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'328)287 SEPTEMBER 2013

SPECIALFEATURE

46

2013-2014BALLS&GALAS DIRECTORY

EDITOR'SLETTER ................................ 

FYIDC

French Historical Society Dinner ...............................

Hillwood's "Living Artfully"Opening.......................... 

Book Party for Walter Cronkite IV ............................

Opening of "Terminators" Exhibition ......................... 

DC Greens Fundraiser ..........................................

WomenAgainstAlzheimers (WA2) Dinner.................. 

Congressional Coalition for Adoption Luncheon ............

Operation Smile's Grin Gala .................................. 

INSIDER'SGUIDE ..................................... THEDISH ................................................. LIFESTYLES PERSONALITIESBar None .......................... FASHIONGolden Hour .................................. WHO'SNEXTWalter Cronkite IV .................. PERFECTPITCHDazzling Virtuoso ...............  SOCIALCALENDARSeptember Events ......... TRENDREPORTLeopard Print ...................... 

Global Down Syndrome Foundation's Gala & Fashion Show .........................................  Stroud Foundation 5K .........................................  1776 "Stars, Stripes & Startups" Independence Day Party 

HOMELIFE

WASHINGTONSOCIALDIARY

INSIDEHOMES Frank Islam and Debbie Driesman's Potomac residence ............................................

LIFEOFTHEPARTY

AROUNDTOWNSummer Scene .......................

Ford's Theatre Gala ...............................................

CharityWorks 100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting ............

REALESTATENEWS Great Estates ................... OPENHOUSE Autumn Offerings .......................

"Baby Cambridge" Reception ..................................

EVENTSPOTLIGHTCharityWorks 100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting and Dinner .......................... 

INMEMORIAMCreative Director J.C. Suares ..........

Step Afrika! Gala .................................................  National Geographic's 125th Anniversary ...................  POLLYWOOD

REDDz Trading Opening...................................... RAMMY Awards Gala......................................... The Corcoran Ball ................................................

Young Concert Artists of Washington Gala .................. Kuwait-America Foundation Dinner .........................  Children's Hearing & Speech Center BBQ ................. Washington Kastles Charity Classic ..........................  Events by Andre Wells 10th Anniversary ..................... Junior Tennis Champions Center Celebration ............... OVERTHEMOONWinner's Circle................... 

ONTHECOVERRaul Fernanez and Kevin Plank, chairmen of Fight for Children's Fight Night, at the Under Armour Campus in Baltimore, Md. (Photo by Tony Powell) TOPFROMLEFTFrank Islam's Potomac residence (Photo by Tony Brown); Richard Thomas and Condoleezza Rice at the Ford's Theatre Gala (Photo by Tony Powell); Environmental Working Group Anniversary Gala chairmen Izette Folger, Nora Maccoby, Ami Aronson and Skye Raiser at the Patterson Mansion for WL's Balls & Galas Directory (Photo by Tony Powell); "Golden Hour" fashion (Photo by Dustin Lilley) See inside for full crew and shopping credits; Holidae Hayes and Matt Gavin at the CharityWorks 100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting event (Photo by Tony Powell)

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T H E I N S I D E R’S G U I D E TO P OW E R , P H I L A N T H R O PY, A N D SO C I E T Y S I N C E 1 9 9 1

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Nancy Reynolds Bagley EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Anne Kim-Dannibale MANAGINGEDITOR

Alison McLaughlin SENIOREDITOR

Kevin Chaffee ASSISTANTEDITOR

Laura Wainman COLUMNISTS

Janet Donovan, Patrick D. McCoy,Vicky Moon, Stacey Grazier Pfarr and Donna Shor

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

J.C. Suarès GRAPHICDESIGNER

Matt Rippetoe CONTRIBUTINGPHOTOGRAPHERS

Tony Brown, Ben Droz, Alfredo Flores, Dustin Lilley, Tony Powell and Kyle Samperton

PUBLISHER & CEO

Soroush Richard Shehabi ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

John H. Arundel ACCOUNTEXECUTIVES

Kaitlin Froelick, Sheila Menn and Christina Salek-Raham BOOKKEEPER

Trina Hodges WEBTECHNOLOGIESDEVELOPMENT

iStrategyLabs LEGAL

Ackerman Brown PLLC INTERNS

Kelsey Edelmann, DaRio Hall, Katerina Polymeropoulos and Aysia Woods FOUNDER

Vicki Bagley CHAIRMAN, EXECUTIVE BOARD

Gerry Byrne Washington Life magazine publishes ten times a year. Issues are distributed in February, March, April, May, June, July/August, September, November, and December and are hand-delivered on a rotating basis to over 150,000 homes throughout D.C., Northern Virginia, and Maryland. Additional copies are available at various upscale retailers, hotels, select newstands, and Whole Foods stores in the area. For a complete listing, please consult our website at www.washingtonlife.com. You can also subscribe online at www.washingtonlife.com or send a check for $79.95 (one year) to: Washington Life Magazine, 2301 Tracy Place NW, Washington D.C., 20008. BPA audited. Email us at info@washingtonlife.com with press releases, tips, and editorial comments. Copyright ©2011 by Washington Life. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial content or photos in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs.

EDITOR’S LETTER

Kick Up Your Heels P

ack up your bathing suits and sandals, dust off those ball gowns and dinner jackets. Gala Season is upon us! From now until Christmas, our readers’ mailboxes will be flooded with invitations to numerous exceptionally special events and we want everyone along for the ride. So, get your calendars out, turn to the Balls and Galas directory on page 46, and start filling in dates for all the soirées you simply can’t afford to miss. You’ll find everything you need to know about the names, faces, places and causes related to 2013-2014 social season. September kicks off with a number of WL-sponsored events including the Ambassadors Ball, the Joan Hisaoka “Make a Difference Gala,” the Charityworks Dream Ball, Susan G. Komen’s Honoring the Promise Gala, Fight Night and After Dark @ THEARC — with many more to come before the Thanksgiving turkeys hit the table. The fun continues after the holidays with plenty of WLsponsored events as well: the Washington Ballet’s Noche de Pasión, Children’s National Medical Center’s Childrens Ball and Refugees International Dinner. While we were compiling our roster of what lies ahead, we didn’t neglect to report on all the major events that occurred from late spring until all the usual suspects left town for the Eastern Shore, Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, Newport, the Hamptons and other favored vacation spots. The many smiling faces on our party pages prove that we didn’t dare miss the Ford’s Theatre Gala, the Washington Kastles Charity Classic, CharityWorks’ 100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting Dinner and the French Historical Society’s Dinner with Alain Ducasse. No September issue is complete without pages devoted to fashionable eye candy, and this time we partnered with photographer Dustin Lilley to showcase the best in gala garb, including a jaw-droppingly exquisite Gucci gown that was the

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envy of everyone on set. The “Golden Hour” not only highlighted the beauty of the covetable garments, but also showcased the historic grounds at “Evermay,” the new home of the S&R Foundation. Drop-dead gowns aside, if you are suffering from a lack of leopard this fall, don’t miss our trend report highlighting the best in spots that can add a sophisticated touch of animal magnetism to any black-tie affair. There’s much more to come next month in our annual “Ambassador’s Directory,” which has long served as a comprehensive spotters guide to Embassy Row. We’ll feature coverage of the top September events, of course, plus Calvin and Jan Cafritz’s Welcome Back from Summer party. That’s when you know t Gala Season has officially begun! I part on a sad note with the news that J.C. Suares, the magazine’s creative director, passed away recently. I was very fond of him personally and will always be professionally indebted to him for helping elevate the style and tone of Washington Life with the design of 80 covers over the past decade. Our executive chairman, Gerry Byrne, knew J.C. for many years and we thought it appropriate to ask him to write the tribute that appears on the last page of this issue.

Nancy R. Bagley Editor in Chief

Readers wishing to contact Nancy Bagley can email her at nbagley@washingtonlife.com

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FYIDC Movie marathon

Footlights

THANNUALDCSHORTSFILMFESTIVAL

‘THEVELOCITY OFAUTUMN’

The largest ďŹ lm festival on the East Coast featuring mini movies — between one and 20 minutes in length — celebrates a milestone with 153 ďŹ lms from 23 countries shown in an expanded number of venues ranging from the E Street Cinema to Angelika Mosaic.This year’s roster includes local projects ranging from the smile-inducing “Honk If You Love Someoneâ€? to the heart-wrenching “Legal Strangerâ€? plus a special focus on emerging Russian ďŹ lmmakers. Sept. 19-29, various venues, $12 online/$15 box ofďŹ ce per showcase, all-access pass $100, festival.dcshorts.com.

Oscar-winner Estelle Parsons is Alexandria,a 79-year-old woman who refuses to move to a nursing home. Facing a stalemate with her family, she barricades herself inside her Brooklyn brownstone with a pile of Molotov cocktails when her long-absent son comes to save her life. Molly Smith directs Eric Coble’s intimate play, which also stars Tony-winner Stephen Spinella, before it heads to Broadway. Sept. 6-Oct. 20, 2013, Arena Stage’s Kreeger Theater, 1101 6th St. SW, $40-$90, 202-4883300, www.arenastage.org timeline

Clyde’s 50th Anniversary One of Washington’s oldest restaurant groups celebrated a milestone. A few key moments in the Clyde Restaurant Group’s journey: AUGUST-Harvard grad National Cash Register Company heir Stuart Davidson scouts dive bar B&J for a Manhaan-style saloon.

FALL-Georgetown freshman John Laytham gets a job as a dishwasher at the newly opened Clyde’s. Laytham works his way up to become sole partner with Davidson. >>  -Davidson and Laytham aend an auction and end up buying everything. A former boarding house becomes The Old Ebbi Grill.

To writ

NATIONALBOOKFESTIVAL Focusing on “books that changed the world,� this year’s ode to the written word brings literary greats Khaled Hosseini, Margaret Atwood, Don DeLillo, Joyce Carol Oates, Maria Arana and others to the National Mall where they will read from and sign their latest works. Sept. 21-22, National Mall between 9th and 14th streets NW, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sat.; noon to 5:30 p.m. Sun.; www.loc.gov/bookfest/ 14

  - Three new restaurants join the Clyde’s portfolio: 1789, The Tombs and F. Scott’s. In the ensuing years, they also expand to 10 Clyde’s locations. -Clyde’s pulls a 180 and opens The Hamilton, a restaurant and live music venue. >>

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N A T I O N A L B O O K F E S T I VA L L U C K Y D I A Z & T H E F A M I LY J A M B A N D N A T I O N A L B O O K F E S T I VA L 2 0 1 2 . A M A N D A L U C I D O N / F O R T H E L I B R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S . A R E N A S T A G E P H O T O B Y T O N Y P O W E L L . A L L O T H E R S C O U R T E S Y O F E A C H C O M P A N Y.

TheInsider’sGuidetoWashington

FYIDC | THEDISH

FROM FINE TO FAMILY DINING With the help of his 9-year-old son Luca, Fiola’s Fabio Trabocchi has moved the concept of family dining beyond the shared dishes on his menu at Casa Luca.

F

abio Trabocchi’s name is well known in Washington’s restaurant scene. Many will maintain that he ushered in a new age of fine dining with Fiola, the upscale trattoria that he and wife Maria opened in 2011. Fiola quickly found a place as a culinary hotspot and was chosen at the 2012 RAMMY Awards as the “Best New Restaurant of the Year.” (Fabio picked up the “Best Chef of the Year” award at the 2013 awards as well.) Now, with the help of the youngest Trabocchi, he is expanding his empire to the more casual realm of family dining at his osteria Casa Luca. “Casa Luca is the story of how I grew up, and how Luca represents a link to the future,” Fabio says. “It is a depiction of our everyday lifestyle as a family.” For Fabio, cooking was never meant to be a career or formal education. It began as bonding time with his own father, Giuseppe Trabocchi, in his hometown of Le Marche, Italy. Fabio would accompany his father on weekend trips to friends’ farms, where together they would decide on what fresh and available ingredients their dinner would be based upon. While we often hear of Italian mothers doing all the cooking, Giuseppe was the one who prepared the Trabocchi family meals. Fabio still remembers waking up on Sunday mornings to the smell of fresh pasta his father had been making since 5 a.m. Today, Fabio tries to give his family the same memories by making a point of cooking Sunday family dinners, much like those that can be found on the menu at Casa Luca. Giuseppe was Fabio’s first cuisine mentor and Casa Luca is, in many ways, homage to his father’s role in his booming career. From the family photos adorning the walls, including a 1960 mural of a young Giuseppe on a motorcycle, to the food on the plates, such as his signature grilled pork chop with orange-nepitella gremolada, everything at Casa Luca has a history. Even the dining room light fixtures are handmade from linens that came from a family-owned

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factory in Le Marche, while the glass sconces hanging over the tables were handmade in Mayorga Spain, Maria’s hometown. Fabio is now passing along the same accidental education to his own son, who asked to begin helping in the restaurants at age 7. Fabio and Maria let Luca choose the restaurant in which he wants to work, but lately he has been spending most of his time at Casa Luca — “for obvious reasons,” Fabio says. “Luca spends most of his time in the kitchen helping with small projects, such as making pastries,” Fabio says. “He likes to take responsibility for his work, which shows a higher sense of maturity than most [children] his age. I hope that his time in the kitchen will make him street smart when he is a young man.” Luca, he notes, “is also doing everything a kid his age should be doing. He just isn’t as interested in playing video games for six hours as he is in coming with us to work in the restaurant.” When he’s watching his precocious son walking around in a mini chef ’s coat putting finishing touches on desserts, it can be easy to forget Luca is only 9 years old. Spend a few minutes asking him what his friends think of his “job” or his career aspirations and you will rest assured that his childhood innocence remains intact. “It’s not like everyone has a restaurant named after them. It’s special,” Luca says. “I want to be a chef just like my dad when I grow up.” Though it is an answer most parents might yearn to hear, Maria says she isn’t sure it is the path Fabio would choose for his son because he knows the job can be tough on families. Nevertheless, she believes Luca’s time at the restaurant is beneficial both for his own growth and for his understanding of the family business. “He is a great kid, and I think he is really having fun at the restaurants,” Maria says. “It is good for him to see and understand what we do, and why we may not be home every night.”

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PHOTO BY GREG POWERS

B Y L A U R A WA I N M A N

FYIDC | PERSONALITIES

BAR NONE

As nouveau cocktail culture climbs to new heights, Washington’s old-school barkeeps keep it real. Rediscover the classics with those who led the way. ANNE KIM-DANNIBALE | PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN

JIM HEWES

BILLY MARTIN

THEWILLARD’SROUNDROBIN

MARTIN’STAVERN

RUNI started in the summer of 1971, working as barback at a spaghetti house in Rochester, N.Y. I filled in for a guy who didn’t show. I was 17. I’ve been at the Willard’s Round Robin for 27 years. I was on the opening team when the hotel reopened in 1986. SIGNATURE DRINK Southern-style mint julep. It was popularized by Henry Clay who introduced it at the old Willard Hotel. It’s Southern because it adds Kentucky bourbon. Julep is usually made with rum or brandy. Clay was known as the “Great Compromiser,” and what better way to compromise at the end of the day than with mint juleps? IFIWEREACOCKTAILIWOULDBE… an Absolut Elyx martini, straight up with a twist of orange because it’s so cool, so clean and so absolutely sophisticated. UNDERAPPRECIATED COCKTAIL OR SPIRIT Old Fashioned. There’s so much going on in mixology with infusing drinks — this was an original cocktail with infused whiskey, and the legacy goes back 150 years. WHEREISCOCKTAILCULTUREHEADED?There will be more education around the distribution of locally distilled spirits — ryes, bourbons. Minnesota is making great gins. It’s almost an offshoot of brewing beer. Liquor laws have changed so more people are getting into sustainability and what’s healthy. Some people are infusing sugars with spices and becoming more aware of garnishes, ice, etc. Henry Clay’s Southern Style Mint Julep In a crystal tumbler, muddle 6-8 mint leaves with 1 tsp. sugar and a small measure of Maker’s Mark Bourbon. Fill glass with freshly cracked ice and stir vigorously. Add more ice and fill glass with equal measures of the bourbon and sparkling water. Garnish with fresh mint sprig, twist of lemon and powdered sugar. 18

RUN I bartended for 18 years, almost six nights a week from 1982 to 2000. Once a bartender always a bartender. I will make guest appearances behind the wood here at Martin’s Tavern. Everyone usually says, “You still have it!” SIGNATUREDRINKI have three: Old Fashioned, frozen drinks and martinis up, especially a lemon drop martini. I made these with fresh ingredients and a little extra attention. I was presented with a, signed and inscribed framed photograph from a guest who was very well known for his photographs of martinis, saying I was the best martini maker in D.C. IFIWEREACOCKTAILIWOULDBE… A Champagne cocktail. Classy and sophisticated yet simple, bubbly and colorful. It’s not watered down and enjoyable anytime by anyone, day or night. UNDERAPPRECIATEDCOCKTAILORSPIRITA classic Sidecar.This wonderfully balanced mix of Cognac with a touch of sweet and sour has been lost to the misconception that it’s a difficult drink to make or that it’s outdated. I surprise guests when I make this for them. It is always well received. WHEREISCOCKTAILCULTUREHEADED? In the same direction as food with infusions, mixing ingredients that don’t seem to belong in cocktails and creating artwork out of alcohol. However, as with food, things always come back to comfort. With drinks, it’s martinis, gin and tonics, Scotch and sodas and good old Bourbon. Craft beers are changing the landscape, as are wine producers. We will see small-batch producers (legal moonshiners) popping up and relying on the Internet. Billy Martin’s Lemon Drop In a shaker, combine 2 1/2 oz. Absolute Citron, 1 oz. Cointreau, 1/2 oz. simple syrup, juice of 1/2 lemon and shake well. Pour into a frosted martini glass rimmed with sugar blended with dried lemon peel and serve.

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FYIDC | WHO’SNEXT

WHO’S NEXT Walt Cronkite IV, 24, associate producer, CBS News PHOTO BY TONY BROWN

T

he grandson of “the most trusted man in America” has followed in his famous grandfather’s footsteps, and reveals a side of Walter Cronkite many may not have known in “Cronkite’s War: His World War II Letters Home,” a collection of personal correspondence to his wife discovered at the Dolph Briscoe Center at the University of Texas.

WHAT LED YOU TO PUBLISH YOUR GRANDFATHER’S LETTERS? Neither my father nor I had known those letters had existed and we were completely blown away. My grandfather wrote home to my grandmother several times a week detailing his daily life in wartime London. Stories he told include; manning the .50 caliber gun in a Flying Fortress during a bombing raid over Germany and crash landing in a glider behind enemy lines with the 101st airborne during Operation Market Garden. The letters also tell of some of the more enjoyable aspects of his job, such as covering movie star Clark Gable’s war-time service and a boozy Christmas dinner with Ernest Hemingway and Martha Gelhorn. I wanted to share these fascinating letters with a wider audience, so I brought them to my esteemed Hamilton College writing and history professor Maurice Isserman and together we turned it into the book published damaged the business model of the newspaby National Geographic. per industry. But overall I think he would be pleased with the state of the journalism profesWHATDIDYOULEARNABOUTHIMTHAT sion today, with its strong self-regulating stanYOU DIDN’T KNOW BEFORE? I learned dards and large crop of smart, well-credentialed what a talent my grandfather had for writing men and women eager to become journalists. letters.The letters also confirmed what I already I also think my grandfather would have been knew. At his memorial service, Bob Schieffer a master of Twitter; he was sharp, funny and said that one of the most impressive things a fast writer, who always made sure to stay about Walter Cronkite was that he was the exact abreast of new technology and trends. same person on screen as he was off-camera. And reading these letters I heard the exact same WHATISTHEMOSTINTERESTINGSTORY voice I remembered from growing up; plain YOU’VE COVERED SO FAR? Coverspoken, sharp, funny and kind. ing immigration reform as it works its way through Congress has been fascinating. It’s an WHAT WOULD HE THINK OF NEWS- issue that will affect every single American, GATHERINGTODAY? He would certainly and have huge economic, political and social be sad to see the marketplace trends that have impact on the country for generations.

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One specific story that was interesting happened a few months ago when I was asked to interview Mayor Bloomberg at the Capitol for a story about gun control by reporter Dean Reynolds. Dean and his producer are based in Chicago, and they gave me guidelines on what questions they wanted asked, but they let me write and ask the questions from behind the camera. Sitting across from one of the most successful, powerful and controversial figures alive, and asking him tough questions was a pretty incredible experience. IF YOU COULD CHOOSE ANYONE TO INTERVIEW WHO WOULD IT BE AND WHAT WOULD YOU ASK? Thomas Jefferson. I recently visited Monticello and was awed by the man’s genius, and soon after read Jon Meacham’s “Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power” and Christopher Hitchens’ “Thomas Jefferson: Author of America.” I would ask Jefferson to articulate how the principles of 1776, which have served this country so well for so long, could be best applied to deal with the challenges our nation faces today. I would also ask him to explain the contradiction of the author of the Declaration of Independence profiting immensely off of human bondage. I think Jefferson would also be able to offer good advice on how to live well and achieve a balanced, ordered life, healthy in both body and mind. George Washington is the founder I most admire, because of his fortitude as the commander of the Continental Army and the precedents he set as President, but Jefferson was a true conversationalist who would give a more in-depth interview.

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FYIDC | SOCIALCALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

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COMMONSENSEMEDIA AWARDS Innovative and visionary leaders such as Bill Clinton and George Lucas gather at this annual ceremony to honor those who have helped transform the way children learn, grow and thrive in a new digital world. An awards program plus cocktail buffet are featured. The Kennedy Center,Terrace Theater; 7 p.m.; tickets start at $500, sponsorships at $2,500; contact Kate Love, 415-553-6707, development@commonsense.org

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AMBASSADORSBALL This internationally themed ball supports the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and is noted for the attendance of the diplomatic corps, members of Congress and prominent locals. This year’s ball includes a tribute to Sen. Richard Burr, Rep. Chris Van Hollen and Chief of Protocol Capricia Marshall as well as dinner, dancing and charitable bidding. JW Marriott Hotel, Washington, D.C.; 6:30 p.m.; black-tie or national attire; tickets start at $500, sponsorships at $5,000; contact 202-296-5363, MSAmbassadorsBallDC@nmss.org

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NatIONALSPORTING LIBRARYBENEFITPOLO MATCH A seated luncheon precedes a much-anticipated polo match at this annual outdoor fĂŞte, which includes a performance by the Washington Scottish Pipe Band, a parade of Piedmont Fox hounds and a ladies hat contest. Tailgating will also be offered for the ďŹ rst time this year. Virginia International Polo Club, 21515 Trappe Rd., Upperville,Va.; 12:30 p.m. gates open, 1 p.m., luncheon, 2:30 p.m. polo match; tickets start at $500, sponsorships at $5,000; contact Holly Johnson, 202-741-1294, holly@webstergroupinc.com

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SUSANGKOMEN HONORINGTHE PROMISEGALA Heroes of the breast cancer movement take a break from work to celebrate their accomplishments at this inspirational evening. Hosted

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by Bob Schieffer and Zoraida Sambolin, the gala celebrates survivors and remembers those who have lost their Paula and Bob Hisaoka with Bonnie and Dick Patterson at battles. Proceeds support rethe 2012 AfterDark at THEARC. (Photo by Tony Powell) search to eradicate the disease. Kennedy Center, Eisenhower Theater; 8 p.m.; tickets start at $200, sponsorships tickets start at $250, sponsorships at $1,000; contact sat $2,500; contact Lynn Sellers, 202-654-6532, Janet Stone, 202-889-5901, jstone@thearcdc.org lsellers@komen.org NATIONALSYMPHONY JOANHISAOKAMAKEA ORCHESTRASEASON DIFFERENCEGALA OPENINGBALL Though it has been more Symphony patrons kick-off the NSO’s 83rd than ďŹ ve years since Joan Hisaoka lost her bat- season with cellist Yo-Yo Ma and organist tle with cancer, this gala, hosted annually in her Cameron Carpenter. The festivities continue honor, has raised more than $4 million to bring with dinner and dancing with proceeds benhope and healing to those still ďŹ ghting the ill- eďŹ ting the orchestra’s artistic, education and ness. BeneďŹ ciaries include Life with Cancer, community engagement programs. The KenneThe Smith Center for Healing and the Arts and dy Center; 7 p.m.; black-tie; tickets start at $1,000, the Brem Foundation to Defeat Breast Can- sponsorships at $5,000; contact Matthew Porter, cer. Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C.; 6 202-416-8102, nsoball@kennedy-center.org p.m.; black-tie; tickets start at $600, sponsorships at J STREETGALA $1,500; contact Vivian Thompson-Goldstein, 202DINNER 302-0053, joansdifference@aol.com WL’s Nancy Bagley will WOLFTRAPBALL be honored for her commitment to IsraeliThis annual ball supports Wolf Trap Palestinian peace efforts following J Street’s Foundation’s arts and education pro- National Conference. Civil libertarian Morton grams, including the Early Learning Through Halperin will also receive the Tzedek v’Shalom the Arts for preschoolers, and the Wolf Trap Award. A cocktail reception and dinner bookOpera Company. Guests will dine and dance end the awards ceremony. Washington Convenon the Filene Center stage where the cui- tion Center; 6:30 p.m.; business attire; tickets start sine and dĂŠcor will honor the “joie de vivreâ€? of at $100, sponsorships start at $1800; contact 202French culture. Filene Center stage; 7 p.m.; black- 448-1605, gala@jstreet.org tie; tickets start at $500, sponsorships sat $7,500; contact Melanie McCarty, 703-255-1944, melaniem@wolftrap.org

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SAVE THE DATE :/6321625('(9(176

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AFTERDARKAT THEARC The Ambassador of Gabon and gala chairwoman Michelle Freeman show that “good things happen after darkâ€? at this entertaining evening to support the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation Campus (THEARC) and its 11 nonproďŹ t partners. THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE; 6:30 p.m.;

OCT 5 CHARITYWORKS OBSIDIANOBSESSION OCT 9 ANGELSINADOPTION GALA OCT 11  POINTSOFLIGHT TRIBUTEAWARDS OCT 26 WASHINGTONBALLET UNMASKTHENIGHTGALA

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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LIFE OF THE PARTY WL-sponsoredandExclusiveEvents|Step Afrika!, Ford’s Theatre Gala and more!

Valerie Jarrett, Judy Woodruff and Al Hunt at the British Embassy party celebrating the birth of H.R.H. Prince George of Cambridge (Photo by Kyle Samperton)

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LIFE

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Bill Russell and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi

Eric Stonestreet Condoleezza Rice Richard Thomas

WL SPONSORED

FORD’S THEATRE GALA Ford’s Theatre & National Portrait Gallery | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Will Ris, Paul Tetreault and Nancy Dorn

LINCOLNIAN LEADERS: Though a last-minute scheduling change limited Vice President Joe Biden’s participation to a markedly subdued welcome speech honoring emergency ďŹ rst responders, Ford’s Theatre’s annual gala hosted by Richard Thomas (“The Americans,â€? “The Waltonsâ€?) included plenty of toe-tapping entertainment with rousing tap dancers, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves, Broadway’s Brian Stokes Mitchell and Heidi Blickensta, “Nashvilleâ€? stars Clare Bowen and Sam Palladio and “Modern Familyâ€? star Eric Stonestreet, who delivered a moving tribute to Dennis and Judy Shepard of the Mahew Shepard Foundation. Aer presenting former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and basketball Hall of Famer Bill Russell with the Lincoln Medal, supporters made their way to the National Portrait Gallery for dinner and dancing under the stars.

Sharon Malone and Attorney General Eric Holder

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Stephen Kessler and Heather Podesta

Loran Aiken and Sam Palladio

Brian Stokes Mitchell, Ellington Mitchell and Allyson Tucker 26

Clare Bowen and Alex Fasching

Marcelle Leahy and Sen. Patrick Leahy

Omar Edwards, Luke Spring, Leo Manzari and John Manzari

Paul Pelosi with Marlene and Fred Malek WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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LIFE

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PARTY

British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott

‘BABY CAMBRIDGE’ CELEBRATION British Ambassador’s Residence | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON HEIR AND TWO SPARES: British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmaco and Lady Westmaco wasted no time dawdling once the news of the royal birth was announced. Invitations were dispatched at once to celebrate the birth of “Baby Cambridge” even before his royal parents, aka Wills and Kate, had decided upon a proper name for the third in line to the British throne. KINGLY NAME: By the time the party took place, it had already been announced: Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge. (George for his great-great-grandfather, the current Queen’s father; Alexander, as Sir Peter suggested, “because he will be a great monarch like the famous Greek”; and Louis “to signal our intention to take back France for the British crown.” Very clever, of course, but those in the know seemed certain it was to honor the late Lord Louis Mountbaen, Prince Philip’s favorite uncle and a beloved mentor to Prince Charles.

Count Renaud de Viel Castel and International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde

Debbie Dingell and Steve Clemons

Lady Westmacott, Ina Ginsburg and James Adams Robert Allbritton, Howard Fineman, Amy Nathanson and Elena Allbritton

Andrea Mitchell and Anita McBride

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Rupert Cornwell and Jurek Martin

Fred and Genny Ryan with Kathleen and Chris Matthews WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Susan Blumenthal, Alexandra de Borchgrave and Lucky Roosevelt

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LIFE

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Chancellor of DC Public Schools Kaya Henderson and Samara Albert

Chris and Stacey Garrett, Leslie Carey, Step Afrika Founder Brian Williams and Bill Kirk Jason Turner and Jackie Francis “Symphony in Step� WL SPONSORED

STEP AFRIKA! GALA Atlas Performing Arts Center | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL DANCE AND DRUMS: Supporters of Washington’s famed Step Afrika! dance troupe gathered to celebrate the innovative company’s success with dinner and — what else? — dancing at the Atlas Performing Arts Center. Guests enjoyed mingling with founder Brian Williams and his mother, Patricia Williams, before and aer a performance that featured the group’s signature tribal beats. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Beverly Rivers and David Gilbert

Elise Shore, Robert Raben and Leticia Miranda

John Hill, Justin Stephens and Michael Spencer

“Symphony in Step�

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Lisa Dorsey and Charlie Jones WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Gail Percy, Wade Davis andCarson Josh Bernstein Telesa Via and Ethan

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LIFE

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Boyd Matson and Betty Hudson with host Alex Trebeck

(Photo by Robert Isacson)

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC’S 125TH ANNIVERSARY GALA

Felix Baumgartner, Cory Richards and National Geographic Editor Chris Johns

The National Building Museum | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

Mike Fay and Howard Buffett (Photo by Robert Isacson)

BIRTHDAY BASH: National Geographic’s glamorous gala was just as much about the fearless individuals who have helped explore the planet’s rich diversity, expand knowledge and conserve natural resources as it was a celebration of the many achievements of one of the largest scientific and educational institutions in the world. EXCEPTIONALLY ACCOMPLISHED: Among those honored at the event amid a spectacular video backdrop of erupting volcanoes, verdant forests, parched deserts, massive ocean waves and preposterously cute baby animals were oceanographer Sylvia Earle, filmmaker James Cameron, scientist Edward O. Wilson, and philanthropist Howard Buffe, who said he shared his award with those who work with National Geographic — “a big family around the world.”

Steve and Jean Case with Lale Labuko

James Cameron (Photo by Rebecca Hale)

Sylvia Earle Ben Ballard and Robert Ballard

Sayed Gul Kalesh and National Geographic Chairman and CEO John Fahey 32

Edward Wilson

National Geographic President Howard Owens and Marnie Owens WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Gail Percy, Wade Davis and Josh Bernstein

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CharityWorks is grateful for the support of our major sponsors. Adeler Jewelers

Barry Dixon and Mark Lowham

Barry Dixon Interiors / Barry Dixon Patrice and Scott Brickman Capital One / George Swygert Carl M. Freeman Foundation Amy and Pierre Chao

Co-Chairs of the CharityWorks Dream Ball Cordially invite you to the

Kay Kendall and Jack Davies DHL DRS Technologies / William Lynn Fernandez Foundation / Jean-Marie and Raul Fernandez Fisher Brothers Leah and Jacques Gansler Pamela and Richard Hanlon

CharityWorks

Glenn Lebowitz The Leonsis Foundation / Lynn and Ted Leonsis Karen and Bruce Levenson Susan and Alex Mandl Liz and Fernando Murias ManTech International / Marilyn and George Pedersen Northrop Grumman / Linda Mills Pagnato-Karp Group PwC / Chris Simmons Norma and Russ Ramsey Raytheon Sobieski / Imperial Brands TTR Sotheby’s / Mark Lowham and Joseph Ruzzo

Dream Ball Noir A magical evening of cocktails, dining and dancing To benefit Capital Partners for Education and Fisher House October 5, 2013 6:00 p.m. The National Building Museum

US Trust / John Devine Judy and Michael Wood

CONTACT US 703.286.0758 Telephone charityworks@aol.com Email

Washington, D.C.

POLLYWOOD TheNexusofPoliticsďš?Hollywoodďš?MediaandDiplomacy|Kuwait-American Foundation Dinner and more!

Catherine Zeta Jones and Sec. John Kerry at the Kuwait-America Foundation Dinner (Photo by Tony Powell)

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POLLYWOOD

Bob Woodruff, Lynn Blitzer, Kari McDonough, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough, Lee Woodruff and Wolf Blitzer PHOTOSBYVICKYPOMBO

Amb. of Kuwait Salem Al-Sabah, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Secretary of State John F. Kerry, Rima Al-Sabah and Teresa Heinz

KUWAIT-AMERICA FOUNDATION DINNER Kuwait Ambassador’s Residence EDUCATE AND EMPOWER: Secretary of State John F. Kerry wasn’t exactly kidding when he noted that the “splendid seing” of this year’s Kuwait-America Foundation Dinner hosted by Amb. Salem Al-Sabah and his wife Rima made it rather obvious that his hosts “didn’t have to worry about sequesters” as they thanked donors of scholarship funds for promising Arab students at Georgetown University. “They’re the most remarkable team to hit Washington in 20 years,” Kerry added before the spotlight turned to his co-honoree, Catherine Zeta-Jones. Aer accepting an award for her charitable work, the glamorous multi-award-winning actress won over the audience of political, media and business leaders with her heartfelt statement that “public service is not a chore, it’s a joy for me.”

Rep. John Dingell

Susan and David Axelrod

Justice Stephen Breyer

John Watson, Lisa Barry and Jim Gale PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Sophie L’Hélias Delattre, Wayne Berman, Andrea Mitchell and French Amb. François Delattre

Rep. Ed Royce, Marie Royce and Organization of American States President Luis-Alberto Moreno

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Lady Westmacott with Sen. Tom Udall and Jill Udall

Paul Boulos and Jack DeGioia

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Y LIFT Founder and Medical Director Yan Trokel and Mani Trokel

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POLLYWOOD

David Gregory, Martina Hingis and Indonesian Amb. Dino Djalal

Mark Ein and Ed Henry

Reps. Charlie Dent and Donna Edwards

WL SPONSORED

WASHINGTON KASTLES CHARITY CLASSIC Kastles Stadium at The Wharf | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON HEAVY HITTERS: Washington has long been a sports-crazed town because of the ‘Skins and Nats. When summertime comes, however, it’s pro tennis that whips crowds into a frenzy, especially when the Washington Kastles are here defending their third World Team Tennis championship. FUND-RAISERS: Right about midseason, team owner Mark Ein invited heavy-hier pals onto the court to support the DC Education Fund, Food & Friends and TAPS. NBC’s David Gregory and DC United Coach Ben Olsen were named MVPs of the night, but the Kastles enjoyed the biggest triumph when the team hit its way to its third WTT championship in a row. Game. Set. Match.

Reps. Cheri Bustos and Shelly Moore Capito

Rep. Mike McIntyre VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Lane Luskey and Melissa Maxfield

Murphy Jensen 38

Ali Amirhooshmand, Lillian Dunn, Diana Lawson, Danielle Rodman and Erik Huey

Jonathan Karl and Meredith Webster

Lang Campbell and Lauren Rickets

Amy Mehlman, Elise Pickering and Sally Stiebel

David Ross, Leander Paes and Steve Chenevey

Ben Olsen WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Jimmie Williams and Bobby Reynolds

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POLLYWOOD

Ray Benton, John Breaux and Mats Wilander

Jim Handly, Chris Evert, Rynthia Rost and Eva HafstrĂśm

WL EXCLUSIVE

JUNIOR TENNIS CHAMPIONS CENTER CELEBRATION Residence of Swedish Ambassador | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES GAME ON: Hall of Famer Chris Evert and former Sen. John Breaux have more in common than one mignt think. On her way to winning 18 Grand Slams, Evert became the ďŹ rst female owner of a high performance youth training facility and raised $20 million through Chris Evert Charities. Breaux, whose ďŹ rst court was asphalt “with cracks so big you could break your ankle,â€? founded the Senator’s Cup, an annual charity event featuring Congressional tennis players. Both were recognized for pouring their respective energies into giving back to the game they love, raising $170,000 for the Junior Tennis Champions Center and Game On!, a crusade providing educational opportunities to underserved city youth.YOU JUST CAN’T WIN: “His grip is still a lile dodgy,â€? Everts joked.

Brett Haber and Robb Bunnen

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Adrian Fenty

Liz Fitton, Christine Harrison, Susan Grow and Carole Walter

Hunter and Stephanie Johnston with Tom McMillen

Jerry and Isabel Jasinowski with Jane Harman

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Sudhir Rajkumar, Rebecca Hanson and Liz Legg WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Kristina Rennerstedt, Gisela Fviden and Karin Hoglund

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POLLYWOOD

Chef Alain Ducasse

Co-chairwomen Jeannie Rutherfoord and Michèle Imhoff French Amb. François Delattre, Co-Chairwoman Elizabeth Stribling and Sophie l’HÊlias Delattre Sam Lehrman and Katherine Wood

WL EXCLUSIVE

FRENCH HERITAGE SOCIETY DINNER Embassy of France | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Count Denis de Kergolay

Pianist Mary Anne Huntsman with Francesca Craig

A FAMILY AFFAIR: Supporters of the French Heritage Society’s mission to preserve France’s architectural legacy on both sides of the Atlantic paid $1,000-a-pop to underwrite college education programs and toast Franco-American relations at a dinner prepared by renowned chef Alain Ducasse. The proprietor of 24 restaurants worldwide — three of which possess Michelin’s coveted three-stars — is a master of “l’art de vivreâ€? and no one who tasted his spectacular repast — pressed foĂŻe gras, slow-baked Maine lobster, milkfed veal loin and baba Armagnac — was heard to disagree. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Rep. Joaquin Castro and Chris Isham

Kate and Jim Lehrer

Chip Cronkite, Walt Cronkite, Lily O’Hanlon and Michael O’Hanlon WL EXCLUSIVE

WALT CRONKITE BOOK PARTY Christopher and Jennifer Isham Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYBROWN

Camsie and Errick McAdams

A FAMILY AFFAIR: It didn’t take long to come up with an idea for a book aer Walter “Walt� Cronkite IV started looking into archives amassed by his grandfather, legendary CBS newsman Walter Cronkite, that are stored at the University of Texas at Austin. “Cronkite’s War: His World War II Leers Home,� which he co-authored with Maurice Isserman, has earned critical reviews — including those by colleagues at CBS News (where he is an associate producer) who aended a party in his honor at the home of network bureau chief Chris Isham.

Jackie Alemany, Jennifer Isham and Kylie Atwood

Chip and Nina Reid VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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POLLYWOOD

Shelley Holt, Ann Brown, Lauren Shweder Biel, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Sarah Bernardi

Don Brown and Caroline Croft

Sophie l’HÊlias Delattre, Gabrielle Bekink and Willee Lewis

WL EXCLUSIVE

Jeremy Bernard

DC GREENS FRIENDRAISER Donald and Ann Brown Residence | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

Carlota AndrĂŠs and JosĂŠ AndrĂŠs

GREEN LIVING: 150 health-conscious Washingtonians sipped, nibbled and mingled in a picturesque garden to support DC Green’s mission to bridge the gap between local residents and freshly grown produce. Beloved actress and newly named advisory board member Maggie Gyllenhaal spoke of the importance of the group’s impact on local health, referring to DC Green’s eorts as a “national model.â€? Guests were elated when the The Carlyle Group’s Allan Holt made a generous $200,000 matching challenge grant. White House Social Secretary Jeremy Bernard and celebrity chef JosĂŠ AndrĂŠs were spoed enjoying tunes by the King Street Bluegrass Band before guests le with parting gis of Herbs de Provence spices grown in the gardens of local schools.

Nancy Taylor Bubes with Steve and Susan Kostorowski

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Sarah Gesiriech, Kathleen Strottman and Alain Datcher Rep. Suzanne Bonamici and Sen. Mary Landrieu

WL EXCLUSIVE

Richard Thompson and Dale Mott

Russell Pretz and Alexandra Gruber

CONGRESSIONAL COALITION FOR ADOPTION LUNCHEON Sen. Mary Landrieu’s Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Lindsay Ellenbogen and Heather Guay

FOSTERING HOPE: The annual luncheon at Sen. Mary Landrieu’s home has become a highlight of the summer for the Foster Youth interns working on Capitol Hill. The intimate gathering featured advice from their host and colleagues, Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, followed by moving testimony by 2013 Foster Youth intern Alain Datcher about his experience working on the Hill. “Foster care can, in many ways, be a cesspool of hopelessness. And yet we understand there is no recession on goodwill, there is no furlough on investing in the future,â€? said Datcher, 22, who interned in Sen. Tim Kaine’s oďŹƒce. “You cannot put a price on this opportunity.â€?

Shannon Crowley and Rebecca Vermette

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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THEESSENTIALGUIDETOTHEYEAR’SBESTEVENTS

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MICHELLE FREEMAN, CHAIRMAN

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SEPTEMBER THEAMBASSADORSBALL

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The Ambassadors Ball kicks off the fall social season with members of the diplomatic corps, Congressional leaders and other notable guests at an internationally themed evening that includes dinner, dancing and a silent auction. The event has raised more than $17 million for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. DATE: Wednesday, September 11; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: JW Marriott, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Mrs. Terese Casey and Mrs. Mylene Walden TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000-$100,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-2965363 option 2, msambassadorsballdc@ nmss.org

THEUNITEDSTATESNAVY MEMORIAL’SLONESAILOR AWARDSDINNER WHAT TO EXPECT: Coast Guard veteran and CNN Founder Ted Turner, Navy veteran and chairman & CEO of General Motors Corporation Dan Akerson, Gen. P.X. Kelley, and former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison will be honored for their service to country and community. DATE: Wednesday, September 18; 6 p.m. LOCATION: The National Building Museum ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Vice Adm. John Totushek and Dr. Jack London TICKET PRICE: $425 SPONSORSHIP: From $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: M.C. Dunn, 202-380-0728, mcdunn@ navymemorial.org, www. navymemorial.org

SUSANGKOMENPRESENTS ‘HONORINGTHEPROMISE’

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Master of Ceremonies, Bob Schieffer hosts the 2013 benefit celebrating progress in the fight against breast cancer, featuring inspiring stories, entertainment and awards. This year’s honorees include Victoria Reggie Kennedy and the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the Caterpillar Foundation

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and Dr. Olufumilayo I. Olopade. DATE: Friday, September 20; 8 p.m. awards presentation; 9 p.m. Pink Party LOCATION: The Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: U.A.E. Amb.Yousef AlOtaiba and Mrs. Al-Otaiba, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, Rep. Dave Camp, Sen. Susan Collins, Rep. John Dingell, Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz Founding Chairman: David Rubenstein Gala Chairmen: The Hon. and Mrs. Spencer Abraham TICKET PRICE: $200-$500 SPONSORSHIP: $2,500-$500,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-6546532, lsellers@komen.org, www.komen org/honoringthepromise

JOANHISAOKA‘MAKEA DIFFERENCE’GALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This gala honors publicist Joan Hisaoka, who lost her battle with cancer in 2008. Proceeds benefit Life with Cancer, part of the nonprofit Inova Health System; The Smith Center for Healing and the Arts; and The Brem Foundation to Defeat Breast Cancer. Guests can expect cocktails, a four-course dinner with wine pairings, dancing and silent and live auctions. DATE: Saturday, September 21;VIP reception, 5:30 p.m.; 6 p.m. general reception and silent auction; 7:30 p.m. dinner program LOCATION: Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Robert Hisaoka TICKET PRICE: $600 SPONSORSHIP: From $1,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Vivian Thompson-Goldstein, 202-302-0053, joansdifference@aol.com

WOLFTRAPBALL WHAT TO EXPECT: Wolf Trap’s annual benefit, in partnership this year with the Embassy of France, supports the Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts, Children’s Theatre-in-the-Woods, Wolf Trap Opera Company, and the Center for Education at Wolf Trap. DATE: Saturday, September 21; 7 p.m. LOCATION: The Filene Center Stage, Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Sean O’Keefe, Karen

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Schaufeld and Kimberly H. Stewart TICKET PRICE: $500-$1,500 SPONSORSHIP: $7,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 703-2554030, events@wolftrap.org

AFTERDARKATTHEARC

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The 11 nonprofits housed in the Town Hall Education Arts Campus are celebrated for providing services to children and families living east of the Anacostia River in Southeast Washington, D.C. Cocktails, dinner, dancing and surprise entertainment are featured. DATE: September 28; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: THEARC ATTIRE: “After Dark Chic� EVENT CHAIRMEN: Gabonese Amb. Michael Moussa-Adamo and Michelle Freeman TICKET PRICE: $250 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 host committee CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Janet Stone 202-550-8528, jstone@thearcdc.org

NATIONALSYMPHONY ORCHESTRASEASONOPENING BALL WHAT TO EXPECT: The first concert of the NSO’s 83rd season features Music Director Christoph Eschenbach with superstar cellist Yo Yo Ma and organist Cameron Carpenter accompanying the orchestra for works by Tchaikovsky and Saint-SaÍns. Dinner and dancing follows inside a grand pavilion on the center’s South Plaza. Proceeds support the orchestra’s artistic, education and community outreach programs. DATE: Sunday, September 29; 7 p.m. LOCATION: Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie CONTACT: 202-416-8102 http://www.kennedy-center. org/events/?event=NNSOP

NATIONALHISPANIC FOUNDATIONFORTHEARTS’ NOCHEDEGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The 17th annual Noche de Gala is widely considered to be the premier event for Latinos in the entertainment, corporate and political worlds celebrated with top Latino stars, including NHF founding members actors Jimmy Smits, Esai Morales and Sonia Braga. This year’s festivities include a VIP reception with celebrities and dignitaries, a dinner with an awards presentation and an after party.

DATE: Monday, September 30; 6:30 p.m. VIP reception; 7:30 p.m. dinner. LOCATION: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie FOUNDERS: Jimmy Smits, Esai Morales, Sonia Braga, Merel Julia, Felix Sanchez TICKET PRICE: $1,250 individual, info@ hispanicarts.org SPONSORSHIP: $1,250-$100,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-2938330, www.hispanicarts.org

OCTOBER ANEVENINGTOBENEFIT INNOCENTSATRISK

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Honored guests from the White House, State Department, Congress and the diplomatic corps will attend this event to honor individuals working to end child trafficking. DATE: October 24 LOCATION: Melvyn and Suellen Estrin Residence ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Melvyn and Suellen Estrin TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $1,500-$10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-6254338, dsigmund@innocentsatrisk.org

CHARITYWORKSDREAMBALL

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Described as “power philanthropy at its finest,� the CharityWorks Dream Ball brings together top business and government leaders for an evening of fine dining, live entertainment, dancing and bidding on luxury items and one-of-a-kind experiences. Proceeds benefit Fisher House and Capital Partners for Education. DATE: October 5; 6 p.m. LOCATION: National Building Museum ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Barry Dixon and Mark Lowham TICKET PRICE: $650 SPONSORSHIP: $1,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 703-2860758, charityworks@aol.com

CAPITALFORCHILDREN’S CASINONIGHT

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Top private equity professionals gather for food, fun and gaming to help bring hope and resources to

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children waiting for their lucky break. DATE: Saturday, October 5; 7:30 p.m. LOCATION: Long View Gallery ATTIRE: Business casual EVENT CHAIRMEN: Phil Deutch and Paul Feeko TICKET PRICE: $175 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Cicely Fox, cfox@ngpetp.com

 

HUMANRIGHTS CAMPAIGNNATIONAL DINNER

WHAT TO EXPECT: More than 3,000 HRC members, friends, family and allies gather for cocktails, a silent auction, dinner, live entertainment and a thought-provoking program hosted by top political and entertainment personalities. DATE: Saturday, October 5; 5 p.m. LOCATION: Walter E. Washington Convention Center ATTIRE: Black-tie/festive EVENT CHAIRMEN: Jason Laney and June Crenshaw TICKET PRICE: $307.25 SPONSORSHIP: $3,000-$25,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: dctickets@ hrc.org

HARMANCENTERFORTHE ARTSGALA

-RDQ+LVDRND´0DNHD'LIIHUHQFHµ*DOD ROBERT G. HISAOKA, CHAIRMAN

WHAT TO EXPECT: This event celebrating the arts features world-class entertainment and the presentation of the Will and Harman Philanthropy awards. Proceeds provide funding for Shakespeare Theater Company’s community engagement and arts education programs. DATE: Sunday, October 6; 6 p.m. LOCATION: Sidney Harman Hall and National Building Museum

ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Nick and Marla Allard TICKET PRICE: $750 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Eric Bailey, 202-547-3230 ext. 2330

 

THPEN/FAULKNER FOUNDATIONGALA

WHAT TO EXPECT: Calvin Trillin serves as master of ceremonies this year as writers Christopher Castellani, Matt Gallagher, Roy Scranton,Yiyun Li, Anthony Marra, George Pelecanos, Cheryl Strayed, Christopher Tilghman, Meg Wolitzer, Tiphanie Yanique and Mary Kay Zuravleff read on the theme of “Renewal.” A seated dinner follows in the Old and New Reading Rooms. DATE: Monday, October 7; 6:30 p.m. reception; 7:30 p.m. readings; 8:30 p.m. dinner LOCATION: Folger Shakespeare Library ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Sen. Thad Cochran, Mary Haft, Sen. Patrick Leahy and Susan Richards Shreve TICKET PRICE: $500-$1,000 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 per table of 10 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Lisa Jourdan, 202-636-8743, lisa@campbellpeachey. com, www.penfaulkner.org

CHAMPIONSOFDEMOCRACY AWARDSGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Champions of Democracy address the injustice of living under a system where the governed have no vote in the national legislature. MSNBC’s Karen Finney serves as emcee at this year’s awards, which honor Moriah Fund’s Mary Ann Stein and D.C. veterans.

BY THE NUMBERS

ELIZABETHMCGOVERNTHISYEAR’SRECIPIENTOFTHEWILLIAMSHAKESPEARE AWARDFORCLASSICALTHEATREANDSTAROF‘DOWNTONABBEY’ Number of plays she’s performed in >> 23 Number of movies she’s performed in >> 17 Shortest rehearsal period she’s ever experienced (number of days, for what play/movie) >> 0 / Kick-Ass (movie)

Time she usually wakes up >> 7

a.m.

Number of miles she’s traveling to come to the gala >> 2,000 Number of minutes it takes for her to get her hair and makeup done for “Downton Abbey” >> 80

“Being honored with the Will Award will be one of the proudest moments of my life. The time I have spent immersed in Shakespeare has been nourishment for a lifetime.” — Elizabeth McGovern on being named the recipient of Shakespeare Theatre Company’s William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre

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&KLOGUHQ路V1DWLRQDO0HGLFDO&HQWHU路V&KLOGUHQ路V%DOO UNITED ARAB EMIRATES AMB. YOUSEF AND ABEER AL-OTAIBA & AMY AND BRET BAIER, CHAIRMEN HAIRBYKRISTIANANDRADA

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DATE: Wednesday, October 9; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Mayflower Renaissance Hotel ATTIRE: Business EVENT CHAIRMEN: Trish Vradenburg and Vinoda Basnayake TICKET PRICE: $175 SPONSORSHIP: $500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Catherine Cavander, 202-462-6000 ext. 19, ccavander@dcvote.org

WASHINGTONNATIONAL OPERA’SOPENINGNIGHT

,QQRFHQWVDW5LVN DEBORAH SIGMUND, CHAIRMAN

WHAT WHAT TO EXPECT: This intimate affair to kick off Washington National Opera’s season includes a performance of Verdi’s “The Force of Destiny,� a new production directed by WNO Artistic Director Francesca Zambello. The post-performance supper is attended by patrons and members of the cast. DATE: October 12 LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie CONTACT: 202-416-8397

CHRISLIFECOLONCANCER FOUNDATION’SBLUEHOPE BASH WHAT TO EXPECT: The Chris4Life Colon Cancer Foundation’s annual Blue Hope Bash raises awareness of colon cancer through stories of hope, inspiration and celebration. Expect an evening of live entertainment, dinner and a silent auction. DATE: Thursday, October 17; 6 p.m. LOCATION: Four Seasons Hotel ATTIRE: Cocktail TICKET PRICE: $125-$500 SPONSORSHIP: $700-$10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Maurisa Potts, maurisapotts@gmail.com, www. chris4life.org

ARTHURMSACKLERGALLERY OFART’S‘SOMEENLIGHTENED EVENING’

&KDULW\:RUNV'UHDP%DOO BARRY DIXON & MARK LOWHAM, CHAIRMEN

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WHAT TO EXPECT: Join diplomats, philanthropists, artists, yogis and celebrities at the Smithsonian’s Freer|Sackler to celebrate the unveiling of “Yoga: The Art of Transformation,� the world’s first exhibition on the art of yoga. A sumptuous affair of art and fine cuisine by Floyd Cardoz, executive chef of North End Grill in New York City and winner of Top Chef

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Masters Season 3, the evening features a performance by Grammy Awardwinning artist Chandrika Tandon, followed by Transcendance, and an after-party hosted by the Silk Road Society. DATE: Thursday, October 17; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Arthur M. Sackler Gallery ATTIRE: Black-tie or Asian fancy EVENT CHAIRMEN: Dame Jillian Sackler, Hilaria and Alec Baldwin, and Chandrika Tandon TICKET PRICE: $2,500 SPONSORSHIP: $25,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: asia.si.edu/ events/galas or fsevents@si.edu

MERIDIANBALLANDMERIDIAN GLOBALLEADERSHIPSUMMIT

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Billed as Washington’s “destination event,â€? Meridian’s Global Leadership Summit and 45th Annual Ball provide a unique opportunity for dialogue, exchange and networking with the nation’s most powerful decision makers. The summit convenes international and domestic policy makers and corporate leaders to explore effective ways to address global economic and social challenges. The day culminates at the ball, where members of Congress, ambassadors, prominent media figures, and international business leaders continue their relationship-building. Guests dine at ambassador-hosted dinners or Meridian’s White-Meyer House, followed by dessert, dancing and conversation at Meridian House. DATE: Friday, October 18 LOCATION: Meridian House ATTIRE: Ball: black-tie or military equivalent; Summit: business EVENT CHAIRMEN: Ball Chairman: Dalia Mroue-Fateh Corporate Chairman: Christophe Navarre, Chairman and CEO, MoĂŤt Hennessy Congressional Co-Chairmen: Sen. and Mrs. Roy Blunt and Rep. and Mrs. John Delaney White-Meyer Chairman: Britlan Malek Young Professionals Chairmen: Jaclyn Mason and Frances Holuba TICKET PRICE: Ambassador-hosted dinners and Ball: $650; White-Meyer Dinner and Ball: $450 SPONSORSHIP: From $10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Olivia Dorieux, 202-450-5899, olivia@ cblaneygroup.com

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Making Dreams Come True For the children and families in Wards 7 and 8, half of whom are living in poverty, THEARC is that dream BYMICHELLEFREEMAN THEARC (which stands for Town Hall Education, Arts Recreation Campus) opened its doors in 2005, determined to give the children growing up east of the Potomac River the hope, safety and opportunity that most of us take for granted for our own kids. THEARC offers this and much more. It has after-school art, dance and music lessons six days a week, a Boys & Girls Club, middle school for girls and social services for parents and young people who want to rebuild their lives. Furthermore, THEARC is home to a Children’s Hospital clinic so families in the area now receive quality medical and dental care. None of this was possible before an astounding private-public partnership came together to create THEARC and it happened as a result of the vision of founder Chris Smith, a dedicated native Washingtonian and chairman of William C. Smith + Co. Seeing the need, Chris and co-founder Skip McMahon founded a nonprofit group that is aptly called Building Bridges Across the River (BBAR) to create and now run THEARC. These local heroes raised the capital, oversaw the construction and secured 10 enthusiastic partners-in-residence — all serving a neighborhood that has been under-served for far too long This year our gala, AFTERDARK@THEARC, celebrates THEARC Theater. This state-of-the-art facility is the only theater of any kind east of the Anacostia River. Last year it was booked for 312 events, everything from high school graduations to performances by the National Symphony Orchestra and the Dance Theater of Harlem. There are free movies for the children each week and the Washington Ballet performs the “Nutcracker” every Christmas. THEARC is a national model for what we can and should do by always looking for new ways to help the community. Two summers ago, it created an organic garden to encourage healthy eating and now young people from the neighborhood run THEARC’s vegetable stand at the Ward 8 Farmers Market. In the near future, Building Bridges Across the River will partner with The Bishop Walker School to build a middle school for boys in grades 4-8 on THEARC’s grounds and is exploring the creation of a commercial kitchen to teach the food preparation skills that not only lead to health and wellness but jobs in Washington’s growing hospitality industry as well. THEARC truly is a beacon of hope. Knowing that you are helping in such a big way puts a smile on your face. I chaired the AFTERDARK@ THEARC Gala last year, and because I strongly support how THEARC works to help and strengthen its community, I am doing so once again.

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SIBLEYMEMORIALHOSPITAL’S HOPE&PROGRESSGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Prominent social, civic, business and medical leaders join together for Sibley Memorial Hospital Foundation’s 13th annual gala supporting Sibley’s ongoing commitment to provide state-of-theart, compassionate and personalized medical care. DATE: Saturday, October 19; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Four Seasons Hotel ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Niloofar Razi Howe and David Howe TICKET PRICE: $750 SPONSORSHIP: $2,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Kristen Pruski, 202-660-6814, kpruski@jhmi. edu

WOOLLYMAMMOTH’SDINNER ONSTAGE WHAT TO EXPECT: Explore backstage, see how a show is put together and mingle onstage with actors, directors and designers over cocktails and dinner. “Each guest,” organizers promise, “will experience theater from a new perspective.” DATE: Saturday, October 19; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMAN: Elizabeth Friedman TICKET PRICE: $325 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Melissa Crawford, melissa.crawford@ woollymammoth.net

MARKTWAINPRIZEFOR AMERICANHUMOR WHAT TO EXPECT: The nation’s foremost award for humor is presented annually by the Kennedy Center to an individual who has made an indelible imprint on the American comedic landscape. This year, a star-studded lineup of the nation’s top comedic entertainers salutes Carol Burnett during a televised awards presentation followed by an exclusive dinner reception with the cast. Proceeds support Kennedy Center programs, performances and outreach activities. DATE: Sunday, October 20, 8 p.m. LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Semi-formal TICKETS: Special event packages:

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$5,000, $10,000, $25,000 and $50,000. Single tickets $1,000. CONTACT: 202-416-8335; mtp@ kennedy-center.org; http://www. kennedy-center.org/programs/ specialevents/marktwain/

WASHINGTONINTERNATIONAL HORSESHOW

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Join business, government, military, diplomatic and community leaders at this annual sports and social event that combines the excitement of worldclass equestrian competition with sophisticated hospitality in the heart of the city. Dine at the skybox level or on a ringside platform while watching Olympic-level show jumping. DATE: Tuesday-Saturday, Oct. 22-27; Evening sessions begin at 7 p.m.; daytime competition begins at 7 a.m. LOCATION: Verizon Center ATTIRE: Cocktail/business/equestrian chic EVENT CHAIRMAN: Juliet W. Reid TICKET PRICE: General admission from $10,VIP from $40. Tickets for Thursday-Saturday evening receptions at the skybox level are $150. SPONSORSHIP: From $2,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Bridget Love Meehan, 202-525-3679, bridget@wihs.org

BOYSANDGIRLSCLUBOF GREATERWASHINGTON’S ICONDINNER&TALENT SHOWCASE

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Cocktails a silent auction, dinner and a live auction are followed by a performance by the five winners of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington Talent Search, which take place over months of competitions at local and regional levels and concludes with the finals at the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. DATE: Wednesday, October 23 LOCATION: Four Seasons Hotel ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Maria Ferris and Patty Perkins Andringa TICKET PRICE: $400 SPONSORSHIP: $4,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Terri Johnson, 202-540-2323, tjohnson@ bgcgw.org

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A Place for Women Artists BYMARYV\MOCHARY]NMWATRUSTEEAND CHAIRMANOFTHEFINANCECOMMITTEE Twenty years after my first significant gift to the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA), I am even more committed to founder Wilhelmina Cole Holladay and her goal of bringing recognition to women artists and teaching the public about their accomplishments. Billie’s vision of creating a venue in the nation’s capital to learn about and enjoy the wonder of women artists has been realized, and it is flourishing. She was among the first to recognize the need to resuscitate and honor the reputations of great women artists whose names had been forgotten and who were not being given their due, in collections both public and private. Today, NMWA has earned its place as one of the great museums and the only one in the world that champions women’s outstanding contributions to the history of art. Love of art and music is in my DNA. My parents’ romance grew around a mutual passion for art and music. My brother and I inherited their passion, and in 1997, we honored my mother, Elisabeth A. Kasser, by helping fund a new wing of the museum in her name. I know that she would be so pleased with the depth and variety of exhibitions and performances taking place at NMWA. She would be particularly pleased with the success of our music series, under the artistic direction of Gilan Tocco Corn. Now in their 16th year, the Shenson Chamber Music Concerts feature remarkable talents such as Sharon Isbin, the Ahn Trio, Christine Brewer and Olga Kern — many of whom go on to stellar music careers. One of my favorite exhibitions showcasing women’s artistic brilliance was our 2003 exhibition of masterpieces from Russia’s Hermitage Museum. In this exhibition, 18th- and 19th-century paintings by Elisabeth-Louise VigéeLebrun, Angelika Kauffman, Christina Robertson and others were literally resurrected by NMWA. These paintings had been shoved into the attic storage spaces of the Hermitage. They were uncovered by NMWA, restored by us to their former glory, and after being exhibited here in Washington for our show, they now hang proudly in the Hermitage’s galleries. I have also enjoyed working on NMWA’s endowment campaign with our goal of reaching $50 million. Speaking for myself, as honorary chairman, for Billie and for everyone at the museum, we are grateful to the campaign’s marvelous and indefatigable co-chairmen Carol and Climis Lascaris, and to donors whose contributions both large and small are helping the museum work toward this important goal. With this endowment, the great programming in the visual and performing arts that we have come to expect from NMWA will continue to develop and thrive. I am encouraged to imagine a bright future for women in the arts thanks to this rare and special place known to us as “the Women’s Museum.”

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ENVIRONMENTALWORKING GROUP’S THANNIVERSARY

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Patrons can expect cocktails, dinner and entertainment celebrating 20 years of the Environmental Working Group’s efforts to make the environment healthier and safer for generations to come. DATE & TIME: Thursday, Oct. 24; 6 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. dinner LOCATION: Union Station ATTIRE: Festive and elegant EVENT CHAIRMEN: Ami Aronson, Izette Folger, Nora Maccoby and Skye Raiser TICKET PRICE: $300 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000-$50,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Jocelyn Lyle, 202-667-6982, jocelyn@ewg. org, www.ewg.org/20years

CHILDREN’SNATIONAL MEDICALCENTER’SWHITE HATGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Leaders from Washington’s cyber security industry host an evening of entertainment and inspiration benefiting Children’s National Medical Center. Be part of the fun as this popular U.K. event branches across the pond for its inaugural year. DATE: Thursday, October 24; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Ronald Reagan Building ATTIRE: Black-tie optional EVENT CHAIRMEN: Paul Innella and David Trout TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $2,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Cristy Heffernan, 301-565-8424, cheffern@ childrensnational.org

GOINGPLACESGALA WHAT TO EXPECT: The sixth annual Going Places Gala celebrates 38 years of dedication and commitment by Higher Achievement scholars, staff and champions. This inspirational evening features performances by Higher Achievement scholars and alumni, followed by cocktails, a buffet dinner and dancing. Current scholars and alumni will speak about their personal experiences in the program and their long-term goals. DATE: Thursday, October 24; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: The Warner Theatre ATTIRE: Business casual/cocktail

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EVENT CHAIRMEN: Chairman Mitchell N. Schear Co-Chairmen: Douglas J. Donatelli, Nora Dweck-McMullen, Christopher D. Gladstone, Debra Lehman-Smith, Ronald D. Paul Corporate Honoree: Capital One TICKET PRICE: $250 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Jacquelyn Horstmann, 202-375-7709, jhorstmann@higherachievement.org

USOGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: More than 1,000 guests gather to celebrate the USO and pay special tribute to our men and women in uniform. This star-studded event honors the Spirit of USO Award recipient, heroes from each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces and the USO volunteers who support them around the world. DATE: Friday, October 25; 6:30 p.m. reception; 7:30 p.m. dinner LOCATION: Washington Hilton ATTIRE: Black-tie/military equivalent EVENT CHAIRMAN: David J. McIntyre Jr. TICKET PRICE: $1,000 SPONSORSHIP: $15,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Emily Farwig, efarwig@uso.org, 703-740-4970

HURSTON/WRIGHT FOUNDATIONLEGACYAWARDS WHAT TO EXPECT: This literary event honors achievements in AfricanAmerican literature and raises muchneeded funds to support writing programs for young aspiring AfricanAmerican writers. Hosted by Dolen Perkins-Valdez, this year’s festivities feature U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey. DATE: Friday, October 25; 7 p.m. LOCATION: Carnegie Library ATTIRE: Business TICKET PRICE: $125 SPONSORSHIP: 301-459-2108 for details CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Darlene. writingbythewater@gmail.com

NATIONALITALIANAMERICAN FOUNDATIONANNIVERSARY AWARDSGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: NIAF’s gala is one of the premier events in the nation’s capital attended by close to 3,000 guests each year. Past honorees and special

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guests include: Frankie Valli, Sophia Loren, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Lee Iacocca, Gen. Raymond Odierno, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Sylvester Stallone, Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Susan Lucci,Yogi Berra and other notables in business, sports, entertainment and politics. DATE: Saturday, October 26; 6 p.m. reception; 7 p.m. dinner LOCATION: The Washington Hilton Hotel ATTIRE: Black-tie TICKET PRICE: $350 members; $400 non-members SPONSORSHIP: $1,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Jerry Jones, jerry@niaf.org, 202-939-3102

LUNGEVITYFOUNDATION’S MUSICALCELEBRATIONOF HOPEGALA WHAT TO EXPECT: The nation’s largest lung cancer nonprofit focusing on research to end the disease hosts an “Arabian Nights”-themed evening to raise funds and awareness to eradicate lung cancer while celebrating the hope and promise of survivorship. This year’s gala honors Rep. John D. Dingell The Dow Chemical Company. DATE: Saturday, October 26; 7 p.m. cocktails; 8 p.m. dinner & dancing LOCATION: Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Gala Chairmen: Ginny Grenham and Michelle Olson Vice Chairmen: Sharon Bradley and Jamie Dorros Corporate Chairman: Frederic V. Malek TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $2,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Anna Pugh, 240-454-3105, apugh@lungevity.org, www.lungevity.org/hopegala

 

WASHINGTON BALLET’S‘UNMASK THENIGHT–AGRANDE MASQUERADESOIRÉE’ WHAT TO EXPECT: The Washington Ballet’s Women’s Committee and Jeté Society host an evening of cocktails, tempting cuisine and sultry performances by TWB dancers. Guests can look forward to a silent auction featuring luxury items, exotic vacations, entertainment and dining packages. Funds benefit TWB’s artistic and educational programs.

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NOVEMBER S&R foundation’s ‘NIGHT NOUVEAU’ WHAT TO EXPECT: S&R Foundation’s “Night Nouveau” for young professionals promises an evening of intrigue and suspense that includes a mystery followed by dancing. The event benefits the S&R Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to encourage scientific research and artistic endeavors among talented individuals. DATE: Saturday, November 2 LOCATION: Evermay Estate ATTIRE: Black-and-white cocktail, or dress as your favorite film noir character EVENT CHAIRMaN: Kate Goodall TICKET PRICE: $250 per person; $400 per couple SPONSORSHIP: Visit http://www. sandrfoundation.org/support for details CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Kate Goodall, k.goodall@sandr.org

Lombardi Gala

Meridian Ball

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DATE: Saturday, October 26; 8 p.m. LOCATION: The Homer Building ATTIRE: Masquerade cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Ashley Taylor Bronczek and Stacey Lubar TICKET PRICE: $200 general; $250 VIP SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Liz Sizer, 202274-4518, esizer@washingtonballet.org

organization of american states’ GOLDEN GALA OF AMERICAS WHAT TO EXPECT: The Organization of American States’ international gala draws some 450 guests from around the world and benefits the National Museum of Catholic Art and Library’s

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new museum headquarters downtown, slated to open in 2014. Past honorees have included Ambassador Thomas Melady, Thomas Boggs, Richard Trumka and astronaut Michael Massimino Paul Odili. DATE: Monday, October 28; 6 p.m. LOCATION: Organization of American States ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMeN: Timothy Barton and Christina Cox TICKET PRICE: $250, $500 and $1000 (VIP) dessert table ticket: $125 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000, $10,000, $25,000 and $50,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: NMCAL office 202-450-5707, cell 917-750-0014, catholicart@aol.com

WHAT TO EXPECT: This dinner dance features a cocktail reception, a silent auction with luxury items that include a 2014 Lexus sport vehicle, and an awards ceremony honoring individuals who have made a difference in the fight against cancer. All of the proceeds go to Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center for cancer research, education and treatment. DATE: Saturday, November 2; 6 p.m. LOCATION: Washington Hilton ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Honorary Chairman DeMaurice Smith Co-Chairmen: Brian Katz Jill S. Kirkpatrick and Paul Schweitzer TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $2,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Elena Jeannotte, 202-687-3866, ej48@ georgetown.edu

DC Public Education Fund’s Standing Ovation for DC Teachers WHAT TO EXPECT: Hosted by Jim Vance and produced by George Stevens Jr., the fourth annual “Standing Ovation” presents extraordinary educators with the Excellence in Teaching and

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Excellence in Leadership awards. Entertainment and inspiring stories round out this energetic evening celebrating District public school teachers. DATE: Monday, November 4; 6:30 p.m. awards presentation; 8 p.m. reception LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Gina Adams, Katherine Bradley, David M. Rubenstein, George Stevens Jr. TICKET PRICE: $50-$300 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000-$250,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Lisa Jourdan, 202-636-8743, lisa@ campbellpeachey.com, www. standingovationfordcteachers.org

ARTS FOR THE AGING 25TH ANNIVERSARY ‘VISIONS OF GOLD’ GALA WHAT TO EXPECT: A reception hosted by Swiss Amb. Manuel Sager and Mrs. Sager with tributes to AFTA Founder Lolo Sarnoff, a Swiss-German artist, scientist, entrepreneur, humanitarian and philanthropist. The 5th Annual Sarnoff Award will be presented to Donald T. Bliss for distinguished philanthropy, community service and engagement in the arts. DATE: Tuesday, November 5 LOCATION: Swiss Ambassador’s Residence ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Bill Dunlap and J.C. Hayward TICKET PRICE: $250 SPONSORSHIP: From $500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 301-2550103, info@aftaarts.org

HEROINES IN TECHNOLOGY WHAT TO EXPECT: This annual event recognizes women philanthropists who work in the technology industry and includes cocktails, dinner and silent and live auctions. DATE: Friday, November 8; 6 p.m. LOCATION: McLean Tysons Corner ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Sabret Flocos and Rebecca Cowen-Hirsch TICKET PRICE: $300 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Marissa Nihill, 571-257-2305,mnihill@ marchofdimes.com

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INOVAGALAEXPERIENCE ‘BUILDINGOURLEGACY’ WHAT TO EXPECT: Inova’s signature benefit has been expanded to an entire weekend of events at the new Salamander Resort & Spa in Middleburg,Va. This year’s festivities include a 48-hour immersion designed to provoke serious thought and discussion around the impact of healthcare reform on our region and nation, the game-changing role that genomics will play in the future of healthcare delivery and the strategic investments that Inova is making to lead the change toward personalized and predictive medicine. Guests will have the opportunity to choose between varieties of offerings, all while enjoying farm-to-table cuisine prepared by Washington D.C. Chef of the Year Todd Gray. DATE: November 8-10 LOCATION: Salamander Resort & Spa, Middleburg,Va. ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Mark and Brenda Moore TICKET PRICE: $2,500 (individual for Saturday night only) SPONSORSHIP: $10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 703-2892057, specialevents@inova.org, www. inova.org/gala

CAUSEVETERANSDAYGALA WHAT TO EXPECT: This annual Veterans Day gala celebrates wounded warriors served through Comfort for America’s Uniformed Services (CAUSE) and pays tribute to donors who make it successful. DATE: Monday, November 11; 5:30 p.m. LOCATION: Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie optional EVENT CHAIRMAN: Tom Dyer TICKET PRICE: $300; $150 active-duty military SPONSORSHIP: $375 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Tyler Gately, 703-591-4965, marketing@cause-usa. org

MARCHOFDIMESSIGNATURE CHEF’SAUCTION

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: More than 30 celebrated chefs, bartenders and vintners offer samples of their best creations to benefit the March of Dimes. The event

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Prevent Cancer BYELLENNOGHÈS When my husband Gilles and I were graciously invited to serve as the honorary patrons of the Prevent Cancer Foundation Annual Spring Gala in 2011, we eagerly accepted. Personally, we were most grateful for the opportunity to support the important mission of the foundation. Prevent Cancer is the only nonprofit cancer organization to focus solely on cancer prevention and early detection, a cause very close to our hearts. I am a three-time cancer survivor and for each of my separate cancer diagnoses — melanoma in 1996 and 2006 and breast cancer in 2001 — early detection was the gift of life. Over the past 27 years, Carolyn “Bo” Aldigé and the foundation she created in memory of her father, have raised and invested more than $130 million to improve cancer screening methods, reach out to underserved communities, raise awareness of risk factors, educate people about how to make healthy lifestyle changes and fund research that significantly contributes to cancer prevention and early detection. Professionally, we were thrilled that the gala would celebrate the Principality of Monaco and showcase the elegance and grandeur of our small country. With thousands of fragrant red roses, magnificent crystal candelabra, and his own touch of magic, famed event planner David Tutera transformed the National Building Museum into “The Enchanting Principality of Monaco.” Joined by many members of the diplomatic, Congressional, medical, corporate and social communities, over 800 guests dined and danced the night away in true Monte Carlo fashion. For over 20 years, the Prevent Cancer Foundation has fêted the diplomatic community here in Washington, honoring a different country each year. In 2012, alpenhorns welcomed us to “Modern and Majestic Switzerland.” On March 8 of this year — International Women’s Day — Italian Amb. Claudio Bisogniero and his wife Laura Denise joined us to celebrate “La Festa della Donna.” I am truly inspired by the international community that annually pulls together to embrace this cause and show its solidarity in the global fight to prevent cancer. My gratitude to the Prevent Cancer Foundation for its leadership and friendship is deeply heartfelt.

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SPONSORSHIP: $20,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Jeff Travers, 202-772-0436, jeff.travers@ fightforchildren.org

includes an auction of unique dining, entertainment, travel and leisure offerings. DATE: Tuesday, November 12; 6 p.m. LOCATION: The Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Business TICKET PRICE: $200 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Nicole Vagnerini Dolan, 571-257-2307, ndolan@marchofdimes.com

KNOCKOUTABUSEAGAINST WOMENBENEFIT

THELABSCHOOL AWARDSGALAHONORING OUTSTANDINGACHIEVERS WITHLEARNING DIFFERENCES

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Speaker of the House John Boehner is expected to deliver the keynote address at this event celebrating two outstanding individuals with learning disabilities who have achieved success in their chosen careers: Dannel Malloy, governor of Connecticut, and Tiffany Coletti Titolo, a marketing and advertising executive. DATE: Thursday, November 14; 5:30 p.m. reception and silent auction; 7:30 p.m. dinner LOCATION: The National Building Museum ATTIRE: Black-tie optional EVENT CHAIRMEN: Joey and Tim McKone, Lalie and Mike Tongour TICKET PRICE: From $250 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Tiffany Parry, events@labschool.org.

FIGHTFORCHILDREN’SFIGHT NIGHT

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: About 2,000 business, government and entertainment leaders join legends from the world of sports for an evening of entertainment and live professional boxing to benefit Fight For Children and other organizations that provide education and healthcare services to low-income children in Washington and Baltimore. DATE: Thursday, November 14; 6 p.m. LOCATION: Washington Hilton ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Kevin Plank and Raul Fernandez TICKET PRICE: From $1,000

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WHAT TO EXPECT: Members of Congress join corporate and philanthropic community leaders to benefit victims of domestic violence. WUSA9’s Andrea Roane emcees this evening of dinner, dancing and silent and live auctions. DATE: Thursday, November 14 LOCATION: The Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie or “Gatsby gowns” EVENT CHAIRMAN: Gina Adams TICKET PRICE: $600 SPONSORSHIP: $7,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Morgan Goodale, morgan@lindarothpr.com.

CAPITALCITYBALL

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This lively evening helps raise awareness about the fight against human trafficking and modern day slavery. Expect an open bar, live music, dinner, dancing and a silent auction. Proceeds support the programs of Courtney’s House, Global Centurion and Urban Light. DATE: Saturday, November 23; 8 p.m. LOCATION: City Tavern Club ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT COMMITTEE: John Dunford, Marco A. Garcia, Karen Ogden, Tanya Lynn Sabel, Liz Sara and Adrienne Szabo TICKET PRICE: $125 in advance; $250 Angel SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Liz Sara, lsara@bestmarketing.net

DECEMBER KENNEDYCENTERHONORS WHAT TO EXPECT: The 36th annual Kennedy Center Honors presents awards to performing arts icons for their lifetime contributions to American culture. The 2013 Honorees and additional information will be announced in the fall. DATE: Sunday, December 8

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LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie CONTACT: 202-416-8366; www.kennedy-center. org/programs/specialevents/honors/

 HOLIDAYATEVERMAY WHAT TO EXPECT: This holiday event benefits the S&R Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit whose mission is to encourage scientific research and artistic endeavors among talented individuals. Further details will be released soon. DATE: December 13, 2013 LOCATION: Evermay Estate ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Kate Goodall TICKET PRICE: TBD SPONSORSHIP: Visit http://www. sandrfoundation.org/support for details CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Kate Goodall, k.goodall@sandr.org

THENUTCRACKERTEAPARTY

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This quintessential Washington, D.C. holiday tradition is a delight for ballet lovers of all ages with holiday entertainment, an elegant plated tea with white glove service and a buffet of sweets and treats after a performance of “The Nutcracker” at the Warner Theatre. The event benefits The Washington School of Ballet. DATE: Sunday, December 15, immediately following the 1 p.m. matinee performance of “The Nutcracker” LOCATION: The Willard InterContinental Hotel ATTIRE: Festive holiday attire EVENT CHAIRMEN: Jamie Dorros and Jean-Marie Fernandez TICKET PRICE: $200 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Liz Sizer, 202-274-4518, esizer@ washingtonballet.org

CHORALARTSHOLIDAY CONCERTANDGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This concert and gala is a signature holiday event that draws corporate, social and diplomatic leaders. The evening includes “An Enchanted Christmas” holiday concert followed by a silent

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auction, cocktail, reception, dinner and dancing. DATE: Monday, December 16; 7 p.m. LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Olwen Pongrace TICKET PRICE: $1,000, $775 and $675 individual; $10,000 and $7,500 tables SPONSORSHIP: $15,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Patricia Kramer, pkramer@choralarts.org, 202-244-3669

JANUARY CHILDREN’SNATIONAL MEDICALCENTER’SDANCING AFTERDARK

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The Children’s National Junior Council’s annual gala for young Washington philanthropists features cocktails, desserts, dancing and a silent auction to benefit the hospital’s young patients. DATE: TBD LOCATION: TBD ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMAN: Elizabeth Ballas TICKET PRICE: TBD SPONSORSHIP: TBD FOR MORE INFORMATION: www. childrensnational.org/dad

ARENASTAGEOPENINGNIGHT GALAFOR‘THETALLESTTREE INTHEFOREST’ WHAT TO EXPECT: This evening celebrates the life and legacy of famed actor and singer Paul Robeson. Bursting with soulful music and poetic storytelling, “The Tallest Tree in the Forest” combines the theatrical talents of award-winning artist Daniel Beaty with acclaimed director Moisés Kaufman. The evening includes an award presentation to a member of Congress for supporting the arts in their community and in our nation’s capital. DATE: Thursday, January 16 LOCATION: Arena Stage ATTIRE: Business TICKET PRICE: $5,000-$25,000 tables SPONSORSHIP: mcorso@arenastage.org, 202-600-4025 for details CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Maria Corso, 202-600-4025, managermcorso@ arenastage.org

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&RUFRUDQ%DOO IVY HOWELLS, CHAIRMAN

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Our Commitment to Tackling Preterm Birth BYTIFFANYBOWEN

The days following your child’s birth are usually filled with happiness, but those days were very different for my husband Stephen and me following the birth of our twins. Everybody thinks of babies being born healthy, but few people ever think about what can go wrong. Despite a healthy first pregnancy, I went into labor 15 weeks early. After an emergency cesarean section just six months into the twins’ pregnancy, our sons Stephen and Skyler were born. Each weighed less than two pounds. In the following weeks, Stephen underwent a successful heart surgery and Skyler caught an infection that ultimately took his life. Also during this difficult time, Stephen signed a contract with the Redskins and had to leave us. I never knew how strong I was until I was forced to be. Like thousands of other families, we felt both the greatest loss and the greatest triumph the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has to offer. Stephen and I want to do whatever we can to help babies be born healthy so that families can avoid our experience. We started Skyler’s Gift Foundation to provide financial support to families that have lost their newborn. In addition, we are committed to supporting the March of Dimes’ efforts to improve the health of babies by preventing premature birth. We are honored to participate in one of the District’s premier social events that highlights the city’s culinary masters: the March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction of D.C. The evening will include wine, cocktails, dining and auctions while celebrating the March of Dimes 75th anniversary. We encourage you to join us, Jamie Leeds of Hank’s Oyster Bar, Occidental’s Jo-Jo Valenzuela and WJLA-TV anchor Leon Harris in supporting this vital cause.

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FEBRUARY ALVINAILEYAMERICANDANCE THEATEROPENINGNIGHT GALABENEFIT WHAT TO EXPECT: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s opening night gala includes a performance, dinner and dancing. Proceeds support company programs, including new works, artsin-education activities, and scholarships to talented young dance students in the Washington area to attend The Ailey School in New York. DATE: Tuesday, February 4; 7 p.m. performance; 9:30 p.m. dinner LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Co-Chairmen: Gina Adams, Lyndon K. Boozer and Debra Lee Corporate Chairman: Thomas A. Fanning Vice Chairmen: Joyce Brayboy, Sela Collins, Robert Raben,Vanessa Reed,Yelberton R.Watkins, Katharine Weymouth TICKET PRICE: $500-$1,000 SPONSORSHIP: $7,500-$25,000 per table of 10 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Ariel Metzger, 202-636-8745, ariel@campbellpeachey.com, www. alvinailey.org/washington-dc-gala

THESTUDIOTHEATREGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Political and community leaders gather to celebrate on the stages and behind-the-scenes at The Studio Theatre. With specialty cocktails, a seated dinner, dancing and an exclusive one-night-only performance, this celebration highlights the artistic vitality of the nation’s capital. DATE: Saturday, February 8; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: The Studio Theatre ATTIRE: Festive black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Liz Cullen and Susan Butler TICKET PRICE: $450 SPONSORSHIP: $2,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Marisa Alford, 202-232-7267 ext. 375, malford@ studiotheatre.org

WASHINGTONBALLET’S¥NOCHE DEPASIÓN!

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: A Latin party featuring live performances from the Washington Ballet, hot dance music and delectable

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

cuisine.This year’s gala highlights the sultry Colombian city of Cartagena and Shakira’s birthplace, Barranquilla. Proceeds support the company’s Latino Scholarship Fund. DATE: Saturday, February 8, 7:30 p.m. LOCATION: The Residence of the Ambassador of Colombia ATTIRE: Caribbean chic EVENT CHAIRMEN: Pilar O’Leary, Isabel Ernst, Irma Frank and Carolina DeSouza TICKET PRICE: $275 SPONSORSHIP: $500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Liz Sizer, 202274-4518, esizer@washingtonballet.org

HEROESCURINGCHILDHOOD CANCERGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Now in its sixth year, this event has raised millions of dollars for patient care and research — and ultimately a cure for every child diagnosed with cancer — at Children’s National’s Cancer Center. DATE: Saturday, February 22; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Four Seasons,Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie TICKET PRICE: $1,000 per couple SPONSORSHIP: $5,000-$50,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Meredith Chipman, 301-565-8422, mchipman@ cnmc.org

STJUDEGOURMETGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This evening offers guests the opportunity to taste the area’s finest restaurant cuisine, mingle with business, financial and political leaders and support children suffering from cancer and other deadly diseases. DATE: Tuesday, February 25; 5:30 p.m. LOCATION: National Building Museum ATTIRE: Business EVENT CHAIRMAN: David Gorodetski TICKET PRICE: $350 SPONSORSHIP: $2,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Daniela Romero, 703- 351-5171, ddaniela. romero@stjude.org

MARCH PREVENTCANCER FOUNDATIONGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This spring gala attracts more than 900 guests from the business, diplomatic, government, medical,

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sports, media and social communities. Each year, the foundation selects a country to celebrate as the gala’s honorary patron. The countries are represented by their respective ambassadors to the United States. Since 1994, the Annual Spring Gala has raised over $19.9 million in support of the Prevent Cancer Foundation’s research, community outreach and education programs. DATE: Friday, March 7 LOCATION: National Building Museum ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Gala Co-Chairmen: Jeff and Gail MacKinnon Corporate Co-Chairmen: Rich and Linda Tarplin Honorary Congressional Co-Chairmen: Sen. and Mrs. Richard Burr, Sen. Mark Warner and Ms. Lisa Collis, Rep. and Mrs. Fred Upton; and Rep. and Mrs. Mike Thompson TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $7,500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Kristen Fagley, 703-519-2103, kristen.fagley@ preventcancer.org

LATINO STUDENT FUND GALA WHAT TO EXPECT: Proceeds benefit the Latino Student Fund’s programs to provide academic support and opportunities for PreK-12 Hispanic students. Expect a lively evening of music, cocktails and hors-d’oeuvres from around the Latin world, silent and live auctions and the organization’s signature Ambassadorial Dinner. DATE: Thursday, March 13 LOCATION: Organization of American States Headquarters ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Mandy Delk, Tammie Collins and Dena Henry TICKET PRICE: $125-$500 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Maria Fernanda Borja, 202-244-3438, mfborja@latinostudentfund.org

TEACH FOR AMERICA GALA WHAT TO EXPECT: Teach For America corps members, alumni, champions and community partners share stories about their efforts to pave the way for educational equity for all children. DATE: Thursday, March 13; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Omni Shoreham Hotel ATTIRE: Cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: Joey and Stan Sloter

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

| SEPTEMBER

2013

Washington International Horse Show Mary elizabeth cordia, elizabeth kruse, terry daniels & Maddy zehner; Junior chairmen photographed at the river farm stables, leesburg, va

| washingtonlife.com

61

Celebrating Hope BYCO-CHAIRMENGINNYGRENHAM ANDMICHELLEOLSON

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/81*HYLW\·V0XVLFDO&HOHEUDWLRQRI+RSH GINNY GRENHAM & MICHELLE OLSON, CHAIRMEN ONMICHELLEOLSONGOMEZ-GRACIADRESSJULIAFARRBOUTIQUE THSTREETNWJULIAFARRDCCOM

TICKET PRICE: $500 SPONSORSHIP: $10,000 table CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Coury Shadyac, 917-952-8091, coury.shadyac@ teachforamerica.org

SPONSORSHIP: $10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Korey Lindesmith, 703-399-2957, korey. lindesmith@lls.org.

AFCEABETHESDANIGHTFOR THECHILDRENGALA

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WHAT TO EXPECT: An elegant event benefitting charities supporting children and their families, this evening features dinner, live and silent auctions and dancing. DATE: Saturday, March 22 LOCATION: Marriott Wardman Park ATTIRE: Formal TICKET PRICE: TBD SPONSORSHIP: TBD CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: TBD

LEUKEMIABALL WHAT TO EXPECT: The Leukemia Ball has raised nearly $48 million for the National Capital Area Chapter of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society since it began in 1988. The 2014 ball features lively entertainment, a Mercedes-Benz raffle and a silent auction. DATE: Saturday, March 22; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: Walter E. Washington Convention Center ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Candace Duncan and Daniel Waetjen TICKET PRICE: $1,000

62

CHILDREN’SNATIONAL’S BOARDOFVISITORS’‘A VINTAGEAFFAIR’

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Children’s National’s Board of Visitors promises an evening to be savored by oenophiles and gourmets alike with wines paired with inspired cuisine. Live and silent auctions of rare wines, exotic trips and one-of-akind dining experiences round out the evening’s festivities. DATE: TBD LOCATION: TBD ATTIRE: Cocktail TICKET PRICE: $400 SPONSORSHIP: From $2,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Grace Weisser, 301-565-4950, gweisser@ childrensnational.org, www. boardofvisitors.com.

ARENASTAGEOPENINGNIGHT GALAFOR‘CAMPDAVID’ WHAT TO EXPECT: This evening includes cocktails, dinner and the world

e have both lived through lung cancer in different ways. Ginny’s close friends Ann Reilly and Kara Kennedy, as well as her mother-in-law Barbara Zevnik, fought courageously against this latediagnosed killer and both lost their battles in the prime of their lives. Michelle remembers friends’ parents grappling with their own diagnoses and treatments and the pain of losing a classmate to lung cancer at just 41. The personal connections we’ve had to those who left us too soon and the powerful interactions we have with survivors have been catalysts for us to spread awareness of the nation’s number one cancer killer and raise critical funds for this often misunderstood disease that affects one in 14 Americans. In fact, 60 percent of all new lung cancer diagnoses are among people who have never smoked or are former smokers. We are honored and thrilled to serve as co-chairmen of LUNGevity Foundation’s third annual Musical Celebration of Hope Gala on October 26 at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium. At the gala, we will recognize the outstanding advancements that have been made to provide better care to patients, raise support for ongoing cutting-edge research to develop new treatment options and early detection tools, and celebrate survivors while paying tribute to those we’ve lost to this terrible disease. LUNGevity is committed to turning months into years for lung cancer survivors. The foundation has already made a major difference by awarding more than 100 grants at 56 institutions in 23 states to researchers, building a grassroots network, and creating an online community to provide care, comfort and hope to those who have been affected. At the event, we will honor Rep. John Dingell with the Face of Hope Award for his healthcare advocacy in Congress over an incredible 57year career. Andrew N. Liveris, president, chairman, and chief executive officer of The Dow Chemical Company, will accept the Hope Award for Corporate Leadership in recognition of Dow’s commitment to working across business lines for the health and well-being of our lung cancer communities in the United States and around the world. An incredible team has worked with us. We are grateful for the contributions of our honorary chairwoman, Jordanian Ambassador Alia Hatoug Bouran, vice chairmen Sharon Bradley and Jamie Dorros, corporate chaiman Frederic V. Malek, and our committee members for their essential assistance in preparing for the Arabian Nights-themed gala. We are delighted that WUSA9 Anchor Andrea Roane will join us for a third year as emcee. We hope you will join us for an extraordinary and hopeful night. To learn more, visit www.LUNGevity.org/hopegala.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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premiere of “Camp David� by Pulitzer Prize winner Lawrence Wright. Directed by Arena Stage Artistic Director Molly Smith, the play follows the 13 tumultuous days President Jimmy Carter spent with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in an attempt to create peace in the Middle East. DATE: Thursday, April 3 LOCATION: Arena Stage ATTIRE: Cocktail TICKET PRICE: From $250 SPONSORSHIP: mcorso@arenaatage.org, 202-600-4025 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Maria Corso, 202-600-4025, mcorso@ arenastage.org

THEAFRICAREBISHOPJOHN TWALKERMEMORIALDINNER

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The annual gala is held in memory of Africare’s former board chairman, and is recognized as the nation’s largest fundraising event for Africa. DATE: saturday, april 5; 6 p.m. LOCATION: The Washington Hilton Hotel ATTIRE: Black-tie or national dress TICKET PRICE: $300 SPONSORSHIP: From $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Denise Cummings, 202-328-5370, dcummings@africare.org.

SIGNATURETHEATRE SONDHEIMAWARDS WHAT TO EXPECT: This gala honors those who have contributed to the works of legendary composer Stephen Sondheim and the canon of American theater. The Sondheim Award Gala benefits Signature Theatre’s artistic, education and community outreach programs. The evening includes a cocktail reception, award presentation and a seated dinner. DATE: Monday, April 7; 6 p.m. LOCATION: The Embassy of Italy ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Tim Keating SPONSORSHIP: From $1,000 per person; from $10,000 per table CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Zack Lynch, 571-527-1828, lynchz@signaturetheatre.org.

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

CHILDREN’SNATIONAL MEDICALCENTER’S CHILDREN’SBALL

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: The annual signature event benefitting Children’s National Medical Center features cocktails, dinner and a live auction followed by live entertainment and dancing in the after-hours lounge. DATE: Friday, April 11 LOCATION: The Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: United Arab Emirates Amb.Yousef Al-Otaiba and Mrs. AlOtaiba, and Amy and Bret Baier TICKET PRICE: $1,000 SPONSORSHIP: TBD CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Diana Kurnit, 301-565-8530, dkurnit@ childrensnational.org

CORCORANBALL

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Long considered a highlight in Washington’s spring social calendar, the Corcoran Ball features individually decorated formal dining rooms within the Corcoran’s historic galleries among priceless works of art with floral arrangements by Jack Lucky Floral Designs and dinner by Occasions Catering. The post-dinner scene features drinks and dancing at “Club Corcoran.� Proceeds support musuem arts programs and scholarships and educational programs at the affiliated college. DATE: Friday, April 25; 7 p.m. cocktails; 8:15 p.m. dinner LOCATION: Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art + Design ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Mrs. Horace Howells TICKET PRICE: From $600 per person; $750 patron level; $1,500 benefactor level SPONSORSHIP: $10,000 per table CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Tammie L. Collins, tammie.l.collins@comcast.net, www.corcoran.org.

MARCHOFDIMESGOURMET GALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Enjoy selections prepared from recipes borrowed from more than 40 members of Congress — who will be on hand to personally serve them to guests. Proceeds support March of Dimes’ efforts to prevent

| S E P T E M B E R      | washingtonlife.com

6XVDQ*.RPHQ3UHVHQWV +RQRULQJWKH3URPLVH MELISSA MAXFIELD, CHAIRMAN

63

THEWASHINGTONBALLET’S SPRINGGALA

birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. DATE: April/May; 6 p.m. Contact Michele at mmurphyhedrick@ marchofdimes.com for date confirmation LOCATION: National Building Museum ATTIRE: Business EVENT CHAIRMEN: Bobbi Barrasso and Martha Hinojosa TICKET PRICE: $1,500 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Tina Cavucci, 571-257-2308, ccavucci@ marchofdimes.com

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: TWB’s always lively and spectacular event attracts notable guests who usually stay on to dance with the dancers after dinner. Proceeds benefit the company’s community and school outreach initiatives. DATE: TBD LOCATION: TBD ATTIRE: Black-tie TICKET PRICE: $1,000 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Liz Sizer, 202-274-4518, esizer@ washingtonballet.org

REFUGEESINTERNATIONAL DINNER

1DWLRQDO0XVHXPRI&DWKROLF$UWDQG /LEUDU\·V*ROGHQ*DODRI$PHULFDV CHRISTINA COX, CHAIRMAN

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This annual dinner honors humanitarians on the international stage, in Congress and in the field while highlighting Refugees International’s lifesaving work. The dinner program has been emceed by Academy Award-nominated actors Sam Waterston and Matt Dillon, who are both on R.I.’s board of directors. DATE: April 30; 5:30 VIP reception; 6 p.m. general reception LOCATION: Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium ATTIRE: Cocktail TICKET PRICE: $400; limited number of discounted tickets available for young professionals under 35 years of age SPONSORSHIP: $1,250 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-8280110, events@refugeesinternational. org

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64

WHAT TO EXPECT: Each spring, the Shakespeare Theatre Company welcomes senators, representatives and other Washington insiders onto the company’s stage to perform scenes from Shakespeare infused with comedic references to contemporary politics. Proceeds support STC’s education, artistic and community engagement programs. DATE: TBD LOCATION: Sidney Harman Hall ATTIRE: Business EVENT CHAIRMAN: Mr. Bernie McKay TICKET PRICE: $250 VIP; $50 performance-only SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: willonthehill@shakespearetheatre.org

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

MAY NATIONALMUSEUMOFWOMEN INTHEARTSSPRINGGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: Washington’s top business, government, diplomatic and social leaders turn out for this lavish event featuring VIP guests. Proceeds support the programs, exhibitions and education initiatives for students and educators at NMWA, the only museum dedicated solely to women in the arts. DATE: Friday, May 2 LOCATION: Washington Wardman Park Marriott ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMAN: Annie S. Totah TICKET PRICE: $650 per person; $1,500 per couple; $5,000 package of four SPONSORSHIP: From $10,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Melody Ain, 202-266-2815, main@nmwa.org

KENNEDYCENTERSPRING GALA WHAT TO EXPECT: One of Washington’s premier benefits, the Kennedy Center Spring Gala includes a reception on the River Terrace, an elegant dinner on the Center’s Roof Terrace and a onenight only gala performance followed by music and dancing at the ’Til Midnight Party. DATE: Sunday, May 4 LOCATION: The Kennedy Center ATTIRE: Black-tie CONTACT: 202-416-8338; springgala@ kennedy-center.org; www.kennedycenter.org/programs/specialevents/gala/

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CITYDANCEGALACELEBRATION WHAT TO EXPECT: CityDance’s annual gala at the historic Lincoln Theatre features a performance by top dance companies and a special guest appearance by CityDance Conservatory & DREAM Community Program students. DATE: Saturday, May 10 LOCATION: The Historic Lincoln Theatre ATTIRE: Creative cocktail EVENT CHAIRMEN: CityDance Board of Directors TICKET PRICE: $20, $35 and $150 VIP SPONSORSHIP: $500 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Alexe Nowakowski, 202-347-3909, alexe@ citydance.net, www.citydance.net

PENFEDFOUNDATION‘NIGHT OFHEROES’GALA WHAT TO EXPECT: Past honorees, distinguished guests and patrons and recipients of the organization’s programs celebrate the foundation’s accomplishments at this festive benefit. DATE: Wednesday, May 14 LOCATION: National Building Museum ATTIRE: Black-tie or military dress TICKET PRICE: $1,000 SPONSORSHIP: $5,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Pauline Poh, 703-838-1085, pauline.poh@penfed. org or Ashleigh Dorfman, 202-741-1273, ashleigh@webstergroupinc.com.

PHILLIPSCOLLECTIONGALA WHAT TO EXPECT: Celebrate “Made in the USA: American Masters from The Phillips Collection” while dining amid museum masterworks.The annual gala attracts over 400 cultural, political, diplomatic and business leaders and features a cocktail reception and dinner. Proceeds support the Phillips’s award-winning education programs. DATE: Friday, May 16; 6:30 p.m. LOCATION: The Phillips Collection ATTIRE: Black-tie EVENT CHAIRMEN: Bruce and Vicki Tanner, Michael and Mariella Trager TICKET PRICE: $1,250 SPONSORSHIP: $15,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: phillipscollectiongala@linderassociates. com

the use of green technology to harvest energy from dance. Meet the artists and dance until dawn at the after party. DATE: Thursday, May 29 LOCATION: Dance Place ATTIRE: Cocktail TICKET PRICE: $350 SPONSORSHIP: $1,000 CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: Joanne Coutts, 202-399-7993 ext. 112, jcoutts@ stepafrika.org

WASHINGTONNATIONALOPERA BALL WHAT TO EXPECT: This stunning annual event is the highlight of the WNO’s social calendar and draws Washington’s social elite to celebrate WNO’s past season. Pre-ball dinners are hosted in various embassies and ambassadors’ residences, making this elaborate event a night to remember.The evening culminates with guests gathering for dessert and dancing at a major embassy. Additional information about WNO’s signature event will be announced at a later date. ATTIRE: Black-tie CONTACT: 202-416-8366

&KRUDO$UWV+ROLGD\&RQFHUWDQG*DOD OLWEN PONGRACE, CHAIRMAN

FORD’STHEATREGALA WHAT TO EXPECT: Luminaries from stage and screen perform on the historic Ford’s Theatre stage usually with the president and first lady in attendance. A post-performance dinner under the stars follows in the National Portrait Gallery’s Kogod Courtyard. DATE: TBD LOCATION: Ford’s Theatre ATTIRE: Black-tie TICKET PRICE: TBD SPONSORSHIP STARTING PRICE: TBD CONTACT FOR INFORMATION: 202-434-9523

2013-2014

Check WASHINGTONLIFE.COM for photos from all your favorite balls and galas.

STEPAFRIKA!VIPGALA

 

WHAT TO EXPECT: This year’s festivities include a performance of “Green is the New Black,” a new production exploring

WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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65

PHOTOGRAPHYDustin C. Lilley, www.dclimagery.com WARDROBEWill and Shani Lawry, 202-277-0340, willj412@gmail.com MAKEUPKim Reyes, 301-254-5282, faceofdesign@gmail.com HAIRChris Rushton for T H E Artist Agency MANICUREAngela Turner, angela.turner18@gmail.com MODELLeanne Hyer

EDITORIALDIRECTORAnne Kim-Dannibale ASSISTANTEDITORLaura Wainman EDITORIALASSISTANTSKelsey Edelmann, Katerina Polymeropoulos

Photographed at Evermay Estate, home of the S&R Foundation

LIFESTYLES

ARMANI COLLEZIONI pewter jacket with black lapel ($2,995) and GUCCI crystal eve sandals ($995), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; VINCE woven pants ($295), Neiman Marcus, 5300 Wisconsin Ave., NW, 202966-9700; CICADA platinum and diamond antique oval pendent on long pearl and diamond chain necklace ($41,800) and LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD cushioncut halo diamond ring in platinum ($31,000), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200.

GUCCI black tulle net embroidered gown ($25,000), www. gucci.com; SPARK CREATIONS 18-ct. peridot and diamond ring ($18,200), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; TIFFANY’S cobblestone diamond bracelet ($12,000), 8045 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182, 703-8937700; CHRISTIAN DIOR suede pointy sandals ($820), available at select Dior boutiques nationwide, 1-800-929-3467, www.dior.com.

FABIOLA ARIAS lace and organza petal-embroidered gown ($6,700) and JIMMY CHOO glitter t-strap sandal ($795), Neiman Marcus, 5300 Wisconsin Ave., NW, 202966-9700; ROBERTO COIN multi-color semi-precious stone earrings ($9,200) and ROBERTO COIN multi-color semi-precious 18K ring ($5,100), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703749-1200; TIFFANY’S enchant scroll bangle ($50,000), 8045 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182, 703-893-7700.

ARMANI COLLEZIONI “Gazaar” full-skirt dress ($1,295), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; LOS GITANOS VINTAGE 1950s pheasant feather hat (price upon request), Blue’s Hard Goods, 1803 14th St., NW, 202-462-6200; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT rhinestone button clip on earrings ($120) and IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT t-style gold textured chain necklace with bronze rhinestones ($280), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250; ROBERTO COIN multi-color semi-precious 18K bracelet ($17,200), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200.

ARMANI COLLEZIONI pewter jacket with black lapel ($2,995) and GUCCI crystal eve sandals ($995), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; VINCE woven pants ($295), Neiman Marcus, 5300 Wisconsin Ave., NW, 202966-9700; CICADA platinum and diamond antique oval pendent on long pearl and diamond chain necklace ($41,800) and LILJENQUIST & BECKSTEAD cushioncut halo diamond ring in platinum ($31,000), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200.

THE ROW silk front fold gown ($1036) and PRADA peep toe booties ($950), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisonsin Ave, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOTT Swarovski crystal teardrop cubic zirconium necklace (worn as a bracelet) ($230), Saks Jandel, 5510 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-652-2250; MIKIMOTO multi-color black Tahitian pearl strands (price upon request) and BULGARI blue topaz and diamond ring in 18K white gold ($9,950), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; TIFFANY’S “Legacy Collection” fivebar drop pendant ($19,050), 8045 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182, 703-893-7700.

CAROLINA HERRERA faille trumpet skirt ($1,990) and ALEXANDER MCQUEEN suede and studs knuckle clutch ($2,295), Saks Fifth Avenue, 5555 Wisconsin Ave., Chevy Chase, MD 20815, 301-657-9000; CHRISTIAN DIOR satin crepe back cape ($2,700) and CHRISTIAN DIOR wool and silk crepe bustier ($2,200), available at select Dior boutiques nationwide, 1-800-9293467, www.dior.com; ISSAC & CO. sliced blue sapphire and diamond dangle earrings ($5,850), Liljenquist & Beckstead, 2001 International Drive, McLean, VA 22102, 703-749-1200; TIFFANY’S metro 5-row bangle ($23,000), 8045 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182, 703-893-7700; IBEAUTIFUL MIA ELLIOT silver chain bracelet with Swarovski crystals and rhinestone bars($250), ibeautifulmiaelliott. com.

LIFESTYLES | PERFECTPITCH

DAZZLING VIRTUOSO BY PAT R I C K D. M C C OY

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ith punk rock hair and flamboyant style, Grammy-nominated organist Cameron Carpenter, 32, is setting the classical world afire by giving a staid instrument glam-rock status. This month, the virtuoso tackles the Rubenstein Family organ for what’s sure to be an eclectic show co-starring cellist Yo Yo Ma and conductor Christoph Eschenbach. WASHINGTON LIFE: For your Kennedy Center debut with the National Symphony Orchestra in the Opening Ball Concert, you will be the organ soloist for Saint-Saëns’ “Organ Symphony.” What are the challenges of playing an oftperformed standard work and how does this determine your approach and perspective in your performance? CAMERONCARPENTER For somebody like me who is under the influence of opera director Peter Sellars or who is continually put in a position that almost no other organist in the world would have to be put in — secularizing an instrument — you can imagine that a lot of those certain attitudes and self-expectations carry over into classical music. It has some of the same problems as the organ. Both classical music and the organ are institutional. They don’t like to change. They are both slow moving, expensive and site specific to a certain degree. In the case of the “Organ Symphony,” I can bring to bear a lot of my experiences with reinvention because this is a work where I get to be a collaborative musician for once. That in itself represents stepping out of my comfort zone into a place that in many ways is more interesting. I want to try to play this work that uses the limited, reticent statements of the organ in a way that is equally shocking and message filled as the entire preceding movement. I feel sometimes that when I am listening to music, someone is talking. That piece has this effect in a concentrated fashion. When that voice is coming through the organ, there is another terrace or level of expression that has been reached. It’s quite a staggering achievement in orchestral music. There are a

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great number of composers in the 20th century who are still trying to figure out ways to self-contextualize music, but that is one of the great secrets of the organ. WL: What’s on the program for your first full recital on the Rubenstein Family organ Cameron Carpenter (Photo by Heiko Laschitzki) in October? CC I’m still deciding what that program There is a certain strength and outrageousness might be. I think one of the important things in walking out on stage in a fashionable or about that program is what I have to bring as a voice and musician. In the case of a musician like glamorous way. Any drag queen can tell you that there is an element of taboo that when Joshua Bell who gets to walk out on stage with tastefully invoked in a dramatic setting can their own instrument that they have known for be an aspect of performance that takes the years, they may never worry that they won’t be able to give their best. I on the other hand, have audience out of the literal. very high hopes for the Kennedy Center organ, having heard nothing but good things and having WL: If you could perform with a popular artist, never played or seen it. So, for me to promise or who would it be? CCKate Bush, who is an elusive figure, but say what I will be able to play in the future in a to me is a musical mind that is absolutely at sense would be even more absurd. the level of Franz Schubert. I would have the exact same feeling about someone like Annie WL: Probably not since the reigning “First Lady of the Organ” Diane Bish or even the late pianist Lennox. I would never consider myself to be all that well informed about music in general. Liberace has someone brought such panache I have these small areas of knowledge, to the keyboard. How does your personal style surrounded by vast universes of ignorance. accentuate your concert performances? My nature is to be attracted to that which CCPersonal style is not something separate from music for me. The allegory I suppose is that is lyrical, tonal and expansive. Obviously, someone like Lana Del Ray is an important of the composer Ned Rorem, who lamented artist for me. that we can always close our eyes if something is visually offensive to us. So much of what happens on stage is by a sense of awareness of Cameron Carpenter solos with the National my own life. In terms of style and substance for Symphony Orchestra Opening Ball Concert me, style is substance. In regards to articulating Sept. 29 under conductor Christoph Eschenbach a personal style on stage, I simply find that and cellist Yo Yo Ma and performs his own allows me to do away with preconceptions. recital Oct. 16.

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WASHINGTON S O C I A L  D I A R Y AroundTown�CharityWorks’{}}PointVintageWineTasting�OvertheMoonandMore!

Laura and Douglas Gansler at CharityWorks 100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting (Photo by Tony Powell)

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AROUNDTOWN

Summer Scene International pianists compete for top prizes; Capital City Ball supporters fight human trafficking BY DONNA SHOR

POLYGLOT PIANISTS: They came from

nations on four continents — Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, Argentina and Japan — and from 10 cities across the U.S. for the 11th annual Washington International Piano Arts Competition (WIPAC). It’s been said that the ultimate oneupmanship is to have a hard-earned degree in law or medicine and then “do something else.” These competitors, many of whom have already proved themselves as awardwinners, are not full-time salaried musicians; these “something else” professionals included a software engineer, physician, mortgage broker, psychiatrist, chemical professor, lawyer and kindergarten teacher. They are musicians imbued with a love of the piano and, as WIPAC board member Henri Georges Polgar reminded us, they are “amateurs” — meaning “lovers” in the root sense of the word — who play for the joy of it. (Remember your high school Latin, amo, amas, amat?) After two days of elimination rounds, the finalists competed at the Embassy of Bulgaria, where they were hosted despite the absence of that country’s vivacious ambassador, Elena Poptodorova, who was, alas, out of the country on official business. Portia Davidson chaired the event while her husband Maurice Davidson headed the distinguished jury of musicians and music professors. The winners were announced and prizes awarded by WIPAC’s co-founders, concert pianist John Gardecki and his indefatigable wife Chateau during dinner at the nearby Fairfax Hotel. Psychiatrist Matthias Fischer won over the jury with his rendering of Chopin’s “Sonata No. 3 in B minor, Opus 58” to take first prize; Maurice Thomas took second; and Dr. Barry Cotinho third.

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Portia Davidson, chairman of the 11th annual Washington International Piano Arts Competition with the group’s founder, John Gardecki (Courtesy Photo)

UP IN THE AIR WITH COURTNEY’S HOUSE: The roof deck Observatory Bar

atop Georgetown’s Graham Hotel was the scene of the Courtney’s House cocktail fundraiser and kick-off to November’s Capital City Ball. The bar, which opened at the beginning of summer, is Georgetown’s newest beatthe-heat playground, boasting panoramic views of the capital. The deck wraps around the building, continuing after the bar to a quiet section in back. The seventh annual Capital City Ball, always held on the Saturday before Thanksgiving, will take place this year at Georgetown’s City Tavern Club. The ball was founded by Bruce Fries and Dr. John Dunford, two friends who decided to combine a good party with a

good cause: fighting human trafficking. The ball sponsors three anti-trafficking charities each year, focusing only on hands-on groups that get tangible results. The first, Courtney’s House, provides support and a healing home environment for sex-trafficked girls between the ages of 12 and 18 and is dedicated to ending commercial sexual exploitation of all children. The other two selected charities, Urban Light and Global Centurion, will also hold events in a lead-up to the ball. Urban Light’s supporters are dedicated to restoring the lives of often forgotten male teenaged victims of sex trafficking and labor exploitation, both globally and locally. Global Centurion focuses on cutting off buyers who fuel the $32 billion per year sex trafficking industry, most recently focusing on more than 200 cases involving U.S. street gangs coercing and trapping victims. Forced labor is the equivalent of modern slavery, a form of human exploitation where workers are kept as near-prisoners, penned-up, underfed and unpaid. Global Centurion works with the Department of Defense to identify companies with U.S. construction contracts overseas that enhance their profits by using slave labor. “The ball, a team effort, draws on the hard work of many people,” Dunford said. “This includes staff, executives and volunteers from our charity beneficiaries as well as our own executive and host committee members who are connected to a variety of social networks. Support from our corporate sponsors, vendors, and guests is also vital to the success of the event.” Everyone, he noted, “literally has a ball working for this worthwhile cause.”

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Chefs Alex and Susan Mandl

WL SPONSORED

CHARITYWORKS 100 POINT VINTAGE WINE TASTING Alex and Susan Mandl Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Barry Dixon, Leah and Jaques Gansler and Christine Dunn Kay Kendall and Jack Davies

PERFECT PAIRINGS: The Mandls’ spectacular Virginia home proved a picturesque seing for the CharityWorks Vintage Wine Tasting, a “best of the bestâ€? dinner event featuring 10 wines paired with dishes craed by local celebrity chefs. THE SCENE: Philanthropists, high-tech heavyweights, wine aďŹ cionados and gourmets enjoyed a ďŹ ve-course feast. Television personality Montel Williams performed miracles as the evening’s auctioneer, proving that charm and passion can induce generosity on a major scale. (He sold a dinner for eight, three times at $28,000.) WORTHY CAUSE: Guests agreed that the best pairings of all were CharityWorks, Capital Partners for Education and Fisher House, which received nearly $500,000 to support programs for at-risk youth in Washington, D.C. and military personnel in need of medical care. SPOTTED: Barry Dixon, Mark Lowham, Chris Simmons, Amy and Pierre Chao, Mike and Judy Woods and Atlanta Hawks owners Karen and Bruce Levenson. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Jean-Marie and Raul Fernandez

Joe Ruzzo, Judy Green and Mark Lowham

Wendy Adeler Hall and Valentina Adeler Armour George Swygert and Khalid Jewayni

Montel Williams

Scott and Patrice Brickman Fariba Jahanbani and Bradley Nelson WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

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Paul and Angie Pagnato

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Sarah and Tim Fallon

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EVENTSPOTLIGHT

CharityWorks

100 Point Vintage Wine Tasting TO B E N E F I T C A P I TA L PA R T N E R S F O R E D U C AT I O N A N D F I S H E R H O U S E

An insider’s look at the gourmet multi-course menu and wine pairings, as well as the celebrity chefs who prepared each course PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHARITYWORKS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED MENU

CANAPÉS

KYLEBAILEY—Birch and Barley JOHNMELFI—Blue Duck Tavern s0ORKBELLYBIT PARKERHOUSEROLL RAWMACKEREL ASPARAGUS PRESERVEDLEMON PEASHOOTS s,AMBTONGUERUBENS FRIEDSEACUCUMBER SMOKEDTROUTROE SEABEANSALAD

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SCOTTDREWNO—The Source A TASTING OF MARYLAND BLUE CRAB

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MENU

SECONDCOURSE

BRYANVOLTAGGIO—Volt, Range PASTA BOLOGNESE

s#UTTLEFISHANDBACONSMOKEDWITHHICKORY STEWEDWITHROASTED TOMATOESANDKIMCHIOFDAIKONRADISH RICOTTACHEESEANDMISO CAVATELLI INKPAINTFROMTHECUTTLEFISH GRATEDPARMIGIANOREGGIANO s6ERITE,A*OIE3CARECROW#ABERNET3AUVIGNON

THIRDCOURSE

JEFFBUBEN—Vidalia, Bistro Bis SPICED DUCK BREAST

s3PICEDDUCKBREASTFOIEGRASMOUSSELINE PORCINI VIDALIASPRINGONIONS RICEGRITS DUCKPANCETTA RHUBARBRAVIGOTE s"AROLO!NNUNZIATA6OERZIO"AROLO0ERCRISTINA#LERICO

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SPIKEGJERDE—Woodberry Kitchen 50 DAY DRY-AGED STEAM SHIP ROAST

s4ALLOWPOPOVER LOCALVERJUSMUSTARD BLANCHEDCHARD MARROWSFORMATINO s#HATEAU-ONTROSE#HATEAU,ATOUR

PALATE CLEANSER

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TIFFANYMACISAAC— Neighborhood Restaurant Group 50 DAY DRY-AGED STEAM SHIP ROAST

s"LACK&ORRESTPARFAIT CHOCOLATECHEESECAKE BRANDIESCHERRYICECREAM HAZELNUTBUCKEYE s$OW6INTAGE0ORT&ONSECA6INTAGE0ORT

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Mario Lanzone Stuart McLean and Wendy Ezrailson

Jonathan Osborne, Joseph Bryant, Yaneek Proctor, Darieta Tyler and Quincy Jones

Vincent DePaul, Fran Holuba and Giuseppe Lanzone

WL EXCLUSIVE

REDDZ TRADING OPENING PARTY 1413 Wisconsin Avenue NW | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

Susanna Michelson, Jay Villar and Christina Sevilla

FASHIONABLE EXPANSION: A chic crowd gathered at the opening of Wendy Ezrailson’s second Reddz Trading outpost for a night of shopping, socializing and Peruvian cuisine. Following the success of her Bethesda agship store, Ezrailson is now oering gently worn contemporary clothing in Georgetown as well. Vincent DePaul of “House of Cardsâ€? fame and Ralph Lauren model/Olympic-rower-turned-businessman Giuseppe Lanzone both stood out amid the vintage Hermès and Chanel creations. DePaul greeted guests with a kiss on the cheek, while Lanzone dished out sliders and quinoa salad from the Peruvian Brothers food truck he runs with his brother Mario Lanzone.

Dennis and Jamie Roche VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Vikram Sunderam and Ashok Bajaj

Julia Hobbes and Rachel Wolfowitz

Maria and Fabio Trabocchi

Dave Moran, Kathy Hollinger and Geo Tracy WL EXCLUSIVE

RAMMY AWARDS GALA Marriott Wardman Park | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

Andrew Davidson, Renee Eisman and Ernie Arias

BLOOMING SUCCESS: No evening is more anticipated in the restaurant industry than the annual RAMMY Awards when chefs, owners, baristas and foodies alike gather to celebrate the local cuisine scene. With 50 new dining spots opening this spring alone, the evening’s theme, “Restaurants in Bloom,â€? was particularly apt. Major wins were snagged by Blue Duck Tavern (Fine Dining Restaurant of the Year), Mintwood Place (New Restaurant of the Year), Fabio Trabocchi (Chef of the Year) and Ashok Bajaj (Restaurateur of the Year). Aer a few long-winded acceptance speeches that included colorful references to demographic changes on 14th Street NW and one-liners mocking politicians, more than 1,600 guests enjoyed an open bar, elaborate buet and dancing that continued into the wee hours.

Kori Sarubin and Mike Attman

David Harrison and Joe Farruggio

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Sally Chapoton, Janet Lindgren, Laurie Coughlin and Sally Webster

Grace Fenstermaker and Russell Lyons Patty and David Cohn

Lindsay Angerholzer, Rep. Jim Moran, Deborah Warren, Sen. Mark Warner and Maz Angerholzer

Missy Cook and Collette Bruce

CORCORAN BALL Corcoran Gallery of Art | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON VISUAL SPLENDOR: Insiders may have noted budgetary constraints but this year’s art-themed ball didn’t lose points for visual ďŹ nery. Guests lingered in the gallery’s many decorated rooms, especially the main hall where bright Warholian daisies hung from the ceiling. Aer dining on spring lamb, guests made their way upstairs for breakfast ďŹ nger foods and dancing to the wee hours at the popular “Club Corcoran.â€? VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Nancy Sidamon-Eristo, Susie Canton and Laurie Kush

Stuart and Gwen Holliday

Ryuji Ueno and Sachiko Kuno with Sakie and Glen Fukushima

Lola Reinsch

Mary Mochary, Indian Amb. Nirupama Rao and Gilan Tocco Corn Juliette Six, Gene MitchlerFik and Suganthi Kadirgamar

Musicians Cicley Parnas, Gleb Ivanov and Benjamin Beilman

WL EXCLUSIVE

YOUNG CONCERT ARTISTS GALA Indian Ambassador’s Residence | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL BRILLIANT TALENTS: Russian pianist Gleb Ivanov joined Americans Cicely Parnas (on cello) and Benjamin Beilman (on violin) to wow benefactors aending this year’s Young Concert Artists gala at the residence of Indian Amb. Nirupama Rao. RITE OF SPRING: The event, chaired by Gilan Tocco Corn, Mary Mochary and Mahinder Tak, also featured a cocktail reception, silent and live auctions and a dinner of traditional Indian cuisine and spectacular oral decorations by porcelain artist Anna Weatherly.

Keiko Kaplan and Eric Motley

Linda Stern and YCA founder Susan Wadsworth

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Rob and Kelly Lee with Kim and John Snedden

Ethan and Lindsay Drath with Chris and Allison Putula

Anne Polk, Angle Steever, Otto Hoernig, Mary Cull and Lizzy Conroy

Marc Schappell, Tom Anderson and Daryl Judy

Samantha Corrigan and Kerry Carlsen

CHILDREN’S HEARING & SPEECH CENTER COUNTRY BARBECUE

Drew Flood with Shannon and Lindsay Stroud

Villa Firenze | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON BBQANDBELLINIS Supporters of Children’s Hospital’s Hearing and Speech Center sipped bellinis and enjoyed the Rocklands Barbeque and Grilling Company’s mouthwatering specialties before dancing to the suave sounds of the Eric Felten Jazz Orchestra at the residence of the Italian ambassador. Rainy weather didn’t stop guests from dressing in their usual laidback-but-stylish aire — lots of Lilly Pulitzer colors worn by the ladies and “jazzy� jackets, ties and pants by the men.

Marnie Owens, Mae Haney Grennan and Howard Owens

Kate Collins and Brad Nelson

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Carla Sims and Frederic Yonnet

Robyn and Andre Wells

Adra Williams, LaToya Lewis and Kadreika Maiden

EVENTS BY ANDRE WELLS 10TH ANNIVERSARY

Carla Sims and Cheryl Masri and Frederic Yonnet Ann Walker Marchant

Deborah Kalkstein and Lynda Erkiletian

Malmaison | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL ANDRÉ’S DANCE PARTY: Aer planning more than 4,000 high-end events throughout his career, noted Washington party designer AndrĂŠ Wells celebrated 10 “amazingâ€? years in business with his very own private soirĂŠe. Accompanied by his wife, Robyn, “the love of my life,â€? the aable host treated friends, clients and event partners to a typically Wells-esque aair that included a three-course candle-lighted dinner, multiple toasts of bubbly and dancing to music by DJ Adrian Loving. Wells’ ďŹ rm, Events by AndrĂŠ Wells, was launched in 2004 and is nationally known for producing glamorous aairs for President Barack Obama’s inauguration and companies such as Walt Disney, BET, PBS, ABC and NBC. Other clients have included Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder and Smokey Robinson. His ďŹ rst gig? His own seventh birthday. “It was,â€? he recalled, “a big deal.â€? VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Krystal Ugo, Anton Papich and J.C. Hayward

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SEPTEMBER

Angela Biciocchi and Claudia Barcelo

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OVERTHEMOON

Saratoga Springs Sojourn Fast paced fêtes, faster horses and an an even faster car

Marylou Whitney (le) on the viewing stand at rthe races in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Inset above: The Whitney Invitational Handicap trophy

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locks of folks from Middleburg flew up for the annual August festivities in the swank upstate New York spa known as Saratoga Springs: Maggie Bryant, Bill Backer, Mimi AbelSmith, Jacqueline Ohrstrom, Doug Fout, Ann MacLeod, Diana and Bert Firestone and more. The captivating town was awash in parades, parties and galas to celebrate 150 years of the finest in thoroughbred horse racing.Those first races, in August, 1863, were a welcome respite within weeks of the bloodshed at Gettysburg during the Civil War and continue as a welcome summer diversion. The Whitney family name has been linked to this magical place since 1900, when railroad tycoon William Collins Whitney rescued the track with a $365,000 investment. This year, as always, octogenarian Marylou Whitney was hostess, grand marshal and chairman. The widow of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney (W.C. Whitney’s grandson) is now married to the debonair John Hendrickson, 48, a constant appendage. The revelry began with a Floral Fête promenade of carriages, bicycles, petal-festooned baby carriages and even red wagons pulled by parents with blossomadorned children. Reminiscent of a long ago and longed-for era,Whitney and Hendrickson waved to thousands of spectators who lined the

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Butch Leitzinger with his blue Bugai Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport

sidewalks along Broadway. An ice cream social for all followed at Congress Park. Whitney and Hendrickson were honorary chairman of the Whitney Polo Meadow for the Saratoga Hospital Benefit and donated a surprise $100,000 for the intensive care unit. As founding sponsors of the Backstretch Employees charity, they also show up regularly for weekly Sunday suppers, English lessons and bingo games with the grooms and track workers, awarding lavish prizes to the winners. Swathed in a creamy yellow suit that matched the ribbon she cut,Whitney joined her husband to dedicate the $500,000 WhitneyViewing Stand at the training track one morning. The next afternoon, they presented Paul Bulmahn, owner of GoldMark Farm and the winner of The Whitney Invitational Handicap, with a new sterling silver, three-handled chalice trophy donated by youknow-who and adorned with the Whitney crest. The winning horse, Cross Traffic, was draped with a hand-made blanket of 500 pink roses. Of course, they were the appropriately named “Marylou Whitney Roses.” But we’re not finished yet, add to the races a flurry of other activities. Just ask Julie Chlopecki, who divides her time between Washington, Middleburg and Saratoga Springs. A partner at Xenophon Strategies, a Washington, D.C. public

affairs firm, she moves her base of operations to Saratoga during August. She’s often spotted holding court at the Reading Room or the side porch of her Union Avenue home. Among those visiting this summer for a bit of business: Reps. Bill Shuster (R-Pa.) and Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. Congressional Horse Caucus. At the annual yearling auction, we spotted Middleburg horseman and real estate guru John Coles and watched as an elegant bay filly topped the sale at $1,225,000 to an investor from Brazil. Back home in Virginia, we noticed a 1,200horsepower Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport in front of the Ashby Inn recently. Professional race car driver Butch Leitzinger, three-time winner of the Rolex 24 at Daytona, was out for the weekend taking the blue baby for a country zoom. Meanwhile, five-time Grammy award winning singer and songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter has quietly settled at her 105-acre farm in hunt country. (The asking price in February 2012 was $2.2 million.) Formerly known as “Sunny Side” and later “Lost Corner,” the 1919 Virginia farmhouse has been redesigned and renovated and is a mere hop, skip and a jump from Wolf Trap, where she recently performed with Shawn Colvin.The property features several fireplaces, a small barn and stunning inspirational views.

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MARYLOU WHITNEY AND TROPHY PHOTOS COURTE SY OF THE NEW YORK RACING ASSOCIATION. BUTCH LEITZINGER PHOTO BY VICKY MOON.

BY VICKY MOON

Guests explore Mrs. Post’s Dining Room

Post descendants: Samuel Iverson, George Iverson, Ellen Macneille Charles, Ellen Iverson, Anna Rose Iverson, Andrew Iverson, Nedenia Rumbough and Stanley Rumbough

Hillwood Director Kate Markert

‘LIVING ARTFULLY’ OPENING Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens |

Tommy Boggs, Aubrey Sarvis, Barbara Boggs and William McPherson

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SEPTEMBER

Charlotte and Michael Buxton

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PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

“AMERICAN EMPRESS”: It was said that Marjorie Merriweather Post (18871973) lived beer than most queens (an observation shared by a number of European monarchs) and her hospitality and graciousness were renowned when she entertained at “Hillwood,” the fabulous art-filled estate that she bequeathed to the nation as a house museum. “She loved to share her wealth with people and le a great gi to us,” Ellen MacNeille Charles told guests at the opening of “Living Artfully, ” an exhibit devoted to her grandmother’s extraordinarily luxurious lifestyle — one that even the most privileged guests noted was “fast disappearing” from the scene.

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Katherine Carr and Aaron Beattie

Tor Jorgen Van Eijk, Hans Christian Skovholt and Karen Nikgol

Stephanie Kwak, Victoria Reis and Julia Young

OPENING OF ‘TERMINATORS’ EXHIBITION Transformer Gallery | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

Johanne Eikenes and Sina Lunde

ART TALK: Transformer’s opening of “Terminatorsâ€? had a certain intellectual edge with Norwegian artists Tor Jørgen van Eijk, Karen Nichols and Hans Christian Skovholt

Melinda Diachenko and Kelly Hughes

of the No Place! collective discussing “both the process of deconstruction, and the ever-present sense of nostalgia that deconstruction carries with itâ€? in their work. Norwegian Embassy staers Johanne Fjellestad Eikenes and Sina BrĂĽten Lunde were spoed among the other art lovers at the decidedly no-frills gathering. Ben Black, Tim Hammond

Eames Armstrong and Kent Reynolds

and Nicole Upano VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Sara Allen Abbott, Trish Vradenburg, Diane Rehm, Shane Harris and George Vradenburg

Alissa Vradenburg, Connie Fulton and Mary Beth Howlett Ashley Taylor Bronczek and Laura Gail Smith

Jill Lesser, Elise Le owitz and Jill Granader

Carol Seay, Billie Leigh Rippey and Paige Rippey

WOMEN AGAINST ALZHEIMERS DINNER Phillips Collection | PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON WOMEN WARRIORS: Supporters of Women Against Alzheimers (WA2) gathered at the Phillips Collection to view art while bolstering eorts to creatively explore a cure for a disease that disproportionately aects women. VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Shawn Taylor and Jennifer Molino WA S H I N G T O N L I F E

Susan Cherney and Liz Plant

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Clint Wheeler, Todd Gray, Scott Spear, Anita Brikman, Ray Kimsey and Emily Wheeler

Chris Wilson and Jessica Frith Bill and Kathy Magee Faranak Arab, Michael Skehan, Ski Johnson and Andrea Roane

WL EXCLUSIVE

OPERATION SMILE’S ‘GRIN GALA’ U.S. Chamber of Commerce | PHOTOSBYALFREDOFLORES

ALL SMILES: Miss District of Columbia USA Jessica Frith and WUSA9 anchor Anita Brikman hosted a moving evening for Operation Smiles’ programs beneďŹ ting children born with cle lips and palates worldwide. Boosted by one supporter’s personal story, guests jumped on the silent auction, raising $50,000 to cover surgeries and adding to the evening’s overall $300,000 proceeds. FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Chefs Enzo Fargione, Michael Fiorelli and Todd Gray added a tasty turn to the festivities, partnering on a top-notch surf-and-turf menu of lobster and ribeye.

Alisha Waid and Morgan Foster

David and Maureen Shuler VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

Karen Sessions and Rep. Chris Van Hollen

Sheryl Crow Olivia August, Rep. Brad Schneider and Scotty Lesmes

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers

GLOBAL DOWN SYNDROME FOUNDATION GALA AND FASHION SHOW Ritz Carlton, Washington, D.C. | PHOTOSBYTONYPOWELL

FEEL-GOOD FASHION: Washington celebrities, from Redskins cheerleaders to members of Congress, joined 25 models with Down Syndrome to strut down the runway in ensembles styled by Bloomingdale’s, at this gala with nearly 400 guests. The festive evening raised $400,000 for the Global Down Syndrome Foundation and honored Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Rep. Chris Van Hollen with the Quincy Jones Exceptional Advocacy Award for their support of those with disabilities. The hit of the evening was a sensational performance by nine-time Grammy-winner, Sheryl Crow, who was a huge crowd-pleaser when she was joined on stage for one performance by one of the models. Canela Bahamonde and Rep. Virginia Foxx Alex Sessions with Redskins cheerleaders 94

VIEWALLTHEPHOTOSATWWWWASHINGTONLIFECOM

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Sloane Suiters and Olivia Carnot

Kandy Stroud and Dr. Bill Stixrud

Mike Wardian Keith Powell, Scotty Powell and Stephane Carnot

Kakie, Annie and Charlie Magruder

Bill Endicott

Cal Homan and Sebastien Carnot

WL EXCLUSIVE

STROUD FOUNDATION 5K Fletcher’s Boat House | PHOTOSBYWILLYHOFFMANJR PURPOSEFUL FITNESS: More than 200 participants gave up their Saturday beauty sleep to run in the third annual Stroud Foundation 5K race and continue eorts by the late Dr. Frank Stroud to help local children with learning disabilities. Before the race, aendees listened to tender remarks from Stroud’s friend and colleague, clinical neuropsychologist Dr. Bill Stixrud, on how far ahead of his time the beloved pediatrician had been. Among the competitors seeking a healthy and informative morning activity were ďŹ ve-time winner of the National Marathon Mike Wardian and former Olympic oarsman Bill Endico (who rowed himself to the race).

Matt Finn, Nick Pinero, Matt Moore, Wes Lincoln and Kayuon Kauiani Edward Saachi and Peter Corbett

Evan BurďŹ eld and Donna Haris

Jen Consalvo, Frank Gruber and Mayor Vincent Gray

WL EXCLUSIVE

Laura and Matt Thompson

STARS, STRIPES & STARTUPS 1776 Campus, 1133 15th Street NW |

PHOTOSBYKYLESAMPERTON

MADE IN AMERICA: What beer way to mark our nation’s independence than with a trip to a county fair? Since city living usually makes that rather diďŹƒcult, the tech startup ďŹ rm 1776 decided to bring a County Fair Independence Day Bash to Washington, complete with striped ag pants, bales of hay, traditional fair games and plenty of BBQ and corn on the cob. Even Mayor Vincent Gray and Deputy Mayor Victor Hoskins turned out to hear speeches by company stalwarts Peter Corbe, Frank Gruber and Jen Consalvo. Guests also learned about 1776’s new global initiatives: the Challenge Cup, the Startup Federation and access to 1776’s programming and resources for startups all over the world.

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Joe Miller, London Rakestran and Curtis Johnson

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SEPTEMBER

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HOME LIFE RealEstateNewsandOpenHouseIInsideHomesandMyWashington RealEstateNewsandOpenHouse|To come

1MRM;EWLMRKXSR Tech Titan Frank Islam and his wife Debbie Driesman use their 47,000-square-foot home to pay homage to the city they love. BY LAURA WAINMAN PHOTOS BY TONY BROWN MAKEUP BY LIZ WEGRZYN | HAIR BY CHRIS RUSHTON FOR T.H.E. ARTIST AGENCY INTERIOR DESIGN BY SROKA DESIGN | LANDSCAPING BY LEWIS AQUATECH CONSTRUCTION BY GIBSON BUILDERS | LIGHTING AND AUDIO BY BETHESDA SYSTEMS

HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

Photo by Kenneth M Wyner

P

otomac is no stranger to mega-mansions. The suburban town has long played host to young couples driving along River Road to admire luxurious houses sprawled across acres of land they can only dream of acquiring. Amid the grandeur, “Norton Manor,” the newly constructed home of entrepreneur Frank Islam, founder and former CEO of QSS Group providing IT services to clients, and his wife Debbie Driesman, is impossible to miss. The 47,000-square-foot complex, situated on nine acres, consists of three French Neo-Classical buildings: the main residence, a 7,000-square-foot guest house and a tea house. The complex is a far cry from what the site looked like when the couple purchased the land five years ago. The space originally consisted of two adjacent four-acre lots, each of which contained a house that was torn down to realize their vision.The guest quarters and tea house, located east of the main house, overlook four acres of woodland gardens, a once completely wooded area that now includes a babbling brook, gazebo, multiple bridges and even a “secret gardenstyle” bowling lawn tucked away at the rear of the property. The first thing a visitor sees from the winding driveway in front of the house is a reflecting pool similar to the one in front of the U. S. Capitol. (The house is also divided into east and west wings.) Inside the grand foyer, there is a domed, painted ceiling surrounded by a double sweeping staircase, chairs with the same fabric used in the Blue Room of the White House and hand-painted murals depicting scenes of Maryland life. A quick chat with Mr. Islam, who has become a very active fundraiser for the Democratic Party, and it becomes clear that such tributes to the Washington landscape are no accident. “Washington is near and dear to us,” he says. “It is our home, and I think it is important to showcase these national landmarks that we are fortunate to be surrounded by.” He has showcased them indeed. In the downstairs lounge, where Mr. Islam can host upwards of 120 guests

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OPPOSITE PAGE, Clockwise from top left: The Beaux Arts exterior of “Norton Manor” was inspired by “Rosecliff” in Newport, R.I. Though Mr. Islam was initially skeptical about the bird design, the entrance to the lounge is now one of his favorite decor elements. Ms. Driesman and designer Skip Sroka worked with artist Barry Entner, who created the glass sculptures and custom light fixtures while the house was still in the blueprint stage. The conservatory walls were painted by Lenore Winters Studio in classic trellis style.

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: The Art Deco influence is most noticeable in the bar. Every rug is custom made and inset into marble floors. Mr. Islam fell in love with the replica Resolute Desk he saw in Ronald Reagan’s personal library and had to have one of his own. The French Garden room overlooking a statue of Persephone is Mr. Islam’s favorite room. The lounge is where the couples’ many political guests will be entertained.

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for seated political fundraising dinners, floor-to-ceiling murals of the Capitol, White House, Lincoln Memorial and the United States Institute of Peace, where he is a member of the International Advisory Council, decorate the walls. In his personal library he uses a replica of the Resolute Desk, complete with the Presidential Seal, which has been used by two of his favorite presidents, John F. Kennedy and Barack Obama. Mr. Islam considers himself to be living proof that the American dream can be achieved, and he wants his home to not only pay homage to the land that he loves but inspire others to believe they can live that dream as well. “This country invested in me through education and opportunity, so it is my duty to give back to my community and to stay involved,” Mr. Islam says. “I do that through political fundraisers, writing policy papers and philanthropic activities like setting up college scholarships through the foundation my wife and I run.” Though the couple — who just moved in over the summer — are still adjusting to their new home and establishing a routine there, they have found plenty of ways to ensure that the spaciousness of the house does not take away from the welcoming, homey atmosphere they wish it to convey. “The rooms we actually live in, the kitchen or the family room for example, were kept to a comfortable scale so that it would still feel like our home,” Ms. Driesman says. Mornings are spent reading the daily newspapers together over several cups of coffee before heading to their respective home offices to begin their daily tasks. Mr. Islam pens op-ed columns on the state of American politics and works on editing his second book; Ms. Driesman busies herself with paperwork and design plans. The couple usually takes a quick walk through the gardens for their mid-day exercise before heading out to meetings. On rainy days, they make good use of one of their favorite rooms in the house, the very open and airy conservatory. “It has such a comfortable, whimsical feeling and you can pretend like you are outside even if you are indoors,” Ms. Driesman. says “Plus, it has a great view of the Koi fish.” 

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HOME LIFE | INSIDEHOMES

Behind the Scenes THE MAKING OF NORTON MANOR

Tales of the men who spent more than five years bringing this Potomac mansion to completion

Photo by Kenneth M. Wyner

JIM GIBSON

SKIP SROKA

GIBSONBUILDERS-CONSTRUCTION

SROKADESIGN-INTERIORDESIGN

    We became involved six years ago, right after Mr. Islam purchased the home in 2007. We spent two years on pre-construction before we even broke ground. First we had to tear down the existing two houses and combine the adjoining properties into one. We tore one down, and the fire department burned the other down. Then we could get started on what became a four-year build.  The project is unique because there was a very strong, unique vision on the part of Debbie and Frank.The house was always going to be designed around the domed double staircase, with the entertaining rooms coming off the grand foyer. I liked that when we finished, it was going to look like a house that had been there for 100 years. My favorite element of the project is definitely the staircase. Even in my wildest dreams, I didn’t know it was going to turn out as well as it did. I am still amazed at the detailing every time I see it.

on budget. We had ongoing meetings with the clients to ensure their expectations were met.

When I came on board with the project four years ago, there were already elevations for what the house would look like. It was set as French Neo-Classical design, so the main priority was making sure the design remained period correct. This project was a marvelous way of taking my significant historic knowledge and applying it. We looked to many historic French residences, including one of the lesser palaces at Versailles, for inspiration and brought pieces in from all over the world.

DON GWIZ LEWISAQUATECH-OUTDOORSPACES

We’ve been involved in this project for four years. We loved its scale, its level of complexity, and the desire of the clients to create formal gardens. The two acres of woodland gardens incude a 450-foot natural steam, stone bridges and entry arches, a natural gazebo and over 400 landscape lights. The scope continued to change and increase but we were tasked to stay

MICHAEL WILSON BETHESDASYSTEMS-LIGHTINGANDAUDIO

We worked for a long time with the construction manager, Mike O’Connor, to not only create energy efficient lighting, but to find the best kind of lighting that would result in the most wattage savings. In the end, we did the entire home in LED, which is saving more than 70,000 watts a month. Our greatest obstacle was creating a seamless wired and wireless internet not just within the house, but across the entire property. We also created an enterprise grade network including a customized router, five-gigabyte switches and 18 wireless access points. Now, from the time Mr. Islam enters the security gate, his iPad connects with full bars to his wifi network and he can move anywhere in the house, outside to the Koi terrace, across the lawn panel to the tea house and through the woodland gardens — all without dropping one bar or changing networks.

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HOME LIFE | REALESTATENEWS

Great Estates

Under Armour CEO buys the Bruce Mansion in Georgetown, David Brock and James Alefantis sell in Kalorama, Tom Phillips sells “Eaglecrest” in McLean BY STAC E Y G R A Z I E R P FA R R

THE DISTRICT Michael Chisek and his wife sold   WOODLEYROADNW for $5,250,000 to a

private trust. Mr. Chisek is chief investment officer for Sterling Stamos Capital, a New York-based investment advisory firm. The sprawling Cleveland Park residence spans over 8,300 square feet and includes a media room, gym, large recreation room, library and gourmet kitchen with a connecting family room. The property also features a two-room guesthouse with full bath and kitchenette plus a cabana with full Viking outdoor kitchen adjacent to a 75-foot outdoor pool. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Jean and Tim Hanan were the listing agents. Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank bought 

THSTREETNW for $7,850,000. The Georgetown beauty was formerly the abode of the late legendary socialite Evangeline Bruce and diplomat David K.E. Bruce. Mr. Bruce had the unique distinction of serving as ambassador to France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the People’s Republic of China. The eightbedroom Federal brick mansion in the West Village, built circa 1810, played a central role in Georgetown society and world affairs. Newspaper heiress Clara Bingham, who bought the house from the Bruce estate, then sold it to Curtin Winsor III and his wife Deborah. Mr. Winsor, who died in December 2012, was the founder of the Bank of Georgetown. The grand 34-foot ballroom, added by the Bruces during their lengthy ownership for grand entertaining, is now a drawing room. The house boasts 12-foot ceilings, three large Jefferson windows that open fully to the garden and a large fireplace. The property also features a guesthouse, a greenhouse and an original detached smokehouse.The spectacular grounds were designed by landscape architect Rose Greely (1887-1969) and include mature specimen plantings, vintage boxwoods, a

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The 8,300-square-foot residence with a two-room guesthouse at 3836 Woodley Road NW sold for $5,250,000.

heated pool and expansive terrace. The twolevel garden is one of the largest and most important in Georgetown. Washington Fine Properties represented both sides of the transaction. Eileen McGrath and Jamie Peva represented the seller, while Joanne Pinover represented the purchaser. Hashim Hassan sold  TILDENSTREET NW for $2,150,000 to David Israelite. Mr. Hassan is a District-based residential real estate developer. Mr. Israelite is president and CEO of the National Music Publishers’ Association, the largest U.S. music publishing trade association, and a former justice department official. The newly built five-bedroom Forest Hills contemporary features a two-story foyer and open floor plan with a gourmet kitchen and abundant light throughout.The lower level includes a kitchenette with bar and access to exterior patio. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Barbara Zuckerman was the listing agent while RE/MAX Realty Services’ Suzanne Reynolds was the buyer’s agent. David Brock and James Alefantis sold   CALIFORNIA STREET NW for

$2,250,000 to Scott and Luz Driscoll. Mr. Brock made headlines on the right as the author of two bestselling Clinton-era books, “The Real Anita Hill” and “Troopergate,” before switching sides to found Media Matters for America, a group that monitors right-wing media bias. Mr. Alefantis is the restaurateur behind the popular local eateries Comet Ping Pong and Buck’s Fishing & Camping. Dr. Luz Driscoll is a District-area dentist. The sixbedroom Federal-style Kalorama row house was built in 1919. The four-story residence has a marble entrance hall, Florida room, patio, three fireplaces, second floor reception hall and parking for two cars. Beasley’s Jim Bell was the listing agent. Lynne Williams sold  NSTREETNW in Georgetown (just a few houses down from one of President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy’s Georgetown residences) for $5 million. Mrs. Williams is the ex-wife of Jack Davies, AOL International’s founder and president. The seven-bedroom brick Georgian-Colonial was built in 1916 by a prominent doctor and boasts over 8,000 square feet of living space on four

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M. Veatch, trustee, for $2,275,000. The

handsome four-bedroom Federal townhouse is set on a double lot and includes over 4,000 square feet of interior space. A gourmet kitchen with adjoining family room, luxe owner’s suite and third-level water views are just a few of this historic residence’s features. The listing agents were Washington Fine Properties’William F. X. Moody and Robert The former residence of diplomats David and Evangeline Bruce at 1405 34th Street Hryniewicki.The buyer’s agent was Coldwell NW in Georgetown sold for $7,850,000 to Kevin Plank, founder of Under Armour. Banker’s Phyllis Patterson. levels, a gourmet kitchen, banquet-sized dining Hryniewicki was the listing agent;William F.X. Thomas and Randall Phillips bid room, a spacious master suite with a new Moody, also of Washington Fine Properties, adieu to Eaglecrest compound at   BASIL ROAD for $5,677,777. The buyers are Ian and Waterworks bath, detached two-car garage and was the buyer’s agent. Christine Fujiyama. Mr. Fujiyama is a managing walled garden. TTR Sotheby’s International director of The Carlyle Group and is a director Realty’s Michael Rankin acted as the listing MARYLAND Clarke and Naomi Camper bought   of Booz Allen Hamilton.The 16,000-square-foot agent and also the buyer’s agent. Konstantinos Siozios sold Maple Adams- KIRKE STREET EAST from Richard Marsh Georgian Colonial broke records back in 2005 Krygier and Markus Krygier  EDMUNDS for $2.6 million. Mr. Camper is an executive when it was sold for $8,727,327. At the time, it STREET NW for $3.2 million. Mr. Siozios, at NYSE Euronext.The seven-bedroom classic was the highest price ever paid for non-waterfront who purchased the house in November 2012 Colonial was built in 1908 and sits in the heart property in Northern Virginia. Mr. Phillips is for $1,750,000, is the owner of Acropolis of Chevy Chase Village. It offers the style and currently the chairman of Eagle Publishing Inc. Homes. Mr. Krygier is a financial manager. elegance of another era with many modern and the Conservative Campaign Fund.The estate The seven-bedroom Observatory Circle amenities as well. Flaherty Group’s Cynthia features six bedrooms and nine baths, a threeresidence was originally built in 1913 and has Davis was the listing agent while Long & bedroom guest house, indoor recreation pavilion been completely restored and renovated to Foster’s Hans Wydler was the buyer’s agent. with regulation-size tennis court and a heated feature a 7,000-square-foot open floor plan swimming pool. The listing agent was William on four levels. Amenities include a gourmet VIRGINIA F. X. Moody of Washington Fine Properties; the James and Melanie New sold  DUKE buyer’s agent was Robert Hryniewicki, also of kitchen, marble bathrooms and a heated pool. Washington Fine Properties’ Robert STREET in Old Town Alexandria to Christie Washington Fine Properties.

PROPERTYLINES SPANISH PALACE IN MCLEAN: The opulent limestone residence belonging to commodities investor and carbon trader Frank Fernandez-Asin and his wife Katherine Jiwan Kim is officially on the market for $15 million. The nearly 16,000-square-foot, sixbedroom Renaissance-style estate was designed by architect Richard Foster to be reminiscent of the palaces of Northern Spain built in the 15th and 16th centuries. The house on Virginia’s Gold Coast was built in 2011 and includes every conceivable amenity — including an exterior made from hand-chiseled limestone crafted by Portuguese masons, imported Spanish candelabras, a 15-seat

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home theater with stadiumstyle seating and a 30-foot-long underground tunnel that connects to another lot (where the owners had planned a pool, tennis court and guesthouse which they never built). The listing agent is Michael Anastasia of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty. MODERN MARVEL: Arlington’s   ROBERTS LANE, a 1960s structure designed by famed Washington architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen, is on the market for $1,499,900. Jacobsen, who also did the late Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis’ Red Gate Farm on Martha’s Vineyard, designed this five-bedroom Contemporary

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dwelling that features an updated kitchen, bright open floor plan with walls of windows and winter views of the Potomac River. Capital Realty Ventures’ Husam Misleh is the listing agent. TEMPORARY WHITE HOUSE: The 112-year-old Patterson mansion, the sole remaining example of the palatial homes that once graced Dupont Circle, is now on the market for $26 million. The property, once owned by famed newspaper publisher Eleanor “Cissy” Patterson, was the center of social life for Washington’s elite during the first half of the 20th century. In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge

and his wife Grace lived there while the White House was under renovation and also welcomed aviator Charles Lindbergh from its balcony following his famous solo transatlantic flight. The 36,000square-foot, four-story white marble and brick residence at   DUPONTCIRCLE has been home to The Washington Club since 1951. The property was designed by architect Stanford White in 1901. TTR Sotheby’s International Realty’s Jonathan Taylor is the listing agent.

Send real estate news to Stacey Grazier Pfarr at editorial@ washingtonlife.com.

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HOME LIFE | OPENHOUSE

Autumn Offerings Extraordinary properties abound in the local real estate market POTOMAC ~DURHAMDRIVE POTOMAC]MD~

ASKING PRICE $18,000,000 LISTING AGENT: Marc Fleisher, 202438-4880, Marc@ TheFleisherGroup. com; Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc.

This property features 33,000 square feet of unparalleled European style and craftsmanship and was constructed by one of the areas most prestigious custom home builders, Niroo Masterpieces, and designed by the highly-respected Haleh Design. Interior details include a spectacular twolevel, two-story library with custom-milled cherry and tiger wood paneling. Additional amenities include a two-story great room, floating curved marble staircase, two elevators and custom plaster moldings. Potential buyers must provide a pre-qualification letter before viewing the property.

KALORAMA ~TRACYPLACE]NW WASHINGTON]DC

ASKING PRICE $8,500,000

LISTING AGENT Located on a rarely available quarter-acre lot on Cynthia Howar, 202one of the most prestigious streets in Kalorama 297-6000; Washington and boasting nearly 9,000 square feet of interior Fine Properties. space, this property emanates both grandeur and style. Features include a crescent drive approach, serpentine marble staircase, seven spacious bedrooms (each with an en-suite bathroom) plus two half baths. Outdoor living areas include manicured gardens, pool and cabana. This one-of-a-kind property is perfect for elegant entertaining.

MCLEAN

ASKING PRICE $15,000,000

CHAINBRIDGEROAD MCLEAN]VA

LISTING AGENT: Michael Anastasia, 703-501-1000; TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

This estate combines a rare 3.22 gated acres along the Potomac River “Gold Coast” including nearly 200 feet along the waterfront that offer stunning views of the river and its rapids. Built in 2011 by The Galileo Group, the house was inspired by the Renaissance palaces of northern Spain and designed by architect Richard Foster. The dramatic two-story foyer features a dramatic curved staircase flooded with light from a custom oval skylight. The main level includes a formal dining room, butler’s pantry, family room, study, multiple outdoor terraces with river views, mahogany-paneled library and an eat-in kitchen with commercial-grade Wolf, Sub-Zero and Miele appliances. On the upper level, the master suite features a vaulted ceiling and a living area with fireplace plus a vast dressing room. The master bathroom offers an oversized rain shower, double vanity and jetted soaking tub. There are four additional bedrooms, each with a private sitting room and full bathroom.The lower level features a 15-seat home theater with a Sony 3D system as well as a tapas bar, game room, recreation room, fitness center with a half bathroom, and a bedroom suite with a private terrace.

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LONG & FOSTER

®

RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Bethesda, Maryland

$5,250,000

Grand, European-style custom masterpiece to be built with the finest materials and craftsmanship. Formal gallery, spectacular kitchen, pool/guest house and elegant architectural detail throughout. Jill Schwartz 301.758.7224/ 301.907.7600 (O). JillSchwartzGroup@Gmail.com

Chevy Chase, Maryland

$1, 425,000

MORTGAGE

TITLE

Garrett Park, Maryland

INSURANCE

$1,245,000

Stately 4-level, 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath Colonial with 9-foot ceilings, generously proportioned rooms, excellent entertaining in and out! Lovely family room addition and master suite bonus room.

A must see! This 4-level, 4 bedrooms, 2 bath Victorian beauty with picturesque in-ground pool has all the bells and whistles! Huge wrap-around porch, vintage lighting, and original wood floors.

Miller Bethesda Office 301.229.4000

Friendship Heights Office 301.652.2777

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

$750,000

Luxury waterfront home, 2.1 acres along the Intracoastal Waterway! This 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home features a beautiful gourmet kitchen, open floor plan, fabulous water views, and tiled floors throughout! Phyllis Bosomworth 252.339.5151

Long & Foster is proud to be the Official Banner Sponsor of

The Shopping Program With Heart!

Save 20% Oct. 18–27, 2013 with the Care for Kids Card Use it at hundreds of stores and restaurants. Card sales benefit Children’s National Medical Center.

Dunnsville, Virginia

$1,695,000

Ben Lomond Circa 1730. Elegant Georgian Manor House set on 60 private acres. Convenient to Williamsburg, Richmond and Fredericksburg, Virginia. Located in the Historic Chesapeake Bay region of Virginia. Karin Andrews 804.445.5500 Karin.Andrews@LNF.com

Gloucester, Virginia

$1,395,000

Fairfax Station, Virginia

Visit your local Long & Foster office to purchase your card or for more information go to

www.BoardofVisitors.com/CareforKids

Mathews, Virginia

$950,000

McLean, Virginia

$2,500,000

$2,470,000

Extraordinary estate nestled on a beautiful 5 acre lot. Four finished levels with approximately 15,000 sq. ft. of luxury living. Elegant spiral oak staircase. Stunning great room overlooks the gorgeous yard. Lilian Jorgenson 703.407.0766 Lilian.Jorgenson@LongandFoster.com

Sterling, Virginia

$1,189,900

Highview Manor. Classic Virginia estate house includes 4,628 sq. ft. of elegant interiors! 5.5 acres of riverfront grounds include a deep water pier on the Piankatank, 3 garages, 9 bays and guest/caretaker quarters. Tim Hill 804.366.5140

Weston Hall Daybreak. Impressive and elegant river home with 3,548 sq. ft. and private deep water pier offers dramatic formal rooms and wide water views. Full lower level boasts elevator, wide lanai and a heated and cooled garage! Tim Hill 804.366.5140

Exquisite Cullinane-built gem on 3.17 private acres. Gated entry, Flemish bond brickwork, gourmet kitchen with Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, main floor master suite, au-pair suite, 5 fireplaces, elevator, and wine cellar. Debra Talley 703.408.3266

Stunning Craftmark Oakton model with over 6,000 sq. ft. of luxury living on nearly a 1 acre lot. Almost $200K in upgrades. Totally remodeled master bath. Wonderful huge deck. Lovely patio and landscaping. Lilian Jorgenson 703.407.0766 Lilian.Jorgenson@LongandFoster.com

Vienna, Virginia

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

$2,975,000

You must see this estate to believe it. Main level master domain. The exterior plaza and main level terrace overlook a resort-style pool with an outdoor lounge pavilion. This will exceed any of your dreams! Lilian Jorgenson 703.407.0766 Lilian.Jorgenson@LongandFoster.com

$1,890,000

Elegant, stately and charming 10 bedrooms, 7.5 bath brick house in prime location. Renovated 10,000 sq. ft. with grand foyer, 4 fireplaces, 2 kitchens, sunroom/ solarium, library, skylights and so much more. Leigh Diggs 301.717.2736 Leigh.Diggs@LongandFoster.com

$1,179,000

$989,500

Stunning, light filled contemporary with 2-car garage. Open kitchen with granite counter tops, new stainless appliances, wrap-around deck, finished walk-out lower level, and possible au-pair suite.

A stone and brick, 5 bedroom country manor with English gardens. Four finished and beautifully appointed levels with superb entertaining space. Two adjoining lots offered separately at $450K and $485K.

Woodley Park Office 202.483.6300

Chevy Chase Office 202.363.9700

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We mourn the loss of the legendary J.C. Suares, who helped design 80 Washington Life covers over the past decade B Y G E R R Y B Y R N E , E X E C U T I V E C H A I R M A N , WA S H I N G TO N L I F E

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e met in 1989 when I was the newly I left Variety in 2000 to acquire Stagebill, installed publisher of Variety, the bible the publication that served performing arts of the entertainment business. The bible was centers throughout the U.S. My artistic in need of some fixing and good fortune led director and designer was none other than us to hire Peter Bart, the renowned Wall Street J.C. We later added Avenue to the fold. Again, Journal editor and New York Times journalist more J.C. I then had the good fortune to meet who went on to run both the Paramount and Washington Life’s dedicated owners, Soroush Lorimar studios. J.C. Suares came to Variety Shehabi and Nancy Bagley. Whom did I via Peter to revitalize the publication … to suggest be part of WL’s future? J.C. of course, bring new energy, irreverence, vitality and who went on to help guide the design 80 of an illustrated voice that would transition and the magazine’s covers in addition to helping transform this magical brand for a new life, set a design path that has been a continual hopefully, in global Hollywood’s fast lane. The influence on this journal. success was unparalleled. Peter and J.C. made it Countless stories about his talents could WASHINGTONLIFECREATIVEDIRECTOR]- happen. The brand soared. be mentioned, but I add only one more And I found myself with new Best Friends. J.C.’s beautiful because for J.C. it was a labor of love. Post-9/11, as part of Tribeca wife, Nina Duran, an accomplished artist and marathoner who Enterprises, I helped organize a special “thank you” trip to Iraq, so wonderfully complemented him, was the bonus. They were a Project Salute, to thank our troops in the field. MTV, Vanity Fair, renaissance pair and it was always great to be around them. J.C. was the USO, the NBA and the Intrepid Museum were our partners. brilliant and loved unchartered waters. He went down artistic and Robert De Niro, Kid Rock and Wayne Newton were among the creative alleyways most mortals could hardly fathom. He was fun, entertainers who were part of this very memorable mission. How resourceful, experienced, accomplished and, considering his extensive do you thank a crew like that for their most appreciated generosity credits, also very modest. This was particularly the case when it came of time and talent? You guessed it. With a beautifully designed to one of the most important parts of his life: his time as an Army Project Salute poster created by my very dedicated fellow veteran, paratrooper with service in Vietnam. J.C. Suares. After we got to know each other better personally, J.C. asked me Semper Fi, J.C. We miss you. We love you. about my own background and how I got to be the publisher of Variety. Gerry Byrne is also vice chairman of The Penske Media Corporation, Hardly able to match his extraordinary C.V., I gave him my quick bio then added that I had a few years as a Marine officer, also with a tour in owners of Variety, Deadline Hollywood, Hollywood Life and The Style Awards. Vietnam. He offered a knowing smile asking when and where. That did He serves on the boards of the Intrepid Museum Foundation and Fisher Houses and is senior advisor to Veterans Advantage. He is also the chairman and founder it. Few words were spoken but a bond was solidified that remained at of Veterans Week NYC. the core of our relationship.

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June 2007

June 2010

September 2012

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November 2008

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Washington Life Magazine - September 2013