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Extracts + Graduates TThe University of Toledo College of Pharmacy Magazine for Alumni and Friends

I N S I D E Outstanding Alumni

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Faculty Notes

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Student Features

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Alumni Capsules

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The Future of Pharmacy, Now Marcia McInerney, Distinguished University Porfessor, Page 5.

Pharmacy Camp, Page 10.

After years of planning, the Future of Pharmacy has arrived at The University of Toledo. The College of Pharmacy has seen monumental growth in its student population, from 800 students in 2001 to over 1,500 students today. This growth and the University’s 2006 merger with the Medical University of Ohio have allowed the college to expand to a newly constructed facility on the University’s Health Science Campus, home of The University of Toledo Medical Center. Each of the college’s degree programs has evolved since 2001, along with its residency porgrams. The PharmD program has stabilized at 108 students per class and has the support of a number of community and Health Science Campus clinicians. Over the last three years, 15 percent of the graduating PharmD students have entered residency training. The BS in pharmaceutical sciences (BSPS) programs, composed

of four majors, have met their enrollment cap of 90 students and include international internship sites in Szeged and Budapest, Hungary. BSPS graduates populate the MS in pharmaceutical sciences programs and PhD in medicinal chemistry, and they have been successful in physician assistant, public health, nursing and medical programs. The college’s PhD program in medicinal chemistry has placed more than 30 graduates in postdoctoral positions, academia and industry as it reached the significant milestone of its 20th anniversary. The pharmacy and critical care residency programs, which have been based at The University of Toledo Medical Center for several years, have grown to include five residents each year. Postdoctoral students are training in the laboratories of several of our faculty members.

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Vol 20, No. 2 Fall 2010 Extracts & Graduates is published twice yearly for alumni and friends of The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy Copyright 2010, The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy; All rights reserved. Editor Charisse Montgomery, MA ‘10 Contributing Writers Jeff Barton, BBA ’98 Laural Seewer Paul Erhardt, PhD Dr. Youssef Sari Photographers Dan Miller Dean Johnnie L. Early II Charisse Montgomery Richard Montgomery Donna Haar Support Staff Donna Haar Cynthia Soncrant Design Stephanie Delo Special Thanks Dr. Youssef Sari Dr. Salah-uddin Ahmed Dr. Wissam Abou Alaiwi Dr. Susanne Nonekowski Development Office Office of Marketing & Communications Office of Publications UT Foundation Dean’s Cabinet

Dear UT Pharmacy Family, It has been a year since I joined the College of Pharmacy as the development director. I have been amazed by the generosity of the alumni, faculty and staff. In these tough economic times, we have seen strong support of our annual phone-a-thon and our White Coat Mentor program, and our Mortar and Pestle Society membership continues to grow. Every dollar we receive assists us in our mission to meet the pharmaceutical needs of society. The continued and generous support of our donors allows us to maintain a strong academic program while producing the best and most prepared graduates. The 2010-2011 academic year is shaping up to be one of the most exciting in our 106-year history. I want to personally thank all who have supported us during this expansion to the Health Science Campus and welcome everyone to come and visit us in our new home. We cut the ribbon and officially opened our new doors on September 3, and our alumni and friends had the opportunity to look around and tour the new labs and classrooms. While the construction of the building has come to a close, the campaign for quality continues. Throughout the new facility, recognition has been given to donors who have named labs, classrooms or offices. There is also a donor recognition wall acknowledging those who have made a contribution or pledge of $1,000 or more. For the past 12 years, Wolfe Hall has been our home, and we have not left behind those who supported us during that campaign. Donors recognized in the Wolfe Hall campaign will also be listed on our donor wall to remind our visitors of the progress the facilities at Wolfe Hall allowed us to make. We will maintain our history and our presence on the Main Campus, and as you enter the front doors of University Hall, the Mortar and Pestle will forever be carved into the archway. We remain the oldest college at UT, and as a result of the merger with the former MUO, we now open a new chapter in our history. The support of our alumni and donors serves as the driving force behind our success, and the “Future of Pharmacy” is very bright as a result. For a personal tour or the new building or for information on how to support UT Pharmacy and the Future of Pharmacy campaign, please contact Jeff Barton at 419.530.5413 or at Jeffrey.barton@utoledo.edu. Sincerely,

Jeff Barton, BBA ’98

How to Reach Us The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy, MS 1013 3000 Arlington Ave. Toledo, OH 43614 Alumni Office: 419.383.1935 Fax: 419.383.1907 Dean’s Office: 419.383.1997 Student Affairs Office: 419.383.1904 Development Office: 419.530.5413 Email: utpharmacyreply@utoledo.edu Internet: www.utoledo.edu/pharmacy

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Pledge Your Support

Letter from the Development Director

Office of University Alumni Relations Local Phone: 419.530.ALUM (2586) Toll Free: 800.235.6766 Fax: 419.530.4994 Email: alumni@as400.driscoll.utoledo.edu

The new College of Pharmacy building, dedicated on September 3, 2010, provides the college many more opportunities for collaborative practice and research among the health sciences. This $25-million, LEED-certified pharmacy facility includes laboratories, lecture halls and offices to provide more space for the College of Pharmacy and to offer students more hands-on experience in an integrated medical community. It has been amazing to witness the building and expansion project as it progressed from an idea and a sketch to a real, brick-and-mortar home for our academic and residency programs, students, faculty and staff. The college’s professional division students have begun taking classes in the new facility, while the pre-professional students continue to study on the main campus. Expanding the college’s programs to the Health Science Campus involves more than simply arriving at the building and turning the key. The University is engaged in promoting and supporting interprofessional education as a way to build bridges between health-care disciplines, and in the planning stages for the new building, the college set many goals for progress and collaboration in order to improve

upon the already-excellent academic and research programs. You will read about many of these initiatives in the pages that follow. Student pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists learn about and actively participate in collaborative care, gaining insight from their peers and faculty in the other health science disciplines. At the same time, the other health science disciplines benefit greatly from the breadth and depth of knowledge the College of Pharmacy brings. The expansion has certainly enhanced current collaborations in the fields of cancer and diabetes treatment, immunology and transplantation, and neurodegenerative disorders. The UT College of Pharmacy has many people to thank for the success of this momentous expansion, including donors, alumni, faculty and staff, University leadership and student leaders. Without the effort and cooperation of these outstanding people, the college’s most recent venture could not have been such a tremendous success. The college’s dedication to advancing the profession and building the Future of Pharmacy makes this a truly exciting time to be at UT.

The support of our alumni is paramount to the success of our students. Through the generous giving of our alumni and supporters, more than 125 merit and need-based scholarships were awarded last year through our pharmacy endowments, reflecting more than $108,000 in scholarship support for our students. Please consider making a gift to the college or to a specific program or fund. Your support will impact the lives of current and future students at The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy. Please use the form below to make your gift or make your gift online by visiting the UT Foundation’s secure website at www.utfoundation.org. Designate my gift to: ❍ New Lab Equipment & Technology Fund ❍ Endowed Lab Equipment & Technology Fund ❍ Pharmacy General Scholarship Fund ❍ __________________________________ (fund of your choice)

In the amount of: ❍$100 ❍$250 ❍$500 ❍$1000 ❍Other ______ Payment Options: ❍ Enclosed is a check made payable to the UT Foundation Charge my: ❍ Visa ❍ MC ❍ AMX Card # _______________________________ Exp. Date _____ /_____ Signature ______________________________

Honor the Past, Celebrate the Future As the Future of Pharmacy Campaign for Quality comes to a close in December, the College of Pharmacy offers a unique gift to those who participate. Donors who make a gift of $2,010 or more will receive a 10”x12” artistic montage of the College of Pharmacy’s past and current locations. Those who join Mortar and Pestle Society, with a $10,000 pledge that can be paid over five years, will receive a larger gift. New Mortar and Pestle Society members will receive a 20”x22”montage with a piece of Lannon stone, as seen on the façade of Wolfe Hall, and glass, as seen on the façade of the new pharmacy facility. In order to receive the montage, gifts must be made by December 31, 2010.

This is a joint gift: ❍ Yes ❍ No Spouse’s Name _________________________ Matching Gift: Name of Company I have enclosed the matching gift form from my human resources department.

❍ I would like additional information on including The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy in my estate plans. For more information regarding giving, contact Jeff Barton, director of development, at 419.530.5413, or via email at jeffrey.barton@utoledo.edu. Contributions are tax-deductible as provided by law. Return this form to: The University of Toledo Foundation, MS 319 2801 W. Bancroft St. 11MPHEG Toledo, Ohio 43606

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Medicine & Biological Chemistry:

Our Legacy: Outstanding Alumni The College of Pharmacy Alumni Affiliate continued its tradition of honoring outstanding alumni during this year’s Homecoming weekend. On Friday night, alumni were honored at the annual gala, and on Saturday, alumni celebrated with award recipients at the Alumni Affiliate luncheon. The Distinguished Alumnus/a Award is the highest honor and distinction The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy Alumni Affiliate bestows on an alumnus/a. This year’s recipient, recognized for outstanding career achievements in pharmacy or healthcare, is Cindy Puffer.

Over the years, Dr. Puffer has made dozens of professional presentations at conferences and on television that highlight the impact of the pharmacist’s role in health care. Dr. Puffer’s most significant contributions to pharmacy come in the form of mentorship. Over the years, she has touched the lives of more than 200 pharmacy students, 25 IPPE students, 15 BSPS students and two managed care students. She is a member of Rho Chi Honor Society. The 2010 Outstanding Young Alumnus/a Award is bestowed by the affiliate to an alumnus/a 40 years of age or younger (BSPS, BS, BSP, PharmD, MS, or PhD). The awardee, who has displayed leadership and professional excellence in pharmacy or healthcare, is Sharrel Pinto.

Cindy Puffer, 2nd from left, with Joel Levitan, ‘69, Dean Early and Laura Manzey, ‘93

Cindy Puffer, ‘80, is the coordinator of managed care pharmacy services at The University of Toledo Medical Center. Her career includes roles as a pharmacist, a pharmacy manager and a consultant. In addition to her role at UTMC, Dr. Puffer serves on numerous committees and has received various honors and awards for her service to the profession of pharmacy.

Dr. Sharrel Pinto, 2nd from left, with Joel Levitan, ‘69, Dean Early, and Dr. Steve Martin, Pharmacy Practice chair

Dr. Sharrel Pinto, MS ‘01, is an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and the director of the Pharmaceutical Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR) laboratory at The University of Toledo. The PCOR lab is focused on measuring

Matthew Fettman, PharmD ’03, was installed as president of the Ohio Pharmacists Association at its 132nd Annual Conference held April 9-11 in Columbus. Dr. Fettman now practices at Davies Pharmacy in Canton. He is also a consultant pharmacist with several outpatient surgery centers in the Canton area. At the UT College of Pharmacy, Dr. Fettman received the OPA Student Leadership Award, the Toledo Academy of Pharmacy Senior Award, College of Pharmacy Top 10% Award, and was elected to Rho Chi Society membership. Dr. Fettman was selected to attend the 2006 Great Lakes Young Pharmacist Leadership Conference and is serving as Ppesident of the Stark County Academy of Pharmacy. As an OPA member since 2004, Dr. Fettman has been active in many different ways. He has served on the OPA Board of Trustees since 2005. He currently serves on the Long Range Plans Committee, Legal and Regulatory Committee and Independent Pharmacists Special Interest Group. In addition, he is the chair of the Finance Committee and E-Prescribing Task Force.

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comparative effectiveness of health care interventions, with the goal of improving the human condition. The lab has proven the results of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM), which allows patients with chronic diseases to review their drug regimens with a pharmacist and get the greatest benefit from their medications. Dr. Pinto’s worked has been published in numerous national and international publications, and her work has been recognized by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. Dr. Pinto’s expertise on MTM programs has resulted in many invitations to serve on panels and speak at professional meetings in the U.S. and abroad. She is one of eight individuals selected from across the nation to serve on an APhA Committee to identify emerging issues related to MTM, and she was invited by the incoming president of ASCP to talk about MTM at The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists Annual Meeting. Dr. Pinto also hosted a Research Round Table at the 2010 Ohio Pharmacist Association Annual Meeting. The Distinguished Service Award is bestowed by the affiliate to an alumnus/a or non-alumnus/a for contributions to the growth and success of the College of Pharmacy, and/or the College of Pharmacy Alumni Affiliate or the UT Alumni Association. This recipient will have demonstrated dedication, distinction, innovation, philanthropy and leadership within his/her chosen field.

20 Years of Exemplary Research University and MaMoun Al’Hamadsheh, PhD ’04, completed his postdoctoral fellowship in HHMI Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Wayne Hoss, center, with Joel Levitan, ‘69, and Dean Early

Dr. Wayne Hoss, executive associate dean for the College of Pharmacy, was selected for this award in recognition of his contributions to the successful expansion of the College of Pharmacy to the Health Science Campus. Dr. Hoss managed the details, small and large, of the construction and move-in process, from working with the engineers and interior designers and selecting construction materials to having the debris removed and making sure the water was on when faculty and staff moved in. His leadership in this process was essential to the success of the expansion. Dr. Hoss earned a PhD in chemistry from the University of Nebraska in 1971, and he has served on the faculties at University of Rochester, Nagoya City University of Japan and The University of Toledo. At UT, Dr. Hoss has served as associate vice president for research and development (1989-1998), interim vice provost for research (1999), and interim dean of the college of pharmacy (1999-2000), in addition to his roles as associate dean of the college of pharmacy (2001-present) and executive associate dean (since 2003). Nominations for next year’s alumni awards are now being accepted online. The new process to nominate an alumnus takes less than two minutes! Visit utoledo.edu/ pharmacy/alumni to submit a nomination today.

Department Chair Marcia McInerney is joined by Dr. Basel Al-Ramadi, who participated in the department’s 20th anniversary lecture series.

The Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry (MBC) is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the PhD program in Medicinal Chemistry. Department chair Marcia McInerney, who was selected as a 2010 Distinguished University Professor, has a great deal of pride in the PhD program, its faculty and its graduates. “The success of our graduates is indicative of the quality of this program and of the outstanding research the program has produced throughout the years,” said McInerney. After two decades of producing exemplary researchers, the department has many alumni who have achieved great success in their fields of study. Among the program’s notable graduates are several assistant deans and department chairs. Mohammad (Mohammad) K. Laham, PhD ’03, is assistant dean of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Jordan, and Sushma Ramsinghani, PhD ’98, is assistant dean, department chair and associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Feik School of Pharmacy. Regina Truss, PhD ’93, is the chair of the Department of Chemistry at Kalamazoo College, and Richard Dudley, PhD ’06, is assistant professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Findlay Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Other graduates who are excelling in academia include Wellington Pham, PhD ’00, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at Vanderbilt University, and Rahul Khupse, PhD ’06, who has joined the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences faculty at the University of Findlay as an assistant professor. Program alumnus Michael Morran, PhD ’06, is a postdoctoral research fellow at University of Michigan in the department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism. Mohammad El-Dakdouki, PhD ’09 is a postdoctoral researcher at Michigan State

 While MBC graduates have seen considerable success in academic settings, still more have entered industry and are influencing research and health care. Vyjayanthi Krishnan, PhD ’00, is a senior scientist at Wellstat Biologics, and Rittesh Mittal, PhD ’07, is a postdoctoral research fellow for Anatrace, a reagent manufacturer. Nimish Mehta, PhD ’00, is director of educational strategy for MedscapeCME, which develops educational content for health care professionals. Sunghan Yim, PhD ’03, is a research scientist II for Avon Products Inc., and Sachin Patel, PhD ’08, is a scientist I for Codexis Inc., a company that produces enzyme products. Meanwhile, Lisa Ficke, PhD ’08, is a project leader for clinical research organization Kendle International, and Ji Dong Liu, PhD ’07, is assistant director of the Division of Medicinal Chemistry at Beta Pharma. Nirdesh Gupta, PhD ’08, is a technology transfer patent specialist at Los Angeles Children’s Hospital. Lindsay Alexander, PhD ’10, is a postdoctoral fellow at The Cleveland Clinic, and Paul Brown, PhD ’10 also conducts research at The Cleveland Clinic. These MBC graduates serve in roles that are critical to patient health and research. continued on page 11

Dr. Marcia McInerney, chair of the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, was selected as a 2010 UT Distinguished University Professor because of her research and scholarship as well as her impact on students at UT. Dr. McInerney has earned research awards from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International, the Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation, the Ohio Board of Regents and the National Institutes of Health. Her current research is supported by the United States Department of Agriculture. She has received more than $3 million in funding for her research in immunopathological mechanisms in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As a Distinguished University Professor, Dr. McInerney will receive an annual grant of $5,000 for five years, funded by the UT Foundation.

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P H A R M A C O L O G Y: Two research projects are ongoing in Dr. Youssef Sari’s Neuroprotection and Drug Abuse Research Lab. The first project deals with the Dr. Youssef Sari use derived neurotrophic peptides and other neuroprotective factors in the treatment of disease involving oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is the major cause for most neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrion is a key player in oxidative stress, and preventing its dysfunction will be a therapeutic useful tool to prevent or delay the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Sari’s lab is focusing in Huntington’s disease, and they are currently testing novel trophic factors to prevent or slow the progression of the disease. Moreover, these novel trophic peptides are also being tested for their effects on stroke damage in collaboration with Dr. Zahoor Shah, a faculty member of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry in our College of Pharmacy. In addition, Dr. Sari just established a new collaboration with Dr. Kenneth Hensley, a member of the Department of Pathology at UTMC. Together, they plan to test a new compound that has anti-oxidant and antiinflammatory actions. According to Dr. Sari, “The integration of the College of Pharmacy on the Health Science Campus provides very fruitful and interactive collaborations with very talented scientists.” Dr. Sari’s lab studies many aspects of the brain, and his recent work on addiction was published in the Journal of Neuroscience. This project deals with the role of a neurotransmitter system in drug abuse. In this study, Dr. Sari and his collaborators identified an FDA-approved drug, previously used for the treatment of meningitis, that can cross the brain-blood barrier. The researchers, including Dr. Jumpei Sasabe at KEIO University School of Medicine in Japan and Dr. George Rebec at Indiana University, tested this drug for its effects on addiction and found that it prevents relapses to cocaine use and reduces alcohol consumption. Dr. Sari is currently collaborating with Dr. Paul Erhardt from the Center for Drug Design and Development and his associates, Drs. Jeff Sarver and Jill Trendel, to advance this project at the level of

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From Lab to Real Life

high-throughput screening. He also has a grant proposal pending approval with the National Institutes of Health. If the project is funded, it will bring around $1.2 million to The University of Toledo to support this research project for a period of five years.

Dr. Surya Nauli, far left, and members of his laboratory

Dr. Surya Nauli’s lab is conducting cuttingedge research that focuses on cilia biology and associated Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD). Cilia are micro-sensory organelles that extend from the apical surface of cell membranes to the body lumen or microenvironment. They are involved in diverse functions within the cells, and these range from fluid flow sensors to cell signaling regulators. A group of genetic disorders, known as ciliopathies, occur when a mutated gene encodes a dysfunctional protein that is localized to the cilia. Among these diseases is Polycystic Kidney disease. Patients with PKD suffer from enlarged kidneys due to the abundance of numerous fluid-filled cysts that infiltrate the kidney and lead to kidney failure. Although it is a kidney disease, PKD can also be considered as a systemic disease since patients with PKD suffer also from extra-renal complications such as cardiovascular, brain and liver abnormalities. Currently, Dr. Nauli’s lab is focusing mainly his research interest of deciphering the mechanisms that lead to the cardiovascular abnormalities in PKD due to abnormal cilia function. The research conducted in his lab involves the use of cell lines, genetically manipulated animal models and human cells and tissues from organ donors. Dr. Nauli’s lab personnel includes two technicians, Maki Takahashi and Blair Mell, who contribute significantly to the overall organization and technical support for all members of the lab. In addition, two graduate students, Shakila AbdulMajeed and Brian Muntean are very active students in the lab who

presented their research work at major national conferences. Their research is currently under peer review in highly ranked scientific journals. In addition to graduate students, a large number of undergraduate students, mainly from the College of Pharmacy, have been trained in Dr. Nauli’s lab and have contributed to published manuscripts as co-authors. Most of these talented students are pursuing their higher education as PharmD students, medical students or research and medical professionals. Among those students who contributed significantly to the lab are Shao Lo, a PharmD professional division student who co-authored a manuscript and in the process of generating a monoclonal antibody, and Christine Horvat, whose work is under final stages of peer review and is being considered for publication. Dr. Nauli is a mentor to postdoctoral trainee, Dr. Wissam AbouAlaiwi. Since joining Dr. Nauli’s lab, Dr. AbouAlaiwi has contributed to a highly ranked publication in the AHA journal Circulation Research — in which he is a first author — a review paper and two book chapters. In addition, Dr. AbouAlaiwi’s research work is currently under review. Dr. Nauli’s lab has published two major research papers in the prestigious journals AHA Circulation and Circulation Research and secures research funds from the NIH, AHA and other intramural funding supports. Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed’s pharmacology lab researches Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. In particular, they are interested in suppressing Dr. Salah-uddin Ahmed inflammation in RA using Epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG), a compound that is found in green tea. According to Dr. Ahmed’s research, EGCG inhibits the chemicals that cause inflammation, slowing the progress of RA. Because the joint inflammation in RA patients eventually affects the cardiovascular system, Dr. Ahmed’s findings could prove to be life saving. His work has been published in Arthritis Rheum, Arthritis Research and Therapy, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, and Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

Pharmacy Practice: Reaching the Community While the Department of Pharmacy Practice focuses on training future pharmacists, its role in the community continues to expand. As you read in the Spring 2010 issue of E&G, Dr. Amie Smith works with UTMC’s cardiac rehab program to educate patients on blood thinners and the importance of taking their medications as prescribed. Pharmacy Practice faculty are working to improve the human condition in many ways through collaborative practice and patient education. The department’s Pharmaceutical Care Outcomes Research (PCOR) lab, under the leadership of Dr. Sharrel Pinto, MS ‘01, has been instrumental in conducting MTM programs for the City of Toledo, Lucas County and CareNet. At the Neighborhood Health Association’s Cordelia Martin Health Center, Dr. Aaron Lengel, PharmD ’05, conducts medication therapy management (MTM) for patients with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes or high blood pressure. The MTM sessions provide education for patients, and help them to meet specific health goals, through a partnership between the patient, the physician, and the pharmacist. Dr. Eric Sahloff, ’93, is a member of a multidisciplinary health-care team dedicated to providing optimal medical care and psychosocial and financial support to people and families living with HIV. As the sole pharmacist for this busy clinic, he provides education and drug information to patients and health-care practitioners on current and new advances in HIV pharmacotherapy. Additionally, he practices MTM with the selection of optimal therapies, patient education and follow-up monitoring for therapeutic success, adverse events, drug interactions and non-adherence. Dr. Megan Kaun, PharmD ’06, serves as a consultant for a six-physician internal medicine group, managing MTM for patients with chronic disease states such as diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol and tobacco addiction. Dr. Gayle Kamm, ‘91, practices with an interdisciplinary team in UT’s Parkinson’s Disease clinic. The team that includes a nurse practitioner, physical therapist, occupational therapist, neuropsychologist, speech therapist, social worker, physician and pharmacist. Patients rotate through all the practitioners for same-day evaluation, and the team collaborates to form an optimal therapeutic plan for the patient. Dr. Kamm also sees patients in the Headache Clinic and works with neurology patients for MTM services. Her role within all these clinics is to evaluate medication regimens for drug-related problems such as drug interactions and side

effects, make recommendations to optimize their regimens and provide education to the patients. In addition to outpatient services, Pharmacy Practice faculty also have inpatient practices at UTMC that allow them to practice MTM in a collaborative environment with other healthcare professionals, and train student pharmacists and pharmacy residents in the process. Patients at the medical center may receive care from Dr. Vince Mauro, a cardiology specialist; Dr. Laurie Mauro or Dr. Martin Ohlinger, critical care specialists; Dr. Michael Peeters, a internal medicine specialist practicing in the emergency department; Dr. Mariann Churchwell, a nephrology specialist; or Dr. Diane Cappelletty, Bio ’82, and Dr. Eric Sahloff, infectious disease specialists. In addition to patient care responsibilities, Dr. Ohlinger directs the PGY2 residency in critical care.

Dr. Jerry Nesamony leads a pharmaceutics lecture in a new Collier Building lecture hall.

New faculty in the Department of Pharmacy Practice include Dr. Jerry Nesamony and Dr. Varun Vaidya, both assistant professors. Dr. Nesamony began his career at the University of Appalachia College of Pharmacy in Oakwood, Vir., where he developed and taught courses in pharmaceutics, extemporaneous compounding, sterile products compounding and pharmacokinetics. He earned a PhD in pharmaceutics from the University of Louisiana at Monroe and has performed research in the areas of oral and subcutaneous delivery of insulin and microemulsion-based synthesis of nanocrystals. Dr. Nesamony’s current research interests are developing microemulsion-based formulations suitable for drug delivery and nanoparticle synthesis, transdermal and topical drug delivery, and stability studies involving compounded non-sterile products.

Dr. Vaidya earned a PhD in health outcomes policy research from the University of Tennessee in 2009. His research areas include pharmacoeconomics, pharmacy care, health outcomes and health services research. Dr. Vaidya’s dissertation on the impact of pharmacy benefit plans on utilization of medications among patients with persistent asthma earned him two years’ access to a large administrative claims dataset (MarketScan) through a doctoral dissertation support program. Dr. Vaidya is actively involved in the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).

Appointments Dr. Diane Cappelletty was recently invited by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to serve on the Advisory Committee to the Division of Anti-Infective and Ophthalmology Products. Dr. Cappelletty will provide clinical pharmacology expertise for the committee, which serves a pivotal role in determining anti-infective drug safety and efficacy as well as recommending new drug approvals. An expert in infectious diseases and past-president of the Society of Infectious Disease Pharmacists, Dr. Cappelletty began her tenure with the FDA in September 2010. Dr. Monica HolidayGoodman was recently selected for the 2010-2011 AACP Academic Leadership Fellows Program, a competitiveselection, yearlong leadership training program sponsored by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Dr. Holiday-Goodman serves as a fellow along with just 29 other fellows selected nationwide. She began this program in August 2010. Dr. Mary Powers, ’82, was elected President of the UT Faculty Senate for academic year 2010-2011. Dr. Curtis Black, ’74, received the 2010 APhA Merit Award. Dr. Black was also elected vice president of finance for Phi Kappa Phi.

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BSPS: Preparing Professionals

Student Features

PI students Justina Mueller, Kristin Satterwhite and Emily Esakov.

Student Affairs: Techno-Focused, Student-Centered Jordan Karr, BSPS ‘09, Pryesst Strickland and Michael Marchionda, BSPS ‘05, host a panel discussion about the burgeoning pharmaceutical science industry.

In fall 2010, the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (BSPS) program reached an enrollment of 88 students. This milestone marks the program’s largest enrollment and demonstrates the growing popularity and desirability of the program. BSPS graduates are in high demand in career fields such as forensics, pharmaceutics, and biomedical research. Furthermore, many of the college’s BSPS alumni pursue graduate education in business, pharmaceutical sciences, nursing, medicine and law. Each fall, the P1 BSPS students participate in a Professional Advancement Conference, which orients them to their future career fields, introduces them to alumni and professionals in various fields, and allows them to interact with their classmates. The purpose of this daylong

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program is to develop the students’ leadership skills and to teach them the behaviors and practices of good leaders. This fall, the conference keynote speaker was Deb Gmerek, associate dean of the College of Medicine, who spoke with students about professionalism in corporate settings. Dr. Gmerek is the former director of clinical research for Pfizer Global Research and Development. Panelists for the BSPS conference included Jordan Karr, BSPS ’09, who is a pharmaceutical chemist for Boehringer Ingelheim (BenVenue Laboratories), Michael Marchionda, BSPS ’05, the Pharmacy Business Manager for MetroHealth System, and Pryesst Strickland, the regional pharmaceutical sales representative for Sepracor Incorporated. In addition to the panel discussion, BSPS students participated in Current Good Manufacturing Processes, a certification that will

keep them competitive in the marketplace. The new BSPS P1 students will spend the remainder of the fall semester building on the skills they learned in the conference by participating in interview and resume writing seminars, learning about professional conduct and enhancing their interpersonal and written communication skills. In addition to the Professional Advancement Conference, this year’s P1 BSPS class also participated in diversity training funded by a grant from Target® Corporation. P1 students from the PharmD and BSPS classes learned about cultural sensitivity and the values of diversity in a half-day session that encouraged dialog and interaction. BSPS students were also certified in Good Clinical Practice and Good Manufacturing Practice, a program initiated this academic year.

The College of Pharmacy’s Office of Student Affairs now operates on both the Main and Health Science Campuses. The high-tech side effect of this expansion of student services is a paperless system that is unprecedented at The University of Toledo. Student Affairs has a complex calendar that requires advisers to split their time on both campuses, and as of fall 2010, all student files for the College of Pharmacy are managed and stored electronically. IT professionals devised an effective and efficient file storage system that allows the advisers, who need to travel back and forth between campuses, to access student files from either campus location. After a considerable amount of scanning and converting documents, student files are available through a secure online system. The office’s creative approach to providing services on both campuses has also led to

the use of the Web to facilitate advising and enhance the student experience. Student affairs advisers use a software program that allows students to schedule their own advising appointments at any time of day or night. Not only will this student-centered approach reduce the amount of time secretaries spend scheduling, it may actually result in more student appointments and increased retention. Just as exciting is the use of Web cams to allow for a “face-to-face” advising experience if a student is on one campus and needs to speak with an adviser on the other campus. Plans of study for pre-professional division students are stored electronically so advisers can review and change them easily. Students were introduced to services on the Health Science Campus through a comprehensive brochure that was delivered to their homes in print and made available on the

Web for instant access, and a new “frequently asked questions” Web site for prospective transfer students reduces phone time with advisers. Most impressive is that the College of Pharmacy’s entire admission application process is now electronic, reducing mailings and associated costs significantly. Students can log on to a secure Web site to review the process, apply, and receive notification of admission. All out-of-state transfer student applications are received, reviewed and processed online — electronic data storage and has eliminated all paper review of these lengthy applications. The advances made by the college’s Offices of Student Affairs are certainly enviable. In addition to being environmentally friendly, Student Affairs is focused on student success through accessibility and the use of technology.

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Pharmacy Camp: Outreach and Diversity

CD3: Building Bridges By Dr. Paul Erhardt

By Laural Seewer

2010 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

When Monee Johnson, 12, scented her newlycompounded hand lotion with “Dance Fever” scented oil, she was stepping into the world of pharmacy, if only for an afternoon.

The Center for Drug Design and Development (CD3) is evolving to emphasize collaborative grant submissions and interactions among UT departments. Twenty-one interactions are now ongoing, and 15 have led to or are close to, grant submissions. Three of these submissions have already resulted in extramural funding: The Ohio Third Frontier Award with Akira Takashima as lead primary investigator; an RO1 Addition (Economic Incentive) Award with Bill Maltese as lead primary investigator; and a new RO1 Award with Ron Viola/Paul Erhardt as Co- primary investigators. In addition, two internal submissions have also been awarded: a URAF Award with Janet Salzwedel of Adrian College as a visiting research scientist and a UT Undergraduate Research Award with Peter Yanosko as an honors thesis investigator.

Johnson, a sixth grader at Ella P. Stewart Academy for Girls near downtown Toledo, was one of 40 middle-school students to participate in “Pharmacy Day Camp” in spring 2010. Her class, and a class from Lincoln Academy for Boys in Toledo, savored a day away from school as they participated in a compounding lab, building tour, career video and a visit to Pharmacy Counter’s Central Avenue store. The program is funded with a grant from Walgreens. “The very fact that you get the kids to come to campus is good,” said Anna Brown, Monee’s grandmother and a chaperone on the field trip. “The positive role models, seeing people working as pharmacists, seeing recent graduates – that was wonderful.” Outreach programs such as this in the College of Pharmacy are attracting, and often recruiting, students of underrepresented ethnic backgrounds. Pharmacy Summer Camp for high school seniors has become a College of Pharmacy tradition, involving dozens of faculty and volunteers and more than 100 participants each June and July. Thirty students from multicultural backgrounds participated in the 2010 camp, a record number according to camp statistics, which span a decade. Participation in the camp by minority students has steadily increased since 2001, when seven minority students attended. Efforts to build on the positive trend are planned in the form of targeted mailings of camp information and visits to high school science classes. Walgreens has sponsored the camp since its inception in 2001. In past years, Discount Drug Mart and CVS/Caremark also provided sponsorship.

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The College of Pharmacy Summer Camp attracts students in the summer before they begin the college application process. Pharmacy Camp uses lab activities, job shadowing, career speakers and faculty lectures to provide students with a hands-on, in-depth introduction to careers in pharmacy. Staying on campus in dormitories, playing at the Rec Center and touring campus acquaint campers with campus living at UT. Students from the College of Pharmacy professional division work as camp counselors, using informal discussions during evenings and mealtimes to answer questions about student life. Camp statistics show that students leave with a good impression. Since 2007, as many as 76 percent of the minority students participating in summer camp have applied to UT’s College of Pharmacy. Twenty-one percent of those students have enrolled in pre-Pharmacy at UT since 2001. Pharmacy Summer Camp cost is $275 per student. Students for whom the fee poses a

financial hardship can apply for a fee waiver. In 2010, the fee was waived for 11 students. Campers are asked each year to evaluate the camp before leaving. Students often credit the outreach by faculty members, students and community pharmacists with influencing their choice of a pharmacy career. “I really want to go into pharmacy now that I know there are so many options. It’s going to be a long and hard road, but I’m very excited,” wrote one camper. “The camp helped me to make the final decision that pharmacy is the right thing for me,” commented another camper. “I can’t wait to make a difference in the world.”

Laural Seewer is the Pharmacy Summer Camp coordinator. Information on Pharmacy Summer Camp for rising high school seniors is available at utoledo. edu/pharmacy/prospective. The online application and 2011 camp dates will be posted in February 2011. The application deadline is in mid-April.

A notable accomplishment for CD3 is that all three of Director Paul Erhardt’s grants have not only been renewed, but have also been scaled up in funding so that they are now running at about a total of $750,000 annually. When these

grants are combined with the composite of new collaborative awards, this brings the CD3’s overall funding level to the $1 million mark. The “Maltese grant” is associated with another type of distinct accomplishment in that it provides funding for CD3’s first MD/PhD Graduate Student. This type of educational cooperation, along with the CD3 director’s recent academic appointments as an adjunct professor in pharmacology and as a joint professor in biochemistry and cancer biology, constitute additional accomplishments help to position the CD3 as a functional bridge between the Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine. On the Health Science Campus, CD3’s Biological Testing and Bioanalytical Testing cores are housed within the basement area of the new facility. A central office for CD3 and a Computational Chemistry core dry-lab are on the second floor. CD3’s larger Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry core and its Analytical Chemistry core have gained additional space in Wolfe Hall, as well.

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Medicinal Chemistry applies chemical biochemical, molecular genetic, and novel biological methods to the problem of rational drug design for the development of new therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Areas of research focus in the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry include: cancer research; drug design, delivery and development (Drs. Slama, Tillekeratne, Bryant-Friedrich and Erhardt); immunological disorders and inflammatory diseases including diabetes (Drs. McInerney, Wall and vonGrafenstein); structural analysis of protein-protein interactions (Dr. vonGrafenstein); biomarkers of oxidative DNA damage in cancer and other diseases (Dr. Bryant-Friedrich); neurodegeneration associated with stroke and cerebrovascular diseases and neuroprotective mechanisms of various agents that occur nationally in foods (Dr. Shah); and chemoinformatics (Dr. Erhardt). Faculty have grant funding from a variety of sources including NSF, NIH and USDA to support their research.

The Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry has programs at the graduate and undergraduate levels. For more information on about the department, visit utoledo.edu/ pharmacy/depts/mbc

Pharmacy students organized a huge calendar of events for American Pharmacists Month.

President: Joel Levitan, ‘69 Secretary: Steve Meyer, ‘76, ‘78 Treasurer: Jayne Gibbs-Peseckis, ‘00 Three-Year Term: Dr. Laura Manzey, ‘93 Dr. Janice Marsteller, ‘02, ‘05 Dr. Anita Stonehill-Ridner, ‘95, ‘98 Two-Year Term: Neda Archie, ‘08, ’10 Lucas Blazejewski, ‘09 Steve Meyer, ‘76, ‘88 Jeff Muszynski, ‘78 Dave Waller, ‘78 One-Year Term: Jayne Gibbs-Peseckis, ‘00 Joel Levitan, ‘69 Ex Officio Members: Dr. Johnnie L. Early, II Dean, College of Pharmacy Dr. John Clark, ‘00 Past President Dr. Robert J. Schlembach, ‘49 UTCPAA Historian Jeff Barton, BBA ‘98 Director, Pharmacy Development Dan Saevig Associate VP, Alumni Relations Charisse Montgomery, MA ’10 College Communicator & Scientific Editor Donna Haar UTCP Liaison Shawn Mills, Student Council President Student Representative

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AlumniCapsules 2000s Vyjayanthi Krishnan, PhD ’00, is a senior scientist at Wellstat Biologics. Nimish Mehta, PhD ’00, is director of educational strategy for MedscapeCME, which develops educational content for health-care professionals. Wellington Pham, PhD ’00, is an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at Vanderbilt University. Matthew Fettman, PharmD ’03, was installed as president of the Ohio Pharmacists Association at its 132nd Annual Conference held April 9-11 in Columbus. Mohammad K. Laham, PhD ’03, is assistant dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Jordan.

Richard Dudley, PhD ’06, is assistant professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Findlay Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Rahul Khupse, PhD ’06, has joined the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences faculty at the University of Findlay as an assistant professor. Megan Marchal, PharmD ’06, is a pharmacy manager for Walgreens in Canal Winchester, Ohio. Megan is also a new member of the college’s partnership board. Michael Morran, PhD ’06, is a postdoctoral research fellow at University of Michigan in the department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.

Sunghan Yim, PhD ’03, is a research scientist II for Avon Products Inc. Michael Marchionda, BSPS ’05, is the pharmacy business manager for MetroHealth Systems. Christina (Zalecki) Scharf, PharmD ’05, and her husband Joshua, a 2004 graduate of UT’s College of Engineering, welcomed their first child, Noah Austin Scharf, on February 28, 2010. Kevin Secrest, PharmD ’05, was installed as the trustee representing District 2 at the 132nd Annual Conference of the Ohio Pharmacists Association. He is the clinical coordinator and pharmacy manager of Ryan Pharmacy and Orthopedic Supply in Toledo, Ohio. He is also certified in diabetic care.

Kyle Dawson, PharmD ’07, completed PGY1 and PGY2 residencies at The Methodist Hospital in Houston. Kyle presented the research from his PGY2 residency about cardioprotective medication use after renal transplantation at the International Transplant Congress in Vancouver in 2010. Ji Dong Liu, PhD ’07, is assistant director of the Division of Medicinal Chemistry at Beta Pharma.

Rittesh Mittal, PhD ’07, is a postdoctoral research fellow for Anatrace, a reagent manufacturer.

Lindsay Alexander, PhD ’10, is a postdoctoral fellow at The Cleveland Clinic.

Jessica Castrataro, BSPS ’10, is working for Medco as a pharmacy operations supervisor.

Nicholle Gregg, BSPS ’10, is pursuing a master of business administration degree from The University of Toledo.

Maria S. Borchers, PharmD ’08, married Christopher Barga in May. She is a pharmacist at CVS in Westerville, Ohio.

Tariq Ata BSPS ’10, is pursuing a master of public administration degree from The University of Toledo.

Kin Chan, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at Akron General Medical Center in Akron, Ohio.

Stephanie Grossman, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy.

Aaron Aten, PharmD ’10, is completing a managed care residency with Humana Pharmacy Solutions.

Krystal Chavez, BSPS ’10, has joined the United States Air Force.

Alem Hailemichael, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy in Atlanta.

Lisa Ficke, PhD ’08, is a project leader for clinical research organization, Kendle International. Nirdesh Gupta, PhD ’08, is a technology transfer patent specialist at Los Angeles Children’s Hospital. Sachin Patel, PhD ’08, is a scientist I for Codexis Inc., a company that produces enzyme products. Catharine Szefcyk, BSPS ’08, is the assistant manager of pharmacy operations for The Cleveland Clinic. Brian Harmeyer, BSPS ’09, is a smart pump analyst at The Cleveland Clinic. He has primary responsibility for the collection, validation, analysis, reporting and evaluation of quality assurance data associated with the use of the drug library for these devices, which are computerized infusion pumps Jordan Karr, BSPS ’09, is a quality control chemist for Boehringer Ingelheim, a division of Ben Venue Laboratories Inc. Katherine Savakis, BSPS ’09, is currently in her second year of pharmacy school at NEOUCOP. Jared Ackley, BSPS ’10, is attending graduate school at The University of Toledo.

Jessica Ballinger, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Rite Aid Pharmacy. Whitney Bennet, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Kroger Pharmacy in Cincinnati, Ohio. Cara Bennett, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Rite Aid Pharmacy. Ryan Bolus, PharmD ’10, is working for Cardinal Health Nuclear Pharmacy in Dayton, Ohio. Paul Brown, PhD ’10, is a research associate at The Cleveland Clinic. Scott Buckley, BSPS ’10, has joined the United States Air Force. He plans to pursue a criminal justice degree and pursue work in the field of forensic toxicology.

Robert Cox, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Harris Teeter Pharmacy. Garrett Curtis, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich.

Kenneth Hohmeier, PharmD ’10, is completing a community pharmacy residency at The University of Toledo Medical Center.

Daniel Dagadu, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens.

Jennifer Houser, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, W.V.

William DuBois, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abby Keiser, PharmD ’10, is completing a residency at Parkview Health in Fort Wayne, Ind.

Kristen Felix, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Daniel Keller, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens in the Cleveland South district. He plans to pursue a master of business administration degree, as well.

Victoria Ference, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy. Abigail Fosu, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens.

Samantha Carson, BSPS ’10, is attending graduate school at Chatham University in Pittsburgh to become a physician’s assistant.

Emily Givens, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens in Columbia, S.C.

Bryaune Carter, BSPS ’10, is employed with Ben Venue Labs in Cleveland, Ohio.

Matthew Grable, PharmD ’10, is completing a pharmacy resident at Akron General Medical Center.

Harrison Cash, BSPS ’10, is attending graduate school at University of Cincinnati.

Amanda Gray, BSPS ’10, is attending Northeastern Ohio University College of Pharmacy to earn a PharmD degree.

Kevin Kissling, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at Inova Fairfax Hospital. Kevin was one of the three valedictorians for his PharmD graduating class, and he was selected to speak at commencement. Jinender Kumar, MSPS ’10, is a research analyst for pricing and market access at Heron Evidence Development LLC. Jennifer Leiby, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency at Methodist Dallas Medical Center.

AlumniCapsules Taylor Lindsey, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at The University of Toledo Medical Center. Brandon Malicki, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens in Las Vegas. Jessica Markin, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy in Columbus, Ohio. Anualita Mbarusha, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens Pharmacy. Heather McNamara, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Wal-Mart Pharmacy. Jeffrey Mikolay, Jr., BSPS ’10, is pursuing a master of science degree in the human donation sciences program at The University of Toledo. Kristen Monarch-Mocek, PharmD ’10, is completing a pharmacy practice residency at Toledo Hospital. Kristen was one of the three valedictorians for her PharmD graduating class. Alex Moseley, BSPS ’10, plans to attend medical school in fall 2010. Annie Nguyen, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens. Annie was one of the three valedictorians for her PharmD graduating class. Kyle Nguyen, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy. Renee Niese, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Meijer Pharmacy. Devin Niese, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Wal-Mart Pharmacy. Blair O’Dell, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens.

Michelle O’Donnell, BSPS ’10, is attending The University of Toledo, where she is pursuing a master of business administration degree. Muneshaw Persaud, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Kmart Pharmacy. Melissa Prybor, PharmD ’10, is pursuing a master of business administration degree. Jonathan Rios, PharmD ’10, joined the UT College of Pharmacy as a research assistant professor. He is responsible for creating an electronic medical record system for the college’s MTM programs. Julie Rose, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Target. Haley Sauder, BSPS ’10, is now attending medical school at the University of Cincinnati. Haley was valedictorian of her BSPS graduating class.

Kelly Schoeppler, PharmD ’10, is completing a pharmacy practice residency at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver. Michelle Serres, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 residency at W.W. Knight. Shana Snook, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens. Lindsay Taylor, PharmD ’10, is completing a PGY1 Pharmacy residency at The University of Toledo Medical Center. Jill Timmerman, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for Walgreens. Uma Sundari Vanguri, PharmD ’10, is working as a pharmacist for CVS Pharmacy.

Kelly Verhoff, BSPS ’10, is attending graduate school at Bowling Green State University. Cathy Vue, BSPS ’10, plans to attend graduate school to study public health. Julie Whitekus, BSPS ’10, has joined the United States Air Force. Zheng Xu, MSPS ’10, pharmD program in Wayne State University Abraham Zawodni, BSPS ’10, is attending graduate school at The University of Toledo for a master’s in human donation science.

Sushma Ramsinghani, PhD ’98, is assistant dean, department chair and associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Feik School of Pharmacy at the University of the Incarnate Word.

1980s Gayle (Buffalo) Brazeau, ‘80, is dean of the College of Pharmacy at the University of New England in Maine. Brian Joyce, ’80, is a member of the Ohio Board of Pharmacy.

We want to hear from you!

Please let us know about your new job, advanced degrees, marriages, children, change of address, etc.

Name Class of Maiden Name (if applicable) Street Address City

1990s

Anthony Ciaccia, ’81, is director of marketing and public affairs for the Ohio Pharmacists Association.

Regina Truss, PhD ’93, is the chair of the Department of Chemistry at Kalamazoo College.

Mary Powers, ’82, was elected president of The University of Toledo’s Faculty Senate.

Business Phone

Janene (Rigelsky) Madras, ’97, is an associate professor of pharmacy practice and director of admissions and student services at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Pharmacy.

Caroline Gaither, ’83, is using her one-year sabbatical from University of Michigan to research health care disparities with Dr. Monica HolidayGoodman in The University of Toledo’s Department of Pharmacy Practice.

Kelly (Snyder) Ragucci, ’97, has been named assistant dean of curriculum for the Medical University of South Carolina’s College of Pharmacy. She holds faculty appointments of associate professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences and associate professor of family medicine. Previously, she was associate director of graduate pharmacy education at the MUSC Medical Center-College of Pharmacy residency program. She has a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from Ohio Northern University and a doctorate degree from The University of Toledo. She completed a clinical pharmacy residency in MUSC’s department of family medicine.

Lori (Snodgrass) Woodson, ’84, is a member of the Ohio Board of Pharmacy.

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Home Phone

Preferred Email

What’s New? ________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

1970s Curtis Black, ‘74, was the 2010 recipient of the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Merit Award and was featured on the cover of the April edition of Pharmacy Times magazine. William Owad, ‘79, is senior vice president of operational excellence for Cardinal Health in Dublin, Ohio.

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Return this form to: The University of Toledo Foundation MS 319, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606 or email to utpharmacyreply@utoledo.edu.

College of Pharmacy, MS 1013 3000 Arlington Ave. Toledo, OH 43614

UT COLLEGE OF PHARMACY ALUMNI AFFILIATE:

JOIN THE FUN! Homecoming weekend was October 1-3, and many alumni pulled out their UT gear and headed to campus. In addition to hosting the annual Homecoming Luncheon, your UTCP Alumni Affiliate plans fun and educational events for you and your family throughout the year. Over the past year, the College of Pharmacy Alumni Affiliate held free family events at Imagination Station and Tam O’Shanter Sports Arena as well as familyfriendly outings at Toledo Walleye and Mud Hens games. Alumni Affiliate events are posted on the UT Alumni Web site at toledoalumni.org, and post cards are mailed to local alumni. Make sure you don’t miss out on the fun!

Dr. Aaron Lengel, PharmD ’05, lecturer in the department of pharmacy practice, explores science with his sons at the Alumni Affiliate’s Imagination Station event.

Say Yes to (Dark) Chocolate

Dr. Zahoor Shah, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicinal and Biological Chemistry, is working on developing neuroprotective agents that target neurodegeneration associated with stroke and cerebrovascular diseases. His lab has previously shown that epicatechin, a polyphenolic compound found abundantly in dark chocolates, has neuroprotective properties. Epicatechin salvages dying neurons and reduces neurological defects after a stroke. PH 477 1010


Fall 2010 Extracts & Graduates