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OCTOBER 2012 | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

VEUX Magazine - Issue 8 - Free Falling STAFF

Ada Adams Editor-In-Chief/Content Director/Public Relations ada@veuxmag.com

Vivien Hoang Editor/Advisor/Layout Design vivien@veuxmag.com

Wales Wong Editor/Literary Editor/Photographer wales@veuxmag.com

Yawen Chan Web Producer

CONTRIBUTORS: Jason Bekolay, Nikole Cecchini, Ricci Chen, Nikki Chicoine, Luc Chretien, Ayobola Ejiwunmi, Vi Vien Hoang, Sheldon Inkol, Trevor Lafond, Victoria Laza, J.C. Martin, Julia Muldoon, Christopher Palazzo, Jade Starmore, Michael Walchuk, Wales Wong PUBLISHER AVW Publishing Inc. CONTACT www.veuxmag.com General Information: info@veuxmag.com Editor-In-Chief: editor@veuxmag.com Editorial Submissions: editorial@veuxmag.com Writing Submissions: write@veuxmag.com Advertising Inquiries: advertise@veuxmag.com Subscribe: subscribe@veuxmag.com FOLLOW www.facebook.com/veuxmag www.twitter.com/VeuxMag

COVER PHOTO Photography: Philip’e Make-Up & Hair: Philip’e Model: Josie Lee BACK PHOTO Photography: Rodney Ray Make-Up & Hair: Jamie Dorman Wardrobe Styling: Jen Summers Model: Lulu

IN THIS ISSUE

ISSUE EIGHT | FREE FALLING

Photography: Ricci R Chen Make-Up & Hair: Mark Gonzales Fashion Design: Ricci R Chen Wardrobe Styling: Volen S. Stylz Model: Danielle Marie Klupsch

FEATURES

EDITORIAL

6 Beauty: A Beautiful Descent 12 Feature: MAC Viva Glam Fashion Cares 19 Poetry: The Years 26 Feature: National Film Board: A New Era 27 Feature: Sounding Off: WILDsound Film Festival 44 Book Review: Oracle 46 Feature: The New Food Truck on the Block 47 Feature: awesTRUCK 2012 64 Feature: Carine’s Rebirth 90 Feature: In the Raw 112 Writing: Stanley 120 Beauty: masque 121 Writing: Free Falling

14 Polly 20 New York, Paris, London, Milan 28 Car Culture 40 Coquette 48 Dusk ‘til Dawn 58 The Girl in the Garden 65 Above the Blocks 72 Just Colours 78 .elevate. 84 Endangered 96 Beautiful Charm 114 Take Off

ARTS 34 Visual: Michael Walchuk 55 Visual: Trevor Lafond 102 Photography: Falling Woman 106 Photography: Anti-Gravity 126 Photography: Aquarium Paradise

IN EVERY ISSUE 4 Letter from the Editors 54 Lifestyle: A Date with Toronto

Letter from the Editor

After we launch every issue, the Editors here at VEUX Magazine spend some time celebrating the new issue and taking a few days to rest and unwind. Then it’s back to doing what we love - working on the next and newest issue! The first step is to always come up with a theme. We’re constantly looking for themes that have defined borders, without being too restrictive - a theme that allows guidance, without oppressing creativity. This month’s theme is Free Falling. We felt it fit our criteria quite well. It is our Fall issue, after all. You could have a literal interpretation of free-falling - the gravitational pull towards the earth after a jump. What about the metaphorical free-falling of a person’s life? How quickly can a romance fade, a career stall, or a bank account empty? A free fall can be thrilling and exhilarating, or terrifying and uncontrollable. I recently took the plunge and moved thousands of miles to a new country for an internship. Exhilarating since I have a whole new city to explore. Terrifying since I’m leaving behind my friends, family, and social support network. Thrilling since I’ve never done anything like this before. And uncontrollable - who knows what adventure and mischief await? We all take these leaps in our daily lives; some bigger than others but all leading to change. I believe all creative people at some point in their lives decide to just jump headfirst: a new project, a new idea, a new vision. How can we stretch the bounds of our creativity without taking a risk and without throwing ourselves entirely into our passions? We hope you enjoy this month’s FREE FALLING issue, and join us in celebrating our contributors’ feats of daring. ~ VH, on behalf of the Editors

UNITED STATES Photography: Sonya Lalla Make-Up: Sonya Lalla, Young Lee, & Samantha Suermann Models: Young Lee & Samantha Suermann 4 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

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BEAUTY

A Beautiful

Descent

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Feather hair accessories by Acailawen Designs FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 7

BEAUTY Feather clip & scarf by Acailawen Designs

UNITED STATES Photography: Andrea Acailawen & Christopher Wright Make-Up & Hair: Monique McLaughlin Creative Director: Andrea Acailawen Model: Andrea Padilla (Benz Mondaile)

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Feather collar by Wicked Betty Designs FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 9

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BEAUTY

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M•A•C Viva Glam Fashion Cares: 25th Year By Wales Wong

Fashion has never been an industry to turn away from issues that have a profound effect in the community. When it comes to making a statement, what we wear and what we use to beautify ourselves can create a sense of commitment to what we feel is important. On September 9, 2012, stars lit up the red carpet at the Sony Centre in Toronto for the M•A•C Viva Glam Fashion Cares. On its 25th year, the event is pulling in even more media attention than it has in the past. Organized by the AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) and sponsored by M•A•C, the evening was a night to remember. This year’s event is also the last Fashion Cares in which The M•A•C AIDS Fund and ACT will collaborate together, so it was important to ACT that it be a celebration of all the important contributions made by individuals in an effort to raise awareness regarding HIV/AIDS around the world. Even more significant was the addition of the Elton John AIDS Foundation (EJAF) to the event, which garnered even more media attention to the cause. A collaboration between these renowned organizations brought together philanthropists such as Hazelle Palmer (ACT Executive Director), Karen Buglisi (President of M•A•C Cosmetics), Nancy Mahon (Senior Vice President at M•A•C and Executive Director of the M•A•C AIDS Fund), Scott P. Campbell (Executive Director of The Elton John AIDS Foundation), and John Demsey (Chairman of M•A•C AIDS FUND and Honorary Co-Chair of M•A•C VIVA GLAM Fashion Cares 25). Adding to this list were many well-known Canadians who made an appearance and discussed how HIV/AIDS has had an impact on their lives. Canadian talent such as Jully Black, Kreesha Turner, and Scissor Sisters were busy voicing their support for this cause on the red carpet and later performed on stage to an enthusiastic crowd. In addition, models wore items from featured fashion designers and had creatively unique makeup throughout the night. The fundraising event has always pulled in big names and this year, stars such as Elton John, Linda Evangelista, Dean and Dan Caten of DSQUARED2, and Jeanne Beker were there to do their part in spreading the message of how far Fashion Cares has come since it began back in 1987. For the last 22 years, Fashion Cares has made nearly $12 million dollars through the always sold out annual event. I got a chance to speak to Adam Ferraro, ACT’s Communications Coordinator, to find out more about ACT and the history of this star-studded event. Fashion Cares, an idea spawned by ACT, has come a long way since its humble beginnings. In 1983, ACT started off as a fundraiser where t-shirts were sold. Eventually, it evolved into a larger production with the inclusion of celebrities and notable people who came to the event when ACT partnered with M•A•C. With the involvement of so many individuals, it has become a great success that showcases how ACT has made a mark, both locally and internationally.

Hazelle Palmer, ACT Executive Director

Even though this is the last year for the event, ACT has continued to advocate their goals by moving on to other endeavours. Back in September, the Scotiabank AIDS Walk For Life Toronto took place with a fantastic turn out of about 1000 people attending. The weather report called for rain, but that didn’t deter the supporters and the participants of the run. Also, SNAP presented by Toronto Dominion, a fundraiser auction featuring the amazing work of photographers from around the world, had a successful session in March. They are currently planning for next year’s SNAP event. Public reception has never been lacking. Such collaborations show that ACT understands how to connect with othTop to Bottom: Chantal Kreviazuk & Raine Maida; Kreesha Turner; Linda Evangelista; Jeanne Beker

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John Demsey, Chairman of M•A•C AIDS FUND and Honorary Co-Chair of M•A•C VIVA GLAM Fashion Cares 25

FEATURE

ers so that their message and goals are supported by the community. However, they are more than just an organization that coordinates these events. Ferraro succinctly described the offices of ACT, located in the heart of The Village. “If you want to see a transparent organization, you can just walk into the ACT offices.” They offer a wide variety of programs and services such as educational programs, counseling, youth outreach programs, online programs, and workshops. For the people living in Toronto and those who have been effected by HIV/AIDS, ACT maintains its strong presence while ensuring awareness on “prevention, helping people living with HIV/AIDS live better lives, continuing to do work that is bold and sex positive, and facilitating the wide spectrum of programs and services needed” for the community. Next year will be ACT’s 30th Anniversary. So what’s in store for them? “We’ve been keeping up with the changing shape of HIV/AIDS in Toronto and we’re going to continue doing that and continue fighting.” From the longstanding history, ACT has proven that they will continue to put forth their strongest efforts to take action against HIV/AIDS. For more information: AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) 399 Church Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, ON M5B 2J6 www.actoronto.org www.facebook.com/ACToronto www.twitter.com/ACToronto Jeanne Beker

Sir Elton John

Dean & Dan Caten with Yasmin Warsame

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EDITORIAL

Polly

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Pullover by Basically You Necklace: Model’s own

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EDITORIAL

Dress by Hilfiger Denim

Pullover by Basically You Shorts by Object Sahara Necklace: Model’s own

Dress by Mango

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EDITORIAL

GERMANY Photography: Andrea Kuhn (www.andrea-kuhn.de) Make-Up & Hair: Selina Reimann (selinareimann.com) Assistant: Daniela Schleker Model: Polly Rouditser (Viva Models Berlin) Dress by See U Soon 18 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

POETRY THE YEARS By Sheldon Inkol The years They have been kind to you So kind to you So cruel to me At least that is how it seems to be Because it’s been forever since I’ve seen you and for that whole time I was deprived of anything more than rumours of this rare beauty that is yours I had to make do with half-remembered dreams and half-forgotten poems with blurred visions and fading films with things I can’t change because they won’t stay the same But now you are here reminding me of someone I used to know or used to be three or four lifetimes ago and it’s all good even the pain Yes The years They have been kind to you but not near as kind as I will be

Sheldon Inkol was called to the Bar of Ontario in June of 2012 and subsequently joined Blaney McMurtry LLP as a litigator. In a prior life, Sheldon freelanced as a writer, director and assistant director in the film and television industry. His last feature film, HELLBOX (aka ALL THAT IS HIDDEN), is now in post-production. FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 19

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New York, Paris, London, Milan

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EDITORIAL

UNITED STATES Photography: Jiamin Zhu (jajasgarden.com) Make-Up & Hair: Jessica Rowell (J-Chan’s Designs - jchansdesigns.com) Fashion Design: Jessica Rowell Mask Design: Marianna Harutunian (Marianna’s Designer Jewelry - ilovemariannas.com) Wardrobe Styling: Jessica Rowell Model: Elizabeth Maiden

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National Film Board: A New Era By Wales Wong With the National Film Board closing off a section of the physical space in their downtown location, there have been pros and cons. I’ve frequented this place on a number of occasions, with each visit giving me a different opportunity to make use of their facilities. They still offer educational workshops which have been a popular tool for many schools in analyzing the Canadian identity and other popular themes that are in their large collection of films. There are also a variety of workshops from creating animation to understanding digital literacy and these workshops get booked up very fast once the school year begins. However, when you step foot into their Toronto location, you’ll notice some things are different. The 10 personal viewing stations are no longer there. Shrinking from 3 floors to 2 floors, the cinema will also not be there. With the last showing of the WILDsound Film Festival at this location, it is evident that the changes have an effect on many groups and organizations that have found the place to be both an educational tool and entertainment venue.

gral to the building of our Canadian identity, the silver lining is that it has opened other doors of opportunity for the NFB to continue its work. Deborah Drisdell, Director General of Distribution, Accessibility and Digital Enterprises, has been responsible for developing the online screening room since 2009. Many of their films can now be viewed online. “We’re responding to a consumer change,” says Drisdell who noticed very early on that the digital shift is necessary for maintaining an organization’s relevance to the times. Accessibility has increased, allowing people to stream films on their own time with the option to purchase. This change was also in part an effort to minimize the impact of shrinking both the Toronto and Montreal locations.

The National Film Board is mainly funded by the Canadian government with an agency under the Heritage Portfolio. A small percentage comes from their revenues. The big changes are due to last year’s Strategic Review implemented by the federal government in an effort to review their spending. As part of the Heritage Portfolio, the National Film Board was asked to cut 10% of their spending last April, with the decisions made by their own departments.

While such changes can bring an unsettling feeling to many, the future does hold many exciting prospects. Drisdell encourages the public to give NFB another look, “Sometimes people think of us as an old organization because we are almost 75 years old, but I think when people see the new NFB, they will see it’s much more digital, dynamic, and innovative.” Their website also offers IPhone and Android apps, highlighting their understanding of being able to get information to your fingertips. Updates are constantly posted, with new productions that are in the works or completed. With these changes, they’ve embraced the “digital shift” which is now helping them to reconnect with the audience. Most certainly, it looks like the evolution of the NFB will continue its positive path in the years to come.

While these changes reflect yet another move by the government to cut down spending on resources that many recognize as inte-

For more information: www.nfb.ca

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FEATURE

Sounding Off: WILDsound Film Festival By Wales Wong Ever get annoyed with the theatre patrons that feel the need to add their two cents during a movie? You pay to watch a film, only to have to sit through 90 minutes of whispering that entails the opinions of one movie-goer sitting in the back of you. We often watch a movie for entertainment, not for the purposes of playing the critic when there are other people around. However, Matthew Toffolo and Jen Frankel, founders of the WILDsound Film Festival, realized the value of giving the audience members an opportunity to voice their feelings without having to wait till they leave the theatre. Toffolo says, “Film festivals were missing something, which is the feedback from the audience.” While I didn’t know it at the time, one of the artists that was a part of the Betty Boom production, a Canadian short, was also present that evening but was not identified, making the experience a true opportunity to gather public reception of the film. I can see how all the constructive criticism is a valuable tool that film makers would want to utilize too. On August 25, 2012, Torontonians gathered in a theatre at the National Film Board located in the heart of downtown Toronto to watch a series of short films from around the world. We were treated to an evening of romance, suspense, action, and music. The purpose of the WILDSound event was to get feedback from the audience on five shorts. As a participant, I listened to the opinions of many and also had a say in how the film moved me. Someone in the crowd was bound to share a similar outlook and it encouraged me to really dissect and analyze what we just watched. One of the strengths inherent at the WILDsound events is the welcoming atmosphere that allows for individuals to present their views. “Moderation is a fine art” and Toffolo is at his finest with his ability to be diplomatic even when there are those who only want to focus on the negative. Keeping that in mind, there does need to be a balance and if the audience members are simply voicing an honest opinion, the floor is theirs. Its origins began in 2003 as “Lift Out Loud”, a monthly reading of screenplays with its original location at the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto (LIFT). In 2007, the festival moved to the National Film Board’s (NFB) downtown location and reinvented itself as an event for screenings of film shorts alongside a featured script reading. The venue was perfect for the number of patrons, a physical space capable of screening short films to about 100 theatre goers. Since its conception, over 60 festivals have had a successful run. In terms of selecting these short films, filmgoers and filmmakers can submit shorts. Two other members of the WILDsound team carefully select the final line-up for the event. Toffolo shares in the experience with the audience because he, too, has not seen any of the submissions prior to the screenings. The years of continued support by the NFB have been beneficial to both parties. Since NFB has had to close a section of their venue back in September due to cuts in government funding, WILDsound is now focused on developing their online presence and accessibility. Toffolo reflects on the situation with a positive outlook, “The interactive aspect will still be there. The event aspect is still something that I want to go back to.” With this change, it has given him an opportunity to think and reassess what they want for their future. Going back to utilizing the internet has definitely not been a challenge considering the popularity of their site. While it was the first of WILDsound’s events that I participated in, I’ll be on alert to hearing their comeback to the theatres. For more information: www.wildsound.ca

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Car Culture SCOTLAND Photography: Oliver Schneider (www.oliverschneider.co.uk) Make-Up & Hair: Sarah Vieira Da Cruz (www.sarahdacruz.com) Fashion Design: Lucy Price (www.nainai-fashion.com) Wardrobe Styling: Lucy Price Assistant: Elaine Stables Model: Adriana Bucur (Colours Agency) & Victoria Middleton (Model-Team) Cars provided by Waterside Weddings (www.watersideweddings.com)

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ART

MICHAEL WALCHUK

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ART

“August 15th, 2010. 1:35 p.m.” | Oil on Panel | 24”x68” | 2011

CANADA ABOUT THE ARTIST: Mike Walchuk is a Toronto based realist painter. Having graduated with a BFA from York University in 2009, Mike has since been focused on the creation of a body of work that depicts natural landscapes from around Ontario. His exceptional mimicry of real images with only brush and paint invokes a sense of awe and admiration which ultimately parallels those same feelings one experiences in the actual presence of such scenes. Of his work Mike says the following, “I am trying to recapture that unique importance which landscapes once held for us but has since been drowned out and lost over the years amongst all of the mass marketed and commercialized imagery.”

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ART

“August 9th, 2011. 8:16 p.m. | Oil on Panel | 10.5”x25” | 2012

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ART

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“June 6th, 2012. 1:48 PM.” | Oil on Panel | 10.5”x32” | 2012

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Blue cashmere sweater - Blue Label by Ralph Lauren Pink bra by Victoria’s Secret Jeans by Lucky Crystal bracelets by Accessories Palace Crystal earrings by Swarovski Pearl/crystal necklace by Sparkling Princess Rings by Mawee Caspro Collection

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Coquette

Black satin lingerie gown by La Senza Pearl & feathered bracelet by Accessories Palace Crystal starfish necklace by Swarovski Crystal earrings by Swarovski FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 41

EDITORIAL

Animal print faux fur coat by Marciano Animal print bra by Victoria’s Secret Jeans by Lucky Crystal bracelets & necklace by Accessories Palace Crystal ring by Sparkling Princess Crystal earrings: Accessories Palace 42 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

EDITORIAL

UNITED STATES Photography: Philip’e Make-Up & Hair: Philip’e Model: Josie Lee (www.josielee.com)

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BOOK REVIEW

From J. Taylor Publishing:

With London gearing up to host the Olympics, the city doesn’t need a serial killer stalking the streets, but they’ve got one anyway. Leaving a trail of brutal and bizarre murders, the police force is no closer to finding the latest psychopath than Detective Inspector Kurt Lancer is in finding a solution for his daughter’s disability. Thrust into the pressure cooker of a high profile case, the struggling single parent is wound tight as he tries to balance care of his own family with the safety of a growing population of potential victims. One of whom could be his own daughter. Fingers point in every direction as the public relations nightmare grows, and Lancer’s only answer comes in the form of a single oak leaf left at each crime scene. Available from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. 44 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

BOOK REVIEW

Book Review: Oracle Novel by J.C. Martin Reviewed by Vi Vien Hoang

Oracle is J.C. Martin’s first full length novel, but you wouldn’t know it from the professional pacing and polish. Set in the months preceding the London 2012 Olympic Games, the setting is more than a gimmick to sell the novel; it is an integral and very clever part of the plot. Kurt Lancer is a detective on the homicide squad, working alongside his longtime partner Sam (don’t call her Samantha!) Blaize, and the newest and unlikely detective, Tom Holloway. As if a serial killer on the loose isn’t enough, Lancer is also dealing with a daughter with a disability, a brother with a past, and a broken heart. Martin mixes the classic and typical elements of a crime thriller (e.g. the hard-nose boss and the machismo) with creative aspects that breathe a refreshing life into her novel. Lancer is not your typical Brooklyn-CSI-officer: he’s a mixed-race detective who is only too aware of how people’s stereotypes and prejudices affect him. The buddy-cop formula is varied as well: his partnership with Blaize is strained, so he’s relying on Holloway to help solve the case of a lifetime. However, Holloway has his own issues to work out. At home, instead of having the nagging wife who complains about the long hours, Lancer has a precocious daughter who is too young to fully grasp the pressing nature of her father’s work, but is old enough to understand that it takes him away from their nightly bedtime reading ritual. His brother Reggie’s story is a tale of what happens when a man takes a few wrong turns in his life, and how hard it can be to change. The two brothers couldn’t be more different. In the end though, Lancer will need everybody in his life to help him with the case. Martin’s London is real, raw, and gritty – written from the perspective of one who has lived in the city and is aware of both its problems and beauty beyond Buckingham Palace and Big Ben. Her London accurately reflects the city’s multiculturalism, and the views through the eyes of a local. J.C. Martin is a butt-kicking bookworm: when she isn’t reading or writing, she teaches martial arts and self-defence to adults and children. After working in pharmaceutical research, then in education as a schoolteacher, she decided to put the following to good use: one, her 2nd degree black belt in Wing Chun kung fu; and two, her overwhelming need to write dark mysteries and gripping thrillers with a psychological slant. Her short stories have won various prizes and have been published in several anthologies. Oracle is her first novel. Born and raised in Malaysia, J.C. now lives in south London with her husband and three dogs.

The chapters in Oracle are fast and snappy. It was easy to keep turning the pages because you wanted to know what would happen next, who the next victim would be, and whether the team would put the clues together. Martin builds the atmosphere well through her deft phrasing and diction; the British slang is an added treat for the North American reader! Plot-wise, Martin reveals her pieces carefully to build suspense. In a few instances, her usage of “Chekov’s Gun” is obvious, but there was no other way for her to foreshadow a key story element. J.C. Martin’s Oracle is an entertaining read, ideal for your morning commute on the train, or sitting poolside while on holidays, and should please both crime fiction newbies (like myself) and the experienced reader.

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FEATURE

Crispy Vietnam wings with Pineapple

Pork belly taco with taro root crisps

The New Food Truck on the Block By Wales Wong While foodies love to eat, it’s also the get-togethers that make the eating experience a memorable one. If you’re looking for a party, look no further than The Food Dudes who threw a shindig to celebrate the launch of their food truck on the streets of Toronto. When we walking towards the venue, 99 Sudbury, on August 15, 2012, my friends and I thought that it would be another event where food samplings would be served alongside some much needed alcohol. However, it turned out to be indeed what Food Dudes promoted the event to be – a Block Party. The music was amped up and games were enjoyed by many. Adrian Niman, C.E.O. and Executive Chef of The Food Dudes, has put in a lot of work into the development of this company. The Food Dudes first started as a catering company back in 2007, serving up creative and unique dishes at a number of well-known events such as the Toronto International Film Festival. Last year, they expanded to a permanent location at the Bloke & 4th on King Street. As if that were not enough, their recent addition of the sleek black food truck will have many hungry Torontonians asking, “Dude, where’s the Food Dudes truck?”

Adrian Niman

It’s evident that branding a business is just as integral to maintaining its relevance. Brent McClenahan became Creative Director in 2008, adding what many now recognize as signature touches by the Food Dudes. What McClenahan gave to Food Dudes was a face through the use of media like social media and a visually stimulating website. By incorporating artistic flair with gourmet fare, their vision of the brand is to bring both mouth watering cuisine and enjoyable entertainment to its clients. The Food Dudes also prides itself on supporting sustainable farming. Their produce is fresh, organic, and local, delivered from Cherryvale Organic Farm, a farm in Prince Edward County, Ontario. Niman and Daniel Frenette, who became a partner and Executive Chef back in 2009, ensure everything is made from scratch—including their sauces. “Food Dudes’ roots are founded on global flavours with ingredients that are locally bought,” says Niman. He understands the growing movement and importance of sustainability and being an environmentally friendly business. Some savoury munchies served included their popular fish tacos, a Captain crunch cod covered with spicy guacamole, lime spiked slaw, and smoked sour cream on a homemade tortilla. Servers floated around from one crowd to another carrying crispy Vietnam wings with pineapple on wood platters that have been custom made from burl wood, easily recognizable by the Food Dudes logo on one end (which Niman also has tattooed onto his arm, clearly showing the love for his company). I still can’t forget the last bite I had of their deep fried cheesecake. It is tasty treats like these that make a party worth attending. Niman sees the amazing potential Toronto has for the future of food trucks. “It’s a city built around culture,” he excitedly says. This observation indicates the desire by many to have a different eating experience in comparison to the more pretentious and formal setting for which most customers have paid. However, there have been bumps along the way with the strict rules that the municipal government of Toronto are still enforcing. In the mean time, they are taking full advantage of the monthly arts, foods, and music festivals that take place in the downtown core. As for Food Dudes, Niman is already planning for the next party. The goal is to incorporate a charity event at the Evergreen Brick Works to give back to the community. With the popular reception to their new food truck, it looks like next year’s event will be more than just a block party. For more information: www.thefooddudes.com www.blokeand4th.com www.cherryvale.ca

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FEATURE

Gorilla Cheese’s El Jefe

AwesTRUCK 2012: “And the Award Goes To...” By Wales Wong My chat with Adrian Niman led me to Suresh Doss, the organizer of the much talked about and well-received Food Truck Eats events. A food writer for nine years and the man behind the popular blog, Spotlight Toronto, he has been leading food truck rallies in Toronto for the past three years. After attending a food truck rally in Miami, he saw the potential for Toronto to have the same events but on privately owned locations. Niman, founder of The Food Dudes and a recent food truck owner, says one of the biggest challenges is the restriction on setting up shop in certain public areas. By collaborating with managements that own venues such as the Distillery District and the Evergreen Brick Works, Doss found a way to bring street food to this city. Many restaurants still see them as competition, but it’s been evident that food truck rallies bring in the big crowds, which in effect, bring more customers to the area. These are also the same customers who return and grab food at the permanent eateries. While talks are still in progress to get Toronto’s city councillors on board with opening more locations to food trucks, the cities of Hamilton and St. Catharines have had more success in the past year with reducing the distance allowed between the trucks and food establishments. On September 9, 2012, AwesTRUCK 2012 made its mark at the Evergreen Brick Works’ Holcim Gallery. Making use of out of this unique outdoor private space, seven food trucks from Toronto, Caledonia, Hamilton, Mississauga, and St. Catharines came together to celebrate the first awards ceremony to recognize the work of mobile food vendors. They were joined by other pop-up food vendors, drink sponsors, and surprise food trucks, such as Gourmet Gringos. There was a range of delectable grub from Gorilla Cheese’s El Jefe (an oh-so-melty grilled cheese sandwich made up of swiss cheese, mozzarella, shredded pork, ham, and pickles) to Blue Donkey’s Fried Calamari Pita (a scrumptious pita containing fried calamari, Greek salad and the pièce de résistance - french fries). El Gastronomo Vagabundo served up some winning tacos with their Tempura Cod Taco, made with the freshest ingredients, such as smoked pineapple, habanero hot sauce and toasted coconut sour cream. Rome N’ Chariot’s Veal Slider was the perfect size to enjoy with its breaded veal and Romano cheese. Taking home the award for Best New Truck, Dobro Jesti’s schnitzel was crunchy and pleasing to the eye. Of course, no meal is complete without dessert, but I admittedly tried Cupcake Diner’s sweet bestseller, Caramel Apple Pie Cupcake, before doing the rounds with the savoury dinner dishes.

The public got a chance to vote on the AwesTRUCK 2012 website for The People’s Choice Award. The winners of six categories were determined by the following panel of judges—Alison Fryer, manager of The Cookbook Store; Matthew Blackett, publisher of Spacing magazine; and Amy Rosen, food and travel writer. The People’s Choice Award was awarded to the truck who received the most public votes. Fidel Gastro was the only eatery to receive an award at this year’s AwesTRUCK. They only recently launched their first food truck back in August. Clearly this is an indicator that the city needs to start opening its arms to mobile eateries so that we can make our mark in the food truck scene. While it’s taking some time for the local food trucks in Toronto to literally find a place in the city compared to trucks in the U.S. cities that have more accessibility to heavily frequented spots, the popular demand for such gourmet food on wheels cannot be ignored anymore. Doss has been busy, continuing to find more unique spaces and constantly devising creative events for the next food truck rally. It looks like with the success of these foodie get-togethers, Torontonians have spoken and the city needs to start listening.

Winners of the AwesTRUCK 2012 Awards People’s Choice – Gorilla Cheese Best New Truck – Dobro Jesti Road Warrior – El Gastronomo (winner) Best Menu Item – El Gastronomo (winner, Fish Tacos) Best Concept – El Gastronomo (winner) Best Pop-Up – Fidel Gastro (winner) Best Graphics – Blue Donkey (winner)

For more information: www.foodtruckeats.ca www.foodtruckeats.ca/awestruck2012 www.ontariofoodtrucks.com www.spotlighttoronto.com www.bluedonkeysteatery.com www.cupcakediner.ca www.dobrojesti.ca www.elgastro.com www.fidelgastro.ca www.gorillacheese.com www.gourmetgringos.com www.romenchariot.ca FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 47

EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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UNITED STATES Photography: Alessandro Babini (www.sabastudio.com) Make-Up & Hair: L’Nu Wardrobe Styling: L’Nu Model: Laura New Myers

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LIFESTYLE

Date with Toronto:

Free Falling into Love By Ayobola Ejiwunmi What do you think of when you hear the term free falling? I picture a wily spider, sitting atop his finely spun web in a tree, observing all that transpires in its surroundings, floating as if in space, deep in the jungle.... the spider spots a fly several meters down below going about its business. In a flash, the spider releases a fresh length of silky thread and rappels silently down to snare its prey. In my mind’s eye, I conjure up an image of height, overview, speed, silence, stealth, perhaps life and death – some kind of terminal swoosh. Technically speaking, free falling is when gravity is the only influence acting on a body, giving the falling object or person a feeling of weightlessness. All free-falling objects (on Earth) accelerate at a fixed rate of 9.8 meters per second, each second. But let’s get away from the science of it. In common usage, free falling has taken on many other meanings. One is the part of a sky jump that precedes the opening of the parachute. Where in our city are such delights on offer? If we lived in British Columbia, all it would take to achieve this state of suspended elevation would have been to step out into the Rockies, find some appropriate scraggy overhang, take into account some favourable winds and plunge into the ethereal abyss, using a contraption like a hang glider or a bungee cord! Within moments, one would attain bliss free falling. Hey, there are even rentable facilities where one could be a passive participant, strapped into the underbelly of an experienced glider, in whose hands you could entrust your life. You don’t even need to learn how to do it yourself. But here in the relative flatlands of Ontario, there are fewer options. Still, there are places where the adventurous soul can find some air time. In the farmlands surrounding the metropolis of Toronto, there are several skydiving schools where planes take off from remote airfields and offer the opportunity to try out your parachute jump on a day excursion. Many schools offer tandem jumps, as well as training classes to become fully certified. Perhaps in the late summer, early Fall season, when the polar jet stream is in full swing blowing across Canada, one can drive a short distance out of the city to several launching sites – in Elora, Barrie or Kitchener-Waterloo – for a tranquil, hot-air balloon ride over the green heartland of Ontario. For an average ride of two and a half to four hours, the experience of free falling will surely come your way during the landing. However, be prepared to spend upwards of CAD $275 plus tax for the rush! Closer to home, one simulation of free falling the city of Toronto can offer is the Edge Walk on the CN Tower. Decked out in a bright orange safety fireman’s suit with a double harness securing your front and back, you get to walk on an OUTSIDE platform no wider than a city sidewalk around the roof of the CN Tower, some 350 meters above ground. Many participants in this attraction will develop sweaty palms, rubbery knees, or even give up altogether due to paralysis by fear. You’ll be told the cables can take up to 15,000 pounds, but you’ll be hard pressed to trust the equipment when you look down and see the city traffic inching way below you like a line of ants. By the end of the adventure, you may not have fallen, but your stomach will let you know that you have come close to free falling, and that you’ve experienced the thrill of a lifetime for just under CAD $200 per person. Go for it! The season is open from May to October. One thing about free falling is that constant element of high-risk. No one messes with the basic laws of physics without tempting fate. So can there be a better way of sealing your fates as one rather than convincing your partner to take a ride or a jump together? I’d say it would be the perfect date! If your date passes that test, then you can start making the wedding plans, with the confidence that he/she will go through thick and thin with you! Another ever present aspect of free falling is aloneness. It will provide you with ample opportunities for contemplation and introspection, if that is what you seek. On the spiritual and emotional levels, free falling can also be achieved, not by challenging the physical laws, but by going into the metaphysical. Consider the yogic experience of meditation. If well practised, one can also achieve the experience of that lightness of being, where one is transported away from the weighty problems of everyday life. How do you get there? Our lovely multicultural city is blessed with all kinds of yoga offerings. Do your research well and book yourself and your date into several sessions of yoga. You can sweat and stretch together. A pleasant surprise may await you when both of you find yourselves free falling into a common space where bodies and souls can meld together. Yet another usage of the term free falling is the financial one - a sudden sharp decrease in some quantity. Our nightmare memories might take us back to October 1 - 10, 2008, when the market experienced eight consecutive trading days of negative movement. During that time, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 22.11% of its value. Such huge drops are euphemistically considered “a dip in prices” and are often described as “stock prices going into a free fall,” highlighting another example of the ever-present danger associated with free falling. We’ve all been affected by this current recession; we’ve all been forced to re-think expenditures but in doing so, we’ve become more creative with our dates. The lovely thing about Toronto is the number of options for no-to-low costs dates. The economy might have crashed, but our love life doesn’t have to!

Bola is a world citizen whose world view has been stamped by the fact that he was born in Africa, was educated in Europe, has lived and worked in many countries on different continents and immigrated to Canada some 33 years ago. He’s now retired, but has a keen interest in giving back to society. Writing and books in general have always been an area of consummate passion. Compassion, an eye for the not-so-overtly observed and adventure in general on the road less travelled could be considered his strong points.

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TREVOR LAFOND

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ART

This willingness to be open and to experience life bleeds over to his art. It is one of those symbiotic relationships that without art there is no Trevor, no outlet for him to process the world. Those daring adventures between 3 a.m. and the sunrise are used as inspiration for a character he is playing on stage. I’ve watched him breathe life into the role of the psychotic brother Teddy Brewster from Arsenic and Old Lace. I have performed with him in both Beauty and the Beast and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat. I’ve heard him sing mesmerizing harmonies in the Bel Canto Choir of Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Most recently, he has been involved with the Indie film Anthem, directed by Josh Herd. He played an alcoholic deadbeat dad in vintage rock shirts, and although he is nothing like this in real life, he rocked this role. Text by Julia Muldoon Photography by Luc Chretien When you first meet Trevor you are presented with this very happy outgoing personality: he’s easy to get and you are instantly drawn to hang out with him. However the more time you spend with him the more you realize that he has this edgy, off beat persona. As an artist he is much the same way. Trevor pulls inspiration from all avenues; especially those margins that happen between the moments of day job and expectations; those moments that mean you are truly alive. It’s being able to call him up at midnight and seeing the sunrise after an all-night adventure. Weekends spent with little sleep, lots of energy drinks, and nefarious shenanigans down hotel hallways after a few too many Vodka Cranberries. Times like these remind you that you are truly alive and spending it in the best of company.

One of the most beautiful traditions Trevor has amongst his friends is the painting of the grief wall. When a family member passes away, you paint a wall, a bold colour to always remember them. This started with a friend’s relative passing away, too much vodka and an afternoon at the local home renovations store ‘helping’ people pick out paint, to an apartment make over. Now, he lives with a purple wall in his own apartment to mark the passing of his grandfather. Life may have him in this small northern town of Sudbury, Ontario, but Trevor is more than willing to experience life outside of it. One of his hopes is to experience life in the mecca of art: Paris, France. However, fundamentally Trevor believes that “Life can be amazing and it’s what you want out of it at any location in the world. Its what you make out of it…. As long as I can paint and act and do whatever my artistic heart desires, I can be happy anywhere.”

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EDITORIAL

The Girl in the Garden SWEDEN Photography: Sebastien Larreur (sebastienlarreur.com) Make-Up: Elin Laine (elinlaine.com) Hair: Nathalie Wolk Wardrobe Styling: Nathalie Wolk Model: Nathalie Wolk (3Mmodels)

Dress by Versace for H&M Necklace by Versace for H&M Shoes by Christian Louboutin

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EDITORIAL Dress by Sonia Rykiel for H&M Shoes by Zara Purse by Alexander McQueen

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EDITORIAL

Shorts & Top by Limited Edition Jewellery by Jimmy Choo for H&M Bag by Jimmy Choo for H&M Shoes by Jimmy Choo for H&M

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Shorts & Top by Limited Edition Jewellery by Jimmy Choo for H&M Bag by Jimmy Choo for H&M Shoes by Jimmy Choo for H&M 62 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

Dress by Versace for H&M Shoes by Karen Millen Bracelet by Versace for H&M

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FEATURE & EDITORIAL

Carine’'s Rebirth A Portrait of a Woman

By: Christopher Palazzo

Sexy. Seductive. Elegant. Daring.

Scene: Nighttime in Paris; the glow of the lights stationed from within the homes emanate onto the quiet streets as if to pave an illuminated path for passersby. A woman, with rich chocolate brown hair enters her dimly lit bedroom, draped in a red silk robe and red lipstick to match. She undresses - nude; red Louboutins are all that adorn her body. She grabs her Louis Vuitton pocketbook, lights a cigarette. Smoke fills the room. She opens the doors to her balcony, lies on her bed which is graced with fine silk linens and stares into the Parisian night. End scene. For over 30 years, Carine Roitfeld has reinvented the way we approach fashion, as well as how we should perceive it. Irreverent in her own ways, Roitfeld has produced and styled photo shoots that have conjured up praise in some, and loathing in others. Roitfeld started her career as a model at the age of 18 then became a freelance stylist before she was approached by Tom Ford to help him rebrand the then near-defunct house of Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent. Along with her close friend and photographer, Mario Testino, she worked with Ford to revolutionize and reinvent the two famed fashion houses. When Tom Ford published his autobiographical pictorial coffee table book in 2008, flipping through the pages, it is hard to ignore Roitfeld’s influence. I opened this piece with describing to you a scene in Paris. It is not real; rather, it is a recreation of the aura that is Carine Roitfeld. Her photographs and style conjure up an ideal we all have of the quintessential French woman. The woman is sexy; she is elegant, she seduces her audience. For Roitfeld, human sexuality is a natural part of life and therefore, holds a prominent position in the photo spreads she styles and directs. In 2001, Roitfeld left Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent to take up the position as Editor-in-Chief of French Vogue. Before her sudden departure in December of 2010, Roitfeld made French Vogue the premiere fashion magazine; American Vogue had its focus and roots in commercialism with its covers adorned with celebrities. Roitfeld refused to put celebrities onto her covers. Fashion, in its very essence, is about branding: the clothes we choose to wear will dictate to the world not the individual that we are, but the individual we are trying to be: powerful – sexy - innocent. When analyzing Roitfeld and her work, there is one term she is synonymous with: “Porno Chic.”

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“ABOVE THE BLOCKS” Jacket by inWear Hot pants: Vintage

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Leather jacket: Vintage Shirt by H&M Pants by Set

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FEATURE & EDITORIAL

In a recent interview she gave to New York Magazine’s The Cut, Roitfeld admitted that, while her photographs were provocative, the only part of “Porno Chic” she liked was “Chic.” She stated, “Although the girl is naked we always try to make her look chic.” With a style similar to the idiosyncrasies of the great and famed photographer, Helmut Newton, Roitfeld has brought sexuality to the forefront without any apologies. However, today she has turned a new leaf: there’s a new image—a new Roitfeld. Earlier this year, after leaving her post at French Vogue, Roitfeld announced that she was starting her own magazine: CR FASHION BOOK. A biannual publication, CR FASHION BOOK, is a mix between a magazine and a book. The physical publication will focus more on images and stories, whereas the daily trends and news of the fashion industry will be placed onto the magazine’s website. For Roitfeld, it is her hope that her magazine will be viewed more so as a book which people will retain for years rather than a magazine which becomes obsolete after a few months. Ambitious in her dreams, launching the magazine has not been an easy road for Roitfeld. As she had publicly stated, many of her friends, including Mario Testino who worked under her direction at French Vogue for many years, were no longer able to work with her on her new magazine due to the contractual obligations they had under Conde Nast, Vogue’s publisher. Roitfeld was forced to find new people to work with—new stylists, photographers, hairstylists, and make-up artists. When asked how launching her new magazine felt, she summed up her emotions in one word: “freedom.” (Interview in The Cut, September 6, 2012) Yet the biggest contrast between Roitfeld’s previous work at French Vogue and today is shown on the cover of the opening issue of CR FASHION BOOK: an elated Kate Upton, photographed in black and white holding five baby chicks. Quirky yet memorable - perhaps Roitfeld has accepted the mantra that celebrity culture is a seamless and integral part of fashion. Not only is Roitfeld focused on the launch of her magazine, her and Karl Lagerfeld, a close friend, teamed up together to produce a new book, The Little Black Jacket: Chanel’s Classic Revisited, which hit store shelves in August of 2012. Photographed by Karl Lagerfeld and styled by Roitfeld, the 232 page book depicts celebrities and models, both men and women, wearing Chanel’s famed jacket. Currently sold out in most stores, the response for the book has been jubilant. The photographs are also the subject of a traveling exhibition. After opening in Tokyo, the exhibition will visit cities such as New York, London, Moscow, and more as it crisscrosses the globe.

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FEATURE & EDITORIAL

At age 58, Roitfeld is a grandmother now, yet she shows no sign of slowing down. For Roitfeld, her family has always been her number one focus in life, as is evident by her devotion to her two children and her partner of three decades, Christian Restoin. After surviving the trenches of the fashion industry, many individuals in Roitfeld’s position would have been reluctant to allow their children to follow in their footsteps, but not so for Roitfeld. Her daughter, Julia, prior to becoming pregnant, was the face for Tom Ford’s Black Orchid fragrance campaign in 2006. Roitfeld has had a long and storied career within the fashion industry. That career was the focus of her 2011 coffee table book entitled, Irreverent. It was filled with images from her time at French Vogue and personal anecdotes—a glimpse into a career filled with fashion’s thought leaders such as Michael Kors, Domenico Dolce and Stefan Gabbana. While the fashion industry has changed over the last thirty years, one thing has remained constant: Roitfeld’s love for the industry, and her signature style. Always adorned in form fitting outfits and heels, eyes emblazoned with black mascara and eye shadow - the look is timeless—elegance with a bit of Rock n’ Roll. That iconic look has grabbed the attention of M-A-C Cosmetics which has teamed up with Roitfeld to produce her very own line of cosmetics for Fall 2012. Looking back on her career, she reflects on how the fashion industry has changed. She remembers a time when people had little interest in fashion compared to today’s standards. In an interview she gave with The Telegraph, she describes the emergence of ‘super-editors.’ As an ode to the supermodels of the eighties and nineties, the super-editors are a result of the modern blogging industry which has placed editors like Anna Wintour and herself under the microscope and elevated them to stardom. Perhaps we can label The Devil Wears Prada as a byproduct of that fascination. Today, the fashion industry is all about business; no longer can an organization rely solely on creativity and ingenuity to sustain themselves, rather a knowledge of commercialism and market trends have become essential. Carine has rejected the calls for commercialism. Her departure from French Vogue was marred by criticisms as it followed the December 2010 issue, guest-edited by Tom Ford, which was labeled as ‘pedophilia’ for depicting 10-year-old-model, Thylane Loubry, in high heels and lipstick with the headline: “Quel maquillage a quelle age?” (“What make-up at what age?”) Freedom she wanted, freedom she has. Roitfeld’s legacy is undeniable; she is a true visionary. Never afraid to push those buttons of political correctness, as Roitfeld has stated in her interview with The Telegraph, “The last Joan of Arc of fashion—it will be me,” and for us fashion followers, we would not expect any less.

Christopher Palazzo is a men’s fashion, lifestyle and culture enthusiast. He is currently studying political science and history at the University of Toronto. He can be reached at chris.palazzo@me.com.

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FEATURE & EDITORIAL

Rabbit fur gilet: Vintage

Top by H&M Skirt by H&M Gilet by H&M Jewellery: Vintage FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 69

Top by H&M Skirt by H&M Gilet by H&M Jewellery: Vintage

Jacket by inWear Hot pants: Vintage Shoes by Buffalo

Pullover by drykorn Hot pants by H&M Shoes: Vintage Socks: Vintage

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FEATURE & EDITORIAL

GERMANY Photography: Daniela Schleker (www.daniela-schleker.de) Make-Up & Hair: Swetlana Schw채bisch Wardrobe Styling: Daniela Schleker Model: Juliane Marie (Satory Management Berlin) Pullover by H&M Jewellery by H&M

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EDITORIAL

Just Colours

BRAZIL Photography: Alexandro Adds Make-Up: Monique Caetano Wardrobe Styling: Betto Gomes Model: Évora Andrade (40 gruas)

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EDITORIAL Blazer by Emporio Anna Pants by Emporio Anna Earrings by Leticia Oliveira Shoes by Miezko

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Jumpsuit by Fato Basico Belt by Betto Gomes

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EDITORIAL

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Top by Dona Florinda Bottoms by Betto Gomes Belt by Betto Gomes

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.elevate.

CANADA Photography: Ian Compton (iancompton.com) Make-Up: Christina Nguyen Hair: Jesse Young (Lift Salon) Clothes Design: Victory & Vice, Dystropolis Shoes: Aldo, H&M Model: Christy (B&M Models - Toronto)

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ALGOS black print white jersey dress with pleather tie and cuffs 80 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

LYSSA sequin-pleather scales satin sheath dress FREE FALLING | ISSUE 8 | VEUX | 81

PANDORA organza feather triangular mirrors white satin dress

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Astris Harness Dress by Victory & Vice

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Animal bodysuit by Sugarpuss Turquoise & silver bracelet by Muheeka

ENDANGERED UNITED STATES

Photography: Rodney Ray (www.rodneyrayphotography.com) Make-Up & Hair: Jamie Dorman (www.jamiedorman.com) Wardrobe Styling: Jen Summers (www.jensummers.com) Model: Lulu (Envy Models)

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Animal bodysuit by Sugarpuss Turquoise necklace and bracelet by Muheeka Leopard peep-toe pumps by D.A.O.

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Red leopard skirt by Sugarpuss Shearling vest by Doubel Zena Leopard tie by Sideca Feather bracelet by GATA Designs

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EDITORIAL

All Clothes and Jewellery by Muheeka: - Poncho with fur trim - Leather cuffs - Agate & coral necklace - Leather earring - Conch shell earrings

Fur neck wrap by Bebe

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EDITORIAL

On Back Cover Leather & faux fur crop jacket by Muheeka Fur wrap (on neck) by Bebe Leopard denim shorts by Sideca Metallic gold stockings by Leg Avenue Leather earring by Muheeka Coral bracelet by Muheeka Leopard print pony fur boots by VanEli via Nordstrom

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Above Military crop jacket by Libertine Leopard leggings by Claire’s Agate necklace by Muheeka Coral & jet bracelet by Muheeka Animal print pumps by D.A.O.

Pink fur coat by Karolyn Kiisel High-waisted teal snakeskin shorts by Sugarpuss Fringe stockings by Leg Avenue

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In the Raw On Lauren: Railcar Fine Goods - Fit: The Donna - Denim: Cone Mills Stretch - $168

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On Tom: dutil - The Quintessential Series - Denim: 13.75 oz Cone Mills White Oaks - $258

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On Lauren: BLK DNM - Fit: Jeans 8 - Colour: Blue - $168 On Tom: Tellason - Fit: Ladbroke Grove - Denim: 14.75 oz - $198

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FEATURE

Fashionable clothing typically has a short life. Most garments peak when they are first worn and become less and less appealing as they degrade and become obsolete. Raw denim makes the opposite proposition - that your clothing can become more beautiful the more you wear it. By Jason Bekolay Most jeans that you find will have been washed and maybe distressed after the indigo dye is applied to achieve a specific look. However, raw denim is left untreated; the jeans are uniformly dyed and the fabric has no artificial wear. The intention is not for the jeans to stay this way. Instead, they are a blank canvas that the owner will fill in. The way the jeans are worn and cared for will determine how they look, and the more they are worn, the more they reflect the owners’ lifestyles. For that reason, many raw denim enthusiasts will wear their jeans as often as possible - for months at a time without washing them! The result is a pair of jeans that is unique to the owner - each crease, scuff, or hole reflects an event or habit in the owner’s life. It will also stretch and conform to the owner’s body which results in an extremely comfortable pair of jeans, even if they look really tight. For both of these reasons, raw denim enthusiasts will form a bond with their jeans that most cannot feel for any other non-descript article of clothing. For someone just getting into raw denim, the first purchase can be a bit intimidating. There are a lot of brands that make jeans with very subtle differences. It is worth the effort to find the right brand, fabric, and fit for you since a purchase implies a commitment to at least six months of continuous wear. If you have access to stores carrying raw denim, spend an afternoon or two shopping around. The salespeople at these stores are often denim nerds who are happy to share all the details they know about the jeans they carry. I also recommend that one’s first pair of raw jeans should be lighter - 12 ounce denim or lighter. Lighter denim will usually stretch and break in much quicker. Be aware of whether or not the denim is sanforized or pre-shrunk using a special process. Unsanforized denim will shrink significantly when soaked or washed for the first time. Typically when buying unsanforized denim, buy one size bigger then soak the jeans before wearing. This “shrink to fit” process can be a bit more personal. Some people wear their jeans while they soak them, ensuring a perfect fit. If the jeans are sanforized, then the initial soak is not necessary and can be worn right away. Now that you have a pair jeans that are ready to wear, what do you do? Just wear them. As much as possible, as long as they are appropriate for the occasion. Try not to baby them; don’t be afraid to get them dirty! Wear them in the rain! Get sweaty in them. You are going to spill something on them eventually. Don’t worry about it. Spot clean them with a moist cloth if you must, but many stains will fade and disappear on their own. I encourage you to take the opposite approach. Seek out new and interesting things to do while wearing your jeans. Even if you find that you can’t climb trees as well as did when you were a kid, you will at least have a mark or two on your jeans as proof that you tried. As you wear the jeans, you will likely notice lines forming on the hips and upper thighs. These are called whiskers and are imprints created by your sitting posture and what you keep in your pockets. Creases that form behind the knees are called honeycomb. They are formed when the knee bends. Cycling in your jeans will result in a lot of honeycomb quickly. If the jeans are a bit long for your legs and you let them bunch up around your ankles, then you will also see creases there called stacking. All of these fades will form slowly, so many people regularly photograph their jeans to record their progress. After months of wear, the time will finally come to wash your jeans. When to do it and the best method for washing are both contentious issues. Some people will throw their jeans in the washer every couple of months. Others will only do a delicate hand washing less than once a year, or even attempt to avoid washing the jeans altogether. In the end, it’s up to the owner. It’s another decision that affects the appearance and story the jeans tell. Eventually, the jeans will wear out. Retiring your jeans will be bittersweet. You are finishing one chapter in your life, but you are starting another at the same time. With a new pair of jeans, you get to tell a whole new story.

The raw denim market is growing with additional players every month, but these are some of the writer’s favourites: - Nudie Jeans: This brand emphasizes jeans that fade quickly and even fall apart. They encourage repairing and recycling worn out jeans. Nudie recently went all-organic with their denim. - Naked & Famous: A Canadian company that makes both no-frills quality denim for a low price and really innovative, fun and quirky jeans using unusual fabrics (e.g. glow in the dark jeans, scratch & sniff jeans, and an ultraheavy 32 oz. jeans). - Iron Heart: Iron Heart is a denim brand that specializes in heavier denim with a focus on clothing for motorcyclists. - Roy Denim: A true one-man show, Roy Slaper makes every pair of jeans himself on vintage equipment. Other brands to check out include dutil. denim’s own line (The Quintessential Series), Railcar Fine Goods, BLK DNM, Tellason, and Rogue Territory.

Jason Bekolay is a computer programmer, living in Winnipeg, Manitoba. When not on the hunt for the next perfect pair of jeans, he can be found exploring the Canadian wilderness with his trusty camera, and working out at the gym. (Photo by: Lori Ebbitt)

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Shot on location at dutil.denim (Toronto). Jeans provided by and available at dutil.denim. 94 | VEUX | ISSUE 8 | FREE FALLING

CANADA Photography: Wales Wong (www.waleswong.com) Make-Up & Hair: Isabelle Faure (www.isabelledoeshair.com) Wardrobe Styling: Kaitlin Churcher (dutil.denim) Creative Director: ViVien Hoang Models: Tom Hsiao & Lauren Barnes (Sherrida Personal Mgmt) All jewellery (Rich Abundance, Linked Charm and Silver Cuff) provided by Lynnette Barnes, Independent Silpada Representative (chrislyn9@rogers.com) On Lauren: Railcar Fine Goods - Fit: The Viper X001 - Denim: Cone Mills 13.5 oz - $228 On Tom: Rogue Territory - Fit: SK - Denim: 12.5 oz - $258

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beautiful charm

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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CANADA Photography: Ema Suvajac (www.emasuvajac.com) Make-Up: Cassie Shuttleworth (www.cassieshuttleworth.com) Hair: Sarah Cifuentes Wardrobe Stylist: Kristy Skelton Model: Stefanie Meyer (Gemini Models) All clothing provided by Sweet Trash

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ART

Falling Woman SCOTLAND Photography: Jade Starmore (Towzie Tyke Photography - www.towzietyke.com) Make-Up & Hair: June Long (June Long MUA) Model: Anon.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Anti

“The Couple’s Demise” UNITED STATES Photography: Nikki Chicoine (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jesuisnikki/) Models: Nikki Chicoine and Richard Wagner II

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Gravity

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Nikki is an aspiring freelance photographer located in the north eastern mountains of the United States. Inspired by her surroundings and the remnants of memories from childhood, her photos appear to be dreamy, in tune with nature, and thoughtful. Her dedication to self portraiture allows her to explore the depths of her own perspective of life and of her experiences in this world.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

“The Fear of Cats”

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PHOTOGRAPHY

“To Produce Stars”

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By Victoria Laza “I don’t care about the party. If you want a party, we’ll throw a party. But don’t you think we should do something, just us?” Laura laughed. “Aw, Stan. Like a date?” “Yes, exactly. Like a date.” She got this look on her face, an odd mix of childlike hope and grown-up pity. “Come on. We can do it on the weekend. I’ll take you anywhere you want.” “I promise I’ll think about it, okay? I gotta go though. I’m late.” Laura gave him a kiss, the kind that went mwah, and he tried to open her mouth but couldn’t. She put on her jacket, grabbed her bag and said, “love you see you tonight,” moving so quickly that her voice dragged behind her like the train of a wedding dress, picking up dirt until it looked like a rag. “I don’t like your hair blonde!” he said to no one. He watched her from the kitchen window until she had driven too far away for him to possibly see her. There was a speck though, probably a tree, that he focused on for a full minute after that. He imagined faking a suicide attempt, writing a note and everything, but placing the shot expertly so that he only lost his memory. Then he would wake up in a hospital bed, look up at this beautiful woman he didn’t recognize and fall in love with his wife again. This was a fantasy he often had during the day. Once, he had it late at night.

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Stanley Stanley sat in bed with his laptop. Laura was beside him sleeping contently. He took three deep breaths so he wouldn’t cry, so he wouldn’t throw up, so that the anger didn’t turn his face a color that could be seen even in the dark. Then he opened the laptop a little too fast, and was scared the hinges would break, but they didn’t. In his bookmarks, he had two folders: Articles which included news stories like “Man hit by train miraculously survives”) and Updated for his chat groups and forums. He always went through Updated first. There was nothing. He opened Articles, but didn’t click on anything. After a dozen frantic searches that yielded no new results; he was about to get off when he received an instant message from a stranger. DANGER: hey Stan: Hello, who is this? DANGER: andrew - from the ishouldbedead internet forum your instant message name is on your profile Stan: Oh hi Andrew. DANGER: your name really stan Stan: Yep. DANGER: you post the best shit Stan: Thanks. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing. I’m more interested in the subject than I should be. DANGER: how old are you? Stan: 32. You? DANGER: 18 Stan: … DANGER: it’s no big deal. i wanted to show you stuff i wrote. it’s fiction i wrote b/c no one updates on the forum. except us. lol Stan: Are you an angel? Send now.

FICTION

He walked along a street with his head down and his hands in his pockets. Across the street appeared something that looked like a beacon, and he began to walk toward it without thinking. A car that he had been vaguely aware of wasn’t too far down the road, and its brights came on when he was about halfway across. He thought the car would slow down, but it sped up, almost hitting him. Stanley jumped into a shallow ditch and lost his shoe, but he was happy because he could have lost more. He looked into the car, trying to identify the driver, but it was moving too fast for him to see a face. All he caught was a ribbon of blonde hair. Laura had spent excessively to make the yard look perfect. Still, one of the little lights lining the edges of the tent was dead. Stan sat in a plastic chair beside a long table of food and drinks he didn’t like very much. It took him ten minutes to find the instant messaging application in the Media Store and commit to spending $2.99 a month. It took another five minutes for it to download, during which he drank three glasses of alcoholic punch. It tasted just like non-alcoholic punch to him. As he filled his cup for a fourth time, his pocket lit up. That fourth glass went down like a shot, and he logged in to his account. DANGER: FINALLY. how’s the party? Stan: Drunk already. Haha. DANGER: ton of people there? Stan: Yeah, but I don’t know most of them. DANGER: you at least having fun? Stan: No. DANGER: :( Stan: Any good stories today? DANGER: actually yeah....a kid fell off a balcony like twenty stories high and he’s not even in that bad of a shape Stan: This was today? DANGER: yep! literally just saw it on the front page of aol Stan: I hate AOL. Oh and just so you know ... Tonight is gonna to be one of those do as I say, not as I do things okay? DANGER: what are you gonna do???? Stan: I’m gonna get wasted. DANGER: yesssssssssss Ten drinks into “one shot every time I have a suicidal thought” and Stan was gorgeously candid, though somewhat incoherent. Laura’s parents had never loved him more; and he had never loved Laura less. The morning was special, but Stan didn’t ask Laura if she had noticed. The light coming through the window made their bedroom look like a child’s—and Laura’s face like an old woman’s as she turned and left. An hour later, he was still so depressed about it that he decided not to go to work. At 9:00, he had been online for two. DANGER: hey i skipped school. couldn’t sleep last night Stan: Why not? DANGER: well i slept for a little bit but then i had a dream about you Stan: What kind of dream? DANGER: you finally left. Stan: Come on. DANGER: why don’t you do it i’m dead serious Stan: And go where? DANGER: i don’t know.... you can stay with me ;D Stan: Haha. No I can’t. DANGER: ok you’re right. so let’s get our own place Stan: I’m not going anywhere. Real world. DANGER: you suck ass

Stanley

stared

at

the

screen

for

thirty

seconds.

DANGER: i love you. Stan: Fuck. DANGER: do you love me? stan seriously Stan: ... Yes. DANGER: i almost forgot. there was another article when you were asleep Andrew sent him a link to the story of a skydiver who survived a 6,000 foot fall without a parachute, and he read it twice.

DANGER is typing... Stan: Sorry I read it, I’m here. DANGER: do you like it?!? Stan: I love it. Adding it to my bookmarks. DANGER: i really think we should go Stan: Come on DANGER: pick me up Stan: This is ridiculous. DANGER: pick me up please please please Stan: Do you realize what you’re asking me to do? DANGER: jump DANGER is offline Stanley put his head in his hands. This was ridiculous. He wasn’t going anywhere, not picking up an eighteen year old kid—an eighteen year old boy—and doing what? Eloping? Online was an escape. He would never mix a thing like that with real life. Just like he would never shoot himself in the head (though he had illegally bought a gun this year) or jump off a roof (though he had once stood on a ledge and stirred the sky with a leather toe). When he stood up and started pacing the room, he couldn’t decide which bothered him more: that he was considering dropping his whole life and going on a metaphorical journey on the prompting of a kid he met online, or that he was only still here because Laura still spoke to him, even when all but the physical matter that made her up, was gone. He began to pack a suitcase on the bed, then stopped because it was cliché. The only things he took were the keys to his car and some money. He opened the drawer where he kept a crumpled piece of paper with a smudged address on it. And the next time someone saw them, they were not Andrew and Stanley.

Victoria Laza is a 21 year old college student from Lansing, Michigan. She is currently working on a serial entitled Dismay Disco, which will run online beginning June 5, 2013. Her blog is whisperingcorridors.tumblr.com.

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Take Off

CANADA Photography: Kelly Mulner (www.mulner-photography.com) Make-Up: Jonah Fheonix Hair: Joshua Kun Luan Fashion Design: Plastik Wrap (www.plastikwrap.com) Wardrobe Styling: Adriana Fulop (www.plastikwrap.com) Assistant: Jonah Kamphorst Model: Josie Lee (www.josielee.com) & Araina Nespiak (www.arainaonline.com)

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Left, On Araina All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Uzumaki top - Venus pants - Oilslick gloves Shoes by Dr. Martens Right, On Josie All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Vanity dress - Pomise harness - Oilslick gloves - Leggings Boots by United Nude

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EDITORIAL

All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Vanity dress - Pomise harness - Oilslick gloves - Leggings Boots by United Nude Hand Shield clutch by Guy Latulippe

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All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Uplift top - Kinetik leggings - S.O.S. mini skirt Necklace by Missy Industry Shoes by Trippen

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EDITORIAL

All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Gateway dress - Promise harness - Oilslick gloves Necklace by Raven Moon Design Boots by United Nude

All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Bandage dress - Gloves Shield clutch by Guy Latulippe Boots by United Nude

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All Clothes by Plastik Wrap - Uzumaki top - Venus pants - Oilslick gloves Shoes by Dr. Martens

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And during your deep sleep the dream you are currently encountering couldn’t be more blissful – you are sitting at a European café with a glass of wine watching the locals go about their everyday lives. All of a sudden, your dream comes to an end when you feel yourself falling off the chair - and right before you hit the ground you abruptly wake up and are left scared and unsure of what just happened.

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According to dream analysts, falling in a dream is an indication of insecurities, instabilities, and anxieties. You are feeling overwhelmed and out of control in some situation of your waking life. In today’s modern day world when the majority of society is driven by work, success, and money, it is easy to build up plenty of concerns and apprehensions. Think back to the times in university when you would have three finals in one week all worth 50% of your mark and were scheduled to work four shifts at your part time job. You felt out of control and asked yourself, “How am I going to get through this week alive?” To your pleasure, you are reading this now with a smile on your face because you remember those times and feel a sense of power and accomplishment for making it through.

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Now and then, we need to take a step back and face our insecurities and anxieties with a fistful of confidence and remind ourselves that we are the commanders of our own lives. There are many exterior forces working against us; such as the pressure of being a part of a society that is aesthetically demanding, the hopes and stress of climbing the workforce ladder, and many more that are personal to each and every one us. But if we don’t stop to look around and appreciate the beauty of life and pat ourselves on the back for the people we have become, we will continue to fall.

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I leave you with this – if you are going to fall, fall freely into the arms of the one you love, fall for your best friends’ corny jokes – but never fall victim to false hope or insecurities.

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BEAUTY & WRITING

UNITED STATES Photography: Sonya Lalla Make-Up: Sonya Lalla, Young Lee, & Samantha Suermann Models: Young Lee & Samantha Suermann Text by Nikole Cecchini

Nikole Cecchini is 23 years old and currently living in Rome, Italy teaching English as a Foreign Language. She recently completed her Honours degree in Kinesiology and her Bachelors of Education in Toronto. She hopes to make people laugh, cry, or smile through her words - but more importantly she hopes to inspire others through her positivity. Find more of her writing at: chiccer.wordpress.com

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Aquarium

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Paradise

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

CANADA Photography: Ricci R Chen Make-Up & Hair: Mark Gonzales Fashion Design: Ricci R Chen Wardrobe Styling: Volen S. Stylz Model: Danielle Marie Klupsch

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www.veuxmag.com AVW Publishing Inc.


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