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2012-2013 Student Affairs Annual Report

University of San Diego

Student Affairs 2012-2013 Annual Report Vice President for Student Affairs Carmen M. Vazquez, MSW, CSW The 2012-13 academic year was marked with outstanding achievement in the division of Student Affairs. Delivering a vibrant student life experience is central to our focus in the division. Toward that end, we expanded enrollment in our livinglearning communities to 53% of our first year students and made the decision to expand the program to all first year students in fall 2013, one year earlier than our goal of fall 2014.

sponsored nine Changemaker Student Fellows through funding, mentoring and support to implement their Changemaker ideas during the summer.

tion Technology Services. We also established a cross-divisional Major Event Pre-Planning Council to coordinate large-scale campus events.

Through our inaugural efforts to establish a culture of giving among our current undergraduate students, in collaboration with University Relations, we achieved a 10.4% giving rate for 2012-13 and doubled the total dollar amount of gifts from 2011-12.

The Employee Development Committee concluded work on the NASPA/ACPA competency, Personal Foundations and will focus on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in 2013-14.

We continue to expand our web and social media presence with a 200% increase in Facebook We proposed, and the Board of In collaboration with Univer“likes” and Twitter followers Trustees approved, a two-year sity Ministry, we developed and and a 300% increase in Youresidency requirement providing hosted the inaugural Mission Tube video views with over the opportunity to enrich our Integration Institute designed 20,000 minutes of video content sophomore experience program to foster the understanding and viewed. Our Web Content Spein meaningful ways. We also appreciation of Catholic higher cialist produced over 20 feature made strong gains in the area education’s purpose and envivideos and over 50 featurettes of student success, achieving a ronment for new and mid-career for the Torero Life website and 90% first year retention rate, an professionals. 17 videos, and multiple presenall time high and one year earlier tations, websites and photos for than our goal of fall 2014. We expanded our Student Afuniversity purposes. fairs/School of Leadership and To advance our identity as a Education Sciences CollabSadly, this past year we expeChangemaker campus, we deorative (SASC) to include four rienced several losses in our signed a space for students to graduate assistant positions in student community. We prolearn about and engage in social the Provost and Business Servided support for our students, change activities. Key Student vices areas. families, and community. These Affairs units will integrate their tragic losses cast an indelible work with the Center for Aware- We designed a process to ideninfluence on 2012-13. ness, Service and Action to tify, prioritize, and meet the diviincrease student engagement sion’s annual technology needs in changemaking activities. We in collaboration with Informa-

D ean

of

S tudents A rea

What We Do The Dean of Students leadership team collaborates to plan, implement, and assess services contributing to the student experience in each unit or area of responsibility.

H ighlights 1. Proposed a two year residency requirement that was approved by the Board of Trustees to be implemented with the incoming class of 2014. 2. Developed a comprehensive plan to identify, prioritize and meet the division’s annual technology needs. 3. Hired an advisor to lead an integrated approach to student media. 4. Served on the implementation team and faculty for the inaugural Mission Integration Institute at the University of San Diego. 5. Participated in the coordinated response to 62 sensitive issues team (SIT) cases (+16/35% from 2011-12), and 7 critical incident response team (CIRT) cases (-3 from 2012-13). 6. Met with 48 students individually regarding significant alcohol policy violations, a 34% decrease from 2011-12.

2013-2014 G oals 1. In partnership with Academic Affairs, University Ministry and student governments, design a dynamic sophomore residential and student life experience. 2. Collaboratively work with student governments to increase meaningful opportunities for students to engage in dialogue and authentic relationships. 3. Collaborate to develop and implement initiatives to foster the spiritual development of all students. 4. Increase faculty awareness of student conduct processes and resources by meeting with each department and posting resources on the Dean of Students and Office of the Assistant Dean of Students websites.

7. Made 158 (+46% from 2011-12) faculty notifications about student illnesses, injuries or other circumstances preventing them from attending class.

H ighlights 1. USD MAP-Works efforts recognized as the Educational Benchmarking Inc. National Overall Excellence Award recipient for the second year in a row. (four-year institution, 2-10,000).

C enter for S tudent S uccess What We Do The Center for Student Success generates innovative strategies to assist all undergraduate students in persisting to graduation.

2. Assumed responsibility for coordinating the implementation of all new undergraduate student orientation programs including a redesign of the program. 3. Student use of the Commuter Commons continues to increase, +10% from 2011-12 and +67% from 2010-11.

2012-2013 Results 1. The average number of MAP-Works contacts logged increased to 9.2 per first year student (+18% from 2011-12). 2. Successfully piloted “Registration Days� for transfer students over the summer, will implement for all transfers in 2013-14 along with a transfer peer support program in the fall semester. 3. Developed a comprehensive retention plan and established a new group, RETNET, to expand collaborations about student success. 4. Processed 166 leaves of absence, 157 withdrawals and 131 exit interviews, numbers are consistent with prior years.

2013-2014 Goals 1. Implement the redesigned new student orientation programs (first year, transfer and spring) and measure success by student satisfaction and learning outcome achievement. 2. In partnership with Academic Affairs, continue implementing our comprehensive plan to sustain strong retention of new students and begin exploring strategies to improve time to degree.

H ighlights 1. Expanded living-learning community participation to 53% of the first year class. 2. Maintained strong spring occupancy (96%), despite smaller incoming class in 2012.

R esidential L ife What We Do Residential Life is committed to providing a safe, inclusive living community and to creating learning opportunities for actively enhancing the growth of the resident as a whole person.

2012-2013 R esults 1. Refined processes to prepare for 100% of the first year class participating in livinglearning communities. 2. 83% of resident students report that living in the residence halls provides opportunities to engage with individuals who are different from themselves. 3. 89% of residents report that their RA creates an open and welcoming atmosphere, which promotes respect for all individuals.

3. Redesigned the roommate agreement to incorporate restorative justice principles.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Design strategies to increase the likelihood residents will utilize their RA for assistance with personal or academic concerns. 2. Increase community director visibility, 90% of residents will report knowing their community director. 3. Continue to implement the CAS review recommendations. 4. Retain 70% of the first-year class in residence during their second year. 5. Increase efficiency in business processes by more fully utilizing StarRez for all operations.

H ighlights 1. Created and began implementing a strategic plan for the unit. 2. Streamlined the hearing notification process and decreased the number of days between incident and O ffice of the A ssistant D ean of S tudents hearing to 10 days (-6 days or 38%). What We Do The Office of the Assistant Dean of Students contributes 3. Restructured graduate stuboth to undergraduate and graduate student learning by asdent activity fee, approved sisting new students with their transition, developing ethical by Board of Trustees and decision-makers through the student conduct process, buildwill be implemented in ing community through restorative justice practices, and pro2014-15. viding support services for graduate students.

2012-2013 R esults 1. Piloted a summer orientation program including three webinars and Google+ Hangouts for new students. 2. Advanced the restorative justice program through collaborative trainings and program implementation with Residential Life staff and securing a graduate assistant to facilitate the program in 2013-14. 3. Completed 2,385 background clearance checks for USD students. 4. Processed 632 student conduct referrals (-26% from 2011-12) and 26 restorative justice referrals (+18% from 2011-12).

2013-2014 G oals 1. Using findings from hearing board assessment, improve trainings to include code of conduct updates, restorative justice principles, and relationship building among members. 2. Continue to work closely with Residential Life to enhance the restorative justice program by creating a manual, orientation and training video, a revised assessment tool, an online service request and implementing the Restorative Justice and Conflict Transformation training. 3. In partnership with Academic Affairs, increase strategies to enhance co-curricular graduate student life.

S tudent L ife A rea What We Do Student Life fosters a welcoming and inclusive community, developmental opportunities and services as a catalyst for students to become ethical leaders with meaningful lives that positively impact a global society.

H ighlights 1. In collaboration with others, increased student giving from 3.3% in 2011-12 to 10.4% in 2012-13. 2. Implemented passive programming in the first year residence halls designed to increase awareness about diversity and inclusion and reduce acts of intolerance. 3. Created the Weekend Programming Collaborative to coordinate weekend programming, implemented San Diego Spotlight trams. 4. Attended the National Outdoor Leadership Risk Management Conference. 5. Established a Foster Care Collaborative to support former foster youth attending USD.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students. 2. In collaboration with University Relations, implement a plan to further establish and sustain a culture of giving with our current students to support USD’s capital campaign. 3. Collaborate to develop and implement initiatives to foster the spiritual development of all students. 4. Participate in the development and implementation of the Social Change Hub’s three-year strategic plan and activate the Changemaker student space. 5. Participate in the development and implementation of the university strategic plan for diversity and inclusion.

6. Created a new position to support the division’s website and social media interfaces. 7. Managed a record number (9) of university assembly requests (+125% from 2011-12). 8. Assessed the student co-curricular experience. Key findings include the need for increased variety in activities, offerings on weekend afternoons, events that expose students to the San Diego area, and improved marketing.

H ighlights 1. Spring elections garnered an 18% participation rate from the student body. 2. Allocated $30,000 in academic research grants (+50% from 2011-12).

A ssociated S tudents What We Do The Associated Students’ Leadership Team serves University of San Diego undergraduates as official student representatives who promote opportunities for growth and expression, address student issues, and enrich a diverse, inclusive, and engaged community.

3. Allocated $232,000 toward student organization sponsored events (+16% from 2011-12). 4. Torero Programming Board sponsored over 85 events for students. 5. Created a director of changemaker initiatives position. 6. Partnered with the Office of Sustainability and Student Affairs to fund the replacement of all bicycle racks across campus. 7. Facilitated campus-wide discussions on academic freedom and produced two resolutions related to this topic. 8. Launched the USD, I LOVE YOU (#USDILY) campaign in response to student losses. 9. Increased financial support to Associated Studentssponsored centers by an average of 3%.

H ighlights 1. Intramural participation continues to increase with 1,730 participants (+5% over 2011-12.) 2. 525 students participated (+4% over 2011-12) on 26 intercollegiate sports clubs teams. All participants completed physicals as per the newly implemented concussion policy.

C ampus R ecreation What We Do Campus Recreation provides quality programs, services, and facilities to a diverse USD community, encouraging the community to pursue an active, healthy lifestyle through participation in one of our many offerings. We encourage student development through leadership, participation, and employment opportunities.

3. McNamara Fitness center hosted an average of 1,538 users per week, (+6% over 2011-12) and Missions Fitness center remained consistent with last year averaging 1,765 visitors per week. 4. Implemented Physical/Occupational Therapy Club observation in athletic training room for sports clubs.

2012-2013 Results

2013-2014 Goals

1. Fitness programs and recreation classes assessment findings identify strengths in quality of instruction, achievement of learning outcomes and almost every patron would recommend the program to others. Areas for growth include increasing variety of class times and increasing participation and outreach.

1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students.

2. Improved training for student employees by consolidating multiple operation manuals. 3. Hired a sponsorship and fundraising coordinator for the department.

2. Increase intramural participation to 2,000 students. 3. Create and offer new, for-credit recreation leadership class for Sport Club leaders, department student leaders and others interested in recreation leadership. 4. Collaboratively create and implement a year round youth program including youth physical activities, swim lessons, and “camps.” 5. Continue to grow the recreation class offerings including more weekend classes and potential off-campus classes (add 5 to 10 classes per semester). 6. Improve Sport Club Trainer records management by creating electronic “patient charts” vs. filing of injury forms, physicals, etc.

H ighlights 1. A record number of guides (71) were active with the program this year, 26 (37%) were guides or lead guides compared with 18 (26%) in 2011-12, an increase of 44% in experienced guides. 2. Program hours for outings hit 16,600, a 10% increase over last year’s record high of 15,039.

O utdoor A dventures What We Do Outdoor Adventures provides USD community members with opportunities to experience new adventures that aim to promote personal growth, leadership development, relationship building and environmental responsibility.

2012-2013 R esults 1. Demand for custom trips increased 114% from 21 trips in 2011-12 to 45 in 2012-13. 2. Implemented a process for compensating lead guides. 3. Developed a guide manual which will be used for guide training in August 2013. 4. Sponsored three new outdoor service trips in support of Changemaking efforts. 5. Assessed the Orientation Adventure program, key findings are consistent: the most common reasons for attending are to meet new people and help with the transition to USD; students report feeling more confident about their transition to USD (98%), making connections with at least five other first year students (95%), learning things they have in common and ways they are different from other students. Fall to spring retention rate for participants was 98.4%.

3. Hosted a photo exhibit in the Hahn University Center Exhibit Hall featuring our trip experiences and information about environmental sustainability. 4. Staff and students presented two sessions at the Western Outdoor Leadership Conference.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students. 2. Infuse environmental education into 100% of our trips. 3. Work with the USD Office of Sustainability to define and work towards “zero waste” on 100% of our overnight trips. 4. Revise guide training to systematically move towards establishing and retaining six “senior” level outing guides capable of guiding overnight trips without full time staff in attendance. 5. Develop a more intentional connection between university Changemaking efforts and outdoor service trips.

H ighlights 1. Sponsored an Immersion Trip to Peru with 11 students. 2. Offered new services in the Creative Zone and experienced a 25% increase in usage from 2011-12.

S tudent A ctivities What We Do Student Activities collaborates to serve as a hub of student involvement initiatives, designed to educate students through advising, program planning, participation and connection to further our purpose of graduating Changemakers.

2012-2013 Results 1. Re-designed the student involvement and information desk space. 2. Welcomed a new assistant director for student activities and organizations. 3. Increased attendance at key Torero Program Board events including sporting tailgates and Homecoming Week events.

3. Collaborated with the preceptorial program to coordinate first year student attendance at the Alcalรก Bazaar and clustered tables by area of interest. 4. Registered 1,842 on and off campus events.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students. 2. Revise the student leader competency guide to be more user-friendly. 3. In partnership with SOLES, complete an inventory of existing Leadership Programs across campus and complete a needs assessment. 4. Expand Student Involvement and Information Desk services to incorporate student organization support. 5. Evaluate the event registration process to identify possible ways to increase efficiency.

H ighlights 1. Saved University Events and Promotions approximately $10,000 by offering departmental resources and services formerly outsourced.

S tudent L ife F acilities What We Do Student Life Facilities provides the infrastructure and services to enhance community life within the Hahn University Center, Student Life Pavilion and other event spaces on campus. We are committed to providing an environment that is safe, comfortable and fosters community.

2012-2013 R esults 1. Developed learning outcomes and a rubric for student staff that measure four competency areas. 2. Implemented improved business practices including an event cancellation policy, enhanced safety procedures, and a consistent pricing for external clients. 3. Established a strong Weekend Programming Board that hosted over 75 weekend events. 4. Coordinated 10,400 internal and external events (+32% from 2011-12).

2. Employed over 40 undergraduate students in our office. 3. Coordinated 24 blood drives and received recognition from the San Diego Blood Bank.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students. 2. Establish a three-year assessment plan. 3. Develop strategies for managing the increasing number of events without an increase in resources. 4. Increase Weekend Program Board events and attendance by 10%. 5. Assist with the implementation of the Changemaker space and Black Student Commons. 6. Work with auxiliary services to develop consistent custodial standards in all areas of the University Center and Student Life Pavilion.

H ighlights 1. Welcomed Kappa Delta Sorority to our campus with a 56 woman chapter that successfully achieved quota in their first year. 2. Implemented a series of Bystander Behavior and Personal Responsibility workshops in monthly chapter meetings for the entire Fraternity and Sorority community.

S tudent O rganizations

and

G reek L ife

What We Do Student Organizations and Greek Life collaborates to serve as a hub of student involvement initiatives, designed to educate students through advising, program planning, participation and connection to further our purpose of graduating Changemakers.

2012-2013 R esults 1. Applied for the 2012 AFA Diversity Initiatives Award. 2. Implemented new travel policy for overnight events. 3. Dedicated a chapter advisor to Delta Tau Delta fraternity to ensure their continued success following a full member review. Developed a new member program, supported officer transition, and implemented a philanthropic event.

3. Registered 148 first year students in 12 sections of Emerging Leaders, LEAD 161. 4. Registered 227 eligible men for fraternity recruitment and issued 180 bids. Registered 355 women for sorority recruitment and issued 316 bids. 5. Wrote 20,000 letters, raising over $43,600 in support of St. Jude’s Hospital.

2013-2014 G oals 1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students. 2. Activate the Changemaker student space and integrate efforts with CASA staff. 3. Identify and engage with three new faculty partners. 4. Enhance student organization advisor education, engagement and recognition. 5. Investigate the possibility of implementing a pre-orientation experience focused on student organization involvement.

H ighlights

United Front Multicultural Center What We Do The United Front Multicultural Center (UFMC) engages the University of San Diego community in exploring and affirming the unique identity of each person. The Center fosters an environment where student leaders feel empowered to become change agents for social justice and builds relationships with faculty, staff, students and community members to develop a foundation that honors and values diversity. The UFMC serves as an educational resource, working to contest the dominance of prejudice and intolerance, and works to enact the values of the University as “a welcoming, inclusive and collaborative community ...marked by protection of the rights and dignity of the individual.�

2012-2013 R esults

1. Increased number of programs and participants: a. 14% increase in the number of community lunches offered, 10% in crease in participants b. 50% increase in Safe Space Allies trainings of fered, 104% increase in participants c. 46% increase in Rainbow Educators presentations, 51% increase in partici- pants d. 56% increase in Greater Than Yourself retreat par- ticipants. 2. Developed a new weekly email template to enhance communication with our constituents. 3. Strengthened relationship with CACCHE, co-presented a session at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity.

2013-2014 G oa l s

1. Developed a rubric to measure four competencies for center interns through the performance evaluation process.

1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students.

2. Completed expansion of the Rainbow Educators program to include more diversity topics and established a Rainbow Educators leadership course.

2. Implement improvements to the LINK mentor program based on assessment findings including increasing community service opportunities, mentor/mentee connections, and one-on-one meetings among others.

3. Recruited 60 LINK mentors and mentees for fall 2012, 100% of mentees returned to USD for spring 2013.

3. Pilot the Rainbow Educators program expansion including finalizing learning outcomes, developing curriculum and assessing the program. 4. Develop meaningful partnerships and education with key stakeholders (i.e., CID, Changemaker HUB, Women’s Center, Alumni, Faculty). 5. Identify strategies to meet the continued increase in demand for programs and services with the current level of resources.

H ighlights 1. Implemented C.A.R.E. Advocate initiative, providing direct support for students going through the university sexual assault reporting process. 2. Experienced record numbers at new and annual events held during Sexual Assault Awareness Week (Spoken Word Workshop, Consent Discussion and Peace Circle).

Women’s Center What We Do The Women’s Center invites women to find voice, develop skills for transformation and understand who they are called to be. The Center empowers women to engage as leaders in a student-centered learning community that provides resources and engages students in educational dialogue around gender-related issues. We advocate for a safe, supportive campus environment that creates equity among all voices.

3. Redesigned the center’s organizational structure to better align with the feminist leadership principles to which we aspire. 4. Developed a social justice education and learning model through action research that will guide the center’s work.

2012-2012 R esults

2013-2014 G oals

1. Continued to increase the visibility of the Women’s Center through social media, participating in the Summer Bridge program, partnerships with faculty and other departments and sorority recruitment. Results include increased student participation in key programs and in the center, particularly with SSS students.

1. Study the student life experience, identify high impact strategies and develop an implementation plan to foster a vibrant student life experience and a sense of belonging among all students.

2. Continued student outreach with the First Year Women Rock program averaging eight women attending each session. 3. Launched the new Pregnant & Parenting Students website, offering comprehensive information to students.

2. Continue to increase visibility of the Women’s Center and services it provides. 3. Provide opportunities to explore gender and its intersection with other social identities through events such as “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”, First Year Women Rock Discussion Group, and staff and intern trainings. 4. Further develop C.A.R.E. Advocate initiative by streamlining reporting and record-keeping procedures, on-going advocate training, and campus-wide marketing and outreach. 5. Increase campus-wide support for pregnant and parenting students.

S tudent W ellness A rea

H ighlights

What We Do The Wellness area works collaboratively with the USD community to help and support students achieve and maintain well being as they strive to reach their personal and academic goals.

1. Participated in the coordinated response to 62 sensitive issues team (SIT) cases (+16 or 35% from 2011-12), and 7 critical incident response team (CIRT) cases (-3 from 2012-13). 2. Processed 75 medical leaves of absence (+15 or 25% from 2012-13), 60% involved psychological and/or psychiatric difficulties. 3. Institutionalized trainings for International Center staff and faculty on identifying and responding to “Distress, Disruption, and Critical Incidents� for study abroad experiences.

2013-2014 G oals 1. In collaboration with the university community, develop and implement campuswide education and prevention initiatives to address alcohol and other drug use and mental health concerns. 2. Participate in the development and implementation of the Social Change Hub’s three-year strategic plan and activate the Changemaker student space. 3. Assess the effectiveness of the collaborative care model and develop a plan to disseminate the findings and recommendations. 4. Secure funding to renovate Serra Hall 300. 5. Identify strategies to meet the increased demand for Wellness services given no projected growth in staffing.

4. Collaborative Care model at the Student Health Center increased pathways for students to access mental health services including alcohol, anxiety, depression and suicide ideation screening for 1,769 students which identified 898 positive screening results. 5. Secured a major capital outlay to design an integrated Changemaker student space in the Student Life Pavilion. 6. Implemented sexual assault C.A.R.E advocate program and submitted a $300,000 grant to support sexual assault efforts.

H ighlights 1. Developed a new wellness orientation session for first year students focused on USD’s core values resulting in a significant increase in students’ ability to identify wellness resources.

C enter

for

H ealth

and

W ellness P romotion

What We Do The Center for Health and Wellness Promotion provides the University of San Diego community with a comprehensive array of health and wellness promotion initiatives and clinical alcohol and other drugs services.

2. Implemented Nutrition Taskforce recommendations including a healthy menu for Pavilion Dining, Nutrition 101 classes, and SLP dining tours. 3. The Student Wellness area participated in 267 wellness promotion/prevention programs (+8% from 2011-12). 4. The LGBTQQ discussion group met 14 times during the academic year with an average attendance of 12 students.

2012-2013 R esults

2013-2014 G oals

1. 83% of clients agree or strongly agree that as a result of their visit(s) they are thinking more seriously about their use of substances and 78% agree or strongly agree that they have made positive behavior changes related to their use of substances.

1. Lead the efforts to develop a comprehensive set of environmental interventions to reduce the incidence of problematic drinking and drug abuse on campus.

2. Initiated eight medical leaves of absence through our office (+6 from previous years).

2. Implement peer education initiatives and enhance positive peer influence in the Greek Life community.

3. Identified four marijuana prevention initiatives and implemented two: E-Toke, an on-line assessment, and training faculty and staff who travel with students studying abroad. 4. Explored the possibility of formalized Greek Life peer programming and will implement interventions in 201314. 5. Conducted wellness trainings for preceptorial assistants, faculty and administrators participating in study abroad programs, and Emerging Leaders Council Summit. 6. Analyzed data from the ACHA-NCHA survey to inform goal setting and revise learning outcomes.

3. Explore more effective ways to collect client satisfaction and behavior change data and pilot a new process this year. 4. Develop CHWP-specific guidelines and protocols for electronic medical record clinical documentation.

H ighlights 1. Served 996 students (+13% from 2011-12, and +28% from 2010-11).

Counseling Center What We Do The Counseling Center enhances the emotional, relational, and psychological well-being of students. We strive to facilitate students’ personal growth and enhance their academic success through accessible, culturally congruent clinical and outreach services. We work in collaboration with other Wellness and university departments and community partners.

2. Experienced an increase in the number of students referred to the community for long-term and specialized care requiring “case management” while the number of walk-in/intake sessions, counseling sessions, medication intakes, and medication follow up sessions remained relatively unchanged. 3. Offered eight counseling groups during the academic year for a total of 69 group sessions for 54 different students. 4. Responded to 56 after-hours emergency calls, risk of suicide was an issue in one fourth of these calls, the most common area of concern for all calls.

2012-2013 R esults

2013-2014 G oals

1. Conducted an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative analysis of a large random sample of clinical cases seen in the fall of 2011. Planned changes include implementing improved clinical documentation policies and procedures.

1. Review and update policies and procedures for “case managing” students referred to the community for long-term or specialized care, clinical documentation of services, walk-in policies and procedures, and Wellness Area and community psychiatric referral process.

2. Implemented an innovative Collaborative Care treatment model for students screened at the Student Health Center for mental health concerns. 3. Developed and implemented a training program for psychiatric nursing students from the university’s School of Nursing. 4. Developed and implemented an ongoing satellite consultation and screening service for Greek Life.

2. Develop enhanced liaison and new provision of satellite consultation services with Residential Life staff.

H ighlights 1. Served 5.7% of the total student population for a total of 463 students registered with Disability Services (+16% from 2011-12)�. The number of undergraduates served, 383, represents a 20% increase in that population. 2. Experienced a 66% increase in the number of students registered with psychiatric disabilities (88 in 2012-13, 53 in 2011-12).

D isability S ervices What We Do Disability Services is committed to helping students with verified disabilities obtain meaningful academic accommodations and support and to help improve access to the many excellent programs and activities offered by the University.

3. Strengthened collaborations with Residential Life, Parking Services, and the Student Health Center to bolster services for students with temporary health impairments. 4. Successfully continued to provide the full range of support services to the largest number of registered students in the unit’s history despite staffing transitions.

2012-2013 R esults

2013-2014 G oals

1. Completed a successful national search for a Disability Services Coordinator.

1. Pilot enhanced assessment methodologies for measuring satisfaction of services including collecting data from multiple stakeholders.

2. Developed an implementation plan to utilize the $125,000 gift received in 2011-12. 3. Implemented service improvements based on assessment including new electronic informed consent documents, more secure email accounts for communication with faculty and new protocol for service animal utilization.

2. Continue to develop the implementation plan associated with the $125,000 gift received in 2011-12 and enhance existing donor-partner relationships. 3. Coordinate a comprehensive ADHD workshop featuring Dr. Russell Barkley. 4. Create a protocol for managing special health and disability related housing requests. 5. Participate in the launch of the Wellness clinical psychology practicum.

H ighlights 1. Co-Sponsored USD’s first Reproductive Health Awareness Week with Associated Students. 2. Provided a record number of inperson patient contacts, 11,000 (+8% from 2011-12). 3. Served 54% of USD students resulting in 20,064 patient contacts (+3% from 2011-12).

S tudent H ealth C enter What We Do The Student Health Center provides primary healthcare and promotes the health and wellbeing of students at the University of San Diego.

2012-2013 R esults

4. Responded to 47 after-hours calls (-17% from 2011-12) and 816 students participated in SHC campus outreach events (+5% from 2011-12). 5. Professional staff functions with a high provider efficiency (up to 147%) and receives very positive feedback from students (> 98%) while our full time equivalent staffing compares at below average nationally.

2013-2014 G oals

1. Moved into a new, state of the art facility in August 2012 and implemented the expansion of select specialty services: Immunotherapy (178 visits, + 98% from 2011-12), Travel Medicine (109 visits, + 68% from 2011-12), completed 254 pre-participation physicals, a new service in 2012-13.

1. Assess the collaborative care model and SHC-8 screening program and consider publishing and presenting findings.

2. Implemented the “SHC-8” screening program and assessed its effectiveness. Screened 1,769 students seen at the SHC for depression, anxiety and alcohol use. Of the 898 with a positive response, 51% connected with a mental health provider.

3. Increase medical support to students studying abroad by strengthening collaboration with the International Center.

3. Successfully implemented a Collaborative Care Model with the Counseling Center, Center for Health and Wellness Promotion and the School of Nursing Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Program. 4. Contributed to the development of Health and Safety Abroad Response Guide and provided travel medicine consultations. 5. Completed significant steps in becoming HIPPA compliant.

2. Expand collaboration efforts across the Wellness units.

4. Prepare for reaccreditation by Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).

A wards Moises Baron USD Parents Association Award of Excellence Moises Baron STAR Award COMPASS and the USD Legal Clinics

and

R ecognition

Margaret Leary Thomas F. Burke Administrator of the Year Award USD Student Affairs Karen Lese-Fowler Elected to the Board of Directors of the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies

Alejandro Cervantes Thomas F. Burke Staff Member of the Year Award USD Student Affairs

Toñis Manríquez Partners 4 Life Award San Diego Blood Bank

Jessica Critchlow CHR Employee Recognition Award USD Human Resources

Marie Minnick Faculty Appreciation Award USD Chapter of Mortar Board

Liberty Hebron Faculty Appreciation Award USD Chapter of Mortar Board

Jason Schreiber Faculty Appreciation Award USD Chapter of Mortar Board

Darla Laatsch, RN USD Employee of the Year

Carmen’s Crusaders Torero Cup Champions USD Employee Picnic

Center for Student Success and Residential Life National Overall Excellence Award for MAP-Works Efforts Educational Benchmarking Inc. Outdoor Adventures Green Office Certification (Platinum) USD Office of Sustainability Student Leadership and Involvement Center Green Office Certification (Platinum) USD Office of Sustainability

2013-2014 S trategic P lan Student Learning and Development Student Affairs will advance the philosophy that learning takes place in all aspects of campus life. We will engage students holistically, to collaboratively provide purposeful learning experiences and environments that support the University’s mission and learning goals. •

In partnership with Academic Affairs, University Ministry and student governments, design a dynamic sophomore residential and student life experience.

In partnership with Academic Affairs, continue implementing our comprehensive plan to sustain strong retention of first year students and begin exploring strategies to improve time to degree.

Participate in the development and implementation of the university strategic plan for diversity and inclusion.

Community, Participation and Engagement Student Affairs will lead the collaborative process of fostering community and “Life-long Torero Pride”. We will be a celebrative, just, inclusive, open and caring community. We will actively engage in providing distinct learning and social experiences driven by Mission, traditions and students. •

Collaboratively work with student governments to increase meaningful opportunities for students to engage in dialogue and authentic relationships.

Implement a plan to further establish and sustain a culture of giving with our current students to support USD’s capital campaign.

In partnership with Academic Affairs, increase strategies to enhance co-curricular graduate student life.

In collaboration with the university community, develop and implement campus-wide education and prevention initiatives to address alcohol and other drug use and mental health concerns.

Catholic Identity In collaboration with Mission and Ministry, Academic Affairs and the Council for the Advancement of Catholic Social Thought, the division of Student Affairs will promote our Catholic identity and foster the spiritual development of all students. •

Collaborate to develop and implement initiatives to foster the spiritual development of all students.

Participate in the development and implementation of the Social Change Hub’s three-year strategic plan and activate the student Changemaking space.

Organizational Excellence Student Affairs will be a dynamic organization with structures and processes that are innovative, and clear in communication, expectations and roles. Each member of our team will actively contribute to creating an environment where employees’ well-being is valued, and all are well informed, supported an empowered. •

Develop a structure and create a plan for engaging in systematic area and unit review for each unit in Student Affairs and pilot this process with the Student Life area.

Develop strategies to ensure that pertinent theory and best practices are embedded in our practice so that we maintain relevancy in terms of the contemporary student life experience and needs.

Identify and implement relevant revenue generating opportunities in Residential Life, Parking and University Scheduling.

Student Affairs Mission Statement In the Catholic tradition, we create an educational environment which motivates and inspires student learning and personal development, serves the University community, and challenges students to make a positive contribution to society.

Mission The University of San Diego is a Roman Catholic institution committed to advancing academic excellence, expanding liberal and professional knowledge, creating a diverse and inclusive community, and preparing leaders dedicated to ethical conduct and compassionate service. Vision The University of San Diego is a nationally preeminent Catholic university known for educating students who are globally competent, ethical leaders working and serving in our complex and changing world.

USD Strategic Initiatives 2010-2015 • Redesign the Core Curriculum • Strengthen undergraduate research and scholarship • Engage students in themed Living-Learning Communities • Renovate general use classrooms • Leverage the Ashoka Partnership • Engage alumni and build relationships • Expand USD’s global presence • Assess programs expressing our Catholic character

USD The University of San Diego expresses its Catholic identity by witnessing and probing the Christian message as proclaimed by the Roman Catholic Church. The university promotes the intellectual exploration of religious faith, recruits persons and develops programs supporting the university’s mission, and cultivates an active faith community. It is committed to the dignity and fullest development of the whole person. The Catholic tradition of the university provides the foundation upon which the core values listed below support the mission. Academic Excellence The University pursues academic excellence in its teaching, learning and research to serve the local, national and international communities. The University possesses that institutional autonomy and integrity necessary to uphold the highest standards of intellectual inquiry and academic freedom. Knowledge The University advances intellectual development; promotes democratic and global citizenship; cultivates an appreciation for beauty, goodness, and truth; and provides opportunities for the physical, spiritual, emotional, social, and cultural development of students. The University provides professional education grounded in these foundations of liberal learning while preparing students to understand complex issues and express informed opinions with courage and conviction.

• Imagine Alcalá Park West

Community The University is committed to creating a welcoming, inclusive and collaborative community accentuated by a spirit of freedom and charity, and marked by protection of the rights and dignity of the individual. The University values students, faculty and staff from different backgrounds and faith traditions and is committed to creating an atmosphere of trust, safety and respect in a community characterized by a rich diversity of people and ideas.

Meet the

Ethical Conduct The University provides a values-based education that informs the development of ethical judgment and behavior. The University seeks to develop ethical and responsible leaders committed to the common good who are empowered to engage a diverse and changing world.

Changemakers. University of San Diego Student Affairs

5998 Alcala Park San Diego, CA 92110 www.sandiego.edu/studentaffairs www.sandiego.edu/torerolife

Compassionate Service The University embraces the Catholic moral and social tradition by its commitment to serve with compassion, to foster peace and to work for justice. The University regards peace as inseparable from justice and advances education, scholarship and service to fashion a more humane world.


SA Annual Report 2012-13