blood pressure and the risk of coronary heart disease by 30-40 percent.

Reference: http://health.howstuffworks.com/ wellness/aging/retirement/10-health-benefits-ofswimming.htm

health & wellness services

Healthy alternatives

It’s morning, you’re tired, have to go to class, and don’t have time to make food or visit the caf. So what do you do? Food in a mug! It’s quick, self contained and delicious!

Apple Banana ‘Baked’ Oatmeal in a Mug Ingredients: 1/2 cup quick cooking oats 1 tbsp ground flax see 1 egg 1/2 cup milk  1/3 of a banana, mashed 1/4 tsp cinnamon 1/2 of an apple, chopped 2 tsp honey 

Want more food in a mug and/or jar? Then check this a esome page out: http://www.buzzfeed.com/arielknutson/delicious-snacks-in-a-mug

If you don’t have flax seeds you can substitute with ½ tablespoon of butter. First, get a microwave safe mug and add oats, flax, egg and milk. Next, stir the mix with a fork. Then add banana, cinnamon, apple and honey. Stir once more to get it fully combined. Now cook in microwave on high for two to three minutes. When it’s done, fluff it with a fork.

You can enjoy it plain or stir in a little milk, yogurt, or nut-butter if desired. You can find most of the ingredients at Midtown Foods, the Co-Op, or Rochester Whole Foods— all of which are in town and only a few blocks from main campus. Recpiee and image from Food & Whine: Foodwhine.com

Wellzine

September 2013

Images from Buzzfeed.com

! y o j n E

health & wellness services

Healthy alternatives

It’s morning, you’re tired, have to go to class, and don’t have time to make food or visit the caf. So what do you do? Food in a mug! It’s quick, self contained and delicious!

Apple Banana ‘Baked’ Oatmeal in a Mug Ingredients: 1/2 cup quick cooking oats 1 tbsp ground flax see 1 egg 1/2 cup milk  1/3 of a banana, mashed 1/4 tsp cinnamon 1/2 of an apple, chopped 2 tsp honey 

Want more food in a mug and/or jar? Find more awesome recipies on Buzzfeed.com!

If you don’t have flax seeds ou can substitute with ½ tablespoon of butter. First, get a microwave safe mug and add oats, flax, egg and milk. ext, stir the mix with a fork. Then add banana, cinnamon, apple and honey. Stir once more to get it fully combined. Now cook in microwave on high for two to three minutes. When it’s done, fluff it with a f k.

You can enjoy it plain or stir in a little milk, yogurt, or nut-butter if desired. You can find most of the ingredients at Midtown Foods, the Co-Op, or Rochester Whole Foods— all of which are in town and only a few blocks from main campus. Recpiee and image from Food & Whine: Foodwhine.com

Wellzine

September 2013

Images from Buzzfeed.com

! y o j n E

health & wellness services

e h t t e G ! e r e h s t n e v e t s late

Attention!

s i h t k c u L d o o ! r G a e Y l o o h c S new wellzine | may 2013

health & wellness services

e h t t e G ! e r e h s t n e v e t s late

Attention!

s i h t k c u L d o o ! r G a e Y l o o h c S new wellzine | may 2013

health & wellness services

FIVE TIPS

5 Tips to

Avoid Mayhem

I’m that college party that kept you up late last night. Now you are waking up in someone else’s bed, wondering what happened the night before. You remembered someone suggesting it would be a great idea to skip dinner and drink instead. You are now exhausted, nauseated, missing class, and regretting ever going to that party. If you attend this workshop, you will learn how to be better protected from mayhem like me.

1 2 3 4 5

Alcohol Poisoning

Warning Signs of Alcohol Poisoning: Cold, clammy, pale or bluish skin Unconscious or unable to be roused Puking repeatedly or uncontrollably Slow or irregular breathing If any of signs of alcohol poisoning exist, first call 911 Then call campus security (507) 457-5555.

Sexual Assault

- Know it’s not your fault - Find a safe environment - Do not bathe or wash and put clothes in a paper bag - Consider reporting the assault. An advocate can help you decided if you want to report. - A rape exam and tests for STIs and pregnancy are available. The e is no charge for the exam. If you would like to speak with an advocate, call WSU’s Gender Based Violence Helpline: (507) 457-5610

Eating Disorders

Warning signs: Refusal to eat, intense fear of gaining weight, excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, going to the bathroom after eating or during meals, skipping meals to drink because of calories For Guidance, Resources, & Referral call: Health, Counseling & Wellness Services, (507) 457-5160

Suicide

Warning Signs of Possible Suicide: - Talks about death or dying/looks for a way to do it - Withdrawn/isolated/extreme mood swings or sleeping too little or a lot - Feelings of hopelessness, trapped, unbearable pain - Increased use of alcohol/drugs

Health Insurance

If you are experiencing any of these signs to the left, please call: - Health, Counseling & Wellness Services: (507) 457-5160 - National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK - In an emergency, please dial 911

No Health Insurance? Detox? Ambulance ride? And 10,000 in Medical Bills? Many students attend college with no health insurance. Be sure to avoid unexpected medical situations like this and get health insurance. Student Health Insurance Resources Health & Wellness Services: (507) 457-2224 www.winona.edu/healthservices/insurance.asp


Wellzine August/September 2013