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WSU Health & Wellness Services, Vol. 1/ No. 7 | April 2013

April Welcome

Showers!

Glowing Skin Super Foods!

Confessions Are they really anonymous? WSU

2013

MWMF Midwest Music Fest

EDITOR’S LETTER I’ve been a student at Winona State University for four years and every April is the same: irresistible sunshine accompanied with immense amounts of stress. There’s something about the last four weeks of school that generates a sudden panic throughout the university. Students lose sleep over their impossible to-do lists and professors come to terms with how many projects they have left to assign. Begin mayhem. And just as the incessant anxiety becomes a part of our every day lives, procrastination comes into play pulling us even farther behind (is it just me or do even the simplest of pastimes like taking a walk become the most alluring in the spring?). But never fear. No matter how challenging the upcoming month may seem, everything always works out in the end. And before you know it, you’ll be packing your bags, saying goodbye to friends and heading home for the summer—or for good. In the mean time, take a break from studying and give April’s issue of Wellzine a read.

wellzine | april 2013

This month you’ll learn all about the perks of April: National Walk to Work Day, Counseling Awareness Month, National Earth Day and the infamous Midwest Music Fest. We’ve also included some tips and pointers when it comes to preparing for upcoming job interviews, why you should register to attend the Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners in June and the 411 behind recent trends in social media “confessions” pages. Looking to obtain glowing skin? Check out the healthy alternatives page. Curious about getting more involved within the university’s health promotion? Flip to page 8 and learn all about Winona State’s wellness clubs. While it’s true your homework won’t finish itself, it’s also true that your health should come first. April’s a hard month, no matter what. But it’s also pivotal. So take the good with the bad and find balance among your million tasks. Before you know it, it’ll be your last spring. Make it count.

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contents pg19

pg15 WSU Confessions

Midwest Music Fest

pg25 Natural Glowing Skin 7 DIMENSIONS OF WELLNESS

EVERY ISSUE

11 13 15 17 19 21 23

03 05 07 09 25 27 29

INTELLECTUAL Job Interview Prep SPIRITUAL Counseling Awareness EMOTIONAL WSU Confessions Page ENVIRONMENTAL Earth Day 2013 SOCIAL Midwest Music Fest OCCUPATIONAL WELL 2013 PHYSICAL Walk to Work Day

& HEALTH& WELLNESS SERVICES Live Well Winona

CALENDAR CREDITS Monthly Events and Holidays

STUDENT GROUPS WSU Health & Wellness Clubs FEATURE PAGE Alcohol Poisoning HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES Natural Glowing Skin BULLETINS Future Events - Don’t Miss Out! FIVE TIPS Healthy Relationships

SUNDAY

MONDAY

April

credits

World Health Day

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Healthy Monday 7 p.m. The WELL

TUESDAY

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Anxiety Management 2-2:50 p.m. IWC 222

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Fit-Stop 11 a.m. The WELL

PUBLISHERS Anxiety Management 2-2:50 p.m. IWC 222

Erica Thibodeaux Shawnessy Mohawk EDITOR IN CHIEF Samantha Luhmann

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GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tegan Blank

Healthy Monday 7 p.m. The WELL

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Tegan Blank

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Earth Day

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Apr 1-7: National Public Health Week Apr 5-7: Alcohol-Free Weekend: NCADD Alcohol Awareness Month STD Awareness Month Sexual Assault Awareness Month

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Anxiety Management 2-2:50 p.m. IWC 222

COVER PHOTO CREDIT

April Observances

Fit-Stop 11 a.m. The WELL

Fit-Stop 11 a.m. The WELL

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Anxiety Management 2-2:50 p.m. IWC 222

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Healthy Monday 7 p.m. The WELL

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Fit-Stop 11 a.m. The WELL

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Anxiety Management 11-11:50 p.m. IWC 222 Wellness Wednesday 3 p.m. The WELL

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Anxiety Management 11-11:50 p.m. IWC 222 Wellness Wednesday 3 p.m. The WELL

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Anxiety Management 11-11:50 p.m. IWC 222 Wellness Wednesday 3 p.m. The WELL

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Anxiety Management 11-11:50 p.m. IWC 222

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Sexual Assault Awareness Month

In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Embrace, a Winona State University gender based violence club, and Winona State’s Gender Based Violence Advocacy Program, established by Winona State’s All-University Committee and Sexual Violence Advisory Committee, collaborated to bring awareness to sexual assault and its prevalence across the country through the creation of a teal banner display located on the Winona State campus. Each of the flags displayed on the banner represents one person who contacted the Women’s Resource Center of Winona in 2012 regarding sexual assault. The display will be hanging outside throughout the month of April to inform passersby about the reality of sexual assault, as well as advertise GBV helplines for those in need. A 40 percent increase of sexual assaults was reported to the WRC compared to 2011. According to Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, every two minutes someone in the United States is sexually assaulted. In addition to the teal flag display, the Women’s and Gender Studies department will host a variety of events related to sexual assault including presentations, photo shoots and discussions. For more information and resources regarding gender based violence contact Winona State’s helpline at 507-457-5610.

“I Heart Female Orgasm:” 7 p.m. April 9 in Somsen Auditorium Sexual Assault Survivors Photo Shoot : April 11 on the third floor of Wabasha Hall “Take Back the Night:” 6 p.m. April 25 in Kryzsko Commons

Empowerment

Through Lifestyle Improvement Janneke Quick, Live Well Winona Community Wellness Director Live Well Winona partners with many organizations and programs in the community in order to facilitate new health initiatives. The non-profit organization was recently recognized by Winona State University as a finalist for the Minnesota Campus Compact President’s Civic Engagement Steward Award. Following Live Well Winona’s mission to engage the Winona community in a culture of health and wellness improvement through lifestyle changes, the organization strives to provide community members with the right health resources to affect positive change in themselves and in our the Winona community. Live Well Winona intends to improve the health of the community by increasing awareness about healthy habits and encouraging lifestyle improvement. When community members are conscious of the effects of their habits on their own bodies, the cognition simultaneously extends their focus to the community and people around them. Live Well Winona serves as a community health hub by connecting people with:

Resources

Programs

Over 330 health and wellness resources in the Winona area are available through our online directory making it easier than ever to get involved with the community of Winona.

We offer health initiatives such as: • Mississippi Medley 5k Run/Walk Series • Substance Abuse Coalition Develop programming for youth • Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners WSU’s Wellness Conference • Winona Rides Local Celebration of National Bike Month • Colors of Cancer Cancer Awareness and Fundraising Fitness Festival

Volunteering Winona Connects is a virtual volunteer center provided by Live Well Winona that hosts many ongoing and one-time volunteer opportunities available to the public.

Community Events We maintain a community calendar with all the area health and wellness related activities such as smoking cessation classes, farmers markets and story time at the Winona Public Library.

Races Whether you run, bike, swim or ski, our race calendar can help you get connected with races within approximately 100 miles of Winona.

It’s never too late to get involved within your community, establish real-world connections and gain handson experience from professional workforces. Stop in to Live Well Winona today to find out what you can do to make a difference! health & wellness services

ABOUT

Winona State University’s Health & Wellness Services collaborates with a variety of wellnessfocused clubs and organizations on campus to promote holistic wellness for Winona State students and Southeast Technical College students. These groups focus on peer-to-peer education on specific wellness related topics in order promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. If you are interested in working with Health & Wellness Services to join a Student-2-Student Communicator Group, please contact the Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant Shawnessy Mohawk. Email

Health & Wellness Advocates

Find us on Facebook!

Finals week stressing you out? Come by the WELL’s Fit Stop from 11 a.m. to noon April 30 in the Integrated Wellness Complex, room 141 to learn stress management techniques that will keep you sane and focused during the stressful end to the semester. The Health & Wellness Advocates will be handing out free de-stress kits to students that contain all the essentials to get you through your exams: a water bottle, Nutri-Grain bar, calming tea, pens and meditation guides.

SHAG

Sexual Health Awareness Group The Sexual Health Awarenss Group will be working alongside of Semcac Clinic as they host their first “Get Talkin’ 1/2K Fundraiser” on May 4 that will focus on “Getting Conversations Started” through the establishment of healthy relationships. The event’s mission is to get people talking and communicating face-to-face about health-related topics without the interruption of electronic devices. The event is intended to emphasize the importance of the role of communication in our relationships and community, as well as how communication intertwines within all aspects of life. This will not be a timed race, but rather a 1/2K (one-third of a mile) walk with signs to be posted as conversations starter topics. Proceeds of the event will go to fund Semcac Clinic’s education and outreach program. Learn More!

SHAC

Student Health Advisory Corps The Student Health Advisory Corps will be disseminating results from the 2012-2013 Population-Based Assessments of current wellness services and programs during the month of April. SHAC will be meeting to create recommendations to promote public wellness and improve the wellbeing at Winona State University for upcoming years as the assessments’ results are showcased. If you would like to get involved with SHAC, email Health & Wellness Promotion graduate assistant Shawnessy Mohawk. Email

FAN Club

Food and Nutrition Club Let’s celebrate sustainability! Earth Day will be held April 22. Do your part to keep our planet healthy by learning more about the impact our food habits have on the environment. Join the FAN club as we prepare an ecologically-sound meal using all natural ingredients at their final Well Cafe from 4-5 p.m. April 15 in the Integrated Wellness Complex, room 143. Learn all about the “whys” and “hows” of earth-friendly food selection and preparation while preparing a sustainable meal. Find us on Facebook!

Power in Diversity Diverse and Cultural Groups

Power in Diversity is offering an Inclusion and Diversity Training Program for students at Winona State University or Southeast Technical College. This workshop will give a down-and-dirty look at many aspects of diversity such as ethnic, cultural, sexual, gender, language and economic, and explain how people’s lives are affected by their diversity compared to other people. The workshop will also include strategies on how to best include and showcase active tolerance toward marginalized groups. If you would like to order the Inclusion and Diversity Training Program for your class, residence hall, campus organization or community event please contact Winona State’s Health Promotion office. Email

health & wellness services

Dear WSU Freshmen,

Southeast Tech Anxiety Management Series at WSU Winona State University Counseling & Wellness Services is offering a new series of seminars for any student, Winona State or Southeast Technical College, who wants to learn more about managing anxiety. Please join Winona State Counseling for any or all of the events that will be taking place throughout the following four weeks at both 2 p.m. on Tuesdays and 11 a.m. on Fridays in the Counseling and Wellness Services Group at Winona State’s Integrated Wellness Complex, room 222. For more information, email Winona State counselor Eunie Alsaker for more information. Week 1 - April 2 & 5: Understanding Anxiety

Did you know that young people age 15-24 accounts for 50 percent of all new sexually transmitted infections, even though they represent just 25 percent of the sexually experienced population? According to WebMD, STIs are serious illnesses that can be contracted from vaginal, anal and oral sex. If you are someone who has had more than one sex partner, is having sex with someone who has had multiple sex partners or do not regularly use a condom during sex of any kind, you are at a heightened risk of contracting an STI. Get Yourself Tested Awareness Week will take place April 8-12 and offer STI testing at both Winona State University’s Health and Wellness Services and Semcac Family Planning Clinic. All appointments are confidential and available to all students, even if you’re just looking to learn more. STIs can be largely prevented if given the right amount of consideration. To learn more about the symptoms causes, risk factors and prevention methods of STIs, take part in Get Yourself Tested Awareness Week and put your health first.

Learn More!

Week 2 - April 9 & 12: Calming the Anxious Body Week 3 - April 16 & 19: Calming the Anxious Mind Week 4 - April 23 & 26: Changing Anxious Behaviors

Freshmen News

Email health & wellness services

Stefani Schmidt, WSU Senior, Mass Communications Journalism and Political Science

Intellectual

Job Interviews: The “Dos” and “Don’ts”

Your palms are sweaty, you’re wearing uncomfortable shoes and you’re trying harder than ever to impress someone you haven’t even met.

The idea of having to go to an “adult” job interview terrifies me, but as the spring semester is coming to an end, it is definitely the time to look into what interviewing skills I’ll need.

Job interviews are situations most college students dread, but the formal one-on-one meetings are inevitable for us all after graduation.

After scouring the web, I was able to compile a list of the most important “dos” for job interviews and the most entertaining “don’ts” as told by leading job experts at our very own Winona State University Career Services.

As a 22-year-old, I’ve undergone interviews for mostly part-time Although the experiences were largely the occupations were simple which interviews very casual.

four job positions. beneficial, made the

Let’s start with the “dos.”

Make a great first impression by preparing for your job interview ahead of time. Photo Credit: Corbis Images

2013 2012 wellzine wellzine april | october

Dress like a million bucks. Winona State’s Career Services lists dressing professionally towards the top of its interview tips. I would say this is a must for any job interview. It has been my experience that dressing professional can help anyone in almost any situation. Professional doesn’t always have to be dark and drab either. According to a Forbes magazine article, wearing colors can be positive during an interview as well.

Use proper manners. Oftentimes manners can get neglected in modern times, but being mindful of your actions is important in any social interaction. According to Career Services, it’s important to be polite to the receptionist, turn off all electronic devices, arrive at least 10 minutes early to the interview location and address the interviewer by his or her proper title.

Communicate confidently. Career Services recommends greeting the employee with a firm handshake, smile and to always maintain eye contact. It is also suggested to avoid using filler words during conversation such as the words “um,” “ah” and “like.” It’s important for all job interviews that both your written and verbal communication are professional and clear, as well. So make sure to practice!

Answer practice questions. Most interviews will ask standard adeptness questions such as what your strengths and weaknesses are, why you applied for the job and what would make you a good candidate for the available position. Knowing what you’re answers are going to be beforehand can be a

great way to not only prepare for the meeting, but maintain good conversation throughout the q and a. Career Services offers a list of sample job interview questions on their website that can help get you started. Some jobs; however, like to throw unique questions into the mix, as well. According to the job website Glassdoor, interviewers at Google have asked prospective employees, “How many people are using Facebook in San Francisco at 2:30 p.m. on a Friday?” The site also said that Trader Joe’s is known to ask its interviewees what they think of garden gnomes and that Amazon employees ask people what strategies they would take to cure world hunger. According to Courtney Kampa in the social blog “Thought Catalog,” there are some things you just don’t dp during an interview. In her own personal experiences, touching the employer’s items is not OK. Misspelling words on job applications and resumes can also hinder your chances, as well as calling the interviewer by a nickname. Even crying can be frowned upon during a job interview. For more interviewing “don’ts,” check out the “Everyday Interview” which lists the “Seven Funny Ways to Ruin Your Job Interview.” Among the many no-nos includes “being a jerk” and “asking for bus money.” Cosmopolitan also recommends not going on Twitter and Facebook and talking about the interview right after it happens. This shows employers that you make a lot of your personal life public. Overall, the key component to any good job interview is being professional in all areas of your life. If you’re interested in a little practice, Winona State’s Career Services offers a free “mock interview” that can be done via a webcam straight from home.

health & wellness services

Counseling: Who Want to

T

hree floors of workout equipment, basketball courts and machines. Winona State University’s fitness center is frequently packed with people. However, the Integrated Wellness Complex has much more to offer than a good workout. Located on the second floor of the IWC is Health Services and the Counseling Center. Although many students have taken advantage of Health Services for a professional’s advice, several remain unaware of the benefits the Counseling Center can provide. In fact, April is Counseling Awareness month. “Counseling is an attempt to assist people with personal problems so that these problems don’t interfere with academic performance,” Elizabeth Burke, a counselor at Winona Sate, said.

wellzine

Help

Counseling is also a relationship between a counselor and patient that provides not only emotional support, but information, as well. Counseling can be helpful for a variety of issues including anxiety, stress, depression, grief and relationship concerns. Many students also utilize counseling services to aid in time management and other academic concerns, such as career counseling. In addition to individual counseling, the Counseling Center offers counseling sessions for roommates, couples and groups. “With an individual person, we are able to go much deeper,” Eunie Alsaker, a counselor at Winona State, said. “But groups offer a lot of learning from one another with some structure provided by a group leader.”

Writing about our thoughts, feelings, questions and fears can lead to a clear understanding of what drives our emotions

Spiritual

Kim Schneider, WSU Freshman, Mass Communications Photojournalism and English

A Community of Professionals

Photo Credit: Corbis Images

april 2013

The Counseling Center also offers support groups that pertain to issues such as body image, chronic medical conditions, coping with anxiety and those grieving the death of a loved one. These groups allow students to support and learn from one another and were created to accommodate the growing number of mental health issues occurring on college campuses. “Part of that is because treatments for mental health have gotten so much better, people with these issues can go to college now,” Burke said. College students deal with many sources of stress including finances, families and over-involvement in activities. Because of the combination of multiple stress sources, anxiety has become a comon issue among college campuses. The Counseling Center responded to this growing number of mental health issues with an anxiety seminar, a four-part seminar aimed at developing skills to manage anxiety. In addition to such groups, the Counseling Center is developing a new one—Active Minds. Active Minds is national organization that raises mental health awareness on college campuses. The group aims to change the stigma about mental health and those with mental issues. Although the number of people seeking counseling in recent years has increased, many people are discouraged from counseling because they are unsure if it will be a useful experience for them. “Counseling is helpful if their concern is interfering with their daily lives,” Alsaker said. “That concern could be seen as academic, social or their overall satisfaction with life.” Counselors provide an outlet for student’s concerns and different ways to cope and overcome them. Although counselors at Winona State are trained to diagnose and treat mental illnesses, they do not prescribe medications. Counseling is different than psychiatry. Psychiatry is a means of managing concerns through medication whereas counseling is very holistic; this includes all seven dimensions of the wellness:

Counseling can be a useful resource for anxiety, stress, depression, grief and relationship concerns

Photo Credit: Corbis Images

spiritual, occupational, social, environmental, intellectual, physical, and emotional. “Change can happen on many levels,” Alsaker said. Psychiatry emerges from a medical model while counseling stems from a developmental model. This means that instead of diagnosing a mental health disorder and prescribing medication, counselors aim to help their patients by assisting them in adjusting their habits contributing to their concerns. In essence, counselors help students to discover themselves and who they really are on the inside. Throughout this process, students are able to overcome the daily stress of college and find peace within their hectic lives. “Counseling is a process of self exploration and discovery,” Alsaker said. health & wellness services

Jeremy Ertl, WSU Senior, Mass Communications Public Relations and Creative Writing

Emotional wellzine

Confessions:

Winona State University Facebook Page

“My roommate is a b**ch [that] never cleans up after herself, so I use her razor to shave my pubes,” one reads. “I just dropped a class because I was drunk and it seemed like a good idea,” another said. The admissions above come courtesy of a recent anonymous confessions page that has emerged on Facebook: WSU Confessions. Created on Feb. 1, the site parallels other popular campus confession pages in Madison, Wis. and La Crosse, Wis. that have risen in “likes” among Facebook users; UW-Madison’s subscribers coming in just above 21,000. But pages like this certainly aren’t new. Accounts that have been created in my own undergraduate career at Winona State University alone include WSU Cupid, the WSU Squirrel, Overheard at WSU, Winona Texts From Last Night and WSU Problems. And these are just the ones I’ve come to know about. Does anyone remember LikeALittle? Formspring? However different such social media sites are from one another, they all have one thing in common: anonymity. But before I go any further, here’s a disclaimer: these sites/pages are not actually anonymous. The truth of the matter is that there are administrators in many cases that are remaining anonymous themselves. And even if there isn’t a human on the other side, everything you post online can be traced back to you in the long run. “It’s weird how trusting people are under the guise of anonymity when ultimately they

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should know better,” Mollee Sheehan, director of web communications at Winona State, said. All user data is being collected, tracked and responded to in ways whether students realize it or not. “A lot of times social media mirrors real life,” Sheehan said. “When you post it online, you lose your discretionary filter that you have when you’re talking with your close friend.” An anonymous page like WSU Confessions affects more than just the current study body, Sheehan said. Younger generations in the class of 2017 or 2018 are seeing these pages and making assumptions about Winona State based on their content. “This is definitely affecting the perception of our school,” Sheehan said. The University of Wisconsin La Crosse has already had issues with its own page, a majority of submissions including anonymous descriptions of sex acts, alcohol consumption and drug use. A student died on Feb. 17 after leaving an Onalaska bar. An autopsy showed she had a preliminary blood-alcohol level of 0.21. UW-L Chancellor Joe Gow said in an email to students and staff referring to the previously named UW-La Crosse Confessions, “There’s an image of a young woman lying passed out on the floor [of this page], and this comes days after the tragedy involving our student.” The photo and page were later taken down due to a user complaint, but similar accounts such as LAX Confessions sprung up in their absence. There seems to be a certain drive that

students experience to know what the person on the other side of dorm room wall is doing with his or her night. Sheehan believes mediums such as PostSecret, the anonymous postcard-driven project/site created by Frank Warren, are a safer alternative to student-run confession pages. “There is a definite value in knowing you are not alone and you share common experiences and struggles,” Sheehan said. “It wouldn’t be this popular or robust if it wasn’t fulfilling a need for the posters and the viewers.” Cindy Killion, a mass communication professor at Winona State, refers to social networking as generational. “I’m 57. We didn’t have Internet. We just gossiped,” Killion said. “I think the anonymity of it makes people feel freer to be stupid. It’s unfortunate because you’re not accountable. You should be accountable for what your opinions are.”

“I don’t think I would submit to the page,” Sarreal said. “Even though it is anonymous, the person behind it could still spread your confession in the future. They still know.” Sarreal admitted that she’s looked at the site before when one of the posts pertained to her organization, Delta Phi Epsilon. “I wasn’t too happy about it, but at the same time: freedom of speech. You can’t really stop people from doing what they want,” she said. In many ways, Facebook is already a “confessions page,” Wastart said. “All social media can be. It just depends on how you utilize it.” But the page is comprised of more than just funny posts such as the misunderstanding of the difference between euthanasia and youth in Asia.

The stress of knowing other students’ secrets was likely the cause of the anonymous admin’s on March 10 All user data is being collected, resignation as the following message tracked, and responded to in was written on the WSU ways whether students realize it Confessions page:

Killion said what bothers her most about pages like WSU Confessions and even reality television is the landscape of the or not content. The point is to humiliate and when you see enough of it, it becomes normalized and acceptable to continue doing and posting these things.

Several students were in agreement with Killion. “Personally, I wouldn’t post on it,” Brittany Wastart, a senior at Winona State, said. “I feel like I tell my closest friends some of these things and that’s enough for me. I feel like I don’t need to announce my problems to the world.”

“Dear Warriors,

Running this page has been fun, but knowing others secrets is a heavy burden, which is why I, the admin, decided to terminate the page. If another willing warrior wants to start up a new page, feel free!” But the page continues to thrive under a new admin and since, even more vivid and perverse admissions have rolled in. “I think the concept of WSU Confessions is dumb and mean.” Okay, that one I posted.

Linzey Sarreal, a senior at Winona State, also had fears about posting a confession anonymously.

health & wellness services

Environmental

Sarah Christiaansen, WSU senior, Journalism and Creative Writing

Earth Day

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April 22

T

he 1970s is making a comeback in Winona, Minn.

Maybe not a flower power, platform shoes and mini-skirts kind of comeback, but as the 1970s is considered the birth of the modern environmental movement, a concern-forthe-planet kind of comeback. As some tried to perfect their “Saturday Night Fever” look, others, like Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, were working on social change by establishing the first Earth Day.

Along with the move to Levee Park, Fassbender said she is hoping to work with the newly formed Winona Outdoor Recreation Group in order to see a large representation of outdoor recreation options in Winona. Fassbender is also excited about the different bicycle components occurring throughout the day such as valet bike parking, a bike photo booth, bike route to the event posted on the website and “show your ride.”

Earth Day, held this year on April 22, is an annual holiday meant to spread awareness and appreciation for the earth and its natural environment. The day is recognized in more than 175 countries every year in a variety of festivals and get-togethers that often condone improving the earth, such as planting a tree or recycling. Winona has hosted an Earth Day celebration for more than 25 years and this year is no exception. The Winona Earth Day celebration will take place from noon to 5 p.m. April 20 in Levee Park, Winona. Julie Fassbender, programs director at Winona Park and Recreation, said she is most excited about the new location and the “Chalk On,” a chalk drawing competition that pairs local artists with businesses.

Minnesota native Jake Ilika will perform from noon to 12:50 p.m. at Levee Park for Winona’s Earth Day Photographer: Megan Huizel

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Other events that will take place at the celebration include a full concert in the park, dancers, performers, exhibitors, vendors, food, kids activities and education, Fassbender said. The Zinghoppers, a children’s band comprised of a kangaroo, an opossum, a donkey, a DJ Kitty and Conductor Jack, are playing at the celebration, as well. “We are performing a high-energy show for children and their families,” Jack Norton, co-creator of the Zinghoppers, said. “Our music is influenced by hip-hop, electronic dance music and pop.”

hearing about what people feel after they experience acupuncture. “The people sitting around with the needles in will tell people that, ‘No, it doesn’t hurt at all,’ ‘Just try it,’ ‘These few needles made me feel so much better!’ I love that part.” “It’s a beautiful event,” Fang said. “Winona is really a wonderful community.” Acupuncture will occur from 2-4 p.m. at the Earth Day celebration. Whether enjoying the Zinghoppers or trying acupuncture for the first time, Winona’s Each Day Celebration has something for all

This band has a television series that airs on more than 100 PBS member stations nationwide and in 175 countries generating more than 1 million viewers each day. “We haven’t been to the Winona celebration before, but we usually celebrate Earth Day in some fashion wherever we are,” Norton said. “We’re excited to party in Winona!” The Zinghoppers are playing from 1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. at the Earth Day celebration. Another exhibit at the celebration is acupuncture. “I am going to be giving free acupuncture treatments,” Jade Fang, of Jade Community Acupuncture Clinic, said, “So people can experience what acupuncture is like.” Fang has been to the celebration before and said she loved the music, the people and the sense of community. Her favorite part of the celebration is “just talking to people.” Fang said she loves

different kinds of people, even those stuck in the 1970s. “This community understood the importance of coming together to celebrate the earth before being green was mainstream,” Fassbender said. “I think to this community it represents a collection of people who are coming together to help each other live simply, to share information, to celebrate together.” Winona’s Earth Day Celebration

health & wellness services

Midwest Musi

community

Bringing together the

Social

Eileen Jennings, WSU Sophomore, Spanish and English

of Winona

S

pring has finally arrived and you know what that means: sunny mornings, blooming flowers and, of course, the plethora of music that makes up Winona’s very own Midwest Music Fest. Taking over downtown Winona April 18-20, MWMF has grown into one of Winona’s most anticipated events of the years. MWMF volunteer coordinator Isaac Sammis said that one of the festival’s main purposes is to establish a community through music by encouraging local residents and college students to take part in the culture of Winona. This year’s festival will feature a variety of venues located at some of the hottest spots in town including Ed’s No Name Bar, Acoustic Cafe, Jefferson’s Pub and Grill and Blooming Grounds cafe. MWMF will also offer a wide variety of artists who provide the audience with an even greater variety of music. “It brings basically every genre of music you can possibly think of to Winona and it showcases hundreds of people that normally wouldn’t be showcased around here,” Alexandria Fisher, president of the MWMF club at Winona State University, said. Johnson said among the many genres that have performed at the festival include acoustic, one-

MWMF Line-Up wellzine

april 2013

ic Fest:

man-band and even rap. Not to mention the variety of midwestern artists who appear, some of which who even attend Winona State such as “Jaybone Bell and the Restless Light.” “Last year, we had more than a 110 bands perform,” Fisher said. “It supports a ton of local businesses while also showcasing awesome artists.” MWMF originally ran during the Shakespeare Festival in July; however, the festival was moved in 2011 to run during Earth Day in April in order to establish a weekend of its own. The festival began with 77 bands that spread throughout 10 venues around Winona. MWMF continues to grow with every passing year and expects a greater turn out than past festivals this year. Winona State has shown immense support over the years by promoting the festival throughout different venues in Winona. The university has also established a club on campus for interested students to join and help with the festival’s planning and preparation. “We’re making posters, flyers and we’re going through the newspaper,” Sammis said. “We are using Facebook, as well.” Apart from the variety of musical performances that will take place throughout the festival will be a summit conference held from noon to 4 p.m. April 20 where record labels, music business owners and artists of all kinds will discuss how to find success in the challenging and competitive music industry. This summit will also feature a learning component to aspiring musicians that isn’t normally seen at music festivals. Last year, such events as an instrument petting zoo and a disc golf tournament were held for attendees to visit.

Ed’s No Name Bar, Acoustic Cafe and Jefferson’s Pub and Grill are among the many venues for this year’s Midwest Music Fest Photgrapher: Megan Huizel

Tickets

MWMF donates all the proceedings from the festival to charities that support the arts in order to give back to the community. The festival is truly a unique experience that can only be found in a place as charismatic as Winona, nestled between the bluffs and the Mississippi river.

Volunteer health & wellness services

20

Occupational

Alli Gerls, WSU Senior, Communication Arts and Literature Teaching Major

The

wellzine

Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners Conference One

of the most frequent questions I hear my peers ask while in college is “What can I do to set myself apart?” This summer, the Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners, Winona State University’s Inaugural Wellness Conference, will give people of all backgrounds the ability to stand out among their peers. The conference, WELL ’13, will take place June 6-7 in Winona, Minn. and is operating under the theme “Manifesting the Philosophy,” which will showcase some of the work students, faculty and staff have made under the 2012-2013 academic theme “Well-Connected: Piecing Together a Well You.” Tucker Blegen, Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners Coordinator, said the conference would provide personal and professional development opportunities for all students, faculty, staff and community members. The convention will be organized into breakout sessions that are divided into three distinct sections: healthcare, education and community wellness for students and professionals. The conference is also a great way to make the beginning steps toward starting and establishing a job in the health, education and community setting by meeting potential employers in a comfortable and leisurely setting. Added benefits include a local program, affordable admission and an added resume builder. I wasn’t sure if the conference would set my peers or myself apart, so I tracked down two professionals april 2013

who are involved with the Wellness Exchange to find out their opinions of the conference. “When looking at internship applicants, many haven’t attended conferences so it definitely isn’t an expectation,” Shawnessy Mohawk, Winona State’s Health and Wellness promotion graduate assistant, said. “I have attended conferences in the past so I understand that going to conferences can give you a different perspective on your field of study and desired profession.” Janneke Quick, community wellness director at Live Well Winona, agreed with Mohawk and said students often ask her what they can do to strengthen their resumes and improve their chances of working in the public health arena. Quick’s No. 1 answer included obtaining opportunities for personal and professional growth, as well as establishing professional relationships through networking. “The Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners is a unique way to set yourself apart as a candidate,” Quick said. “Participation in the conference will expose you to a variety of wellness topics that will be applicable in many aspects of your life and that

will allow you to gain valuable knowledge directly from the experts in the fields of healthcare, education and community wellness.” Among many professionals that will be featured in the Wellness Conferences is Richard Swenson, physician-futurist, best-selling author and awardwinning educator. Swenson will be presented as the keynote speaker where he will discuss his current research involving the connection between health and culture. Swenson strives to be a leading voice in the future of medicine and works toward captivating audiences from all around the world, including those at the Pentagon, NASA and members of the United Nations. Katy Smith, the 2011 Minnesota Teacher of the Year, will also be a featured speaker at the conference. Smith currently teaches in Winona as an early childhood family educator and is on a mission to engage communities in conversation to save childhood.

Physician-futurist, author and educator Richard Swenson will be the keynote speaker of the Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners Photo Credit: Winona State University

Those interested in the conference can reserve their spot by registering now. Cost is $60 for students and $160 for non-students until May 1. Admission will then increase to $185 after and includes one Continuing Education Credit. Student clubs can ask for Student Activity Fund Committee funds through Student Senate to sponsor their members’ registration. The Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners is a unique opportunity for students who want to get a head start on the competitive working world. The conference is an opportunity that can benefit all students by providing valuable experience through networking opportunities and education. Now, it is up to you—will you take the next step to set yourself apart by registering?

Register Online

Katy Smith, the 2011 Minnesota Teacher of the Year, will speak about childhood at the Wellness Exchange for Lifelong Learners Photo Credit: Winona State University

health & wellness services

walkWork Day

Physical

Sami Schwanke, WSU Junior, English Writing and Business Management

to

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N

ational Walk to Work Day is held the first Friday of every April. The U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services first created the day in 2004 as a means to promote adults to work out and be environmentally conscious by walking to work, during lunch hours and breaks. Walking even just 30 minutes a day brings people great health benefits such as weight loss, a reduced risk for heart disease and an overall healthier life, according to Holiday Insights. Avoiding the use of motorized vehicles can significantly benefit the environment, as well. According to Global Issues.com, scientists have said that currently over Antarctica the ozone hole is three times the size of the United States and continues to grow. The purpose of the ozone is to protect people from the sun’s harmful rays and without it, serious exposure to harmful UV rays can take place. Air pollution also contaminates the things we eat. According to National Geographic, some toxins settle onto plants and into water sources that are then consumed by animals. Therefore, animals that fall on the top of the food chain are shown to have the largest concentrations of toxins in their bodies. Walking will also help fill your wallet. According to the AAA Monthly Gas Price Report, the average price for gas during the month of February was $3.65. Looking further, if your car gets 15 miles to the gallon and can hold 10 gallons

april 2013

Biking can be a good alternative to walking Photographer: Samantha Whillock

of gas per mile, it would cost you about $2.40 each time you drove 5 miles work and home again. This means that every 30 shifts or so you would have to fill your tank. If you worked four days a week for a year, you would save almost $500 by walking or biking to work instead of driving, and that’s not considering when gas prices increase to nearly $5 in the summer when students have more availability to work.

I asked several students if they would consider walking to work on April 5 and for many, it all depended. “I like the outdoors, but the cold weather and the fact that I don’t want to leave early to get to work prevents me from walking or biking to work,” said Nikko Medina, a junior at Winona State University who works part time at Wal-Mart. Some students use Winona State’s shuttle system to commute to their jobs. Winona State junior Angela Christenson is a clarinet studio instructor at Cotter High School and utilizes the shuttles to get to West Campus. “I live in the East Lake Apartments so I take the shuttle to main, then to West Campus and walk to Cotter from there,” Christenson said. Although Christenson doesn’t work on the national holiday, she promised she’d start walking to campus, which is a great idea for students who don’t work while they’re in college. Keeping up this trend can be hard, especially when it comes to extreme temperatures, tight timetables or working the night shift. Riding your bike, carpooling or public transportation in these cases can save you money, as well. There are many students who work together and never consider carpooling to the same location. The next time you work, ask what your coworkers’ schedules are and try to make a carpooling plan to save energy and money. This could also help you get to know your coworkers and build a friendly community at your workplace. Many people are also unaware of Winona’s Public Transit System. The bus is available from 6-6:15 a.m. Monday through Friday. It also has a Safe Ride service from 7 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Friday and Saturday. A trip on the transit costs only 80 cents for students and monthly passes can also be purchased. Tokens can be purchased at City Hall, Southeast Technical College, and St. Mary’s University.

health & wellness services

Healthy alternatives

Healthy Alternatives to Glowing Skin Because of mainstream media, it’s easy to forget that our skin is more than just a beauty staple. In fact, our body’s largest organ plays a prominent role in regulating our kidneys, controlling our liver, safeguarding internal organs, regulating overall temperature and detoxifying harmful chemicals. Without our skin, frankly, we’d be dead. But you don’t need to shed out entire paychecks to ensure a healthy and blooming complexion. All you really need is to keep your skin care natural by eating the right foods, incorporating the proper herbs and, of course, drinking plenty of water. The following is a list of anti-inflammatory foods and spices that will help support your skin’s function and reduce the stress caused by free radicals we are exposed to each and every day. If consumed on a daily basis, you’ll be likely to notice a smoother complexion, more even pigmentation and a noticeable reduction in acne and blemishes. Skin care doesn’t have to be complicated. Get back to basics and fuel your body with what it really needs: whole food, natural nourishment and sufficient hydration.

Basil

70 % Cocoa

Parsley

Cayenne Peppers

Licorice

Rosemary

Chili Peppers

Mint

Thyme

Cinnamon Cloves

Oregano

wellzine | april 2013

Photo Credit: Corbis Images

HERBS & SEASONING

VEGETABLES Bell Peppers

FISH

Cod Halibut

Bok Choy

Herring

Broccoli

Oysters

Broccoli Sprouts

Rainbow Trout

Brussels Sprouts

Salmon

Cabbage

Sardines

Cauliflower Chard Collards Garlic Green Beans Green Onions/Spring Onions Kale Leeks Olives Spinach

Snapper Fish Striped Bass Tuna Whitefish

FRUITS Apples Avocados Blueberries Fresh Pineapple

Sweet Potatoes

Guavas

Turnip Greens

Kiwifruit

NUTS & SEEDS

Kumquats Lemons Limes Mulberries

Almonds

Oranges

Hazelnuts

Papaya

Walnuts

Raspberries

Flaxseed

Rhubarb

Linseed

Strawberries

Sunflower Seeds

Tomatoes

OIL

TEA

Avocado Oil

Green Tea

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

White Tea

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Ways to Maintain a

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Don’t try to change your par tner

Give what you wish to receive Do something every day to show you care

Photo Credit: Corbis Images

Establish good communication and be open and honest with one another Always be willing to compromise Ben Strand, WSU Freshman, Mass Communications Journalism


Wellzine April 2013