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the

Getting

WHOLE Picture The University of Rhode Island is not a single entity by any means. It is made up of many small parts that come together to form the whole

picture. Even the word

"university" means all-encompassing, composed of many pieces. There is no

frequently forget

that

they

exist

The community around us is an im portant part of our University, as well. Where would we be without Wakefield? Still surrounded by cow fields, that's where. Even

though we are "out in the compared to many schools, enough to town to escape

way to list every one of these pieces, for they are far too many in number, but we

boonies"

do realize that each and every contribu

from campus when necessary, and to conveniently go shopping, see a movie, get "real food" instead of our own cook ing, or worse, dining hall food, and sometimes find adequate off-campus housing. The community depends on

tion is a necessary part of the University. Some contributors are veiy well-known,

such

as

the President and the Adminis

trators, but these

wide-reaching

are only the front of a complex organiza people work behind the

and

tion. Most ofthe

scenes, and receive little

or no

recogni

often, when they are toying to do their job, all they get is hanassment from impatient or angry students. It is im tion;

portant

to realize that while it often

impossible, or nearly so, to accomplish anything without cutting through miles of extremely sticky red tape, there really is a reason for doing things the way they should be done. seems

(Granted, this reason is often obscure and hard to find, and incomprehensible once you do find it, but it really does

we are

close

us, too. The students of URI

shop

in

town, partronize the bars and liquor stores, rent housing, providing income for many people, especially during the winter, off-season for tourists, but inseason for the ten thousand students at URI. Of course, the main driving forces be hind the University are the people. Professors to teach classes, maintenance to keep up the buildings, physical plant people to keep the campus crews

beautiful and neat, secretaries to organize things, administrators to make decisions, people to work the computer

get your schedule fixed, multiply that by

To begin somewhere, we must remember that URI has several tJifferent campuses. In addition to the main Kingston campus, where the dorms,

system, people

a

student center, administoation buildings, and most of the classes are located, there is the Narraganssett Bay campus, for Oceanography studies, the Wickford campus, where a dwindling Fisheries

campus police to enforce traffic laws The list goes on and on. Oh, and of course there are the students

exist

.

.

.)

program is

based, and

an

extension in

Providence. There is also Peckham

Farm, tight across the road firom Keaney gym, and East Farm. Unless we have Mends who go to any of these places, we

people

to create

to

answer

new

questions,

ideas, people

to

support the student organizations, the dining hall staffs, program coordinators, .

.

.

themselves, who are the reason for all these other people being here. So for those of you who have gradu ated, and those of you who are still trying to, remember that you, and everyone around you, is just a small part of the big picture. While it may be a hassle trying to

couple thousand and remember that the person trying to help you has to go through all that, while you just have to deal with your own. This is not to say that everything is the way it is: far from it. Sometimes reform and revolution are necessary. Just remember that for the

perfect

most

part people are trying to work together and make things tun smoothly. Without each vital contributor, a huge gap would be left, and then things could get really difficult Got the picture? Gail H. Wagner

The

Kingston Campus:

the center of activity

The

Kingston Campus

center

is the main

of activity at URI. All the are located here,

student dormitories

and most of the classes

the

are

the

highest

taught in Quad. here, and

the

buildings surrounding

The President has his home

administrators work out of

the AdministiBtion

Building and

the

Memorial Union. Here is where students

can find counseling, activities, entertainment, companionship, and natiurally an education. The ivy

covered

Quadrangle URI, dating

buildings that line the the original core of

are

from the times when it

was just a school of agriculture. Over the past century, URI has grown into a large bustling university, recognized for

its

outstanding engineering

business programs,

as

well

and

as

its

schools of nursing and oceanography. Today's students can barely

recognize old pictures of URI. Many new buildings have changed the skyline, the water tower is gone, and the fields surrounding the old school have been ploughed under and built on. But as URI grows the students grow with it, and pursue new roads of education, venturing forth to brave the

world after

taking

<S5

a

graduating,

but

always

part of URI with them.

The URI Bookstore a convenient place to shop; this year a new set-up eliminated much of the frustration dur ing the beginning of the semester book-buying rush.

THE BAY CAMPUS AND WICKFORD: SPECIALIZED PLACES OF STUDY

These two smaller campuses the location of the Schools

are

of

Oceanography and Fisheries, respectively. The Narraganssett Bay campus, located right on the Bay about fifteen minutes from Wngston, is the base of research and

exploration of ecology.

marine affairs and

Students get on-hand experience as they learn, and the department works closely with the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency. The campus in Wickford is the home of the School of Fisheries and Marine Technology, where a few dedicated students leam the ins and outs of net-making, fishing and sailing techniques, effects of and marine variables on life, and maintenance and repairs of their working fishing vessel.

current

marine

Student Students

University,

...

the focus of URI.

the mainstay of the the reason for its creation are

and existence. Students give URI its identity and individuality; it is their diversity that creates the atmosphere of URI which allows students to themselves, leam about

express

themselves, and enjoy themselves, as well as develop the program of study which best suits their own individual needs. Students come from all over to attend URI, not just the United States but also such counbies as India, with them their own unique culture and customs,

China, and Japan, bringing

so

our own. All religions represented at URI, and everyone encouraged to leam about them, in

different from

are

is

an

effort to broaden outlooks and eliminate discrimination.

Many people feel that apathy is a problem at URI, that the students don't care enough to get involved in anything. For many students this is true; others devote their efforts to non-school causes. But the small core of active students are very active; the Student Senate is active, groups such as URISSC (URI Students for Social Change) and RIPIRG (Rhode Island Public Interest Research Group) protest and demonsti:ate, and the abundance of clubs and organizations a wide variety of interests and activities. For the interested is always something to there student, get involved in. For eveiy student, URI is a place of opportunity, offering a chance for the student to explore the world and gain useful atKl practical expeiience and

represent

knowledge. The

resources are

up to the student to make

A

(ypic^^l sight

a

there;

use

it is

of thera

heavily laden student trudges to class

URI's Student the purpose behind the

Body: University

IF1??'^VW

Our President Hopefully a university education gives us exposure to people who count. Sometimes we're lucky enough to encounter them personally. Most of us, however, meet them and get to know them through literature, history, the news, drama, "success stories," or word of mouth. These are the people who believe so deeply that their actions are shaped by their beliefs. In the course of acting and believing, they help to make the world a better place for the rest of us. Sometimes the people who count are world leaders but just as often tiiey are the common people who, when put to the test, find the courage to say, "Wait just a minute. You can't do this to me. You can't treat anybody this way." It's as if a button were pushed and shoulders were shraightened everywhere. "That's right," people respond, "you can't get away with this." Sir Walter Scott wrote that "one hour of life, crowded to the full with glorious action, and risks, is worth whole years of those mean observance of palby decorum." The ti'agedy of many educated people is that they never rise to the occasion. They spend their filled with noble

whole years in a "mean observance of paltry decorum." Lately we've seen more and more examples of people who count, who are willing to say, "It doesn't have to be this way." Some of them speak up in South Africa and some in Rhode ear listens for their whisper or their shout. Gradually in higher education and particularly at URI, we're learning that is is important to a stand and that education is the process of building a foundation of belief. William Faulkner said that he "found that the greatest help in meeting any problem with decency and self-respect and whatever courage is demanded, is to know where you yourself stand." We're discovering that this is what URI is all about. Edward D. Eddy

Island. The ti-ained take

President

July 9,

1986

A Few of the

People Who Keep

URI

Going

The Future of URI

.

.

.

South

County,

Rhode Island:

the communities around

The town and

people

around

us are an

us

in

tegral part of our life at URI. They support the school, and provide needed shops, markets, restaurants, and recreation. In return, students a lot to the community, not just economi

give

cally but socially. This year, however, a problem arose between students of URI and the residents of Narraganssett. Several residents felt that allowing students to live in Narraganssett was damaging the image of the community; complaints were made of students being loud, throwing beer botties on the sb'eets, driving on lawns, and in general lowering property values. The end result of this was an

ordinance restricting the number of un

people living in one house to three, thereby eliminating the allegedly common practice of cramming up to eight students in related

v>

house to cut down on costs. The Town Council insisted that the ordinance was not directed solely at students. one

gutojj

What

Happened This Year: From

Below left: Super Bowl XX Chicago Bears Jim McMahon and kicker Kevin

record in

Butler

pitch

the sidelines

during

the game.

The Bears beat the New Pahiots 46-10.

England

on

4192 hit

Ecstasy

September single to left Diego

was

from San

hander Eric Show with

field

on a

Padres

one

2-1

right

out in the

right: An entire city block was desh-oyed in Philadelphia. Police hied to

various times

evict members of the radical groups

Vietnam Memorial in

MOVE from their fortified row house by dropping a small bomb on the building.

commemorate the tenth

A fire

Vietnam. The Vietnam Memorial is in

started

about 60 houses

by

were

the device and

desti-oyed.

Bottom: Ceremonies

the fall of the

were

held at

during the year at the Washington to anniversary of

Saigon government

scribed with the

names

of

more

in

than

58,000 dead or missing soldiers from the

Right: Cincinatti Reds player-manager Pete Rose broke Tv Cobb's

Catastrophe

The historic No.

bottom of the first inning.

Below

was

to

career

Vietnam

war.

hit

E^ m^

1

^FT>^T^3^^H r

il

^

ibS^^M m ^y

mk

9

'^

r

''VkI^I

i^i^S

^

---^a

Above: The shuttie

explosion of the space Challenger in January was the

first in-flight disaster in 56 manned U.S. space flights. The explosion killed all

members, including Christa McAuliffe, a teacher from New

seven crew

Hampshire. Far left: President Reagan gives the AOkay sign from his hospital window in July after undergoing surgery to remove a

cancerous

testine. The

back

on

the

tumor from his lower in

74-year old President was job within weeks after the

operation. Left: The space program moved ahead. walker James van Hoften

Space

stands tall

on

the end of the robot

the

arm

of

Space Shuttle Discovery after successfully launching the repaired Syncom satellite in September.

All

photos courtesy

of AP Plioto

The World Around Us: Full of

Right: The war in the Mid-East dish-aught Moslem man his son moments alter they survived a car bomb explosion outside continued. A

hugs a

West Beimt restaurant in late

August. They

are

shown

hurried

being

away fi-om the carnage by another bum in the rubble-stiewn

man as cars

sh-eet.

Far

A Trans-World Airlines jet with 145 passengers and eight crew

right:

members

was

hijacked

in

Athens.

Greece in June. The Sheite hijackers took the plane to Beirut, then to Algeria, and then back to Beirut. Most of the

hostages

were

One American

held for 17

hostage

was

days. killed.

Bottom right: A series of devastating earthquakes rumbled through Mexico City in September and the death toll was

in

the thousands. Of the 18

million in the

escaped which

scale,

metropolitan

area, few

the effects of the first

registered

or

8. 1

on

of the second

quake.

the Richter

quake,

which

measured 7.5.

Tension, Tragedy, and Terrorism

Above: A resident of

Armero, Columbia

in the Columbian mountains is

helped by the Columbian Red Cross during dig out efforts. were still ging Many people trapped in mud, and were being rescued with the help of hundreds of volunteers.

limiiiHiiiiuiiiiiiiiaiiiimiiiiinili

Left: Four Palestinian terrorists hijacked the Italian crusie liner Achille Lauro while on

a

Mediterranean cruise. One

was killed. After the ship was Egyptian government agreed to return the hijackers to the PLO. However, the hijackers were inter cepted by American jets as they were flown out of Egypt and returned to Italy

American

released the

All

photos courtesy of AP Photo

to strand tiial.

These

pages show

only

a

very few

of the aspects of URI. There is no room to acknowledge each and

every person,

nor

to describe every

place that supports and contributes to the smooth functioning ofthe University. 1 hope this has made you more aware that everywhere there is more to the pic ture than what you see on the surface; some judicious digging will result in an enlightened view of the world. Instead of focusing on the negative aspects of a situation or person, pick out the positive points and work to enhance them. Remember, too, that we ourselves are no more than a piece in the whole pic ture, working with those around us to

pleasant place to live and work we work together that deter smoothly everything works. Most importantly, however, we must remember that the people around us are create

a

in. It is how

mines how

important too, and that for the most part they are trying to do what they have to, are. They have different views, different priorities, different obligations to fulfill. With this in mind, we have to be

just as we

willing

to

compromise sometimes,

to

allow for these variations and to make it easier to

get along. At the

time, we must be willing and be able to stand up for our own beliefs. same

If*"

.>-

Table of Contents

31 65

Special Events Student Life Sports Activities

p.

Seniors

p. 201

p.

p. 105 p. 167

URI THEATRE This year the URI Theahre Department kept the URI community entertained with several

plays and two major productions. The Rimers of Eldrich and The Effect of Gamma

one act

Rays on the man in The Moon Marigolds. Both major productions were well received and continued the tradition of fine drama

at

URI.

Sally Tracy

I 32

Special Events

-ffi|ri

F'iiH^

Special Events

33

A REASON TO SMILE Homecoming

combines old with new, Octoberfest and tailgating, beauty and football. Under a bright October sky about

fourteen thousand

Rhody

alumni and fans

mingled, ate, drank, cheered, and watched the crowning ot a new Homecoming Queen. The Rams, led by the Ehr-Force and great defense defeated Lafayette, capping a terrific after-

4^>-l:

34

Special

Events

Special Events

35

Halloween

36

Special Events

Some holidays are more fun than others and as far as campus social life goes Halloween has got to be the best. Even the least sociable can hide behind a mask, and go to one of the dozens of parties to cut loose. This year Halloween just happened to fall on the tradi tional Thursday party night, so the results were several all-out Halloween hashes.

Sally Tracy

Airband Want to know what's hot and what's not in the world of rock? Just look at

our

airband

held in the M.U. Ballroom this fall. Participants showed a lot of choice of "insti-uments" in their imagination

competition like the

one

joined in the fun as Huey Lewis and the News,

and acts. The crowd

students acted

out

The Blues Brothers, and the old Tom Cruise dance routine from ffisky Business to Bob

Seger's Old Time Rock

'n' Roll.

Kim Fester

Special Events

39

Dance Series The SEC the fall with

up the nights during series of dance concerts that

brightened a

featured such different groups

as

Jazz band Fat

and rock band JP Dart. The concerts

City spaced through

out the fall to

provide

tive entertainment to that old stand

were

alterna

by.

TV.

Feahared in addition to Fat City and the JP Dart band were Greg Greenway, Al Dimeola and capping everything off was the Hooters.

40

Special

Events

Mm

Special Events

41

AND WE DANCED brought an up and coming Keaney in November; the Hooters

The SEC band to

and their opening band the Outfield played to a full house that danced to a variety of

numbers from the Hooters' And We Danced to the Beatles' classic

Lucy

in the

Sky with Diamonds. In what is hopefully becoming a tiadition of name acts appear ing in the fall semester, the SEC provided a rockin' good night.

1 1 1 I^^H^^^ 42

Special Events

rf*-"*^

^

JPS^^I

^^^/^

(

Frank Santos you are a Martian having sex, or the world's sexiest stripper or that there are feathers in your underwear, or even that

Imagine

you're Madonna. Frank Santos returned packed Edwards Auditorium and

li. 44

Special Events

.J

^

hypnotized

The

response from

a

Patti

his

even

to

performed these acts and Striptease drew the biggest an already rowdy crowd. When Peckerwrecker performed money was

more.

victims

thrown

on

stage.

Returns! the best moment of the night occured when Santos told two students that they were Martians and that Martians had sex with their

Maybe

feet. He had both take off their shoes, leaving the girl barefoot and the guy with socks on.

Special Events

45

SPRINGFEST '86

4

i \w

^^

1

J -^^^

46

Special

Events

MORE THAN A WEEKEND What's better than

Spring Weekend?

How

Spring Week? This year the SEC put on week of events and titled it Springfest, the

about a

first of its kind. The weeks' events included a semi-formal dance, charicature artists, old time

pictures and was capped by a concert featuring

George Thorogood. Sally Tracy

Sajly Ttacv

Special

Events

47

WILL THEY OR WON'T THEY? The headline

the question on the lips of students since September and it referred to the was

threatened walkout of URI's Professors who had worked without

a

conhract since June. No

including the Professors seemed to know a sttike. although it was agreed that it would be very brief. The issue was finally settled in February without any job

one.

if there would be

action.

4S

Special Events

A SNOWBALL RIOT Some of the best are

those that

special

are

events in

lives

our

spontaneous and

un

Then again, sometimes these spontaneous happenings get a littie out of

planned.

hand. Remember the Great URI Snow Ball

Riot? The one where the students captured the enemies' fort just like in a real snow ball fight. Of course in this case the campus police station was the captured fort, and not without a whole lot of

damage.

Broken windows and windshields, and several injuries were enough to get URI in the newspapers and even the national evening news.

Sallv Tracy

Tim Taiinl

Special Events

49

I V 5fc

i

SALLY RIDE Fr.ro

Space Shuttle Challenger expl US'sfirst women in space, Sally Ride. Miss Ride

the

et the

)ut her _

trips

the space shuttle as well as the future shuttie film she jokingly called a home movie of one of

on

She showed

a

and then answerd questions. As well as answering some typical she also answered a not so typical question about sex Smiling a bit, Sally Ride responded that it would probably 1 i

"

ons,

It, you'd need -

-L-

someone

-i-,ubted such ist

isn't

an

enough

there

to

push

at

the "c

experiment would

eve,

.u.^^

p.,..^,^

room."

Sally

T

^

WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL

A team of Rhode Island wheelchair athletes

took on a team of Greeks in a wheelchair basketball game in order to raise money for a special handicap accessible van for URI students. The Rhode Runners spotted the Greeks more

good.

forty points

in the first half and

thirty

the second, but they were just too The Rhode Runners demonsti-ated that in

there is

no

need to feel sorry for victims of can handle themselves.

handicaps, they

Sally Tracy

52

Special Events

i.

\

,^-^ K \ Wk' --^ Pi -7% M

^^

Larry Lindville What was it like

being Frank Burns on M*A*S'*H? It u

ing to Lanv Lindville. after all, where else could you get f a

came to campus in tne gorgeous blonde every week? Larry Lindville fall and addressed a packed house about everything, from his

early

childhood to his jurse

current

projects.

the main topic of discussion was M*A*S*H and his role -" "~^' c:i, "urns. Lindville s--'' '

'""

"-

..,^

tten

people

as =,

he h.

Lindville himself isn't like Frank Burns, except as the audience found ^'""^ ot,,ro tho c=,rr,o out, when it comes to the laugh: Lindville and "ckle.

Special

Events

55

A FASHION

SHOW Capping a week of events designed to make stiidents

more aware

of the different nationali

ties of students who attend the

University,

the

International Students Association sponsored a fashion show, demonsfrating tiadition and ceremonial

clothing

of their home countries.

Sally Tracy

1^1 f

^^v

P

L ^r.^^#i \

^

^b

56

Special

Events

Tim Tanni

Special Events

57

PADDY MURPHY

As highly anticipated as the return of Spring, Paddy Murphy's brief life and alcoholic death were celebrated by the men of Theta Chi. While the amazing legend of Paddy Murphy acted out, the brothers of Theta Chi collected money to help fight leukemia. An all around good time was had and the Greeks was

continued to show their

concern

for

charity. Sally Tracy

V: 60

Special

Events

Special Events

61

APARTHIED

Few events of the past decade have spurred students into active protest. Long c generation willing to sit back and v than to stand and be counted, the issue of

aparthied has motivated students

into action.

Students rallied at a protest to force URI into divesture and flocked to a debate about aparthied. There the principle debaters dealt with the

problem.

Sally Tracy

J

j*^i

^

TW ^1

k^

>-^

/

\

I

Life:

College

Get The

SENSATION College .

.

.

.

.

.

the best four (or five, or six so they say. A time to

) years of your life,

break away from home and parents and find your own identity, your own interests,

capabilities. A time to have fun, people, try new things, and ex plore possible future careers. A time of decisions, determining what directions your your own meet new

life will take. For many, college is the first taste of in dependence, of being on your own, with no one

to

tell you what to do

to make

or

when,

no one

you go to class or do your no one to make you clean your

sure

homework,

make decisions for you. This independence can be exhilarating room, no one to

URI offers varsity sports, or at least inor clubs for almost every sport. They get involved in student organizations tramurals

again, there is something for everyone. only are organizations a great way to

Not

meet

people, they provide

valuable

ex

perience that show favorably on any resume, and can give you an idea whether or not you like that particular activity. Work is a major part of many students' college life college may be fun, but it is also ex pensive. The University can help you find a

job that relates to your chosen field, provid ing experience that may give you an edge in a job interview. Of course, there are also classes, a wide selection to choose from, on

wild, partying, drinking, skipping class. So do many sophomores. And juniors. And seniors. College provides the opportunity to live practically any lifetyle you choose, and the only person you

almost any topic you care As a student, you have

have to

every individual creates lasting memories of the college years. So go ahead and jump right in get the sensation!!

many fi-eshmen go

answer to

is you.

Many students, however, find

college than socializing They get involved in sports

there is a lot more to

and drinking.

out that

to

leam about.

lot of options open to you; opportunities are available that you can find nowhere else. Every in dividual

picks what

a

is best for him. and

Fisheries: Facing

a

Shaky

Future

There

exists in Wickford

campus,

a

URI, that

a

small

littie-known part of is the home of the

Fisheries program. This is a two-year program, in which the students leam the arts of netmaking, fishing techniques. and operation of a fishing vessel. This may sound pretty easy, but it takes a lot of hard work and determination. These few dedicated students

are

on

the go

early in the morning until late in the day, attending numerous classes, work their projects, and taking their ship on ing out on fishing voyages, which sometimes last all day. The small size of this program gives the students and faculty an ideal opportunity to work together closely, get to know each other well, something which is all loo often impossible in the larger schools. Unfortunately, this from

an uncertain fuhjre, due smallness, and also due to a

program laces to its

decreased number ol interested students.

i^fastward^.

Down the Line: to the

Living Up

you want to move down-the-line, have do you? Live on your own

So

.

.

.

Challenge

Time is another factor you can't just roll out of bed four minutes before class and

wild parties without worrying about cook the RA live in your own room

still make it

not have to share a your own meals bathroom with twenty other people Sounds great, doesn't it? But beware the

you have to add on travel time, and of course time to park your car in a nonexistent parking space (Good luck!).

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

new

it all adds up if even

makes you

if you are). a lot more

you're

Living aware

not

careful

your own of where the

on

money goes. In the dorms you could take as long a shower as you wanted, and the water

still hot; in your own house, if you keep the thermostat turned down to save money, you may run out of hot water pretty fast was

no more

to

most

people

getting dressed and

Traveling,

of

course,

raises another

point. If you don't have

array of difficulties awaits you. For instance, monthly bills that have to on time. be paid Rent, phone, oil, elechl-

city, (and

(well,

time

ready to go.

horrors that befall the unsuspecting

student!! A whole

on

can't). In addition

half-hour showers!

Another example something breaks. Guess who has to take care of it? Not the maintenance crew. You either have to wait for the landlord to do it.

or

do it

yourself.

a car of your own, if you live too far away to bike, you have to order your life around everyone else's or

schedule

begging rides from friends or taking the bus. Even if you do have a car, it is very likely to go on strike the morning of your most important exam, which is also likely to be the coldest, snowiest day of the

leaving you to dash madly in search of alternate means of transportation. These are just a few of the problems you may encounter living down-the-line. I'm sure you can come up with a few of your own. But on the other side, it is yet another toward the "real world" and in step year,

an

dependence.

It is

a

great opportunity, and a living in the dorms.

welcome alternative to

How To Survive Your First

Shopping

Spree

Well,

you're living

down-the-

line. that wonderful worid off

campus. You have a house, great housemates, you're all moved in on your first shop and ready to go ping spree in the grocery store. Yes. now the adult world, plan too must enter you ning your own meals, selecting and ...

purchasing this all

on an

your

own

food; of

course.

cxh-emely tight budget,

too.

the So. with trepidation you set forth automatic door slides silently open before you, and there you are, standing in the middle of the store. .

.

.

thoughts of a carehiUy followed list are forgotten, balanced meals are thrown out the window, and as you begin to struggle with seventy-six varieties of crackers, fifty-nine of cereal, generic brands, seemingly endless aisles, astronomical prices, maniacs driving swerving shopping carts, and intimidat ing check out clerks, you begin to re evaluate. After all. you don't really need to eat that much, do you? As long as you take your vitamins you' 11 be alright, if you All

convince your stomach that it is full. really like macaroni and cheese

can

And you one

box of

ready-made only

costs

about seventy-nine cents. If you eat three a week that's only a littie more than two

dollars, times sixteen weeks is

.

.

.

Well, you really do need more than that. Popcorn is cheap and filling, and you can always eat salad. Basic lettuce is rela tively inexpensive, as long as you don't get into anything really fancy. If you're not a gourmet, peanut butter and jelly is

staple food. Taking a deep breath and your own squeaking shopping cart, you embark down the first aisle, produce. Well, that's easy, you think, grabbing a few grapes. a

classic

After all, you know what you like. Put them in bag and throw them on the scale ...

pound and

a

a

half

until you see the price Wow. Maybe you don't

much; half

no problem, $ 1 49 a pound! really want that .

will do. You

pound proceed, taking a few oranges from the carefully piled display, then pray no one notices when it comes tumbling down behind you. (The one orange holding the entire thing up always leaps right into your hand.) Leaving furious stock boys a

behind, you round the

corner

into the

chips and snacks row. A whole inviting row. and you've always had a weak spot for chips well, just this once you'll get .

some.

.

.

After all. you have to have

some

fun when you eat. Soda is on the next aisle, and of course you have to get some to go with the chips. Some dip would taste

really good

too.

And you

always

need

something sweet afterwards, to get super-salty taste. Great, the

rid of the cookies

are

just around the

corner.

Now

what kind will the hard part you get? You love chocolate chip, but vanilla wafer and fig newtons are really

comes

good

too. It's

just get

one

so hard to decide, so you box of each, to hold you

Now you are really hitting your stride, and you swing wide around the next corner, dodging littie old ladies like over.

expert. You pause by the frozen foods, bypass the veggies and grab a couple of TV dinners, just in case you don't feel like cooking one night. Ice cream is right next to that, and you just can't resist the Double Chocolate Fudge

an

Ripple, even though all they have is the half-gallon size. The cart is filling up, and you head for the checkout line. While you wait, you examine the tents of your cart.

con

Wait, something's

As the line advances you wrack your brain ti^^ing to remember what's of course! You yell "Hold Oh. wrong.

missing!

"

my

place!

and sprint off down the store,

as your cart is pushed up to the counter. As the clerk totals your purchases, you dump the peanut butter,

to return

just

jelly, and bread on the counter, and feel very proud. After all. you just survived your first shopping spree! Gail H. Wagner

1f

^ 11 L i

-'\

Vr

>

11

,

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1

rJ

M WM ^gggjl^^^

Going Greek:

The Choice of

Many

Pledging Process:

The

It's Worth the Wait .

.

tiiat

.

Pledging

period

of initiation

before you become a lifelong member of your favorite sorority or

fraternity. The procedure to the individual

varies

according

organization, with the frats and tiickier than

generally being tougher the sororities. Things Hke scavenger hunts for back issues of Playgirl and slinky under wear, midnight raids, "kidnapping" of a fellow pledge, and sunrise calisthenics are a few of the things a pledge might expect, in addition to attendance required at all meetings and other and often

being

a

numerous

general

functions

"slave" to the

older members ofthe house. Pledging takes time and committment, but it gives both house and pledge an opportunity to decide for certain if they really belong together, and it brings the pledges closer to the sisters and brothers, giving everyone a common starting point. It may take time, it may be inconvenient and uncomfortable, but find almost anyone who has gone through it all as a pledge and as a brotiner or sister and ask worth it. The

them if

they feel

it

is

to be

enthusiastic

sure

an

was

yes!

answer

.m^m^^m''^sm

OH NO MY CAR'S BEEN TOWED AGAIN

How

many times has this

happened

to you.

It's been

a

horrible

day.

Somehow you managed to get out of bed and get to school. You didn't want to of course but there's that exam that you stayed up studying for all night so you decide that you might as well take it. The shower's cold so it took you longer than usual so you're late for your first class. So late in fact, that tiiere was only ten minutes left to go when you got there. That was the good part. At twelve o'clock you found that be no you had no money so there would

eating today. This was rapidly followed by a surprise quiz that you had no clue to and then a fascinating stint of work study in the to

until four. At five you proceeded BISC auditorium to take your exam in a near panic. Your stomach sounded a lot like French you imagined the carts taking the

library

aristocracy to the guillotine sounded as they the cobble stones. "I'll be fine," you tell yourself as you decide whetiier you are going to be sick or pass out. Then you're THERE. The exam was rattied

over

about to start and you were in this huge auditorium with orange lights and

lights and you're sitting in every other seat in every other row and any security you might have gotten from a friend was totally shattered. 45 minutes fluorescent

later you

staggered

out into

a

biting

wind.

Where did 1 put my car, you wondered. That was indeed the question of the hour. The commuter lot, that's it. No, that was

full, 1 put it on Flagg's Road. No 1 didn't, that was

full too

so

I put it in the Chaffee lot.

Where did 1 put it? You stopped walking around campus and decided to hide in a

building until you remembered where you left the car for sure. From the seventh floor of Chaffee you yelled, "I've got it!" Indeed, it's in that parking lot behind

warm

Independence

and Greene. In the

fading

light you could be seen hurrying with an arm-load of books and your collar turned up against the wind. You got there and there

was

nothing

but

a

geology

van.

Did

you leave it somewhere else after all? Did you go down behind the Police station? No,

this

was

means

where it

was

only one thing.

last

You

seen

were

and that

Towed. In

and

happy shining were surfing instead of going to class, but, here in Rhode Island your car was in the possession of Bruno, the evil car tower. Was there anything else that could go wrong? You decided that there was nothing else that could possibly go wrong, California the

sun was

students

and looked to see what time it was getting to be. 6:30, the last bus had left URI for the

day. Maybe things only get you've been towed.

worse once

Dawn M.

Wright

VIDEO WIDOWS Losing

There's

new

a

breed of

at

women

the Arcade

on

campus today and they're known as video widows. This faction of society

was a painful reminder of already fleeting past. Pinball, "I'll get you yet Centipede, ice hockey

arming grin that the

major trademark they're lonely. lonely for friendship, but for a piece was there for a fleeting mo ment only to be snatched firom them by the ugly clutches of the game room. Yes, they were happy once. They were

Jean Claude, if it's the last thing 1 do. I swear it" then pool for $12 worth of quarters.

carefree young women about campus with the worid by a shing and then it shruck. Their newly acquired loves of their lives

then the weekend

has

one

Not just

of their life that

taken from them just as

the money for this

was

weekend,"

After all it

of

no

was

return. She

called. On

all down hill to the Point saw

Monday

him less and less and

came

when he

never

she bracked him down.

"Is it another woman, your homework, all the time you spend on the Student

ft started

quickly as they acquired at last week's parties. easily enough.

Senate, drugs? We can get help, I'll stay with you through the whole thing and never

"Do you want a soda?" he asked. "Sure," she replied wfth the adoring

leave your side. Only tell me what it is so I can help you deal with it." But she knew

were were

smile of

a one

week

relationship. "I'd love

That she the

what it

was

without

asking.

tion of her worst fears

one."

he

,

"That

she cried.

all it took. Well, almost. While trying to get her change back from

was

was

eternally money hungry soda machine, stepped over to look in the game room.

THAT

was

all it took. He

was

gone like

was

The confirma

almost more than

she could bear "1 tried to quit, 1 swear I did but I can't. a love more true than any I've

I've found ever

It's

known before and 1 can't leave it alone. a

passion that

is

all-consuming and

where

way out. I hope you can under stand and maybe if you're lucky and do all

he had gone and saw his reti-eating figure as he entered the game room zone. She had

of your homework and go to all of your classes maybe you will be this lucky."

heard about this phenomenon but had always thought, like everyone else, that it would never happen to her.

You may wonder how 1 know all of this, 1 was the but the tale is really quite simple

water

evaporating off the

summer.

street in

She tumed around to

"Noooooooo!!!," she cried

see

high

out in anger

and ftustration. This wasn't happening to her, it couldn't be. Sure, it had happened to

giri down the hall and someone else that worked in the library and there had been other reports of it across campus. The Cigar the

it all in

had

way faithfully reported completely devoid of al! emotion. The question was, why her out of the whole a

campus. She had done her homework and gone to her classes, well most of them

anyway. She followed him in horror and watched as

she became

a

video widow before her

very eyes, ft started off with Ms. Pacman, then that stupid boxing game. From there it was a

quick stop at the juke box "for some play by," he told her with that dis

tunes to

there's

That

no

was

the last time she

ever saw

him.

girl that worked in the library, and I saw how the whole thing began. You may think it cruel that 1 did nothing to stop this girl from her folly but my heart is bitter from the grief I endured at the clutches of my crazed boyfriend.

Ours

own

video-

long relation ship but one of long standing. I thought that one day we might marry and everything was as good as it could possibly be when the horror struck. "Wanna play pool?" and then he

was

not

was

a mere

week

gone.

So if you dare to near the game room, and you see a girl with a bitter smile across her

lips think of this story and remember

what evil and darkness the game room holds for us. Dawn M. Wright

Banking Blues: A Student's Tale of Woe

You

are

about to enter the Book

for several desperately needed items, when you realize that you have no money. You don't have your checkbook with you, so you store

run

out to the Automatic Teller Machine

money, finding lo your thirty other people are doing thing, with the Bookstore clos ing in ten minutes. Impatiently you join the line, which proceeds at the rate of a tired snail. As you wait you contemplate

to

get

some

horror that

the

same

the carpet of littie white tickets that the machine spits out tirelessly, ostensibly to give you an official record of your

"banking transactions," but realistically give the illusion that something is real ly happening behind that implacable

to

computer

screen.

Miraculously, you make it to the head of the line with minutes to spare. With great relief you slide your card into the appropriate slot. There clicks and

are a

few quiet

bleeps, then the ATM requests

your code number. You lift your hand to the number pad and ft-eeze, drawing a total blank. Your mind works furiously; you know you know it, you just can't think of it when you have to. The person

behind you coughs discreetly, and wildly punch in some numbers.

you

The

computer spits your card back out, and you can just hear it laughing to itself. Swearing under your breath, you try again. "There's an 8 and a 4, I know," you mutter, punching in another combi nation. Another rejection. The line next to you moves on, and you hear the person behind you shuffle his feet rest

lessly

and clear his throat.

time.

As you slide the card in again, you the machine giggling happily to

Try

one more

can see

its chips in anticipation. Warily you eye it, then hit the numbers rapidly. Maybe if you do it fast enough

itself, rubbing

the computer won't realize that it is wrong. No such luck. As it gleefufly swallows your card back all you have to do is have a long chat with the branch manager, consent to

seven

years of hard

labor, and relinquish all claims to your future earnings. Sighing with defeat, you turn away, avoiding the sympathetic of those in line behind you. You'll to go to the bank tomortow. Not until minutes later does it hit you

stares

just have

today is Friday, and it is a long weekend. Wearily emptying your pockets you count up your total and

possible

wonder,

to survive for four

days

is it on

twenty-seven cents? G.H.W.

Land Your Plane

.

.

having parking problems? seem to find a parking driving time? spot?

Are

you

Just can't

How about

Does it take forever to get from where you start to school? Well, URI has provided a solution to these problems.

Yes, students, courtesy of URI you can now fly your plane to school and land it on the Quad. Of course, where you put it after that is still a problem, especially since your average small plane takes up or four parking spaces. But just think of the time it could save you, flying to school. You would avoid all of the

three

tangles, and wouldn't have to stop every hundred yards at a stireet light. You would also have a great arrival view of the entire campus, and could locate a

traffic

good parking spot

before you even a good idea to

landed. It would be

carpool (planepool?), because the one of you could parachute out and land in the parking spot to reserve it until the other landed the plane. After all, who would argue with someone entangled in a large parachute?

X

^

('

3

FALL SPORTS

106

Sports

Sports

107

RAMS CROSS-COUNTRY

While the cross country season began in the oppressive heat of the Great Swamp in all the

September,

Championship

races were

in the rain, snow and ice of mid November. Senior co-captains, Greg Hale and Joe Swift

run

led the

cross

season

and

country

a

Englands

team to

fine sixth

equaling

an

excellent 7-3

place finish

in the New

the best URI finish since

the 1960's. Other seniors

the team in

on

cluded: h'ack co-captain, Tennyson Muindi (Ny, eri, Kenya) and Brad Moravec who was

running his first collegiate season.

cross

country

The bulk of the team consisted of

un

Sophomore Paul Daniels and fireshmen Roger Bragg, Jim Dandeneau. Tony Fioto, Mike Hilghman, Chris Mamos, Steve Neri, Dave Bagus and Jim Garster all added to derclassmen.

the top

seven

at

some

stage of the

season.

Greg Hale led all scorers this year with second place finishes at the New Englands and the ICAAAA. Hale also qualified for the NCAA for the second time in his URI career. Joe Swift added to the team eftort with

a

Atlantic 10 and 15th at the N.E.

10th in the

VOLLEYBALLERS NET SUCCESS The WRAM netters opened their season by fal ling to tough Minnesota, They came back dur ing the quadrangle match to top North Carolina and Providence College. During a 16-team California tournament the volleybailers gave a demonstration of what they could do by upsetting #12 Pepperdine. The spikers topped Penn State while winning the McDonald's Classic Tournament. Then the multi-talented squad beat up on PC as they easily won the second annual Durfee' s Classic. During a successful Southern tour, the WRAMS emancipated #18 Georgia from the Top 20.

The ladies ended the regular campaign at 267. Then frailed Penn State in the Atiantic 10 Conference with a 4-1 record. They were given an at-large bid to play in the NCAA Tournament. The WRAMS had a season of high points, and at one point, led the nation in hitting efficiency. Team captain Sue Scott was number tiA/o in that category. a senior, ended 1985-86 with the deserved honor of being named co-player of the year in the conference.

Scott,

The WRAMS future seems to be in good hands. The 1984 Rookie of the Year, Christine Gallery, will be joined by 1985's top rookie. Dawn Banket. The

lady volleyballers

were

a

only a great 10, they were

not

team in tiie East and the Atiantic

great national team. John Christian

Hopkins

Tough Odds Bring Out Best

After

a highly successful first year as a varsity squad, this year s women's soccer team had a tough act to follow. The schedule was changed in order to challange the team with some nationally and regionally ranked competition. The opposition proved to be very tough, but brought out the best in this young squad who finished with eight wins and eight losses.

Returning junior, Susan Rocchio (Most Valu Player) has had another outstanding year leading scorer with thirteen of the thirty goals scored. Sue was responsible for several game-winning goals including the over-time goal in the 3-2 win over Keene. Second lead ing scorer, Allison McManus, finished the sea son in style by leading the WRams with two goals to take the RIAIWA State Championship in a 3-2 victory over Bryant. Newcomers on able as

the forward line included freshmen Lisa Conigliaro, a very speedy winger who had a goal and two assists against Westfleld; Sheni Gourley, an outstanding dribbler who also doubled

midfielder; and a local Rhode Islander, Debbie Caswell, who came on stiong at the as a

end of the

season.

The WRams midfield was led by senior cap tain, Jean Cotta and sophomore Teri Carroll, who proved to be very tough at mid-field in the games against Rutgers, College and Keene.

Holy Cross, Colorado

Senior Sue Guillemette, who has now played every position for URI, sophomores D'Anne Smitii, and Amy Dole led the defense aided by -newcomers Sharon Frank, Lori Farquhar, and outstanding Kris Tortora at stopper back. In contrast to last

year's seaon

without

a

*

goal

keeper, the WRams were fortunate to have MacCaull, a superior keeper Long Island, New York.

freshmen Melissa from

Liz Belyea Coach, WRams

_

Soccer

^

In WRams

Freshmen Assets For Ram Booters

U.R.l. Soccer has

powerhouse success can

always been recognized as a England. Coach Henni's by his outstanding

in New

be measured

winning record. The 1985

squad had a disappointing year by finishing tiie season witti a 8-11-1 record. This has only been the second losing season for

Coach Henni's teams in 17 years. The Ram's 20 game schedule included four nationally ranked teams; Penn State, Universi ty of Connecticut, F.D.U. and Rutgers Uni

i

t^

versity. Rhode Island played outstandingly against all four by losing to the first three by only one goal and tying with Rutgers. Coach Henni and Assistant Coach Couto real ized from ttie onset that it would be difficult to

replace whom

seven

were

graduating seniors;

starters. In

five of

addition, the Rams lost

it's starting goalkeeper Mike Salfrank and de fender Joe Tavares due to severe injuries. However, sfrong performances by freshmen Lance

proved This

Klima, Rui Almeida and Rich Nicholas to be great assets for the Ram squad.

year's

leadership of co-captains Aguinaldo Almeida

team was

three seniors:

^1^^

under the

and Rich Fischer, and John Resendes. All three performed well; however, due to in juries, only Resendes started in every game. Juniors John Lopes, Dave Anderson, and Bill

Harrison; sophomores Adam Homier and Fred Elkins also performed steadily through out the year. With a good recmiting year,

r

U.R.l. will again be a powerhouse in New Eng land.

.-a-^xug&i'y^Bgai't .v-j-.'-

114

Sports

l{SMi<HM*vEw

'ML-^

,

URI Tennis Teams Net

a

Successful Season

Ram's Ehr Everyone

happened to the URI they played Furman. But forget what the team did dur They won the Yankee Confer

knows what

football team when

they

should not

ing the

season.

titie. going undefeated in the conference. defeated the University of New

ence

They handily Hampshire, a

team that

was

supposed

to beat

URI and win the conference. For their L-ambert

eftorts, the Rams were awarded the Cup for being the best team on the

east coast,

feat that has not been

a

accom

plished by an Yankee Conference team in a long time. They also brought something to this school that had been lacking: enthusiasm and pride. People were proud to say they went to school with Tom Ehrhardt, Dameon Reilly, Pat Lawson, Mike Cassidy and the host of players who were members of this year's team.

Individually,

the Rams had

some

of the best

talent in New

England. Tom Ehrhardt made people forget about Doug Flutie as he passed his way into the record books like no one else had. He did in two years what it takes

ever

most

players

to do in four.

and Jim Don

Dameon

Reilly, Tony DiMaggio,

nelly

three seniors who will be

are

sorely

mis

sed. Their receiving ability was incomparable in New England. When Reilly burned a cocky player from the University of Connecticut and scored

a

touchdown in the Ram's incredible

comeback against the Huskies, it felt be a URI fan.

Watching DiMaggio play

good

to

the best game of his

against Akron, you realized, that along and Brian Forster. he was a great receiver After missing the playoffs last year career

with

Reilly

broken arm, it had to feel

with

a

that

showing against the Zips.

good

to

make

Then there is Brian Forster. The number

one

Force

Flys Again

tight end in college football today. The records will continue to fall into his hands as he has one more year of college football left. His perform ance

against Brown

was one

of guts,

plain and

simple. In the backtield,

a

freshman stole the show.

Doug Haynes provided many exciting mo URI fans. A mnning back in a passing attack could be considered a less than enviable position, but when he was called upon to mn the ball, he did his job well. ments to the

The oftensive line also deserves a lot of credit. Bob White, Steve Stoehr, Jeff Denny and company

provided Ehrhardt

with the protec

tion he needed to set his records.

On the other side of the ball, the Rhody de came up with the big plays all season

fense

long. Mike Cassidy filled in for the injured Tony Hill and made his presence felt im mediately. In his first game, he intercepted the Howard quarterback on the first play from scrimmage. At the end of the

regular season, he was seventh in the nation in interceptions, and he hauled in two touchdown saving interceptions against Akron in the first round of the playoffs. No

one

who

forget Guy

was

at Meade

Carbone's 109

Stadium will

ever

yard interception

against Lafayette for a touchdown. His steady play and tough hitting made him one of return

the steadiest defensive backs in the confer-

The Ram line and linebackers

were

the

emo

tional leaders of the team. Todd

Tunnell, Pat Lawson, and Damon Hewlette brought new to the word meaning intensity. Lawson is the hardest

I play

hitting 200-pound

linebacker

ever

to^

the game, and he led the team in tackles.

^

_-^f!

!t.

j^SSVh >'^r '

1

..

.

'

JR^^H

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~-

Il ^'^^I ^^.....-..^

-"

Tunnell, really, brought enthusiasm and emo new heights at the defensive end posi

tion to

tion and his to

country hoe-down dance is done

perfection.

Hewlette,

like

DiMaggio,

Akron. With 20 tackles and rose

to the occasion and

a

shined against blocked kick, he an excellent

played

game.

Next year, the team will be without the Ehr-

Force, but Greg Farland showed that he is capable of taking confrol of the Ram offense when Ehrhardt

was

injured.

This year, it was great to be a URI football fan. It was also an honor and a privilege to cover such

a

great football team. Eric Colby Cigar Sports Editor

URAM Field

Hockey

Sticks It to 'Em

^^m

'^

A Year to Build On

For Coach Lauren Anderson, is was a long year. The lady harriers continued to improve their times, but rarely were they able to finish in the money.

Kerry Arsenault was, perhaps, the top WRAM counti^ mnner, although Lynn Audette some good times.

cross

also showed

The women mnners placed fourth in the URI Invitational out of a field of seven. The whole year would follow that pattem.

highlight was a meet featuring the top teams in the state. Witti squads from Salve Regina, Brown, RIC, and PC in competition it didn't look good for the WRAMS. The

However, Coach Anderson was delighted when her gutsy performers tied Providence College for second place.

Things went sour when the cross counhi/ team faced some of the stiffest competition in the na tion, though. The WRAMS suffered through the meet to wind up 11th out of 12 teams. The year on the whole wasn't very spectacular for the WF5AMS. But with steadily improving times and their never-say-die attitude, the women's cross country squad faces a promis

ing '

new

year. John Christian

Hopkins'

Sports

127

WINTER SPORTS

128

Sports

Sports

129

Ram Basketball After the end of every URI basketball game this season, after all the fans have left, the only

people that were left in Keany gym were the cleaning up. On a dismal Tuesday night the Rams played the last game of the

custodians

season, and

they lost

as

it had been for most of the year,

another

cliffhanger, 50-47,

at the

hands of Penn State. the team finished the

with dismal reord of 9-19, one has to read between the lines to see that this team is no

Although

season

a

way

near as

For

bad

as

the record shows.

consisting of four freshmen, sophomores, two juniors, and only one senior, the Rams were only 17 points away from winning seven more games. a

team

three

This year

they played in a record seven They lost three games by a single point, one game by tiA/o points, and one game by three points. This season, the Rams were led by Carlton "Silk" Owens. The sophomore guard had to carry the weight of this young Ram team on his overtime games.

shoulders for the better part of the season. For the second straight season, "Silk" led the Rams in scoring with

an

impressive 15 point

per game average. But it's not just the statistics that make 'Silk" special to his team. He is the

floor leader, the

quarterback

on

When he is in the game, the Rams

the team. are

at their

best. The freshmen corp saw plenty of action this year. John Evans stepped into the starting role in

mid-season, and won freshman of the week

in the Atiantic 10 conference three times.

William Alston did the third

Owens

guard,

was on

to

a

fine job stepping in as the offense when

run

the bench. Bonzie Colson led

the team with 39 blocked shots for the year. Ric Blevins is the best outside shooter on the team.

Perhaps the most talented freshman. Green, played only five games this season, due to an injury he sustained in December. His return next

season

will contribute much to the

team.

Veterans Tom Garrick, Chris Scotti, Dennis Tabisz, and Bryan Mitchell should take some

of the

weight

off "Silk's" shoulders next

season.

If the Rams those

one

can

end up

on

the other side of

and hA/o point losses next year,

Rhody fans may see another Ram team competing for a conference championship.

*r Rhode Island Rams * 1985-86 Men's Varsity Basketball Schedule

WRam Basketball The WRams finished the season at 5-10 in the Atiantic 10 Conference and 14-13 overall. The team was led by senior super star

Michelle Washington along with teammate Tracey Hathaway who were the bright spots all year for the WRams.

Michelle

Washington

is the all time

scoring

and

rebounding leader in WRam history. She has rewritten the record book at URI, averag

ing 21.4 points and 10.8 rebounds She

was

also named

player of

per game.

the week three

times.

The WRams, witti many are

looking

to

players returning,

improve next year. Tim Tarini

3

fjC

4

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URI Swimmers Dive Into Action The 1985-86 season

with

an

mens

swim team finished their

impressive sixth place finish

at

the New

England Championships held at Springfield College. Improver times is something that the team is always striving for. This past season was no ex ception

as

Tad Hollworth established

new

school marks in four different events. Tad is

certainly

an

improve his Scott

incredible swimmer who times

Lovely

even

had two great Breastsfroke

swims at the New

England Championships.

Erik Ness's 1650 time In Tim

hopes to

further.

was

also

a

great swim.

and Scott

Fitzpatirick Lovely the team losses two swimmers who had been vital to the team for the past four years. The team hopes to improve on their times further next year and finish better in the New

England Championships. Tim Tarini

Led

by tri-captains Grace Abbott,

Keri

and Sue QuintiHani the 1985-86 women's swim team finished the season 5-5

Griffin,

placed seventh in the New England championships. Another highlight of the season was the fact that two of the swimmers qualified for the prestigious Eastern Swim League Champion ships at Penn State. Michele Mulligan's time of 25.17 qualified her in the 50 yard freestyle and

event, and Karen Denr's 100 yard breastsfroke time of 1:11.15 qualified her. With all of their points returning from the New

England Championship team, the development of the swimmers,

tinued some

con

and

solid recruiting the team is optimistic

about next year. Tim Tarini WOMENS

w IMMING

HEAD COACH Mick Westkott DIVING COACH Art Scolari Dale Nov

14

Site

Fairfield

Fairfield CT

Kingstori,

Sec.' 1"

Holy

Dec, 7

Smith College

''l.Fs

CSCAA Forum

Jan- 15

Providence

tii

Time

Opponeni

Rl

Cross

Noilhhamplon. Champ"

College

p:m.'

F, Uuderiat.

Kingston. RI Kingslon, Rl

mA 7

00pm

7100 p^m: 7;oo

Springfield New

Springfield, MA

England Champion Shi

(Maine hosit EWSL

Mar 20-23

7 00pm 7,00 7:00 pm. 2:00 p.m.

Championships

(SpringfidJfhosV^^

NCAA

Championships

Springfield, MA

p;m:

Gymnastics Flips The Wrams gymnastic season came to a close with both disappointment and inspira tion when URI hosted the Atiantic 10

ference

con

championships.

URI scored 173.15 their second highest score of the season. It was good for a fourth

place finish behind Penn State, West Virginia, and Temple University. Although they were disappointed with their fourth place outcome, URI looks forward to an even more

impressive season

next year.

There

many skills that they've been working on but haven't been able to compete with this are

season.

Since

seven

of the gymnasts

on

the URI

team

are freshmen, coach Charies Connery said, "We can only get better" The team can use this year's experience to sfrengthen them for the next campaign.

Though the Wrams had no delusions about beating Penn State, a nationally ranked team, they had hopes of placing second in the championship meet. Despite the disappointment of losing to Temple, the championship was a very special night for the Wrams.

for Fun

WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS SCHEDULE COACH: Charles Connery ASSISTANTS: Nancy Alvarez, John Knowles DANCE CONSULTANT: Kim Lewis

Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA New Haven, CT Kingston, Rl

Temple & New Hampshire lUNH host) Brown, Hofstra & Bridgeport

Durham, NH

Kingslon,

Rl

Ston^, CT

George Washington Kentucky

Washington. DC Lexington, KY

Atlantic 10 Conference

Championships (URI host) NCAA

Kingston, Rl

Regional Championships

(Penn Stale host) NCAA

University

Park P

Championships

[Rorida host)

GainesviUe, FL

Hockey The Rams

double overtime game College 4-3. This was no

won

against Bryant

a

normal game won the New

though. By winning it the Rams England Small College Hockey Championship. team was led by tri-captains Dave

Association The

Cloxton, Mark Moretti and Norm Lafluer. did a fine job in piloting the team to victory. The team is looking forward to bring ing home another championship next year.

They

Tim Tarini

Team Wins

Championship

||i

I

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M

SPRING SPORTS

144

Sports

Baseball The Ram baseball

season was

begun with

a

3-

3 record this year after a six game southern swing into North Carolina. The Rams defeated North Carolina

Wilmington, 3-2

in the

tip

opener and later defeated Campbell University in a tiAio game series, 6-5 and 12-7. Later in the season the Rams swept both games in eastern.

doubleheader against North on leading the

a

This tiend continued

Rams to third ference with and

Rutgers

a

place

in the Atiantic 10 Con

record of 3-2-1 behind

who is

ference record.

leading

with

a

Temple, 5-2

con

Softball Although

the WRams

outcome

was

went

opened their season with a record of 0-8 the final good. Things had begun to look up when the WRams

3-3 in the Penn State invitational upping their record to 16-13-1. followed by an unsuccessful double header to Adelphi and

This

was

then

a

split against Brown. This brought the WRams' record to21-18-l. placed Rhody in the Atiantic 10 Conference where they hosted such opponents as Temple and St. Joseph's. This

I J^

CREW TEAMS "CREWS" THROUGH SEASON VICTORIOUS

Botii the mens and womens teams did very well in all catagories this season. The novice teams showed sti-ongly fi-om the very

beginning and improved steadily.

mens

and

womens

teams also showed

The

sfrong-

ly in the lightweight and heavyweight divisions against such strong rivals as Coast Guard, UNH, MIT, Lowell, Temple, and La Salle.

,.t-M*i

152

Sports

Sports

153

1 RUGBY The URI

Rugby

team

started off the

season

well, sweeping a three game match from Providence College. This was followed by a total wipeout of Bryant College with a score of 45-8. The season continued on in this note the

Ruggers to first place in the second England College Invitational Tournament, The tournament began with leading

annual New

games

these

they

against Boston and RIC. After winning

they qualified

ran

up

for the semi-finals. There

against Southern Connecticut and

Dartmouth but after and 10-4

beating these teams 10-0 respectively the championship was

theirs.

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The URI La Crosse team

opened

its

season

impressive victory over Fairfield fomi University this season. Their aggressive

with

an

helped them throughout the

of play

to continue season.

on

in this note

The laxmen

maintained this fonn and devastated Roger Williams College 18-2. This was followed by another successful game against Boston

College.

Track All facets of the tiack team did amazingly well this season. The mens and womens teams did well indoors as well as out of doors. The teams in such prestigous events as the

participated Penn

Relay and

tiie

Fitchburg Invitational.

URI The URI

university

Sailing

Sailing Club

is open to all the and the community to teach sailing

and have fun. The

Sailing Club is located on Salt Pond in Wakefield, and is open from early March to the end of November. This has been an excep tional year for the receiving of boat donations and the

teaching

of students.

The

Sailing Club is now operating ten tech dingys, four flying juniors, an international class 470, and a Flying Dutchman. Also tirrough donation they are operating a J-24 class boat. The URI

Sailing Club's advisor Norm Windus and the club officers Mark Wood and Dot Hall wish to have you stop by so you too may be come

part of the Sailing Club family.

Club

URI Ram Band Once again, the URI Ram Band made this season more enjoyable with their own musical style and flair. Resplendant in their football

new

uniforms, the Ram Band performed with

brilliant precision and grace. Their exceptional performing ability and style made them an in

tegral part of URI football and without them the season could not possibly have been as ex citing and colorful. Dawn

170

Actiuities

Wright

i

^

STUDENT ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE

The Student Entertainment Committee

SEC, is a group of dedicated students whose quest is to raise the spirits of the campus. SEC

provides entertainment in the form of concerts, lectures, and spe cial acts ranging from comedians and jugglers to authors and activists.

Programs for this year included Frank Santos, an Larry Linville, The Hooters, Al DiMeoIa, and the Band.

R-rated

hypnotist,

Jon Pousette-Dart

Front Row: Tony Lucci, Second Row: Renee Conley, Karen Roy, Martin Pratt, Paula McDonough, Joanne Ludouici, April Singer. Third Row: Sue Di Fillipo, Jennifer Sutherland, J. Brett Taylor, Ron Bates, Maureen McDermott, Bob Seger. Fourth Row: Terri Goulart, Jo-Ann Mazzadra, Carole Bradshaw, Bill Brinkman, Joe Crowley, Jim Johnson. Fifth Row: Steve Wright, Tara Marshall

WRIU WRIU, 90.3 FM and 530 AM, is Rhode Island's largest educational radio station. WRIU FM can be heard throughout Rhode Island and from as far away as Long Island, N.Y. Students broadcast a wide variety of music, ranging from progressive rock to classi news, and live coverage of Ram Football and basketball games.

cal,

WRIU AM is heard

only on campus and broad music, news, and special programming. Both AM and FM are operated and maintained casts

managed almost entirely by undergraduates. WRIU

plays

"alternative" music, that of which on area commercial stations,

you can't hear and strives to

England

provide southeastern New and the very best alternative

programming.

UUlLtl

Bennie

Jones, Dan Davies, Steve Salhany,

Ricl<

Lacroix,

Keli Walsh. Steve

Conroy.

Pete

Lussier, Julie Pistacchic

STUDENT TECHNICAL SERVICES Student Technical Services

STS, is a professional sound, lighting, and staging rental operation for private or university use. They provide everything from small turntables, sound systems, amplifiers, tape decks, and speakers to a full, complete concert system. STS is located in

rooms

Memorial Union and 2034.

can

140 and 151 of the be reached at 792-

STUDENT SENATE The URI Student Senate is the legislative tion of the

undergraduate population

ac

of the

campus.

There

are many committees that constitute the Student Senate. Each committee (Affirmative

Action, Academic Affairs, Communications and Public Relations, Extemal Afiairs, Student Affairs, Student Organization Advisory and Review, Tax, and Executive) has its own range of action and responsibility. Elections

are

held

regulariy

at the

beginning

and end of every year. The Senate welcomes any interested student; one does not have to be a senator to become involved.

Apportionment in the senate is divided among the Greeks, dorms, commuters, and the various colleges in the University. Sound

always

interesting? The Senate open,

office door is and its Room 138 in the

Memorial Union.

1st Row: John Simonian. Joe Crowley, Joe Marasco, Lisa Gibolerio, Nicole Labrosse. Matt Bray Robert Dolan. Jane O'Connell, Armand Pastine, Wing Chau 2nd Row Chris McCarton, Mark Hirschberg, Franc Silva, Dan Connery, John Scott, Mike Campbell. 3rd Row: Natalie Spencer, Steven Porter, Eric Cote, Bob DiMaio, Dean Wagner Jim Moore Chns Bicho, Kirby Roberts Keith. Nicole Mines, Lisa Makowsky, Danielle Vaillancourt, Jim O'Grady, Amy Gizzarelli, Noelle Doyle, Laurie Chiapetta, Joe Army Back Row: Jen Bau, Scott Traudt, Dave Williams, Kris Reddy, Charlie Abuzaid, Charlie Wescott. Missing in Action: Scott Bosworth, Peggy Mueller, Donna La Flamme Jira Monti Ted Kelly, Andy Thompson, Andrea D'Agostino. '

'

'

fix '

URI GAY TASK FORCE

Joe

The URI

Gay Task Force is a student-mn. recognized organization. Its central goal is the formation of a better understanding

Senate

of the gay community. This task is education presented

plished through

accom

by

gay

films, speakers, and literahjre made available through the university.

Additionally, and perhaps most importantiy, it offers friendship and information to the over 1500 gay students attending the university, and gives both students and faculty a place to turn if they are having problems. Membership

is open to anyone

having

a

a hand, although the majority of members are usually gay stiidents. The Task Force also offers confidential support

sincere desire to lend

groups each semester to those who

ready to openly come preference.

are

not

forth about their sexual

Perry

Back

row

Paul

Belloni, Ray Riley. Robert Doll.

SPEAK-EASY

L-r: Linda

Speak-easy is an on-campus service, staffed by students and professionals, which offer support and information

sexuality. Students

trained in

on

aspects of

special section Speak-easy office, hodine, conduct workshops a

of NUR 260 staff the answer

the

tiiroughout the

campus, and teach birth

trol education sessions.

Workshops

con

cover

material in many areas of sexuality including: Birth Control, Rape Prevention, and Sexually

Speak-easy is here to provide support, and open, non-judgemental human information regarding sexuality. Transmitted Diseases.

Davett, Paula Tassoni, Janey Jorgensen. Kathline Lawless. Anne Menard.

URI'S UYA (University Year For Action) Internship Program, founded in 1975,

URI's UYA Student

academic program that provides under graduate students opportunities for profes sional development and field study. Students is

an

can

compliment their courdework with a struc

tured fraining experience provided by quali fied professionals in carefully selected settings.

The program offers students a choice of more than 200 field study internships. Students work full-time in a career-related setting and may

earn

up to 12 elective academic credits. In

experiential study, students closely with a faculty member to develop and criteria for goal attainment. learning goals

addition to their work

Wayss 1

180

Activities

Leisa

Tammie Foster Linda Gibbs, Christine D'ors. 2nd Row: Eileen

Kenahan-Klein. Marlaine Keenan, Stephan Babine, Suzanne Tanner, Susan Karp if Back [JYA Director, Young Brett Penney. Karen KoIek, Janice McChesney, Richard Sullivan ij

THE GREAT SWAMP GAZETTE

Claude Masse. Noah Hume. Willis Kim. Kris

Reddy,

Paul Nussbaum. Back

row:

Charies Westcott. Bill Fortier, Richard Wilmarth

If standard newswriting is not your interest, then perhaps The Gazette might better smt your needs. URI's "Alternative

Source," The specializes in investigative news report ing, feature articles, satire, commentary, crea tive writing, poetry, photography, and Gazette

artwork. Part of the

philosophy which guides publication is that views and opinions are efiectively argued by those who strongly believe them, and the Gazette states that

the

most

"contiibutions

are

welcomed from any think are a poet, writer, or just

ing person." If you

provide "Some Clear Thinking Out of the Muck and Mire," join this biweekly, na tional award-winning magazine. Contact through their office in room 149 Memorial want to

Union,

or

call 792-2700.

ROTC Army ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps) is a program which provides collegetrained officers for the U.S. Army, The Army National Guard, the U.S. Army Reserve, and the Individual Ready Reserve. The program spans the four years of undergraduate college attendance and, upon satisfactory completion, cadets are awarded

a

commission

as a

Second

Lieutenant in the United States

Army con currently with the award of a baccalaureate degree. In this manner, the Army gains officers with diverse educational backgrounds and contemporary ideas. The program at the University of Rhode Island was established in 1894 under the "Land

Grant Act," and has contributed more than 2000 officers firom URI to the service of the countiT; since its inception. In 1974 Congress initiated major changes via the ROTC Vitalization Act which among other two year program.

things added the

This program is designed and students at

for junior

college graduates

four-year

institutions who did not enroll in

ROTC their first two years Today, the ROTC program is offered by over 300 colleges and universities

throughout

the nation.

:.*'' ^

CATHOLIC STUDENTS ASSOCIATION

^

The Catholic Students Association fosters Christian community tion and

on

campus

by

programming spiritual, cultural,

social activities

through

a

coordina and

the Catholic Center.

This year the Catholic Student Association sponsored a dormitory canned food collec

tion, college retreat weekends, bi-weekly bible studies, and a Break the Fast Meal for Oxfam/ Day in conjunction with the URI

America Fast World

184

Hunger

Activities

Committee.

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL The URI Chapter of the B'nai B'llth Hillel Foundation attempts to bring together the Jewish community of URI and define and solve Jewish problems locally, nationally, and

They also sponsor social events speakers, as well as weekly and High Holiday religious services. Hillel's Kosher din ing plan is an alternative to the university din ing plan, with meals served during the semester and during passover.

woddwide. and

^^^^^-J

Back row, l-r: K.C. Tan, Ramzi Barghout, Eyad Mizian Wilhs Xu Antonia Papandreou, Aii Rabbani, Khaled Haddad, Gfiassan Saiaf Seated- Anne Marie Kacal, Rae Ann Calkins, Ann West. Jan Newell, Annet Arakelian. Missing: Jen Bau Nicos Maknniotis

The International Student Association (l.S. A.) currentiy represents approximately 450 international students on campus, who come from 71 different countiies. The objective of this organization is to bring

together the

various foreign student groups at URI, while integrating them into campus life and promoting international and intercultural awareness within the community. During the academic year, the I.S.A. a number of cultural, social, educational, and athletic activities special dinners, parties, bands, food fairs, speakers, and the

sponsors

such

as

popular yearly affair of International Week. The International Shjdent Center, located in the yellow house at 37 Lower College Road, houses the office for International Services and the International Student Association, as well as being a relaxing place for intemational students to get together, talk, or stitdy. The I.S.A. meets here each week and everyone is welcome to attend the meetings. You

are also sh-ongly encouraged to join in the many exciting activities planned by this active and successful shadent organization!

186

Activities

LITTLE BROTHER/LITTLE SISTER

The main purpose of Littie Brother/Littie Sister is to have the members be a hiend to a boy or

giri who is either economically or socially deprived and who lives in surrounding areas of URI. It is

an

extension of

tion of America and in the fall of

Need

was

a

national organiza

founded here at URI

1966. Their mott is "Little

People

Big People."

There is brother

a or

members

great responsibility sister. /Ml

big

they

their children

see

in

being

a

big

ask is that the a week.

once

When the children do visit, members listen to their problems, help them with their

homework, take them swimming and maybe even

to

a

URI football game.

Transportation to

see

is not

a

problem when

one

his/her "littie," Members have the

the K.S.S.

van

which

can

has

use

of

seat 15 children in

trip. Bringing children closer to us, show ing them a different world that one tends to one

granted, and establishing meaningful lasting hriendships is what it is all about people need attention and see

take for and

Even the littie

ing

a

smile

worthwhile!

on

their face makes it all

THE GOOD 5-CENT CIGAR Most students

sleepily reach for a copy of the at breakfast without giving a thought to the work that goes into getting the paper ft'om the drawing board to the dining halls four times Cigar

a

week And with

a

staff of less than 35, it's

no

easy task.

Being a part of the Cigar takes

a

lot

more

than

full pot of coffee and the ability to function on less than five hours of sleep a night it takes a real commitment to the job and a belief that we a

providing a valuable service to the entire University community. Where do you turn to are

find out what's

new

at

URI? The Good 5-cent

Cigar. It's been said that Bloom

personals

are

the most

County and the highly read parts of the

paper. But we tell students, faculty, and staff much more than that, ft'om news of potentially

dangerous amounts of asbestos in campus buildings, to the exploits of our winning football team to who won the latest Stijdent Senate elections. We at the

Cigar also have selfish

reasons

for

here. The Cigar provides one of the best opportunities for one-the-job training on campus. Here we can get the experience

working

Back Row, l-r: David Duprey, Willian;! Levesque, Joelle Bekaski, Diane Feole, Eric Colby, Geni Owren, Stephen Peterson. Middle Row: Darrell Perry Paula D'Elia Dehhie Purvis Christine Johr son, Robert Marsocci, Domingos Dias, Richard Arden. Front Row: Jennifer Polke, Gary Pazienza. Anthony U Roche, Randall Haussmann, Christina Camara, Daniel Martineau.

needed to go

to the "real world" with the

on

confidence that we understand the a

workings of

from start to finish.

newspaper

And the paper is not just an outiet for journa lism majors. Those interested in business,

photography, art or computer science can find something to learn in Room 139 of the Memorial Union.

The

cally

Cigar

is also

advanced

country. With

one

of the most

college

technologi

newspapers in the

typesetter and computer system, we have the resources to put out 8,000 copies of the paper with a of

budget

our

own

$110,000.

Although putting out the paper from the first day of classes to the last can be a grind, and a crooked headline

cringe, to

we

know

we

page one makes us have the next day's paper challenge of putting

on

look forward to. The

together

the main

campus

The

source

Cigar

of information

keeps

us

on

going.

Christina Camara Editor in Chief

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Sally Tiacy ActivitiGs

191

WILDLIFE SOCEITY

,

The URI Student

Chapter of the Wildlife Society is a student chapter of a nationally recognized organization. Membership is open to all students at the University. The chapter encourages the wise use and protection of wildlife and other environmental resources,

supports public education on natural resource issues, and provides an opportunity for the members to meet professionals in wildlife related fields.

Pat Hamisfar, Back

row:

Tom Husband, advisor. Patrice D'ovidio, Jeff Otico. Nandkumar

URI CHESS CLUB Fomied last Febmary, the URI Chess Club has become visible on campus very quickly; be coming known for their remarkable demon strations in the Memorial Union lobby. In 1986, the club hopes to send a team to the United States Open, the United States Championships, the New England

Amateur

Championships, and to tournaments sponsored by the Rhode Island Chess League. an afiiliate of the United States Chess Federation located in New York.

The club is

This is the first time in recent years where URI has been represented in the R.l. Chess

League. The team does not have a high performance rating due to the number of un rated players. However, the team is comprised of very talented players who show a stiong potential to excel in the future.

to

right: Frank Marshall, Nick Linsky, Tony Chanko,

Willis

Kim, James Weaver, Vem Van Pattan.

RIPIRG

The Rhode Island Public Interest Research

Group Inc. (RIPIRG) is a statewide, independent, nonprofit, public interest organization which conducts research, develops educational programs, and advocates on behalf on students, consumers, and the environment. RIPIRG works on issues which affect the health, welfare, and well being of the citizens of Rhode Island and has conducted research and advocacy programs in the areas of environmental protection, consumer rights, energy policy, tiransportation management, and the jiistice system.

SOCIETY OF WOMEN ENGINEERS

Front row, l-r: Dawn Zbryski. Katherine Veley. Debbie Androvich. Maureen Gaccione, Karen Kactiele. Debra CuUerton, Sue Pereira

Faye Boudreaux-Burtels.

Peter

Barry.

Back

The

r

Society of Women Engineers has been

at

URI for almost ten years now, and engages in a variety of activities. They serve as a liason between all the Engineering Societies, and as a

body to serve the whole University population in general. They assist women engineers in their adjustment to college life, specifically as engineers. Some special events sponsored by the Society of Women Engineers this year in cluded a speech by Sally Ride, the first U.S. woman astronaut in space, a speech by Dr. Eleanor Baum, the first and only woman dean of engineering in the U.S. and

a

Christinas party.

,

as

well

as a

cookout

BUILDING SERVICES ORGANIZATION

3

Lefebure. Margaret Chrostowski, Debbie Nickerson, Bill Lake, Barbara Paulson. Second Row: Bob Le Valley, Bill O'Donnell, Jim Miller.

The

University of Rhode Island Memorial Union Building Services Organization is responsible for the smooth operation of the Memorial Union's functions.

The organization is overseen by James Miller, the Assistant Director of the Memorial Union and by Bill O'Donnell.

Building Services is made up of two components: The Building Managers, and the Service Coordinators. The Building Managers are responsible for the security of the Student Union, the Service Coordina tors

organize, set-up, and

oversee

the Union offers to the students.

the mini-malls and mini-courses that

MOTAR BOARD NATIONAL SENIOR HONOR SOCIETY Mortar Board, Inc. is a national honor society composed of seniors who have demonstrated outstanding scholastic ability and continual leader-

ship qualities throughout their college careers.

Mortar Board is

a

unique

honor society. In return for the honor of scholastic recognition, members must pledge to actively recognize their responsibility to

society. For the Laurels Chapter members of URI, this means active dedication to providing service to the university and the surrounding community.

Fundraising activities for 1985-86 contributed to intemational, national, and local organizations. Activities to aid the URI community include free tutoring services for URI students, and the annual publication of the senior survival booklet and calendar. Laurels Chapter members also

granted a scholarship to a freshman student who has demonsttated the outstanding characteristics of a fttture Mortar Board member, and recognize teaching excellence through a professor of the month award.

Left to

right Dr Clay Smk Lynette Macaluso, Laura Levine,

Bruce

Grobman, Kim Stewart, Kathy Dunn, Stephanie Patron. Kathy Rexrode, Susan Weir

URI AMBULANCE CORP The

University Ambulance Corp completed its first full semester as a

student

run

volunteer service in

January 1986. It has been a smashing success. Over seventy people have benefited from this service in

just

three month

a

period. They started

with fifteen

members and have grown to almost fifty. The Ambulance

Corp, under the Department of Public Safety, offers first aid, CPR, and radio communications

training to any

member of the URI community. In addition, it has supplied people with

a

ests

an

variety of majors and inter entirely different aspect of

emergency medical

The

Corp

runs

care.

with

a

trained

emergency medical technician on board at all times. They are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Faculty, staff, students, and visitors to the Kingston campus are all treated with quality care by this group of professionals. All necessary training is available through the Corp. At the rate they are a

growing the campus should be

safer

place

for many years to

come.

Ray

Maxim just

stepped down

from the position of the Corp's first commander and founding father The 1986 year has Mike Handrigan as commander, Ron Pope as

commander, and Paul Sepuka as personnel coordinator. vice

ARTS & SCIENCES

Richard J.

Casey Zoology

^Political Science

Michael M. Cassidy Political Science

Leslie M. Cassinari Music Education

Isn't he just the devil? Halloween costume parties

are one

of the many great braditions at URI

Owen B. Devine

Geography

Keith I. Dickman

and Marine Affairs

Dorm Life: What could be

Susan M. Defilippo Speech Communication

Economics

more

fun than

having

friends

over

for

a

snack!

Tom E. Ehrhardt Economics

John M. Ellis

Zoology

Patricia A. Eno

Lori Ann Enos

Speech Communication

Speech Communication

Scott A. Erickson

Sylvia A. Fasciano Speech Communicataion

Political Science

Arthur S, Gow III

Chemistry Chemical Engineering

Mack D, Grandchamp Mathematics

Erika

Lynn Greene

Psychology

Eileen Kirk

Psychology

Linda A Kornasky Literature Studies

Comparative

Richard G LacroK Journalism

1

^

I^H

^^H

>4^^^^H

WAm^^^^H ^^^^^^^^n

fMS

^^^^^^^^H

w%:Vi^^^H 1

the annual URI airband contest Looks like

Chris M. Marie Political Science

a

lot of fun doesn't it?

Donna A. Mans

English

Daniel J. Martineau Journalism

Karla M. Masiello Dental Hygiene

Glenn A. Maslyn Political Science

Steven J. Parker

A smaD snack. These

are

just a few delicasies offered by the Ram's Den in the MemoricJ Union.

Dawn T. Silvestri

iL/LO.P.

VaLue ^ ''

-"'^

fe-V(-e<is

QUALITY

SALARIES

%k4 -^ncutty '.QUALITY

DUCATIOW

faculty threatens strike. For a while students weren't sure classes would open in January due to the threat of a faculty strike Luckily for graduating seniors and other students the disaster was averted and classes opened on time. URI

Michelle E. Tolman

Ihppiilr

College

The great American smokeout The point

was

made with

of Business

emphasis this

year with this balloon

being

put upon campus.

Marketing

Venders

day.

selling anything ranging

from

Kenya bags to jewelry could be found

downstairs in the Memorial Union

on

any

given

Kathleen Croston

John E. Curzake Jr

Marketing

Accounting

I^^^^H^^^K -^^B

^^^ iHJ H^^j -^ ^^^^^ J^^^^ -

-^

'^^^ ^'-^^Ml

^"W' w^

Julianne Domey

Paul H. Dudzinski

Accounting

Management Infonnation Systems

Fitzgerald Management Science

Jeannine M.

William J. Fortier

Gerald M. Freitas

Sanford L. Friedman

Accounting

Management Information

Management Information Systems

Systems

Kimberiy

J.

Guthy

Timothy J. Hotchkiss Management Information Systems

Dorothy M. Hall MarKeting

Beth A. Halvajian Management Information Systems

Karen L. Hamilton Finance

One familiar sight at URI is the constant coming and going of people. All of us have this at one time or another.

experienced

Christopher M. lacona Biomedical Electronics Engr.

Michael A. lemina

Management Information Systems

Richard C. Lozzi

Management Information Systems

Jeffrey

M. James

Finance

Terry

D. Jann

Management Information Systems

Maria D. Karahalios

Marketing

rice A. Martin

Finance

David P. Murzilli General Business Administi:ation

MiMAd Robert R. Mastriani

Brian J. McGinnis

Marketing

Accounting

Gwyn

D.

Mehringer

Management Information

Systems

Lisa M. Saueir

Management Information Systems

Management Information Systems

Finance

Luanne Viticonte

Frances Vorbach

Susan Wiener

Marketing

Management

Accounting

College

Mathew W. Aitkenhead Mechanical Engineering

Jihad Almahayni Electrical Engineenng

of

Engineering

Deborah Androvich Electi-onic

Comput* Engineenng

Michael L. Beaujean Electronic Computer

Engineering

Edward G. Bums Electronic Compuh

Engineering

Lynn Elechlcal

M. Carll

Engineering

Donald L, Chace Chemical Engineering

Registration day neverending. Haveaseat Keep on looking!

the class you needed to graduate is closed out

Stephen Garabedian Mechanical Engineering

Mmm John M. Gennari Electrical Engineering

Christopher Giordano Chemical

Engineering

Robert A. Grizzetti

Chemical

Engineering

Charles Hall Mechanical Engineering

Richard T. Haupt Mechanical Engineering

f^"^.,^

Amanda Hill Biomedical Electronics

Karen L. Kachele Indusbial Engineering

Engineering

WM BBBB Hf^^B w^ P-^-5 ^9 '^-'#'^1

m

n^

'.a-'t.yr-^i

^^

Eric Larson MechanicI Engineering

Peter Lombardo Industiial Engineering

Richard Lonardo

Civil

Engineering

Joseph P. Electironic

Lopes Jr. Computei Engineering

^

^

,^3

prepared by taping windows. Luckily damage on campus as well as around the state was minimal.

Eric T. Miller Electronic Computei

Engineering

Imad E, Massabni Mechanical Engineering

James C. Chemical

McCaughey Engneering

James F. Silver Chemical Engineering

Steven Silvestro

Electrical

Engineering

William G, Varden Electronic Computer

Engineering

Ralph A. Vecchio Engineering

Mechanical

College

Mary Rose Ahem Elementary Education

of Human Sciences

Diane Allaire

Textiles, Fash. Merch. & Design

Anahid R. Avedesian Communicative Disorders

Heather Baker Fash, Merch. &

Textiles,

Design

Diane Baranoski Education

Elementary

Paula Brandell

Communicative Disorders

Christine Brennan Textile

Marketing

Sharon L Cappalli Education and Communicative

Lisa Camevale Consumer Affairs

Mana Camevale Textiles Fash. Merch. & Design

Disorders

As this picture shows, there is both

beauty and danger in the

Sara De Salvo Human Dev. & Family Studies

The Memorial Union is a familiar sight to many URI students. There students can as the yearbook and newspaper.

Maria Stella T. Delia Communicative Disorders

buy books, jewelry, food and other things as well as join student organizations such

Dana Gilman

Textiles, Fash. Merch. & Design

Joan Heaton Human Dev. & Family Studies

Jill N. Goodman Consumer Affairs

Terri Goulart Textile Marketing

Donna E. Howkins Human Sciences and

Martha Holmes Human Dev. & Family Studies

Services

Kitchm Human Studies

Shirley M

Lake Education

Willima H

Secondary

Maeve Healey Textile Marketing

Jane Healy Elementary Education

Julie Jacques Textiles, Fash. Merch. Design

Elizabeth G. Laver

Textiles, Fash. Merch. &

Design

Judith A. Marble Human Dev. & Family Studies

Sandra M,

Nightingale Family

Human Dev. &

Studies

lti Linda Ann Ruggien Textiles Fash Merch. &

Design

Robin J Russell Textiles Fash Merch. &

Bonita B. Oliver Human Dev. & Family Studies

Jill E. Werber Human Dev. & Family

Studies

Sharon R. Whittaker Human Dev, & Family

Studies

College of Nursing

College

of

Pharmacy

Warren A,

Goolgasian Pharmacy

Stephen E. Heidenthal Pharmacy

Fran M. Kochn

Pharmacy

Charles M Rowlett

Manta R Sherbo

Pharmacy

Pharmacy

College

Guy Carbone Food Science & Nutrition

Linda L. Foss Natural Resources

M:J

Jl

of Resource

Lisa K. Cooley Food Science & Nutrition

Scott M. Garvey & Rsh. Tech.

Aquaculture

Gerald C. Coumoyer Plant Sc. & Tech.

Charles A, George Natural Resources

Development

Lexie J, Cox Plant Sc, & Tech.

Patrice C. D'Ovidio & Fish. Tech.

Aquaculture

i5*^r^^

College of Continuing Education

Senior Ab^id. lid. Charii CKarles;

16

Anderson, Sherry; P.O. Bot 90919, Anchorage, AK 99509 Anderson, Slephen; R.R. 2, Box 205 West Kingston, Rl 02892 Andoscia, James; 27 Concord Avenue. Cranston, RI 02910

TopHtld

Breni i; S

John;

Andrade. John;

Adler. Umren.

22

Highvicw Avenue. Warren,

Rl 02885

Donna; 416 West Popular St., Shenandoah, PA 17976 Andrew. Timothy; 7 Cecile Street, Uncoln. Rl 02865 Androvich, Deborah; 46 Morgan Road, Toms River, NJ 0ST53 Annonio, Unda; 74 Long Meadow Hill Road. Broolcficld, CT 06S41 Antonelli, Anihony; 23 Kensington Streel, East Providence, Rl 028 Archer, Allen; 44 Hillside Avenue. East Providence. Rl 02914 Ardestani, Fatemeh; 10 Winchester Dr.. Wakefield, Rl 02879 Armacost. Beth; 5 Runnymede Drive. North Hampton, NH 03862

Andrausk^.

Aduani. Behrooz; P S South

County TraU. I

aC!' Bruce; 81 Ahem, Mary Bos AhUen. Lori; 7 Pl Aitkenhead, nhead, Matthew: 16 Edith Boad. Narragaos 03, KinRSton. RI 02( Al-Awfy. Hi I

Armstrong, Brian; 24 Spruce Street, Westerly, Rl 02891 Arrastrong, Jennifer; 82 Elmwood Drive, North Kingstown, Hi 02f152 ME 04572 Armstrong! Marcia; P.O. Box 103. Waldohoro. Army, Joseph; 18 Webster Streel, NewTWrt, Rl 02840 Aroiuon. Usa; P.O. Box 136. Rehoboth. MA 02769 Arrigan, John; 27 Circlcwood Drive, Coventry. Rl 02816 Arruda. Joseph; 110 Easl 84th Street Apl. 5B. New York, Nl 100218 Arruda, Lucia; 28 Andre Ave., Peace Dale, RI 02S83

1437. Kingiton, Rl

1513, Kinsston. Rl 0

Al'Sodduh,

College. KinKston.

I

Alfiero. John; 34 Cedar Ore Aide. Sarah; 77 Wanton Sh AJEire. Diane; 53 OreRon A

Jsup, Mark; P.O. Box 42 Fort Neck, Charles totvii. Ahnahayni, Jihad; 72 Springdate Boad, Kingston, Ri .

Almeida, Hilario; 43 Greenwich Sireel, Providcnte,

Allinuiri. Bichardi

Rl 02906

Anderson. Mark; 699 Black Point Farm Road, Portsmouth. RI 02^]' Anderson, Paul; Fort Ninigrel Rd., Charlesiown. Rl 02813 Anderson, Soott; P.O. Bo 54. Kingston. Rl 02881

Hampshir

Adam^.'CreRorv; 1417 Washington VaUey Addessi. Addessi.

Directory

Anderson. Kenneth; 18 Chapel Street, Warwick,

Abberton, Timothy; 47 Boxivood Dri' Abbott. John;-)

tonBoad. Bethany. CT 06.

Westerly. RI Oi ikfietd Lane. Sougus. .MA

land Bd. Bd. 8 Midland

36 Congdon Street, Narragansett, leather; 1320 Kingstown Bd.. Kingslon. R

1 ( I

Ash, Susan; 40 Fhimingo Dr., Warwick, IU 02886 Ashely, Henry; 613 Graduate Village, Kingslon, Rl 02881 Ashmore, Nancy; 261 Worden St. Melville. Netc Newport, RI 02* Ashraf, Lucie; 36 Aliens Avenue, Wakefield, Rl 02879 Aspinwall, Mark; 121 Dover Road, Wcstwood, MA 02090 AtanasoIT, John; 1065 Frenchtown Road, East Greenwich, Rl 0281 8 126 Vineyard Bd., Warwick, Rl 02889 Alayi, Atwood, Stephen; P.O. Box 234, Kenyofl, Rl 02S36 Auhio, Stacey; 57 Everett Streel. Newort, RI 02840 Audino, Frank; 284 Sea Meadow Drive, Portsmouth, RI 02871 August, Kimberly; 1995 Frenchtown Rd.. East Creenvrich, RI 028 IS

Julie;

Chris;

Suiaiu 40 Woodside

Boad, WyckofT, NJ

0

'""'"'

Oakland, NJ 07

.ely;

1

4 Elton

<videt>c

AyrasJian, Gary; 234

GenHan Avenue, Providence, Rl 02908 George; 39 Own Drive, CumbereUnd, Rl 02S64 A22olioo. Robert; 13 Stratford Court, Wcstwood. NJ 07675 Babey, Sandra; 12 Abbott Road, Somerset, NJ 088T3 21 Babine. Stephen; Eyler Drive, Portsmouth, RI 02871

Azar,

Bablenis, Elen.i; 177 Garden Hilb Drive, Cranston. RI 02920

Bablcnis. Nikki; 177 Garden HUls Drive. Cranston, Rl 02920 Bachhuber, Lisa; 1 1300 Tara Boad, Polomas. MD 20854

Bade, Catherin; 25 Woodland Drive. Boonton. NJ 07005 Bahl. Eliiabet; 72 Monterey Dr., West Warwick. RI 02893 Baker, Constanc: R.F.D. 2 Box 308. No. Scituale. RI 02S57 Baker. Heather; 15 Francis Street, Newport, Rl 02840 Baker, Janice; 9 School Ln., Tillon, NH 03276 Baker, Wdliam; 32 Partridge Hollow. Gales Ferry, CT 06335 Bakr, JamiUah; 199 Mautuckel Road. Wakefield. Rl 02879 Ballou. Daniel; 365 Essex Street, Salem, MA 01970 Ballou, Rebecca; 177 Mathewson Road, Barrington, Rl 02806 Banick. Cheryl; 27 Cedar fond Drive 9, Warwick, Rl 02886 Baranoski, Dianei 329 Fines Lake Drive East. Wayne. NJ 07470 Barber, John; CUITord Drive. Weckapaug, RI 02891 Barber. John; East Fairway Avenue. Westrly. Rl 02891 Barbour. Bruec; 626 River Ave., Narragansett, Kl 02882 Barcan. Kalherin; 10 Cottage Place. HiUsdalc. NJ 07612

^^.\"E'6^hoTe\i^e'L"^e!'FX.MfSS35 Barall, J. Micha; 287 Waylaod Ave., Providence. RI 02906 Barsoom. Maha; 20 Garfield Street. North Providence, RI 02904

Battey, Brian; Cucumber Hill Rood, Foster. BI 02825 Batu, Michael; 523 Savoy Streel, Bridgeport, CT 06606 Bava,

Jospeh;

2A9 Hidden Pond Path. FranUin

Lakes, NJ 07417

Bayncs, John; 74 Greenville Avenue. North Proridcoc*, Rl 04911 Baziolis, Angela; 95 Clcnotere Drive, Cranston, RI 02920 Bcade, Paul; 32 Marbury Avenue, Pavrtucket, RI 02860 Beardsk-y. Dawn; 3 Grays Plain Road, Sandy Hook. CT 06482 Beaudelte, Daniel; 140 Cottage Street, Central FalU, HI 02863 Beaudreau, Berlha; P.O. Box 394, West Kingston. RI 02892 Beaujean, Michel; 15 Dwight Street, Cumberiand. Rl 92864 Beaulieu, James; 554 E. Mam Road, Middletown. RI 02840

Due to a regrettable oversight by our Senior Section Editor the following Seniors were omitted from their correct College pages. We have done our best to rectify the situation, and we offer our most sincere apologies. Gail H. Wagner Dawn M. Wright

Co-Editors-In-Chief Renaissance 1986

^

Karen Blais of Arts & Sciences

Aileen M. Burke

Marketing

Dartiel Bocktis & Sciences

College of Arts

Janet Bonitati

Nursing

Atliiiy Paul Barnes Mgt. Information Systems

John Capalbo

Accounting

Will Collins

Laura Contardo

College of Arts & Sciences

College of Arts & Sciences

Anthony Costantino College of Arts & Sciences

Roxanne D. Ambolo

Marketing

Steven Jacobs

Chemical

En^neering

Dean

Sposato

Finance

Lee Wesolowski

Brian Whalen

College of Arts & Sciences

College of Arts & Sciences

[vjary M Wrenn Biomedical Electrical

Eng.

Beeb. Usa; Box 256, Dover 1 B^kecl1, Michael; 22 Longviev Bdche r, Thomas;

B<ll.

B<U.

V

ii^desjaraej

County Lini 300

,;

Ridge Caparco. Gina;

Diamond H

Marlboro. NJ

0

160

Carey! Richard; '31 Douglas Circle, Greenville, Carlini, Elena; R.d. 1 16 Norlhgale Dr., Wald

Carls'on.^Eric;

102854

18

ooia

lonsville Road,

-.

Jeffrey;

1

ChappcU

Woniuue;

.,

iickory

lii^Haven,

BlackweU. Dawn; 16 Vincent Avenue. Pawtucke' Blais, .\lan; Apt. 434, Grad. Village. Kingston, I Blaskowski. John; 22 Cold Spring Road, Avon, ( Block. Dale; 22 DiUon Avenue. North Kingston,

Cozzolino, Joseph; 11

RI D281

Kingston, Rl 0

Cribari, Jacquely; Betty Pond F

23*1^1"^ AvenueTwes't Wai

Providei

orefield S

Shar

Casey. Deborah; Casey, Paul; 400/16 Pleasant St., Ruinlord, Rl U216 Casey, Richard; 5 Pearl Street, Easl Greenwich, RI 02818 Cassavell, Patricia; 3 Skyline Drive. Upper Saddle Rv., NJ 0 Cassidy, Michael; 33 North Grove Street, Valley Stream, m

Edef^e'irs^vr Lin^lo*! Ri'mSCS

12

Cavaliere, MarceUa; 70 Griffllh Drive, Riverside, RI 02915 Centracchio Annie; 67 Lakewood Drive, Narragansett, RI 02 Chace, Donald; 35 Old Carrage Rd. Apl. 97, West Warwick, Cbak, Sonia; 482 Smithfield Ave., Pawtucket, RI 02860 Chambers, Karen; 70 Russett Hill Road, Sherbom, MA 0177

P.O.Xx 3M,"wyom'iliE,' RI

Bonetli,' Michael; 29

NJO

CastX"Richard;

Block, Denise; 2 Devon Court, Holmdel, NJ 07'

Bombard, WiUiam;

Champlin, Joseph; Champlin Drive, Ashaway,

Wysid^Driv^W^ck

4 HiUcrest Avenue,

, ,

CuHen

,

Cunha

.

Elizabet; 43

IJsa;953'G reenville

CunnilT.

Jacqueli;

F

Cuomc1,

Deborah;

1

Alfred; 11 U Kenyon Jr., John; 95 Hyde

.V,

Curzaice,

IXp; p!a'i Cynthia;

Czam,

D;Alfo nso,

2O80

Bay;

56

Lori; 46

d;(Cfrio, Robin;

:ck Bd.

F

Johnston,

Lisa; 10 Ca

,

Cuddy Susan; 34 ,Vloorbnd Cugno Paul; 1320 Kingstow.

Cynar,

Booth. Barry; 137 Lepes Road, Portsmouth, RI Borge, Laura; 28 Atlas Streel, Providence, RI 0

EUse;

Kathleen; 1069 Cla,

Crostoin,

RI 02804

Bonitati, Janet; 16 Prospect Street. Smithfield, i

Bourcier.

^ Rd.,Asb Village

Cox, Lexie; Colonial

Warwick,

ible Road. Middletown, RI 02 Road

iusan; 4042 Post Road, Warwick, RI ( tephen; 818 Kingstowi

Mdlpond. North Andover

BirdseU

Cower, Kathleen; 20 Cedar Isli

Johnston,

el Dr., Cranston. R102S I, West

:helle;

High' Tor

k)unihan. Robert; 298 West Forest Ave., Pawtucket, RI 5 Donald Drive, Middleton, Rl 02840 Coumoyer, Gerald; 32 Arona Street, Woonsocket, RI 02 :ourtney, Maria; 802 North Salem Rd., Ridgfield, CT 0

:oupul, Joseph;

CheTry La'^ne. BrislorRl'M8

Camevale.

0

layHov SUnley Avenue, Woonsocket, RI 0289' ^Itam, Thomas; 35 Cypress Avenue, Narragansclt. RI :ottreIl, Karen; 115 Dodge Street, North Kmgstown, KI >uEhlin, Timoihy; 58 Cochran Street, West Warwick, 1 :ouher, Cynthia: Purgatory Road, Exeter, Rl 02822 Me. Michael; 17

Hub'^rd R(^d" Hartlbrd, ") Cardu^i, JoTnne; .m TirStrTet; Su^f City,% Ca^W' Guyi

i, Robert,' ( M Central Si Bergei Bergeiron. Lawre nee; 130 Sou

77

JorthF

Joanne 18 Charles Avenue, Westerly. I 33 Bishop Hill Road. North Sit

Capalbo, John;

HighbawW

J

Frit;'3684

]105 Iden

,

4Eboi

Id Hdl Road, Ash: anor

VV. Bel Air

Ion, Jan in.-

Todd; 7S07 Bethany Drive, ForestviUe, M "

>ul;

96 Slee i

Hollow Drive, Cumberland rborah Road, Warwidc, Rl 0

Highlar

Ch^n, jlnetf

Cov'enl sentry, :

isereau,

Chartier, Daniel

cy,

Jonalh; 7

Maryann;

Chaves. Kevin; t indenE Chon ISO Hut lewell A Chen, :hen, Chong; ;henard, Jeffrey; Addison Kd., '

1

Court,' Wychoff.'NJO

rface. Ridge?ield!"c itrcc't!'Pro^den^, KI ( nd

lande. Fr:

Drive,

Avenue,

:,

Malveme, NY

11565

csRd.. North Kingstov

-.,

""" "

Cheshire, Jeanet Cheslock, Kathie

0 Dillor

Bartolo' 20 Lonpvue Avenue, Westerly, R Benedetto. Marina; 71 Crescent Ave., Rye, NY ll De Marco. Linda; 126 Edgewood Boulevard, Cranslo De Menocal, Peter; Crad School Oceanography, Nar

Maria';

De De

DPlai

Chisholm I

John;

I

Davis, Tracey; Tamanaco Road, Bradford, Rl 02808 Dawson, William; 1165 Main Street, South Windham

Chester, Charles Chevalier, S iabai, Joseph; 1 Chic.

mford,

I. Chris

Provider

Robin;

Chmielewski, Stephen Chofav, Pamela; I Chofay, Ronald; I "

Salvo, Sara; 26 Ichabod Road,

De

Santis,

Christop;

Thomas;

Deaett, Laurette; 187 Sisson Street, Pawtucket, RI 0! Deal. Elizabet; 70 Adams Pt. Rd.. Barrington, RI 02i

Demes,

Cheryl;

76

Delus'ki, alrisliii; 6 Scott Drive , NortII Easion, W mo, Debotah; 218 We, Ic, Fred; 25 7 Beacon Di lerly, RI 02! Huu; 98 0lak SI. Apt. ner, Gary; 7185 FairfitildCoo art 60 Allei ; 60 Fifth SI no,

^eLTlCcvin

Sauga

;hes,"jirc

B^adw:

Kingstown,

Fall Rive Cumberl

Jackson

40 iaw MiU H

Avenue,' North

Pr^s'^THe^ghtsrAs'hland, MA

13

*;dA

1, 126 IS,

18

Julie;

Simsb'ury,

CT 060" 23 Spring Street, Milford, MA C P.O. Box 3605, Peacedale, RI 028(

De

De Witt,

^hurchill. Kiel ;illino, Jo'hn; 1

t.

Apt, 203, Newport. Rl 02840

Mayfl -ly St.,

Jeanne; Kenyon School Bo ad, Kenyon,

Colby, Erie;

553 Essex Road P.C

,liddletowi Cole, Dale Ann; 182 Jones Stree Cole, Jeffrey; Shelldrake Rd., Wakefield, I .

Coleman, Michael; 223 Glen HUls Drive, Cra Collier, Wiehrs; 246 Foddering Farm Road, ! Colson, Boslyn; 34 Luion Ave. 12, Providcnci

Cabral, Betty; 84 Ea.st Bourne Avenue. Tivei Cahral, Davra; 130 Hayden Ave., Tiverton. 1 Cacchiotti, John; 196 Rockwood, Cranston, R Cafferky, Virginia; 25 Third Streel, North KiI Cain, Thomas; 91 Pipers Ilill Road, WUlon. Cajto, Teresa; 65 Webb Sireel, Providence, I

iad, Schenecl'ady, rank;! lond. Laui >iaz, Elizabet; 74 Boon Street, Narragansett, 3ibella, Anihony; 4430 Post Rd. B-22. East Ci

Comeau. Paul: 28 Cedar Crest Drive. Weslei mhledon Court, Ki 7 Woodland [ /akefield, I

JickJe, CynthU;

Me.^"iith tephen;loUy,

.

Dickson, 'Kelly;

Maynower Vsbury

21

Upyonda Way, Rumford.

!

'l070

Oiebler, Herman;

silver Lake

Union Street, Manchcstei 58 Deacon Abbott Road, Ke

Dieffenbaeh, Patricia; 240 Maple Avenue, Nev I, Soulh 1 loffer

Providence,

RI Oi

.ispo', CA 93401

NY 12309

Dolan, Owen;

549

Dry Bridge

lad. North Kingstown,

RI

Donatelli, Kathryn; 118 Cottagi Donnelly, Cand; 100 New Loni Donnelly, Patrick;

Flores, Mary; 953A Tower HiU F Fbru, Arthur; 114 Homestead A' Flynn, Charles; 57 Tuckermao A

le, ton

765 Conesto

1 Oak Street,

iewport,

Dou^as, Robert;

Westerly,

WOMSI*

Road,'Flahml^U

16 HiUside 02: U Oak Grove Avenue, FaU River W

K

Shore

DrewV., B.J.;450 MI 488M

Dub, Michael;

85

',

5 Chris Ter

"ian, Easl Greenwid

lartl^;

fiingwood, NJ 074S6 Itreet, Emerson. NJ 076: 0

Ira

>,

EUal,"^

tephen;

Geduldig, Juhe;

;elhac

-enue,

Rl 0

Cranston,

I

4

Enos, Lori; 17 El Inora Street. Riverside.

Coil;

0'27

MA

AshaWay,

re,

156 Delfwood

Escobar, Joseph;

32

n

Fordson Avenue, Cran;

asen,

Elizabet;

asm,]

Steven; 123 Westfiel

284A

Candlcwood Isle, New Fairf

Pequotsepos Road, Mysti

]

'Leslie;

Rd., %lystic,

(

i^w Blvd.,

Box 2302

Garvey, Scott; Bayberrv Lane Caumer, Gerald; 91 Rochambe Gauvin, Kenneth; 39 Gorham f Gebhia, Eileen; 32 Pond Road,

*S^konk,

ichard

esfport, CT 06880

rS

Apt.

Elm:

Eranosian,

84

rabedian,

Leslie;

Englund, Robert;

Road, Claslonbur

dT, bS',

S

Wakefield, ] NJ 07013

L,

Lane, Cumberland, RI 02864 31, Riverside, KI 02915 193, Kingston. Bl 02881

GaUogly, SheUo; 161 Overfield Road, Easl Gre Calvao, Joflo; 18 Amstrong Ave., Providence, I CambiDO, Denbe; .364 VaOey Brook Road. Ora Gammen, Deborah;

Frederick Streel,

Elia

s

CaU^er, Michael; 2]

rabediai

"

Thomas; Ehrhardt, Thou

..

f

,

194, West Kingston, HI

"

Edfer,

Avenue, Madawaska,

65 Elle V St., Cambridge, MA 02138 D Street, Mechanic Falls, ME

Nl C

Earlev. David; 127 Crane Cir Ebeni

Eberly, Slem F Ebinger. V " Edge, Johi

33-15 Tb.

107 Hillside Ti 35 James Roac Beth; 111 Ashley S 8 Color

Hal!, Kaihryn; milton

ioad, Scotch Plains,

Richard: ]

';

Hall, Dorothy; Spring Valk)

Duggan, Elizabet; 94 Albert Avenue Duggan, Francis; 94 Albert Ave., Ci

Kathleen;

(

HaU, Charles; 82 Cloverdali t.

85 Sciluate Ave., Dufresnc, Roberta; 17 Arnold St., S Dugan, Randall; 14 Englewood Lani

:

Heights, NY 1059S

-adR.

I

Dufresne, Robert;

oArthui

1

Gutowki. James; 602 Main Street, Sayreville, NJ Guy, Patricia; 28 Little Rest Road, Kingston, RI OlHWi Guzuhiitis, Peter; 1097 Old Baptist Rd., North Kingstown, Haas, Kristin; SO County Street IOC, Norwalk, CT 06851 ichard; 1 Jones St., Lincohi, Rl 02665 Hagerl ames; 64 Nonquit Lane, Tiverton, Rl 02878

Hafe,

Dudzinski, Paul; IS Woodi oed, Duffel Duffck, Mary Ell; Duffy, Paul; 71 Lorraine Avenue, Pi Duffy',

rshfield,

^

Sloco m, RI 02877

Yay1^00 Valley Apl. 2,

a;

Rl 02840

Nordi Kiogstov

Nedc H

S Cedar A

aon'd; (

Road,

Rl I

Rd.,

Wei

Cenesse, GiUes; 10 Josephine S 1025 BuUocks P

John;

Gennari,

Birchnood Drive, North

iLnlas; 85^Fe^cr

rshkoff,

Kings

w"ckfordRI fraSM""^*""'

,

iller. Paige; P.O. Box 1

Cransloi

Halsey Street, Newport,

Bach

Gee, Katherin; P.O. Box 242, 1 CencareUa, Michael; Nichols L

3

Copse Hoad, Madison, CT

0<

1

rchard Rd.. Wes( Elder

laperville,

Circle. Lincoh, 1

IL 60540

Box 194,

Cilchrest igan.

Brandon; 5648

Bonita Vista

Way

Noank,

<

irhlehead. MA 01945

Gill. Car

It

I^Joh^*15!"flucna''visla oI^e.^^Nort 37 liUace. Edward;

Beverly Drive. Avon,

,

.,

Heditsian, Donald; 10 Heemskerk, Ardith; Z'. Heearty, Margaret; Si Hehi. Robert; 109 Sim

North Smithfiet.

Smilhfi'eid,

SyivL

RI 02:

10 Cold Spring Avenue, North Provider zio, William; P.O. Box 1403, Kingston, Bl 02S81 therstone, Ian; 74 Porter Phice, Monlclair, NJ 07042 , Christiii; 88 LeedsviUe Drive, Uncroft. NJ 07738 ney, Shari; 1 Black Pt, Horseshoe, Bumson, NJ 0776 man, Robert; 108 Dccrfield Road, Cranston, RI 029: n, William; 49 Hamilton Boulevard, Piscataway. NJ ( rante, Ellen; R.R. 1, Box 328, East Shore R., Jamesl ranle, Richard; 628 East Shore Hd., Jamestown. RI I rara, John; 181 Lake Garden Drive, Cranston, RI 02 rau, Kathleen; Bolka Drive Box 204, Kenyon, RI 028

'Cett,

Clazman, Roman; Crad Village Apl. 223, Kingston, I Clover, Holly; Box 184. Kingston. RI 02881 Coffe, Wendy; 159 Kiwanee Road, Warwick, RI 0281 Cms, Richard; 116 Eileen Drive, North Kin^town,

^ket, RI 02S60 Ue., 0314 Sunnyva!

Hemashree. Thodur; ( Hemmalin, HoUy; 53 i

oad, North Kingston

David;

,,John; is, Stephen;

nela;285

Gombeysk

,

1

,

Comes, ChnCoodalJ.

inthrop St., Rehoboth, 5 Hood

e

138 Grad

Village

1

ragansett, Rl 02882

'BrTce; 57 Bokarl

Coodma'n.

Andrew;

Goodman, Jfli;

28 1 y Hill Drive

Goodman, Laurie;

:

2EhnS

Hill. Leah; HiUsdale

1^. WiUiam; W4i

Cordon, Michael; P.O.

7

Box 3-

Hilhna'Robert; in

Vovidencc RI

jcci, Joseph; 15

.

Attleboro,

A

Gossehn.

i; Willow Avenu I,

Field! Mary; 195 Blanchard Avenue, Warwick. RI 02SS8 Field, Sandra; 15 Meadowbrook Road, Bedford. MA 01730

;

High St., Westerly,

RI 02891

ink, J^ffr.;y; 76 Harmon Street, Long Beach, NY 11561 'ischer. Hi ony), ; 'ischette, !Gloria Ro; II Sandpiper Road, Narragansett, I Wakefield. Kei th; 77 Woodmans Tr..

RI 02S79 itch. Glenin; Hamdton Avenue, Jamestown, HI 02835 i; 153 New Meadow Kd., Barrington, Rl 02801 "itjgera d. Jeannine; 24 Hillside Road, Sparta, NJ 07871 30 Cake Lunc, Portsmouth, RI ( Johnny itzgera d. John; Kevin; P.O. Box 4629. Middlelov, HI 02840 'itzgerold. Kimberly; 28 Gorton Holden Terrace. Warwi.

[., Frederic; 832 Soulh Prospect St., Buriinglo itzpatriek; Mary; 36 Gloria Street, Pawtucket, RI, 02861 itzpahick. Timothy; 15,3 Bridal Path Uoe, New Cannan , CTi

ipton.

GraveUv Hill

Joseph; Hirschfeld, Mindy; 21 Hittner, Riehard; 53 4ort)> Ba Hoblitcelt J., jDhn;2! 1 Oaklav

Gow. 'Arthur; 'SOOH Mitklev Run. Whilehalj; Gow, Arthur; 117 5. Fourth Si. Apl. 511. AUei

Grady, lane; "indlen D anie); 145

nithfield, RI 02^28

IMPIeasan^Vi

iJv:

Could, ]

fisher,

Heidenthal, Stephen; Heun, Donald; Box 16 Helle, Julie; 169 Pleas HeUer, Sheryl; 117 To Helraa, Thomas; 802 t Hem, Sodan; 190 Mag

46

Douglji^'Terra".

'North

Hogan, Brian;

Grand^ha'mp, Mark; 65*CollegrAvenu'e. O^n 60 Brown Grant, Deborah; St., Narragansell, Grant. John; H.F.D. 3. Box 32, Pittsburgh, ^

Greenberg, Elizabet; Greene, Dana;

7F Flintlock

Wyoming,

31 Ml. Vernon 8 Alda Drive

Sti^eet,

MA 01867

iren; 1137

Wevmonlh Roa^Hinckley, OH 4 S"''*^^:."T''i'!^'.^^ Michael; Allenhurst, NJ 07711 1

:.

,

Remy, NY 12401

Robert; 206 Terrace Place. New Milford, NJ 07646 :; 43

HarboCr IsUnd RoaANa

lohnes, Martha; 103 KnoUwood Avenue, East Gi lollon, Jill; 276 HoUiiier Way, Glastonbury, CT

Ledi

Reading,

White Plai umberlar

lolmes. Elizabet; Box 444, Milford, NH 03055

Warwi. Rl 02S98

'r.R^K, St.

21 Cla

.^s^, ^u.c;

no Lancaster Avenue

Greene. Erika; Box 223.

John;

Dri^,

islon. NJ 07035 vingston, NJ 0 ',

Prov

Quince Lane, .Monsey, NY 10952 Brightwood Avenue, Torrington, CT 06790

rd, John; P 1. Joi ; Upper

,A)e

mbridge.

-

:

mpden Rd..

Hubbard. NaiKy; Hubbard,

Si>san;'2 Carvin Court, a

HuKbes, Martm; Dept. of Chemistry

Hufi,

Mae Keae, Junes; 3 Adams Avenue, Craufbrd, NJ 07016 Mac MuUan, Anita; 40 Briarwood Drive, North Branford, CT 06471 Mac Vicar, Susan; 4 Hdmes St^ee^ Westerly, Rl 02891 Macaluso, Lypelte; 709 Danids Farm Howl, Trumbdl, CT 066II MacDonald, Kimi 82 Mountain Avenoe, Riverside, RI 02915 MacDoDidd, Stephens 15 Upper CoDege Rd., Kingstwi, RI 02881 Magnan, W^IHam; 83 Jc^ Street, Newport, RI 02840 Magnano, Qy, SouAl Mais Street Box 154, VTestbrook, CT 06498

Street, Fall B ive,C Fawtudet, B '^

Koad, Middle!

3 Porter

Hughes, Mark;

Lagana, J<Meph T.; L, Daniel; 254 I L*fce Jr., WiUiom; :

WarwidJ^RI 02886

Bd., Kingston, 1

th Sdhiale Norths

Lidiberle, CidWn;

U

Diane; 104 Presidential Drive, H 132 Crsd. ~.

Laity, Martha; Apt. Hurley, William; 6 Bay Streel, NWth Kin^brwn, I Huskins, DouiOas; 79 Orchard Avenue, Middletown, lu ikmu Hyoes, Timothy; 3 Onondega Road, Narragansett, Bl 0288Z

Franki

Loiwlfi,

Village, Kingstam, King!

igstown Road, West Kingston, I

Majeika, Rose Mar; P.O. Box 289, Ki^gKoo, RI OZSSl Mallinson Jr., WHliam; 3 Sberri Lane, MidtUetowo. HI 02840

140 George Street, 43 Orchard Avenue; ^rovHiei

Ijindry, Joel;

785

Landry, Patrida;

Victory ffi^way, Woonsodat, Warwick, RIO

lannuccUk), Stecie; 85 Superior View Blvd., Nortii Proividence,

]

lemma, Michael; 35 Biceatennial Way. North Providence, RI OS Imbof, Susan; R.D. 3 Box 124 Kenyon Road, Greenwich, NY 12 Imoodi, Deborah; 257 Raoldn Avenue, Providence. HI 02908 Ingram, Doona; 33 Raleigh Court, Groton, CT 06340 Ireland, Judidi; 58 Northbriar Drive, North Kingstown, RI 02K IsTvel, Karen; 650 East Greenwtcb Ave. NOIO. West Warwick, I -

M J,

Jamfts; 224 New London Avenue. West Warwict, RI 0! 24 Mullen Ave., Wanaque, NJ 07465 19

^

I4IS2

^j^g eDale. 1

1

Manickas, Beth; Manning, Jo)

Manning;

Tb

Ma^Id,'

tBidgi HA,

ragak^, El^herj

Beach Townbouses, Charlesiown,

P.O. Rox

New

Fairiieid, C

203, Kingston

Jorth Provide (tee, 1

Maryland Street, New Bedford,

108

aid;

RI 02S13

1

KnoUwood Circle, Simshury, CT 06070 1.

Gail;

P.O. ft ,

stors

5

,^^^^^^,jjj^^

Latos, Heidi; 42'West Bel Air Road, C Latourette, Robert; 78 L^urelwood Di louder, Francis; 99 Bbck Point Farm Lauer, EUzabel; 10 Hilkrest Road, Fa

Jmckson, Thnotiiy; Jacobs, Steven;

Rd, R.F.D. 1. West Kingston,

idge

m Aven venue. Lappin Jr., James; 81 Washburn Laprade, Michel; 325 North Main Stn

MaUoy, Brian; 52 BIu*erry Lane, Cnmstoo, HI 02920 Malloy, Michael; II Gushing Rd., Warwick, RI 02888 Malloy, Robert; 7 Diana Drive, Pawtucket, RI 02861 Mahmey, ChristiH]; 73 West Elizabeth Street, Skaneatelei, NY Mancini, Kimberly; 1320 Kingstown Rd., Kingston, HI 02881

Walk,

Le

B^, Mic'hael; -Mift^r Street

'court,

raine; 3 Shady HiU Road, Nashuc

;reton,'CT 06340

9CliffonSin Et, Maiden, MA 02;

Sbertey Phce, Fairfield,

12 Chestnut Hills

lediany;

Coventry, BI 0281

Deborah: 122 Ga

.

""3 URI, :,

Kingston, 1Rl

02!

id 0 L. Stenton Stentoi Ave., Westerly, 1 College Road, Kingston, RI OS West Kuigston, 1 a Rd. Apt 2, We Kingstovm

Central Falls, HI 0

__

""

I

Maring, Hal;

Newport Ave

1763

Leach, Carolyn; 50 Third S&*et, B

Marks! ks, SheiUh;

Leber, George;

JohnsOD, Laura; Saugatucket Boad, Wakefield, Shirley

1

Stephen

Lee, Fraw*s; 13

Maris, Donna; 10 Lawrinda Drive,

S

Avenuc^West

V RI 02893 Warwick, Lefehvr*. Gisele; 57 Potter Lefebvre, Undo; 6 Flanders Street, Johnsti Lefebvre, Stephen; 55 Friendship Street, E

Legg. John;

Severance

Co'mmack.

1

rshall, Robert;

>udi,

525 Crad

Kalisz,

57

tin, Paul; Sprii zilU, David; 235 I

U

Lello. Mary; 56 Phillips Streel, Wickford, HI 02852 Lemek, Paul; 157 College Street, Warwick, Rl 02S8 Leone, Chiara; 161 Windward Walk, North Kingstov Keporc, Lisa; 115 Neepaug Boad, Apt. 9. Narragans Leveillee. John; Hopkins Hill Road, Coventry, RI 02 Leventhal, Andrew: 583 Ocean Terrace. Slaten IsIbb

lello.JKaHa; 24

M

CortJina,

:,

Imad; John;

,

1

rMiddiei

354 South Pier Hd. Apt. 12 Cove Court, North P

'orthind, CT 06480

Jennifer; Jobs

Kansata, Tadashi; 44

Village

Shimoidiiki, Kagosbima

RI 02871

loulh, RI 02S7I Portsmouth, RI 0! mdham, NJ 074I

Lodge Club, Lovel.

E!atber Hill V

Jud<Jnijunio, Kusumasl;

NY U725

MarseUa, Cheryl; 1974 Atwood Avenue, Ji^nston, RI 0291! Marsh, Oavid; 51 Ridgeview Circle, New London, CT 063:

t

'estport Boad Lambert Co. 43, Wilton, C

Partree Road, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003 ittle Resl Road, Kingston, RI 02881 Middlebridge Rd. H.H. II, Narragansett.

^rland,

B

Matusze'wsbi,

Ley, George; 92 Eas

Mauran,

9:

John;

William';

I

P.O. Boi 36,

Kings'lon,

B

Mayette,' Brett; 5 Indian Trail, e

Wakefield, I Maynard, Hoork; Hoss Hill Road, Bradford, RI ffiiSOS Mazzadra, Joann; 115 Lantern Road, Stratford, CT 06497 Mc Allister, Joseph; 1401 Blair Mill Rd., 719, SUver Spring,

HI 02881

Village, Kingston,

Mc Conn,

Mary Bet; 59 La Salle Dr \ 02777

KecUer, Kimberly;

1

Ruth; 6

tepha.

1 Atahar

Locker.

'Aleiande;

Logan, Cynthia;

I>ogcher, Erica;

423 North Wood Avenue, florence, Al. 58 Biscay Drive, Flanders, NJ 07836 331 Springs Road, Bedford, MA 01730

Lidos, Donna; 611 Beacon Circle, 4

Box 323 ;,

CanAi

jr*.

Village,

Kingston, RI 028

Bluff Road, Newport,

VI

Mc

Donald.

1

c

Long^

Road,

"^

KareD^9 '

Richborou^ Road, ChesterHeld,

]

'

>au^as Hoad,

'

Kathy;

Soulh

210

Pier

Road,

Narre^nsett,

Crane; HI 02882

c

37 Lower

College Road, Kingston,

ISOOakivood

Steven

Greavy, June; 125 Canton

Av

^umness. Hale, Susan;

I4

Hugh, Pauline Kansa, Slephe c

Kieman, Fred

c

Kinney, Ceral

Gray Streel, Myrtle Ave

96

;

80

Rodney

H

RI 02881

An^e Street,

-^

WS; 8

Mc

Park

Mc

8 Gould Pll

leryl; Lynch, Judy; Kranz. Mary; 539 Shore

Lynch!

ishna; Dept. Che. I i;r;

2351

CaA^i^; 459 Wanvick Ne<iAvenue. Warwick.1 :

tonough, Witlia Elroy, Kathleen;

Box 344-, Saunderstow)

Lopes Jr., Joseph; 2 Major Clethe Runway Narragansett, RI { Losie^ricz, David; 70 England Street, Cumberland, RI 0S864

Lundgaard, Ola; Kolek,

Daniel, Kathleen;

vidence

3 Plum BeaA

Lucas, Barbara; 120 Staples Road, Easion. CT 06612 Lucia, Rita; 259 Strobel Road, Trumbull, CT 06611 Lulewitz, Terry; 336 E. Mosser, Allentown, PA 18103

Knott, Kristin; 77 Jersey Stree Knowles, Robert; P.O. Box 35<

62 Talbot

mberland,

02874

:ollege Hd., Kingston,

:, Valhalla, Streel, Caughcy, James; 525 Charles St., Providence, RI 02904 Comadi, Stuart; 45A Eagles Run, East Breenwich, RI 02? (>>urt. Brian; 3 Dukes Road, Wellesley, MA 02181

Carthy, Justin;

Lonardo, David; 7 Mame Street, Johnstmi, RI 02919 Lonardo. Richard; 26 Angell Boad, North Providence, RI 029

Londcrgau, Julia;

Central A

Garrick, Robert; 50 Woodland F Carthy, Gregory; 9 Thomas Hat

MA 01119

Ijifayette Road, North Kingstov

:raduate

24

Springfield,

Mc Mc Mc Mc Mc Mc Mc

1900

Randolph

^

g. Crawford y,

Hall, Kingston

Mc

140 Goodhue

Hopkins

Th.

LiTin,'Corinne;'35

Druid

Av

ve, ,

-Kirk, Eilee cBeth, it

Road. Wakefield, f

i^d,

Jan

Jamcs; M) Cliff Avenue, Newport, i Nulty, Shanoo; 229 High Street Rear, Cu: ibertand, HI 02864 Pardand, .Mark; 12 Beach Plum Road, Ng idgewater, NJ 08807

HiJl'l

Lynn, Mao'; 99 Soundview Dri

Wall, NJ 07719

Nally!

Coventry',

Smithfield.

]

Medved, Robert; I'ebsler

i

Mehdizadeb, Vahid;

23 E Route

Mehringer, Gwyn;

Essam;' P.O.

Meleby,

Osgood, Sheri; 2156 Mendon Rd.,

Osto, Robert;

oad, >,

Psghusi, Maria;

1

Paige, Karen; I

H

Iwood Hill

I

lidden

'

Palumbo, ! o C Carla; Panaggio

-

V; Lane. Valley

4CoggeshaU

5

iki, Nddd;

Cogge:' Coggeshall

Avenue, T

:.

Wendy La^e

10

Wilbur Avenue, Newport, RJ 02;

H.D.

HI 02J

widtefkld, HI

5,

Elgar Place, Bronx,

1

NY 10475

Avenue. Prorid^nce,

Ravenswood

R

Reis, Thomas; 95 Brcn^de Hoad, Somerset, MA 0272

'

a

30 Woodcr

Pappadia, Priscilh

Highl^d I

Miller, 'Oebi

120 28

Reilly^ Teresa; 72

7

Alfred;

^

Mikei

Road, WdieBeld. RI Oi

Reilly, Geoffrey; 74 Grain Terrace, Portsmouth, HI 0! Reilly, Joanne; 74 Grain Terrace, Portsmouth, HI 028; Reilly, Robert; 171 Grant Ave., New Providence, NJ 0

Monica; 54 Rocky Boad

'

>

Parent, Lorinda; IS Park, Jae-Youn; 31 Parii, Stephe,

CooLdge

>

15 Normandv

Rebello, Karen; 18 Buston Ave.. Apt. 4, Somerset, M^ Redraido, Maria; 3595 Post Rd., Apt. 24107, Warsvick,

Reilly. Dameon;

Mey, (Jarolyne; 134

John;

Br^ord;

Read,

Reid! Patrick;

\

Meyer, Christop; 50 Wood^.,.^ Meyer, Jerri; 3 Old Fourth Hoad, .

Road,

Rauch, Katharin; Bmi 901 High Street, Bkidc bland, B Ray, Beverly; 45 Spencer Street, West Warwick, RI 01 Hay. Richard; 8756 Granada Blvd., Orlando. FL 32811 Haymood, David; 85 Hulda Hill Road, Wilton, CT 06i

Reid. Cynthitt; 188 Brookwood Hoad. Warwick,

"ly.J

There; _

Michaud,

Wo!onsocket, 'rI 02895

P.O. Box 375,

Kingslon, RI 02881 Osmansb, Matthew; 45 Adirondack Drive, East Greenwich, Ottaviano, Russell; 4 Edwards Road, Johnston, RI 02919 Ozguc, Ismail; 37 Lower College Road, Kingston, RI 02S81 PaciUi, Paige; 764 Oak Hill B PariUi, 1

,.

iaolkciurt

Gary;

157 C

iel;

Pawcatuck', CT 06379

Hartfor J. Box3C ^ -"'' 12 Oak Court, Fanwood, NJ 0

.

Sana,

Orsia

t.

B03

Cranston^' HI 02920

Lane,

Hubbard Street,

Reatillard, Jo Ann;

Tailgate Rd., Apt. 4. Warwick

:

238 Center

Street,

HI

Westerly,

Rhodes, Roger;

5 Continental Dr.,

Farkei

Be^gham, UA

Middletown, RI

021

irtfaF ; 45 Woodniff Avenue, Wakefield, HI 02879 len.Carc.1; 34 Western Ave. 10, Trenton, NJ 08618 8 South HUlview Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882 I; 28 South HiUview Drive. Narragansett, RI 02882 n

Ave.. Utile Falb.

NJ

Riemer, ScoH; 126 Counlrv Ridge R Hieatti. Paul; 45 Wells Park Road. Sl Klbme Rigney, Mary; 167 Woodbi

^"'^'^^'

street

,

07424

Elizabet; ( ithre. Uday; Arohan.Plot 30 Siu^^ey 133, Aundh Poona, India 4 FS 91 .,

maid; a

^airfield,

ingdon Hill

,

edersen, Kathryn;

loberts.

Apt. C, Provit

Ave. ,

Rd'. N. Scituate, HI 02 Winona Street. Providence, I 108 Roberta Avenue, Woonso Kevin; 19 linrohi Street. Esmond, HI Kevin; 21 Pleasant Street, Chelmsford -

F

CT 06-

Eck, John; 36 Thurston Street, <; 19

Armingtot)

itron, Stephani; 928 Hampshire Road, Bay Shore, NY 11706 ittersoD, Tina; 7 Doreen Drive. Westerlv. Rl fa.m\

Monashim, James; 904 Boston Nek I Monahan, Charles; 362 Sahshury Str Monahan, Lee; 24 Locust Valley Hd.,

Angell

;

7

P.O. Boi 64]

nson, jane; 118

Highland Water Sti

Benson Avenue, Warwick. HI 02888

Moran, Mary; 145 Pleasant St. Apl. 4A. > Moravec, Bradford; 44 ElUand Road. Wa Morin, Glenn; 141 Weslfield Drive, Crans

itho

.

.

^eaUi^^Debt

>1 Stree

Ralph; 220 Shady Penrod, Mary; (67 ,

*

i.'Tivertoi.

,

Perdomo,

BI

Rodngues ,

Mosher, Byard; 144 Mountain Road, Cone Mosisa, Abraham; 12 Fortin Road, Kingsti Mrm, Melissa; 2 Michael Terrace, NeT>o

Central

HI02S78

Falls.

RI 02*

KiwaneJ

Penin, 'Jennifer; 128

Peterson, Mark; 153 Chapci S -

Peterson, Marv; 459

Peerson,Sephe^7 ael; 1

Muller, Ronald; Widgeon Lane' Little Coi Mulligan, CoUeen; Hunting House Une, ) MidUgan. Paul; 12 Porter Road, Middletoi Murdock, Kim; 24 Fortin Rd., Kingston. F

Arrowhead Dr

[ichae"'s

Rothchild, Alexa

Rov, Mat

Rubin, Murphy. James;

Lisa

Murphy, Susan;

Lane. Westport, CT

96 Glenhrook

Murphy, Joseph;

11

Road,

Apple Valley Pkwy.,

Tr.U.n, NJ

Piccillo,'Sandra;'

G

Nadeau, Sharonle; I Nagel, Robert; 35 C

mfield,

Brid;

Ppkys, Michel;

3

Poethke, Martin;

1

Iggieri! Mark' 251

Church

A-

iggiero, Charles; 148 Plain Sl

n,'0flrleoe; : Pollari^ Natahe; 6)

Olive.

0

110

0

idotph, Robert; 9 Cladstoae igg, John; 154 Adrian Streel. iggeri, John; 3 Mechanic St iggieri, Carl; 41 B Street. Ci igeri, Joanne; 17 Ledge Sb

Pierce, Ellen; 5 Sh

Pile, Joy;

Nguyen,

7 Hutherglen J I Garden HilU

Ai

Picard, WiUiam; 11

Wai

<

Na

erton. RI 02878 North Kingstown,

Foslon. Jerald; 34 :

Nordmann, Angela; Norton,

1

Fowde'rly,

1 Whitehor

'Cathet

69

Nunnery, James;

Morley Drive, WyckofT,

Maureei

Salvione, Lisa; 21 13 WestgateDr-.Bo se, m 83702 _I6 Central Street. Sanchei, Daryl; rly,

Nl O:

Son Souci, Leah;

O'Brien, Cinny; 37 Buckingham Drive, Dix Hills, 1 O'Bnen. lane; WA Chestnul Street, \ewtvirt. RI

ichard; 78 Old D'Sulliva

n

0;ConDor,

196 Watch HUI

John;

Bd..

Westerly,

RI 02891

ptra Drivel Hum^d,

15 RI 02916 OKeefe, Tommy; 385 Pound Hill Rd., North Smilhfield, 1 O'MaUey, Linda; Colt State Park. Bristol, RI 02809 O'Neil, Patrick; 4J3 Tower Hill Hoad, North Kingstown, I

Saravo, Dina;

Priestiey,

Elizabet; 11 Appian Vay, vid; 30 Tilden Aven

Pmnp'hrey

cy; 217

Tomahawk Trail, Wakefield, I

Oliver, Oliver,

Omaj-a-AIwftlB, Tboi

Ridge Road,

I

Drive, No

WilUam;

Hago, Thomas;

Raphael,

Fall

236, Kenyon

>liddle

21 Could

,

North

Kingslov

Winter Street, Wnnnwtpt I

Sawyer, Gena;

-lighway, Wake^elo

Way, Saunderstown, HI

2 Bo<

>

I

iau^"j"r'jX.VMKtnn^yDrive'^,\V8^'cV!'lM iavaria, Uonel; 425 C

18

Uberty

Stree c

15 Sealund

flo^rt; H.R.

Rive^,

mouth, Rd., E

P.O. Boi MIL Kintst

Pine Roa Gold Star

walk^CTt^ 82, Oxford, M

1

Id.. James Road. Quin h Road, Kingston, HI 02 Backie, David; 29 Morgan Avenue, Warvrick. Rl 0

Ohsberg, Ronald;

It Bonita; 68 T Stephen; 24E

arsalari, Sattel, I

Ba^

h; 55 Old

Susan;

,D. 2. Delhi. NY 13753 Woodbin 28 NortI North HiU

173 Beechwood Av

2t Lisa; P 0. Boi

Hemlock Drtve. East G

;

OtK>n>ewski, Ann;

Kso'l

;

H ucklebury

165

arkis, Edgar;

uie; 1223

OTRourke, Joseph;

Core

Sands, Stacy; 3

Lane. Newport. HI 02840

O'ConneU. Jane; 16 Stenton Avenue. Westerly, HI 02891

0"Ga,ViIl^mi

Sandrovnki.

F

f

314. Foster, RI 0282!

RaspoUo, Michael; 2 Jasmine Lane. Johnston, RI 0 Ratte, Brian; 285 Auburn, Cranston, RI 02910 Ratzlaff. Linda; 30 Brandywine Place, Oakland, N'

xkviUe, Village,

<

Saymeh, Hiyad; e/o Ministry of E 02881 0 Sakonnet

Blvd., Narragansett, HI 02882 'arren Road, Sparta, NJ 07871 ; 277 Still Hill Hoad, Hamden, CT 06518

SchaefTer, Ira;'3 Scheer, Eric; 9 Lakeside Drive, Narragansett,

BI

0^2

Schluhach, Linda; p'.O. Box 77, West Kingston,' RI 02892 Schmidt, Christin; 57 Anne Lane, North Kingstown, HI 02852

SduDidt, Uura;

P.O. Boi

Sthtaier. Riehanl.

Sdiodc, Steven; Scbolz, Steven;

1536, Kineston,

Blaine Street, Cranston, RI 02020 Road, Manchester, CT 06040 idolph Avenue, Tiverton, Rl 02878 Eleventh St., Providence, R

IS H;U >

tteraut

588 Tillinghast RoafLEasI Green' 46 Peacock Lane, Commack, NY I

School

Scfawager, Kathleen; R.R.

Fairfield. I Kingslon. HI 028)

I

Judith;

Tanglewood Lane,

4

e. North Kingstown, RI ragansett, RI 02882

Ridgewood Road, Middletov

1

Greenwich, RI 02818

Cove Road, \

1, Warwick,

ScuUin, Mary; 34 Goodard Scully. Margaret 71 Laure Sebestyen, Paul; Sebrii

k

rly, RI ,

Segern, Job Seidel, Susan

Road. Middletc ad. Narragansc is,

toad, Kingston, Sullivan, Thomas; ]

St N. 1, MakedoE

Shafto, Alison; 125 Nortbfield A

7

Casey

James;

12

taple lane. Little

Dri

Sutli^iimd, Jennifer, 546 Grei

it

Kindlon,

City Hd.,

Svosti-Xulo, Wittawat; 631 Tei Rod

C

HI 02S

1343*HeaS'^ 'Ave.^Apt.

Road,' North' Kingstowi

14, 1 5, Lane 164 Chung Shan R,

::;

Shamis, Fern; 850 Chess Drive, Baldwin."l Fairfield. C Shankey, Etoabet; I S hands, Nicholas; I venue. Wartvick -ive, Randolph, I Shapiro, Michelle;

2

Christop;

(er,

a"th>w R^ m'(ledTield,

Setteriund, Deborah; 21 Longm

02891

Jamestown, RI 02835

o'rtsmouth,RI 02871

rCoUege

EsJe.

I

,

'

Rd,. Warwick, RI 02)

'

'

Oakwoods Dri'

Swift. Jl Swobod wboda,

Shea,' Michael;

34 I

Sherbo. Marita; 35 Rochelle Street. West Springfield,

irfieid E

kes. Be Sykes. Bethany; Thomas; 7 < Szlyk, Th. Szymanski, WiUiai

Shebell,'Peter;'3W I

Ta^, Richard; -^^tTRicBflra Kok

mhous

Chin;

I,

Charles Stre 3 Flynn 104 Speer Ro.

Rod Rd.

[)

Uovd;

34

d; 264 Gai 6 Colonial 1

i

Ma^; Partridge

Hun. Charles

Sheth.

rt

ShiUer.'Pfaylhs; Pfaylhs;

inhach,

Tanner, Taren; 35 West Main

CaldweU, NJ 0

Tapply, Jon;

Yawgoo Valley Apts., Slocum, HI 02877 Short, Francis; Williams Road, Esmond, HI 02917 Shrake, Michael; 33520 Christa Drive, In^sloe, IL 60041 Sibsoa, Mono; 35 Plymouth Hoad, While Plains, NY 10603 Siebens, Kimberlv; 34 Goulart Lane, Portsmouth, RI 02871 Siedel, Thomas; 158 Rose Place, West Paterson, NJ 0Y424^ 13

4er! Malt; 3 1

Taykr. James;

Tayh>r, Philip;

Westrich, Elizabet; Weyant, Catherin;

enhavet

Anthony; iiro, Mark;

Kennedy Sireel, ,

iayviUe,

Thibeauli,

Nl

Woonsoi

Tr^. Smithfield, Rl

Kingston. ) Ri 0289

Dr.,' North Kingstown',

392 Butternut 22 Owen Street.

I

Providence, RI 02909

Thompson, Brian; 20 Miio Drive, Branford, CT 06405 Thompson, Mary; 25 Granite Street, Westerly, RI 028S1 Thompson, Nancv; 10 Summit Avenue, WakeGcld, RI 02879 Thompson, Ronald; 24 Grant Drive, Coventry, HI 02816 Thomson. Judith; 596 Fatter Rd., North Kingstown, HI 02852

'

Sisson, Xisa; 251 Saugatut^t B

slader, Eri^*^? Marion Road,

Thomson, Richard; 56 Byron Street, Cranston,

K

Thul^i, 1

1

Billings

St.

102881

Wild, Alan; P.O. I Rl 021

Theirfeld, Jane; 332 Memorial Union URL Kingston, Rl 02881 Thoman, Cynlhtu; Sdiumancanuck HiU Hoad. Charlesiown, HI Thomas, Christop; 271 Ridge Road, West Milford, NJ 074SO Thompson, Barbara; 74 Ledward Avenue, Westerly, RI 02891

IS BuDod( A

Sluwnski, Beth;

Judith;

Thielsch, Helmut; i, Kinsston, RI 0! On Streel, ElUand

oad. WaUingford,

706, <

Thall, Elise;

3 AshS

Sirois, Valerie; 8

Hd.,

White, Kathleen; 96 iviuorea Avenue, wateroi While, Sheree; 6 Lihbey Lane, Eliot, ME 0391 Whittaker, Sharon; 193 Sabin Street, Pawtuck. Whitten. Lynn; 373 Bedstone Drive, Chesshir. Wice. Robert 71 Causeway Street. Hudson, \ in Hill Drive, West I

14 Coleman Avenue. Warwic 121 Forestwood Dr.. North P

1 Hill Apt. 1 isfield C i Therwui, Christin; 45A Concord Ave., West Warwick,

Spring Road, North Kingstowi

Woodridg) 0 Shore

Whalen. Jeffrey; P. WheweU, Rohm; So Whipple, Paul; 67 I

14 47

tore, Aaron; 31

56

180

ingbird Drive

i.

:

9 Brooksidc

indy;

;

Todd;

R<

19 Caspee Roa<

Paula;

Taltersall, John; I TavW, Gregg; 19

rwood, NJ 0

%

ingstoc

Tarboji, Edward; '341 Potter

Tassoni',

inrcich,

71 Clenwood Drii

Silk, Cynthia;

Silva, Fnmcisc; Siber, James; ;

Single, Anne;

RI 02886

Way, North Providenct

s;Qts5U

48 Jei

;

No

Vetleco, David; 31 Bugbee Avenue, Warwi. Venancio, Lisa; 22 Cunning Court, Middle! Vendettuoli, David; 133 Ausdale Road, Crs

Strabley, E^abe Streicber, John; ( Streicher, Mauie Stringfellow, Pau

Sciola, Michael; 1207 Kings Scon,

Vartanian, Kirkor;

""

Ho^d.

^1 Hillside P.O.. Box Bo I1473,

Schulte, Daniel;

Williams William:

3 Whaleli

WiUm'otiyEllei Ellen; 6 Riverfield Dri' WiUoughby,

Ni

RI 02920

Winslow, Martha; 8 Tilley Avenue, Nevmort, Rl 02840 Wisehart, Marilyn; 15 HiUcrest Rd., WaVefield, RI 02B71

Apt, 3, Quincy, MA 02I7I

Wiseman.

Pamela;

226

Bay View Avenue, Easl Grcenwic

H.F.D. 2, Win

4Ches

Woodard,

Tmkha

Smith, Glenn; 505 North Washi

Smith, Jennifer;

4535 East Via

S Druid

Road, Warwick,

Todd,'

:

BI 02888

Woods, Linda;

Tobnan, Michel

9ad, Trumbull, CT :,

Smith'

Mark; '23 Valley Crest E

Philadelphia,

9

wtucket, m 02860

Ridge

ird Road, Kingston, I

Warw'ck,

Sokolos';ki,Ja. Solor

06611

PA I<

RI 02888

amford, CT

06902

',

RI 0287

Rockville,

Wright!

Julie;

Wakefield, RI (

10 Seavic*

Id

Wyliie, Robin;

3 Arnold

Hoad, Greenville, RI ( inccln, RI 02365 -eel, WakeBeld, RI Street, WakeReld, 1

Xu,

Jiai^-Ve; 37' Lower College

t,

Warwick,

eehanic

Treat, Jennifer;

eld. 1

Road,

54 Way

Tremblay, EUine;

R.R. 1 Box

Trooni, Carl; IIO Progri

Trumbull, Philip; 159

0 Oak HiO C

Hi idaU

luale

Road, Si

ViUage

Sovet, Carol'

Tucker, John; 10 Black Oak Drive. Easl Lyme, C

;a, Thoi

Yu, Daphne; 37 Lower CoUeg

Kathleen; Spengler, Gary;

209 Asylui 4 Lewis Road,

Avenue. Pawtucket, T^Jil, St'^'n; 50'viv^ 37 Burham Drive, Smilhtown,

1

Montvale. NJ 0

Umsletler, Glenn;

Unsworth Jr., David; 64

Spinella! Spirgd,

B( Baymooa;

Vache'ron, toad. WoodcliffLake. NJ

1 u;

Spring

183

0

mdre Shades 8 Pert

St Pierre,

Elizabet;

m

Dragt, Randall; 1

in

Horn, Wendy; So

uiasse.

Nancy; 210 C

wdal, Jeffrey; 136 F

Stedman, Lori;

38 Silve

Stem, C. Renee; Stony

Stewart!

Kimberly;

10 I

West 1

tucker, Robert; :342 ^inyeh, George:

!:amharano.

Fori^st

NY 11795 I. HI 02879 ,.

BI 02874

Varley,'Robert; 39 Ash

E

Street,' Hamdei

Mar

Chang, Ying Jie; 37' LoweT College Road, iliirleen, Richard:

etcr It '

I.

Hoad, Hamde

Valley Road,

Fe

Euena, Rosa; 117 Colwell

Evonkovic, Pauline;

Unit 4 Chestnul

Ewinklis, Francis:; 6 Glor

B.l

Stamp, David; 200 Cine Stanton, Barbara; 45 Oi

Walbridge Road,

Peter; 43 Bennington Court, Stamford Valenti, CynUiia; 1185 Carrs Pond Road, East Gi

High Stree

St. Jea

.,

RI 0281

Rd., Kingston, HI 0

laufor

Hill.

I

/

7

\

\

Closing

255

EDITOR'S

Dawn M. The '86 Renaissance is finished

or

Wright

at least

Gail H.

almost. It will make tomor

regardless, of that I'm sure. It's been an interesting year. I've a lot of garbage and to keep my parents up all night a lot of friends through the yearbook. When I think of the office I remember ransoming off plants and tapes and phones hidden in the ceiling. I also remember staying up all night to meet a deadline just like I'm doing right now. I learned how to take pictures and to develop and print. Dealing with perpetual stupidity and cranky people that hang up on you was my first lesson. Standing up to people was soon to follow. I guess this year has been good for me, I can stand up for myself now. Working with Gail has been part of the good times. We have disagreed but when it came down to it we worked it out. We've settled all kinds of staff disputes over things no one would imagine. Right now we've done it though, we've published a book together and except for one lone, dragging editor it's ready to be mailed. I've agreed rows

mail

learned to deal with but I've also make

to do this can

again

do it. I've had

count

on

1 don't know how it will go but I'm sure that I from my friends and family and I know I can

next year.

help

them in the future. I've

book and I'm

sure

it will be

already begun

a success

as

this

work

year's

on

next

year's

book is. Our

Dick Sweich, is always ready to help and without John DeWaele and his help with photography I don't know what we would have done. It is their help along with the staff, co-editor,

yearbook representative,

my

family

success

and

for

our

advisors that has made this year and this book

a

me.

Dawn M. Wright Co-Editor in Chief

Renaissance,

256

Closing

1986

Well, here

it is

Wagner

another late

night/early morning; finally the last one. All the pages are finished and lying neatly in the box, ready to be mailed. It seems amazing that all of the work of an entire year doing layouts, writing copy, cropping and shooting photos, untangling financial knots, the list is endless planning, reorganizing yet all the results can be sent off in a little box This year has been an enlightening one, and I would like to thank all the people who helped to complete the '86 Renaissance: the yearbook staff, whose humor kept everyone wonder ing what would come next; our publishing representative from Hunter, Dick Sweich, who patiently answered our every question, no matter how often we asked it; John DeWaele, of T.D. Brown Studios for cheer fully keeping our photographers supplied and our photo files full, and for coming through on the eve of deadline; all my friends who put up ...

.

.

.

with missed and cancelled meetings; my room mates, Lisa and Laurie, for understanding and putting up with all of my "yearbook talk;" and of course, to my ever-present sidekick, my co-editor. Dawn, without whom I would never have made it. We supported each other through the rough parts, disagreed when necessary, and through sheer determi nation overcame some serious difficulties to complete the book on time. Thanks for everything; I hope you cherish the memories as much as I

do. Gail H.

Wagner

Co-Editor in Chief Renaissance, 1985

A. ROBERT RAINVILLE The University was saddened at the loss of Vice President of Student Affairs A. Robert Rainville who passed away June 20th. Mr. Rainville had been with the University for

twenty years, serving

in various

posts from

personal interest in the body will be sorely

assistant director of the Memorial Union to his

tense

present position. Mr. Rainville had enjoyed

student

a

long association with URI from his days as a student when he was captain of the soccer team and

president

of Lambda Chi. His in-

school and the missed. In his

memory, the staff of the Renaissance dedicates the 1986 yearbook.

THE 1986 RENAISSANCE STAFF

^

:<s\'

^5"^

S) ^^ <^ G

i>-^'

^^

266

Closing

i^;^

>^^

i


YEARBOOK_1986