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I AM NOT THE SAME HAVING SEEN THE MOON SHINE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD. /

Mary Anne R admacher

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H O R S E S H O E B A Y, S A N F R A N C I S C O Taken right before a kickoff meeting held at Cavallo Point. The crisp morning air and fog drenched view from our team’s corner spot in Murray Circle was the perfect inspiration. See more images on our blog at wayfaremag.com p h o t o g r a p h y B y PEGGY W ONG

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E DI T OR’ S NOT E N EW YORK STAT E OF MI ND MOR N I NG R I T UA L S T H E PIG P W. T R A V E L O G U E ROME I N BL ACK A ND W HITE MOROCCO A T HOUGH T

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editor’s note WAYFARE

ERICA DUBLIN

Founder / Editor-In-Chief

PEGGY WONG

Partner / Creative Director

FOUND Jane Potrykus Market Editor

Adriana Jamet

Looking back to summer, my husband, three-year-old son, and I traveled to Mexico, where we spent four

One of my favorite souvenirs to collect while traveling is beautifully packaged candy.

Senior Designer

sun-drenched days at the luxury resort Las Ventanas.

Everything about the trip exceeded expectations. The grounds were pristine; not a speck of sand was out

ERICA NIKOLAIDIS

of place, including the tiny rake markings in the sand beds surrounding the various cacti. The moment

Copy Editor

you left the front door of your hacienda, personal butlers would magically appear to help you find your

NICOLE ROGERS Vannucchi

way to the next margarita or poolside lounge. These unexpected surprises were my favorite part of the

Editorial Assistant

trip. Each morning, I would order a carafe of coffee for myself, freshly squeezed orange juice for my hus-

Michaela Schickel

band, and warm milk with muffins for my son. This breakfast spread arrived wrapped in beautiful fresh

Creative Assistant

linens, and the server took special care to ensure that each detail was just so before quietly escaping speci a l T H A N Ks

issue CONTRIBUTORS

Emily Johnston Anderson Leigh Beisch Ashley Muir Bruhn Fawn DeViney Nicole Franzen Erin Hiemstra Liz Libré Rick Poon Mark Weinberg

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“Spotted these milk chocolate sardines by Michel Cluizel at Granola Café. The chocolates were delicious, and the packaging is cleverly done: it really looks like a tin of sardines, down to the rolled-back tin top!” H A R V E Y N ICH OLS.COM

down the back stairwell. This level of detail and care is what stood out, what made us feel like we could escape it all. Enter the hallmark trait of luxury destinations: their ability to anticipate the unexpected and take the extra step to make small details memorable. They personalize your trip to match your definition of luxury. For me, luxury was sitting down to a fresh pot of coffee, with no background noise from morning TV to distract, and taking the time to quietly sip and stare at the ocean. These fleeting moments made me feel as though all was right with the world.

JOSEPHINE COURANt

For this issue of Wayfare, we decided to go that extra step to make your reading experience even better

Co-Founder

by offering a print version filled with little surprises. When I see the sewn seam that ties together stories

Co n cept d esi g n fo r Wayfare's d i g i ta l Pi lot Issu e: A nne Stark D i t m eyer an d Lau ren O'N ei ll

of faraway places like Morocco and Rome with gorgeous photography and meaningful experiences, my heart does a little flip flop. Each story speaks to the lived experience of travel not just the end destination. When you read “A Thought” (page 44), you see how a trip’s quiet moments often make the biggest impact.

Cov er ph oto by R i ck P o o n

In our pilot version, I wrote, “At the heart of Wayfare is the desire to inspire people to go and do.” This mission still holds true, and the Wayfare team is more excited than ever to take this vision and bring it to life. So whether you read us online or in print, I invite you to daydream about your next adventure. Travel is important, but the small details of a journey are even more so. sto ckh o l m

“These caramels from Pärlans Konfektyr in Stockholm were hard to resist, and the simple, beautiful packaging made them the perfect gift for friends back home. Made by hand and available in a variety of flavors, including ligonberry, licorice, and vanilla/sea salt.” par l ansko nfektyr.se

E r i c a D u b l i n , E d i t o r - I n - C h i e f o f way fa r e

NEW YORK STATE OF MIND

p h o t o g r a p h y B y E M ILY J OHN S TON ANDER S ON

While in the midst of New York Fashion Week’s, Erin Hiemstra of Apartment 34, a daily destination for style lovers, and New York based photographer Emily Johnston Anderson, share their love of modern minimalism by uncovering the often-overlooked corners of the West Village.

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“I love to walk a city, whether I’ve been there once or a hundred times before. It’s amazing what sort of inspiration you’ll find when you steal a second glance.” /

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FOUND This page: leather jacket, Mike & Chris. Necklace, Joslyn Taylor. Ring, Chloe Rose Boutique. Bonnie bracelets, Kara Ryan. Astrid Cuff, Dream Collective. Right: blazer, Theory. Jeans, Jbrand. Boots, Dries Van Noteb.

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morning rituals WAYFARE

T R O O S T, B R O O K LY N Whether you take your cup strong and straight or creamy and embellished, the vessel you sip from is as telling as your drink of choice. These morning companions reveal the beauty of our varied designs in service to the ceremony of waking up—and how similar we all might be.

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As refined as the ingénue in a French New Wave film, the Abbesses creamer evokes the youthful sophistication of France balanced with playful blue and red rims. $16.25

The Dorchester teapot from Claska marries Japanese restraint with a decidedly homey sensibility. Rounds out any teatime ritual. $60

You heart New York? We heart this Fishs Eddy mug with a darling illustrated take on the iconic Brooklyn Bridge in New York City. $12.95

CA N VASH OM ESTO R E.COM

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p h o t o g r a p h y B y NICOLE FRAN Z EN

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The smooth curves and midcentury-inspired handle on this espresso cup from Heath Ceramics suggest effortless and iconic California cool. $34

This Royal Albert 1930 Polka Rose three-piece tea set (dessert plate not shown) is all frills and florid English grandeur, right down to the 9-carat gold trim edging. $65

Just the right size for espresso, this Les Artistes Espresso Set features glazed interiors and level indicators for ristretto (short) and lungo (long). $45

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OS A K A

LO N DO N

The seamless integration of form and function that is a hallmark of Swedish design is on display in this perfectly simple teacup with wooden Hana saucer. $29.25

Designed by Makoto Koizumi, the warm wood handle on this minimalist Japanese Kaico enamel kettle suggests enjoying a cup on a white-sand beach. $140

From Emma Bridgewater’s Utility line for Liberty London, an excellent representation of British utilitarianism with its “½ Pint Mug” inscription. $29

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IN THIS ISSUE: ROME IN BLACK AND WHITE MOROCCO /

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for ROME. Photographer Leigh Beisch, along with her husband, father, and ten-year-old daughter, forgo their annual trip to Cape Cod for something a little more mysterious. Here we get a light-filled glimpse into the beauty of a region teeming with old world intrigue.

WOrdS and photogr aphy By leigh beisch

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experience. The various monkey portraits were taken at the Zoo, located in the stunning Borghese Gardens. We had been looking at so many important artworks, pictures of Popes and Emperors depicted, over the course of our trip that when I saw these furry, animated faces in gilded frames, I couldn’t help but laugh.

e decided to rent a small apartment in Trastevere, located on the outskirts of Rome and just south of Vatican City. We booked the apartment for two weeks so we could spend one week as tourists and the next week as locals. While Rome is where scale and extraordinary monuments are on display at every turn, the color and texture of this neighborhood are what captured our hearts. Here we felt like we could experience art, not just see it.

The building of our tiny rented apartment had the most amazing rustic front door that was designed to keep out invaders during the medieval period. There was also a stone staircase that was so worn with age that I could imagine a young slave girl carrying water up them thousands of years ago. Staying here instead of a hotel allowed us to let the language of the place—the people, the light, the smells—to seep in and shape our experience. The family and I enjoyed being part of the neighborhood’s everyday routines, sampling from the well-visited osterias and trattorias; shopping at the local designer clothing boutiques; and enjoying the famous Sunday flea market, Porta Portese. One place we frequented was local trattoria La Scala, where my daughter would order her favorite dish of spaghetti con burro e parmigiano, a simple dish of pasta with butter and parmigiano. One of my favorite dishes here was the tagliolini cacio e pepe con fioridi zucca e pachino, a pasta with a beautiful squash blossom layered on top, then sprinkled with parmesan and ground pepper.

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SEE. I spent some time shooting for my personal work entitled “Bodies of Land,� which is a series of abstract landscapes that are out of focus with the subject matter being light and color. This allows me to create a more timeless landscape that captures the imagination.

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eAT. My father and I woke up early a few mornings to photograph. Before we headed out, we stopped at the local Bar for morning cappuccinos and jam filled pastries. I loved the colorful trays here.

ur first morning in Rome, we headed to the Piazza di Santa Maria, where we found a beautiful fountain guarding the entrance to the Basilica of Our Lady, or Basilica di Santa Maria, one of the most ancient churches in Rome. So ancient, in fact, that it’s one of the few churches where you can see Christ depicted as a living prophet, rather than on the cross. It was here that I noticed the light streaming in through the clerestory, illuminating select statues and giving the sense of divine light. This light shaped my experience in Rome, becoming my subject matter and focal point of the trip.

The photo of the portal looking out onto the wall with a row of dotted trees was at the entrance to Hadrian’s Villa, a Roman Emperor of the 2nd century AD. The wall pictured here was built to be just one mile long, which was the length of the palace and, according to our guide, the distance that the Emperor’s physician had advised him to walk every day. The morning light of this photo gives us a glimpse into what one of the Emperor’s walks might have been like. From the cobblestone streets and terracotta and maize buildings cast in deep wine hues to street windows dotted with laundry lines, Rome was richer than I had ever imagined. I loved the color of the place, and the way the light would fill ancient crevices to reveal some things and hide others. It felt as though this light held the secrets of Rome.

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