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RENAISSANCE

VOLUME

6

1977

"Time waits for

no

one" the

semester after semester

we

saying goes, and just how true

realize

it is. Whether

wasting time, making time, keeping time, losing time, doing time, or just passing time, it forever remains

beyond

our

We've the

seen

more

For

our

diversions, a

little

beer.

We've had

days, 35,064 hours, 2,103,840 minutes, or 126,230,400 seconds have passed, we can do nothing but wonder in amazement how they man aged to slip by us. Yet even as we marvel over their quickness, we realize how jammed full of events these years really were. We've watched the Pub turn into the Disco-pub, as the Ram's Den dances all but disappeared. Our

given

haircuts.

way to disco-

a new

URl

president

and two

new

United

States presidents. We've been forced into a na tional oil crisis whose validity is still being debated, a

natural gas crisis in the midst of an unbelievably winter, and our own personal campus-wide

cruel

water crisis.

Many of and

have

Cigar get better, and

worse.

control.

Now that 4 years, 48 months, 208 weeks, 1461

blue-jeans and long hair style clothes and angled

the Good be

Dining Halls get

we've turned to slightly fewer drugs and

us

have been

through

two

or more

majors

choices, three or more lovers (and heartbreaks), and countless parties, flings and

other

career

"good

times,"

r

\ii

^

How often

we

have all been told "these

are

the

years of your life," inevitably countering with "if these are the best I can just imagine what's best

ahead!"

imaginings will become frightening and some wonderful. we've years just finished will then be "good old days," and this book will be one of

Very

soon

realities, The our

all of these

some

four

many souvenirs. With this in mind

we bring to you the 1977 Renais appreciation of the last four years and how quickly they passed, in remembrance of the

sance:

in

countless hours it took to create the book, and in

hopes that for the moments you spend read ing it, we'll have succeeded in taking you however briefly backwards in time, djc

the

THE CLUBHOUSE What

can

be said about the Memorial Union? Some students

spend all of their waking hours in it Most students do a walk-thru every day. No student, in four years, can avoid entering the huge chalet-like edifice which serves as a club-house, meeting room, bar, and cafeteria to URI's 10,000 plus-undergraduates.

In

a

subtle mid-summer

out of the Union. The

move

in 1976,

God

even

was

chaplains' office complex

taken

was

re

Office of Student life, the latest of the "old" Dean of Students office.

modeled to suit the

generation

new

chaplains tucked away in Taft Hall, the new Stu was poised for student input. And what better place for student input than the clubhouse, the

With the

dent Life Office

Here in Kingston, we may not possess "those hallowed halls" the typical alumnus is supposed to remember. Our Union does boast very long bank lines (INBANK, for you), very crowded

happy hours (Fridays, the Pub), overpriced books, (every day the bookstore "serving all your campus needs"), and that classic statement a barbershop, the last vestige of a 1960's Memorial Union which saw crewcuts turn into Beatle-bangs turn into the unkempt look. So let the Ivy league have its Ivy to remember. We plebeians have our Memorial Union and for most of us, a good time was

Union? The Director of Student Life, A. Robert Rainville is a URl alumnus and former director of the Union. He is one of the most competent administrators to students as "Bob." He is

and concerned. Rainville is

"Confine" may be the wrong word. If our forbears could return they'd envy us for the vast amount of space we possess. Even though the Ram's Den seems to be bursting at the seams with commuters on a given weekday, can you believe that in the old days the Union set hut? In 1954 the "old part" of the

occupied a Quonpresent structure was built and was dedicated to those students and faculty members who died in WW II and the Korean Campaign, (Gee, wasn't that a war?) was

built, add

a new lounge, bookstore, information desk, party room, ballroom, room, and the Ram's Den, vaulted ceiling and all. It was truly impressive. Now, unfortunately, the sturdy building is showing signs of wear, tear and age.

ing

But there

aspects of the Union which remain to be

are

reconciled. On any morning, the student entering the build ing sees Miller or Budweiser bottles perched on window sills. Broken

glass

is strewn about, witness to the alcohol

campus. The huge expanses of glass bounding the Ram's Den have been smashed time and again. The

problem

globe

on

street

have

lights

shattered like broken

exploded lollipops.

an

The 1954 part is dark and carries the faint odor of mildew. "Modernistic" paintings adorn the browsing room, as do

light-fixtures. Strolling through

the old

Union is like going back in time. The TV room is similarly "old" and one expects IKE to emerge on the screen.

long. A facelift is due. And the class of 1977 just have to remember the way it was,

But not for will

.

.

and

stand dark

outlet for beer and wine? Should

Cuproom push alcohol? A study of the campus for a typical Thursday night, printed in the Cigar, showed a line of vandalism moving down the hill from the Union, hitting the dorms and then trickling off. The answer is not

an

easy

one.

Students and administrators

the

consensus

a

union. New rooms, fresh paint, of the 70's is revamp. A new pub,

came a new

byword

re-done America's Cuproom. Even the mudslide out front a landscaping. The bookstore's back wall is

is due for

moving back

a

few feet

are wres

it is, the Union will reflect of the students. It always has. ever

The weekend. The suitcase. The commuter. The buslines convene

in front of Rameses the "Ram." The school is

seemingly tipped on its side and the students roll out. The Union regains a semblance of order and cohesion. The sound of a janitor waxing the floor is quite audible. Without the onrush of harried students the PA system can even be heard. Voices echo. Memories echo too

With the 60's, expansion. The

and

the Pub and the

tling for the solution. What

and

advisor and friend to student

senator, commuter, and administrator alike. If there's anything to like about the Union, chances are it has the

Should the Union be

fiflyish sofas

campus and is known

Rainville touch.

had within Its confines,

In 1965, the Swiss Chalet part of the Union

an

on

firm, tough, straightforward

.

.

.

Paul Senzer

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SEPTEMBER Sunday

Monday

*

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Frid

1

3

2 V.J.

Day A^

A k

k.

r

5

6 Labor

8

7 Day

First

Registration

10

9 day ol

classes

Djsco

m

t

k.

Charles

16

15

14

13

12

17

Findly D.J. Sullnan Ballroom

19

Tae Kwando classes resume

Rosh Hashanah

Cellar Sounds opens

Tennis

20

21

22

23

Men's Tennis Yom

26

28

11

vs.

Rugby

UMass & PC

Women's Tennis

vs.

A\.

P.C,

A\.

30

29

Afternoon Theater Soccer

Pottery Workshop begins k.

A

k.

vs.

PC.

"Home Free" A

k.

vs.

24

USCG

Kipper

^k

|k

^

s.

A

^

?3^

Tuesday

Monday

Sunday '^

Wednesday Thursday

Frid

r

1 ^

A

f

3

4

University College Bike tour of "Great

Swamp"

area

10

11

5

6

7

Soccer vs. Brown Student Senate "Bilcti-ln" for College of Arts & Sei,

Student Senate elections

Soccer

12

13

14

8

Judy Collins vs. Bridgeport

15 Soccer

Columbus

Day

Soccer

vs.

Long

'

r

18

17

19

20

vs,

PFii Mu Fo

Timothy Leary

Island

21

22

John Chalee Ballroom

RIPIRG Grand

Billiard Tournament

4

24

25

31

26

Opening

\l Soccer

vs.

Ramesy ClarkPastori

28 New

Halloween Food

Hampshire Fight

Football vs. Holly Cross Adam's Family Halloween

Parly

29

NOVEMBER Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

1

8

9

Wednesday Thursday

Frid

3

4

5

10

11

12

Bernadette Devlin

14

Bowling Tourney

Soccer

15

16

vs.

William

Holly Cross

17

Perry speaker

19

18 URl Jazz Ensemble

Open Forum Crabapple

Music Festival

22

21

John Belushi & Dan

29

28 play"Taming ot

the Shrew"

23 Ackroyd

30

witti Pres.

Internatio

Patrick McGeeFine Arts

Newman

Se HIGH NO

24

25

26

Thanksgiving Day

Vacation

Day

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Frid

1

3

2

Crafts Fair

Madrigal Singers

Basketball vs.

Brown

vs.

Women's Swim meet

Choir

Men's Swim meet

UNH

v

Southern Conn.

8

10 Basketball

vs.

Washingloi

State Basketball

13

vs.

UNH

14 Dance in

featuring

Billy Joel

15

16

17

Aarow

Ihe Ballroom

Basketball vs. Robert Morris College

20

21

22

23

24

27

28

29

30

31

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

^

r

^

2

Basketball

vs.

^1.

k

4

5

6

7

11

12

13

14

20

21

LaSalle

10

Quebec 77 Intersession trip to Canada

Basketball

16

Frid

^

A

3

9

Wednesday Thursday r

18

17

vs,

Richmond

19

Pipe in Rodman Hall University Telephone system is knocked out.

Water

Registration

Basketball

for 2nd

first

semester

vs.

P.C.

day of classes

Men's Swim meet Basketball

vs.

vs.

Trinity

Southern Conn

25

24

23 30

Basketball

k

4

31 Basketball

vs.

South Carolina

26

27

28

Pousette-Dart Band with Chris Rush basketball vs. Boston Univ.

play "The

conversion of

Aaron Weiss"

^FEBRUARY--Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

4

1 Wrestling

vs.

UConn

8

14

15

Basketball

vs.

P.C.

10

11

16

17

18

23

24

25

Basketball

13

Frid

vs,

Boston (

live entertainment in

Basketball

Ihe Pub

vs.

Boston Univ.

A

k

21

20

22

Washmgton's Birthday International Week starts with film

d

,

27

28

International Documentaries

Basketball

vs.

UMass

Kung Fu de

MARCH Sunday

Monday ''

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Frida

1

2

4

-^

Kenneth Wooden

Sill( Screen demonstration

^

7

3

8

A

A

k^

9

11

10 Commuter forum

13

20

14

15

Sandra Haggerty

Christopher Derrick-

Career opportunities open forum

speaker Wine tasting party

21

22

16 Show

28

St. Patrick's

23

29 Folk

Dancing lessons

A k

k.

30 Harry Chapin

25

(ifledicine Show Student Senate Elections

performance A

Paddy Murph

Day

24

Solomon's Dance Co.

fc-

18

Textiles class fashion

Ralph Nader play "Richard II"

27

17

Ballroom Dan

A^

31

APRIL Sunday"

Tuesday

Monday

Wednesday Thursday

Frida

1 -1

f

3 Palm

5

4 Sunday

6

7

8

VACATION

k.

Good

^

11

10

k.

A k.

^r

?

12

14

13

15

Open Parkin Ellis Hall Gr GSA'S Sprin

Easter

k.

^

17 Beer

18

A

k.

19

24

k.

_J

*r

'

20

21

Greek Sing Crafts Fair

Tug of War Campus Bfock Party

Greek Game

27

28

29

22

Rebirth Weekend

Chug

Circus Odyssey GREEK WEEK

Friday

Michael Grando Tricycle Contest

25

Greek Week

Psyche Night

26 White Roots Of Peace

Spring Weekend Homage to Sammuel

Beckett

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TV

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MAY Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Frida

4

6

^

5

Last

day of

Farewell Par

the Internati

^

8

A

11

10

16

18

17

A^

22

23

u fc

29

30

31

A^

20

19 A^

A k

25

24

13

12 Ak.

A^

15

A^

k

27

26 4 ^

4^

TIME

.

,

To Come and Go

*-

/

^ *'?ii'!

To

Specialize

To Live

To Be Greek

TIME

,

.

,

To

Compete

For The Theater

waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait waitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwaitwait lines

Long

at 11:00

.

.

....

.

I would like to ADD this

What????Wrong

course

LINE????

WAITWAITWAITWAITWAITWAITWAIT WAITWAITWAITWAITWAITWAITWAIT I would like to ADD this LONG LINES I course at 11:00. What????? Waiting list???? OK heard this course was really good. I need it to grad uate. Yes I am a Senior. Yes it is part of my major. I've been screwed by the computer again. Conflict in times. I don't want the 8:00 section

on Monday!!! early bird do you think I am??? The open?? I need this course to graduate. the waiting list but put me in the 8:00

What kind of

only section Keep me on

section anyway; I'll DROP the

later

$5,00 last

,

.

to

day Cigar?? me

one

I don't get into

.

DROP was

a

course?? What do you mean the What notice in the

yesterday?????

Now let's

this time.

see

what the computer did

to

COMMUTING IS IT WORTH IT? Wake up to a screaming alarm clock even though it's only 7:30 and on campus you could sleep until

8:15,

drag yourself stumble

out

of bed, stumble into the bath

of the bathroom, get dressed, go into the kitchen for cereal or toast or whatever you room,

out

of since the last

haven't

run

long

it is easy to

as

out

start your car, start your car,

swear

try

to

shopping trip (as make), brush your teeth, try to a little, try again, swear a lot, dodge

the

pot-holes

the way and brains

on

school, pull into Fine Arts with car rattling (no one can dodge all the pot-holes), try to fit a 60 inch car into a 58 inch parking space, give up and settle for a space halfway across the world, to

to

(classes) in

parking lot

Enter

year

take

a

morning classes, end of morning classes are

classes

no

matter

where you

live),

wait

the Ram's Den line for lunch, if you can afford it go to afternoon classes, end of afternoon

walk

money to pay the

heat, electricity and phone bills,

enough

gas station to money and head for home. a

spend

monthly

return some

to

more

the beach, which is just a few minutes night to cook dinner, make your

on

not, enjoy a home-cooked meal by one of your house-mates. Have seconds or thirds if you like. If you want to be alone, re tire to your own room which you don't have to share and you don't have to leave during vacations. If you made

even

have

party, have

a

registering with the 30

people

into

with

one

one

without worrying about

campus police or trying to fit room. Go to bed whenever you

keep the light on. Stretch better yet share it with a Sleep tight you won't be awakened by a fire alarm at 3:00 a.m. And as you contentedly drift want

"friend".

you have

happen here. lovingly picked out

with

favorite

classes, go back to your car (if you can remember where you parked it), head for the bank where you

hope

you

space. Don't worry

doesn't

If its your meal, If

away.

out

your car, stop at

it

your closest friends. Grab a snake and stretch out on the living room couch. Shoot the bull or watch TV with your friends. On a nice day,

today,

rent,

own

vandalism

house which

your

last

want to

park. Go

Home at last. Park in your

about

on

into

"Boy

a

sleep, am

no

roommate to

double bed,

I

or

the last thought I moved off

glad

to

cross

campus."

your

mind is,

"<-M

1.:.

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The Narragansett Bay Campus had its beginnings in 1940 with the construction of the present North Laboratory on one acre of land. Since then it has grown to encompass about 165 acres, with 16 acres

deeded to the Environmental Protection Agency and National Marine Fisheries Service, and another 3 deeded to the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center,

About 450 university and 150 Federal personnel work and study at the Bay Campus, which has an annual budget of more than $1.5 million. Those who have never visited the Bay Campus may think that the only thing going on there is a graduate school. This is like thinking that the only thing that happens in the Memorial Union is ping pong. The campus is, in fact, tied in to many state and federal agencies, and involved in countless research projects, as well as being one of Rhode Island's major sources of public information on marine affairs.

THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center is the home of the well-known Nuclear Research Reactor. The Reactor provides neutron and gamma ray irradiation facilities for University

research projects, and is for students.

a

valuable

training tool

Initial was

planning began in 1957, and the Reactor put into operation in July, 1964, Actually, a part of the University; it was con

it is not

structed and is operated by the State of Rhode Island acting through the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission,

The fissionable material in which the nuclear chain reaction occurs is Uranium 235, con tained in plates 1/16" thick. The U.S. Govern ment provides funds for the fabrication of this fuel.

Neutrons, small sub-atomic particles given off in the reaction, may be used to study the structure

produce

of

Also, they can be used to substances, make substances

matter.

new

radioactive for and biological

study, and changes.

to

produce

chemical

Gamma rays, electromagnetic radiation similar to x-rays, are very useful in shielding studies and radiation damage studies.

The

pool-type reactor was chosen because of flexibility for research and its inherent safety characteristics. It contains 46,000 gallons of water, which is kept at approximately 100 its

F. The water slows down the neutrons, which move at an average speed of 10,000 miles per second. It also serves as a coolant and a radia tion shield.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY The National Environmental Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency occupies 50,000 square feet on the Bay Campus. Its function is to provide a scientifically sound basis for Agency decisions on the environmental safety of various uses of the marine environment. Research is conducted on heat, sewage, industrial wastes, dredge spoil, metals and marine hydrocar bons. The lab is also equipped for biological studies in closed and flowing sea water systems, and for

chemical

analysis.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHY There School

are

of

about

students

170

at

Oceanography, pursuing

the M.S.

Graduate PhD or

degrees. Studies by these students and their faculty performed not only in the Narragansett Bay and around Rhode Island, but also throughout the Atlantic Ocean and beyond. These studies cover all phases of Oceanography, including chemical, bio logical, physical, and geological. Significant parts of the GSO are the library, the Marine Ecosystems Re

are

waters

search Lab, and the R/V Endeavor,

The excellence of the Graduate School's Pell Marine Science Library is partly due to the National Sea Grant Program. This program was created by Con gress in 1966 for the purpose of accelerating re search, education and advisory services in marine resources, including their conservation, proper management, and social and economic utilization, URl

is

one

of

11

Sea

Grant

Colleges

across

the

country, which means it gets a high level of federal support for approved research projects. It also means that the Pell

Library contains a National Sea Grant This Depository was established in 1971 to insure that materials published under Sea Grant auspices would be available at a single loca tion. It is the most complete collection available in the United States of publications resulting from Sea Depository.

Grant

Programs throughout the

nation.

The Marine Ecosystems Research Lab, which houses a

wet

chemistry lab,

an

instrument room,

a

hydro

carbon lab, a trace metal lab, and office space, is funded by the EPA, Adjacent to the lab is an openair tank for experiments simulating natural en vironments and temperatures.

The

primary objective

is to carry out basic research

structural and functional responses of the coastal marine ecosystems to environmental stresses related to national energy policies. on

The GSO's 177-ft. Research Vessel Endeavor was christened on December 11, 1976, It replaced the R/V Trident, which was acquired in the 1960's. It will be used for oceanographic research in both the coastal region and the deep ocean. In addition to the Endeavor, the GSO operates a number of smaller craft in the Narragansett Bay.

THE DIVISION OF MARINE RESOURCES The Division of Marine Resources was established in 1975 as an umbrella unit for the University's marine public safety programs: the Marine Advisory Service, the Coastal Resource Center, and the Ap plied Marine Research Group. This division acts as a link between the state's marine community and the research

faculty

at

URl,

Advisory Service, an extension of the University's Sea Grant Program, boasts specialists in fishing gear, seafood technology, marine economics,

The Marine

environmental education and recreation. Specialists help client groups in fisheries, seafood processing, education, marine recreation and marine economics to identify problems and opportunities which could become research topics. These ideas are fed back to the University as potential projects, and if im the specialists help the client groups to

plemented,

constructively

use

the results.

The

Coastal

1971 to tion

Center

was

established

in

assistance toward the solu

management problems and in the of coastal management plans. It is staffed resources specialists in coastal planning

of marine

production by marine and

Resources

provide technical

university researchers

in

biological and

geo

logical oceanography. The Center is ment

a

unit of the Coastal Resources

Council, which

Manage

created

by a legislative act Assembly and given a "preserve, protect, develop and where was

of the Rhode Island General

mandate

possible, for

this

to

restore

and

coastal

succeeding comprehensive and long

resources

of

the

state

through planning and

generations, range

management," At the Marine Experiment Station graduate students and faculty from various URl departments conduct a variety of research investigations for industry and government agencies. Their laboratory is based at Jerusalem Marine Field Station, a 2-acre site made available on a long-term, no-fee lease by the De partment of Natural Resources.

THE NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE The Narragansett Lab of the National Marine Fisheries Service is a three-acre facility which is used to study offshore ecosystems of the Northwest and MiddleAtlantic Oceans. About 40 people are located there, conducting studies on relationships within species and with other species that affect the productivity of marine life. Under the direction of the NMFS is the Bay Campus field office of MARMAP, Marine Resources Monitering. Assessment and Prediction. MARMAP is an or ganization which stretches across the country and seeks to evaluate all living marine resources off of U.S. waters.

u\

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THE OCEAN ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The

Ocean Engineering is the graduate of the URl College of Engineering, Grad

Department of

department uate

to develop new instrumenta processing methods for use in the marine

students here seek

tion and data environment.

The

department operates

Brown,

as

a

as an

a

65-ft, research

vessel, R/V

underwater acoustics tank,

shop, a corrosion lab, a computer 100-ft, long wave and towing tank.

ing locker, and

well a

a

div

center,

,(

,.yyf

T^

m

-...^^iim.

^^ Pi

I 4"

Jt^

DORM LIFE

-.

Jl

'"'-*

I

#

$1.8 ItlllllOn from URl budget request

RogOntS

cut

URl prohibits co-ed bathrooms

Dining hall food ^aued disgrace

BTF recommendation: armed Campus Police

Scott Pucino named Sly leads Rams R.I. Athlete-of-Year * 3sy victory

o o z

o TI

o 30

ainJ^^^^^^ College toughenslp

Union strikers for 'Jair" contract

entrance requirements o Mackal Forum dropped Leaks develop i from Public Works list in Laissez^aire attitude

Pot

use

Library

roof

URI rated ninth most expensive state University in United States

played down

Cops bust High Noon 6 cliarged, 4 students Crowd forms on Quad for High Noon activity

tf\G6^pfciais Senate asks

Chris*'"|,\,dents '**

to honor

student body picket lines

Ma Bell to restore phones

Parking proposal defeated;

Women sailors win coveted trophy

increase of fine approved Ackroyd & Belushi: Cannpaign for Carter 'poor quality/ live boasts Student support Craven, Paclieco win Once a Ram... top student body slots always a Ram wrak Greek coverage blamed on Cigar

Student Senate has surplus of $190,000 Towing policy takes effect Milk use tops coffee Ron Barlow an Inspiration in dining han survey for players, fans alike Assailant foiled Friday in rape ,

_

Phi Mu stays given SRO, charter probation -

I

,

^,__

..

attempt

900 more spaces for cars proposed

I IMPROVE YOUR GPA!! -o

^

With 2 fun CREDITS

"Scotfy"

draws full house

Female athletes eligible

|g for

}g g. X

ag

g

E|

-^

scholarships

next year

BTF survey snows P.E. gives more A's

Exciting ttiings

are

ru plan proceeds, though turnout small happening at

BROWNING HALL

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Newman daims that IM is

improving

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COFFEE HOUSE

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November 19, we were rudely awak the fact that URl is not immune to the rules of the outside world. The Friday High Noon Club was finally raided, and 4 unsuspect

On

Friday,

ened

to

ing students along with 2 non-students sudden ly found themselves "in a heap of trouble." uninitiated, the High Noon Club

For the

is

a

to group which meets every Friday on the Quad welcome the coming weekend by getting stoned According to the Good St Ciger, the

together.

bust had been

Kingstown, state

cover

it

appeared

planned for weeks by State, South police. Two under

and Wickford

Police had infiltrated the club, and that they had already picked out

the offenders

they

after.

were

The campus community was in a state of shock. To most of us, it was as if they had raided the Pub for serving beerl After the shock wore off, the

general

mood

was

one

of outrage.

following Friday no High Noon Club ap peared. Two weeks later, it returned bigger and stronger than ever. (Nearly 350, according to the Cigar.) In addition to their usual form of entertainment they rallied for pot legalization, and passed a hat for contributions to the court

The

costs

Most

and fines of their unfortunate friends.

safe and didn't carry more in case there was another there wasn't.

people played it

than

one

raid.

Thankfully,

joint

just

Five of the ill-fated

"Kingston 6" were tried

on

charges of possession of marijuana on March 2. They pleaded nolo contendere and were sen tenced to one year's probation. The sixth will have a later trial for charges of possession with sell, and sale of marijuana.

intent to

Meanwhile, pot-smoking and

djc

on

.

.

.

and

on

.

.

.

and

at

on.

URI goes on Nice try, narcs! .

.

.

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believe

// we

goodness of ourselves goodness of others for all are equal in their humanness all possess inner beauty not always seen on the surface

in the we .

.

.

.

.

.

.

will believe in the

.

.

.

.

.

all

.

are

masked sometimes

with silence arrogance anger.

Thus

by .

.

cannot

we

.

its

we

judge

the

package

wrappings. can only accept the contents as having value.

Now I to

lay study,

me

down

I pray the Lord I won't go nutty.

And

if I fail

learn this

to

junk,

I pray the Lord that I won't flunk.

But

pitty Just

if I do, me at

don't

all.

lay my bones study hall.

in the

Tell my teacher I've done my best. Then pile my books upon my chest. Now I lay me down to rest.

To pray Til pass tomorrow' s test.

If I should die before I wake. That's

one

I'll have

to

less test take.

ROOSEVELT HALL Roosevelt Hall, home of

University College,

is

a

land

mark for URI

undergraduates. The building, reminiscent colonial times, was actually built in 1937. Roosevelt Hall was dedicated in September of 1938 to Eleanor Roosevelt. The Hall, a project of the Federal of

graceful

Emergency Administration, Administration (WPA), for women. In

a

was

division of the Works a

September of 1937, after opened its doors to

Roosevelt

dorm housed the U.S.

wartime

tribute

to the

Progress changing role

three years of construction, 155 freshmen women. The

until the end of 1947

spring term when Army moved in. Roosevelt became a barracks while engineering students went to college for Uncle women

Sam. In the spring of "44" the army moved out and women moved back in until 1951, twenty-seyen years later. The four story wood-framed building was declared a fire hazard, and Residential

Life claimed it couldn't handle the $500,000 May of 1971, Roosevelt bid 'adieu' to residents.

rennovation costs. In its last 1 1 8

women

Today the University College occupies the main part of building. Freshmen and sophomores walk the many stairways and study in the Great Room. Speakeasy, the the

student

run sex information center, is located on the upper floor. Student co-ops thrive in the basement. Roosevelt Hall, moving with the times, has changed; yet memory lingers. A walk through Roosevelt's halls will re veal small flower decals and countless tack holes in the

most

doors themselves. The kitchens still function and the tub and shower still work on the third floor. Roosevelt Hall may have

alive.

changed

but it is still very much

TOM DIFFILYSTUDENT OMBUDSMAN

For those of us who are lost, confused, misused, and abused by the bureaucracy hope still awaits!

In recent times, there has been a growing concern for the plight of the individual at universities across

the country. This has largely been due to the increased size and complexity in its bureaucratic structure. Con

sequently, many complaints have been launched neglect, abuse and arbitration in both academic

about

and administrative affairs.

In response to

this,

many canipuses,

an

office has been created

including URI,

to

help

on

minimize

these

problems inherent within the system. The Om budsman's Office has been established to assist and advise students, and any other member of the Uni versity community who may have a grievance or

problem

What

authority

does the Ombudsman have?

On this campus the Ombudsman

clarify

can:

all

by interviewing parties and conducting

matters

concerned

search.

investigate, mine the

mediate

in

confidence,

to

deter

validity of the complaint.

or

resolve the

problem and conflicting

suggest compromises in situations.

help

insure that

one

is

receiving

due

process.

give needed advice and direction. make recommendations, aimed at reducing problems in academic and administrative

procedures.

So the next time red tape has got you tangled up and you are wandering through the Union, wan

der dov/nstairs and check

out

the Student As

sistant to the Ombudsman in Room 111. It may

prove to be

a

worthwhile visit.

within the bureaucratic

structure at

URI.

The office, established in 1972, includes two mem bers, the University Ombudsman and the Student Assistant to the Ombudsman. Jean Houston, pro fessor of'Nursing, is the University Ombudsman

for 1976-1978. She is located in

Fogarty Hall,

Rm.

128. Tom Diffily is the Student Assistant to the Om budsman for 1976--1977, and can be found in Rm. Ill of the Memorial Union.

The fact that there is a student in this position is of great significance. The "student" is the integral part of the University. Also, it is vital that a student have trust and confidence in the Ombudsman. It may be more preferable for a student to seek out another student for whatever the reasons may be. The student Ombudsman many times has the insight into a stu dent's problem that a faculty member may not be able to see. The balance of the two perspectives en hances the prospects of better dealing with the case. It is important that there is an option, and both the Ombudsman and his Student Assistant share equal

authority.

!!

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The Watson House Guild is interested in

learning about old-time crafts they can be put to use today. This has been through speakers by doing the skills ourselves, through demonstrations and work shops. Past activities have been learning spinning, beer-brewing, leath er-working, quilting, cider-pressing, blacksmithing, and dyeing, to and how

and

;

a

few. New ideas

are

welcome!

I have

mind to confuse

a

things,

unite them, make

them new-born, mix them up, undress them, until all light in the world has the oneness of the ocean, of the ocean,

a

generous, vast wholeness

a

crackling,

living fragrance Pablo Nervda

Imagine

an

empty field, slill silent bul with

undescribabic

an

electricity flowing in the air. Add a few more. String some lights

a

circus tent then

and haul in the water buffalos. Now shatter the

tranquility by adding people. We have a community with strains of music flowing through the air. Laugh ter, shouting, the stomping of dancing feet. People sharing, interacting living and learning together. Bring on the rain and cold, everything is dampened except our spirits we carry on. After three days we come home happy and tired. Armed with fond memories and perhaps dreams. What would U.R.I. be like if campus was more like what like what we had just experienced? If we had these other avenues

of educational stimulus in addition

to

what

in classes

Alone

SPRING WEEKEND

we

can

dream, together

we

can

act.

we

find

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REBIRTH The

of music is

roar

sound

on

weather

Usually a

starts

it

is

multitude

in the balls

a

common

the URI campus when

sun

getting warm. accompanied by basking

of bodies

The

zipping through

Something quite

the air.

different

curred when the first

the brain

are

expression of explore new ways

his

an

Brand's

notes

oc

of

Birthday" by JeanPonty began drifting across Quad. About 50 people gath

the "Earth the

Games

to

effort

to

live.

and frisbees and soft-

ing

Luc

new

child of Stewart Brand, author of the "Whole Earth Catalog,"

ered to watch and take part in URI's first New Games Hap

pening, sponsored by

Rebirth.

for

inspiration

develop

the First New Games

was

the Vietnam War. Brand decided to create

an

activity

which would

people understand war by appreciating and experiencing let

the

source

selves.

of

Brand

it

within

discovered

them that

people could release their feelings of aggression and have a good time doing it.

Michael

LaPointe

and

Marty

Milner, organizers of the games the

decided to

Quad,

bring New Games there so that "people could celebrate the day with play and have some fun," according on

to

LaPointe.

5:30, with the grand finale of "ecoball."

Everyone

bage

within five minutes.

All games have rules, but New

Games have The the

New

tossing

hollow then

Games

began

around of

a

with

While the games were not well those who did play

attended,

more.

a

expanded

to

the

New

Games

was

only one: play hard, nobody gets hurt.

and

four-foot

"moon" ball and

canvas

play fair,

such games Snake, Blob, the Caterpil lar, Skin the Snake and many as

played

the rule of the game was to see who could pick up the most gar

played

until

looked

forward

Weekend,

to

the

Rebirth

22-23, when six-foot ball would be present. from the (reprinted Cigar.)

April

Mathews

BLACK CULTURE WEEK Black Culture Week, one of the premier cultural of the school year, fared about as well as most

events

other cultural events

exceptions, week

were

on campus this year. With few the many different activities during the attended poorly despite heavy advance

publicity. Predictably, Smith drew

just

as

Gil Scott-Heron and Lonnie Listen

SRO crowd in Edwards, but, perhaps predictably at this philistine enclave, poet performed before only a few hundred an

Nikki Giovanni

people. Most of the rest of the events swirl of day-to-day

simply got lost in the non-activity of the average URI

student, and those that had the misfortune scheduled

on

the weekend

to

be

pretty much doomed

were

in advance.

Happily, Scott-Heron

and his

"the Doc

companion

tor" held the rapt attention of their audience with an unusual display of traditional African Rhythm instruments and Scott-Heron's

monologue

more

than

hour-long

about black culture.

"The Doctor" had the entire audience

tapping, shak ing and nodding to the infectious rhythms he created with his seemingly endless supply of percussion instruments. Scott-Heron

was

the star of the

evening, though.

How many other musicians do you know who can talk for more than about 35 seconds without making

complete

fools of themselves?

He entertained the audience with

edy, poetry and rhetoric as plained in an interview later,

he

a

mixture of com

attempted,

to "teach

them

as a

he

ex

little

bit about what black culture is all about." He concluded his set

performance

with

an

all-too-brief

of four of his best-known songs, accompanied "the Doctor" on percussion. In an age when most

by performers seem ment

and

to

gadgets

need

to

a

bank of electronic

survive

on

duo

piano/percussion

and,

the audience's reaction,

to

judge by

equip

stage, the pair pulled

off their spartan

effortlessly, quite

successfully. The crowd also

Smith, proving is

completely

responded well to Lonnie Liston again that not everyone at URI sophis

once

devoid of a modicum of musical

tication. It should be

124

noted, however, that a substan-

tial segment of the audience appeared to be from University and thus immune to the dead ening effects of URI studcnthood. outside the

It is, of course, impossible to say precisely why the of Black Culture Week suffered such poor at Certainly not because students had study

rest

tendance.

ing to do instead, or because there were esting things to do elsewhere.

inter

more

No, Black Culture Week suffered because of one word in its name. Not Black, not Week, but Culture; They should have called it Black Party Week; Every

Night a Thursday Night. A few kegs of Beer and even Tony Edem's talk on Equal Opportunity and URI might've had crowds overflowing down the hall

to

Move you

on

Gray,

WRIU.

over

Homework; Culture needs

a

place

to join

the URI list of dirty words. Black, White or a crowd on a sunny day.

you won't draw

Tom

Sahagian

WOMEN'S WEEKEND Kingston Women's Liberation is a group of about 20 women. It originated in September of 1 976 as sister organization to the Women's Caucus, an organization comprised of faculty and a

administration.

Beginning with just a handful of determined wom and a very limited budget, KWL members im mediately set their priorities as such; 1 ) To estab lish its membership, 2) function as an information and service point for women on campus, and 3) to affiliate itself with other women's organizations

en

in and around the state.

Since that time, KWL has co-sponsored speakers like Bernadette Devlin, promoted a Women's Studies Program at URI, and worked toward the

feasibility

of

a

Women's Center

on

campus:

attended various women's seminars and lectures, and went to Connecticut as a group to attend a "Women and the Law" weekend con ference at UConn Law School.

They've

Their most concentrated efforts however, went into

a

"Women's Weekend".

This weekend, held on campus in of approximately 20 workshops

April, consisted on various legal,

medical, social, and contemporary issues about women. The weekend included a number of films,

speakers, a pot luck supper and entertainment by Cheryl Wheeler and Val Southern.

ir-r

V

muesli

Upon embarking on

your

career

college

you to

come

realize

that the

classroom, books, lectures, and term papers

HH#

.

constitute

only

half of your educa tion, the other half

FIJI'S SUPPORT

QSIICFIBROSIS FUrS ANNUAL RUN~~

Z^OMjJRlie' BROWN

people your

who share goals and

aspirations, who are

willing

to

illiiilM!

i>:..

Being

a

Greek

Greek is

Hfe

being

means

individual. The

an

meeting and learning

It means that your individual express itself in the ways in which you participate in your chapter's activities Every chapter is individualistic and dif

about

ity

people.

can

ferent. Some

are

academic while others

oriented toward athletics You

can

are

philanthropy chapter that meets or

pick that sort of personality needs.

with your Greeks

across

the nation

providing college men lively, well rounded activities

parties.

range

from

are

and

well known for women

social formals

life. to

with

a

Social costume

The

development of good

manners,

good

confidence, along with sharing of good companionship make up the basis of the fraternity and sorority social experience. taste,

poise,

The

fraternity and sorority system is founded on the principle of brotherhood and sisterhood. It is a difficult concept better explained by the experience of living with a group of men or women bonded to gether

through

Brotherhood

for you

a

and

four years of sisterhood will

college.

become meaningful concept as you take in the "Greek Community. "

your

place

PADDY MURPHY

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Our

typical Thursday night

rowdiness was put this not-so-typical

night.

An

crowd

was

aside

on

Thursday unusually orderly

treated

to a

beauti

ful, gracious lady, who has a full appreciation of life from "both sides now." Her sing ing was expressive and emo tional, her songs filled with deep meaning. After a moving encore

of her hit "Where

the Clowns," feeling which

we

left

are

with

a

only be described by that already over used word, mellow, djc can

TIMOTHY LEARY where

are

"Climb

next?

to turn to

we

of

out

water-

your

beds," he cried

the

in

hope

of recapturing some of enthusiasm of the 60's. But

college

70's

are

in

the

quite different from the

those

of

today

tend

cerned

students

the

60's.

to

be

Students

more

con

with

personal growth growth of so ciety. Changes today are us ually made by going through channels made possible by the than with

youth

the

of the 60's, The channels and perhaps soon

move

slowly

our

natural

and exhausted.

resources

will be energy "Our destiny is to said

Leary and

day

we

will

and how this

place "Timothy the

so

"Have over

Leary's dead, or Moody Blues song

You

and

Heard"

over.

The

repeats

man

is not

dead but the spirit of the six ties that he once represented is.

Leary

on

back to URI 14, this time to

came

October

a new idea, space migration. Edwards Auditorium

promote

filled with people, some who idolized him in his early days and some who were just curious about the man ev was

associates

eryone

with

LSD.

Tyler Moore Show, and his jokes and sarcasm turned his speech into a take-off from Saturday Night Live. S.M.I.L.E.

stands

for

Space

Migration

Intelligence Life The idea was de vised by Dr. Gerald O'Neill, a Princeton physics professor, and Leary is touring the coun Extension.

try promoting the idea. Leary said that because we are using up our natural resources and energy we will have to find a way to support our grow population. His analogy that we are being squeezed off the earth like birds from their nests. forsees Leary that in the 1990's the Ameri can dream will change from having a home in the suburbs new

No

for belief is in science. He is the Mr. Clean of the 70's. Dressed in a white suit arid Puma sneakers he asked us to think of him as a more

His

Leary.

style Ted

But his

was

Zen

new

broadcaster

friendly WDNA.

drugs

or

Baxter's

from

broadcasting

like that of the Mary on

more

ing

was

to having a home in a cylin der in space. "All great epics are migratory," he said, and

is up to

I'm

move sure

have move

us.

on,"

some

Where will take

to.

all

Il

started

with

Belushi

going beserk on stage and Ackroyd having to shoot him up with

tranquilizers, explain

ing, "We always have this when

people

to

do

go to campuses. the student loan after him." The

we

thinks

He

are

craziness took off from there and never stopped. Some high

of the

lights bed of

show

ad-lib

basically

impressions

were:

Jimmy

Richard

Carter,

Nixon, David Bowie and Joe Cocker, some old-time films

including Berle

as

of

one an

love

("I

Milton

father,

expectant

babies,

they're

so

changeable"), and films of some Saturday Night commericals, including "Shim mer the floor non-dairy and

wax" in

Pops."

ushi

came

with

a

"New

running

chain

podium right Because

of

and

in

half! lack

and

to

pay

stage his

cut

Crazy. of

quality

performance,

refused

Tops

on

saw

the

fessionalism the

Dad

For the finale, Bel

the

the full

pro of

SEC con

price for the act, and had renegotiate the agreement.

tract to

The

was settled result being a duction in fees of $2250.

April,

dispute the

in re

djc

KENNETH WOODEN in the Playtime of from a semiat 39, a multi-career life illiterate laborer as a young adult to a national consul tant who mixes ideas and programs for the Washington, D.C. National Right to read effort and the Gallup Poll

Investigative author of "Weeping Others", has had,

in Princeton,

Wooden has

N.J.

recently

worked

as

a

writer-advisor for

political campaigns and public and commercial TV including CBS's "Sixty-Minutes." His investigative work has led to national investigations and hearings by both Houses of the United States Congress, the U.S. Justice Department and the New Jersey Crime Com

mission, as well as a major law suit in Louisiana against the banishment of children to distant states.

He is

currently lecturing

on

Juvenial Justice through

the country and is involved in two new literary en deavors editing a second book, "Dust Dreams" A collection of poetry and art work of incarcerated child ren, and conducting research for a major play he is writ out

ing entitled, "Walter Elliott." Wooden's immediate future

plans

are

to

lead

a

national

campaign against profiteering from imprisoned youth.

I think: "if that's so, this must

be

He

euphoria."

harmonica and

on

puts

jokes

a

while,

a

then confides: "Now I'll

play

the song I wore the harmonica for." There's a hush with some hint of suspense

.

.

"It's nine

.

o'clock on a Saturday ." The mood was just right for that He a tune called melody. plays .

"Chinese

.

Handball ("make let it bounce first")

sure

you

The

saxophone

An

screams.

other song Katie whispers to me, "I didn't know he sang .

this."

.

doesn't, but he

He

"still

.

crazy

years

all

don't

know the

of the words

rest

He

sings

is

after I

...

to

these

this

song."

"James";

"Are

to

you still in school living up to expectations?" and I wonder

if

that's

doing, Thursday night at 8:25 p.m. Billy Joel played at Edwards Auditorium. about ears

phonic rather and all .

.

.

We

minutes

25

were

waited

for

while

our

blasted with

good

nice;

they

say

The crowd

.

to

.

was

get

he ap

pears in crescendoes of music.

The crowd roars approval. The drums begin to clatter. Flash then: a voice. lights search The piano man is alive, very .

.

.

.

.

...

you

.ay

songs

Serenader

.

.

.

before the patterns Words pound angrily at me: "and he likes to be known as the angry young man." Joel's hands twist and in

lights.

run

across

new

song

either

the

begins

sadness

.

.

Another

Another

.

keyboard. A "It's always euphoria."

or

Long

haired Man ..." I think "this isn't so" but I see he means And then it, he knows it .

The pot is lit up. The sweet scents drift by me then swirl

mood

.

.

alive!

up

a

has

is it

or

...

.

.

begins Suddenly

very restless.

that

drawn just the pot His hands are floating by? white in the light as he beats the keys Now it's red, sleazy mood, Italian restaurant in New York, "a band straight from Fargo, North Dakota" "you're one drink away from being a total asshole. You're still cool." He sings "I am the entertainer I gave to

company .

just what we're all

because there's

created

in

me

stereo

sound. Even that as

he's

it's

.

.

"But he hasn't sung

over.

Jack'"

'Captain

complains

Katie. One encore; two encores; three encores and then alone:

"Memories

the years .

.

.

.

are .

and that

Joel became

souvenirs

of

."

night

and

Billy

my memory, nkn

Who else would tell of

stories

us

clams"

"humongous giant

behunted by brave men sing ing "clamshanties" and armed with (what else?) "clampoons?" And who else would have a who could Brown

band

Georgia triple .

.

.

.

.

.

Sweet

play

double

in

quadruple-time?

"pickles and been sickles" (I've this dumb song for From

now") of a

a

to

was

years

ballad from

the Hawaiian Zulu to

Lady; from

Beatles Arlo!

11

moving

folksinger;

tune to

ragtime

Ukelele it

a

Chilean

moter-

singing

to

2V2

country-western; hours of pure

djc

l^l^^^l^/ i^/^H

1

BERNADETTE DEVLIN Bernadette us

of

us

with

tional, sion for

Ireland

spoke and

to

moved

logical, if emo speech. Her compas the people of Northern her

evident. She told

was

that

us

Devlin

revolution

the

country is

a

struggle of struggle that

her

has

existed for 800 years, and re minded us of the difficulty of

returning

ended

ternatives

the

by "we or

may

we

us

a

peace

ago. about the

offered

her

that

Finally two

al

people

British government: live on our knees die on our feet." she demanded to

must

"Why,"

know, "may our

to

long

so

she told

we

feet?" nkn

not

live

on

Harry Chapin passed through URI like

a

20th century min

strel; simply dressed,

unpre

tentious, telling true stories in his own unique style. He sang about real experiences and touched people with the things that had touched him. The show

was

given for the

a group called "Ac For Themselves," Chapin informed the audience. AFT

benefit of tors

is dedicated to

for

the

sociation,

earning

money

World Hunger As to which Chapin's

this concert good is the Ameri of can Dream success," he said after the concert "if even one from

proceeds went.

"What

goes

person

to

bed

hungry."

He did all of his hits, many of them very long and in

volved, and the show have

appealed

to

may not

everyone.

"You had to be a real Harry Chapin fan to appreciate it," related one member of the au

dience, most

of

hard

core

djc

that's "And the audience

what was

Harry Chapin fans."

CHARLES FINLEY Colorful.

Con

Flamboyant.

troversial. Those

are just three of the impressions that URI students got from baseball owner Char

les

O.

who

Finley,

Edwards

spoke

Auditorium

on

at

this

Tuesday night.

Finley,

the

time world

owner

of the three-

crowd

of

Oakland

champion

the

large

1,000

stu

Athletics, delighted almost

dents (about 95 percent male). From the time he walked out

stage and tossed orange baseballs to the crowd, until he left an hour and a half later, Finley proved to be de on

lightfully entertaining. The 58-year old Finley blasted Bowie baseball both Kun, and

commissioner, owners.

his

the

other

He went into detailed

background three

Blue, Rollie Rudi, deals

negated by

selling of ballplayer, Vida Fingers and Joe

on

the

that Kuhn.

were

later

the subject of salaries Finley said, "Six of my players are demanding astronomical, salaries. Don't unjustified

On

blame

the

athletes

Criticize the

owners

He stated that the

players'

salaries,

for this. instead."

higher the higher to charge

the

will have

the owners for ticket prices. "The owners afraid to put their feet down, so prices will con are

tinue to rise."

Cigar

GEORGE BENSON On

Monday night, February 28th, George Benson his grammy award winning music to U.R.I. accepted his jazz-rock style with warmth

brought

The crowd

and enthusiasm. Benson

won

the Grammy award for his song, "This URI per one week before his

Masquerade" only

formance. All the musicians with whom he recorded his latest album, "In performed with him.

Flight", except

the drummer,

all his numbers were well received, "Breezin", "This Masquerade" and the jazz-classic "Take

Although Five"

were

the audience favorites.

Comedian Bob Shaw, a 1971 URI graduate now on the national circuit, opened the show. His routine, judged tastelss at times, generated a lot of audience

restlessness; yet, his adept handling of the audience

proved The to

be

his worth

evening, one

one

as a

comic.

of SEC's fastest sellouts, successes, nkn

of its greatest

proved

It

was

Star Trek lover's Para

a

dise. From age 6 on, we crowded into Edwards Hall, anxiously

awaiting the arrival of Scottie,

of

one

favorite

our

heros.

Enterprise Scottish

accent

sporting

a

USS

the

Minus

(a fake), and greying beard and about 25 extra pounds (defi nitely real), he delighted fans with a night of film, facts and fun.

began with Bloopers

He

Trek such

novelties

bers

walking

a film of Star where we saw as

crew

mem

that

doors

into

hadn't

opened signal. We could have watched for hours. He then came back on stage to

on

with

continue

and -answer

everything

wanted

to

Trek.

For

know

that

ears

know

where we

at

Following this

we

always

about

example, did Mr. Spock

least per week?

through

question-

a

period

learned

Star you went

pairs of

two

session

we were

shown

the Star Trek episode Earth" with no commercial interruptions, fol lowed by a movie called "Flight int Danger" which starred Doohan in 1954.

"Assignment

Filled

the

to

Trek and drifted

spaceships, pointed

and

gills

more

home

Star

with

Trek,

Star we

dream of computers, fasers to

ears,

djc

He didn't look like he could

bring

a

general

store

mind General Motors. Gaunt, almost haggard-looking in his plain blue suit (could him in a leisure suit?), he mounted you imagine to

its

knees,

never

the stage in the Union Ballroom to an enthusiastic ovation. Ralph Nader, the consumer advocate, had

the crowd in the

palm

a student press conference held after his Union presentation and his Edwards speech, I was alone with Ralph for an interview. Alone, that is,

Between

if you don't could half of RIPIRG, a some old guy who claimed he'd

and

photographer, met

him

ten

years ago.

of his hand.

hesitatingly asked him about criticisms of his track record with Congress. A broad smile crossed his face, and in mock surprise he said, "Why, it's a great record. How can you say that?" We all burst I

my admiration for

Despite him

to

Nader,

be wooden and aloof. I had

I had never

expected seen

him

before, but in anticipation of having an opportunity to interview him, I did a lot of research about him just before he came. He was one inter in person

viewee I

was

determined

not to

be moronic in front

Unfortunately, most of the extremely critical of Nader, and tive pallor rubbed off on me. of.

books I read a

were

lot of their nega

into

laughter.

wring the last possible word out of him, (and about a dozen groupies) to Edwards. As we passed by Pastore, he stopped in and mid-question began sniffing the air. "What's that?" he demanded, and then we all noticed a faint

Eger

to

I walked with him

odor. When He didn't do much to

dispel

my

new

preconception

his stint in the Union. He drew some ap when he politely asked the obnoxious TV to turn off their lights so he could see the audience. The response was even louder when he asserted that the Charlestown nuclear power plant would never be built. He even smiled a few times, but he still seemed to be a bit mechanical.

during plause people

no

one

could

factorily, he suggested went

back

to my

answer

we

his question satis

'check it out' later, and

question without breaking stride.

When he stepped up to the Edwards podium be fore a packed house, he had already been talking almost nonstop for about two hours. He hadn't con vinced me yet that he was human, although he'd hinted at it. He launched into his citizen action

and

corporate accountability monologue, which should not be confused with Johnny Carson's mono

logue. But damned if he didn't have 'em rolling in the aisles. This skinny guy in a suit and tie with a two or three o'clock shadow was making jokes about

corporate

excess

and he had about

ple laughing harder that had played there

than

any

of

a

thousand peo the comedians

in the last two years.

And then he did it. He

finally proved he was human. He described how irrelevant most of college is, which, for a guy who graduated from Princeton with honors is us

an admission. But there was more. He told about the different kinds of students, and how

quite

they're bored with school. He described the ver tical pendulum, which is when you fall asleep read ing and then your head jerks up and you wake up and then you fall asleep again, and I was instantly transformed to the Reserved Books study area in the Library, his description was so vivid. Right then I decided Ralph was the greatest; anyone who could zero in on human nature so perfectly had to have been human

least

at

once.

I must

not

Ralph,

because later

"A"

was

course

have been the

voted in

most

him will

by

a

only one mesmerized by that week, RIPIRG'S option margin of close to 3 to 1. Of

of the

people who saw him and heard what he said about citizen action, bad (maybe he made them laugh too

forget

and that's

too

much?) But he had the undivided attention of a thou sand people for an hour and a half. How many pro fessors

can

make that claim?

ts

'^

How could

one

characterize the \n^-ll URI basket-

'^

ball season?

imagine a wild, out-of-control roller coaster, cardiogram indicator that goes haywire, a bobbing yo-yo all rolled up into one, and that what the 1976-77 Ram quintet was like.

to

Try an

electric

and was

season had more peaks drops than the Rocky, Appalachian, and Sierra-

Indeed, the rocky Ram hoop and

Nevada Mountains combined.

Having

shaken

Conference

loose from the shackles of Yankee

play,

the

independent Rams gambled

and matched guns with the iron of collegiate basket ball in the long-awaited 76-77 campaign. The result

that they came away with a 13-13 record disappointing to many. Why disappointing?

was was

The

season

had started out

so

that

promising. URI got Haven, Conn, high

unexpected gift when New Sylvester "Sly" Williams switched gears schools and decided Kingston would be his collegiate basketball home instead of Providence. Then there was the highly-touted and multi-talented transfer from Tennessee, Irving Chatman, who was to be the center the Rams desperately needed. Nine lettermen, including four starters, were return ing from the 14-12 team of the year before. Who an

school star and

could ask for more? the exception of Chatman's ineligibility until February 11, the early season was no letdown. The Rams, amid upsets over then 17th-ranked Washing ton State at Keaney Gym, and ECAC playoff qualifier Hofstra University on the road, streaked out to a 7-0

With

record, the school's most successful start in 30 years.

skeptics, critics, and even their own fans were play in those first seven games. a 17-point lead in the last 13

Yet

wary of the Ram's Hadn't they blown

minutes of the

season

opener to Brown which

won

only six games all season? Weren't they losing to lowly New Hampshire at friendly Keaney Gym with eight minutes remaining? Weren't they trailing Robert Morris College (who?) of Pittsburgh, an ex-junior college which moved into Division One for the first time ever in 76-77, by 11 points at halftime? One

writer cleverly put the label of "consistent inconsistency" on the Rams' early-season play, and Coach Jack Kraft said URI's early season efforts were deceiving. even

"It

was a

the teams schedule

got

some

misleading 7-0," admitted Kraft. "Some of we hit early weren't as strong as our overall indicated. I think maybe our ballplayers false hopes.

with that first defeat entered

mostly-downhill

a

lost, 95-85, and

new

phase

of its

roller coaster ride.

'They thought they were better than they were and stopped working. They found out you have to keep working to improve yourself."

The consolation game with Texas was next and the psychologically-upset and unprepared Rams were humbled, 76-66, by the Longhorns.

To its credit, Rhody "worked" its hide off against number one ranked Michigan in the Industrial Na

Things didn't get much better for the Rams either. A 70-61 Civic Center victory over LaSalle College on January 3rd was the only side track in a skid, starting with the Michigan loss, where URI lost six of seven

tional Classic after Christmas at the Providence Civic

I

deficit, only to turn the tide in the second half and outscore the Wolverines 45-39. URI

Center. Admittedly caught "in awe," said Kraft, of the top-rated Wolverines, the Rams fell prey to a sneakyquick Michigan fast break and a 16-points halftime

games. After the LaSalle success, the midst of a 13-game slate away from

Rams, in the

Keaney Gym

1

1

91

HI mm nHi

jl iHK--4f "^

L^

Mfay|--^KLj|^^

W

'"^

H l^jg

??????????????????????????????????????????????????mnmHw^ dropped St.

their record to 8-6 with road losses to powers Richmond, Providence College, and the

John's,

University An

encouraging, refreshing, 75-6 triumph at Boston on January 27 gave way to further downfall. were outclassed in a Southern trip on which they bowed to nationally-ranked Louisville, 105-87, and perenially-tough South Carolina, 64-54. A heart-break ing 67-66 defeat in the closing seconds to Providence College added insult and frustration as Rhody fell to the

University

The Rams

.005 level at 9-9.

Rhody split tion for

an

ECAC

11-11. And

They

of Connecticut.

its last

70-47 loss from

boy

Syracuse

eight

games, Division One

still in conten

yet playoff berth after

a

?mHHHH^

dropped

come

its mark to

close!

95-75 and 61-60 (in overtime). Then the crushing blow was served. Two days before the start of playoffimportant contests with Massachusetts and Connecti cut at

of an

home, the Rams lost the irreplaceable services guard Jim "Jiggy" Williamson, who severly sprained ankle in practice. Despite his absence, URI performed

admirably

but

came

two- and was

which

did the Rams

clutch, do-or-die road contests at sneaky Maine and New Hampshire by respective scores of won

up

on

one-point verdicts spectively. Thus, a season in

disappointment

the short end of crushing to UMass and UConn re of

disappointment

ended

iHHH^HH^H^m^^

B. Murray

^

By

their playoff absence the Rams' only were forced to play the entire without star forward Mark Cizynski, who was

no means was

.^. discouragement. They season

f ?

^ ^ ? ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^

sitting

out

a

Then there

year's suspension. Chatman. The lanky 6-9 shot-blocker

was

embroiled in

near-season-long controversy conconcerning his eligibility. Chatman transferred to Kingston from Tennessee on February 11. 1976, but the NCAA and ECAC couldn't get together on when at the end of URI's Chatman could become eligible was

first semester,

a

December 23, which

was

almost

one

full academic year after Chatman's transfer or February 11, one full year after his transfer. Finally URI made its own

164

safe and sound decision:

February

11.

Such

an

effect

ongoing conflict

no doubt had some adverse the Rams all season long, and the long layoff rusted Chatman. In Rhody's final seven he scored 43 points, grabbed 41 rebounds.

on

apparently

games, shot 53 percent from the field, and averaged 19 minutes of action per game. Chatman's controversy. If it had effect at can all, any hardly take all the blarne for the Rams' year of disappointment. the

Perhaps

thorn total

was

the

demanding

opponents, six

were

biggest

schedule.

Among their 21 among the top 20 teams

nationally and eight made post-season playoffs Along with this rugged schedule, Kraft felt was team's

inability

opponents.

to prepare

mentally

for such

his

top-notch

????????

in the nation. He led the team in six offensive

categories, including scoring (20.0 points a game) seasonal average points. His 520 points were the most scored by a freshman in the 66-year history of basketball at Kingston. The 6-7 forward, who had a season- and teamhigh of 32 points against Michigan, of all teams, also was tops in shots blocked, steals, rebounding, and third and total

,

.

in assists.

;

Williamson's

hitting the 1 ,000 point plateau was another highlight of a dim season. The six-foot New Haven, Conn, hit on a layup in the South Carolina game for his junior 1,000th point. He finished the season with a 14.5 scor- ] ing rate, second only to Williams, and 1,096 career points, placing him 25th on URI's all-time scoring list. Williamson also led Rhody in free-throw shooting (76%) for the third straight year and was second in assists '

'

with 71. Nor

can

Wright

be

the Rams'

forgotten.

heady junior guard/forward Stan ] tri-captain like Williamson, Wright scorer at 13.1 points per

A

.

the team's third-best

was

game, the second-best rebounder at seven a game, and handed out 77 assists, high for the Rams. The 6-4 Cambria Hts., N.Y. native needs just 21 points in 1977-

]

78 to hit the 1,000 mark. Rhody's lone graduating senior, forward starter Lem Johnson, ended a fine two-year career at Kingston

; '.

with credentials of 277 points, 165 rebounds, and a .502 shooting percentage in 51 games. The 6-6 Stuart,

floor Fla.

honored with

tri-captain standing ovation bouquet of flowers given to his wife at the halftime of the final Keaney Gym game against Massachusetts. Other 76-77 Rams squad members and their scoring averages were: center Randy Wilds (6.3 points and six rebounds a game), forward Percy Davis (3.4), guard/ and

was

.

'

'.

a

'

a

forward John Nelson, center Vic Soares Derek Groomes

?????????????????????????????????^ "As an important team," he said, "each game is im portant, and to get the, players mentally ready for every game is something they have to experience. Unfor tunately, this being the first time around, I think this caused us a few problems, especially away from home." Kraft also cited team play and team incohesiveness as season-long letdowns. Kraft added that the Rams had pleased him with "the way we hung in there and played these teams. We

never

gave up; and held

our own

with

them."

Perhaps the most pleasing element of the season was play of freshman Williams. Named to four post teams by various publications and wire ser.-vices, Williams was one of the top 15 first-year players

(2.2),

and

(2.4), forward guards Willie Middlebrooks

(2.6) and Ed Bednarcik (1.3). "Yes, we had our ups and downs," said Kraft, "but I had mentioned at the outset, if we were able to ap

proach the record we had last year of 14-12, I wouldn't be overly disappointed. Outside of a couple of games, I thought we performed very well. I thing the young men have gained confidence in themselves." With an expectedly-fruitful recruit season in process and with 12 lettermen eligible to return, the Rams in 1977-78 could well be the number

England that

most

expected them

So much for roller coasters and

the

season

mHHH^HH^HH^i

one

team in

New

'

'.

to be.

yo-yos!

] Charlie

Joyce

.

^

78

MEN'S BASKETBALL OPPONENT Brown

75

St.

URI

GPP. 74 65

68

Joseph's New Hampshire

72

Washington State

65

62

IVIanhattan

60

62

52

Robert IVlorris

43

87

Hofstra

86

85

Michigan

95

66

Texas

76

70

LaSalle

61

67

St. John's

82

74

Richmond

79

71

82

65

Providence College Connecticut

75

Boston

84

Louisville

54

South Carolina

64 67

University

67 75 105

66

Providence College

85

Boston

63

Massachusetts

77

88

Brown

80

47

Syracuse

70

95

Maine

75

61

New

67

U. Massachusetts

College

Hampshire (ot)

U. Connecticut 89 OVERALL: W-13, L-13

58

60

69 90

Coach: Jack Kraft Assistant Coaches: Thomas Drennan & Claude

English Tri-Captains: Stan Wright,

Jim Williamson, & Lem Johnson

^

-

M

>

y

4

*-!^^

...'

*

^

1

>

RL^s

/

r

.,<5

_

i|h>>in| ''*

^^,.

i

w ,' toaas > -,'^Mte^njHlHl H^^^^^^Y '

^

^^^Z^^^l

ifl

^

^?^?????t A season record of three wins and five losses is ad

mittedly

not

a

great accomplishment. That applies

in most cases,

but not in the

case

of URI's 1976

football team. The Rams'

season

was

a

drastic

improvement

over

the year before. URI ,

,

stayed close in every game but played good, exciting football, and brought the fans flocking back to Meade Field. Following URI football was fun again. Much of the credit should go to first-year head coach one,

Bob Griffin. He revived football from the dead at URI, and took a dissension-racked team and molded it .

[ .

1 .

[ .

into a cohesive unit that could play with any opponent on its schedule. Griffin came here form Idaho State, marking an end to the Jack Gregory regime. He brought with him a sense of enthusiasm and pride, and his players

responded. The young coach installed an entirely new system here, making several personnel changes. "We only played badly in one game all season, and although naturally I'm not satisfied with the overall record, I will truthfully say I'm pleased with the way our players responded. I really feel we've accomplished many of the goals we looked to in our first

'

season," Griffin said. .

.

'.

URI was the Cinderella team of New England in early going, and in fact, probably did too well. The Rams played such great football in their first four games that fans may have expected too much from the young team. In the opener at Meade Field, the Rams trailed Northeastern 14-0 with just eight minutes left in the game. Then URI came alive, scored two touchdowns and on a two-point conversion to win the game closing moments, 15-14. Rhody put up a gallant struggle against Brown in Providence the following week, playing the Bruins

connected

] .

[ .

in the

to

a

standstill before the home team won, 3-0. Brown on to have its best year ever, winning a share

went

of the It was

[

Ivy League on

title.

to Orono, Maine, where URI hasn't

won a

game in six years. But this was a different Rhody team, and they came away with a 14-9 victory.

It

was

'. 8,000

back home for the Rams, where more than fans filled the stands to see URI and strong a 7-7 draw until the last 32

Massachusetts battle to

seconds, when UMass heroics pulled it out .

.

on a

long

bomb and won 14-7. That game burst the Rams' buble, at least tempo rarily, because they disappointed a large Homecom crowd the next Saturday. URI, favored to

ing Day

University, couldn't do a thing right romped to a 36-0 triumph. The next two games also resulted in lopsided wins for the opponents in road contests for the Rams. URI lost to Holy Cross 33-14 and to New Hampshire, the Yankee Conference champs, 31-6. However, the Rams weren't really "out of it" in those two games. Breakdowns on key plays, costly turnovers, and an inability to generate an otfense with a number of starters and even backup players out with injuries, knock off Boston as

the Terriers

led to URI's downfall.

But in the final game of the year, Rhody rose to the to defeat Connecticut at Storrs, 17-14. It the first time URI had won two consecutive games at UConn in more than 20 years. Many URI players had great years, but none better than junior fullback Rick Moser. He 691 occasion

was

gained

yards

rushing, including three-straight the

season

when he

games at the end of 100 yards in each. He named to the All-Yankee Con

gained

over

was one of five rams ference first team. Also named to the squad was junior wide receiver Tom Spann, who hauled in 20 passes for 341 yards, statistics that were good enough to win the conference

receiving

championship.

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????I

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????omnm^ Two other

juniors

were

named to the All-Conference

team: offensive center Ken Duval and defensive middle

guard Tony were

six

addition, sophmore defensive junior defensive end Lee Holden

In

Ozollo.

tackle Dick Bell and

selected to the All-Conference second team. These

players give the

Rams

a

great nucleus for the ig77

season.

returning for the Rams is Tom Marhefka, who led the squad with 55 tackles from his linebacker position; Jim Hodgens. a promising freshman halfback early last season before he was injured; flashy Lorenzo Hender son, a versatile runner and pass-catcher; starting re ceiver Ken Minor; Rob Welsh, just a freshman who Also

????????????????????????????????^

showed flashes of brilliance

punter last

season; and

who will anchor the line

as

both

a

receiver and

offensive lineman Pete

a

Sinagra,

along with Duval.

Also add Steve Tosches and transfer halfback

Leroy

Shaw to the list. Tosches, an outstanding quarterback for two years at Idaho State, transferred here when Grffin came, and sat out last season. He should have the quarterback job for the 1977 season, with Mike

Bailey slated

as

his

back-up. Kingston

Shaw transferred to lustrious prep

career

at Milford

January after Academy, Ct.

in

LAAAAAAAAAA

an

il

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for the season opener against Northeastern, spring practice that he could be the running threat the Rams so desperately needed spark their offense last year.

Eligible

Shaw indicated in

outside to

Graduated seniors URl will sorely miss are Jeff Will iams, a mammouth offensive tackle who earned AllYankee Conference honors for the past two seasons; tough linebackers Bill McCagney and John Avento; de fensive backs

Bob Mitchell, Steve Orante, and John Belviso; defensive linemen Bill Meekins and Tim Rosafort, and offensive guard Mike Charles.

Larry

Berman

FOOTBALL URI

15

OPP.

?Northeastern

0

Brown

14

Maine

7

0 14

6 14

14

3 9

U. Mass "Boston U.

Holy

14 36

Cross

U. New

33 31

Hampshire

U. Conn

17

Overall: 2-6 Yankee Conf.: 1-5 *Home Games

SUB-VARSITY FOOTBALL 13 6 7

Brown

(S.V) (S.V.)

U. Conn

"Holy

Cross

14 7 20

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THAT RAM BAND

AT HALFTIME

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URI 3

OPP. U. Massachusetts

ngton College U. Connecticut U. New Haven

Bridgeport Providence 7 1

Central Conn, State Bates

4

Brown

8

Bridgewater

5

R.I. AIAW

Championships

3rd EAIAW REGIONAL

Championships OVERALL: W 5, L 6. Coach: Claire Robinson

7 12

:^

&ie;s[E;E(s

URI

5

t

1

Ati

*

.v"

2

s?

1

Fir

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jf^BgEJi! .>'-^nSnh

0

Madison

(2)

15

6 1

0

George

1

Connecticut

2

5

Bridgeport

4

0

Maine

Mason

1

1

New

Hampshire (2)

4 2

Providence

(2)

3

1

0 Brown

(2)

0

13

0 11

1

5

6 2

Holy Cross (2)

8

3

2

5

(2)

2

2 7

Northeastern

3

Boston

9

College

Massachusetts (2)

1

8

6

2

Fairfield

0

Connecticut

7

18 5 8

Overall Record: W 11, L 13 Coach: John Norris Assistant:

%-"^

OPP.

(2)

3

5

H

BASEBALL Madison

Larry Gallo

(2) Dou ble Header

?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????H^ The 1976-1977 URI wrestling team will be remem bered as one of the best ever assembled, and the record books will be crowded with its

plishments. The

amazing grabbed another New England four years. Not a single off Rhody, and by the season the Rams posted a 15-2 accom

Rams

Championship, their third in New England team knocked end of the dual meet record. All

bered, but

of these

one event

achievements will be

will

bring back special

remem

memories.

On

January 27, the Rams were ranked 20th in the nation, marking the first time that a Rhody wrestling team

had

ever

been

nationally

ranked.

"Amateur

Wrestling News," which ranked the colleges and universities, could hardly ignore Rhody's impressive performance up to that date.

Pucino's first place finish in the New Englands enabled him to return to the nationals for his second time. He notched a 1-2 record and finished the season with a

17-6-1 record. The

wrestled in the 142

junior

pound

class.

Haislip, a native of Midland, Va., who wrestled at 177, a rough time of it in the NCAA's, but wound up season with an impressive 18-4 record.

had the

Davidson

2-2

was

in the NCAA's.

126-lb.

The

brook, N.Y. native transferred to URI after

a

Holtwo-

year stint at Suffolk Community College. He had phenomenal year and his final record was 25-5.

a

Senior John Gubelman wrestled at 118, and finished season with a 15-10-1 record. The Central Islip,

the

The Rams had

record of 8-1 and had knocked off

a

several powers. in the opener.

They downed Clarion State, 25-12. Springfield, always a New England

power, suffered Rams. But the

a

25-14 defeat at the hands of the

victory which stirred up the most really pushed the Rams into the national was their 21-19 upset over tenth ranked spotlight Navy.

N.Y. native

second in the New

placed

He

Englands.

took his first two bouts of the match with ease, but then was downed 3-2 in the finals by BU's Jeff

Madden.

The year before Madden for the title.

Gubelman

had

beaten

interest and

The Rams continued to roll and in the first week of

February were moved up to 19th. At the conclusion of the season, the Rams suffered only two defeats, both at the hands of Syracuse.

Senior

Garry Barton's forces then began gearing for England Championships. The slogan "ten began to be tossed around. This slogan expressed the hope that every Ram wrestler would take the title in his weight class so that URI would have a full team to participate in the NCAA Champion ships in Norman, Oklahoma. the New

also

was

awarded

the

in the New

John

Serra,

Eng Sr.

for the fastest fall of the tournament. Pereira Boston

College's

seconds gone in the first finished the season with

John Coach

Marty Pereira placed second

lands and

trophy pinned

Staulo,

Gerard Ottavian with

just 57 period. The 158-lb. wrestler

a

14-4-1 record.

senior

heavyweight from Newton, Mass. finished second in the New Englands. He wound up the season with an impressive 18-5 record. a

to Norman"

Jon his

Regini, career

senior from East Greenwhich, wound up a second place finish in the New Eng

a

with

lands. He wrestled at 190.

A freshman from URI went on to capture the New England title by com piling 105'/4 points. Boston University, which hosted the tourney, finished in second with 88y2 points.

150, had

an

in the New

23-3-1 record. His

hearing

a

Bellmore, N.Y., who wrestled at

excellent

Englands

lot

season.

name

more

He took second

place

and finished the season with

is Lee

of that

a

and you'll be in future seasons

Spiegel

name

Steve Pizzo, Frank Pucino, Moe Haislip and Joe David the four titlists and they represented Rhody

at URI.

in Norman. There

Scott Arnel, a sophomore, will return after placing Englands. He had a record of 12-8-1. Sophomore Earle MacQuaide will also return after suf fering a knee injury.

son were

for

were

five seconds and

one

third

Rhody.

third in the New

First year coach Barton was voted the New England Coach-of-the-Year at the conclusion of the New Eng lands. "I was satisfied with the way we wrestled. We went out and worked hard and did a good job," said Barton.

Despite being hampgered by bruised ribs, Pizzo, a Huntington N.Y., turned in an outstanding weekend of wrestling in the New Englands. Pizzo posted a 1-2 record in the NCAA's and wound up the year with an 11-8 record, wrestling in the 167-lb. senior from

Sophomore heavyweight

Fred Smith, who

sive action this year, will be back Greg Mack and Jeff Buxton.

saw

exten

along with freshman

Barton expects a good 77-78 campaign. With such a strong nucleus of returning players around which to build, the Rams should be extremely strong.

Dave Lavallee

class.

???????????^

??????????????????????????????????????

MEN'S WRESTLING OPP. Placed

URI

12

25

Clarion State

26

Massachusetts

21

16

Syracuse

20

32

Connecticut

19

25

14

21

Springfield Wilkes Open Tournament W. Mary/ West Maryland Morgan State Navy

25

Montclair

12

39

Army

32

Central Connecticut

42

Brown

23

Boston

Lock Haven/Ohio

48

16

University New Hampshire Syracuse

21

Hofstra

27

Massachusetts

41

3rd

St./Kentycky

105% New Englands Boston 2nd in N.E.

2nd 11 0

19 2

3 3 13 3 20

19 12 881/2 s

Coach:

Gary Barton, Captains: John G ubelStaulo, & M arty Pereira

man, John

OVERALL: W-15, L-2

1st

(88V'2)

NCAA

27th

^[I[y[b ^[jxDisu^

???????????????????????????????? ^

^^

Keeping Rhody also dissected. Division III Connecticut College three times by big scores (5-2, 6-0,10-1), and with respectable play against Di vision II powerhouse Bryant and the subvarsity

^

-?

of Division I Yale.

Coach Hill, a two time Ail-American at Michigan, and his assistant Dave Dowdell, started with 70 prospects in September and gradually cut that number to about 20

URI

Hockey

players,

which became the

Club.

It was tough to single out one player who could be considered 'Most Valuable', but the name that most players mentioned was that of Bob Carrel-

las, who led the team in scoring, with 12 goals. k Other

names frequently mentioned were John (eight goals), Gordie Wallace (four). Downing (ten), and linemate Steve Herzog

Matuszed Ken

(ten).

Picking the highlight

of the

season was

also

tough

for many players. Many pointed to the "URI Night" at the Providence Civic Center, when the Rams and RIJC

engaged in the first intercollegiate game

Civic Center ice.

on

Matuszek

ing

a

explained, "It was just good team there."

the thrill of

play

players remember the upset over SMU. Dowdell noted, "We peaked when we played SMU.

Other It

was our

best

game."

During the course of the season, the skaters had two big losses. The first came at the start of the second semester, when goalie Joe Rivard was dismissed from the University due to academic reasons,

Wallace

and the second

was

in the game

came

when difinseman

lost after

suffering a separated against Connecticut College.

shoulder

All concerned agree that the loss of Wallace was a key factor at the tail end of the season. "He

typifies

the

style of college defenseman a heads a good puck-carrier," said

up, mobile man, who is Hill.

'??????????????????????? is

was

up his

squad's

up and we're moving how coach Conrad Hill summed

building,

"Momentum

ahead." That

11-5-1

Probably the biggest surprise was the improve ment of goalie Fred Bartlett, who had never skated until his family moved to Rhode Island from Missis sippi about two years ago. "Fred's progress was a pleasant surprise," stated Hill. "We didn't ex pect him to come as far as he has."

season.

Other ?

^.

t'^ ^

'^.

only a club, they played almost half of their games against opponents who in varsity play. compete

Though

the Rams

are

Some of the team's big victories came Division II Southeastern Massachusetts season, and

4-1, in the third game of the New

England Champion

lege,

7-4.

against (SMU), against

Rhode Island Junior Col-

scorers

for

URI

included

Bill

Cloxton and

(seven goals each); Bob Tiernan (six); Billy Lane (five); John Koziara, Gary Stet son, and Paul McGowan (three each); Gerrish (two); and Reardon, Jay Walsh, and Ray Peloquin (one Each). Matt McGowan

In goal, Rivard posted a 7-2 record, and Bakewell, Griffin, Bartlett, Al McGregor, and Gerrish each won

games

or

split

wins. Paul Nonnemache

???4

???????????????? ^^

-4^

^

TENNIS OPP. URI 4 6 < ? 3 Tufts College

^^

College

Boston

.< ?

5

Central Connecticut

4

^ ^ ^ ?

7

Fairfield

2

6

Providence

3

^^

M ?

?

^ ^^

8

1

4 ^ < ? ?

^

-4^

2V2 Brown

^^ 6'/2 ^ ?

< ?

0

Trinity

9

1^

8

S.M.U.

1

4 ^ ^ ?

OVERALL: W 4,. L 4 4. Coach: Leo O'Donnell

^

?

.4^ -4 ?

^^

X

^^

^

FALL TENNIS

URI 4

(Womens) OPP. 3

Connecticut

College 2 4

So. Mass.

5

Bridgeport

3

4

Bates

1

0

Connecticut

7

6

Rl.

3

Brown

1

College

2

TENNIS

OPP.

URI 6

Boston

4

U. of New

6

U. of

8

U.S. Coast

7V2

Guard U. of Maine

3

Univesity 5

Hampshire 3

Massachusetts

U. of Connecticut Overall: 5-1

6

1 l'/2 3

Yan. Conf. Tied for 3rd

Singles: Mark Braunstein

3-3

Al Lancellotti

0-4

Rich Gonon

4-2

Kerry Fenton Rick McKinney Trip Morse Dave McKinney

6-0 4-2

5-0 2-1

Doubles:

Braunstein & Conor 4-2 Fenton & McKinney 4-1 5-0-1 'Morse/Schepps (Mitchel)

^^

sport consists of three sectors at University: Heavyweights, Lightweights and Women. They compete in eight-oar and four-oar shells. The season runs through out the academic year but races are only in the fall and spring. These races include dual The the

meets

such

as

well

as

travels to tournaments,

the National

Championships. traveling to races Philadelphia, Boston, Syracuse, Poughkeepsie and many other places. There are 70 competing members on the Crew with the main qualification being a great desire to win as well as to have a good time while doing it. as

The Crew does extensive in

? ????????????????????????<

?????????? SAILING 165

Yale Intersect. Inv.

Tufts Yale Harvard 57

35th Coast Guard Acad. Inv. U.S. C.G. & Yale

55

Tufts Fall Inv. (Lane Yale

Boston U.

Trophy)

Harvard

Tufts 55

43rd NEISA

Pentagonal Regatta

Coast Guard MIT 112

35th International Inter. Inv. Regatta Tufts Howard Coast Guard

37

30th

Holy Cross Donaghy Bowl

Inv,.

Tufts MIT

39th Brown Fall Inv. Intersect.

64

(Hoyt Trophy) Boston U. Tufts MIT

W-L

8-3

9th NEISA 3-Crew T'm Stake Trophy

Racing Championship

URI 10-1

Harvard MIT

9-2

2nd

TUFTS

8-3

3rd (T)

sailing

team has,

Unknown to most students, the URI existence, been

in its 30 years of

one

of the most

successful of the school's athletic squads. URI was national champion in 1965. Since then, the school has

produced

three Ail-Americans.

In recent years, however, the national

championship

has been very elusive. Even though they were ranked first in the nation going into the eliminations for the

nationals last spring, the team failed to qualify. This spring, the championship regatta will be held at a site where URI has been quite successful in the past the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.

Sailing team was completely reorganized this year. Mac Cuddy was hired as the new coach. The women's team was merged with the men's and given

The

varsity status. Twelve new 12 ft. Beverly dinghy's were purchased as the squad moved from the Sailing Club

site

on

Salt

Pond

to

East

Greenwich

Yacht

^HHHHHHHi Practices

are

held four

afternoons

week

during large, equal num ber of crew. This spring promises to be a strong one as a majority of the team are juniors and seniors. both the

spring

consisting

There

and tall

seasons.

of about 20 helmsmen and

are over

two hundred

intercollegiately. Regattas on

short

courses

Each host school

a

The team is

sailing

an

teams

consist of

competing multiple races

in which owns a

10-15 schools take part. fleet of identical boats.

Club.

f^Hmm^mm^i^m^m^^ifm^m^m^mm^^mm^^Hii^

????????? VOLLEYBALL-S.V. Bates

OPP. 0 2

Univ. of Maine

12

15

14

16 15

15

Central Conn, S. C.

7

10

15

5

15

W-2, L-1 VOLLEYBALL VARSITY

Cen. Conn. Courtland

Brooklyn Brockport Oeonta

Eastern Conn

So. Carolina

Barrington Bates

Univ. of Maine

Cent. Conn. S.C.

Bryant College

U. CONN.

Bridgeport Northeastern Cent. Conn. St. C. Eastern Nazarine Vermont

College

Westfield State

Barrington College

St.

Champ.

^???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????^

? TlrVTTTT TTTTTT ?TTTTT

fTTT

3

15

15

15

4

12

15

10

15

6

15 15

11

15

9

5

10

15 10

Brown U.

(finals

of winner

bracket)

15

15 15

Brown Conn

University

College

15

7 8

15

3

15

15

15

Princeton

(16 Teams) 11 6

3

Salisbury

15

State

Delaware*'*

15

6

10 Delaware Tournament

15

3

Bridgeport

15 Towson

10 10

East

Strausburg,

SC

15

15

3

17

15 URI finished

Fifth Place

^ ^ ^P ^

1

X ^.

?

X

?

????????????????????????????????????????????^

8-15 9-15

^???????????????????????????4

WOMEN'S SWIMMING

ypi

OPP.

96

Conn.

33

So. Conn. State C.

98

68

Wheaton

54

College

22

71

So. Mass. U.

71

Trinity

33

61

Cen. Conn. S.C.

69

22

U. Maine

33

Manhattanville

63

Brown

23

108 95

NEWISA

Champs Bridgewater (Cancelled) did EAIAW Reg. Champs

mmmmmmamt^.

not

qualify

MEN'S SWIMMING OPP. Placed

URI 84

New

Hampshire

29 2nd

U.S. Coast Guard

Relays State College

45

So. Conn.

47

Univ. of Conn.

79 38

26

Trinity

73

.Columbia

Holy

Cross

31

Maine

(Cancelled) 82

Poly. Institute

39

56

Worcester

72

Univ. of Massachusetts

40

56

Boston

30

71

University University of Vermont Bridgewater

48

U.S. Coast Guard

54

N.E.I.S.A.

(35 points)

OVERALL: W-6. L-6 Coach: Mike Westkott Assistant: Pamela Westkott

59 41 59

???????????????????????????????? ^^

Like

a sudden display of fireworks, the Rams shot straight wins at the season's start. They chirstened their new field, complete with an electric scoreboard, with a season-opening 2-0 stunner against always-tough Harvard. Senior Dave Names and sophomore Mario Pereira, scored the goals while goalie Bob Auletta recorded the

out to three

^^ .^.

^^

^^

^P ^^

shutout.

?

^P

Four ton

later Providence

days and

3-2 win

Rhody

the

Rams

College escaped with

to Kings hard-fought

came a

Phil Salice's header late in the game. made it three in a row with a Yankee Con on

ference win at Maine, 3-2, before going into and losing three of its next four contests. In

the

Rams' fourth game, they held ominous 2-1 halftime lead before the

a

skid

Brown to

Ivy League perennial champions dominated the second half and popped in two goals for a 4-1 win. an

The Rams

"played

Bridgeport 3-2.

But

two

of our best games" against 2-0, dropping their record to

one

but lost

days later,

halfback

Bob

Meyer's

header gave the Rams an important Yankee Con ference win over Vermont, 2-1, in double overtime.

A 1-0 loss at

Long

Island

University

in the seventh

game of the season, URI's second shutout loss in three games, pointed up the team's seasonlong worry: SCORING GOALS. "Most of the games

we

dominated and

were

get

ting good passes. But we should have scored more goals," complained Coach Geza Henni. Rhody used mostly a 4-3-3 formation and depended on its midfield to control the play both offensively and defensively. But during this brief skid the midfield was less effective in controlling the ball and thus, the team's interpassing, between midfield and offense especially, was off. However, the midfield's play sparked by senior Bill Doherty, Salice, and Meyer immediately did about-face and, as Henni said, "became a

an

very vital part of the team." The result was five straight wins as Dan McCrudden went on a scor-

^^ '^'

???????????????????????????????? goals in handing URI (2-1), Boston Univer sity (2-1), and New Hampshire (2-0). He also tallied the first two goals in the 5-1 triumph against Boston College for his eighth consecutive goal. all

tallied

McCrudden

wins

the

Massachusetts

over

McCrudden added another

goal in the Rams' ninth

and final win of the season,

Holy Cross,

3-0

a

success

over

Rhody geared for its conference

as

showdown with UConn. The UConn showdown

was

a

URI letdown

as

the

Rams gave up an early goal and trailed 3-0 by halftime. URI actually outshot UConn 23-20, (and in fact had a record 297 shots on goal in 1976), but it

the

was

same

old story of not putting the as the Rams fell,

ball in the net when it counted

4-0, to UConn. Four

Rhody tangled with the Huskies put up a valiant effort

later

days

in the NCAA's and

again

bowing

before

2-1.

McCrudden, who sat out two-

thirds of the game because of a head injury, had a first-half, tying goal disallowed because he pushed a

Huskie in the

penalty

as a

Rhody

his team

pushed

Agoro scored

his first

area

UConn to the limits. Kunle

goal

Ram for URI's lone

thus ended its 1976

ord, the most wins every first time ever, the Rams

as

score.

season

with

a

9-5

rec

mention in the national

URI squad. For the given an honorable poll, making them one of

the

country.

top 25

teams in the

by

a

were

year letterman Dan McCrudden led URI and the Yankee Conference in scoring as he netted 11 of the team's 26 goals and added two assists

Three

despite being hampered by injuries. The star for ward from Kings Park, N.Y., has broken nine school and Yankee Conference records and tied at least

others in his three years at Rhody. Among other marks, McCrudden holds records for most

two

career

goals

Coach

Star,

goals (39), most career points (55), most a game (7), and most points in a game (8).

in

Henni, and

graduate

a

former

assistant

and

a

Luis

former

Hungarian Carvalho. Ram

most obvious influences on

National a

forward,

1973 were

All-

URI the

Rhody. Their tireless

???????????????????????????????? emphasis on basic fundamentals and rugged phy sical conditioning in addition to their knowledge and compatability with the entire squad, enabled the Rams to outlast many of their opponents and have the impressive season they did. Both Henni and McCrudden credit the team's six

graduated seniors all starters as being another major pillar to the Rams' success. Henni also gives credit to the incoming freshmen, who "ad justed very quickly to our style of play." One case in point was freshman standout Phil Salice. The Greenlawn, N.Y., halfback worked his way into the starting lineup just before mid-season and contributed two goals and three assists while

playing

in every game.

Rhody's stingy defense was equally responsible its 1976 showing. Anchored by goalies Bob Auletta and Joe Kanzler, the Rams defense yielded 21 goals in 14 games. Auletta, a senior tri-captain from Massapequa, N.Y., saw action in 12 games and compiled an impressive 1.17 goals-against for

average. He also holds the school record for most career shutouts with nine. His sidekick, Kanzler. has two

just In

more

seven

years of eligibility left and allowed in seven games in 1976.

goals

front of the two netminders

history Bob

one

of the

tri-captain Jim Buehler, senior sophomores Bob Diamond and

senior

Autio,

was

quartet of fullbacks in the Rams'

most consistent and

Agoro. Buehler, a 1976 all-Yankee Confer ence selection, repeatedly was the steadiest of the steady as Rhody's sweeper-back. Henni felt Autio was "the most improved player" on the squad, and sees Diamond and Agoro following in the footsteps of Buehler and Autio. Charlie Joyce Kunle

??????????????l

????????????????????? ? URI

?-

2 3

SOCCER

Harvard Providence

College

OPP.

?

0

^

2

3

*U. Maine

2

1

Brovi/n

4

Bridgeport

2

0 2 0

*Vermont

Long Island

1 1

2

*U. Mass

2

*Boston U.

1

2

*New Hampshire Boston College

0

5

1

1

3

Holy Cross

0

0

*Connecticut

4

+ Connecticut 1 Overall: 9-4-0 Yankee Conf. 5-1-0

*Y.C. Games -FNCAA Div. 1

Playoff

2

??????????????????? ^URI

FIELD HOCKEY

(S.V.)

OPP

Springfield Northeastern Mitchell Bates

Worcester Brown

VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY U. Conn

Bridgewater Bowdoin Providence

College

Bates Maine

Bridgeport Northeastern Brown

?

2

EC Eorcester

g-

2

Sc Mass. U. So.

??????

Harvard

Springfield Northeastern U. Massachusetts

SUNY

(Cortland)

Bates Boston Women's L.A. Brown

Bridgewater OVERALL: 6-3 Head Coach: Beth Bricker Assistant Coach: Jean Carlson

Trny

MEN'S 1977 LACROSSE TEAM

Standing (L R) Steve McGonan Mike Morrissey Marc Conton Ed McCaltrey Ricl Snyder John Staulo Jim Adriance E Rudnic Kneeling (L-R) Rick Erickson Revm GeotI Davis Bob Norton David Dubinsky Chris Lyons Joe Torrealday Silling (L R) Steve Sacks loc Grant Dennis Pesanle Dave Singer Bob Hazle Jeft Delaney Buxton Tony Capuano Missing From Picture Andy Schneider Tom Lucas Marc Maroni John Stiller Geolt Regan Peter Noll Charles Davey Mike Desmarais Charles Thomas Dan Hayes COACH Ed Rudnii TRI CAPTAINS David Singer John Staulo Andy Schneider

Pictured

Paul Connolly

,^

w

t^

RECORD: Won-6

i'^ T -^^Kr

iu

m

-.y

J

-^

1 <^1

Lost-2

Tied-0

OPPONENT

URl 4

A

8

H

Southern Connecticut State Southern Connecticut State

12

A

Fairfield

6

H

College College

13

9 9

12

H

University Assumption College Providence College

8

H

Massachusetts Lacrosse Club

12

A

University

15

A

Providence

2 6

5

of Hartford

7 4

College

HIGH SCORERS:

Jeff Buxton

28

Tom Lucas

22

Paul

Connolly

9

goals, goals, goals,

23

assists

12

assists

7

assists

???????????????????????????????? ^^^

Cr\rr\\rta Coming

I had

iin fh:at coi^nnH hili t ^qUciH up that second hill I asked

spent all

X X

summer

sweating

mwcoif must \A/h\/ myself miict why and straining up

^^^

my friends had all just gone out for a few beers, leaving me with strange looks while I warmed up every night before running. hills

like this one, when

I asked

myself

what

ever possessed me to set my night for 7 a.m., so that I would do a leisurely run before going to

alarm clock each have time to work at 8:20. I

mean,

I

still had about three and

a

half miles

to go and

already my legs felt stiff and my arms up so high I could have combed my hair without too much trouble, and hell, I couldn't even were

see was

I

the leaders anymore and the rest of the around 70 yards ahead.

went

through

would have to broke while I

a

mental

quit and putting

was

checklist of

pack

reasons

I

couldn't finish: my laces on my flats; I had started

fast; my shorts were too tight around my think that pain just above my left knee is a

out too

legs; I pulled

muscle and I wouldn't want to make it any and besides, it didn't matter if I finished

worse;

anyway.

But the

thing is, you know, I didn't stop. I don't was the morning practices, the strange would give me as I ran along down

know if it looks

people

town at four in the afternoon, the tediousness of out every day, or all the dogs who have ever second look at my legs, that chased me to the end of that race, but I didn't stop, not once.

getting taken

a

That's the funny thing about this sport. Once you start you can't ever stop. Even after your flats are buried on the bottom of the closet. Even when it's over ninety out and your friends come over and ask you if you want to go to the beach and them has a sister you've wanted to meet.

one

of

With every step your confidence grows until you can't ever give less than everything because you've learned to depend on yourself to give it.

They say long distance runners are crazy breed. I don't know. Chris Barnett

I don't know. a

.^.

?????????????????????????????H4

CROSS COUNTRY URI 35

106

37

Holy Cross (U. Mass (Northeastern (St. Johns

22

Brown

20

Fordham

37

Brown

42

U. Conn

27

U. New

138

URI

OPP.

PLACED

26

4th

30 79

cancelled 20 17

30

Hampshire

Yankee Conference:

4th

U. Mass

(1st) U. Conn (2nd) U. Maine (3rd) U. Vermont (5th) U. Nw. H'shire (6th) Boston U. (7th)

22 44

75 141 145 202

Yankee Conference: 4th New Englands: 20th

MEN'S INDOOR TRACK OPP. Placed

URI 52

Boston

28'/

Brown

28'/2 79

St. Johns

531/2

Boston

39

College University University

Cross

66 65

45

Holy

60

50

48'/2

Massachusetts/ New Hampshire Northeastern

21

Connecticut/

99

Maine

73

33 69>/2 28

Yankee Conference New

Englands (Tied

5t

OVERALL: W-3, L-7 Coach: William Falk (Acting Head Assistant Coach:

Captains: Mark (co-capt's)

lOt

for

Coach)

Charley McGinnis Charron & Ed. Gray

OUTDOOR TRACK PLACED

OPP

URI Massachusetts

99

52V2

Holy Cross

BSVi

521/2

Brown

84

College Relays* Boston University Yankee Conference**

43

55

Boston

102 25

Connecticut Massachusetts Boston

60 52

Englands***

New

5/14

University

4th 98

Relay, 2nd place in Pole Vault **URI 1st in Pole Vault Bill Hartley set Conf. Record at 16'6'/4" hurdles ****Qualified: Gary Hecker 14.6 & 14.5 in 120-yd. high run (Injured did not attend) Elliott Butcher 10.0 in the 100-yd. 16-71/2" set another record in Pole Vault at New Englands 5/15/77

*URI 1st in Mile

Hartley

Coach: (Acting) Wm. Falk Assistant: Charles McGinnis

TRACK AND FIELD OPP.

URI 61

Harvard-Radcliffe

57

33

Springfield

84

57

61

59

Univ. of Connecticut So. Connecticut State College Central Conn. State College

34

University of Massachusetts

91

82

Brown

35

77

Bridgewater

40

52

& Vermont

66 59

36

Regionals (Nationals)

*EAIAW

*AIAW

*competed

on

individual basis

only.

EAIAW Patti Douglas placed fifth in 880 (Time-2:14.8) AIAW Patti Douglas only competitor who made it to the finals 880 meter time-2:12.6 OVERALL: W 3, L 5, T 1 Coach:

Cynthis

Ciani

RIFLE

URI

OPP.

1044

MIT

1044

Brown

1056

Brown

1056

Providence

1055

Providence

1055

Coast Guard

1064

Yale

1019 862 841 1042 1041

Academy

1058

Academy

1073

936

1064

MIT

1062

Coast Guard

1052

Yale

994 954

WOMENS

27th NEISA 3-Crew

GOLF

URl #1

94

#2!

Racing (Fowle Trophy,

NE.

CH)

OPP.

#1 #2!

#4

92

96

#3

86 86

98

#2 #4 #1

Mt.

Holyoke

92 94

Boston

College

Wheaton

Tufts

2nd

U.S;. Coast Guard Harvard Yate

4th 5th

3rd

MIT

99 197

1st

101 104

Boston U.

6th 7th

Bowdoin

8th

36th NEISA FALL INTERSECT. (Schell 3rd 137 Trophy)

OVERALL: 0-2 (W 0, L2) Coach: Joan Clegg

Yale

133

1st

MIT

136

2nd

WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS

URI

SCORE URI 84.75

OPPONENT Northeastern Rhode Island

95.65

OPP. 49.75

77.25

102.20

U. Maine

95.70

101.65

Brown

65.80 40.25

Bridgeport

100.65

105.90 105.25

U. Vermont

Springfield R.I. College Bridgewater St. Connecticut College University of Connecticut

465

Boston State

96.32

Mt.

96.32

Cen. Conn. State

Holyoke

Assistant: David

Napier

2nd (T) 454 461 464

Hampshire

477

U. Vt.

478

Toski Invit. @

92.45

Amherst 310

9th

N.E.E.C.A.C. Golf Chamip. U. Mass & Cent. Conn. N.E. Intercoll. Golf

Champ

Coach: Jerri DiCamillo

7th

U. Maine

98.30 99.10

OVERALL: W 12, L 3 *B Team doesn't count in overall

2nd

490

Yale Fall Inter. Trn. Yankee Conf. Champ.

U. New

55.45

87.30

463

U. Mass

111.00*

97.90

Match:

Massachusetts Providence College

U. Conn

118.85

101.75

Placed

Bryant College 461

85.35

Westfield 97.95

OPP.

Quadrangular

83.65

College

M.I.T.

98.90

GOLF URI

1st 2nd

Overall: 3-1 Yankee Conf.: Tied for

(T)

4th of 41 Tear

Second

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STUDENT SENATE The URI Student Senate the student

body

the ministration, Regents, and the Island. The

Senate's

acts

as

the voice of

responding to the Ad Faculty, the Board of State Legislature of Rhode in

power

is

granted by

the

At

torney General's office to disperse the Ac tivities Tax. These monies are used to sponsor student activities

including

many

clubs and

organizations, films and speakers.

Through

the

Kingston Student Services, (KSS), to provide free personal

the Senate is able

legal advice,

a

book

exchange,

the

Youth

Hostel, and Student Co-ops including Cellar Sounds, and Underground Films. When an active student dent Senate, many things

body supports the Stu can be accomplished.

STUDENT SENATE MEMORANDUM THE

To: From:

STUDENT

Date:

SENATE

MAY,

1977

1977

ACT strike. .veggie meals. .Zompa stomp. ..Exec in the Pub... Ed Shur. .Budweiser beer. Senate weekend. .ball of string... roll call. "Is the Senate viable?". .category transfer... logo. smoker's rights... the Levey report. .Activities Tax... budget cats... the Taylor report. Parliamentary procedure. "point of information" is a question. .Exec class. .RIPIRG funding... referendums budget hearings. cops & guns. constitutionality. ...External Affairs. resignations. .KSS. .a new V. P. .RamPages ...bogus bills. telephones. .Follies Bazaar towing. .parking. ...root beer soda. .quorum. .ad journ to the Cuproom. ,

.

.

..

..

.

..

.

.

..

..

.

.

..

..

..

..

.

.

.

..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Paul Marineau, Waller Moore, Lisa Gencarelli, Anne Maire Hood, Kathy Connor, Jim Gallagher, Robin Paige Donna Correnle Pacheco, Diane Buleau, Paul Matthews, Mary Atlenwieler, Ernie Crivellone, Brian Beaudoin, Nancy Ferrazza. Sandi Johnson, Clift Schecter! Murphy, Michael Tiernan, Bob Rainville, Anne Marie Brisson, Mike Sousa Heidi Loble Briar. Cullen Steve Alexander Bob Stein, Sherry Barr Ken Mello. Not Present For Photo: Sheila Borek, Denise Colter, John Farrington, Slan Na'scewicz, Henry Zompa, Bob Wise Tom Sayers, Debbi Willel, Carol Conforti, John Washlick, Gary Metzger. Fran

Bob Craven, Miriam

The News Editors are the backbone of this news paper. Without them, I'm in trouble. News Editors be able

must

to

write

the

on

run

and under fire

from me and the typesetters. They must have an all-inclusive knowledge of the University. They must be able to answer any reporter's questions so that even a beginner will know who to talk with, how and why and where to go. A News Editor must be tactful when dealing with egos,

clearly

administrators, have

and

faculty,

know how

to

is what this business thrives

News Editor

Being

a

ment.

Sick, tired

Still,

they

too.

That

on.

means

with

or

students. sometimes

bully

to

a

big

a

big

time

test

the

commit

day,

next

have to be here. If I haven't got good News Editors then not only is this going to look bad, but

they

The News Editors is

try

to

keep

it

really run this paper. flowing and honest.

All I do

The Bood 5C Cigar "Just what this country really needs" More than

likely,

the

Cigar is what our readers Wednesday and Friday morn always there. And so are we,

first wake up with ings. The Cigar is the staff, 32 weeks

trying can.

to

put

out

%m

a

year, 30

or

so

the best damn

hours

a

week,

newspaper

we

A newspaper that is reliable current and in

teresting. And more than anything about this business, one thing keeps us going despite the long hours, that is the truth.

Publishing the Cigar and

involves

a

hell of

a

lot of time

just as much energy. The process starts Sunday, when we give assignments to reporters. The deadline for Wednesday's paper is 7 p.m. Monday so they work hard and fast to get the copy in. As it comes in, the News Editors go over it with the reporters, checking it for style, facts, uses

and flow.

Around 8 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, we mark the flats where we want the stories and pictures to

appear.

stories to

It

is

a

busy night

edit, headlines

and outlines

to write. It is

to

for

us.

There

write, pictures

hard, long, tiring

to

are

crop, work.

V

1 n

H

*-

QUO

^^^

^^^^P

Anna Maria VInl

1 in

Tom

H

Kathy Plaltted

1

-

^

Chr;s Barnett Jo* Pollonk Strei SpauMng

Sahagian

Charlie Joyce

Nancy

Lok

Mark Morelll Ned Hole

EdIlor-ln-Chlel Production Manager Managing Editor News Editor

Cady Goldfield Dave Gregorio

Sports Editor

Gail Kauranen

Photo Coordinator Photo Coordinator

Copy Editor Advertising Manager

is already at work on the next issue. Often the lights of our office are the last to go out. Our lights burn long after the Pub-goers have stumbled home. We grow close to each other while working on these late nights. we

work

to

make

printing deadlines. The Cigar is printed in wich, Connecticut, a 40 minute drive from We

our

Nor URI.

have to have the paper to make it. Paste-up

ready to go about begins early in the The Managing Editor and her staff begin to put the copy which has come from our typesetters, on the dummied-up flats. The News Editors work on checking that all our copy is in. This is a tense time. Working against the clock, a mistake can really foul-up the paper. I do my editorial pages and try to relax. We deal with 7

p.m.

afternoon.

last minute emergencies, miss dinner and around a lot. But, despite all the signs the contrary, we always seem to get the paper

any

grump to out

by

on

time.

Chris Barnett

:^m^

^^l'^-^

Paul Nonnenmacher

Pat Dolan

Dave Dunn

News Editor

Monday and Wednesday nights, the office is packed with busy News Editors, reporters working on their stories and our Business Department which

Tuesdays and Thursdays

Emily Calandrolli

Marie Krasner Dave Lavallee

Rayna Lasaroff Meg LeGros

Sheila Redihan

Kathleen

Vanity

Tim Rosalort

Cathy Sarault Cindy Simoneau Ray Keegan Mike St. Peter Sharon Terzian Sue Waldman

Tony Risica

Georfle Latos

LITTLE BROTHER-LITTLE SISTER

Friendship Little Sister

is

the

concern

(LBLS).

Once

of Little Brothera

week members

spend an afternoon with a boy or girl from the surrounding community and share an ac tivity they both enjoy. Some of these ac tivities are: biking, bowling, collecting shells or simply taking a walk.

Throughout and

the year

trips. This

LBLS

sponsors

parties

the group visited the Children's Museum. LBLS annually a Christmas sponsors Party, Easter Egg Hunt, and Lamda Chi Alpha's Junior Olympics, year

Boston

LBLS is

and

to

an

opportunity for all

to

grow,

share,

care.

President; Mary

Kelly Photos

by T. Hynes

and R. Vantinp

the Children's Museum

TAI CHI CLUB The Tai Chi, or "Supreme Ultimate" was a discipline of China which utilized nature's ways of balance

and centering.

During the fall URI students ment

the

of

art

semester

began

to

a

small group of

develop

campus organization which would bring of Tai Chi to URL After months of meetings

and discussions the tion to

of 1974

work towards the

a

group

presented

its

constitu

the Student Senate and became the URI Tai

Chi Club. Since that time the club has grown in size and en thusiasm under the direction of Mr. Charles Arcieri,

of Newport. "Charlie" has brought the Club the classical Yang style of Tai Chi. For

health

and

practice postures known

slow

purposes,

flowing

members

movement

the "form." These postures be reflections of the motions and as

conceived

to

tinuity of

nature

as

meditational its

daily

and have traditional

names

of

were

con

such

"wave hands in clouds."

The Tai Chi Club has established itself as an alter native to understanding life, within and around us

all, through

conflict.

an

art

which has survived time and

W^i^^'^

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,

"1 ^^^^^^^^VI^nI

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Photos by S. Friedman

INTERNATIONAL CLUB the

Although dents

at

the

than two-hundred

more

University of Rhode Island

foreign

stu

come

from

forty very different countries and speak more than fifty separate and distinct languages, each one of us experienced identical feelings of anxiety, ex citement, insecurity and expectation when we first arrived. The exultation of finally having made it

through all of approval along with

to

adjust

ferences

the part of the foreign students norms of American society.

on

the social

and

face

frustration

fellow countrymen while living in the middle of another nation. They live almost alone in the crowd!

and

cultural shock

acute

being

in

a

sets in.

cultural shock

a

devastating depression

foreign

students

viewed

you choose to find them.

themselves

is

more as

inseparable

a

the

in

part of

from their

of

context

family

a

sense

or

their caste

own

priorities into

a

upon

and

reticent

are

situation

where

and

friends

they

differences in themselves

longer

no

associates

studnets

foreign

thrust

to

for

can

depend

Relationships

often

are

find

friendly,

Americans

helpful. Others

them

see

own

un

as

friendly and disinterested. The points of view are an unresolved issue in the international community and

are

often debated.

After

all, people

are

as

What is

discouraging is that there is little foreign students from dif ferent countries. Have you ever seen, for example, a Chinese man going shopping or elsewhere with an Indian man? (not to mention a Chinese girl going with an Indian guy!) It is unfortunate that birds of the same feather only flock together. more

interaction

between

and

assistance

guidance. with Americans

surround

which

of self. The American

the primary identification to the individual and the independent spirit it generates as a sign views

of maturity and confidence. Many cannot easily adopt such radical

and

or

in the isolation of their

courteous

a

when

cultures

homesickness,

the initial fascination with

with

ing themselves totally

to most of the foreign they observe the tendency of Americans to emphasize the individual and in dividual responsibility, in contrast to the way they

students

and

living

Some

It is indeed

to

Most, with the help of American Students, survive the cultural shock, and adjust themselves very well to the new environment. Others, unfortunately, find it impossible to adjust to such radical dif

the red tape and innumerable stamps and actually being at URI soon fades

society

new

It takes effort

confusing

first. For instance, friendships in India simply total involvement with selected groups based on mutual love, respect and compromise at

imply

unlimited obligation, in contrast to the concept where friendship is loosely applied to many people based on overlapping special interests and involving only limited obliga

students regret

Some

foreign

many

opportunities

to

get

that

to

there

really

are

know

not

other

cultures and feel

that having come all the way the Atlantic Ocean, they must learn more other cultures and customs besides ob taining the university degree. across

about

with

American

tion to

one

another.

Students from societies outside the Western World often perplexed by the "free" relationships What is perfectly men and women here. in Rhode Island may well be considered immodest indecent or even obscene in Istanbul or Tangier, are

between

and

certainly

takes

no

small effort

to

adjust

to.

of Americans

in the classroom and

with deference.

in

would "sir"

never

and

the

foreign

be

done

to

together

students derive

bring foreign

more. a

It

is

true

and

that

lot from

being here, realize that they

but American students need to are benefited as much. It is unfortunate that when an American student sees an activity organized by International students, he tends to think that it is mainly meant for the foreign students. No, it is meant equally for American students.

their dress,

conclude, a personal note: I am happy here. URI, with all the friendly, easy-going, unpreten is tious, well-intentioned, practical Americans, sweet. But my home town Mysore (a small, beautiful town in South India) is sweeter.

India,

NARAYAN S. MURTHY

just around campus.

example, a student professor without using for

expressed

must

American students

To

Another striking difference often remarked on newly arrived international students is the

formality

Something

In

by in

address

treating

a

him

HORSEMEN'S CLUB The

U.R.I.

terested in

Horseman's Club

horses,

(URIHC) welcomes

everyone in

what their riding ability. Members and cleaning of the ten horses leased the by University, the tack building and the barn. For these services, club members may use the horses for weekend riding and trail rides. The club sponsors various films, guest speakers, are

responsible

no

for the

matter care

professional jumping, dressage

and

gymkana demonstrations,

and

admittance to local horse shows. Our main events are organizing, running, and competing in our annual horse show and attending the International Jumping Derby in Newport and the National Horse Show in New York. The URIHC owns its own track and

equipment through Student Senate funds.

Meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month in the Memorial Union.

nd third

President

Denise E.

Vice President

Johanna

Secretary

Kathleen

Gray

Hoffman

Treasurer

Hickey Sandra Fitzpatrick

Program Chairper:

Susan Cartier

Thursday

PHOTO CO-OP The URI Photo Co-op is

a

Student Senate Funded

cooperative organization. All undergraduates are eligible to join. A membership fee of $2.50 per

semester

white

pays

chemicals

for

all

necessary

of for

black

and

developing

the

and

enlarging. The co-op is located in room 118 of the Memorial Union and offers its members a fully equiped darkroom. This includes all of the necessary

developing, enlarging and mounting equipment needed to give good photographic quality. Being a co-op depends on volunteer monitors to responsible for the equipment and the dark room organization. It is the responsibility of members to keep the room clean.

be

The Photo

Co-op also offers a place where new experienced photographers may get to to discuss gether techniques and creative ideas. We also provide the only completely color and

darkroom in the

state. As

and paper have members.

to

be

of now, color chemicals the individual

supplied by

WRIU During the Secretarial Strike

we

provided

live

coverage of all those meetings; we stayed into the night until we could announce that it was over.

forced

to wait; another that were poorly made six or seven years ago before any of us here caused us the most pain, and that's a

Our expansion

hard

pill

difficult idea

to

But

it

through

much

working on

in

an

volunteer

organization whirli

help.

hard when the government knocks doorkeeper is a student who

on

the

big exam, and doesn't have anybody's fault? Not really.

the time to

Sometimes it's hard when you want to so

badly

WRIU ever

that you just get irritable when

has been in

Sometimes your

the papers

more

its

door and for a

studying

is

t

has been in the past, and that make

answer.

things don't.

year

it

work

see

they is

Is

tha,

il hard too.

were suspensions, scandels, boycotts and agreements. There were hearings and

This year there

questionable

meetings, and tempers lost and solidarity found. hard, but we made it. There

It

was

lot of good things for us this year loo. forced us to come together to sink or and that was beautiful.

was

a

Trial-by-fire swim

Metropolitan Opera live from Saturday. We followed all the

We carried the New York

Lincoln

Center

every

Rams' Football games, we followed the Soccer Team to the play-offs. We were there when the Rams beat Washington State, and narrowly lost to Michigan. Our programs included interviews with Peter Alvin Toffler and our own Jack Kraft.

Frampton,

accept. all

made progress, and that's of all. We will be in

we

technical

are

problems

own see

promises

so

Plans

next

to

depends

were

the most important brand new studios Our

Sometimes it's hard

plans

swallow.

to

to

be

smiles a

lot

year,

and

most

solved with that

of

our

move.

pulled together; it's good

has

staff

some

thing

around

more

here,

of them.

and

there

SKYDIVERS CLUB The URI Skydiving Club was established in 1970 and has 14 members. For the past 4 years, the club has been jumping with the Conneticut Parachutists of Ellington, Conn. The URI Club allows students embark

on their own great adventures at little The club meets the first Thursday of eVery month and is located in Room 208 of the Memorial

to

cost.

^^

"FAST, FURIOUS, FUN" Pres. Bill

J. Beaudreau

Tres. Tom Saunderson

Members:

Don

Mike Beaudreau

Debbie Grant

Brian Burton

Steven Lamb

Coke Coaklev Brian Cullen'

Barbara

Lynn Cahoon

Dennis Stovill

Rick Poison

Flynn

Murphy Holly Taylor

{

GEOLOGY CLUB The in

Geology Club promotes an interest A an imderstanding of geology.

and

field

weekend

the

to

trip

White

Mountains of New

Hampshire highlighted this year's events and emphasized the of New geology England. Guest speakers slide presentations have covered topics ranging from lunar geology and

and the

of Mars

geology

periences Western

of

student

U.S.

The

to

the

once

tacted

through

the

geology

dent: Martin Halzel

in

member

per month and

meets

summer

members 2.5

can

office.

be

ex

the club

PRE-VET CLUB The

Pre-Vetrinary Club studies

exotic pets as

well

as

including the

more

a

variety of

snakes and zoo animals house pets. The

common

eating habits and kinds of food consumed by different types of snakes were the topic of discussion during one typical meeting of the Club. The Pre- Vet Club offers

a

variety of discussion

each week and is

open to students in

terested in

different animals.

always learning about

Since its inception in the spring of 1958, the URl Skin Divers has provided a common meeting ground for persons of various academic backgrounds. For

merly

bastion of the "hard core" diving devotee, began to extend itself in broader directions

a

the club 1974.

in

ekly

Bimonthly bullsessions

film and lecture series

both the

diver

evolved

designed

into

a

to interest

d the general campus experienced community. As interest grew so did our memberwhich has ship, tripled since 1973. The club continned to expand this year, nd for the first time women began lo join in appn ciable numbers. i

Chain

saws

desire

to

and

insanity) needed The initial as

life-preserving

bay

under such conditions.

wetsuit.

As

event. water

body

and

the effects of the

jolt fade, a new sensation filters in; the pain of the exposed cheeks and temples. The water in

the suit agony

soon

is

reaches

a

replaced by

The diver swims

tackle the

participate in such an the sting of ice

initial

dives that

to

to

plunge brings

discoveries.

thick shield of ice for the first time since scuba first invented. For club members, this pro vided the opportunity to be the first divers ever

the hole. A perverse

it creeps into the spaces between the

the

and

was

provide

near the freezing point, and the thrill of exploring a world made ominously silent by a heavy, insulating layer of rock-hard seawater provide the enthusiasm (or

Many members activelj- participated in our weekly day trips as well as the special night and boat were held periodically. Artifact dives produced everything from antique bottles to WW II shells. "The deepfreeze of 1977", vintage artillery a curse to most Rhode Islanders, enabled us to initiate a major ice diving program. Sheltered areas of Narragansett Bay were hidden under a

axes

throw oneself into the water

tolerable temperature, the ecstasy of new-

along the underside of the ice and becomes part of a world where the floor is "up". After jettisoning his weight belt, he is pulled towards the surface of this world, and the inherent boyancy of the wetsuit enables him to the inverted landscape using techniques employed by the Apollo astronauts their epic moon walks. Though from his friends on the surface by perhaps foot, the diver is truely alone. move across

similar to those

during

COMMUTER ASSOCIATION

I

The Commuter association, located on the third fioor of the Memorial Union in rooms 311 and

313. offers to commuters a wide range of ac tivities and services. From 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. the Commuter Lounge is open to anyone who desires a place to come, a place to eat in good company, to

study, or to just hang around and always someone here to make home, and if nothing else it's a

socialize, there is you feel at

lot better than sitting in your

During some

car.

the past year, the association sponsored events like the hayride and square

great

dance party, a recruitment contest with a fiftygallons of gas for the first place winner, car washes and the annual road rally and the all

day-all night picnic! Aside from special activities, there are the regu lar services: coffee hours, reduced telephone rates, shower facilities, lockers, the carpool service, and a lot of good times!! So what are you waiting for? Come to the commuter lounge

and join the fun and activities.

UNION BOARD The Union Board works for the students at URI ."Vmong the services and enter

provided are, dances, tourna trips, films and jitterbug lessons.

tainment

ments,

The Union Board also co-sponsors activi ties with the sec:, Ripirg, Uhuru SaSa, and ihc International Hou.se,

Group picture Mike Dupre,

Isl L. To R.

Kathy C^onnors,

Ellen Perr

Jim Landman, Darle Mary Connelly. Cin Letizi, Dan Barron. Ferrazza, Pat Hanim

(iinger Powers, Jean Fox,

Green,

me.

iliff,

2nd Row

Jill

Carr.

Nancy

S-E-C The purpose of the Student Entertainment Committee is to

provide quality

entertain

ment

in the form

events

primarilly for the undergraduate student

U.R.I,

body,

as

well

as

of major

for the

re

interested

Persons

of

phases can

find committees

making

sure

has his

or

the

her

bakstage door,

Students

sponsible for performance.

the are

totally

involved

the talent selection process. Available talent listings are

compiled

and

presented by

the Executive Committee the

general membership approval.

final

to

for

to

ex

press their individual talents. From basic ticket sales to

maining U.R.I, community.

in

all

in

production

concert

All

preformer

star

are

the

are

re

entire

eligible

to

join the S-E-C and members are

eligible

for

positions which

are

Isl: Haul

To R.

.iirMicr, lii-iKv Fried Tom IIviic.v 2nd Joel Gailen,

Janel Kot-nig, Kllen Green, Felderman. C:aroi Johnston. Ikeiula Golduper, Jill Rubin. Gorski. \ane> Siiields, Tom van, Dorotfn Duleba, Spring

the

members of

committee

students

on

L.

man,

Dav

Jordan, JoJir Ayla Sen,

Felln

C:liip 3rd: Lucy

Sidli'Raul-

4th

Kir

Gail Dori

Balsley. Jo;

Biehl, Flo Krakau. Gail Michae 5th Richard off.

Silvj Zubatkin. S.1.S

Fred Lilzky. Dave Kolc, George Alsfeld. Top Row Howard Wolf, Brian McCullv, Steve McTagger. John Skahill, Jill Fortgang, Tom

executive

Morris. Rich Solomon, Karen Bieberstein, Jov \oxick, Heverlv Tomar,

chosen in

Lyna

elections held each spring.

Walsnn,

Lucille

Mark Andersuii. Alice

Fernandcs.

Applelon. Jill

K.S.S. Under Groimd Films, Cellar Sounds, The Alternative Food Co-op, and the Rain bow's End are only some of the services of the K.S.S. All the

of

i

(King.slon Student Services).

Co-op's are

located in the ba.sf

Roosevelt Hall and are available to I students. To help students save money the purpose of all the K.S.S. Co-op's.

RHO CHI

L. Tl) H.

1st Dr.iii., Sli.ili,l.iii

\isei.Mli,

Sh,.^r^

H.,ir.

1 iiul.,

Di.iii.i CLirkf. Tessa

\.ls,,n

2nd

IMlil

Slai.l.T. mil Druliiisl, .\i,,K W.-IU.ry frank Si.slarc, Ii.iicl l)iisal<l lii-.iun. Jnhii Matk.raski, Maun DiP.a.li., |...- I)nl'n-x Missing \ancv Scfii/o, ami M.,r^ Fll.n ( -.irrisili Krwri

II

Prfsiii. Ill Frank Sislarc Slllr^^ liarr Vice I'ri-sidenl Bill t)i hirst llisli.rian

Rho Chi is

a

national

pharmaceutical

honor society

the stimulation and recognition of academic excellence within the field, promoting of the advancement profession. whose

objectives

are

Chapter (URI) enjoyed a productive through its activities within the CoUege of Pharmacy. One major project was the development of a post graduate "directory" which is available to any pharmacy student, providing information about graduate opportunities at every college of The Beta Pi 1976-77 year

pharmacy in the country. Plans are being made to expand this file to include medical schools and other professional training programs. Other activities of the chapter included support of the Swine Fin Immunization program, updating of and relocation of chapter files, preparation of a ne\\' window case display in Hall, Fogarty participation in the PharmacyFreshman Orientation last fall, and the initiation of new members from the fotirth-year class.

membership, rcorgani/ation

SPEAKEASY

J

Speakeasy is a service available to students hich provides health infonnation as well as sex educa tion. The counseling takes place in private or group sessions on the fourth floor of Roosevelt Hall. Women who desire birth control are re

quested a

b\' URI Health Services

group discussion at

is

friendly

one

or

to

Speakeasy.

to

The

talk

to

when

something

if you should have

an\'

is

first attend

atmosphere always some bothering you

and informative. There is

questions.

is

Competition

an

aspect of modern society; ROT

sH-

(

taught the true meaning of sport manship and being part of a team. These men ai i I women know that there is a challenge being offer to them constantly. They have more than enouj^l

students

are

confidence

lo meet

the

challenge

and

responsibilit

them.

placed

on

Unlike

mo.st

more career

civilian

employment,

opportunities for

the

women.

military The

offi

women

r

the Corps will attest to this fact as will all who start off as "junior executives" and not members of tl

proverbial

"secretarial

pool".

participate

in the

ROTC unit

Women same

in

the URI

training

as men

This also holds true for their Advanced Camp train ing in the summer of their Junior year. Althouj,h women

receive

are

allowed in Combat Arms, they d( of what the Infantry i

not

fair

a

understanding

all about. A

misconception held about ROTC cadets

is

tl

I

they drill, drill, drill; not so for URl-ROTC. Th % learn a wide variety of techniques such as: constru I ing rope bridges, camping with the barest essential water survival, mountain climbing, rappeling, ai 1 other techniques that require leadership ai 1 teamwork. In

June another

officers.

They

group of Seniors will become Armv

know that many

a

demand will 1

1

as responsible adults, yet as th r training has shown, the cadets of URI-ROTC v II

made of them

push

on

and find themselves ahead of the game.

.

^>

R.O.T.C. They

that old soldiers

say

fade away Not

so

never

die; they just

....

for

the

University's

Reserve

Officer's

Training Corps. They have neither died nor faded away; instead they are presently enjoying a state of revitalization. As far

as the students of the 70s ; idealistic endeavors are being traded in for more pragmatic ones. The increased enrollment of stu

taking Military Science courses and entering Program speaks for itself, It makes economic sense to consider the military as an alternative to the unemployment lines. dents

the Advanced

When an

one

tries to observe the

actual ROTC unit

physical aspects of they could

the University, confused. There isn't at

become quite a separate facility for the Corps, as they are located in the gymnasium, and are situated between Keaney and Tootell. Except for Monday afternoons Spring Semester, the only persons that yoii will find in

uniform

informality There is structor

are

is

the

military

instructors. The air of

quite noticeable.

no greater sense of rapport between in and student than that of ROTC cadre and

their cadets. Unlike other academic pus, T

the

personal relationship

areas on cam-

and close contact

between these students is unmatched.

Club

Sailing The URI

faculty

Sailing C^lilb has only a place to

not

been giving the students and sail and keep their boats but

also the opportunity lo learn the art of sailing. From March until November, the Club is open giving accredited lessons to undergraduates, graduate students and other members of the University in its I8-boal fleet. The boat house is

on

Salt Pond Road

on

the northern end

of Salt Pond in Wakefield. The clubhouse contains storage and bigger space for all the sails and gear from the dinghies boats, plus a small workshop to help maintain them. It also serves as a

classroom for the

rough

is loo

to

.sailing

classes

on

days

when it

sail.

beginner and advanced classes are given During tlie fall and spring semesters, lessons

Four sessions of every year. are one

given llirougli llic credit. In the

Physical

summer,

Education

lessons

are

department

given

to

for

the other

club members including graduate students and nonUniversity people. Novices are started in the beginners' class, taught in Beverly dinghies, while the advanced class is taught in the faster, more lively Flying Junior

sloops. The

fleet of

class Finn to

club boats also consists of two Olympic one 470, a Cal 27 which was donated

Dinghies,

the University last fall, and by the instructors.

two Boston

Whaler power

boats used

Club membership dues for undergraduates are $3.00 for the school year. This year there were approximately 200 undergraduate members who are taking advantage of the many programs offered In' the club. Besides the use of the boats and

facility,

some

of the other programs

are:

1. monthly meetings featuring guest speakers and/or films, 2. The night s. il and partv o Gardner's Island on

the III

Pond, and

.3.

all members, al

the Club w

lich

a

Champi mship i^egatta, open Irophv is given lo the winner.

Surfing

Club

Renaissance

Bruce

Staff Members

Murray

Production Editor

Art Work

Cady Goldfield

Literary Donna

Cagen

Larry Lutvak

Barbara O'Neil

Nancy Nolan

Contributors Toni Biscica

Andy

Layouts Gail Butler Karen

McDougal

Nemtoz

Art Lisi

Nancy

Ferrazza

Dave LaFlamme

Photography Bruce

Murray

Rick Booth

Barbara O'Neil Tom

Hynes

Alan

Sayles

Jim Malarkey Brenda

Goldapper Diffily Philip Kieras Tom Sahagian

Tom

Paul Sensor

Steve Friedman

Chris Barnette

Nancy Mendes

Meg Mathews Ron Vantine

Treasurer Bruce

Nancy Lok

Murray

Rick Booth

Senior

Photographe

As time takes

future,

it

us

will be

forward into the unknown a

pleasure

to

glance back

and recall the stories of those precious

mem

ories at URI.

I would like to personally thank all the people who helped make this years 1977 Renaissance a success. Because only a small number of stu dents were willing to become staff members, our

appreciation for contributions

extended

to

is

warmly

each individual.

little bit of time from many stages we had accumulated many pictures and literature. All this made it to include possible many ideas. A large variety of subjects has helped make this a better year book. We received

people.

a

In the final

What do you remember about URI? The Pub? The Ram's Den? The Bookstore? The long

lines? The Union? Maybe you remember the Library? The Classes? Studying? The Dorms? Gail D. Butler

Editor-in-chief

Parties? you,

The Renaissance Staff would like to give special thanks to the following people for all their help in an effort to pro duce the 1977 Renaissance Yearbook. Hoxie

David Bosworth

Phil Walsh

Juha

Claudia O'Hare Robert Rainville

Richard Katsoff

Robert Izzo

Chris Wells

Robert

Steinberg

Melino and all the T.D. Brown

Thanks also to Gary photo who took the senior portraits and candids. T.D. needs. all our also Brown photo supplied

graphers

Appreciation

is also

extended

vise and

years'

to

Barry Woolf

,

a

represen His ad

Josten's American Yearbook Company. helpful suggestions contributed to make

tative for

Renaissance

a success.

this

Friends? Whatever URI means to has tried to recapture its

Renaissance

meaning forever. If Renaissance

can stir your memory, then have successfully held on to time. Let's now look back and reflect on the good times we all had in the past. I hope Renaissance will become your lasting memory of URI. we

Gail D. Butler Editor-in-Chief

American Civil Liberties Union

International House

Skin Divers

Amateur Radio Club

Intervarsity Christian

Skydivers

Fellowship American Institute of Chemical

Society of

Women

Engineers

Italian Club

Engineers

Speakeasy American

Meteobological

K. S.

S., Inc.

Society Little Alternative Food

Brother/Little

Sister

Student American Pharmaceutical Association

Co-op Mortar Board

Student Committee

Campus Crusade for Christ

Against

Racism

Mushroom Coffeehouse

Student Health

Christ the King Prayer

Advisory

Council

Music Educators National

Community

Conference

Student Hungar Committee

Christian Science Students Older Than Average

Navigators The Good 5<t

(SOTA)

Cigar

Orienteering

Club Student Senate

Clean Air Now (C. A. N.) Panhellenic Association

College

of

Pharmacy

Student Video Center

Council

of Students

Perspective Surf Club

Collegiate

Association of

Portuguese Club Tai Chi Club

Newswriters

Premedical-Predental Society UHURA Sa Sa

Commuters Association

Prevetrinary Club U.

CREW

J.

B.

Rebirth Union Board

Debate Club Renaissance

Way Campus Outreach

Food Science Club Rho Chi Society Free

University Films

Honor

(pharmacy

Society)

Geology Club

R. I. P. I. R. G.

Hillel

Shiatsu-Japanese Massage

Horsemen's Club

S. I. M. S.

Interfraternity Council (IFC)

Ski Club

WRIU

Young Club

Democrates

Young Republicans Young Socialist Alliance

You know he's

freshman if he asks directions

a

to

Chafee.

You know he's

You know he's

a

Chafee is

behind the gym.

right

senior if he tells

freshman that

a

You know he's

football

freshman if she

a

wants to

date

a

senior if he's

a

You know she's You know she's

freshman if his advisor still

a

signs

registration form.

his

forgery.

expert

at

skips

class every

an

a

freshman if she

a

senior if she hasn't been to

a

few weeks.

player. You know she's

You know she's

a

senior if she

a

freshman if she wants to live in

never

heard of Rick

in

a

a

class

week.

Moser. You know she's

You know she's

a

a

freshman if she

spends

her week

ends at home with Mom and Dad.

sorority. You know she's You know she's

senior if she wants to live down the

a

in her

senior if she

a

boyfriend's

spends

her weekends

room.

line. You know she's

You know he's new

freshman if he

a

his book brand

buys

a

You know she's You know he's

friend who

bought

a

senior if he

buys

his book from

it last year from it last year from a friend who

bought

You know she's at

a

freshman if she

know

registration.

she's

a

senior if she doesn't

even

bring

a

pen.

friend who

a .

a

.

spends

You know he's

.

four hours

registration.

You

freshman if she carries all her books

to classes.

from the Bookstore.

a

You know he's

freshman if he doesn't have a

senior if he doesn't have

a

a

major. job.

dgc a

senior

if

she

sleeps through

Before I

I would like to make

begin,

a

dedication. I wish to dedi

URl students who died this them and to their parents and

cate this commencement to the seven

academic year. I dedicate to friends. Three of these studcnls

to

were

with

graduate

this

us

afternoon. And, if I could, I would like to add a close friend of mine who passed away this week in an auto accident and wanted be here

to

happy

and

today. I say this joyous occasion,

how fortunate

we

bring us down on this very perhaps, only lo acknowledge today.

not to

but

be here

are to

We have learned the value of total education that the party, friends, and our social life can be as effective teachers as the classroom.

our

And

have learned that when the

we

However,

learned

we

a

bit

lo speak before my fellow classmates, might be one of the toughest assignments I've had during my stay at URl. There are many topics to touch upon, and I would enjoy discussing

them all.

The education students will

However, 1 have narrowed my theme lo three fundamental ques tions, which i hope will make us think aboul our college educa tion and

I propose to you today the questions: Who is the class of 1977'? What could we have learned? And where are we going? Who are

our

political

our

education.

science students will have learned how

our

govern

works and doesn'l work.

ment

the

as

The

history student

pitfalls

the merits

graduate realizing

as

of the American educational system.

well

will become

great, yet, sometimes

future.

our

legislature decreases

in turn, decreases

of

more.

The

Now,

state

the University budget, the university, personal budget, by increasing the cost

of

more aware

disheartening

American

our

sometimes

history.

The business student may become more attuned lo the pros well as the cons of our capitalist free market system.

as

we? The

Well, statistically, one

third of

most

us come

of

us

are

Rhode Islanders, and about

from outside the state.

nursing student will have learned the importance of hu patient care, but acknowledge the inability of many hospitals and agencies lo deliver that care. manistic

The

basically a young group of people. However, our class touch of distinction. There are many faces out there today that include veterans of the Vietnam War, people whose educa We

arc

has

a

was put off after graduating from high school. There are others that voluntarily worked for several years before beginning

tion

a

college education. And, there are still others among completed their degree on a part-time basis.

us

who

Also, this graduating class, might students,

those who have been

or

lo

can

to

continue.

My point is

that

we

be critical thinkers while at URI that

discriminate rather than

If this is true than

wc

to

have

hopefully

have learned

wc

accept.

have learned that education is

a

creative

process, that it is participatory and that it involves both ihe teacher and the student. John Dewey once wrote, "F.ducation is

social process, education is growth. Education is not prepara tion for life, bul rather education is life iLself.

a

have

be marked

list

learned

by minority culturally disadvantaged or more

impoverished. a diverse cross section. Many of us may be generation graduates, and others may be second, third or even fourth generation. No matter what the situation, this, my fellow students, is indeed a compliment to ourselves and lo our parents. For together, it has been our hard labors and hard earned incomes which has afforded many of us the opportunity to be here today. We, and especially our parents should be proud.

The class of '77 has

It is these aspects of the educational process that we will carry forth with us. 1 hope wc have learned that the manner in which we deal with education and our future is more important than the

degree

or

piece

of paper

we

receive

today.

first

If I have answered, in a say we have learned

we

We have

certainly

For instance,

wc

been

way who URl?

general at

we

are,

then what

and the person is not."

can

If you are accu.sed of accusation to take

taught

a

to

carry that

If

we

to

its

one

great deal.

have learned what il is lo wait in line,

on

Gregory puts it, "If you have to depend upon education lo gain respect, something is radically wrong. The really important lesson lo learn in life is that it is in the person who should be respected nol one's education. A person has gained nothing in life if his/her education is respected

an

matter what the occasion

We have learned that

As humanistic Dick

from the

registrar's

weekends URI

packs

to

the

no

pub.

owning

have learned that the solution lo

acknowledgement,

own

then

a

conflict is

possibly

we

a

are

tantamount

moving

one

step further toward a more socially responsible and ethical society, a society that has the potential to evolve through our

up and goes home.

We have learned that there can be an extra cost in car at URl, that of ticketing and towing.

being a critical thinker, this is certainly pride in. Yet. hopefully we have learned step further. Hopefully we have learned to act.

own

individual

thoughts

and actions.

a

In essence, our thoughts and actions will exist as a moral force, that can be called our own. Yes, I will be the first to admit

one

(and yes, perhaps like mom's home cooking.

We have learned,

hall food is

282

nol

the hard

way,)

that

dining

that these whether

are

or

idealistic words but their

nol we

keep

in mind

.

.

.

reality

will

depend

upon

Who

we are

.

.

What

.

have learned

we

.

.

and Where

.

we are

Where

the

are

graduates of of

most

Eventually,

us

1977

Graduating from

entering

are

URl

in

1977,

seekers, overlook the still has are

that

the "world of Work", the our ivy walls.

one

cannot

employment

as

that Rhode Island

job market, ignore highest unemployment rates

of the

compelled

our

we or

realize that

to

we

face

a

in the country. different job market

brothers, sisters and parents before

us

have faced.

Dr. Sabatino's message continued and warned against the dan gers of wealth that is earned from a college degree. to say, our prospects are not as bright twenty years ago. Yet, at the same time, many of

Needless

URI with the

hope of securing

a

better

job

as

they

were

us

have

come

when

we

leave.

one of our motives for the time spent at URI ask ourselves, shall we be detered by an unemployment rate? Shall we, as graduates be happy to land a job rather than a meaningful one, one that could reflect, and include, our own

If this has been we

and

planners,

could

we

must

ethical standards.

hope

salespeople,

could sell

we

products

our

doctors, pharmacists and

As

in

the

educating

And

as

Whal I

populis

politicians of

not those

am

our

could

we

friends

or

is that

saying

nurses

of better

initiative to go out and search for and even create that meaning ful lifestyle, which asks us not to compromise ourselves, but only be ourselves. In this

it is

sense,

a

blessing.

career

magazine recently only one job."

wrote, "You

are

only

one

person and you need

But, beyond all of this, we are a class that has a very definitive choice. We have a choice to resign to mediocrity, and whal is to pursue already established by society, or, we have the option our newly formed ideals. We

can

expected

accept of

our

us, or,

role in we can

set 9 to 5

a

do

job, doing only

what is

more.

For instance, as business people we could become more socially the society and responsible, by contributing to, and not defacing environment

we

As teachers and

and

all live in.

lawyers,

underpriveledged,

have the

a

and

living

serve

big

we

we

could assert ourselves and

protection.

the needs of the

and

people,

business.

have

a

choice,

we

have

a

choice to

worthy individual. To long ago said, (and I paraphrase), ". have spent one's youth in college, in contact with the rare and the precious, and be unable to scent out human excellence or to This should be considered the know it only when labeled

As WiUiam James

calamity

of

a

.

So, who

going?

are

.

higher education. Our college education should

have lit up in us a relish for of appetite for mediocrities." we? What have

a

better kind of

we

man

and

learned? And where

a

are

loss

we

....

Gregory has stated that the young people of today are the morally honest, ethical, dedicated and committed group people that has ever lived in the history of this nation.

Dick most

And yet, sell out!"

Lenny

Bruce

The choice, my fellow

means to

we

could reach out

who need

afford it.

our

By

Tom

Student

Diffily speaker

once

said, "It's time

graduates,

at the 1977

Commencement

One statistic you may wish to know, is that only 20% of all jobs are advertised. That means 80% are awaiting to be sought us. I believe that if we search hard enough we will find our a

make

consumer care

meaningful

As

to

not!

Our parents, our friends, and we should be no less proud because of the economic situation. Concievably it can be this poor economic situation that will make us appreciate the worth of a job. But, more than, tperhaps il will give us the

by job.

what is effective and

be: A slave of the system, OR, A servant of the people. A bureaucrat, OR, A missioner. A mediocre, OR, A praise

of I think and

to

plan

not take someone else's away.

Just twenty years ago in 1957, Dr. Richard Sabatino wrote to the graduating class, "What good luck to be graduating at the peak of the boom! No class has ever had better opportunities."

to

engineers

As

going?

often used term that describes what is outside

We

As

safe, rather than what might be efficient and destructive.

going.

to

the lower class

services but who do

not

held

on

May 29,

exercises 1977.

is

only

ours!

to

grow up and

Kathryn

A. Abele

Textiles

Karen J.

Abernethy

Zoology

Linda A. Acciardo

Robert J. Adamonis

William E. Adetifa

Journalism

History

Pharmacy

Janice L. Ahern

John F. Ahern

Constance F. Alarie

Dean H. Albro

David W. Albert

Nursing

Finance

Home Economics Ed.

Natural Resources

Accounting

Steven A.

Jonathan S. Allen

Brenda J. Almeida

Animal Science

Child

Susan L. Aldrich

Physical Education

Shirley A. Secondary

William E. Alexander Jr.

Accounting

Allegretti Accounting

Ameen

Arthur A. Anderson

David R. Anderson

Janis M. Anderson

Education

Electrical

Insurance

Physical

Engineering

Education

Maria D. Andrade

Robin E. Andrade

Victoria R. Andreozzi

Linda K, Andrews

Textiles

Sociology

Journalism

Food & Nutrition

Development

Meredith T. Anderson

Accounting

Susan M. Andrews Home Economics

MEMORIAL DAY'S EVE Dallas I

was

six and you

were ten

And the world Dreams

were

Or Seemed

was very young made of steel

to

Gary M. Ansaldi Respiratory Therapy

be.

Mary

L. Anterni

Elizabeth

Anthony

Textiles

you're summering there; Visiting a sister; Getting a job In a gleaming city of opportunities Here

Of Cold, tall,

new

steel

.

.

.

L.A.'s Where

they're heading

On the cross-country

tour.

youth of America Going West To see the promised land. Of King's dreams. Where equality reigned supreme And people fought For what was right. Or what they thought They believed.

The

P. Arakelian

Serio R. Antunes

Jeffrey

Ocean

Economics

Engineering

Michael

Arbige

Or dreamed. I won't go.

No, I won't go South

or

West

or

right here Wrapped up I'll sit

North.

James S. Arlia

Ellen J. Arruda

Steven M. Arruda

Political Science

Resource

Pharmacy

Technology

down East

Comfortable In my

own

cynical

Security. So there it is my You fight

boy.

f/i

Apathy Where others

once

fought

Poverty. Glenn D. Ashton

Insurance

Nina R. Ashworth

Christine S. Atkinson

Steven D. Aucoin

Sociology

Geology

Electrical

Engineering

Walter J.

Augustyn

Robert L. Auletta

Psychology

For all of

us

Have visions

Late

night. Childish nightmares at

We can't escape Of brothers never known. Who died

Robert J. Autio

Cheryl

Geology

Textiles

Avella

And

were

In

war

a

Some say When 1

mourned

not

earned.

we

was ten

the world shook twice.

Reverberations From four years back When Dallas stole that

gleaming

smile

.

.

.

Of Jack's. And all the

King's horses.

And all the President's men. And General Motors

(matched John J. Avento

Physical

Education

Donna L. Babcock

Frank Baffoni

Respiratory Therapy

with the

GNP)

Couldn't put America's Dreams Back together again.

Yes, in this land of opportunities. Of vast lands and hesitant This land of

equalities

ours

This land of Dreams And the heros

They

heroic

so

.

.

,

die-

and in

dying

their dreams die with them

We

arc

So it

lost

seems

only

too

appropriate

That you, my friend, should turn to me On the eve of America's annual backward In memory Of years gone And

note

by.

that dreams

Seem cobwebbed in

once

graduates Bidding their

under

Vincent J. Barberio

Richard G. Baril

Arthur C. Barker

Karen A. Barker

Accounting

Economics

Dental

Hygiene

.

.

.

cloudy skies granite-faced

adieus to

Accounting

new

generation's

our

"Nightmarish Apathy" As

today glance

URl.

Kim Barlolini

Ruth A. Bartlett

William S. Bartlett

Mary

Art

Marketing Mgt.

Food & Nutrition

Patricia J. Bauer

Phyllis I. Sociology

Phyllis A. Nursing

Bastone

Robert J. Belluzzi

Physical

Education

Marketing Mgt.

Kim C.

Benjamin Physical Education

Nancy

Baum

A. Bemis

Textiles

John J. Barton

Yvonne W.

Political Science

Nursing

William T. Behrcnds Jr.

Physical

Education

Battey

John A. Bellows

Business Administration

Thomas R. Beauchene

Janice A. Bennett

Finance

Marketing Mgt.

David J. Benoit

Michael L. Bennardo

Carol A. Benson

Business Administration

Accounting

Resource

Wendy Speech

L.

Berger

Technology

M. Bcriont

Susan M.

Daryl

Medical

Jounalism

Bergeron Technology

Richard C. Berkowitz

Susan N. Berliner

Lawrence H

Psychology

Sociology

Journalism

Maurice J. Bessette, Jr

Susan M. Bessette

Virginia

Resource Center

Dental

Finance

Douglas W. Bird Marketing Mgt.

Hygiene

Claire R.

Bentley

Craig

N. Berke

A. Bcssom

Andrea R. Berkman Textiles

Journalism

Berman

Ellen R. Benton

Nursing

Nursing

Janice Bernhardt

Richard Bernier

Nursing

Civil

William M.

Betley

Journalism

Engineering

Joanne Bickler

Animal Science

Steve E. Blackmar

Katherine A. Blair

Robert G. Blanchard

Leo R. Blanchette

Journalism

French

Journalism

Bus. Admin.

Russell B. Blank

Robyn

J. Blatt

Accounting

Dental

Hygiene

Catherine M, Blinzler

Kendra A. Bliven

Sociology

Speech

Michael P

Bogert

Amy R. Blonder Marketing Mgt.

Gary W. Blount Elementary Ed.

Gayle

Rudolf Bokor

Richard P. Bonah, Jr.

Sheilah A. Borek Physical Education

Bousquet

Food & Nutrition

Cynthia Nursing

A. Bouvier

Blecharczyk

Sociology

Art

Richard Boucher

Pharmacy

Lisa A.

Blecharczyk

Susan M.

Mechanical Engineering

Kevin P. Bouchard

Michael

Linda J. Blau Elementary Ed.

M. Boardman

Music Ed.

Diane Bonvenuto

Donna M. Bouressa

Pharmacy

Mathematics

Carol L. Brown

Selh E. Bowcrma

William J. Bouser

Home Economics

Political Science

Organizational Mgt.

Beverly A. Boyajian Elementary Ed.

Cary Brenner Zoology

Dugald J. Pharmacy

Brown

LisL B. Brunelle Elementary Ed.

"^^ Richard A. Boynes

James R. Bradford

Margaret M. Brady

Sociology

Civil

Natural Resources

Holly A. Brig Sociology

Ernie C.

Political Science

Knstine B. Brown

Lois A. Brown

Martin Brown

Dental

Elementary Ed.

Patricia E.

Boyd

Botany

Robert A. Brewster

Hygiene

Merrie L. Brucks

Management Science

Engineering

Briggs

Natural Resources

Charles M. Brown Mechanical

Engineering

Richard C. Brown

Pharmacy

Kim

Buckley

William N.Burke, Jr.

Valeria J. Buckncr

Organizational Mgt.

Speech

Michael H. Callahan Political Science

Susan D. Callen

Melinda A.

Textiles

Textiles

Campbell

Thomas G.

Capetan Marketing Mgt.

Diane M.

Caplin

Political Science

^ y

1

'

\

Carbone

Political Science

Mary Elle Carasiti Pharmacy

Joseph

Journalism

Caprio Marketing Mgt.

J. Michael Carcieri

Susan D. Cardosi

Richard S. Carduner

William L.

Brent L. Carlson

Accounting

Urban Affairs

Finance

Natural Resources

Meredith A. Carpenter

Brian M. Carr

Barbara K. Carrier

Marline Z. Carrier

Maribeth Carroll

Nursing

Psychology

Marketing Mgt.

Psychology

Textiles

Susan M.

Capobianco

Carol M.

Kenneth V.

Capuano

Carey

Zoology

Zoology

Steven R. Cascione

Dianne L. Case

Marcia

Geography

Textiles

Food & Nutrition

'd^M

Cauley

.y''^^^^^ >^^

Alan A. Chianesc

Michelle L. Chicoine

Resource

Accounting

Technology

Charles F Cavaretta

Loretta M.

Civil

Physical

Engineering

Casey

Ed.

Christine A. Charest

John R. Charles

Textiles

BusinessAdministration

fr Howard K. Chin

Civil

Engineering

Stanley K. Chin Organizational Mgt.

Mary M. Cofoni Child Development

Barbara A. Cohen

Robert B. Cohen

Carol A. Colafrancesco

English

Psychology

Elementary Ed.

Luigi Colapietro Engineering

Civil

Carlo Colesanl

Frank R. Cometa

Judith A. Cole

Michael V. Colasnti

Zoology

Pharmacy

Carol F. Conforti

John D. Conforti

Patricia A.

Urban Affairs

Accounting

Dental

Mary M. Connelly Biology

Pamela A. Connor

Sandra L. Connor

Ellen A.

Nursing

Art

French

Accounting

Conley Hygiene

Deborah Conn

Gail M.

Campagone Organizational Mgt.

Bradford A. Connell Political Science

Conroy

Carol A. Corbin Urban Affairs

Gary W. Considine Pharmacy

Mary M. Corr Pharmacy

John P. Correia

Marketing Mgt.

Joseph

F. Costa

Animal Science

Lynda S. Correia Physical Ed.

Stephen

M. Cote

Pharmacy

Jeane Corriveau

Deborah Cortrone

Denise A. Cotter

Particia A. Coulthurst

Celeste C. Coutu

Speech

Child Development

Dental

Sandra D. Crandall

Finance

Animal Science

Nursing

George M. Coyne Elementary Ed.

Robert Cressman, Jr.

Lynn F. Nursing

Kevin J. Cronan

Susan J. Cronin

Elementary Ed.

Elementary

Marilyn

J. Cox

Marketing Mgt.

Sharon E. Crowe Food & Nutrition

Charlotte M.

Crevier

Terrance J. Finance

Coyle

Crowley

Janet E.

Coyle

Carol E. Culshaw Textiles

Timothy F. Mech. Eng.

Hygiene

Art

Ed.

Curran

Carol Curtis

Atherton G. Cutter

History

Wendy A. Czcrwinski Pharmacy

Ronald

D'Agoslino

Kalheryn

Patricia A. D'Ambra

John P. Damicone

Barbara D. Davis

Linda A.

Resource

Botany

Textiles

Finance

Technology

M

Daigle

Food & NutrUion

DeAngelis

Joseph

V. D'Almeid

Animal Science

Jeanne De Ciantis

Diana C. DeConti

Joanne L. Decosta

Denise J. De Fini

History

Mary Jane A. Dcfazio Accounting

Michael De Fco

History

Accounting

French

Calvin De Freese

Duanc E. De Freese

Richard A. Defusco

Patricia A.

Management Science

Mechanical Engineering Zoology

Carol A.

Zoology

Deignan

Gina De

Joseph

Animal Science

Douglas

R. Delack

Insurance

Dcgnan Management Science

Geraldine

Sally

Susan M. De Luise

Ann De Luise

Urban Affairs

Speech

English

Carmine A. Di Nilto

Karen A. Dionne

Chemical

Food & Nutrition

Abbe Diamond

Paul DiCristofaro

Thomas W.

Food & Nutrition

Accounting

Speech

David B. DiOrio

Anthony Dipaolo

Gail A. DiRaimo

Russell J. DiRaim

David J

Child

Civil

Natural Resources

Resource

Technology

Sheila A. DiSantc

Nursing

Nancy Disbrow

Diffily

Development

Colleen A. Dolan

Textiles

Engineering

Engineering

Julie Dolan

DiSano

Thomas P. Donahue

Accounting

Lorie A. Donaldson

Joanne S.

Pharmacy

Journalism

Neil P.

Downing

Mary

P.

Donnelly

Paul

Connelly

Ann F. Donovan

Speech

Thomas R. Drcschler

Mechanical

English

Donnelly

Leonard R. Drew, Jr.

Engineering Pharmacy

Susan Drew

Organizational Mgt.

Lynn M. Driscoll Respiratory Therapy

'5!

n Michele H.

Drury

Nalural Resources

Jeanne A. Dubilewski

Jane M. Dudzik

Nancy

Biology

Psychology

Dental

J.

Duggan Hygiene

Perrie H. Dunne Finance

Joseph

A.

Duprey

Pharmacy

Patricia A. Durham

Kathleen A.

Marica Dzaman

Robyn

Nursing

Medical

Child

Textiles

Dybala Technology

Sheryl A. Speech

Roy A. Eckloff Pharmacy

Edwards

Development

Abigail

L. Elli;

w^^J~3r

h^ xky^sM^^^K

Animal Science

Natural Resources

Howard J. Engle Business Adminstration

Patricia

Thomas P.

Robert L.

M. Emanuele

Farley

Marsha S.

Journalism

England

Farragher

Finance

Eastwood

Journalism

PP

Stephen

E

Fay

1 '

^y

"

\i

J

JH

Scott E. Enos

John B. Etchingham, Jr.

Pharmacy

Geography

Evalyn Speech

Michelle D. Fleorant

Physical

Ed.

Feller

Jane W.

Ferguson

Barbara L. Filton

Maureen A.

Textiles

Speech

Fitzpatrick

Sandra L.

Fitzpatrick

Janice A. Flavin

Microbiology

Child

Margery Flynn

Diane M. Fliss

Donald G. Flodin

John T. Flood

Home Economics

Electrical

Secondary

Engineering

Frank T. Ferrantc Insurance

Journalism

Ed.

Development

Patricia M.

Flynn

Nursing

Robert A

Flynn

Economics

Ann Mane E

^MtM

James T. Fortson

Robert J. Fortin

Psychology

Marketing

Roberta A. Gaeta Elementary Ed.

Folcarelli

Ingrid

Jean K. Fox

Joseph Italian

Celeste J. Textiles

L. Foehr

Home Economics

Psychology

Gagnon

L. Francese

Kathryn

G.

Forsyth

Elementary Ed.

Lynn Fraser

Jeanette I.

Gagnon

Art

Marian T. Gagnon

Andrea E. Gaines

Paula Galkin

Natural Resources

Journalism

Political Science

Organizational Mgt.

Nancy J. Gallingcr

Laurie M. Galuska

Journalism

Child Development

John A.

Gagnon,

Jr.

\ James

Gallagher

Michele Gauth

Russcl S. Gautreaux

Elementary Ed.

i David Gamba

Organizational Mgt.

Gayle A. Geller Elementary Ed.

Robert E. Gauvin

Edward H. Gamble

Secondary

Ed.

Bruce R. Gentile

Secondary

Ed.

Marion K. Gentul

James F. Gerstner

Susan M. Gertz

LuAnn S. Gcruasini

Donna Gesualdi

Psychology

Psychology

Food & Nutrition

Elementary Ed.

Journalism

Elaine M.

Geyer

Animal Science

Lynn

B. Goldbert

Food & Nutrition

Patricia A. Gill

Barbara L.

Textiles

Gillespie Respiratory Therapy

Larry E Goldstein Accounting

Pharmacy

Richard B

Goldstein

Barry E. Gillette Pharmacy

Richard B. Gonoi Political Science

IQ^ .{

J

\

i_

Deborah A. Gorman Natural Resources

Burton Gorton

Donna L. Goss

Food & Nutrition

Robert S. Art

Gingras

iH

f"

}

'tI

Elizabeth L, Gowell

Marshall E. Graft

Cindy

Edward J. Graves

Robert L. Gr

Zoology

Marketing Mgt.

Office Administration

Political Science

Zoology

Gary Greer Pharmacy

Maureen A. Greichen

J. Graves

William H. Greene

Linda S. Greenwood

Organizational Mgt.

Physical

Geoff J. Grinsell

Sandra L. Groll

David A. Grossman

Maureen V.

Natural Resources

Music

Accounting

Nursing

Jeffrey

M. Greene

Economics

Ed.

Elementary Ed.

Guadagni

Paul D. Guerette Resource

Technology

David J. Gworek

Ellen J. Haber

Chemical

Accounting

Engineering

M l^

Dental

Hygiene

Judith S. Hall

Resource

BusinessAdministration

Development

Christina L Hannitan

Patrick J

Zoology

Historv

Business Administration

Medical

James Hardwell

Sarah K Hardy Home Economics

Eileen F

Helen I.

Sociology

C

Patricia W Hardiman

Janice Hall

Lee Hamdton

Hannon

Hargreaves

Maureen Hanrahan

Technology

Hargravcs Elementary Ed.

Linda A.

Nelson L. Hawkins, Jr.

Child

Business Administration

Hathaway Development

A. Hecker

Rutherford Hayes

Theresa L.

Robert W. Hecrlcin

Susan E. Heil

Healey Psychology

Gary

Patrica E. Hesketh

Chester A. Hibbard

Kathleen A.

Speech

Pharmacy

Engli.sh

William

Mechanical

Engineering

Bruce C. Hill

Elizabeth A. H

Animal Science

Nursing

1

'^

mm

Amy S. Hinder Child Development

Mechanical

Hays

Marv k

IIkI.

Paul P.

Herzog

Nancy

J.

Highfill

Art

English

Rosemary D. Management

Hayes

Natural Resources

Engineering Journalism

Hickey

William

Hill

Sharon L. Hill

Science

Dental

Hygiene

^^

David Hines

Phyllis

J. Hobson

Food & Nutrition

Deborah C. Hoffman

Robert F. Holden

Sociology

Political Science

Susan Ann

Holley

Home Economics Ed.

Alison L. Ho

Amy

Pharmacy

Elementary

M. Holton Ed.

Brenda E.

Hopkins

Home Economics

Betty

E. Houtsma

Accounting

Mary L. Speech

Hunt

Peter K. Hurdis

Arthur

Hurley

Physics

Tina L.

Horling Chemistry

Maureen A.

Hughes

Office Administration

J. Huth

David F. Husband

Ralph

Journalism

Textiles

Barbara J. Huttman

Elizabeth L. lacono

Bonnie M. Idlis

Music

Psychology

Julie A. Immelt Elementary Ed.

Joanne M.

Microbiology

Richard W. Ingram

Donna J. Ireland

Valerie P. Irons

Michele A. Izzo

Finance

Music

Sociology

Food & Nutrition

Marilyn Nursing

L.

Ingham

Elementary

Ingham Ed.

John M. Jacobs

Matthew C. Jacobs

Scott D. Jacobson

Richard H. Jalette

Pharmacy

Theater

Political Science

Resource

Glenn A. Jones

Jeanne K. Jones

Michael Jones

William A. Jones

Geology

Sociology

Mary Ellen Jordan Pharmacy

Andrew Jacobs

Natural Resources

Technology

Steven C. Jordan

Mark A.

Pharmacy

Mechanical

Joyce Cynthia M. Judge Engineering Marketing Mgt.

Rowena Kamil

Melanie F. Kane

Marketing Mgt.

Nursing

Kenneth Kando

Lisa S. Kahn

Robert A. Kahn

Urban Affairs

Speech

Wayne Kapla

Aimee S. Kaufman

Respiratory Therapy

Allan J. Kaufman

Mary

M. Keane

Textiles

Patricia K.

Keegan

Food Science

Daniel J. Kelleher Political Science

Peter T.

Marketing Mgt.

Kauanaugh Marketing Mgt.

Marybeth W. Kayes Physical Ed.

Textiles

Charles

Kelly

Kevin M. Keane

Irene C. Medical

Kelly Technology

Mary E. Kelly Nursing

Textiles

Laurie B. Kikoen

Linda C.

Nancy

E. Kemble

Claudia L.

Kennedy

Rosemaric Kilmartin

Kilgore

Food & Nutrition

Elementary

Valerie J. Keziarian

Accounting

Nursing

Ed.

Karen Kiely Psychology

Joyce C. Kii Nursing

Frederick Kimball

Michael D.

Nancy E. Kohler Zoology

1 pp *i,^ fr

--^V f. ._hi_._ Christine A. Kirkwood

Kenneth P. Kirwin

Speech

Natural Resources

Joe M. Klicka

Mary

Mech. & Ocean 312

Engineering

Ann

Kluge

:

Eileen Koefin

Psychology

Kogan

Robin S.

Koplan Psychology

Claudia G. Kost

Mark B. Kowski

Food Science

Resource

Technology

Jeffrey

S. Kraines

Plant Science

Marie 1. Krasnc

Journalism

Roxie M. Landers

Elizabeth M. Lane

Laurel A. Lanoue

James T. LaPoint

Mark C. Earned

English

Chemical

Political Science

Mech.

Natural Resources

Engineering

Eng.

Edward J. Larochc

Jill Larson

Chung

Psychology

French

Electrical

Kenneth W.

K.

Lay Engineering

Margo

Political Science

Margaret R. Legros

Catherine A

Natural Resources

Pharmacy

Alan A. Lemirc

Francois D. Demii

Priscilla A. Leonard

Kenneth A

Natural Resources

Accounting

Pharmacy

Elec.

Management

Legler Science

Leighton

li

W. Lawrence

Beverlee A. Lawerence Natural Resources

Kenneth P. LeMaire

Secondary

Eng.

Ed.

Lester

Kathleen E.

LeMay

Textiles

Nancy M. LeToile Development

Child

Charles J.

Christine Liebhauser

Levesque

Levey

Jon J

Lieb

Speech

Michael M. Lieberman

Valerie A. Lima

John B. Liston

Civil

Psychology

Biology

Jacqueline A. Lomazzo Elementary Ed.

Stephen E. Lombardi Pharmacy

Organizational Mgt.

Terry E. Lynn Sociology

Patricia R.

Janet T. Maciarz

Engineering

Kevin L. Lohse Natural Resources

Martin A. Luber Urban Affairs

Anne M.

English

Gerald P. Lucibella

Management Science

Mechanical

Lyon

Political Science

Engineering

David A. Lonardo

Food & Nutrition

Jane E. Madaio

Mark

Textiles

Mechanical

Michael Maiorino

Robert E.

Majcwski Marketing Mgt.

Finance

Thomas J. Mallon Resource

Judith C. Mahoney Maguire Engineering Secondary Ed.

Joseph

A. Main .Ir.

Valerie J. Marak

Lorraine A. Marchessault

Nursing

Markley

Mahoney

Ed.

Cindy Makslein

Home Economics Ed.

Richard P. Mandeville

Jean

Manning

Natural Resources

Technology

Art

Allen

Celia L. Makstcin

Michael E.

Physical

Eleanor Mariani

Robert W. Marshall

Child

Mech.

Markey Development

Eng.

A. Main

Technology

Kath> J .Male) Pharmacy

John J. Mansolillo

Political Science

Dianne M. Marino

Physical

Deborah E.

Kathy

Resource

Ed.

Diane Marshall

Beth A. Marion

English

Dianne Martin

Steve K. Martin

Charles D. Martineau

Cristina M. Martuccelli

Charles Marwell

Electrical

Pharmacy

Art

Physical

Engineering

A. Masterson

Richard O. Mason

Carole A. Masterson

Cheryl

History

Dental

Psychology

Hygiene

Ed.

Kathleen C. Marzilli Political Science

Kathleen A. Mathewson

John M. Matkowski

Micr.ibinlneN

Pharmacy

Richard W. Maynert

Marilyn Maynard Elementary

Pharmacy

f'f^

Barbara J McCabe R.

Admin.

William E.

McCagney

Susan D.

Nursing

McCarthy

Lynn S. McCauley Textiles

Dorothy McCormick

Emma M. McCormick

Mary

Child

Natural Resources

Development

Alice K.

McGinly Marketing Mgt.

E. McCormick

McGowen

Stephen

Maureen A. McLeod

Civil

Chemical

Valerie H. McNeil

Secondary

Ed.

William Mellekas

McCreery

Jack McDonald

Lynn

M

McGillicuddy

Textiles

Michael McGrath

Thomas

McHugh

Robert P. McKenna

Marketing Mgt.

Jane A. McLamarrah

Engineering

Charles J.

Engineering

Terrencc McLoughlin Accounting

Margaret M. Mahon Elementary Ed.

David McNamara

Kathleen McPhillips

Michael T.

Paul Medeiros

Jane E. .Meier

Biology

Journalism

Natural Resources

Textiles

Kathleen Mello

Barbara Mendelsohn

Anthony F. Messa

English

Psychology

Mechanical

Lindsay

E. Meller

Natural Resources

McWeeney

Engineering

Paul Minutell

James P, Mirza

Kristin L. Mix

Barbara L. Moffett

Carey

Natural Resources

Dental Hygiene

Textiles

Bus. Admin.

Monahan

Montenegro

John F.

Moriarty, Pharmacy

Jr.

Alan Morra

Alice A. Morris

Industrial

Pharmacy

Engineering

Lynda A. English

Morris

Daniel L.

Morrissey

Business

Administration

Deborah A.

Leo F.

Michael M. Morrow

Carlo Mosetti

History

Political Science

Accounting

Management Science

Janet C. Moultrie

Clifford D. Movilla

Gwen \

Morrissey

Morrissey

BusinessAdministration Chemical

Bruce P.

Murray

Steven V.

Napoli Marketing Mgt.

Engineering

Francos J.

Murray

Beth A. Nasberg Child Development

Charles Mosunmola

Arlene F. Mrozowski

Alice J.

Home Economics

Pharmacy

Home Economics

Edward S. Nagorsky Organizational Mgt.

Marilyn Nursing

Susan T. Nash

Jeffrey C. Pharmacy

Biology

vIhumii

V. Namika

Mullowney

David E. Names

Marketing Mgt.

Nelson

Linda A. Nelson

Pharmacy

John M. North

Laura A. Novak

Zoology

Child

Development

Sandra A. Okolowitcz

Lynn

Elementary Ed.

Food & Nutrition

P.

Okonowsky

MaryAnn Oakley Dental Hygiene

Kathleen A.

O'Connell

Speech

Speech

Jill L. Olson

Krislcn B.

O'Mahony

Jane A.

Textiles

English

Lorie J. O'Connell

Nursing

Opaluch

Douglas E. Opdyke Accounting

Nancy Speech

R. Orchardo

Lynn

A. Orlowski

Dental

Carole J. O'Tolle

Michael H. Ouimet

William B. Padien

Robin M.

Animal Science

Pharmacy

Art

Speech

Barbara Pajak Psychology

Linda M.

Ann C. Palumbo

Carol A.

Medical Technology

Philosophy

Sociology

David R.

Linda M

Christopher Zoology

Papazian

Sociology

Palagi

Paquin Elementary Ed.

Henry C. Osborne Geology

Oronte

Stephen

Hygieie

R.

Pardy

Sharyn

Paige

Pamela A.

Pampel

Audrey A. Nursing

Cheryl A. Pharmacy

Paris

In

H. Parsells

Susan J. Parkin

Amy

Speech

Nursing

Papa

Food & Nutrition

today

Donald B. Parker Electrical Engineering

P. Paine

Home Economics

will

a

little

seem a

Parker

while,

long

time ago.

Suzanne M. Patnaude

Donna M. Paul

Urban Affairs

Elementary

Ed.

Diana L. Pearson

Debra L. Pcckham

Nursing

Art

dk^M

Michelle C. Pelletier

Physical

Thomas J.

Pendergast

Geology

326

Nancy

C. Penna

Keith E. Perron

Boden J.

Business

Speech

Administration

Marty Pereia

Home Economics

Perry

Paula Ann Perkins

Pharmacy

Jeffrey

W.

Perry

Natural Resources

Raymend A. Peloquin Mechanical

Ed.

Sandra M.

Perry

Elementary

Ed.

Christopher Philosophy

Engineering

R. Perri

Judith S. Pervin Textiles

Claudia A. Pesco

Maria F. Peservich

Deborah A. Petrocelli

Dennis R. Phenii

Economics

Speech

History

Journalism

Donna L.

Phillips

Speech

Mark C. Piccirello

Pharmacy

BusinessAdministration Marketing Mgt.

Roberta A. Plaziak

Donna M. Pontarelli

Dental

Nursing

Hygiene

Ann Marie Powell Food & Nutrition

Robert C. Pierce

Richard V. Piacentini

Gregory W. Powers Marketing Mgt.

Carolyn Nursing

.1, Prall

A

LI

Cynthia

A. Pratt

Food & Nutrition

John J. Finance

Quinlan

Ellen J. Pratte

Psychology

Elizabeth A.

Microbiology

Quinn

Mary E. Prendergast Sociology

Ruth M. Pulver

William A.

Michael

Pharmacy

Quirk

Nursing

Racioppi Pharmacy

Joan M.

Quinlan Physical Education

Donna A.

Child

Rafferty Development

Stop!

I don't have

time,

I'll do it tomorrow,

Maybe later, I'll think about it, I don't have time. The hours The

days

are

too

are too

short. short,

Life is too short. I still find

myself losing

time, wasting time, and killing time.

borrow

time, buy time, time, because we

already

have been

We cannot make

given

all the time there is. All the hours of the

day.

of the year. All the years of our lives.

All the

days

The time

used

we

wisely

do have

to our

can

be

advantage.

Let's Go.

gdb

Leonard A. Reinhart

Rebecce L. Restock

Home Economics

Finance

Natural Resources

Edward W. Riccio, Jr.

Adele M. Richtarik

Wendy

Kathleen A.

Resource

Reilly

Technology

English

Rickman

Debra S. Riendeau

Animal Science

Kenneth J. Rinn

or

Judith A. Rodman

Laurie B.

Joseph Romano.

Jr.

James T. Rosafort

Roghslcin Marketing Mgt.

Lisa J. Rosen

Child

Development

Physical

Margaret M.

William P.

Rosenberg Management Science

Ed.

Roscnwinkel .

Donna M. Rosa Food & Nutrition

Craig F. English

Ross

Lynn

A. Rossi

Steven H. Rossi

Janet M. Rostron

Child

Development

Civil

Nursing

Engineering

Robert P.

Ruggieri

Mechanical Engineering

Beverly

M. Saccoccia

Textiles

Joel P. Russell

Virginia M. Sociology

Geology

m

U

Peter M. Salcone

Civil

Engineering

Lori N. Salk

Child

Development

Richard S. Sabatelli

Pharmacy

David Saftel

Mary E. Saccoccia Pharmacy

^%1 iiv

Russo

'

i

Beverly J. Saltonstall Nursing

Nina Sammartino

Sandra L. Sandel

Elementary

Ed.

David F. Sanders Political Science

Kathleen Sanford

Caryl

Nursing

Elementary Ed.

Speech

Nancy T. Saracco Elementary Ed.

Bradford M.Saunders

Vincent J. Saviano

Francis C. Sawlan

Respiratory Therapy

Marketing Mgl.

Nursing

William H. Schaff

Sherry L. Schecter Organizational Mgt.

Jeri S. Schefts

Natural Resources

Robert

Fredrick L. Schneider

Pharmacy

Nancy E. Nursing

Allen

Patrick J. Sabarra

Susan H.

Sargut

Sayles

Sarra

BusinessAdministration Pharmacy

Frederick D. Schiff

Accounting

332

Raymond Physics

C.

Schlight

A. Santo

Schlossberg

Finance

BusinessAdministration

Linda Schultz

Bruce M. Schulbaum

Susan I. Schulman

William D. Schult

Business

English

Finance

Administration

Jane M. Santoro

Accounting

Andrew Schueffer

Michael Schulz

I^v g^l^ Gerard M. Schwab

Larry

Pharmacy

Natural Resources

Zoology

Karen L. Scott

Susan L. Scotto

Peter J.

Business Education

Natural Resources

Physical

Deanna C. Shahdan

Debbie E. Shalleck

Pharmacy

Sociology

Patricia M. Shea

Doreen A. Shawver Elementary Ed.

N. Schwartz

Textiles

Paul J. Schwartz

Charles Scimecca

Pamela A. Seitcs

Richard M. Selzick

Psychology

Secondary Ed.

Janice S. Shallin

Ellen M.

Kerry

Marketing Mgt.

Sociology

William Shea

Ian R. Shearer

Mary

Respiratory Therapy

Textiles

Scully Ed.

Shalvey

A.

Resource

Sharpe Technology

L. Sheehan

best things in life move slowly. They can hardly over take one who is in a hurry. We arc making haste to ill purpose

The

if

we

visit

time"

"haven't

good books, our

sick and

to

think

friends,

to

read

quietly,

to

comfort the

to

sorrowing,

to

enjoy

the

beautiful creations of God and man, and

to

lend

a

hand

to

Nancy L. Shields

William J. Shields

Debra L. Shriber

Journalism

Political Science

Speech

a

struggling brother. Time is precious but more precious than fleeting hours are Truth, Love, Benevolence, Friendship, Ser vice, a serene mind, and a happy heart, for these

are

the

m

essence

of life itself.

William C. Siart

Physical

Teresa L. Sicotte

David A. Sidla

Accounting

Ed.

Cathy

A. Skeirik

Dental

Hygiene

Christina L. Skinner

Anthropology

Elizabeth J.

Skogley

Political Science

Paula J. Slezak Resource

Technology

Kathleen A. Snell

Elementary

Ed.

Spatt Philosophy David M.

Wi

Ann E.

Ann E. Skudlarck

Paul V. Slabowski

Patricia A. Slavin

Marketing Mgt.

Psychology

Pharmacy

Sleeper Pharmacy

Susan E. Sloane

Linda E.

Ellen Smith

Howell J. Smith

Elementary Ed.

Food & Nutrition

Psychology

Pharmacy

Chariene F. Snow

Management

Maria

Science

Speziale

Smiley

Richard C.

Snyder

Lawrence D

Pharmacy

Glenn E. Southwick

Mark

Sparrow

Art

Psychology

Spinner

Donna C.

Sprague Elementary Ed.

Donald StJean

Urban Affairs

Debra J.

Arlene L. Stairman

Child

Elementary

Stacy Development

Walter

Stamp

Ed.

B. Stanley Pharmacy

Philip

Susan M. Slasiewski Food & Nutrition

John J. Staskiewicz.Jr.

Charles A. Slaton, Jr.

John C. Slavic

Alan T. Steinhoff

Karen D.

Natural Resources

Nalural Resources

BusinessAdministration

Marketing Mgl.

Textiles

Linda

Stimpson

Dana A.

Glenn D. Stokes

Stoffregen

Zoology

Zoology

Patricia M. Storin

Nursing

Mary E. Stoukides Secondary Ed.

Stensgard

H.

Roxanne Stoukides

Timothy

Elementary Ed.

Journalism

Straight

Susan Strasiewski

Michael L. Stricklin

Pamela S.

Ann M. Sullivan

John F. Sullivan

Lauren L. Sutherland

Economics

Journalism

Nursing

Political Science

Home Ec

James J. Szron Elementary Ed.

Thomas E. Tacconc

Joan C. Taraka

Norman G. Tashash

Douglas

Microbiology

Nursing

Medical

Linda A. laylor

D. Sakinah

Resource

Technology

Stryjewski

Taylor

John F.

Speech

Teaque

Tashsian

Technology

James Tedeschi

Pamela S. Tesler Art

Raymond Electrical

James Thacker

Robin A. Thacker

BusinessAdministration Elementary Ed.

Pamela J.

Susan C. Theisen

Donald D. Theroux

Food & Nutrition

Finance

William A.

C. Bernard Tomlin

Debra A.

Nursing

Urban Affairs

Tierney Management Science

Michael Tiernan

Philip D. Tilton Microbiology

Gary W. Tochterman Accounting

Steven G. Tomson

Joanne C.

Topping

Debra Torchia

Johanna Torres

Civil

Secondary

Ed.

Nursing

Chemistry

Judith A.

338

W. Tetreault

Engineering

Thompson

Engineering

Thompson

Toegeman

Finance

Psychology

Bernadette Torti

Lunne E. Tow

BusinessAdministration

Cynthia E. Trask Secondary Ed.

Michael J.

Denise L. Tucker

Ronald C. Tumiski

Civil

Child

Natural Resources

Tubridy Engineering

Development

Emil J. Troianoe Jr.

Secondary

Ed.

Andree S. Vadenais

Karla J. Valentino

Paula S. Vallera

Dental Hygiene

Microbiology

Botany

Laurens D.

Gregory Troy

Electrical

Insurance

Tromp Engineering

Vannessa Turco

William Van Bloom

Louisa C. Van

Derploeg Journalism

339

Cecilia M. Vanhof

Barbara A.VanHouwe

Pharmacy

Elementary Ed

Susie J. Vassetl

William V. Venturini

Child

Elementary

Development

Franeine J. Walleit

Nursing

Ed.

David S. Walsh

Ronald Vantin

Om P. Verma

Mechanical

Engineering

Norman S. Ward

Chemistry

Thomas E. Vars

Karen L. Vascellaro

Natural Rcstiurccs

Medical

Technology

Robert P. Vickers

Angela M. Vetelino Elementary Ed.

Sociology

Stephen A. Pharmacy

Organizational Mgt.

Walker

Kimberly

A.

Wallace

^^"w^^^^

Bruce A. Wasser

Sandra C. Wasser

Jeffrey

Marketing Mgt.

Accounting

Political Science

A. Welch

Jonathan A. Weitzner

Lynn

Accounting

Food & Nutrition

Karen B. West Food & Nutrition

Secondary

Kathleen A. Whalen Ed.

P. Wasserman

-^,

.

David P. Whalley

Pharmacy

^-.<-_

Barbara Waterman

David S. Watson

Psychology

Civil

Charles E.Wentworth Jr. William J. Wenzel

Natural Resources

.

Finance

Jean L.

Whatunough Organizational Mgt.

Engineering

Carol A. Werst

Secondary

Ed.

Kimberly

A. Whitiker

Resource

Technology

Daivid White

Scott D. White

Business Administration

Accounting

Susan A. Wilcox

David

Willcy

Sociology

Robin L. Winston

Robert Wise

Marketing Mgt.

Political Science

Margaret

Whittaker

Donna L. Wikstrand

Child

Development

Wendy L. Wilbur Marketing Mgt.

Diane L. Williams

Karen L. Williams

Caroline M. Wilson

Political Science

Psychology

English

Christine M.

Deborah J. Wolf

Wojcieszak English

Dental

Marilyn

Wlassich

Hygiene

Lee W. Wolff

Susan Wolin

Economics

Food & Nutrition

Gary M. Wollen Respiratory Therapy

Lynn A. Wolslegel Secondary Ed.

Rebecka S

Ronald J. Yanku

Carol E. Yarnell

Organizational Mgt.

Textiles

// '

Eric B. Zajo

Natural

Resources

Wood

Jerry Wolstencroft Mathematics

Richard S

7oolog\

Zoology

Lori B. Wrathall

Shelia A.

Nursing

Resource

Wood

Wright Technology

v

Gwen E. Zanar

Deborah J. Zanella

Debra A. Zendlovitz

Faith Zibell

Political Science

Sociology

Psychology

Nursing

G. Zielinske

Hal J. Zick

Stephen

Finance

Political Science

Henry A. Zompa Pharmacy

Eillecn Zsunkan

Anne L. Zimmer

William Zinni

Nursing

Natural Resources

Michael P. Zwcir

Dawne

Marketing Mgt.

Stirling

On October 1, 1976, URI President Frank Newman publicly stated his view of the University priorities. In the past, said Newman, our best forces for meeting new needs have been

growth

and the allocation of

new resources.

For the next four

five years, however, we can't depend on these. Since we do not forsee a great increase in financial resources or in new

or

high

school

graduates,

we

"We must learn to focus

must turn to a

our

energies,

different strategy.

to eliminate

or

modify

those programs that have served their purpose or are of low priority, and to improve each program of higher priority." Newman's six as

priorities for

the next four

or

five years

are

follows:

positive force in the development of England in two areas first, develop intellectual and the personal capacities of citizens through ing our programs and secondly, helping to apply our scholastic knowledge to local social, economic and cultural problems. (1)

URI should be

teaching, research, and social service. On the undergraduate level, we don't perceive URI as being open to any student. (RIJC fills that role in Rhode Island), but rather to the top 40% of Rhode Island high URI has three main tasks:

schools and countries.

a

for those who

suitable mix of students from other states and

duty to provide education on and off campus beyond the normal college age.

are

(3) There are two main intellectual thrusts at URI. We have of strength in the traditional areas of study, i.e. human ities, social sciences and natural sciences. We have also a major focus on those professional fields, that are important to our state and region, both on the undergraduate and grad a core

uate

levels.

(4) There compass

they a.

are

more

six broad fields of interest and effort which than any

c.

single college,

school

or

en

department

are:

Marine Affairs

b. Science and

a

Rhode Island and New

(2)

We also have a

Technology

Human Services

d. Fine Arts e.

Health Se

f. Administration and

(5) Our standards of measured

Management

achievement should be excellence

as

national basis. Most programs, however, should be focused on regional needs.

(6)

on

a

The size of the present enrollment of the undergraduate body is appropriate and should be held stable in the Along with RIC and RIJC, this size meets

student

immediate future.

the needs of Rhode Island. We expect graduate education to graduate level, we perceive URI as the major center grow slowly to accomodate the growing needs of the public. public graduate education in the state, providing masters "The Kingston campus is presently at a sensible and workable programs in most traditional diciplines. At the doctorate level, the major emphasis on professional programs. We don't ex size, large enough to be diverse and to support the needed social diciplines, yet small enough to be a community." pect to develop any new PhD programs, (humanities, sciences or natural sciences). djc At the

of

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Dobson, Paul G.

485 Mam Si, W Den

Oalphin. Janet E.

34 Hennaly Bld, Li

Donaldson. Lone A.

Sunsel Lane. Sou

Donnelly, loanne S

62

930 SIOEum Avenue. HiilgeWd N

AlgonQuin Hd. I.

Doran. Shirley

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Gladys G.

221 Kent Drive, East Giei

25 Gemini Dr Apt 6 TieM III, Edwaid P.

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PdiI 0 Call Meadon Ave. 82 fames Stfeel, Bangor ME

Weekapaug

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71 Chatham Road. Cranston Rl

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535 Pleasant St. I

52 Pearl Street. Mysli 350 Bleecker St Apl D

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ngton Street, Geneva NY Cilj Road, Kinfiston Rl

leighton, Catherme A.

337 Colonial Dr, Poilsmouth MH

LeMaire, Kenneth P. 36 Warren Ave, IiveHon Rl LeMay. Kathleen E, 265 Balsam Road, Wakelield Rl LeHay. Steven R. 142 Stonetram Dr, Woonsocket HI leMire, Alan A. 11 Steere Dr, Johnston Rl 46 Ale. McGregor Road, Pawti(Ct,el Lennon. Bonnie f,

ffl

Marcoullier, John

R

Margol.s, Barbara

t

5 Resevon Ave Suite 310 Cianston Rl

Meek, David A

0 M

Way. Narragansell

Bl

27 Benlon Circle, Ulica NY

William F

1

15 Gendron Street, West Warwick Rl

2 Btossnm

122 Glen

4asi. Gloda S

vi

A

ichard W.

I

Asylum Road. Warren Rl 30 Linda Ave. Portsmouth F 43

Houghton St, Barnnglon

174 Thatcher St, East Providencf

Melone, KatWecn 4n foppy Ui. Lransion hi 59 CliMside Diive. Cransto Mendelsohn. Barbara A. 30 Kersey Road, Peace Dale Rl Messa, Anthony F 8 Knight Street. Covenlry Rl WSie'. Steven 0 Messier. Susan L Messina, Linda A.

85 Aelna SI, Cenlral Falls Rl

927

Birmingham Street. Bndgep.

RiiJge Road. C

16 Deauville Dr,

Parsippany

NJ

C/0 Ff ) Hall Lower Coll Rd, Kingston Rl PottefSvJie. Bd. Little Compton Rt

.1ar,i,n

25

Medeiros, Michael f Medeiros, Pamela M

4 latt Hall URi. Kingston Rl Manrique Ala, Mictiel A 106 Stella Drive. Norlh Providence fil Mansolillo, John I PO, Bo. 318, Kingston Rl Marak. Valerie I

Marchessault. loriame

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lad, North Scituate Rl

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Omega

38 Grand Ave

PI, Pavftucket Rl

(Stiles .1226 Palucket Ave. East Providence Rl

Mom?, Peter M

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Sprague SI,

Portsmou

Monroe, Brooke 23 Washington Lane, Scitu 2194 Cianslon Stteel, Montetalvo. Joan I

Montenegro, Virginia A Monlmarquet, lames M

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Wa

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Wyilie. Maureen 64 Summit St, Pawtuck Wynock, Austin W. 21 Church Street. Fr Vanku. Ronald J

483 Cedar Ave. East G

Wenlland, Joyce I I.

Gregory C.

35 Pequol Road

5

Skyloy Road, Scarsdali

28 Richland fload, Crai

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YEARBOOK_1977