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JUNE 2012 – VOL. 32 – #6

EVENTS 2012

OCTOBER

JUNE

4

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Oklahoma City, OK

5

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

San Antonio, TX

6

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Dallas, TX

7

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Lubbock, TX

11

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Minneapolis, MN

12

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Des Moines, IA

13

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Omaha, NE

14

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Chicago, IL

18

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Kansas City, MO

19

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

St. Louis, MO

6–12

JO Nat’l. Champs./Invl./Open Champs./RSG Festival (R)

7–10

Visa Championships (M/W)

St. Louis, MO

8–10

Region 4 Congress

St. Louis, MO

26–27

USA Gymnastics Championships (R/T)

San Jose, CA

28–July 1

U.S. Olympic Team Trials–Gymnastics (M/W)

San Jose, CA

28

Certifications for USA Gymnastics National Congress

San Jose, CA

29–July 1

USA Gymnastics National Congress and Trade Show

San Jose, CA

JULY

Lake Buena Vista, FL

20

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Memphis, TN

21

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Lafayette, LA

25

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Louisville, KY

26

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Charlotte, NC

27

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Atlanta, GA

Huntsville, TX

28

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Tampa, FL

London, GBR

NOVEMBER

5–7

U.S. Elite Championships (TT)

Long Beach, CA

5–11

JO National Championships (TT)

Long Beach, CA

19–22

USA Gymnastics For All Nationals

Lake Buena Vista, FL

21–25

Acrobatic National Championships

Detroit, MI

23–26

JO Optional Skills Camp (W)

27–Aug. 12 Olympic Games (M,W,R,T)

AUGUST 8–11

TOPs Invitational Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

10–12

Region 6 Congress

Providence, RI

10–12

Region 8 Congress

Nashville, TN

12 – 15

TOPs Invitational Camp (W)

Huntsville, TX

17–19

Region 7 Congress

Baltimore, MD

22-25

Women’s Level 300 JO Team Coaches Course (W300)

Huntsville, TX

24–26

Region 2 Congress

26 – 29

Women’s Level 400 National Coaches Course (W400),

SEPTEMBER

Everett, WA Huntsville, TX

9

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Ontario, CA

13

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

San Diego, CA

14

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

14–16

Region 5 Congress

Indianapolis, IN

15

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Los Angeles, CA

16

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Anaheim, CA

20

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Las Vegas, NV

21

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Sacramento, CA 

22

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Portland, OR

22

National Gymnastics Day

Everywhere

23

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Seattle, WA

27

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

West Valley City, UT

28 – 30

National TOPs Testing (W)

29

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Colorado Springs, CO

30

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Broomfield, CO

Glendale, AZ 

Huntsville, TX

1

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Cincinnati, OH

2

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Indianapolis, IN

3

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Detroit, MI

4

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Columbus, OH

7–10

Level 9/10 Training Camp (W)

9

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

10

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

10–14

JO National Team Training Camp (W)

NOTE: Dates and events subject to change or cancellation. 2

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Newark, NJ Huntsville, TX

11

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Boston, MA

15

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Washington, DC

16

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Pittsburgh, PA

17

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Hartford, CT

18

Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Brooklyn, NY

2013 MARCH 2

APRIL 12–14

MAY

AT&T American Cup

Women’s Level 9/10 Regionals

TBD

Various sites

2–5

Level 9 East/West Championships (W)

9–11

JO National Championships (W)

Minneapolis, MN

12

JO–NIT (W)

Minneapolis, MN

31–June 2

2013–20 JO Compulsory Master Workshop – East (W)

W = Women, R = Rhythmic, TR = Trampoline, M = Men, GG = Group Gymnastics, TU = Tumbling, AG = Acrobatic Gymnastics, B = Business, TT = Trampoline/Tumbling

Huntsville, TX Philadelphia, PA

(TBD)

Orlando, FL

TECHNIQUE

an official publication of USA Gymnastics University

J U N E 2 0 1 2 • V O L U M E 3 2 • #6

PUBLISHER

Steve Penny EDITOR

Luan Peszek GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Jeannie Shaw

USA GYMNASTICS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chair: Peter Vidmar Vice-Chair: Paul Parilla Secretary: Gary Anderson Treasurer: Jim Morris National Membership – Women: Tom Koll National Membership – Women: Steve Rybacki National Membership – Men: Yoichi Tomita National Membership – Men: Russ Fystrom National Membership – Rhythmic: Brooke Bushnell-Toohey National Membership – Trampoline & Tumbling: George Drew National Membership – Acrobatic Gymnastics: Dr. Jay Binder Advisory Council: Mike Burns Advisory Council: Ron Ferris Advisory Council: Carole Ide Athlete Director – Women: Terin Humphrey Athlete Director – Men: John Roethlisberger Athlete Director – Rhythmic: Jessica Howard Athlete Director – Trampoline & Tumbling: Karl Heger Athlete Director – Acrobatic Gymanstics: Michael Rodrigues Public Sector: Frank Marshall Public Sector: Bitsy Kelley Public Sector: Jim Morris Public Sector: Mary Lou Retton

CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: In order to ensure uninterrupted delivery of TECHNIQUE magazine, notice of change of address should be made eight weeks in advance. For fastest service, please enclose your present mailing label. Direct all subscription mail to TECHNIQUE Subscriptions, USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 .

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F E AT U R E S

6 National Team Physical Preparation Testing for Rhythmic 8

Business Advisors’ Tips – 10 Ways to “Sneak” in Staff Education

12

Off-Season Conditioning – St. Vincent Sports Performance

D E PA R T M E N T S 2 Event Schedule

4 Inside USA Gymnastics Message 16

Member Service Update

20

University Live Course Schedule

24

What’s New

26

National Congress

28

National Congress Schedule

36

Spotlight – National Gymnastics Day

46

Classified Ads

12

8

DID YOU CATCH USA GYMNASTICS IN

VOGUE’S JUNE MAGAZINE?

TECHNIQUE is published monthly except bimonthly in Sept/ Oct and Nov/Dec by USA Gymnastics, 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (phone: 317-237-5050) or visit online @ www.usagym.org Subscription prices: U.S.– $25 per year; Canada/Mexico–$48 per year; all other foreign countries–$60 per year. If available, back issue single copies $4 plus postage/handling. All reasonable care will be taken, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited material; enclose return postage. Copyright 2011 by USA Gymnastics and TECHNIQUE. A­ll rights reserved. Printed by Sport Graphics, Indianapolis, IN. Member Services 1-800-345-4719 Unless expressly identified to the contrary, all articles, statements and views printed herein are attributed solely to the author and USA Gymnastics expresses no opinion and assumes no responsibility thereof.

www.usagym.org COVER PHOTOS: by John Cheng

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INSIDE INSIDE INSIDE USA Gymnastics is restructuring professional membership in the upcoming season. As of August 2012, coaches, judges, gym owners, and others will have two options of professional membership. Option #1 is the Professional Membership - intended for those gymnastics professionals, such as coaches and judges that participate in sanctioned events and receive access to the field of play. Option #2 is the Instructor Membership – intended for recreational coaches and teachers that wish to increase their level of education and obtain certification within USA Gymnastics University. We are encouraging everyone involved in gymnastics to obtain higher levels of education, and we are offering this membership at a cost effective price of $15. In addition, we have lowered the age limit for this membership type to 14 years of age. Along with the simplification of these membership options, USA Gymnastics will also streamline the process of membership and certification expiration dates. Similar to the athlete membership structure, all professional members of USA Gymnastics will expire on July 31st, 2013. You will notice the new process with your 2012/2013 membership. Looking forward to 2013, USA Gymnastics encourages all professional members to enter USA Gymnastics University, take program specific coursework and/or pre-place themselves in the University.  This is communicated to prepare members for the release of the “2013 Rules and Policies” which will require a professional member to have a specific level of certification in order to gain access to a sanctioned event. I also would like to bring your attention to the work of the National Gymnastics Foundation (NGF). Over the past few years, the NGF has been reorganized and working to support the promotion of the sport at the highest level. In 2008, funds from the NGF were used to fund the eight-page insert in USA Today, and again in 2010, when USA Gymnastics produced a similar insert for Parents Magazine. This year, the NGF has funded new television commercials that are available for USA Gymnastics Member Clubs and are being included in USA Gymnastics television broadcasts. These commercials underscore the message that “Life Needs Gymnastics” and the benefits that children can experience at the grassroots of the sport. National Gymnastics Foundation Board L-R: George Drew,

Bruno Klaus, Jeff Metzger, Rita Brown, Sallie Weaver, The NGF has not only become a valuable partner in the promotion of the sport, Dominick Minicucci, Bob Wood (not pictured: Nastia Liukin). they have provided significant support for other initiatives which include the introduction of a Collegiate Development Fund designed to support and sustain collegiate gymnastics, adoption of the Nastia Liukin Fund geared to support fitness initiatives, and sponsorship for the annual USA Gymnastics Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.

I encourage you to consider a donation to the NGF in your charitable efforts. See you in the Gym

Steve Penny President and CEO

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By Elizabeth Darling, DPT, OCS, CLT, ATC n January, 15 members of the National Team took part in the first-ever Physical Preparation testing program during the January National Team Training Camp at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid, NY. This program, the brainchild of coaches and the sports medicine staff, is designed to help athletes improve fundamental strength, reduce their risk of injury, raise the international preparation of U.S. rhythmic gymnasts, and improve the longevity of the rhythmic gymnast’s career. Researched and led by Elizabeth Darling, the program targets areas like core stability, foot and ankle stability, muscle imbalances in the hip and trunk, and examines flexibility in the spine, shoulders, and hips. The final version of the Physical Preparation Testing Program came together after several years of work. “We looked back at the types of injuries the rhythmic gymnasts were sustaining over the last 10 years,” Darling said, “and we wanted to correct some of the common muscle imbalances that were leading to these injuries. We came up with preliminary tests that we then fine tuned after testing them on athletes and brainstorming with coaches and other members of USA Gymnastics Sports Medicine staff.”

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Station 1: Flexibility

Square Splits Posterior Hip Flexibility (Right and Left)

Station 2: Flexibility

Shoulder Flexibility

Low back Flexibility

Station 3: Flexibility

Circumduction

Station 4: Strength

Relevé with elastic band pulling out (Right and Left) Relevé with elastic band pulling in (Right and Left)

Station 5: Strength

Hip extension with leg movement (Right and Left) Hip extension strength (Right and Left)

Station 6: Strength

Spine Stability

Abdominal Stability

Station 7: Strength

Plank

Side plank

The test, which consists of 13 stations, has a maximum score of 100 points; athletes score higher if they are stable in their core, flexible on both sides of their body, and strong in their foot and ankle. The scoring can be done by coaches or teachers and was designed to be consistent and reproducible. Each individual test has its own specific criteria. This testing program for rhythmic gymnasts comes at the perfect time, since USA Gymnastics is making a push to raise its international ranking. According to Caroline Hunt, Rhythmic Program Director, “With the amount of technical progress and talent that is emerging in rhythmic gymnastics in this country, maintaining health is of paramount importance so that the athletes can work to their full potential, which takes many years to develop and achieve. This program is a tremendous asset to all athletes and coaches.” Rhythmic coaches have already begun to see the benefits of the program. National and World Team Coach Lucy Kerznerman explains that “the tests show the weaknesses right away, and [athletes] will become stronger when they work on both the weaknesses and maintain their strengths.” Natasha Klimouk, National, Pan American Games, and World Team Coach added, “Our gymnasts have been back at the gym working on those areas every day with even more focus.” Armed with this testing information, coaches and athletes can tailor their training to address physical needs. Greater strength and flexibility not only helps the gymnasts’ performance, they also keep gymnasts out of the training room. “Improving weaknesses will help with injury prevention,” Kerznerman said. As Program Director, Hunt appreciates the instant feedback that the athletes received by completing the testing program. “Watching the gymnasts during the testing thoughtfully

analyzing their results and thinking about areas for improvement was impressive,” Hunt said. An additional benefit of the test is its wide applicability. Although the test was designed for rhythmic gymnasts, dancers and artistic gymnasts can also benefit from it. Since athletes in these two disciplines are increasingly expected to incorporate strength and flexibility into their performances, it is important that they have the necessary stability to support the increased range of motion. Darling, who has been involved with rhythmic gymnastics for 20 years and has also worked with artistic gymnasts and professional dancers, hopes that a wide range of performers will see the advantage of the program. “Gymnasts and dancers require a unique ability to combine incredible strength with significant flexibility,” Darling notes. “I created this test so that these athletes could know whether or not they had the appropriate balance of these two abilities.” As the U.S. Rhythmic team builds towards its goals, athletes and coaches will use testing data to create championshipcaliber training programs. Their efforts are already paying off; through the continued hard work of the U.S. gymnasts, the team can look forward to an even brighter future.

r

Anyone interested in this program should contact Elizabeth Darling at Elizabeth.Darling@physiocorp.com

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10 WAYS TO “SNEAK” IN STAFF E By Anne Josephson

The day you stop learning is the day you die.  – Unknown

L

ifetime learners are people who have a growth mindset. They are people who believe that their basic abilities can be developed through tenacity and hard work. They understand that intelligence and talent are just the starting points and what really matters is consistent practice and the commitment to improve.   I have yet to meet a great coach or instructor who doesn’t have a thirst to improve their knowledge and a drive to get better and better at what they do. As club owners and managers, it is essential that we find ways to cultivate a growth mindset with our administrators and coaches, and the best way to engage them is through continuing education.  Most professions have a formalized structure for such continuing education, and our profession is no different. There are marvelous opportunities for staff education such as USA Gymnastics National Congress and Regional Congresses, USA Gymnastics University live courses, Jeff Metzger’s Boot Camp, Frank Sahlein’s Business Brain Trust as well as a host of other conferences that, while not specific to gymnastics or children’s activity centers, are marvelous educational opportunities for you and your staff. Likewise, there is online training such as USA Gymnastics University and wonderful collections of DVDs such as those by Patti Komara, Tammy Biggs and the technical materials from USA Gymnastics store, that help you train and educate your coaches. Clearly, these types of training often cost money that many gym owners feel they do not have. And, as wonderful as these resources are, none can communicate your club’s mission, vision and culture. That must come from the leaders in your gym club. Then, there is the other problem -- time. The result? Staff training often falls by the wayside or is a haphazard mix of “shadow teaching” and “learning by osmosis.”  I 8

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know that we at Josephson Academy of Gymnastics (JAG) struggle to find time to meet as a management team–by department and as an entire staff. Being open 8:30 a.m.–10 p.m. six days a week with Sunday being the ”short day” of 8:00 a.m. – 7 p.m. doesn’t leave much time for staff education. But, like the parent who blends broccoli into tomato sauce to get their fussy toddler to eat veggies, there are ways to sneak staff education into your busy gym without taking too much time or breaking the bank. Here are some quick and easy ways to find small pockets of time that lead to great returns on your staff’s continuing education.

1. FACEBOOK.

On Facebook, you can create a private group. At JAG, we have a staff private group on which we post pictures of set-ups, lesson plan logic, share teaching tips, ask questions and post YouTube clips for drills and links to articles we want staff to read. We make the group interactive by inviting staff to post ideas and tips for using the weekly set-ups and props. And the Facebook page allows coaches to put questions out to the entire group and receive answers from which all of us can learn. Also, we use it to post where the weekend beach volleyball game will be held. Sorry, cold weather people.

2. EVERY STAFF MEETING HAS AN EDUCATIONAL COMPONENT.

Yes, you must find a time to meet as an entire staff. We do it monthly from 7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m. on the first Saturday of the month. Bagels and coffee (lots and lots of coffee) are served. In addition to discussing policies, procedures, schedules and the like, each and every staff meeting has an educational component or discussion that lasts roughly 10–15 minutes. Past topics have included class discipline, dealing with kids who have dramatically different skill levels, how to talk to kids, how to talk to parents, great ideas to teach cartwheels (handstands, walkovers, etc.), ways to make beam less boring, “what to do when…” and more. Fifty brains are vastly superior to my one, and many wonderful ideas are exchanged and pesky problems are resolved.

3. HOLD A BOOK CLUB.

Ask employees to RSVP. Provide lunch, sit and discuss the book. Staff members love it because all of them are eligible to attend and have face time with the owner.  As an owner, I enjoy it because I am able to interact with employees with whom I typically do not spend time and learn more about them. It is also a great way to see who

F EDUCATION is really interested in learning and seeking mentorship. Some books we have read as a staff include: Mindset by Carol Dweck, First Break all the Rules by Marcus Buckingham, Delivering Happiness by Tony Hseih, Getting Things Done by David Allen, Good to Great by Jim Collins, Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell, The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle and A Running Start by Pica Rae. For those who do not attend the book club, we send a summary of the book and a list of action items or suggestions so they can see the fun that they missed. Note: For book summaries you can write your own or subscribe to a summary service. I like Getabstract.com. As far as the action items—you are on your own!

4. SEND ARTICLE RECOMMENDATIONS VIA EMAIL.

I get many great newsletters (my favorite is Patti Komara’s), and forwarding articles or pieces of the newsletter to staff is a quick way to sneak in education. In order to ensure it is read, ask for thoughts on it or ideas on how it applies to the gym. Another idea is to decide that it will be discussed in the next meeting or even better, ask everyone to reply and give an idea of how the article can be applied to the gym. The winning idea will get an iTunes gift card or movie tickets. Then, publish all the ideas via email (so everyone can read each idea) and announce the winner.   

5. SCHEDULE TIME FOR MASTER TEACHERS TO “FLOAT” IN THE GYM.

Your team coach doesn’t have a group until 4 p.m.? Have him/her assist in the 3 p.m. classes to mentor a younger coach. Likewise, if a younger coach is finished by 6 p.m., allow him/her to assist on a group with a master teacher to improve skills. At JAG, we allow up to two hours per pay period for coaches to learn from a peer. (Of course, it must be documented and approved by their manager.) If coaches wish to extend their training beyond those two hours, they may do so on their own time.

6. RUN YOUR OWN “MINI-CONGRESS” WITH YOUR COACHES PRESENTING TO THEIR PEERS.

Assign topics or let them choose their own. Everyone is an expert at something! Coaches are excited to share their ideas with each other. This is a must-do, especially if you send coaches to an off-site

congress or training. Don’t let their knowledge stay exclusively with them—have them share it with the whole group! At each session, make sure you assign a secretary, whose job is to record all the great ideas and action items so they don’t get lost!

7. TAKE THEM TO LUNCH. 

You have to eat and so does your staff, so have small groups

or one-on-one lunches to get some informal staff training done. You can also bring in lunch or hold “coffee meetings.” 

8. BE CREATIVE IN SCHEDULING STAFF TRAINING.

As I mentioned, each month we use early Saturday mornings for staff meetings. We also run multiple sections of the same training. For instance, we cannot close down our customer service desk to do on-going education, so we run the identical seminar twice so each customer service person is able to attend one of the two trainings. Yes, it does take a bit more time and money, but do you know what else costs money? People leaving your gym because of bad customer service. We occasionally use Sunday evening to do trainings. Nobody loves it, but we soften the experience with dinner and dessert! Video taping is a great idea as you can then upload it to your private Facebook group!

9. SPEND TIME WATCHING THE GYM, THE FRONT DESK AND READING EMAILS CLOSELY. You will see themes arise. This is a great time to jump in with a recommendation, an article, a website or some other

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10 WAYS TO “SNEAK” IN STAFF EDUCATION...CONTINUED resource that will be helpful. For example, after observing and hearing about several unpleasant customers who were positively rude to customer service members, I sent out an article on dealing with difficult people and setting boundaries. Not only were the tips useful, the staff felt understood and supported.

10. KEEP A STAFF RESOURCE PAGE.

Pinterest is a great way to do this. You can “pin” to YouTube channels, interesting websites and other articles that staff might find useful. In some ways, it duplicates the Facebook effort, but since Pinterest is more of a resource page, staff won’t have to scroll though old news feeds to find the article they are looking for. 

The bottom line: Staff training doesn’t always have to cost a lot of money or take a lot of time. It does, however, need to be planned deliberately and executed creatively!  Do you have any interesting ways to sneak in staff education? Please, share with us! While I cannot offer you an iTunes gift card, I do offer you our entire community’s gratitude for helping us all build better gym clubs!

ANNE JOSEPHSON, President and CEO, Josephson Academy of Gymnastics (JAG) anne.josephson@jaggym.com

Anne is JAG’s President and CEO. She opened Josephson Academy of Gymnastics with her husband, Michael Josephson, in June of 2004. Looking for additional staff education resources? Visit USAGymnasticsUniversity.org and go to “The Library” for articles and quick tip videos.

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EXERCISE 2: Push-ups with Rotation

n the sport of gymnastics, technical ability and preparation can be extensive to be a success. However the technique of each gymnast is dependent on their physical fitness, including their strength, power, flexibility, and/or anaerobic capacity. Whether a gymnast is a beginner or a veteran, the strength training and anaerobic conditioning should play a vital role. For the gymnast just learning the skills, it is imperative for him or her to have a sportspecific fitness level so that he or she is able to learn the skills correctly from the beginning. As a veteran gymnast, with the increase of strength and power, it will give him or her the ability to perform the skills with greater precision. Subsequently, technique and accuracy are important qualities for a gymnast and can be achieved with sport-specific training.

I

EX E

at 1: Squ RCISE

Jumps

EXERCISE 3: Side Plank w/Pulses

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The physical demands of gymnastics events place a heavy load on the anaerobic energy system. When addressing anaerobic conditioning, one should think about “short bursts.” Anaerobic exercises have been proven to increase muscle mass which in turn keeps the gymnast lean. The more muscle mass, the more calories burned through those muscles. Other benefits and most importantly related to gymnastics conditioning is increasing the gymnast’s ability to withstand the

EXERCISE 4: Shoulder Blade

Wall Press

EXERCISE 5: Single Leg

Glute Bridge Pulses

build-up of waste substances (lactic acid) in the muscles and remove them from the body, as well as developing stronger muscles. As a gymnast, the list of benefits of strength training and anaerobic conditioning are numerous just in the same way the list is endless for anaerobic exercise. Anaerobic exercise is defined as exercise intense enough to be used by athletes in non-endurance sports to promote strength, speed and power, and Continued ...

EXERCISE 6: Mountain Climbers

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...CONTINUED

to build muscle mass. The anaerobic energy system leads to greater performance in short duration, high intensity activities which last for merely seconds up to about 1 minute. Many different types of exercise elicit this energy pathway. These activities include sprinting, weight training, circuit training, jumping rope, and running stairs. Interval training is another form of anaerobic training and can be seen through

the circuit below. This training can be used with all the activities listed above as well with any other activities one can think of. With interval training, an interval is done by increasing your pace or completing an exercise for a short period of time (between 10 to 60 seconds) then having a slower pace for recovery or complete rest up to 3 times as long as the interval. In the circuit shown below, a 20:40 work to rest ratio is required.

EXERCISE 7: Handstand Shoulder Taps EXERCISE 9: Plank Pike-up

EXERCISE 8: Capitol T’s

EXERCISE 10: Split Squats

St. Vincent Hospital and St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis, Indiana are official service providers to USA Gymnastics Call 317-415-5747 or visit sportsperformance.stvincent.org

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MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE

PREPARING FOR THE 2012 – 2013 ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Important Updates and Reminders

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lubs no longer use their club number and club password to register/renew athletes, or view athlete or professional membership rosters. Only those individuals who have been given “permission” to be Club Administrators by the club owner/ primary contact will be able to access the club athlete renewal and club roster

Don’t forget to update the levels of

lists.

inadvertently renewing an athlete that

the athletes when renewing them for the season. It is very beneficial to the meet directors when verifying memberships. Contact Member Services to remove athletes that are no longer affiliated with your club. This will help you from is no longer with your gym.

To check on your club’s status, please contact Member Services at 800.345.4719 or membership@usagym.org.

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MEMBER SERVICES UPDATE PREPARING FOR THE 2012-2013 ATHLETE REGISTRATION

Important Updates and Reminders... continued When renewing athletes online, please remember to update

Insurance benefits may not be paid out if forms cannot be

contact information for each athlete. Athletes will miss out on

supplied.

their cards and magazine subscriptions if this information is not up to date. Athlete membership forms are available on the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagym.org/memberservices. Both Athletes and Introductory Athletes receive membership cards in the mail. However, the club administrator(s) also have the ability to access athlete membership cards. Clubs are required to keep a copy of completed athlete registration forms on file in their gym, regardless of whether the athlete membership was registered online, fax or mailed.

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Destroy all unused 2011 – 2012 registration forms. Those forms are invalid after June, and will not be accepted. Athletes Level 4 and above are required to obtain an Athlete membership. USA Gymnastics online registration system is available 24 hours a day – 7 days a week Member Services phone hours are: Monday: 12:30 – 5:30 p.m. E.T. Tuesday – Friday: 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. E.T.

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2012 LIVE COURSE SCHEDULE U101 – SAFETY CERTIFICATION (LIVE) June 7 St. Louis, MO June 9 Stroudsburg, PA June 28 San Jose, CA NATIONAL CONGRESS July 13 Centerville, OH Aug. 9 Nashville, TN Aug. 9 Providence, RI Aug. 16 Baltimore, MD Aug. 19 Kalamazoo, MI –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

schedule

NEW – W200 – DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE: HANDS-ON TRAINING (HOTD) June 7 O’Fallon, MO June 10 Camarillo, CA June 17 Mechanicsburg, PA June 28 San Jose, CA NATIONAL CONGRESS July 15 Oak Lawn, IL July 29 Simsbury, CT Aug. 5 Coralville, IA Aug. 5 Rivera Beach, FL Aug. 9 Franklin, TN Aug. 18 Kalamazoo, MI Aug. 19 Timonium, MD

Aug. 26 Columbia, SC Sept. 30 Waukesha, WI ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– T200/T201 – TRAMPOLINE & TUMBLING DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE: LEVEL 1 AND HANDS-ON TRAINING June 28 San Jose, CA NATIONAL CONGRESS July 7 Long Beach, CA ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– R102 – PRESCHOOL FUNDAMENTALS: HANDSON TRAINING (HOTPS) June 3 Moorehead City, NC June 10 St. Louis, MO June 23 Simsbury, CT June 28 San Jose, CA NATIONAL CONGRESS July 13 Sioux Falls, SD Aug. 9 Nashville, TN Aug. 12 Providence, RI Aug. 19 Baltimore, MD Aug. 19 Kalamazoo, MI Aug. 26 Everett, WA Sept. 16 Indianapolis, IN –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

NEW – R103 – SCHOOL AGE/RECREATIONAL: HANDS-ON TRAINING (HOTSA) July 14 Sioux Falls, SD Aug. 25 Powell, OH Aug. 26 Oak Lawn, IL Aug. 26 Natick, MA Aug. 26 Raleigh, NC Sept. 9 Carlsbad, CA Sept. 30 Hamilton, NJ Sept. 30 Apple Valley, MN Oct. 7 Kennesaw, GA ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– W300 – JUNIOR OLYMPIC TEAM COACHES COURSE Aug. 22–25 Huntsville, TX ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEW – W400 – NATIONAL COACHES COURSE Aug. 26–29 Huntsville, TX ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEW – Y200 – RHYTHMIC DEVELOPMENT COACHES COURSE June 28 San Jose, CA NATIONAL CONGRESS

To register for a course, visit the USA Gymnastics website at www.usagymnasticsuniversity.org. | Register online or download the registration form. | **Save $5 by registering online!**

20

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

21

Attention MEN’S PROGRAM You can now order new technical materials and we will begin shipping on June 11. The 2012–2016 Men’s Junior Olympic program materials set includes a DVD of the compulsory routines (Levels 4 to 7), the new Technical Sequences for the Levels 8, 9 and 10 Junior Elite division and a CD Rom that contains all of the written materials of the Junior Olympic Age Group Program rules for the competitive Levels 4 to 10. The CD Rom also contains the Junior National Team program manual, which includes the Future Stars program and routine descriptions. This program is in effect beginning with the 2012–2013 men’s competitive season.

Price: $69.95 TO ORDER GO TO

http://usagym.sportgraphics.biz/

22

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

OR

call 1-800-345-4719 and select option 1.

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

23

WHAT’S NEW NEW NEW Photos by Dean Capelotti

USA GYMNASTICS FOR ALL NATIONALS UPDATE

T

he 2012 USA Gymnastics for All Nationals is shaping up to be one of the largest TeamGym Nationals ever with at least 36 squads competing in Levels 1-7. There will be over 550 participating athletes representing the USA, Argentina, Great Britain, and Portugal. Currently, there are 19 groups registered for the USA Gymnastics Challenge competition that will be held during the Opening Ceremonies and 18 GymFest display routines that will be showcased throughout the event.   The four-day event, July 19-22, will be held at the Walt Disney World Resort® in Florida. The gymnasts will have up to four different opportunities to compete and perform – Opening Ceremonies will be at Disney’s Hollywood Studios on the Lights Motor Action Stage, Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort will be venue for the TeamGym competition and GymFest displays, and groups will also have the opportunity to perform on the stage at Downtown Disney®. More What’s New on page 41...

24

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

25

What to expect A

s the 48th Annual USA Gymnastics National Congress

NATIONAL CONGRESS REGISTRATION SCHEDULE –

and Trade Show approaches, USA Gymnastics would

SAN JOSE CONVENTION CENTER • Thursday, June 28

1:00 – 7:00 p.m.

this event has to offer. The San Jose Convention Center will host

• Friday, June 29

7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

this year’s event, June 28-July 1. Held in conjunction with the

• Saturday, June 30

7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

2012 U.S. Olympic Team Trials-Gymnastics, National Congress

• Sunday, July 1

7:30 a.m. – 12:00p.m.

like to remind you of the great educational opportunities

provides a unique opportunity to attend over 190 presentations, demonstrations,

certifications

and

educational

seminars

on a variety of topics within the sport – all in one location. ONSITE REGISTRATION: Did you forget to register for the 2012 National Congress & Trade Show? Registration is available onsite at the San Jose Convention Center. Onsite registration fee for members is $335 and $400 for non-members.

USA Gymnastics members can

save $50 by using the coupon available below.

DAILY PRESENTER LIST Please visit usagymnasticsnationalcongress.org for the final list of presenters and topics. NATIONAL TRADE SHOW HALL The 2012 National Trade Show, proudly sponsored by the United States Gymnastics Suppliers Association, will feature more than 160 booths of products and information from more than 65 vendors in the gymnastics community. Special events such as the USGSA Mega-Raffle will take place in the Exhibit Hall. The National Trade Show Hall is definitely a location no Congress attendee should miss! To view list of exhibitors, hall map and mega raffle details visit usagym.org/pages/membership/congress/tradeshow.html

Did you forget to pre-register for the 2012 National Congress & Trade Show? USA GYMNASTICS HAS A SPECIAL OFFER FOR YOU! Bring this coupon to the Registration Booth located in the San Jose Convention Center and receive $50 off your onsite registration fee. As a USA Gymnastics member, you’ll pay only $285! Registration opens Thursday, June 28th at 1:00 p.m. at the San Jose Convention Center. 26 T E C H N I Q U E • J U N E

Don’t miss out on the best educational investment you’ll make all year just because you missed the deadline.

We hope to see you there! 2012

Expiration date: 07/01/2012

TRADE SHOW HALL HOURS • Thursday, June 28

5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

• Friday, June 29

7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

• Saturday, June 30

7:30 a.m. – 6:45 p.m.

• Sunday, July 1

7:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.

MORNING FITNESS Start your day off right and join us for Morning Fitness at the Circle of Palms next to the Fairmont during your stay in San Jose. Improve your strength, cardio and flexibility skills. Morning Fitness will be held from 6:30 – 7:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday. This workout will be hosted by Olympian John Macready.

n a S ! e s o in J 2012 U.S. OLYMPIC TEAM TRIALS – GYMNASTICS COMPETITION & FAN ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE

DATE

EVENT

LOCATION

Tuesday, June 26

Rhythmic Jr. and Sr. All-Around Prelims & Event Finals and Trampoline Prelims

Wednesday, June 27

Rhythmic Jr. and Sr. All-Around Finals & Syncro Trampoline Prelims/ San Jose Convention Center Finals

Thursday, June 28

Friday, June 29

Saturday, June 30

Sunday, July 1

San Jose Convention Center

TIME 9:00 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

10:45 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Trampoline Finals

San Jose Convention Center

7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Morning Fitness Fun

Circle of Palms

6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Opening Event and Road to London Opens

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

Men’s Competition – Day 1

HP Pavilion

2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Morning Fitness Fun

Circle of Palms

6:30 – 7:30 a.m.

Visa Fan Fest

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Women’s Competition – Day 1

HP Pavilion

5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Visa Fan Fest

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Men’s Competition – Final Day

HP Pavilion

12:00 – 3:00 p.m.

AT&T Block Party (Concert, Athlete Interviews)

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

3:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Visa Fan Fest

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

3:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Women’s Competition – Final Day

HP Pavilion

5:30 – 8:00 p.m.

AT&T Block Party (Concert, Athlete Interviews)

Arena Green (Adjacent to HP Pavilion)

8:00 – 11:00 p.m.

12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

27

NATIONAL CONGRESS SESSION SCHEDULE

2:30 – 3:30 PM

1:15 – 2:15 PM

10:45 – 11:45 PM

9:30 – 10:30 AM

8:00 – 9:00 AM

SESSION

FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2012 PRESENTER

TRACK ROOM

"All the Floor is a Stage"…Let's Learn How to Use IT

Cheryl Cupples

GFA

B 1/2

FUNdamentals of Preschool Bars

Michael Taylor

Pre

B 3/4

Insurance FAQ's

Patrick O'Connor

RM

C1

Changes to the Jr. Olympic Guide for Trampoline & Tumbling

Susan Jacobson

TT

C2

Be Your Student's Best Coach

April Sawyer

SA

C 3/4

Vault: Front Handspring: Converting Power to Vertical Direction & Rotation

Tom Meadows

M

J1

Acrobatic Retention=Athlete Retention

Nancy Davis & Selena Chain Peco

Acro

J2

TOPS:New State & National Compulsory Testing Elements/Routines for Beam and Floor

Tammy Biggs

WA

J3

Shoulder Instability: What Is It and How Do You Treat It

Dr. James Bicos

SS

J4

Mastering the "Hang and the Handstand" on Horizontal Bar

Kevin Mazeika

M

F

Wild Wacky Camp Phun

Mike Spiller

All

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

JO Update

Tom Koll & Connie Maloney

WT/WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Keeping the Boredom out of Beam

Annette Thomas

Pre

B 3/4

Rules for Team Gym

Steve Whitlock

GFA

C1

Progressions for Trampoline To Build Skills

Susan Jacobson

TT

C2

Brain & Body Working Together

Beth Gardner

SA

C 3/4

2013-2016 FIG Code of Points

Steve Butcher

M

J1

College Recruiting 101

Kurt Hettinger

COL

J2

How Basic Bar Shapes Turn Into Bigger Skills

Tom Forster

WA

J3

Strength Training from Childhood to Adulthood

Dr. Bill Sands

SS

J4

Men's Technical Sequence Update

Kevin Mazeika

M

F

Common Mistakes on Floor Dance

Tammy Biggs & Myra Elfenbein

WT/WJO

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Gym Layout and Team Scheduling: How to Maximize Your Gym Space

Bryon Hough

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Performance Assesment-Checklist Approach

Ron Brant

M

B 1/2

Designing a Successful Parent/Tot Class

Dr. Pamela Evans

Pre

B 3/4

Rolling Into Reading: How Gymnastics Readies Preschoolers for Academic Learning

Debra Em Wilson

Pre

C1

Tumbling Basics, Skills, Spotting and Drills

Joy Umenhofer

TT

C2

Handstand/Cartwheel for the School Age Child..Again

Sandi McGee

SA

C 3/4

NCAA Collegiate Judging Updates for 2012-2013

Kathy Feldmann

The Mental Edge: Developing a Strong Mindset for Gymnastics

Dr. Robert Andrews

Income Tax Reporting for Judging Income and Meet Director Requirements

Marian Dykes

Developing Yurchenko Vault

Neil Resnick

Low Back Injury Prevention in the Gym

Brandi Smith Young

SS

J4

Level 1– 4 Hands on Spotting

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

HOS

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Intermediate Tumbling & Progressions for Twisting

Brad Harris

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Secrets and Subtleties to Getting Others to Do What you Want

Jeff Metzger

B

B 1/2

Class Management Specific to Preschoolers

Jeff Lulla

Pre

B 3/4

USA Gymnastics Santioned Event Insurance

Patrick O'Connor

RM

C1

Trampoline Coaching Part 1: Basics through Single Somersaults with a Twist

Joy Umenhofer

TT

C2

Smart Spotting

Steve Greeley

SA

C 3/4

Pommel Horse: Breaking Down the Technical Sequence for a 10.0 Performance

Dave Juszczyk

M

J1

Relentless Pursuit of Safety

Trish McGonnell

RM

J2

Front Tumbling Basics to Front Tumbling Greatness

Al Fong

WA

J3

She Won't Go Backwards! Coaching Through Fear

Dr. Alison Arnold presented by Janae Whitaker Ali

SS

J4

Basic Pommel Horse for Boys

Jeff Robinson

M

F

Retaining Recreational Kids with Play

Mike Spiller

All

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Bar Releases from High Bar to Low Bar

Dan Witenstein

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Floor: Level 7/8 Practice Judging

Char Christensen & Linda Mulvihill

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

Go For the Green and Decrease Operation Cost

Lynn Ledford

B

B 1/2

Are Your Using your Trampoline and Tumble Track to their Fullest Potential?

Annette Thomas

SA

B 3/4

Working Together to Protect Kids

Scott Himsel

RM

C1

How to Add a Trampoline and Tumbling Program to your Recreational Program

Susan Jacobson

TT

C2

Building Teams Through Leadership

Kevin Mazeika & Dennis McIntyre

M

F

Floor Exercise: Mastery of Forward and Backward Tumbling Technique for Elite Success

Yoichi Tomita

M

J1

Seasonal Planning for Beam

Beth Rybacki

WJO

J2

Elite Development Tumbling: TOPS to Pre Elite

Ivan Ivanov

WA

J3

Sports Nutrition for Compulsories: Buidling a Foundation for Competitive Gymnastics

Bindee Eberlee

SS

J4

Latest and Greatest Equipment

Brant Lutska & Linda Thorberg

Pre

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

When Will My Susie Start Kipping?

Quin Shannon

HOS/SA

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Compulsory Vault Level 4-6

Brad Harris

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Floor: Level 9/10 Practice Judging

Char Christensen & Linda Mulvihill

WA

Exhibit Hall 3B

28

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

COL

F

M

J1

B/WT

J2

WA

J3

GFA=Gymnastics for All Pre=Preschool RM=Risk Management TT=Trampoline/Tumbling SA=School Age M=Men Acro=Acrobatics WA=Women’s Advance SS=Sports Science WT=Women’S Technical WJO=Women’s Junior Olympic COL=Collegiate HOS=Hands on Spotting B=Business SN=Special Needs

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

29

NATIONAL CONGRESS SESSION SCHEDULE

SESSION

SATURDAY, JUNE 30, 2012

4:45 – 5:45 PM

3:30 – 4:30 PM

10:45 – 11:45 PM

9:15 – 10:15 AM

8:00 – 9:00 AM

Image Management: Creating and Exceeding Your Clients Expectations

PRESENTER Jeff Lulla

TRACK ROOM B

B 1/2

Preschool and Beginner Gymnastics Stations

Cindy Furman

Pre

B 3/4

Protecting You, Your Gym, and Your Kids: Updating of the USA Gymnastics Safety/Risk Managment Book

Scott Himsel

RM

C1

100 Things to do Before Going Upside Down

George Hery

TT

C2

Expect the Unexpected. Behavior Management

Randy Parrish

SA

C 3/4

Pommel Horse: Progressions for Multiple Turning Skills

Dave Juszczyk

M

J1

How to Be a Better Meet Director

Diane Callison

All

J2

Floor Basics

Kathryn Geddert

WA

J3

Sports Nutrition for Optional Gymnast:Advanced Strategies to Optimize Training, Recovery and Competition

Bindee Eberlee

SS

J4

Strength Development for Juniors

Gene Watson

M

F

Best of the Best Birthday Parties and Activites

Mike Spiller

SA

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Teach Front and Back Giants from the Ground Up

Dan Witenstein

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Beam Dance

Neela Nelson

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

Women of Mass Discussion

Patti Komara

B

B 1/2

Fun Movements to Music for Preschool and Recreational Classes

Brant Lutska & Linda Thorberg

Pre

B 3/4

Effectively Utilize USA Gymnastics Adverstising Campaign in Your Gym

Loree Galimore & Scott Willy

B

C1

How to Start a Trampoline and Tumbling Team

Susan Jacobson

TT

C2

Fun Creative Tumbling Basics

Randy Parrish

SA

C 3/4

Gymnastics Injuries: Overcoming the Mental Blocks and Returning to Peak Performance

Robert Andrews

M

J1

Strength/Conditioning Dance for Gymnastics

Linda Fenton

WJO

J2

Overview of the Elite Competitive Track: How to Structure

Steve Rybacki

WA

J3

What do Stretching, Warm Up, and Injury Prevention Have in Common?

Dr. Bill Sands

SS

J4

Creating and Motivating a Boys Team

Jeff Robinson

M

F

Level 5/6 Hands-on-Spotting

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

HOS/WJO

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Transition Releases-Overwhelmed?

John Geddert

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Bars: 7/8 Practice Judging

Cheryl Hamilton & Connie Maloney

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

Best Business Practices Against Accusations and Innuedos

Tom Forster

B

B 1/2

How Safe are Your Youngest Athletes? Things Every Preschool Teacher Should Know

Cindy Morano & Annette Thomas

Pre

B 3/4

How to Start and Sustain a Speical Needs Program

Kim Pladson

SN

C1

Introducing Cheerleading to Grow Your Business

Kevin Brubaker

Cheer

C2

Professionalism: Beyond the Staff Shirt

Sandi McGee

B

C 3/4

Basics Still Rings for Boys

Jeff Robinson

M

J1

Balance Beam Basics

Kathryn Geddert

WJO

J2

Raising the Intensity from Conditioning to Training

Mary Lee Tracy

WA

J3

The Competitive Mindset, How to Hit When it's Time

Dr. Alison Arnold presented by Janae Whitaker Ali

SS

J4

Horizontal Bar: The Jam and Takamoto

Hideo Mizoguchi

M

F

Hands-On Spotting for Back Handsprings

USA Gymnastics National Instructors

HOS/WJO

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Yurchenkos–When and How to Start

John Geddert

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Bars: 9/10 Practice Judging

Cheryl Hamilton & Connie Maloney

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

Wellness for the Club Owner and Coaching Staff

Julia Thompson

B

B 1/2

Preschool Tumbing Curriculum Progressions

Jeff Lulla

Pre

B 3/4

Growing a Speical Needs Program

Nate Hendrickson

SN

C1

Birthday Parties that Boost Enrollment

Mimi Phene McKellar

Recreational Bars

B

C2

Robin Pearson

SA

C 3/4

Keep Calm and Travel On

Mike Hill

ALL

J1

Trampoline for the Competitive Gymnast

Judy Cline

TT

J2

Basic Development for Elite Training on Beam

Tammy Biggs

WA

J3

When the Foot Hits the Mat Everything Changes

Dr. Larry Nassar

SS

J4

Twisting Development for Men's Floor

Joy Umenhofer

M

F

Let's Get Up Up Up with a Warm Up Up Up

Randy Parrish

All

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Preparing for the 2013 Compulsory Floor Elements

Linda Johnson

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

Bloopers: Mistake Management in Judging

Catherine Batsche

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

Lesson Plans that Train Teachers as They Train Students

Steve Greeley

B

B 1/2

Oh Baby, Let's Have Fun

Brant Lutska

Pre

B 3/4

Have a Plan Before the Crisis

Michael Swain

RM

C1

What it Takes to Grow An Athlete

Judy Cline

All

C2

Lesson Planning

Quin Shannon

SA

C 3/4

Men’s JO Update

Dusty Ritter

M

J1

Team Gym at My Gym

Barbara Jo Taylor

GFA

J2

So She Has A Double Back Flyaway…What's Next?

Tom Forster

WA

J3

Perfect 10 Posture-P10P

Paula Lord

SS

J4

Understanding USA Gymnastics University

Lynn Moskovitz-Thompson

ALL

F

Basic Spotting on Parallel Bars

Jeff Robinson

HOS/M

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Let's Get Spotting Acrobatics

Nancy Davis & Selena Chain Peco

HOS/Acro

*Exhibit Hall 1/2

Technique-Why Does My Gymnast Keep Wobling on Turns?

Linda Johnson

WJO

Exhibit Hall 3A

NAWGJ General Meeting

Evelyn Chandler

WT

Exhibit Hall 3B

30

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

GFA=Gymnastics for All Pre=Preschool RM=Risk Management TT=Trampoline/Tumbling SA=School Age M=Men Acro=Acrobatics WA=Women’s Advance SS=Sports Science WT=Women’S Technical WJO=Women’s Junior Olympic COL=Collegiate HOS=Hands on Spotting B=Business SN=Special Needs

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

31

NATIONAL CONGRESS SESSION SCHEDULE

PRESENTER

8:00 – 9:00 AM

Simplify your Hiring and Training with a Simple Step by Step System Preschool Vault State Licensing….Will It Affect Your Business Mini Tramp for Team Gym Awards, Rewards, and High 5's Basic Parallel Bars Curriculum for Boys Solving the Mystery of Motivation The Tkachev: The Most Important Move on Bars Incorporation of Kinesthetic Awareness and Proprioception in Core Strength Basic Sports Medicine Concepts for Coaches Compulsory Floor...One More Year Warm Ups, Conditioning and Complexes for Optional Athletes Beam: 7/8 Practice Judging

Diane Barron Brant Lutska Diane Callison George Hery Steve Greeley Jeff Robinson David Benzel Tom Forster Dr. Larry Nassar Don Rackey Tom Koll Beth Rybacki Carole Bunge & Myra Elfenbein

B Pre B GFA SA M SS WA SS M WJO WJO WT

B 1/2 B 3/4 C1 C2 C 3/4 J1 J2 J3 J4 F *Exhibit Hall 1/2 Exhibit Hall 3A Exhibit Hall 3B

9:30 – 10:30 AM

Winning Business Systems and Strategies Understanding the Preschool Child Buliding a Successful Cheer Program Understanding the Mystery of Twisting Giving the Beam Life: Beyond the Straight and Narrow Peach Basket Development with Emphasis on the Drop Moving your Gymnast Through the Levels Twisting Yurchenko Vaults Coaching Gymnastics/Coaching Life Identifying, Developing and Training Judges The Playful Team Prepare Now For 2013 Beam Beam: 9/10 Practice Judging

Frank Sahlien Beth Gardner Kevin Brubaker George Hery Sandi McGee Vitaly Marinitch Mark Folger Neil Resnick Dr. Alison Arnold presented by Janae Whitaker Ali Mark Sherman Mike Spiller Cheryl Jarrett Carole Bunge & Myra Elfenbein

B Pre Cheer TT SA M WJO WA SS M All WJO WT

B 1/2 B 3/4 C1 C2 C 3/4 J1 J2 J3 J4 F *Exhibit Hall 1/2 Exhibit Hall 3A Exhibit Hall 3B

10:45 – 11:45 PM

Sometimes I Wish….Tips on Dealing with Difficult Parents Parent and Child Class..Set It Up Supervision and Sharing the Safety Message Movtivating Athletes in Daily Training Skills and Drills on Inclines, Traps, and Octagons Acro & Dance Connections: Why Didn’t the Judges Give it and How to Fix It Tumbling Basics on Beam for All Levels Pelvic Instability and Its Implications for Training Rings Turnover Swing for Giants, Honma and Yamawaki Feel the Music…You Can Teach Dance Pathway to a Successful Boy’s Program Conditioning and Flexibility: How Much Time to Spend at Develomental Levels Optional Vault-Do You See What I See?

Anne Josephson Linda Thorberg Michael Taylor Joy Umenhofer Patti Komara & Rhonda Zaluckyj Laurie Reid Tammy Biggs Dr. Bill Sands Hideo Mizoguchi Antonia Markova Dusty Ritter Bryon Hough Connie Maloney & Neil Resnick

B Pre RM TT SA WJO WA SS M WJO M WJO WT

B 1/2 B 3/4 C1 C2 C 3/4 J2 J3 J4 F *Exhibit Hall 1/2 *Exhibit Hall 1/2 Exhibit Hall 3A Exhibit Hall 3B

Running Multiple Facilities Special People in Our Gym: Opening Our Doors to Speical Needs Additional Programs to Build Revenue…It's Show Time Core Stability The 13 Unbreakable Laws of Teaching Giant Swing Variations on Parallel Bars Three Silver Bullet Coaching Strategies that Work Bonus Combinations and Connections for Elite Uneven Bars Back from the Brink: Journey to Overtraining the Back Kovacs and Kohlman Technique Beginner Level Optional Spotting The Switch Leg Leap: Its Application to "C" Level Leaps Handspring Vaults

Jim Jarrett Beth Gardner Beau Biron Nancy Cummings Steve Greely Brett McClure David Benzel Marvin Sharp Dr. Bill Sands Geoff Corrigan USA Gymnastics National Instructors Tom Koll & Neela Nelson Marian Dykes & Linda Thorberg

B SN GFA SS SA M SS WA SS M HOS/WJO WJO WT

B 1/2 B 3/4 C1 C2 C 3/4 J1 J2 J3 J4 F *Exhibit Hall 1/2 Exhibit Hall 3A Exhibit Hall 3B

Procedures that Nuture Relationships. The Key to Great Customer Service Mobile Programs Made Easy Summer Camps: A New Competitive Format Gym Shows and Gym Fest Speical Needs: Teaching for All Children Pommel Horse: Learing the Swing to Handstand and Scissors to Handstand Entering the Wonderful World of Womens Gymnastics Judging Jr. Elite Tumbling Rehab Monkeys: The Physical and Mental Aspects of Injury Recovery Trampoline Part 2:Coaching Multiple Somersaults and Multiple Somersaults with a Twist Help! I Need to Teach Salto Vaults and Don’t Have A Pit Tricky Tricks on Bars

Jeff Lulla Glen Hayden & Brian Zook Beau Biron Cindy Bickman & Steve Whitlock Robin Pearson Dave Juszczyk Kathy Feldmann Ivan Ivanov Brandi Smith Young featuring Dr. Alison Arnold Joy Umenhofer Mark Folger Catherine Batsche

B Pre B GFA SN M WT WA SS TT WJO WT

B 1/2 B 3/4 C1 C2 C 3/4 J1 J2 J3 J4 F Exhibit Hall 3A Exhibit Hall 3B

2:30 – 3:30 PM

SESSION

1:15 – 2:15 PM

SUNDAY, JULY 1, 2012

32

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

TRACK ROOM

GFA=Gymnastics for All Pre=Preschool RM=Risk Management TT=Trampoline/Tumbling SA=School Age M=Men Acro=Acrobatics WA=Women’s Advance SS=Sports Science WT=Women’S Technical WJO=Women’s Junior Olympic COL=Collegiate HOS=Hands on Spotting B=Business SN=Special Needs

33

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

33

WHAT’S NEW NEW NEW

Did you catch us in fitness magazine’s May 2012 issue?

34

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

How about in

Teen Vogue’s June magazine?

JUNE 2012 • TECHNIQUE

35

First Lady joins Team USA to announce

nationwide commitments to get more than 1.7 million kids active this year First Lady Michelle Obama joined U.S. Olympians, Paralympians and London hopefuls to announce a nationwide commitment to get more than 1.7 million American children active as part of her Let’s Move! initiative to solve the problem of childhood obesity in a generation. Through commitments to the Partnership for a Healthier America by the U.S. Olympic Committee, U.S. Paralympics, the U.S. Olympians Association and National Governing Bodies – including USA Cycling/USA BMX, U.S. Soccer, USA Swimming, USA Track & Field, U.S. Tennis Association, USA Field Hockey and USA Volleyball – beginner athletic programming will be offered to more than 1.7 million kids in 2012. PHA has also created a website, AHealthierAmerica.org/Olympics, to help families find affiliated sports programs in their area. Mrs. Obama, who will lead the Presidential Delegation to the Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games in London this summer, is working to turn the inspiration of the Olympic and Paralympic Games into action by getting more kids healthy and Continued on page 38

36

TECHNIQUE • JUNE 2012

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...continued active. In March, Mrs. Obama welcomed Samantha Cameron to the United States by hosting a mini-Olympics event for local school children and two weeks ago, she spoke at the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Warrior Games. “This year, 1.7 million young people will be participating in Olympic and Paralympic sports in their communities - many of them for the very first time. And that is so important, because sometimes all it takes is that first lesson, or clinic, or class to get a child excited about a new sport,” said First Lady Michelle Obama. “So this summer, together with our children, we can support Team USA not just by cheering them on, but by striving to live up to the example they set. In the end, some of these athletes will bring home the gold, but all of them will make our country proud, and all of them will inspire a generation of young people to get active, to strive for excellence, and to pursue whatever dreams they may hold in their hearts.” “We’re incredibly honored to have Mrs. Obama join us in Dallas to celebrate the accomplishments of America’s finest athletes and announce new ways we can all work together to increase access to sport for young children,” said USOC CEO Scott Blackmun. “The Let’s Move! initiative is an important one and something the entire Olympic family in the United States is eager to support.” “This summer, Team USA will inspire us all with their skill, their grace and their abilities. Because of today’s commitments, the inspiration will not end after the closing ceremonies,” said Larry Soler, PHA President and CEO. “The First Lady’s leadership has brought together a group of organizations that are committed to

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helping more than a million young people engage in sports in ways that were previously unavailable to them. It’s important for us to remember that being active and moving more doesn’t mean you have to train like our nation’s elite athletes – but being active is part of a healthy lifestyle. And the more opportunities our kids have to move, the healthier lives they will lead.” Mrs. Obama has been leading a nationwide effort to combat childhood obesity so that children born today will reach adulthood at a healthy weight. The Let’s Move! initiative is a comprehensive, collaborative, and community-oriented initiative that has sought to engage every sector of society to tackle headon the many different factors that lead to childhood obesity. Today’s announcement is a significant step towards providing children across the country with many different opportunities to become physically fit and stay active. The Partnership for a Healthier America secured commitments from several NGBs of the U.S. Olympic Committee. PHA and the USOC will work with each of these groups to evaluate and monitor their progress with these efforts. USA Gymnastics will challenge its local member clubs to host introductory clinics and events for National Gymnastics Day on September 22, 2012. These events will reach approximately 40,000 kids – an increase of 80 percent over USA Gymnastics’ youth engagement last year. To read the full release with all of the national governing bodies’ commitments, go to www.usagym.org.

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WHAT’S NEW NEW NEW

USA Gymnastics continued its partnership with Special Olympics to support the second annual USA Gymnastics Special Olympics Championships, May 5–6, at the Cobb County Gymnastics Center in Marietta, Ga. The event was hosted locally by Chattooga Gymnastics and included an educational component geared at training new instructors. The event featured athletes from nine states, Canada and Costa Rica, and champions were crowned for artistic gymnastics (men, women, and unified), rhythmic gymnastics (individual, group, and unified) and team gym. The competition concluded with an energetic gala performance consisting of group routines and exhibition performances. For results and photos, please go to www.usagym.org/specialolympics.

More What’s New on page 42...

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WHAT’S NEW NEW NEW...CONTINUED We want to thank the following club owners for sharing their valuable time and dialogue with our staff -- Jim Jarrett, David Holcomb, Chris Young, Amanda Borden, Lynn Ledford and Diane Barron.

OROZCO FEATURED IN GYM CLASS HEROES MUSIC VIDEO

On May 23, E! News exclusively broadcast the worldwide premiere of the new Gym Class Heroes music video, “The Fighter (featuring Ryan Tedder),” featuring U.S. National Team member John Orozco of the Bronx, N.Y./ Team Hilton HHonors (U.S. Olympic Training Center). The inspirational video – featuring dynamic band members Travie McCoy, Matt McGinley, Disashi Lumumba-Kasongo, Eric Roberts and special musical guest, Ryan Tedder from One Republic, – highlights Orozco as he trains and prepares to fight for the gold.

L to R: USA Gy mnastics staff members Loree and club owne Galimore, Ste rs Jim Jarrett, phanie Marro David Holcomb n, Cheryl Jar , Chris Young, Barron and US rett, Erica Ko Amanda Bord A Gymnastic ven, en, Lynn Ledfor s staff member d, Diane Lynn Moskovit z.

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An uplifting anthem about perseverance and strength, “The Fighter” is the 3rd single off of Gym Class Heroes’ fourth album. The group approached Orozco about appearing in the video after reading about his childhood in the Bronx in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

O

e ,” / o hi m e

d o n

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Original photo by Chase the Light Photography.

CLASSIFIEDS

for sale • position available • seeking employment • education • consignment

POSITION AVAILABLE INSTRUCTOR/COACHES. Paragon Gymnastics of Norwood NJ (Bergen County), is looking for instructors and coaches, P/T – F/T. Requirements: Positive attitudes, responsible, reliable, and love of children. Position available for competitive team coach level 4 and up with flexible hours. Also preschool through intermediate instruction/ cheerleading. Company sponsored certifications (safety, CPR, First Aid). Benefits available, paid vacations & sick days. Salary commensurate with experience. NEW facility, state-of-the-art approx. 11,000sq ft. Located in the NY/ NJ Metropolitan area, easily accessible from all major highways. Contact Dot: email: paragongymnastics@ verizon.net, 201-767-6921 or fax to 201-767-6693 or at 49 Walnut Street, Suite 4, Norwood, NJ 07648. www.paragongym.com. Rettig’s Gymnastics Training Center Inc. established 1992 is located in beautiful northwest New Jersey. We are seeking a FULL-TIME HEAD COACH for our USAG Womens program. Applicants must be fun, energetic and team players. You must have strong spotting skills and the ability to coach at all levels of the Woman’s J.O. Program. Rettig’s Gymnastics is a well established program with a strong foundation of recreational gymnasts to compliment our U.S.A.G. Teams. Benefits include paid vacations, holidays, health insurance, USAG membership and certifications. Performance based bonuses. Contact: Dave/Diane Rettig. Web: www.rettigsgymnastics.com. Email: djrettig@cs.com. Phone: (973)267-5611 Fax: (973)267-7796.

GIRLS TEAM COACHES NEEDED Legacy Gymnastics in Pearland, TX is seeking a women’s team coach specializing in vault, bars, and tumbling to work with compulsory and optional level gymnasts. Position requires 25-30 hours per week, Mon-Fri evenings and Sat mornings. We are also seeking an additional women’s team coach to work with our compulsory gymnasts on all events. Position requires 20-25 hours per week. Applicants should be encouraging, enthusiastic, and motivated to expand the competitive program. Submit resumes to Miranda_Peel@ hotmail.com. Qualified applicants will be contacted for further interviews. Pay will be hourly based upon experience. ULTIMATE Gymnastics of Gurnee, IL is looking for qualified gymnastics coaches.  We are hiring for our growing team programs, boys and girls recreational classes, preschool program and baby gym.  Salary and benefits based on experience. For more information about out programs and facility, please see our website at http://www. ultimategymnasticsinfo.com All interested coaches please call Nancy Northrip at 1-847-856-8573 or email at nancy@ ultigym.com CHOW’S GYMNASTICS is seeing for an experienced PT/ FT Girls Rec. and team coach (level 4 - 9) and a PT Dance teacher, pay is based on experience. Send resume please. Chow’s Gymnastics and Dance. Web: Chowsgym.com. E-mail: chowsgymnastics@yahoo.com Phone: 515-223-5460. Contact: Li.

FOR SALE Twisters Gymnastics is located on the eastern shore of Berlin, Maryland.  We are seeking FULL-TIME GYM PROGRAM DIRECTOR/SEASONED COACH. Applicants must be fun, an energetic team  player. You must possess strong spotting skills and the ability to coach at level 1–10 for girls and boys. Must have a sparkling track record coaching award-winning gymnasts at all levels. Duties to include but not limited to are:  instruction of recreational classes, teams at all levels 1--10, preparation of  schedules, lesson plans, Strong customer service skills, experience program directing and managing staff. Email: carmgymqueen@aol.com Phone: (410)629-1630, 410-629-0878 fax: (410)629-0879 GYM DIRECTOR/COACH – Jackson Hole, WY. Great career opportunity to help build a new gymnastics program in Jackson, Wyoming! Axis Gymnastics & Sports Academy is looking for an enthusiastic, dependable team-player to join its management team.  Responsibilities include coaching and program development. Our ideal candidate is a self-starter, with management and optional-level coaching experience and outstanding interpersonal and creative problem solving skills. Must love kids and working with others in a dynamic, positive learning environment. Full-time position with health benefits. Some travel, evening and weekend hours required. Send resume and application (available at www. axisgymnastics.com) to jobs@axisgymnastics.com.

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GK RISK-FREE PROGRAM: Get with the program! It’s better than ever, with a terrific assortment of NEW styles and fabrics and incomparable sales potential. Plus, it’s easier than ever to order, sell and return your RISK-FREE garments. We offer customized packages for your pro shop, meets and summer camp. You only pay for what you’ve sold and may return the rest, there is absolutely NO RISK! If you haven’t tried us lately, it’s time you started earning extra profits with our RISK-FREE merchandise. Call 1-800-3454087 for more information on how you can get started today! Email: customerservice@gkelite.com. SCORE MASTER – Scorekeeping software interfaced to many different score boards: EliteScore, BetaBrites, TV’s & Projectors. Download team rosters from the USAG website. Features include: random draws, create rotations, assign #’s, the most comprehensive reporting and results can go directly to your website. Supports: womens/mens, individual/team, artistic/ rhythmic/trampoline, compulsory/optional. Download a FREE demo at www.Score-Master.com.

NEW TOOL for adjusting the UNEVEN BARS. No more reaching, jumping, or climbing. See it at www.GymBarAdjust.com. GYM BAR ADJUST

EDUCATION AVAILABLE NOW! THE NEW GYMCERT Gymnastics training manuals (Levels 1, 2, 3, & the NEW Skills & Drills for the Compulsory Coach Level’s 4, 5 & 6) a must for training your staff; cut your lesson planning time significantly; use to coordinate class progressions and skill training methods; and, best of all have a quick reference that is easy to use which includes Lesson Planning Forms and Class Evaluation Forms by level. The GYMCERT manuals provide concise instruction, clear illustrations, and several coaching, spotting, and safety tips. Will your staff be ready for your fall students? Order direct by calling 407-444-5669 EST or online at www.GymCert.com.

FOR INFORMATION on how to publish a classified ad in Technique, go to www.usagym.org/publications Or call Luan Peszek at 317-829-5646.

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USA Gymnastics 132 E. Washington St., Suite 700 Indianapolis, IN 46204

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 7867

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED


Technique - June 2012 - Vol. 32, #6