Issuu on Google+

Challenging minds. Undergraduate prospectus 2011

Broadening your horizons The University of Southampton has a global reputation for academic excellence. We are one of the top 100 universities in the world and a member of the prestigious Russell Group of research-intensive UK universities. We understand that choosing your future career path is one of the most challenging decisions you have to make. Having listened to feedback from applicants, current students and recent graduates, we are working hard to ensure you get the most from the outstanding opportunities here at Southampton. If you already have a specific career in mind, we can offer you the educational depth you need for success in today’s global workplace. If you are still deciding, we are developing our curriculum to give you the freedom to tailor your degree to meet your needs. This will include opportunities to study broad themes around your subject area and across the other disciplines offered at the University. We will help you make an informed choice about the subjects to study and your future career options. We understand that being at university is more than just going to lectures and we have invested in excellent social, cultural and sporting facilities. Your University of Southampton experience will give you the transferable skills – such as teamwork and leadership – that employers really want. These exciting changes will give you the advantage as you enter today’s increasingly competitive global careers market.

See for yourself:

University open days 3 July, 8 and 9 September 2010 Find out more on page 27 www.southampton.ac.uk/visit

4

2

5

1. Outstanding academics Men and women of the highest intellectual calibre working at the forefront of their fields. Page 12 2. Entrepreneurial edge Our unique commitment to pioneering new approaches and techniques. Page 14 3. Research centres Linking fundamental research with real-world applications. Page 16 4. Ensuring employability At Southampton, employers contribute to the curriculum, ensuring our students are well positioned for future careers. Page 22

3

5. Southampton and region A vibrant mix of recreation, culture and entertainment in a stunning location. Page 34

In this prospectus

1

Our campuses

24

Students’ Union (SUSU)

26

University open days

27

Creativity on campus

28

Sporting excellence

30

Libraries

32

Accommodation

36

International students

40

Fees and loans

42

Scholarships and bursaries

44

The journey to your degree

46

(application information)

Directory of services

50

Our degree programmes

54

(listed alphabetically by subject)

How to get here

204

Terms of use

205

Index

206

3

Conserving our coral reefs. Galapagos project to protect coral ecosystems Some of the world’s rarest coral reefs and the economies that depend on them will be better protected thanks to a major international marine project led by the University of Southampton. The project was funded by the UK government’s Darwin Initiative and led by Professor Terry Dawson from the School of Geography. The research team studied the effect of climate change on the reefs of the Galapagos Islands, as well as engaging with the local fishing and tourism industries on how to manage the reefs in a sustainable way. Terry comments: “It’s encouraging to note that the corals are adapting to global warming. Nature has a habit of surprising us by being capable of looking after itself, as long as the industries linked to it – such as fishing and tourism in the case of the reefs – treat it with care.” The research is published in a special edition of the peer-reviewed journal Galapagos Research.

Protecting against infection. Researchers develop a system to detect hospital superbugs The so-called ‘superbugs’ MRSA and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) cost the NHS more than £1bn a year. They are difficult to treat because of their resistance to antibiotics, and, as they do not cause symptoms in everyone, it is a challenge for hospitals to detect and control them. Scientists at the University of Southampton are rising to the challenge by developing a groundbreaking detection system that can spot superbugs in hospitals. Using a specially designed optical device, the researchers are able to examine medical equipment and surfaces for signs of MRSA, C. difficile and other infections. The multidisciplinary team includes researchers from the University’s Schools of Biological Sciences and Health Sciences, as well as a commercial business, Best Scientific – a company that designs and builds optical and microscopic equipment. The team now plans to develop the system into a portable detection kit for easy use by hospital staff. Professor Bill Keevil, from the University’s School of Biological Sciences, explains: “We are building in the capability of differentiating live from dead bacteria on a range of hospital surfaces and equipment. This will identify hotspots of contamination and improve the efficiency of cleaning protocols. Understanding how pathogens survive in a hospital environment is key to protecting patients and staff.”

Going for gold. Supporting UK Sport Researchers in the School of Engineering Sciences are working closely with UK Sport to help British athletes reach their full potential in events such as cycling and skeleton bob. Head of Research and Innovation at UK Sport, Dr Scott Drawer, explains: “Gold medals can be won or lost within fractions of seconds and our job is to ensure the athletes are in the best possible position to take advantage of those tiny margins. The knowledge and expertise that the University of Southampton contributes is critical to our work.�

Photo: James Roche

Delving into the ‘dark side’. Research that could lead us out of the credit crunch

The behaviour of leaders could affect how companies recover from the credit crunch, according to a new study by the School of Management. The results of the pilot study challenge traditional views of leadership, suggesting that leaders who appear to offer ‘heroic’ and ‘visionary’ leadership may also be narcissistic – self-obsessed and domineering. This type of behaviour can damage a company internally, causing a drop in long-term performance. One example is the excessive risk-taking behaviour that led to the recent banking crisis. Malcolm Higgs, Professor of HR Management and Organisational Behaviour, says: “If we want to avoid the damaging impact of narcissistic behaviours on organisations in the future, we need to change our view of leadership. A key part of this will be emphasising the importance of a leader being open to challenge and able to engage others in decision making.” Malcolm is also looking at how companies can detect the early signs of narcissism and coach leaders to make them aware of the ‘dark side’ of their behaviour.

Outstanding academics 1. Dr Faith Hill National Teaching Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy, 2009 Faith has been awarded a prestigious National Teaching Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy in recognition of her teaching excellence in higher education. Faith is Director of the Division of Medical Education and Director of the Medical Education Development Unit in the School of Medicine. An outstanding leader and innovator in medical education, she works to improve healthcare through enhancing the learning experience and inspiring the next generation of clinicians.

4. Professor Patrick Stephenson Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Prize Patrick, from the School of Humanities (Modern Languages), has been awarded the prestigious DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) 2009 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Prize for outstanding contributions from a non-German to any aspect of German studies. The prize includes funding and a research visit to Germany.

5. Dr Francesco Poletti Royal Society University Research Fellowship Francesco, a research fellow at the Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC), has been awarded two 2. Professor Andrew Lotery prestigious fellowships: one from the Royal Society Royal College of Ophthalmologists Nettleship Medal and the other from the Royal Academy of Engineering. Andrew, a leading eye specialist at the School of Both five-year fellowships were offered to Francesco Medicine, was awarded the prestigious Nettleship to fund his work on a novel platform of extreme Medal of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists for his fibre laser sources. Competition for these awards is research into age-related macular degeneration (AMD). fierce, and to be awarded two fellowships is a great This is a major cause of blindness among elderly people achievement. Unable to accept two fellowships at in developed countries. His work, in collaboration the same time, Francesco has accepted the Royal with Dr Sarah Ennis, was published in the medical Society University Research Fellowship. journal The Lancet. It identified a new genetic risk 6. Professor Dame Wendy Hall factor for AMD. The gene, named SERPING1, is faulty Fellowship of the Royal Society in up to a quarter of people with AMD. The findings Wendy, based in the School of Electronics and could lead to new screening methods and treatments Computer Science, has been elected Fellow of the for the condition. Royal Society, the UK’s national academy of science. 3. Dr Jon Copley One of the first computer scientists to undertake Co-Chair of InterRidge serious research in multimedia and hypermedia, Jon, from the School of Ocean and Earth Science, is Wendy has been at the forefront of this field ever Co-Chair of an international organisation, InterRidge. since. Through her leadership roles on national and In this role, Jon will be coordinating the exploration international bodies, she also helps to shape policy. of the mid-ocean ridge, a 60,000km-long chain of Wendy was appointed Dame Commander of the British undersea volcanoes. In 2008, Jon received the Empire (DBE) in January 2009 for services to science Biosciences Federation Science Communication and technology. Award for his enthusiasm, commitment and innovation in communicating biological science to the public. He features in the Science and Innovation listing of the Courvoisier Future 500, a list of up-and-coming 25- to 40-year-olds, spanning categories from art and public life to business and sport.

1 7. Professor Chris Skinner Royal Statistical Society West Medal, 2009 Chris, from the School of Social Sciences, has been awarded the Royal Statistical Society West Medal for his outstanding achievements in the field of social statistics methodology. The award also recognises his work in the UK and internationally on the development and provision of training in social science research methods. Chris is Leverhulme Professor of Social Statistics. Dr mc schraefel Royal Academy of Engineering Senior Research Fellowship Chief Imaginist for Interactive Strategies in the School of Electronics and Computer Science, mc (lower case deliberate) has been awarded a Royal Academy of Engineering Senior Research Fellowship, sponsored by Microsoft Research. Over the five-year duration of the award, mc will research which environmental conditions (social, physical and informational) are optimum for human creativity and lead to the cognitive leap that synthesises new information in the ‘pre-eureka’ moment.

6

2

3

4

5

7

Entrepreneurial edge The University has a reputation for leadership in enterprise. We work extensively with industrial partners through collaborative research, student and graduate industry placements, consultancy and new business creation. We have several University Technology Centres with major organisations such as Rolls-Royce, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Microsoft to support ongoing collaborative research, the exchange of ideas and technological development. We have achieved considerable success in the creation of spin-out companies. Twelve successful companies have been spun out from Southampton since 2000. Three of these have been floated on London’s Alternative Investment Market with a combined market capitalisation value of £160m. Offshore Hydrocarbon Mapping (OHM) This spin-out company has become a world leader in using electromagnetic imaging to survey the oceans, saving millions of pounds in the hunt for increasingly scarce oil and gas reserves. OHM provides controlled source electromagnetic imaging (CSEMI) services, including surveying, data processing and data interpretation services, to the offshore oil industry. CSEMI has been used by researchers to examine hydrothermal and volcanic systems on mid-ocean ridges for more than 20 years. OHM has assembled a team of leading scientists in this field to further refine and develop the CSEMI technique into a potent tool for optimising hydrocarbon exploration and production. OHM was originally formed in 2002 as a spin out from the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, with venture capital funding. The company has completed more than 50 CSEMI surveys spanning four continents, as well as numerous reprocessing and interpretation projects using data collected by third parties.

Synairgen Synairgen is a drug discovery and development company specialising in respiratory diseases, with a focus on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These conditions are rapidly growing causes of illness and death worldwide, and represent an increasing and largely unmet medical need. Synairgen was founded by Professors Stephen Holgate, Ratko Djukanovic and Donna Davies. The company’s focus is based on their research. Synairgen was spun out from the School of Medicine in 2003. By October 2004 the company had completed its initial public offering on the Alternative Investment Market, raising £10m to enhance its research capabilities, develop its biobank and invest in its proprietary programmes. Synairgen is located within the School of Medicine.

Autism Diagnostic Research Centre (ADRC)

Student enterprise

ADRC provides a diagnostic service for adults who may have an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Set up as a not-for-profit company by the University in 2007, the Centre is based in the School of Psychology. It is directed by Dr Tony Brown, a clinical psychologist specialising in pervasive developmental disorders.

Southampton also provides a thriving entrepreneurial environment for our students. We participate in the annual Students in Free Enterprise competition, which challenges students globally to create enterprises that are ethical, sustainable and improve people’s quality of life both locally and around the world.

The Centre provides a diagnosis and a guide that will help individuals, their families and those who support them to understand their condition. The report gives clear, concise guidance and recommendations for support, enabling people with ASDs to live more engaged, safe and fulfilling lives.

We also provide one-on-one advice via ‘business surgeries’, as well as free residential courses, business simulation workshops, training days and competitions. Fish on Toast is our student entrepreneurs’ society. Run by students, for students, it has a programme of workshops and guest speakers throughout the year. These cover a range of issues, from drawing up business plans to acquiring funding, putting together a marketing strategy and product development. The ‘Fish Food’ investment fund can also provide funding to help get good business ideas off the ground. You can also study Entrepreneurship (at BSc or MSc level) through the School of Management. See page 104. www.southampton.ac.uk/studententerprise

Research centres With an unparalleled reputation for linking fundamental research with real-world applications, Southampton is home to many world-leading research centres that consistently break new ground. Wolfson Unit The Wolfson Unit is one of the most respected marine design consultancies in the world. It has many high-profile clients. These include: the designers of yachts for the 2008/09 Vendée Globe race, with participants Dee Caffari sailing Aviva, Mike Golding sailing Ecover, and Marc Guillemot sailing Safran; the designer of Puma, which was placed second in the 2009 Volvo Ocean Race; and several America’s Cup teams. The Wolfson Unit is also an Innovation Partner for UK Sport.

Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) The ORC is a research-only School in the Faculty of Engineering, Science and Mathematics, focusing on photonics, the study of light. The ORC and its predecessors have played a leading role in optics over the last 40 years, and it continues to be at the forefront of photonics advances today. The ORC provided key components that enabled the communications revolution of the late century. The ORC was formed as an interdisciplinary research centre, merging groups from the School of Physics and Astronomy and the School of Electronics and Computer Science. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)

DOHaD aims to promote research into the foetal and developmental origins of health and disease. Southampton researchers are particularly interested Microsoft Institute for High Performance Computing in how early life influences the risk of later disease, The Institute was created in November 2005 and is the finding new markers of early risk and pioneering only one of its kind in the UK (the only other European new interventions. institute is in Stuttgart, Germany) and one of a total of nine institutes worldwide. Bill Gates, Microsoft National Oceanography Centre, Chairman, announced the creation of the Institute Southampton (NOCS) during his conference keynote speech at NOCS is a collaboration between the University and Supercomputing 2005 in Seattle. the Natural Environment Research Council. It is one Led by Professor Simon Cox and Dr Kenji Takeda in the School of Engineering Sciences, the Institute will push state-of-the-art technologies to tackle real-world scientific and engineering problems. Simon explains: “Our aim is to demonstrate why, where and how we are exploiting current and future Microsoft tools and technologies to make the engineering design process faster, cheaper and better.”

of the world’s leading centres for the development of marine technology and the provision of large-scale infrastructure and support for the marine research community. The Centre has strong links with a variety of businesses, including offshore industries (oil, gas and communications), environmental technology companies and government agencies (UK and overseas).

Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR)

Centre for Maritime Archaeology

ISVR is the world’s leading centre for research and teaching in the area of sound and vibration offering its own undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. It relies on external research contracts and grants for about two-thirds of its financial support, which comes from industry, research councils, government departments, the European Community and health authorities in the UK, Europe and across the world. Considerable emphasis is placed on cooperation and collaboration with these external bodies to ensure that research and teaching are directly related to the everyday needs of society. These industrial links are also important to graduates seeking employment and include many companies in the audio, automotive and consulting industries.

This flagship Centre is embedded in one of the largest and most successful archaeology departments in Europe. With high-performance computing facilities complementing sonar imaging and fluid flow measurement, researchers at the Centre have developed unique non-intrusive techniques to assess buried materials in the marine environment. Such work epitomises the modern maritime archaeology spearheaded at Southampton, integrating cutting-edge science with archaeological and historical investigation to provide a detailed window onto past societies.

In 2005, ISVR was awarded a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education ‘for improving the quality of life for the profoundly deaf and reducing noise pollution’. This honour reflects the successful integration of engineering and medical research in sound and vibration within the Institute. The Parkes Institute The Parkes Institute is a unique centre for the study of Jewish–non-Jewish relations across the ages. The Institute is made up of a community of scholars, curators, librarians, students and activists, whose work is based around the rich resources of the Parkes Library and archive, held in the Hartley Library. Through a combination of research, publications, teaching and conservation work, the Institute provides a world-class centre for the study of themes such as the experience of minorities and outsiders, and the examination of the power of prejudice from antiquity to the contemporary world.

18

The Centre works closely with NOCS on many international ventures, has active research projects on all five continents and collaborates with the world’s foremost research institutes, including Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the USA, and English Heritage here in the UK. The Centre also works with industry and government, including the Royal Navy, to develop innovative underwater technologies. Centre for Citizenship, Globalization and Governance (C2G2) The field of citizenship is changing in response to global forces and this brings new governance demands. Migration, human rights, issues of global warming, pandemics of ill health and a looming crisis in energy provision are challenges that cannot be contained or addressed within national boundaries. With participants from throughout the School of Social Sciences and the wider University, C2G2 merges insights from political science and international relations. The Centre focuses on the central political questions of today about power, cooperation, security, inequality and democracy. Much of the Centre’s agenda will be set by the problems of the political world as perceived by our fellow citizens, although it will continue to challenge traditional ideas.

Our flagship Centre for Maritime Archaeology works with industry and government, including the Royal Navy, to develop innovative underwater technologies.

World-class facilities

Undergraduate teaching at the University of Southampton is informed by our cutting-edge research. As an undergraduate student you will benefit from the world-class facilities that make Southampton one of the best learning environments in the UK.

Marine The National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) is situated in the revitalised dock area. A £49m joint project with the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), it is considered Europe’s finest, encompassing teaching, research and knowledge transfer facilities. Through its National Marine Wind tunnels Facilities Division, NOCS, which houses the School Southampton’s wind tunnels have an illustrious history, of Ocean and Earth Science, has a number of marine having been used by most of the current Formula One (F1) test facilities. Pressure testing facilities include teams since the 1980s. Superstars such as Adrian Newey, two pressure tanks and an acoustic test tank, while F1’s most successful car designer, began their careers in calibration facilities include temperature and pressure our wind tunnels. calibration equipment. Recent projects include working with UK Sport and the RV Callista is a 20m, custom-built catamaran used for world-beating British track cycling team, and developing research, outreach and teaching activities, particularly the Ferrari A1GP race car. The tunnels are used for yacht student fieldwork. With a robust A-frame mounted on design, sail design and aerodynamics testing, including the stern, the catamaran is also capable of deploying the Luna Rossa and Team New Zealand America’s equipment weighing three tonnes, essential for Cup teams. They are also used by the Airbus Noise commercial work. Technology Centre and aerospace companies. As one of the few universities in the world with such an Flight simulator extensive wind tunnel complex, we give students a unique The Southampton flight simulator is unique in the learning experience. Student projects have included the UK as it is being developed by students, for students. 2009 steam car world record, Bonneville 400 world F1 Originally funded by BAE Systems, it is a state-of-theland speed record car, unmanned air vehicles and the art facility that uses commodity-off-the-shelf Quicksilver world water speed record contender. technology (COTS). Dozens of third- and fourth-year Our graduates are prized by companies involved in group projects have been involved in developing the high-performance engineering. We probably supply hardware and software for the simulator over a decade. more aerodynamicists to the F1 industry than any other We collaborate closely with the Microsoft Flight university in the world. Many of our Ship Science Simulator team and have been part of their test and graduates go on to racing yacht and powerboat design. development programme for many years. It was famously used in the Channel4/Discovery Channel Sound and vibration documentary The Dambusters in 2003. The state-of-theThe Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR) art simulator is used extensively in the first-, third- and is the world’s leading centre for research and teaching fourth-year Aeronautics and Astronautics teaching in the area of sound and vibration. Laboratory facilities programmes, so all students are involved in flying and include reverberation chambers, a large anechoic developing it. For example, in the third year, teams of chamber and a loudspeaker listening room. Our unique students design a microlight aircraft from scratch, six-axis motion simulator reproduces transport which is then test flown in the flight simulator as part motion with high fidelity, allowing the study of human of the evaluation. The test pilot for this is John Farley, responses to combinations of the motion, acoustic and chief test pilot for the Harrier programme. Fourth-year thermal environment of transport. We also have a students are continuously developing the simulator simulator for the low-frequency motions causing itself, most recently installing an Airbus glass cockpit motion sickness, including those of tilting trains. for the left-hand seat and a Merlin helicopter cockpit for the right-hand seat.

21

Ensuring employability Employability is about more than just getting a job – we believe in helping our students gain the necessary experience for a future career, along with the skills to identify opportunities and take advantage of them. Our Graduate Passport helps students plan their involvement and gather evidence of their achievements. In an increasingly competitive global market, employers are looking for more than the technical skills and knowledge of a degree discipline. Whatever subject you study, employers are looking for enterprising individuals who can make ideas happen. We want to help you increase innovation, creativity and productivity in the UK and global marketplace. At Southampton, employers contribute to the curriculum in a variety of ways, such as through School industrial advisory boards and programme review panels, ensuring that the programme content is relevant and up-to-date, and that students are well positioned for their future careers. Many of the programmes involve representatives from industry in the delivery of the curriculum. Examples include providing technical lectures, industry case studies, project work to solve a real-life problem, and supporting field trips. These all help to enhance and enrich the programme content, and will help you to test your knowledge and experience in an applied way. The programme-specific pages of this prospectus provide you with a list of the types of careers that our graduates have entered. You will also find more details about our relationships with industry on the websites of many of our Academic Schools and at Career Destinations within the Student Services Centre.

advantage of the opportunity to get involved in placements in local schools and colleges through the Student Associate Scheme and the Undergraduate Ambassador Scheme. Through our Community Volunteering Scheme, we can arrange placements in local schools, clubs, sports centres and other voluntary organisations. We will give you the training you need, free of charge, so all you need to provide is your enthusiasm and your time. Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) Southampton is one of only six UK universities to accept students sponsored by the Ministry of Defence (MOD) on the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS). The DTUS offers scholarships to students wishing to pursue a technical, engineering or scientific career in one of the three armed services or the MOD civil service. More than 150 students at the University are now sponsored by the DTUS. Thunderer Squadron is part of the DTUS and is the military support unit for undergraduate engineering students who have committed to a career as an engineer/technical officer in the armed forces or civil service. Most Thunderers have passed the relevant officer selection board for their chosen service before starting at Southampton. However, it is possible to apply while at the University if you are completing a relevant degree and are successful at officer selection.

In return for their commitment, individuals receive an annual tax-free bursary, currently ÂŁ4,000, as well as training pay and a reserve forces bounty of approximately ÂŁ1,500. In addition, the scheme provides a valuable insight into military life during the semester break periods and numerous opportunities to pursue Make a difference free or heavily subsidised sporting and adventure training activities throughout the year. At Southampton you will have the opportunity to develop your career opportunities and skills by meeting www.thunderersquadron.mod.uk employers, undertaking volunteering activities, getting involved in student enterprise societies, taking up work placements and much more. Many of our students take

22

Seven members of Thunderer Squadron organised and participated in a two-day walking expedition in the Peak District. They camped wild in challenging weather conditions with high winds and low temperatures. This type of activity enables them to understand exactly what their future career in the armed forces may entail.

We have four campuses in Southampton, three of them next to Southampton Common – which stretches for 130 hectares – and one campus in nearby Winchester. Highfield

Winchester School of Art

Our main campus, in the north of the city, is home to the Students’ Union, the Jubilee Sports Centre, the Student Services Centre, the Hartley Library, the John Hansard Gallery, The Nuffield Theatre and Turner Sims. There is also a choice of cafés and restaurants, a shop, banks, a post office, a bookshop, a travel centre and a hair and beauty salon.

The School of Art, founded in 1863, became part of the University in 1996, and is located 12 miles north of Southampton, close to Winchester city centre. The campus provides purpose-designed studios and workshops, an extensive specialist library, Students’ Union facilities, a café and a well-stocked art supplies shop. The renowned Winchester Gallery is based on campus.

Avenue

Southampton General Hospital

A few minutes’ walk from Highfield, Avenue Campus houses most disciplines within the School of Humanities, and the Centre for Language Study. It has a library, lecture theatres, focused study spaces and catering amenities, plus a new £3m Archaeology building, with state-of-the-art facilities for teaching and research.

Three miles west of Highfield is the base for the University’s School of Medicine, at one of the country’s leading teaching hospitals. The campus offers modern laboratories, computer suites, newly refurbished lecture theatres, catering facilities and a specialist Health Services Library.

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton Located on the city’s waterfront, the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton is one of the world’s leading research centres for the study of ocean and earth sciences, and provides the focus for oceanography in the UK. The campus has its own fitness suite, sports hall and catering facilities.

Pictured opposite 1. Highfield 2. Avenue 3. National Oceonography Centre, Southampton 4. Winchester School of Art

24

1

2

3

4

Students’ Union Over 240 clubs and societies

Something for everyone... Uniplex cinema

Comedy nights

Whatever your interests, the Students’ Union (SUSU) organises a diverse range of events and activities to keep you entertained. SUSU is run by students, for students and you will automatically become a member when you join us. From live music, club nights, karaoke, comedy and international nights at SUSU’s Cube nightclub to reducedprice films at our on-site cinema, there is something for everyone. Freshers’ Week SUSU organises Freshers’ Week and the Bunfight during the first week of the academic year, with more than 240 clubs and societies vying for your membership. These include the Conservation Volunteers, Alternative Indie Music, Drama, Comedy, Circus, Breakdance, Astronomy, Motorcycle, Chinese and Mexican societies. If your particular hobby or interest is not represented, let us know and we can help you to start your own club.

Get involved SUSU also gives a voice to the student body. You can get involved with lobbying the University and the government, helping fellow students or working as a volunteer in the community. Getting involved is one of the best things you can do – it’s fun, you don’t need any previous experience and it looks great on your CV. Despite its name, the Athletic Union (AU) is not just for people who want to take part in track and field events. The AU offers more than 80 clubs, covering everything from paintballing and caving to archery and gliding. To explore the full range of what the AU has to offer, go to www.susu.org

26

SUSU facilities Most activities are held at the main SUSU complex on the Highfield Campus, where you will find: −− four bars, including the Bridge Bar, with live DJs, and the Stag’s Head pub, featuring Karaoke Kocktails every Thursday night −− SUSU café, open all day, serving hot and cold food, including organic and halal −− SUSU shop, with essentials such as food and stationery −− banks and cash machines −− travel centre −− hair and beauty salon −− campus market, with visiting traders bringing fresh fruit and vegetables, CDs and other goods −− 330-seat Uniplex cinema, showing recently released films at reduced prices −− the Cube, our main entertainment and events venue There are also Students’ Union facilities at our Winchester School of Art campus, where a lively bar hosts a range of events throughout the year. The campus also has its own sports and activities representative, and a number of flourishing clubs and societies. Find out more at http://wsa.susu.org

Find out more If you want a sneak preview of current and planned activities before you arrive, visit SUSU’s award-winning website www.susu.org Watch the latest events and news using our online TV service at www.susu.tv Tune in to our award-winning student radio station, SURGE Radio (1287 AM), or listen online at www.surgeradio.co.uk Read about the latest news and entertainment in our student-run paper, The Wessex Scene, online at www.wessexscene.co.uk

See for yourself:

University open days Saturday 3 July, Wednesday 8 September and Thursday 9 September 2010 Come along to one of our open days to see for yourself why we are such a popular choice with students from all over the world. You can wander around our impressive campuses, see our first-class facilities and attend a wide range of general and subject-specific events. Our students and staff will be on hand to give you more information about what it is like to live and learn here. If you are unable to make it to any of the open days, you might like to attend one of the campus tours that we run throughout the year. Current students lead guided tours around the main Highfield Campus and nearby halls of residence, so you can see the range of student facilities we offer. Book online for open days and campus tours at www.southampton.ac.uk/visit If you would like to visit an Academic School independently, please call and make an appointment. Contact details for our Academic Schools are listed at www.southampton.ac.uk/about/academicschools and on the relevant programme pages in this prospectus.

“The open day was an excellent day which was extremely informative. The event just confirmed my decision to apply to the University of Southampton.” The University’s UK Student Recruitment and Outreach team attend UCAS and higher education careers fairs every year. These events give you the chance to chat informally with our representatives and ask them any questions you have about living and studying here at Southampton. We also have a series of virtual tours on our website. For more information about the activities organised by the UK Student Recruitment and Outreach team, please see page 53 or go to

www.southampton.ac.uk/visit

27

Creativity on campus We support three of the UK’s most exciting arts venues, all located on our Highfield Campus, providing a rich and diverse mix of theatre, music and art activities and events to inspire and entertain. The School of Art, in Winchester, also hosts the Winchester Gallery.

Get involved If you want to get involved in the Performing Arts Union, the Southampton University Symphony Orchestra (SUSO) or any of the wide range of cultural clubs and societies at the University, visit the Students’ Union website at www.susu.org

John Hansard Gallery The Gallery enjoys a worldwide reputation for exciting and innovative shows by leading UK and international artists. Exhibitions range from painting and photography to video and installations, and the Gallery hosts regular seminars, talks and workshops. Free admission for all. www.hansardgallery.org.uk

Cities of culture Southampton and Winchester both have a vibrant arts scene and boast a rich variety of cultural attractions. As well as the cathedral, Winchester is home to arts centres, a cinema, two theatres and numerous museums and galleries. Southampton’s cultural attractions include:

The Nuffield Theatre Recognised as a major force in British theatre, The Nuffield is funded by Arts Council England and the University, among others, and creates award-winning productions that frequently tour internationally. The theatre runs a full programme of classics, new plays and studio performances, and hosts some of the finest touring companies and stand-up comedians. As a student at the University, you can usually buy tickets at a reduced price. www.nuffieldtheatre.co.uk Turner Sims At Turner Sims, one of the UK’s leading music venues, you can expect anything from New York jazz to African gospel choirs, virtuoso classical artists and traditional folk music. As a student you will benefit from discounted admission for most events. www.turnersims.co.uk The Winchester Gallery The Gallery is a public venue within our Winchester School of Art. It shows contemporary and international work and its programme has an emphasis on new media and photography. From time to time the programme includes material developed by the departments of the School of Art. www.winchestergallery.org.uk

The Mayflower The largest theatre in southern England, staging West End musicals, ballet, traditional pantomime, operatic productions, comedy acts and evenings with celebrities. City Art Gallery With more than 3,500 works of art, the gallery was described by The Independent as “one of the best places outside London to see British modern art and studio ceramics”. Museum of Archaeology The Museum traces the history of Southampton from its origins as a Roman town to the Victorian age.

For more information about arts and entertainment at the University and in the local area, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/arts&ents

Installation in the exhibition space of the John Hansard Gallery.

Sporting excellence Our impressive range of sporting facilities are among the best of any UK university. We have invested heavily in our Sport and Recreation Service (SportRec) to ensure that we can provide everything you need to develop your sporting abilities, or just to have fun – whatever your level of interest, experience or skill, from beginner to elite athlete. Our facilities The Jubilee Sports Centre is a state-of-the-art, £8.5m complex on the Highfield Campus. Facilities include: −−six-lane, 25m swimming pool −−split-level gym, with 160 fitness stations – one of the largest facilities of any UK university −−magnificent sports hall, with eight badminton courts or two netball/volleyball/basketball courts −−indoor climbing wall −−four squash courts −−martial arts studio −−multi-purpose studio and activity room −−second sports hall for five-a-side football, cricket, handball, Frisbee and roller hockey Our recently redeveloped outdoor sports complex, just three miles from Highfield, includes: −−floodlit, synthetic pitches for hockey and football −−20 grass pitches for winter and summer sports −−eight floodlit tennis courts −−training grids −−pavilion, with 24 changing rooms and a bar

Outreach facilities If you are based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, or living at Glen Eyre or Connaught halls of residence, you can also take advantage of on-site fitness facilities. The University offers a scheme for students based in Winchester, Basingstoke or the Isle of Wight to purchase membership at local authority sports centres and receive a partial rebate. The resulting fees are equivalent to the cost of SportRec membership. Sports bursaries The University Sports Bursary Scheme encourages students of outstanding sporting ability to develop their full academic and sporting potential through financial and training support. Previous bursary recipients competed at the 2004 and 2008 Olympics and the 2006 Commonwealth Games, bringing home a selection of medals. For information about the Talented Athlete Scholarship Scheme (TASS), please see page 44. Athletic Union The Athletic Union is part of the Students’ Union, and caters for around 80 sports clubs – both competitive and recreational, from beginners to national level. We provide excellent sporting activities for our 5,000 members at a subsidised cost. Off campus Southampton Sports Centre, close to Highfield, includes a dry ski slope, all-weather pitches, cross-country routes, athletics tracks and tennis courts. Southampton Municipal Golf Course is alongside, and has two courses and a practice ground. The Quays Eddie Read Swimming and Diving Complex also offers a range of activities.

We offer an unrivalled range of water sports, and have fostered Olympic competitors and British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) champions in sailing and windsurfing. We run a number of courses from our Boat Southampton Football Club plays at the purpose-built, Hard on the River Itchen. 35,000-seat St Mary’s Stadium, close to the city centre. Just a few miles from Southampton is The Rose Bowl, www.sportrec.southampton.ac.uk home to Hampshire Cricket Club, which hosts regular international games.

Libraries “Ranked sixth in the Russell Group for the provision of library services and resources.” National Student Survey, 2009 When you join the University, you automatically join all five University libraries, holding between them a total of 2.6 million books, journals and reports. The Reserve Collections containing key materials for course units are especially valuable to undergraduates. The libraries also provide access to a wide range of electronic books, journals and other resources which can be accessed from any computer linked to the internet. The Hartley Library is the largest library and has benefited from a recent £11m extension and refurbishment. Sited on the Highfield Campus, the Library includes a state-of-the-art learning centre which contains high-speed internet access, network points for laptops, a language study area, a café, and a lounge. The Library contains a variety of study areas, including a large number of group study spaces, and has wireless networking throughout. It houses the Special Collections, including the Wellington Papers, worldrenowned collections relating to Jewish history and culture, and the Ford Collection, an extensive collection of British Official Publications. The Assistive Technology Service, based at the Hartley Library, provides specialist services for users with disabilities.

32

The National Oceanographic Library is based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS). It is the UK’s most extensive collection of oceanographic literature, and is one of the largest marine science libraries in Europe. The Library provides resources for undergraduate and postgraduate programmes. There is a specialist art and design library at Winchester School of Art. It includes a range of specialist journals and books, exhibition catalogues, slides and audio-visual materials. It also houses specialist collections including artists’ books and the Knitting Reference Library. The Health Services Library is based at Southampton General Hospital. Materials held support staff and students in the School of Medicine and it also provides the wide range of material and services needed by the staff of Southampton University Hospitals Trust. The Avenue Library holds material placed in the Reserve Collection for students of the School of Humanities. Full details of all five libraries are available at www.southampton.ac.uk/library

Our teaching and research are supported by world-class facilities and learning environments.

Southampton & region Southampton is one of southern England’s top leisure and cultural destinations, offering a vibrant mix of recreation, culture and entertainment – from bars and nightclubs to restaurants, cafés, cinemas, arts and sporting venues.

open grassland and beautiful forests. You can walk, ride horses, paddle canoes, cycle cross-country or relax in a country pub. Alternatively, the sandy beaches of Bournemouth and Poole are just down the coast, and the Isle of Wight is only a ferry ride away.

A warm welcome Located on England’s south coast in the heart of Hampshire, we are situated in an outstanding location, just over an hour from central London and Heathrow Airport, and within easy reach of open countryside. This vibrant, cosmopolitan city provides a warm welcome to the 22,000 students who choose to make their home here, with more than 4,500 EU and international students from 130 countries joining this diverse and friendly environment.

Southampton hosts a number of festivals, including the Kite Festival and Art Asia Mela Festival. The Isle of Wight Festival is also within easy reach.

Outstanding location One of the greenest cities in southern England, our students love the many parks and green spaces around the University, including the huge Southampton Common, located right alongside three of our campuses. Our coastal location provides countless opportunities for sport and leisure. The marinas and waterfront bars and restaurants are great for a night out or a relaxing Sunday. The city also hosts the largest on-water boat show in Europe – the annual Southampton Boat Show. When you want a break from city life, you can head for the New Forest National Park, which is less than half an hour away. Ponies, deer and cows roam free in

Sport and leisure In addition to the University’s sporting activities, the city offers a range of options for sports enthusiasts. The waterfront provides plenty of opportunities for windsurfing, sailing, boating and diving, while the Quays Eddie Read Swimming and Diving Complex is the perfect place to take the plunge. There is also great live sporting action at Hampshire Cricket Club’s Rose Bowl, and at the superb St Mary’s Stadium, home to Southampton FC.

Shopping Southampton is a haven for retail therapy. WestQuay, one of the UK’s top 10 shopping centres, has all your high-street favourites in a single location. The city centre is bursting with quirky boutiques and an impressive number of designer stores – as well as plenty of choice if your budget is tight. A great night out Whether you are into the club scene or you just want a quiet evening, there is something for everyone in Southampton. The city is student friendly and every evening students fill the pubs and clubs – many of which offer good-value student nights. Clubs in Southampton offer a mix of music nights, but if you just want to unwind, head to Oxford Street in the city centre, which has a wide variety of restaurants,

as well as cosy cafés and lounge bars. Leisure World is an entertainment complex that features a 13-screen cinema, two nightclubs, a casino, bowling alley, bars and restaurants. For art-house films you can visit the Harbour Lights Picturehouse, located on the waterfront. Winchester Home to our School of Art, Winchester was once the capital of England and has a rich history. The city is proud of its eleventh-century cathedral, cultural heritage and lively atmosphere. The ancient city streets are always bustling, with a range of great shops. The city really comes alive with the Winchester Hat Fair street festival, featuring music, dance, cabaret and circus acts, and the Hi:Fi South dance festival plays host to a range of live acts and big-name DJs.

With 20 halls of residence, first-class facilities and a guaranteed offer of a room in halls in the first year*, it is no wonder our accommodation is so popular. We provide a wide range of accommodation options to help you settle in quickly and make the most of student life. Halls of residence Our halls vary in size, location, facilities and character, but they all offer the same high-quality accommodation in a safe, friendly and diverse environment. −− Most or all utility bills,** internet connection and uni-link bus pass are included in weekly cost of halls. −− No prepayment is required for first-year undergraduate students. −− There are laundry facilities in every hall of residence and food shops on site or close by.

Most dietary requirements can be catered for by prior arrangement. For more information about catering, go to www.catering.soton.ac.uk Our accommodation is normally mixed and students generally share facilities. However, we can offer accommodation shared by single-sex groups on request. Facilities across our halls of residence include shops, sports facilities, library, plus music and computer resource rooms.***

Our guarantee to you If you are a registered full-time, first-year undergraduate or international postgraduate student, you will be guaranteed an offer of halls accommodation if:

Accommodation

−− you submit an application for accommodation by 1 August in the year in which your studies commence −− A fast and frequent uni-link bus service runs between halls, teaching campuses, the city centre and transport hubs. −− you are unaccompanied and apply for single accommodation (ie you do not bring any dependants, −− Junior Common Room (JCR) committee and organised such as a partner or child) social and sporting events in every hall. − − you normally live outside the Southampton city boundary −− Residences Support staff are available to point students − − you make the us your firm choice in the right direction for any help they may need. They also facilitate communal living by ensuring that If you have made us your insurance choice, you will be students abide by hall regulations in a social, studyoffered accommodation in a twin share room for the conducive environment. A rota system provides start of term, as long as you meet the other terms of the out-of-hours cover. Residences Support staff are not guarantee. You will then be offered a single room as soon trained to deal with emergency situations: they will contact the appropriate services in such circumstances. as one becomes available; typically this would be within the first six weeks of term. −− Secure entry to halls, well-lit paths, walkways, CCTV For more information, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/ and security staff contribute to the safe environment accommodation/apply provided in our halls.

36

Hall facilities Accommodation in halls ranges from rooms sharing bathroom facilities, to en-suite rooms with a toilet and shower/bath. Our self-catered halls of residence have well-equipped communal kitchens. Alternatively, you can opt for part-catered accommodation and enjoy the benefits of breakfast and evening meals provided throughout the week, plus some meals at weekends. Part-catered students also have access to a communal kitchen.

* Subject to the conditions in ‘Our guarantee to you’, above. ** A small number of rooms require top-up electricity cards for additional power– the fees for these rooms are lower than other comparable rooms. *** Facilities vary across hall sites. Please see www.southampton.ac.uk/accommodation for further details.

Our halls of residence are friendly places to work and socialise.

Further information and costs Wessex Lane Halls Complex

Small Halls

Situated a 10-minute bus ride from the main Highfield Campus, Wessex Lane has the feel of a traditional student village housing 1,800 students. It has a vibrant social scene, a 24-hour reception, landscaped gardens and is well served by the uni-link bus service.

We have a number of Small Halls based around the city rather than in centralised hall complexes. All our Small Halls have comparable facilities to those on the two large hall complexes, but have their own style and character, and a close-knit community feel.

Wessex Lane Halls Complex Self-catered – fees 2009/10

Small Halls Self-catered – fees 2009/10

Room type

Rooms

Price*

Room type

Rooms Price*

Standard room

293

£71.40 to £75.95

Standard room

213

£75.95

Enhanced room

84

£86.45

Enhanced room

416

£86.45

En-suite room

414

£103.95

En-suite room

700

£101.85 to £103.95

Flat

75

Premium en-suite room

53

£107.45

£112.35 to £166.95

Part-catered – fees 2009/10 Standard room

115

£120.75

289

£103.95 to £116.55

Enhanced room

55

£128.80

En-suite room

43

£146.30

Part-catered – fees 2009/10 Standard room

Glen Eyre Halls Complex

Erasmus Park – Winchester

Situated in attractive landscaped surroundings, Glen Eyre houses over 2,000 students. It has a 24-hour reception, a shop and fitness suites, plus TV, computer and music rooms.

Ideally situated for our students studying in Winchester, Erasmus Park offers 378 rooms with en-suite facilities, all fitted with an internet connection and telephone. Erasmus Park is entirely self-catered, with each flat having a shared kitchen for food preparation. It enjoys the same high-quality facilities as our halls in Southampton, including communal areas, a launderette, TV room and bicycle storage facilities.

Glen Eyre Halls Complex Self-catered – fees 2009/10 Room type

Rooms

Price*

Standard room

283

£89.25

Enhanced room

146

£97.30

Premium room

314

£103.60

Erasmus Park – Winchester Self-catered – fees 2009/10

En-suite room

890

£112.35 to £114.80

Room type

Rooms

Price*

En-suite room

378

£103.95

Flat

99

£140.35 to £153.30

Standard room

263

£108.85 to £121.45

En-suite room

75

£147.35 to £152.95

Accommodation

Part-catered – fees 2009/10

38

*All prices are weekly

Through social activities in halls, students soon make new friends.

International students

Private rented accommodation

We guarantee an offer of a room in halls for all new, unaccompanied, non-EU international students for the full, normal duration of their course. To be eligible for your first year, you must apply by the deadline of 1 August in the year in which your studies begin. For subsequent years, you must apply by the published current student deadline – for more information see our website.

We advertise over 2,500 rooms in accredited properties in the Southampton and Winchester areas for students who wish to rent private accommodation. Students can access our dedicated private rented website www.sassh.co.uk after accepting an offer of a place to study at the University. We also provide a free and confidential advisory service covering all aspects of housing.

We encourage mature students to apply for a room in halls, although we appreciate that you may have different attitudes towards work and lifestyle from many of your fellow students. Please feel free to contact the Accommodation Service to discuss accommodation options.

Students with disabilities

Weekly rent for a room in a shared house in the private rented sector in Southampton or Winchester costs from ÂŁ65 per week, excluding bills such as water, electricity, gas and telephone.

Contacting us If you have any questions about accommodation, please contact us by telephone, fax, email or post. Alternatively, if you are in the local area, you are welcome to visit us in person at the Student Services Centre.

We provide a range of specially adapted accommodation for students with disabilities and we work closely with our Enabling Services (see page 51) to enhance and extend facilities. If you have a disability and would like to discuss your needs, please contact the Accommodation Service or Enabling Services.

For more information about accommodation options and residence fees, along with specific details about all our halls of residence and renting in the private sector, please go to www.southampton.ac.uk/accommodation

Couples and families

Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5959 Fax: +44 (0)23 8059 3959 Email: accommodation@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/accommodation

Most students have single study bedrooms. In addition to rooms in our halls of residence, we have a limited number of flats and houses for couples and families. If you are planning to bring your partner and/or any children to the University, please let us know when you apply for accommodation.

Keep checking the accommodation website for details of the latest halls fees.

Accommodation

Mature students

39

International students

We are fully aware of the needs of international students: we make student entry straightforward, offer attractive scholarships, help you settle in to your new life and advise you on all aspects of living in the UK.

40

In 2009/10 we welcomed around 4,500 EU and international students from more than 130 countries. With a global reputation for excellence in research and teaching, we are part of a network of university partnerships stretching around the globe.

Meet us in your country

We are one of only a few UK universities to guarantee non-EU international students accommodation in halls for the full normal duration of their course. If you are an EU student, you are guaranteed accommodation for the first year of study, provided you: −−are a new student at the University −−apply by the deadline of 1 August in the year in which your studies begin −−are unaccompanied

For full details of locations and timings of our overseas visits, please contact the International Office or visit our website.

“No worries about bills and guaranteed security, plus the hall’s conducive environment helps me to fit in and feel comfortable in the whole new world of the UK. Feeling safe inspires and motivates me in my studies.” Siti Saleha Basri, second-year BSc Accountancy and Finance student

www.southampton.ac.uk/international

The International Office

Courses

Staff from our International Office make numerous visits overseas and to colleges in the UK. We provide advice and information to anyone who is considering applying to Southampton. Our aim is to make the process of joining the University as simple as possible.

The University offers a number of programmes specifically designed to meet the needs of international students. These include:

You will find a quick introduction to the University on our website. This is translated into 21 languages, with more being added on a regular basis. Each translation is available to view as a web page (HTML) or to download as a PDF. Go to www.southampton.ac.uk/international/translations

−− English programmes: a variety of pre-sessional and intensive English language programmes if you need extra tuition before starting your course

You can also view web pages dedicated to more than 30 specific countries, with information about entry requirements, details of student societies at the University, overseas representatives and other useful links. www.southampton.ac.uk/international/countrypages

We attend education exhibitions around the world, most of them organised by the British Council. Face-to-face contact is the best way of getting to know the University, so if you are unable to visit us in Southampton, make sure that you book an appointment to meet us at one of the exhibitions.

www.southampton.ac.uk/international

Applying We are experienced in dealing with applications from international students and are familiar with qualifications from around the world. Undergraduate students (studying for a bachelor’s degree) need to apply through UCAS and can find details about programme and entry requirements on our website.

Alternatively, contact the International Office or one of our many overseas representatives listed on our website. The British Council has offices around the world and your local British Council office will also be able to offer advice about applying.

−− Foundation programmes: one-year bridging programmes to prepare you for a wide range of undergraduate degrees

−− study abroad and exchange opportunities: one-semester and one-year opportunities to study degree programmes at the University in a wide range of subject areas

Southampton is a vibrant city that offers something for every culture.

English language requirements

Welcoming our international students

For the majority of our courses we require an IELTS level of 6.5 or equivalent, achieved in the past two years. For more specific details about individual course requirements and exemptions, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/international or see page 47 in this prospectus.

Before leaving home and arriving in the UK, there are a number of things you should do to prepare for university life. This includes having the right papers, filling in forms and registering for various services and programmes. Make sure you read our information for international students at www.international.susu.org, which offers help and advice on documentation and registering for various services and programmes. If you have any doubts or questions, please contact the International Office and we will be more than happy to help you.

Before you come to study in the UK, it is essential that you find out about the UK’s immigration procedures and how they will affect you. You should do this well in advance of your arrival in the UK. Our website provides information on student visas, police registration, working in the UK and links to other useful websites. www.southampton.ac.uk/visas

“On weekends I enjoy the peaceful walks in the parks in Southampton. It helps me de-stress after a busy week in School.” Wei Kiat Tang, second-year BSc Occupational Therapy student Scholarships We offer a large number of subject-specific scholarships for courses at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. These are based on academic merit and vary depending on the subject or department. For example, the School of Mathematics offers £1,000 for every A grade achieved at A level if you choose to study BSc Mathematics with Actuarial Studies at the University. For more information, and to find out which organisations offer funds to help international students with their studies in the UK, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/intscholarships

Meet and Greet The Meet and Greet service from London Heathrow Airport is provided free of charge and is designed to get you to the University in time for the International Welcome Programme. You can register for both the service and the programme from June 2010 on our website. www.southampton.ac.uk/welcome

International Welcome Programme The International Welcome page on our website will help you to prepare your own individual checklist of things to do and tell you about our welcome arrangements for international students. www.southampton.ac.uk/welcome In September each year, we arrange an International Welcome Programme. This is designed to help international students settle in to life at the University. The programme includes general events to introduce you to our facilities, Faculty and School events to begin your academic induction, and a range of social and cultural activities. During the programme we encourage you to meet other undergraduate students and have a look around the city and the University, so that you will know where to worship, shop and relax during your time here. You will meet current international students who have been through the same experience and will be able to give you lots of good advice. When our UK students arrive, you will be ready to get involved in Freshers’ Week before the serious work begins. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 9699 Email: global@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/international www.southampton.ac.uk/visas

International students

Visas

41

Here you will find the latest information on fees, loans and financial support, so you can work out how much it will cost and what help is available. Full-time UK/EU student fees 2010/11

International student fees 2011/12

Fees for full-time UK/EU students: £3,290

All programmes (including Foundation Year) in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences and the School of Mathematics: £10,820

The following programmes have exceptions to the standard tuition fee:

All programmes (including Foundation Year) in Engineering, −− BSc Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Podiatry: Science, first- and second-year Medicine, Health and Life students are exempt from fees as these are paid by the Sciences: £13,840 Department of Health Third-, fourth- and fifth-year Medicine: £25,500 −− Nursing programmes: students are exempt from fees as these are paid by the NHS −− Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care: at present, students are exempt from fees as these are paid by the Workforce Development Confederation. If this arrangement ceases, the maximum fee will be equivalent to £3,290 per year

Part-time UK/EU student fees 2009/10 UK/EU students (minimum): £805 Please note: the fee quoted above is for entry in 2009 and may be subject to an inflationary increase. For more details on tuition fees for part-time students, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

Channel Islands/Isle of Man student fees 2009/10 Price group A – clinical courses: £23,479 Price group B – science, engineering and technology courses: £10,498 Price group C – other high-cost programmes with a studio base, laboratory or fieldwork element: £8,240 Price group D – all other programmes: £6,547

Fees & loans

Please note: fees quoted above are for entry in 2009

42

Fees are set by the islands’ governments and UK universities are typically notified of the levels in the spring prior to the academic session in which students commence their course. Full details about the price groups can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

Which fees apply to me? The University is required to classify your fees status in accordance with the Education (Fees and Awards) (England) Regulations 2007 and the Student Fees (Qualifying Courses and Persons) (England) Regulations 2007. The amount you will have to pay depends on a number of criteria, details of which are available from the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA), which provides free advice and information to international students studying in the UK. Publicly funded institutions charge two levels of fee: the lower ‘home’ fee and the higher ‘overseas’ fee. There are certain categories of students who must be charged the ‘home’ fee. More information is available at www.ukcisa.org.uk Overseas (international) fees apply if you do not meet the criteria for UK/EU (home) fees. Note: All figures quoted in this section may be subject to change.

When planning your finances, you will need to take into account the costs of living. These will vary, depending on a range of factors, such as whether you live in catered or self-catered halls of residence, private rented accommodation or with your parents/carers. Typical costs include: −− accommodation −− phone calls −− utility bills −− transport

The maximum rates for the Student Loan for Maintenance for 2010/11 are: Living at home

Living away from home

Maximum Student Loan for Maintenance

£3,838

£4,950

72% not income assessed

£2,763

£3,564

28% income assessed

£1,075

£1,386

Maximum if receiving £2,381 £2,906 Maintenance Grant

£3,453

−− laundry

Additional support

−− socialising

Depending on your personal circumstances (eg your household income), you may also be eligible for:

−− personal expenditure In addition to tuition fees, you will need to consider course costs such as books, field trips, studying abroad and any extra materials and equipment you may need for your studies. For more information about living and course costs, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/livingcosts

Entering higher education for the first time Financial support: If you are a full-time UK student starting a higher education course in 2010/11, you can apply for loans to help pay for both fees and maintenance:

−− a non-repayable Maintenance Grant or Special Support Grant −− one of our bursaries or scholarships (see page 44) Additional help is available if you have: −− a disability or specific learning difficulty −− dependent children or adults You only begin to repay your student loan after you finish your course and are earning more than £15,000 a year (or the monthly or weekly equivalent).

−− Student Loan for Fees

Temporary work

−− Student Loan for Maintenance

If you would like a temporary job to help with your living costs, our Temp Bank service advertises part-time, temporary jobs available within the University. For further details, email tempbank@southampton.ac.uk

Student loans are issued by Student Finance England on behalf of the government – they are not commercial loans. Interest is charged on a student loan from the date you receive it to the date you pay it off. The interest charged is linked to the rate of inflation, so the amount you repay is the same in real terms as the amount you borrow. Student Loan for Fees: If you are a full-time UK/EU student, you will not have to pay any tuition fees before or during your studies. Instead, you can take out a Student Loan for Fees. You can borrow up to £3,290 for the academic year 2010/11 to cover the full cost of tuition fees. The amount you receive does not depend on your financial circumstances. Student Loan for Maintenance: If you are a full-time UK student you can take out a Student Loan for Maintenance to help with living costs. The amount you can borrow depends on: −− your level of income and household income −− where you study −− whether you live with your parents during your course You are entitled to about 72 per cent of the loan regardless of your household income and can apply for some or all of the remainder depending on your income. Higher loan rates are available if you live away from home.

Careers Destinations also has an online job shop. For more information go to www.southampton.ac.uk/careers and click on ‘e-jobs’. Please note: international students are allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during term time according to student visa regulations.

Further information The following websites provide information about all aspects of student finances: www.southampton.ac.uk/livingcosts – get help estimating your university living costs www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance – useful information about student finance in general Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 9599 Email: ssc@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/fees www.southampton.ac.uk/livingcosts

Fees & loans

Living costs

43

We have more than £4m for scholarship and bursaries in 2009/10, rewarding academic excellence with scholarships and offering bursaries to those in most financial need. Scholarships We offer a variety of scholarships and progression awards to the most talented students in all subject areas. Scholarships are available to undergraduates studying the following programmes: −− Art: Fine Art, Graphic Arts, Fashion Marketing −− Biological Sciences: Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology, Zoology −− Chemistry −− Civil Engineering and the Environment: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Environmental Sciences

www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships www.southampton.ac.uk/intscholarships

Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme See page 22 for details.

−− Electronics and Computer Science: Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Electromechanical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Technology in Organisations

www.thunderersquadron.mod.uk

−− Geography

Scholarships & bursaries

You do not need to apply separately for a scholarship as a decision will be made by the University on the basis of your application and qualifications. Please refer to the Academic School for full eligibility criteria.

−− Education: Post-Compulsory Education, Sport Studies

−− Engineering Sciences: Aeronautics and Astronautics, Mechanical Engineering, Ship Science

44

−− Social Sciences: Anthropology, Applied Social Sciences, Criminology, Criminology and Psychological Studies, Economics, Politics and International Relations, Population Sciences, Social Work, Sociology and Social Policy.

−− Humanities: Archaeology, Languages and Contemporary European Studies, English, Film, French, German, History, Linguistics and Language Studies, Music, Philosophy, Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies −− Institute of Sound and Vibration Research: Acoustical Engineering, Acoustics and Music

Talented Athlete Scholarship Scheme (TASS) TASS is a scheme that supports elite athletes who wish to progress with a formal academic course and maintain an involvement in performance sport. Students are selected by the National Governing Body of their sport and the funding is channelled through the university where students are based. Since the scheme was introduced in 2004, the University has supported more than 150 athletes through this programme. Further information is available at www.tass.gov.uk

−− Law

Bursaries

−− Management: Accounting and Finance, Management, Management Sciences, Management with Entrepreneurship

In addition to our scholarship programme, we offer a range of bursaries designed to help UK undergraduate students in the most financial need. On average, a third of our students receive a bursary.

−− Mathematics −− Medicine

You may be eligible if you fulfil the following criteria:

−− Ocean and Earth Science: Geology, Geophysics, Marine Biology, Oceanography

−− you are a new, full-time UK undergraduate student −− you are not already receiving an NHS bursary

−− Physics and Astronomy

−− your household income is £25,000 or less per year (bursary = £1,200 for every year of full-time registration to which the £3,225 tuition fee applies)

−− Psychology

You should apply for these bursaries when you apply for your statutory funding. Bursaries are paid in January.

Hampshire and Isle of Wight bursary We offer up to 150 bursaries each year to first-year students from minority groups who, at the time of application, were living in or studying at a further education college or school sixth form in Hampshire and on the Isle of Wight. We allocate these bursaries on a competitive basis and you must meet certain criteria. You can apply if you are:

Allowances and grants If you have dependants, are a single parent and/or have a disability, you may also be entitled to a grant to help meet certain living costs. −− If you are a parent, you can apply for a Parents’ Learning Allowance and Childcare Grant, together with the Child Tax Credit. −− If you have a disability, you will be eligible for an allowance to pay for non-medical help, specialist equipment, general costs relating to your disability and extra travel costs. The Disabled Students’ Award is the only award that is not means-tested.

−− a new, full-time UK undergraduate student

www.southampton.ac.uk/fees

−− living and/or studying at a sixth-form or further education college in Hampshire or on the Isle of Wight (or with a postcode in the Hampshire and Isle of Wight area)

Access to Learning Fund

−− a UK resident (excluding the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man)

It can be used to help with living costs including childcare, disability, travel, accommodation, household expenses, books and course equipment. Full-time ‘home’ undergraduate students and part-time students studying at least 50 per cent of a full-time course can apply.

−− living in a household with a total income of less than £35,000 −− not already receiving an NHS bursary

School of Medicine bursaries Every year our School of Medicine offers 30 maintenance bursaries, worth £1,000, to students on the Bachelor of Medicine six-year programme (BM6). This programme is aimed at widening access to the study of medicine.

This Fund provides discretionary financial support for those able to demonstrate genuine financial hardship.

If you fall within one of the following groups you will be a priority for help from the Access to Learning Fund: −− students with children, especially lone parents −− mature students, especially those with existing financial commitments

Sports bursaries

−− disabled students, especially where the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) is unable to meet particular costs and the institution has no legal responsibility to do so

See page 30.

−− care leavers

Other funding

−− students from the Foyer Federation or who are homeless

Maintenance grants

−− a parental income of £25,000 or less per year = a grant of £2,906 per year

The Access to Learning Fund cannot help students meet the cost of tuition fees, or help those who have mismanaged their finances and simply run out of money. It cannot compensate for the lack of parental contribution, especially where a student has only been able to take the non-means-tested element of the Student Loan.

−− a parental income between £25,000 and £50,020 per year = a partial grant

Note: All figures quoted in this section are for 2010/11, unless otherwise stated, and may be subject to change.

The government has introduced a UK Maintenance Grant for new, full-time UK students. The maximum amount available is £2,906, but the actual amount will depend on your income/household income:

−− a parental income of £50,020 or more = no grant −− if you are awarded the full £2,906 maintenance grant and are on a programme of study charging the full £3,225, you will also be eligible for a University bursary A maintenance grant does not need to be paid back.

−− final-year students

Scholarships & bursaries

−− your household income is between £25,001 and £35,000 (bursary = £600 for every year of full-time registration to which the £3,290 tuition fee applies)

45

Our aim is to select students who we believe have the potential to complete their chosen course successfully and who can make a valuable contribution to university life. We are committed to making our admissions fair and transparent. Higher education at Southampton is open to all students with the necessary skills and ability, regardless of age, background or financial circumstances.

Mature students

Merit and potential By considering the whole application, we assess each applicant’s merit and potential. Potential factors include: formal educational achievement; the educational context in which the applicant achieved their formal qualifications; indicators of potential and capability, such as subject-specific tests, interview, non-academic experiences and other relevant skills; how an applicant’s experiences, skills and perspectives could contribute to the learning environment, such as paid or unpaid work experience, gap-year experience, home responsibilities, experience of diverse communities or cultures, and musical or sporting abilities.

The journey to your degree

Young students

46

make reasonable, proportionate adaptations to activities, including learning activities and accommodation. However, if we judge that the adaptations necessary to safeguard a young student go beyond what is reasonable, we cannot admit them. For more information, visit our website.

We do not have a minimum age of entry for our courses and welcome applications from younger students, including those who will be under 18 when they come to study with us. Because some of our applicants are under 18, we assess the risk to the young student’s wellbeing and

If you are over 21 (23 for Law) and feel you would benefit from degree-level studies, we can be more flexible about our entry requirements. For full-time courses, selectors will expect you to demonstrate your commitment by means of some recent serious study, for example, one or two GCE A level passes, successful completion of an Open University foundation course or an appropriate Access course. Your application will be considered on individual merit and you may be asked to attend an interview to assess your potential.

Entry qualifications We acknowledge a wide range of entry qualifications. The table below gives a general comparison for popular UK qualifications. If you are studying for other qualifications, more information is available at www.southampton.ac.uk/apply The University also welcomes international applicants with country-specific qualifications. For more details, visit www.southampton.ac.uk/international/entry_reqs

Qualification GCE A level requirement BTEC requirement * OCR national extended diploma requirement * Scottish Higher (Scottish Advanced Higher)

Typical standard offer AAA AAB DDD DDD D1 D1

ABB DDM D2

BBB DDM M1

BBC DMM M2

AAAA(AA)

AABB(AB)

ABBB(BB)

BBBB(BC)

BBBC(BC)

Irish Leaving Certificate at Higher Level Welsh Baccalaureate requirements International Baccalaureate (points from subjects taken at Higher Level)

A1,A1,A1,A1,A1,A1

A1,A1,A1,A1,A1,A2 A1,A1,A1,A1,A2,A2 A1,A1,A2,A2,A2,B1 A1,A2,A2,A2,B1,B1

Pass the core plus AA in the options Pass, with overall score of 36 (18)

Pass the core plus AB in the options Pass, with overall score of 34 (17)

Pass the core plus BB in the options Pass, with overall score of 32 (16)

Pass the core plus BB in the options Pass, with overall score of 30 (16)

Pass the core plus CC in the options Pass, with overall score of 28 (16)

*This is a guide only to the achievement required where the guided learning hours have been assessed to cover the same learning outcomes as their GCE A level counterparts; additional study may be required.

You will need to satisfy our general entrance requirements (which you will find on our website at www.southampton. ac.uk/apply) and those of your chosen Academic School. Typical entry requirements for applicants with GCE A levels can be found on individual programme pages. We will consider a 14–19 Advanced Diploma at level 3 as part of our general entry requirements. However, not all Diploma subjects will be acceptable for entry to every discipline and applicants will probably be expected to take specific additional or specialist learning components of the Diploma in order to satisfy course-specific entry requirements. For more information, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/apply

Alternative requirements Applicants are advised to contact the admissions tutors at individual Academic Schools for definitive programme requirements. Test of English for Educational Purposes (TEEP) (University of Reading, grade 6.5 throughout) Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (grade C or above) Cambridge International Examinations English O level (used in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore) (grade C or above) Certificate in Advanced English (Cambridge) (grades A–B) Certificate of Attainment in English (London) (levels 5–6)

English language requirements

GCE O level or GCSE in English (grade C or above)

If English is not your first language, you will need to reach a satisfactory standard in an approved English language test. This is to demonstrate that you have sufficient command of both written and spoken English to enable you to enjoy the full benefits of your proposed degree programme. The required qualification in English language will usually have been obtained within the past two to three years. Tests currently approved are listed below. British Council/Cambridge IELTS, TOEFL and internet-based TOEFL are usually acceptable at the following grade/score levels: Usual requirement IELTS**

TOEFL paperbased test

Internet-based TOEFL

6.5

580

92

IGCSE English as a Second Language (used in Cyprus, the Middle East and Argentina) (grade C or above) JMB University Entrance Test in English for Speakers of Other Languages (pass) Warwick Higher Education Foundation Programme (55 per cent) Northern Consortium of British Universities (NCUK) EAP English for Academic Purposes UK (grade B) Language Specialists International (LSI) – Presessional English language courses delivered by LSI in Portsmouth (IELTS equivalent) Successful completion of a presessional course offered by the University’s Centre for Language Study

The following qualifications are also acceptable:

IELTS**

TOEFL paperbased test

Internet-based TOEFL

5.5

527

71

Studio-based programmes at Winchester School of Art IELTS**

TOEFL paperbased test

Internet-based TOEFL

6.0

553

81

Law LLM, Bachelor of Medicine, BSc Occupational Therapy, BSc Physiotherapy, BSc Podiatry*** IELTS**

TOEFL paperbased test

Internet-based TOEFL

7.0

617

105

**IELTS qualification must include the academic reading and writing modules. Although the overall grade is stated, requirements for the particular components of listening, reading, writing and speaking may vary. ***For the full list of programmes with these English language requirements, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/ international/entry_reqs

−− German Abitur, with a minimum score of 11 out of 15, or 2 out of 6, in English Language as a Leistungskurs −− European Baccalaureate with a minimum 7.5 in English as the First Foreign Language L2 or First Foreign Language – Advanced L2A −− International Baccalaureate, (Syllabus A1: grade 4 at either higher or standard level; Syllabus A2: grade 5 at higher level or grade 5 at standard level where the International Baccalaureate subjects have been studied through the medium of English; Syllabus B: grade 5 at higher level) −− India English Exam for CBSE and ISC exam boards, with a minimum score of 70 per cent −− Nigeria Year 12 Certificate in English (West African Examinations Council) (grade C6 and above) −− Norwegian Vitnemål, with a minimum score of 4 in English www.southampton.ac.uk/international/entry_reqs

The journey to your degree

Foundation year programmes

47

How to apply Apply online at www.ucas.com, the website for UCAS, the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. Our UCAS code name is SOTON and our number is S27. All students should apply between 1 September 2010 and 15 January 2011. If you are an international student from outside the UK or EU, we may consider your application up until 30 June 2011. However, we cannot guarantee there will be vacancies on our courses after the January deadline; we advise you to apply as early as possible and to check with the University that there are vacancies still available before you apply. If you are interested in studying Medicine, the closing date for all applications is 15 October 2010.

Criminal records and Criminal Records Bureau disclosures The aim of the admissions process is to select students who have the ability and motivation to benefit from the course they intend to follow, and who will make a contribution to the life of the University. This takes place within the context of the University’s equal opportunities policy, which aims to ensure that no prospective student should receive less favourable treatment on any grounds that are not relevant to academic ability and attainment. It is important that this aim is achieved without prejudice to the safety and wellbeing of other members of the University community, and it is possible that there may be occasions when this aim has to be placed ahead of all other considerations.

The journey to your degree

Applicants are asked to read the guidance on the UCAS Apply website and answer the criminal conviction question truthfully. Please note that declaration of relevant criminal convictions will not necessarily prevent an applicant from entry to a course.

48

We require Criminal Records Bureau disclosures for some of our programmes of study, typically where contact with children and/or vulnerable adults occurs. We reserve the right to refuse to admit an individual to certain programmes of study, where the disclosure reveals information that would preclude them from participating in a placement or other learning activity required for successful completion of the programme. Our policy and procedures which govern how we handle applications from individuals with criminal convictions or a criminal record, and how we handle Criminal Records Bureau disclosures, can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/calendar/sectioniv

What happens next? UCAS will send you an acknowledgement and forward your application to the University, where the admissions tutor and others in the Academic School you have chosen will consider your application carefully. You will normally hear back from us within six weeks.

Personal statement The personal statement is your chance to impress. Many people with good grade predictions and good GCSEs will be applying for the same course as you, so you need to use this space to show why you deserve to be offered a place at the university of your choice. Get ideas from your teachers, parents, friends and websites, but make sure that the statement you submit is your own. To help you start thinking about what you will write, here are some ideas: −− Why are you interested in a particular course? Try to give reasons and support them with evidence; avoid sweeping statements, such as ‘I have always had an interest in physics’, without anything to back them up. −− Include relevant work experience and the skills you have acquired. −− Include your career aspirations, ideally related to the course you want to study. This shows commitment to the subject area. −− Include hobbies and interests, especially if you are in a position of responsibility or they are related to the degree course you are applying for. Again, it might be a good idea to talk briefly about the skills you have gained from these activities. −− What do you hope to get from university? This is a good chance to mention any societies or activities you plan to become involved in, including areas that are completely new to you as well as those where you are already active. −− Any other information that supports your application or shows that you are likely to be successful on the course. −− Try to have a strong concluding paragraph. You could try summing up the type of person you are – words that convey qualities such as being organised, self-disciplined and committed might be appropriate.

Remember The UCAS Apply website times out after one hour, so it is easier to cut and paste the statement into your application. −− Get someone (or several people) to check your personal statement – spelling/grammar mistakes do not give a good impression. −− Many universities/courses will not interview you before making you an offer, so your UCAS application might be the only chance you get to impress them. −− Regularly ‘save’ while completing your application and personal statement. −− Never lie. −− Try to avoid some common mistakes: putting the wrong date of birth; entering incorrect university or course codes; not completing all the sections of the form. −− Take your time and make sure your application is complete and accurate.

In the 2008 assessment by the Quality Assurance Agency, which monitors standards of teaching in the UK, we were awarded the highest level of achievement for the standard of our educational provision.

Learning and teaching methods

For most of our courses, teaching is usually timetabled from 9am to 6pm on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 9am to 1pm on Wednesdays.

Independent learning These methods help support your independent learning. The ability to work and learn independently is essential for university study and is expected by employers when you graduate. At Southampton you will be challenged to develop your independent learning skills, and you will receive both academic and personal support from appropriate staff.

Blending innovative approaches with established techniques, we offer a variety of specialist learning and teaching methods – including ocean- and land-based field trips, laboratory study, excavations, private and public sector placements, and interprofessional group work – all of which are supported by virtual learning environments. Depending on your choice of study, you may experience some of these specialist methods, and some or all of the key methods outlined below.

In the 2009 Student Experience Questionnaire, our students rated their ability to learn independently with a score of 4.3 out of 5 – an excellent result.

You will be taught by staff working at the forefront of their fields, ensuring that you receive the kind of education that will give you a competitive edge in the employment market and put you among the most sought-after graduates.

We use a variety of assessment methods in different disciplines. Typically, assessment includes a mixture of exams, coursework, presentations, group work and a final-year project or dissertation.

Traditionally, learning and teaching takes place face-toface in a variety of ways.

The feedback you receive on your assessments is a vital tool to help your personal learning and development. It takes a variety of forms, from individual written comments to dedicated group sessions. You will also exchange valuable feedback with your fellow students.

−− Lectures introduce new ideas and key concepts, and are the backbone of many courses. Lectures may bring together groups of students from different courses. −− Seminars, typically of 15 to 20 students, are used to explore ideas in greater depth, through lively and interactive discussion. −− Tutorials consist of even smaller groups, with your tutor providing guidance on the detailed study of specialised topics and you playing a key role in the discussion and debate.

Assessment Assessment helps you learn and develop a range of skills to prepare you for your future. As well as testing your understanding, assessments enable your tutors to evaluate your progress.

The journey to your degree

We are particularly proud of our working relationship with our students and we were praised for this and for the way in which feedback is used to improve the student learning experience. Having heard the feedback from our students, we are gradually introducing exciting changes to our programmes to enable students to more effectively tailor their degree to meet their needs. These changes will give our students the maximum advantage in today’s global careers market.

49

From the moment you arrive, we will provide you with all the support and advice you will need to make the most of your life here. Specialist staff will be happy to offer guidance on a host of issues, from fees and study to careers advice. Our commitment to widening participation, and our extensive range of bursaries, scholarships and other awards, means that higher education here at Southampton is open to all students with the necessary skills and ability, regardless of age, background or financial circumstances.

Assistive Technology Service

Accommodation

For information about our campuses, see page 24.

For information about our range of accommodation, see page 36.

Career Destinations

Alumni As a Southampton graduate, you will join a worldwide community of 160,000 alumni. In addition to the benefits of contact with past, present and future graduates, this global community provides access to University facilities, invitations to reunions and significant networking opportunities. www.southampton.ac.uk/alumni

Directory of services

Ancillary Learning Support Service

50

The Ancillary Learning Support Service, which is based in Enabling Services, provides learning support if you have a disability or health condition and need additional assistance with your academic tasks. This support is tailored to meet your individual needs and includes note taking, library support, readers, exam scribes, general assistance and buddying to help you settle in to life on campus. You must be referred through Enabling Services or Dyslexia Services. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2441 Email: learningsupport@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/als

Applying For information about applying to the University, see page 46.

If you have a specific learning difficulty or disability, the Assistive Technology Service can provide: −− enhanced computers and specialised software −− specialist advice on the use of IT www.southampton.ac.uk/ats

Campuses

Career Destinations provides guidance and information to all Southampton students, graduates and alumni. Whether you need advice on maximising your graduate skills, or finding the best jobs and opportunities at home or globally, Career Destinations can give you the assistance you need. Specialist teams offer careers advice and can put you in touch with employers, alumni and other organisations to support your learning and personal development. www.southampton.ac.uk/careers

Centre for Language Study With the Centre for Language Study (CLS) you can choose from up to 20 languages which you can study as a component of your degree, as a part-time evening course or in a lunchtime taster session. Languages on offer include: Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, English as a foreign language, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Modern Greek, Modern Hebrew, Danish and Swedish. We also offer in-sessional and pre-sessional English language support classes for students whose first language is not English. You can also study independently in the Language Resource Centre (LRC) at the Avenue Campus, where you can access the latest multimedia technologies, including digital download, recording and playback facilities. Increasingly, however, we are making learning resources available for remote access online.

www.southampton.ac.uk/cls

Counselling Service The University offers a confidential counselling service for all members of our community. Professionally qualified counsellors are available to help you manage any academic or personal difficulties you might experience. Our counsellors are trained to work in ways that respect and value individual differences. No matter how big or small a difficulty seems to be, the Counselling Service is there to help you. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3719 Email: counser@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/counsel

Doctors and dentists At Southampton we make your health and wellbeing a priority. There are two health practices based at the Highfield Campus, both offering NHS practitioners. However, there are several local practices where you may prefer to register. Full-time international students who are in the UK for longer than six months are entitled to free health coverage under the NHS. You can find a full list of doctors and dental surgeries online at one of the following websites. www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk www.unidocs.co.uk www.highfieldhealth.nhs.uk

Dyslexia Services Dyslexia Services offers advice and support if you have dyslexia or other learning differences, such as dyspraxia. Screening and full assessments can be arranged. Trained dyslexia tutors can provide individual study skills tutorials and make recommendations for special examination arrangements. It is essential that you register with Dyslexia Services to organise any special examination arrangements. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2759 Email: dyslexia@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/dyslexiaservices

Enabling Services Enabling Services is a useful resource if you have a disability or health condition. We offer a wide range of services and facilities tailored to meet your individual needs. We can help with: −− accessing and applying for additional funding, for example the Disabled Students’ Allowance −− arranging academic support, such as additional exam requirements −− equipment loans −− transport and access issues The service also provides specialist support if your academic studies are being affected by health problems, including medical conditions and mental health difficulties. Mentor support is confidential, but, if needed, we can help you liaise with your academic department about extenuating circumstances and possible adjustments to exams or coursework deadlines. Mentors also offer support with workload organisation and planning, motivation and morale, as well as study skills. Please contact us for more information, to discuss your support needs or to arrange a visit. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7726 Email: mentors@southampton.ac.uk (mentoring enquiries) or enable@southampton.ac.uk (disability enquiries) www.southampton.ac.uk/edusupport

Directory of services

Other resources in the LRC include foreign language newspapers and magazines, satellite TV, off-air recordings, reference materials, language course books and language learning software. If you would like individual help for your language learning from a language advisor, we can offer both face-to-face and online support.

51

First Support Team

Nightline

The First Support Team is dedicated to being the first Our student-run Nightline service provides emotional point of contact and support for students during times of support and a listening ear from 8pm right through to crisis. Anyone concerned about a student may contact us. 8am during term time. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7488 Email: firstsupport@soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/firstsupport

IT and computing facilities There are approximately 1,700 computer workstations, together with many internet cafés, across our campuses and halls of residence. Rooms dedicated for student use offer printers, scanners and CD/DVD writers, extensive general and course-specific software, including software for e-learning, and specialist software to support the Assistive Technology Service (see page 50). Wired and wireless high-speed internet connections are provided in many campus locations. All rooms in our halls of residence have high-speed internet connections. Our IT services can be accessed off-campus.

Mature students Today, more and more people are considering higher education at a later stage in life, for a whole range of reasons. Studying for a degree is a rewarding experience at any age and we are committed to supporting you throughout your studies. If you are over 21 (23 for Law), our entry requirements are more flexible, with each application considered on individual merit (see page 46 for details). The Students’ Union organises a welcome event for mature students prior to the start of term. This is an opportunity to familiarise yourself with campus facilities and discuss any concerns about study skills and finance with support staff.

Directory of services

Military units

52

Our military units offer you the opportunity to find out more about the work of the armed services while enjoying a range of challenging activities. When you begin your studies, you can apply to join the Southampton University Officers’ Training Corps, Royal Naval Unit or Air Squadron, even if you are not considering a career in the armed services. Officers’ Training Corps www.army.mod.uk Royal Naval Unit www.southampton.ac.uk/~surnu Air Squadron www.southamptonuas.co.uk

http://nline.susu.org

Nursery Our Day Nursery is situated on the Highfield Campus. It provides a stimulating and caring environment for children aged between four months and five years. The Nursery provides a high standard of care and education to meet every child’s individual needs, enabling children to reach their full potential in a secure and stimulating environment. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3465 www.southampton.ac.uk/nursery

Prospective student finance information The University appreciates the importance of providing effective financial information and support for prospective and existing students. This commitment was recognised when the University was shortlisted by Times Higher Education for ‘Outstanding Financial Support Package of the Year’ in 2008. The University employs a Student Finance Outreach Officer who works within schools and colleges to raise awareness of the student financial support provided by the University and the government. This member of staff offers clear, factual information to schools and colleges on the process of applying for higher education funding, as well as detailing the differences and eligibility for loans, grants, bursaries and scholarships. As a new student at the University, you will benefit from a wide range of support. This includes ensuring you have received all the funding you are entitled to, providing help with budgeting, and, if necessary, putting you in touch with trained counsellors to help you with money management and the impact of other issues that affect students studying in higher education. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4737 www.southampton.ac.uk/sais/sfo

Religion – a place for every faith The Chaplaincy Centre welcomes people of all faiths. We provide free tea and coffee, wireless internet and a busy social calendar of events. There is a separate Muslim prayer room with washing facilities on campus. The Centre is open every weekday during term time, for regular services and private prayer. You may like to join one of the many student-led groups of different faiths who use the Centre. Whatever your religion, you will find a place to worship, either on or off campus. For more information go to www.southampton.ac.uk/chaplaincy

The University has invested heavily in an impressive range of facilities to ensure that, whatever your level of interest, experience or skill, our Sport and Recreation Service (SportRec) can provide everything you need to develop your sporting abilities. To make full use of these facilities, you can purchase a SportRec membership, which offers great value at only £110.00 per year (for 2009/10). For details of the indoor and outdoor facilities and activities available, go to www.southampton.ac.uk/sportrec

Student Recruitment and Outreach team

panels, and offer support for students who are dissatisfied with any aspect of their university life. During term time we provide access to a solicitor free of charge on a fortnightly basis. We also hold advice surgeries for home and international students at Winchester School of Art on alternate Wednesdays during term time. Opening hours: Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri: 10am to 4pm, Weds: 10.30am to 3.30pm Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2085 Email: suaic@southampton.ac.uk www.suaic.susu.org

For information about our open days, see page 27.

Studying abroad

The UK Student Recruitment and Outreach Team delivers educational liaison activities, engaging with potential students across the United Kingdom. The team works with schools and colleges, to encourage potential learners to consider progression to the University of Southampton specifically and to higher education in general.

You can choose to broaden your university experience by taking the opportunity to study abroad. Our Academic Schools offer a range of exchange opportunities worldwide, and the EU’s Erasmus exchange programme allows you to spend a semester or a full year at one of our European partner institutions. We currently have Erasmus links in 17 different countries across Europe.

We offer a range of on- and off-campus activities, including campus tours, open days, taster events and Easter and summer school residentials. Team members also carry out visits to schools and colleges each year, attend careers and higher education fairs, and deliver presentations to thousands of prospective students on higher education and on the University of Southampton itself. Tel: +44 (0) 23 8059 4737 www.southampton.ac.uk/schoolsandcolleges

Student Services Centre Our purpose-built Student Services Centre is at the heart of the Highfield Campus. The Centre’s friendly and dedicated team offer support and advice, and will help you with any queries on student-related subjects, such as fees, accommodation and admissions. Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 9599 Email: ssc@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ssc The University’s Points Based Visa Team can provide advice on immigration issues. www.southampton.ac.uk/visa

Students’ Union For more information see page 26.

Students’ Union Advice and Information Centre (SUAIC) We provide independent, free, confidential and impartial advice to students. We can help with practical matters such as student finance, debt counselling and budgeting skills. Our advisors can also provide guidance on changing or leaving your course, housing, consumer rights, legal matters and international student issues. Centre staff can also provide support and representation at academic appeals, disciplinary hearings and fitness to practise

www.southampton.ac.uk/international

Transport Wherever you are based, you will never be far away from campus facilities, most of which are within walking or cycling distance. Our award-winning uni-link bus service connects all four Southampton-based campuses and halls of residence, the city centre and local transport links throughout the day. If you choose to live in halls you will have unlimited use of the service included in your accommodation fees. Most campuses lie within the city’s extensive 29km cycle route network, and the campus cycle path provides a safe and convenient route through the Highfield Campus. There are 47 lockable bicycle stores across campus and at all halls (except Gateley Hall). Cycle repair services are available on the Highfield Campus. Most uni-link buses allow bicycles on board (space permitting). Just over an hour from central London by train and from Heathrow Airport by coach, Southampton has excellent transport links with the rest of the UK and internationally, by road, rail, sea and air. The city is serviced by two mainline train stations and its own airport, with regular flights to UK and major European cities.

Wessex Needs Assessment Centre The Wessex Needs Assessment Centre provides specialist study needs assessments and training for students with disabilities and specific learning difficulties such as dyslexia. Our recommendations may include computer equipment, training, study aids and specialist strategies. We also provide ongoing support and advice. Tel: +44 (0)23 80 597 233 Email: wessexdsa@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/wnac

Directory of services

Sports

53

The School of Management has an international reputation for accounting and finance. These subjects are informed by a range of perspectives, including economics, mathematics, behavioural and political science, sociology and psychology. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, plus GCSE mathematics grade B or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application (interview in special circumstances)

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Accounting and Finance | N400 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Accounting and Economics | NL41 | 3 years | see page 85 BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Finance | L1NH | 3 years | see page 87 BSc Management Sciences and Accounting | NN24 | 3 years | see page 145

Accounting & Finance

BSc Mathematics with Finance | G1NH | 3 years | see page 149

54

International Foundation Year in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences (including School of Management programmes) | LMV0 | 1 year | see page 136 Located at Highfield Campus

A degree in accounting and finance could enable you to operate at a strategic level within a variety of organisations, developing key skills such as problem solving, communication, self-management and teamwork. Accountancy is concerned with the provision and analysis of information for regulation, resource allocation and other decision-making tasks, both inside and outside an organisation. Finance addresses the ways in which money is raised and distributed over time, including the measurement and management of risk, the valuation of financial assets, and the operation of capital markets and their relationships with government, financial institutions and business.

“The programme is challenging, yet extremely rewarding, and covers many topics in accounting, management and finance. It is structured to test you in a variety of ways and to develop your transferable skills, which makes you very attractive to potential employers.� Tom Rossi BSc Accounting and Finance graduate, 2006

Tom Rossi studying in the Students’ Union café

BSc Accounting and Finance N400

Typical course content

This degree will provide you with a thorough working knowledge of accounting and finance theory and methods in the context of social science.

−− Commercial and company law −− Financial accounting −− Financial management −− Information systems and information technology −− Introduction to management −− Management accounting −− Management analysis −− Management decisions −− Portfolio theory and financial markets

−− You will learn how to prepare and interpret financial and managerial information for a variety of users −− You will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of investment and finance −− You will be able to choose optional modules from the School of Management, as well as a language or other approved subjects

Key facts One of the UK’s leading management schools In 2009, 76 per cent of School of Management students achieved firstclass or upper second-class degrees

−− A small number of students go on to establish their own business −− Recent recruiters of School of Management students include Deloitte, Ernst & Young, KPMG, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Barclays

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Management go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Career opportunities −− The School of Management has close links with business −− Many of our graduates go on to professional training and graduate management schemes −− A range of career options are available in management, accounting, finance and banking

Home to the Centre for Research in Accounting, Accountability and Governance (CRAAG) and the Centre for Banking, Finance and Sustainable Development Our student society, ManSoc, is one of the largest academic societies affiliated to the Students’ Union

What to do next Visit the School of Management’s website for more information. School of Management Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5507 Email: mgtmail3@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ management

Dolphins, jet engines, concert and sports halls, sound reproduction, environmental assessment, medical ultrasound, motion sickness, wind turbines, car refinement: put your maths and physics into action, and take a look at acoustical engineering. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB–BBB IB: 32–30 points, 16 at higher level Intake: approximately 25 students Average applicants per place: 4–5 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng/MEng Acoustical Engineering | H722 | 3/4 years BSc Acoustics and Music | HW73 | 3 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100

Acoustical Engineering

Located at Highfield Campus

56

“Studying acoustics provides a unique and fascinating angle on the broader subject of engineering, one which employers will love. Small class sizes make for excellent teaching in a friendly environment.” Toby Park MEng Acoustical Engineering graduate, 2008

Acoustical engineering is taught in the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR), one of the world’s leading centres for research, teaching and consultancy in acoustics. Acoustical engineering demands a remarkable breadth and depth of study, drawing on disciplines such as mechanics, materials, manufacturing, electronics and signal processing. Consequently, acoustical engineering is an excellent degree choice for those who want to open up a broad range of scientific and engineering career options on graduation. The MEng Acoustical Engineering is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the Institute of Acoustics, and meets the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status. BEng/MEng Acoustical Engineering H722 A levels: ABB, including mathematics and physics (one of which must be grade A) IB: 32 points (minimum), including a total of 12 points from mathematics and physics at higher level −− Engineering design to optimise high-quality sound reproduction and minimise noise and vibration −− Small-group teaching and in-depth laboratory and project work −− Optional Audio Engineering certificate programme −− Scholarships available for extracurricular music performance tuition (grade 8 required)

Toby Park performing sound measurement in ISVR’s anechoic chamber

BSc Acoustics and Music HW73

Typical course content

A levels: BBB, in mathematics, physics and music. In addition, grade 8 music practical is required (grade 7 theory is usually acceptable as an alternative to A level music)

−− Principles of sound and vibration −− Electronics and transducers −− Analysis of signals (eg sound, seismic, biomedical) −− Ocean acoustics and sonar −− Controlling noise and vibration (eg in buildings, road vehicles, aircraft) −− Sound reproduction and musical instrument acoustics −− Perception of sound and vibration by humans −− Mechanical engineering design and computing −− Individual and group project work −− 10-week or year-long industrial placements (typically paid employment)

IB: 30 points (minimum), including a total of 10 points from mathematics and physics at higher level and 6 points from music at higher level, plus grade 8 music practical −− Joint honours degree for those wishing to combine a rigorous scientific programme with their love of music −− Wide choice of acoustics and music modules −− Weight your studies in favour of either subject, with a split of anything from 25/75 to 75/25 per cent

Key facts ISVR was awarded the prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for its achievements in higher education ISVR is one of the leading brand names in acoustics, known and respected worldwide 100 per cent employment record in recent exit surveys

−− Research scientist/engineer in industry or a university −− Postgraduate student in engineering, audiology, speech therapy or medical physics

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the ISVR go to www.southampton.ac.uk/ scholarships

Career opportunities A degree in acoustical engineering is well suited to any employer seeking highly numerate graduates, with honed analytical and problem-solving skills. Typical career routes include: −− Acoustics consultant, assessing noise problems and advising on solutions −− Mechanical engineer (eg in design of gas turbines, aircraft, cars, audio and telecommunications equipment or high-precision instruments)

What to do next Contact Dr David Simpson, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Institute of Sound and Vibration Research Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2294 Email: admissions.isvr@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/isvr

The sky is not the limit, it is just the beginning. Aeronautics and astronautics encompasses a broad range of disciplines within the field of aerospace engineering. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA, including mathematics and physics (general studies not accepted), plus GCSE English language grade C or above IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including a total of 12 in mathematics and physics at higher level Intake: 80–90 students Average applicants per place: 10 Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng Aeronautics and Astronautics | H422 | 3 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics | H401 | 4 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Advanced Materials | HJ45 | 4 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Aerodynamics | H490 | 4 years

Aeronautics & Astronautics

MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Airvehicle Systems Design | H491 | 4 years

58

MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Engineering Management | HN42 | 4 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/European Studies | H425 | 4 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Spacecraft Engineering | H493 | 4 years MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/Structural Design | H492 | 4 years MEng Space Systems Engineering | H400 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

Aeronautics and astronautics courses cover applications to the specification, design and construction of aircraft, engines, satellites and other spacecraft. Our wide range of facilities include world-class wind tunnels, state of the art flight simulators, propulsion test cells, astronautics facilities and a student workshop. Strong links with the aerospace and race car industries provide excellent opportunities for work placements and job prospects, and many of our students gain sponsorship. Our graduates have followed careers in all areas of aerospace engineering, including fixed- and rotarywing aircraft, spacecraft and propulsion, and aerospace operations. The multidisciplinary nature of our programmes also prepares you for a career in many non-aerospace industries, particularly the commercial sector. All our master’s (MEng) programmes provide a direct route of entry to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status and are accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society. BEng Aeronautics and Astronautics H422 This is a balanced three-year programme of technical and practical study, meeting the highest international professional standards demanded by aerospace and related industries.

“Studying here has enabled me to focus on the subject areas I am most interested in. This flexibility and the University’s great reputation helped me to start a career in my chosen industry. My first job as a graduate is at the European Space Agency in Italy.” Nicola Beveridge MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics graduate, 2007

Southampton graduates piloting the A380 and Red Arrows at Farnborough Air Show 2006 ©Airbus SAS Photo by exm company / P Masclet

MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics H401

MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ Spacecraft Engineering H493

and avionics.

preferred academic supplier to Airbus UK; and academic partner of Agusta Westland

The School of Engineering Sciences has been awarded an ExxonMobil Award in recognition of Excellence This programme is aimed at students This programme offers a choice of who are interested in pursuing a career in in Engineering Teaching specialist themes of study, or you can select an interdisciplinary theme to provide the spacecraft industry or undertaking Typical course content a broader technical background. You may spacecraft-related research. −− Aerodynamics also choose to spend a semester at one −− Aerospace and structural design MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ of our European partner institutions. −− Aircraft dynamics, propulsion and Structural Design H492 structures MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ This programme focuses on the selection − − Astronautics and spacecraft engineering Advanced Materials HJ45 of materials and the design of aerospace − − Avionics This programme offers in-depth study of structures, demonstrating how materials − − Materials engineering the selection of appropriate materials in behave in service and reasons why they −− Mathematics for engineering sciences sometimes fail. design and manufacture, along with an −− Mechanics of flight understanding of how those materials MEng Space Systems −− Modelling and computing behave in service. Engineering H400 Career opportunities MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ The only programme of its kind in the UK, − − Aerospace engineer (aeronautical/ Aerodynamics H490 this degree is concerned with the design spacecraft) On this programme, you will learn about and optimisation of a complete space − − Civil or military pilot system to meet a set of mission the design and integration of wings and −− Race car designer objectives. propulsion systems for aerospace. −− Management, financial or IT consultant Key facts −− Software engineer MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ −− Systems engineer Number one in The Guardian University Airvehicle Systems Design H491 −− Research assistant (university/ Guide 2010 for mechanically-based This programme focuses on aeronautic government) engineering, which includes aerospace topics with a particular emphasis on −− Research consultant engineering helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, engine design, unmanned air vehicles BAE Systems’ preferred course in the UK; −− Postgraduate study MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ Engineering Management HN42 This innovative programme provides the technical skills to understand, design and manufacture new products, and the expertise to manage the process, people and finances. MEng Aeronautics and Astronautics/ European Studies H425 This programme is aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in the aerospace industry in the European context.

100 per cent of Aeronautics and Astronautics students were satisfied with the quality of their course (National Student Survey, 2008)

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Engineering Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next

Active branch of the Royal Aeronautical Society, with flying opportunities through the Students’ Union or membership of the University Air Squadron

Contact Dr Glyn Thomas, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available.

Recognised by the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme, which provides sponsored places as part of officer training in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces

School of Engineering Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4885 Email: aeroucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ses/aero

Anthropology provides a crosscultural study of the global diversity of human knowledge and cultural practice in the twenty-first century. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB or ABBb (when an additional AS level has been studied), plus GCSE mathematics and English at grade C or above IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 20 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: UCAS application (interview as required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) | LL36 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) | LM39 | 3 years | see page 80 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) | LC3V | 3 years | see page 82 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) | L310 | 3 years | see page 62

Anthropology

Located at Highfield Campus

60

With studies of community and group formation, anthropology forces you to consider vital aspects of social life, such as identity, culture, rationality, ethnicity and belief systems. Although you will specialise in social and cultural anthropology, the overall applied social sciences degree programme has been carefully crafted to offer four degree pathways. These will enable you to enjoy the specialised challenge of your main discipline while you study optional modules from the others, encouraging you to study the social world beyond purely anthropological concerns. This enables you to explore the connections and differences between your main studies in anthropology and wider social factors from the disciplines of psychology, criminology, sociology and social policy, as you create a degree suited for your intended future career. Further information, including a typical module breakdown of the degree over three years, can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

“Everyone is really friendly and you feel comfortable in lectures and seminars, which helps to create an atmosphere of good debate and learning. I decided to study anthropology because I was interested in studying the way other cultures live. It opens your mind to the diversity of culture and the amount of difference in the world. It provides you with a better understanding of your own culture and makes you start to question your own morals, values and ideologies.� Lisa Kyle BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) graduate, 2009

Do tribal systems exist in all societies?

Whether you want to make sense of the role that political systems play in our lives, the meaning of witchcraft and magic, or differing sexualities and patterns of gender relations, the Anthropology pathway will help you to comprehend the complexities of contemporary life. By studying the diversity of human experiences, practices and social group formations, you will gain new perspectives from which to consider your own culture, alongside an appreciation of the social world beyond. Anthropology graduates appeal to employers because of their global awareness and knowledge of cultural diversity. Good communication skills, the ability to design and undertake research, along with skills in gathering and processing data, and the ability to present it in a variety of formats, are equally valued. This pathway allows you to explore other cultures, behaviours, beliefs and social institutions on a crosscultural basis. You will gain an invaluable understanding of the world in which we live, and an appreciation of cultural and social diversity.

−−Throughout all three years there is a wide range of optional courses from other applied social sciences pathways, with increasing specialisation in anthropology −−Introductory year one offers a range of optional courses designed specifically for students who have not studied anthropology before −−In year three you will write a dissertation linked to anthropology, on a research topic of your choice Key facts

Career opportunities −− Overseas development −− Local and central government −− Business and public administration −− Public relations and marketing −− Consultancy and self-employment −− Voluntary sector −− Journalism, publishing and media −− Probation and police work −− Human resources −− Further education teaching −− Postgraduate studies and research (master’s, PhD)

Wide-ranging, contemporary, cross-cultural programme Training in methods unique to anthropologists, who participate in the lives of the people they study Optional module choices from other pathways, with increasing specialisation in anthropology each year Dedicated, friendly and approachable staff

Typical course content −− Exploring other cultures −− Social thought in context −− Crime, social change and society −− Social anthropology −− Cosmology, ritual and belief −− Sexuality and intimacy −− Human emotions: social and cultural dimensions −− Anthropology, film and representations of the other

What to do next Contact Nick Rayner, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2512 Email: sspucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

Study criminology, anthropology and psychology alongside sociology and social policy and tailor your degree over three years to suit your interests. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB or ABBb (when an additional AS level has been studied), plus GCSE mathematics and English at grade C or above IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 15 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: UCAS application (interview as required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) | L310 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) | LL36 | 3 years | see page 60 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) | LM39 | 3 years | see page 80

62

Located at Highfield Campus

You can choose to study criminology and anthropology, which both have their roots in sociology, but which often study different areas of human life. Or you might want to consider the connections and fundamental differences in perspective and methodology between psychology and anthropology. Psychology also provides a valuable connection to criminology. Other optional modules will come from studies in the disciplines of sociology and social policy.

“This programme has given me the opportunity to study a wide range of concepts and courses that a single honours degree could not offer. Watching the news has never been the same. Staff have always been friendly and approachable, giving me the confidence to join seminar discussions and wider activities.� Christian Andersen Tuffnell BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) graduate

General Pathway

Applied Social Sciences

BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) | LC3V | 3 years | see page 82

The General pathway is part of the Applied Social Sciences degree programme. Unlike the other three pathways, the General pathway offers you the opportunity to build your degree around your career aspirations and study interests. This pathway is ideal for you if you are not yet sure of your future career, or if you simply want to enjoy a wide range of choices in your degree.

Develop your skills in analysis and research

This unique fusion of traditionally separate disciplines offers a fantastic range of investigative possibilities for you to explore. Further information, including a typical module breakdown of the degree over three years, can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci The General pathway provides you with flexibility, problem-solving abilities and a broad knowledge base, while developing your skills in data gathering, processing and analysis. Internal safeguards ensure that you do not spread your options too thinly, allowing you to acquire the focused knowledge that employers value. The programme provides a broad-based knowledge of how anthropologists, criminologists, psychologists and sociologists contribute to an understanding of contemporary social and cultural issues. −−You can tailor up to 70 per cent of your course around a central set of applied social sciences modules, creating a programme suited to your intended career −−In year three you can choose to write your dissertation in any of the applied social sciences disciplines you have studied on a research topic of your choice Students progress into comparable careers and postgraduate places as those on the other three pathways (LL36, LM39, LC3V).

Key facts

Career opportunities

The widest choice of optional modules of all the applied social sciences pathways

−− Central and local government −− Voluntary sector −− Probation and police work −− Human resources −− Business and finance −− Social and community services −− Journalism and media −− Commercial, public and other active research environments −− Further education teaching −− Postgraduate studies and research (master’s, PhD)

The broadest range of key ideas and methods Flexible range of optional modules to enable specialisation Friendly, dedicated, student-focused staff

Typical course content −− The making of psychology −− Exploring other cultures −− Society and crime: sociological perspectives −− Social anthropology −− Research methods in the social sciences −− The psychology of groups and its application to real-world settings −− Culture, communication and cognition −− Sexuality and intimacy −− Anthropology, film and representations of the other −− Issues in law enforcement and social control −− Dissertation project

What to do next Contact Nick Rayner, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2512 Email: sspucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

A degree in archaeology will open up new worlds. Whether in the laboratory or the library, you will explore a range of questions about people in the past. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB–BBB IB: 32–30 points, 16 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application and interview

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Archaeology | V400 | 3 years BA Archaeology and Geography | VL47 | 3 years BA Archaeology and History | VV41 | 3 years BSc Archaeology | F400 | 3 years Located at Avenue Campus

Archaeology brings together diverse approaches to answer questions such as what our ancestors ate, what they wore, who they traded with, and the environments they lived in. You might undertake the chemical analysis of ceramics or human bones, or use theories drawn from anthropology or sociology. Archaeology is one of the broadest subjects taught at university, and you can study it with either science or humanities A levels. All you need is an enquiring mind and an interest in the past. We cover the full-timespan of the human past, from the earliest humans to the modern world. The breadth of subjects available means that you can study the areas you are most interested in. Southampton is a world leader in maritime archaeology, and you can take these units in all three years. BA Archaeology V400 This programme covers a wide range of world archaeology, from the first appearance of humans two million years ago. You will also learn more about the methods used to find out about the past.

Archaeology

“I like the way the course progressed almost to self-study over three years. In archaeology there are many links between the different units offered over the course, so you can trace a particular time period or a specific place throughout your degree.”

64

Julia Morgan BA Archaeology and History graduate, 2007

−− Period-based and practical units introduce the breadth of the subject in year one, with specialised units and research in the second and final years −− Three-week field project in the UK or abroad −− Develop your own specialist interest with the dissertation in your final year −− Option to take up to 25 per cent of your programme in an alternative subject

Course includes three weeks of fieldwork in the UK or abroad, and there are opportunities for more fieldwork or placements

BA Archaeology and Geography VL47 Studying these two subjects together allows you to explore the relationship between the wider landscape and environment and the human societies that inhabited them in the past. In addition to the broad archaeological base, this programme covers social and cultural anthropology, historical archaeology, and physical and cultural geography. −− Two compulsory and two optional modules from each subject in year one, with the option of 25 per cent in a third subject −− Flexibility in the combination of the subjects in the second and final years, with a dissertation in either subject BA Archaeology and History VV41 Combined degree structure as for VL47 This programme allows you to study past societies from both their archaeological remains and their textual sources. You can choose related modules, such as the medieval period, from both perspectives, or broaden your interests by selecting modules from entirely different periods, such as the prehistoric era from archaeology and the Second World War from history. BSc Archaeology F400 Apply cutting-edge scientific methods to answer questions about the lives of people in the past. What did climate change mean to people living at the end of the last ice age? What can the chemical composition of human bones tell us about changes in diet during the medieval period?

The BSc will provide you with a grounding in the basics, while allowing you to develop your own interests in specialist fields. −− Specific tracks in computing, maritime, osteoarchaeology and survey −− Option to take complementary units in geography and geophysics −− Access to state-of-the-art laboratory facilities

Key facts Rated in the top six in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise £3 million purpose-built archaeology building, with excellent laboratory facilities and dedicated undergraduate teaching lab

Career opportunities There are many jobs in the field of archaeology. In 2007 there were 6,865 people working as ‘diggers’ and museum curators, professors, public administrators and business consultants. Our graduates have also gone on to become Heads of Archaeology units. Archaeology also offers a stimulating degree, which provides the transferable skills and intellectual achievements employers want for other graduate-entry jobs. Previous graduates now work as solicitors, accountants, police officers, marketing consultants and teachers.

Placement schemes with archaeological units and national heritage bodies Research-based fieldwork project, either in the UK or abroad, in locations such as Crete, Hungary, Sweden and the Caribbean

Typical course content −− Excavation, field survey and geophysics −− Underwater archaeology −− Comparative osteology −− Artefacts analysis −− Human origins −− Medieval archaeology −− Archaeology of the Roman Empire −− Prehistoric archaeology −− Anthropology and ethno-archaeology −− Museums −− Heritage and public archaeology

What to do next Contact Dr Louise Revell, Admissions Tutor, or Thom Bull, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 8404 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ archaeology

Audiology is the healthcare science of hearing and balance disorders. Combining science, patient care and no tuition fees, our award-winning Audiology degree offers exciting career opportunities. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB, including one A level in a sciencerelated subject (mathematics accepted) IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 30 Average applicants per place: 4 Selection process: UCAS application and interview, with a test for applicants with alternative academic backgrounds (applicants should plan to visit an audiology department); enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure required Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Audiology | B610 | 4 years Due to funding arrangements, we are unable to accept overseas applications. Students from the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man pay tuition fees.

Audiology

Located at Highfield Campus

66

Audiologists, based primarily in the NHS, assess hearing and balance disorders in children and adults. They work closely with patients, and their families, to enhance quality of life, through using digital hearing technology and rehabilitation, for example. Audiologists are also involved in the development of local and national services, research and teaching, and they may choose to specialise in a particular area, such as paediatrics, balance impairment or tinnitus. Audiologists work closely with other healthcare professionals, including ear, nose and throat doctors, community paediatricians, speech and language therapists, teachers of the deaf and physiotherapists. Our degree programme is approved by the Department of Health and the British Academy of Audiology. Graduates are therefore able to register and work as audiologists in the NHS immediately, and command starting salaries of at least ÂŁ20,000 per annum. The course is fully funded by the NHS.

“Southampton is a brilliant place to study, with a fantastic range of societies and sports clubs. Studying audiology is really enjoyable. The hands-on approach makes lectures easy to understand and thoroughly prepares you for jobs in the field.� Claire Jenks Audiology student

An audiologist looks in Claire Jenks’ ear using a video otoscope

UK and EU students do not pay tuition fees and they are eligible to apply for means-tested bursaries; they are also paid around £12,000 (2008)during the placement year.

Key facts

Our award-winning BSc Audiology provides clinical training underpinned by a strong foundation in the physical, biological and behavioural sciences, using a variety of teaching methods, including problem-based and discovery learning. In addition to key clinical skills, we aim to develop faculties for independent learning, critical thinking, reflective and evidencebased practice, and problem solving, all of which provide the basis for high-quality professional practice and employability. The research project in year four provides an exciting opportunity for in-depth study on a chosen topic, as well as making a valuable contribution to audiology science.

Over 35 years’ experience of teaching audiology

Career opportunities for Southampton graduates are excellent. Approximately 80 per cent of our students obtain job offers in their preferred area, usually the NHS. The remaining 20 per cent typically obtain offers for further study, including fast-track degrees in medicine and PhDs.

No tuition fees and a salaried placement year (UK and EU students only) Only UK university with in-house audiology and cochlear implant centres

In collaboration with Engineering Sciences, ISVR ranked second in the total number of Unit of Assessment: 28 academics whose research was deemed “world leading” or “internationally excellent” (RAE, 2008) Vice Chancellor’s Award for excellence in teaching (2005, 2009) and Queen’s Anniversary Prize (2005)

Typical course content −− Clinical practicum throughout −− Two six-month clinical placements in year three organised by the University −− Day clinical placements in years one and two −− Research project involving experimental work (throughout year four) −− Biological, behavioural and social sciences −− Acoustics, hearing, speech and communication sciences −− Diseases, disorders and assessment of hearing and balance −− Hearing aids and cochlear implants −− Rehabilitation of hearing impairment, tinnitus and balance disorder

−− Paediatric assessment and rehabilitation −− Interprofessional learning −− Problem-based learning (year four, with topic options) −− Research methods and statistics

Career opportunities −− Registered audiologist in NHS or independent sector −− Research (including PhD) −− Teaching −− Audiology technology research, development and sales −− Healthcare −− Private hearing aid dispenser (with top-up qualification) −− Postgraduate study in biomedical/ healthcare science or engineering

What to do next Contact Dr Daniel Rowan, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. Institute of Sound and Vibration Research Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2288 Email: audiology@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/audiology

Biochemistry, the molecular approach to biological systems, is at the forefront of far-reaching developments in medicine and biotechnology, and is a source of practical benefit for mankind. Typical entry requirements GCSEs: Grades A–C in English, mathematics and science. If you lack these formal qualifications, your aptitude for the course will be assessed at interview. International students whose first language is not English must have already attained the necessary standard in English, such as 6.5 in IELTS A levels: If offering three science A levels: 300 points from three A levels = BBB If offering two science A levels: 320 points from three A levels = ABB For biochemistry degrees, chemistry must be offered at A level (minimum grade B) with at least one other A level science subject. A level science subjects considered include biology, human biology, physics, mathematics, psychology IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including chemistry Intake: 40

As a result of advances in biochemistry we can manipulate genes and modify proteins, and we know the complete sequence of the human and over 400 other genomes. Our staff are involved in research into the molecular basis of disease, the control of gene transcription and protein translation, cell signalling, membrane proteins, DNA structure and drug development, as well as other areas of biochemistry. Alongside research-led teaching, you will have access to world-class laboratories for your third-year project, as well as enjoying the benefits of a new, purpose-built facility from 2010. We also offer a year out in industry for students who want to gain experience working in the pharmaceutical industry. This degree provides broad training in biochemistry, with core subjects covered in years one and two, and the opportunity to specialise in year three.

Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application (all applicants who receive an offer are invited to visit the School) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Biochemistry | C700 | 3 years

Biochemistry

BSc Biochemistry with Foundation Year | CB71 | 4 years | see page 186

68

Located at Highfield Campus

“I spent a lot of time looking at the various prospectuses and course booklets from several universities to compare what was available. Southampton offered me exactly what I was looking for. You start off with excellent core modules to introduce you to the various disciplines. The programme is very flexible, with many different courses to choose from. The School allows you to follow your interests through a huge range of options and you can even study a language.” Annie Cardew Biochemistry PhD student

A 3D render of DNA strands

The flexible structure of our programme offers a wide range of options, and in year two you can choose modules from across the School of Biological Sciences, as well as other disciplines. In year three you will undertake a research project in an area of your choice. Key facts Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with opportunity to study modules from other disciplines Option of working in pharmaceutical industry for a year Third-year project undertaken as part of research team working at the cutting edge of biochemistry

Typical course content −− Molecular basis of life −− Cellular and genetic mechanisms −− Bioanalysis −− Molecular and cellular biochemistry −− Protein structure and function −− Molecular biology −− Molecular basis of disease −− Molecular pharmacology −− Cell membranes −− Molecular recognition −− Genes and genetic disease

Career opportunities −− Biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry −− Postgraduate research training −− Scientific officer in medical laboratories −− Teaching

−− Forensic science −− Legal profession −− Business management −− Medicine

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Biological Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Administrative Assistant for Admissions for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Biological Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7755 Email: bsentry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci

Biology is a diverse discipline, with far-reaching effects. Recent advances in molecular and cell biology have shaped our understanding of medicine and helped to predict the effects of environmental factors such as global warming. You will study biology in its pure aspects and also in its applications to modern life, learning about molecules, GCSEs: Grades A–C in English, mathematics and science. If you lack these formal qualifications, your cells, individual organisms, populations, species and aptitude for the course will be assessed at interview. ecosystems, right through to the global environment. Typical entry requirements

International students whose first language is not English must have already attained the necessary standard in English, such as 6.5 in IELTS A levels: If offering three science A levels: 300 points from three A levels = BBB If offering two science A levels: 320 points from three A levels = ABB For biology degrees, biology must be offered at A level (minimum grade B) with at least one other A level science subject. A level science subjects considered include chemistry, physics, mathematics, psychology, environmental science

Teaching is research-led and our staff are involved in numerous interdisciplinary projects, including foetal development and health, plants and climate change, and risk assessment of GM technology. Exploring such exciting topics helps our students develop into proficient, well-informed biologists. Over 50 per cent of our graduates embark on jobs or further training in areas related to biology, and the range of key skills you will acquire – including written and oral communication, numeracy and the ability to think scientifically – are valued in many careers.

IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including biology Intake: 70 Average applicants per place: 7 Selection process: UCAS application (all applicants who receive an offer are invited to visit the School) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Biology | C100 | 3 years BSc Biology with Foundation Year | C108 | 4 years | see page 186

Biology

Located at Highfield Campus

70

“I enrolled as a mature student and took a foundation course seven years after I left full-time education. I was able to get financial assistance and my tuition fees were paid for with a bursary. I wouldn’t have been able to go if I hadn’t had that help.” Stacey Travers BSc Biology graduate

Polymita picta, an endangered species of Cuban tree snail

This degree provides broad training in the biological sciences. Year one covers core subjects, with the opportunity to specialise from year two, when you will be able to select the areas of study which interest you most, choosing units from across the School. In year three you can specialise in molecular biology, cell and developmental biology, or biodiversity and ecology, and can also choose between a laboratorybased or field research project, with fieldwork undertaken in the UK or abroad.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with opportunity to choose modules from other disciplines and change degree in year one

−− Postgraduate degrees −− Teacher training −− Medicine −− Conservation and the environment −− Agriculture −− Industry −− Journalism

Field trip to Spain in year one Third-year project undertaken as part of research team working at the cutting edge of biology

Typical course content −− Molecular basis of life −− Field course in Spain −− Cellular and genetic mechanisms −− Diversity of life −− Ecology and evolution −− Plant science −− Animal behaviour and neuroscience −− Animal and plant development −− Biodiversity and conservation −− Immunology

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Biological Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Administrative Assistant for Admissions for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Biological Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7755 Email: bsentry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci

Biomedical science is the study of the biological basis of human disease. A degree in biomedical sciences combines interests in biochemistry, physiology, neuroscience, cell biology, genetics and pharmacology. Our programmes will provide you with an understanding of the major concepts and recent GCSEs: Grades A–C in English, mathematics and science. If you lack these formal qualifications, your advances in medical research, preparing you for aptitude for the course will be assessed at interview. a rapidly expanding range of career opportunities for International students whose first language is not biomedical sciences graduates. Typical entry requirements

English must have already attained the necessary standard in English, such as 6.5 in IELTS

A levels: If offering three science A levels: 300 points from three A levels = BBB If offering two science A levels: 320 points from three A levels = ABB For biomedical sciences degrees, chemistry must be offered at A level (minimum grade B) with at least one other A level science subject. A level science subjects considered include biology, human biology, physics, mathematics, psychology IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including chemistry Intake: 120

Biomedical Sciences

Average applicants per place: 8

72

Selection process: UCAS application (all applicants who receive an offer are invited to visit the School)

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Biomedical Sciences | B940 | 3 years BSc Biomedical Sciences with Foundation Year | CB71 | 4 years | see page 186 Located at Highfield Campus

Our staff are involved in research in the molecular basis of disease, oncology, developmental biology, neurophysiology, brain damage and recovery relating to stroke. Alongside research-led teaching, you will have access to world-class laboratories for your final-year project.

“My third-year project was in microbiology, researching the bacteria which are predominantly responsible for causing lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Now I’m really passionate about learning more about parasitic infections, which affect whole populations in developing countries, often through infected water. They are particularly bad in Africa, where they are one of the main causes of blindness.” Michelle Joyner BSc Biomedical Sciences graduate, now undertaking postgraduate research

3D rendering of blood cells and virus

This degree provides broad training in biomedical sciences. −− Core subjects are covered in year one −− Year two extends this study and includes units in biochemistry and a choice of modules from other disciplines −− Year three provides the opportunity to specialise, with a research project in an area of your choice

Key facts Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with opportunity to choose options from other disciplines alongside core modules Good foundation for graduate entry to medicine Final-year project undertaken as part of research team working at the cutting edge of biomedical sciences

Typical course content −− Molecular basis of life −− Cellular and genetic mechanisms −− Bioanalysis −− Molecular and cellular biochemistry −− Neuroscience −− Genes and genetic diseases −− Cell signalling in health and disease −− Molecular basis of disease −− Molecular pharmacology −− Neuropharmacology of CNS disorders −− Immunology, infection and inflammation

−− Clinical research organisations running clinical trials and surveys −− Science writer or journalist in biological and biomedical topics −− Business, legal or management roles in healthcare and health and safety

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Biological Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Career opportunities −− Research in academic, pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors −− Medicine −− Laboratory scientist in forensic, pathology, veterinary, toxicology or haematology laboratory −− Graduate assistant role to physicians or other health professionals −− Teaching science nationally and internationally

What to do next Contact the Administrative Assistant for Admissions for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Biological Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7755 Email: bsentry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci

Chemistry influences many different aspects of our lives. Studying chemistry creates opportunities for you to improve our future quality of life. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–AAB, including chemistry and preferably at least one from biology, mathematics and physics IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Intake: 105–115 Average applicants per place: 7 Selection process: UCAS application, with an invitation to visit prior to offer (interview is not normally required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Chemistry | F100 | 3 years MChem Chemistry | F103 | 4 years MChem Chemistry with six-month placement | F101 | 4 years MChem Chemistry with one-year placement | F102 | 4 years

Our degree courses provide high-quality coverage of the core subject material before offering a wide range of specialist courses, reflecting research interests that cater for every prospective chemist. New undergraduates join a supportive, exciting learning community in which staff and students share the common aim of learning more about this fascinating subject. You will be well-placed to join the multiskilled workforce of the future, working to meet some of the Grand Challenges facing all of us: protecting the worldwide water supply; carbon dioxide capture and utilisation; clean energy; sustainable manufacture; and personalised healthcare. MChem programmes F101, F1BC and F1GC are accredited by the Royal Society of Chemistry for full membership and professional status (MRSC, CChem), while F102 and F103 are submitted for accreditation in 2009. The BSc programmes are accredited for associate membership.

BSc Chemistry with Medicinal Science | F1B1 | 3 years MChem Chemistry with Medicinal Science | F1BC | 4 years MChem Chemistry with Mathematics | F1GC | 4 years BSc/MChem Chemistry with Foundation Year | F108 | 4/5 years | see page 186

Chemistry

Located at Highfield Campus

74

“Chemistry has really done it for me. My excellent experience at Southampton led to a research career in the pharmaceutical industry and then at the Medical Research Council. Working on healthcare solutions is immensely rewarding.” Joanne Hough MChem Chemistry graduate, now working as a Drug Discovery Chemist, Medical Research Council

Enjoying research and discovery in the lab

BSc degrees −− Comprehensive theoretical chemistry coverage in years one and two, with an embedded element of laboratorybased learning −− Training in maths for chemists −− An opportunity to spend 25 per cent of your time studying related topics (F100) or focusing on your chosen ‘with’ subject (F1B1) in years one and two −− An independent research project with a literature and a laboratory-based component −− Selection of advanced chemistry courses, allowing you to focus on areas of particular interest (F1B1 students will replace three of the six lecture courses in chemistry with lectures in medicinal science) −− A leading skills development programme throughout

MChem Chemistry with six-month placement F101 (also F1BC)

MChem degrees −− MChem degrees follow the same curriculum as the BSc in years one and two −− An extensive range of advanced chemistry courses, studied in year three and/ or year four (F1BC/F1GC students will replace two of their chemistry lecture courses in years three and four with courses in medicinal science/maths)

Key facts

The key difference between the MChem degrees is in the nature of the placement and research opportunities. MChem Chemistry F103 (also F1GC) −− Years three and four are hosted in Southampton, with different and complementary independent research experiences in each year −− Each year has a small proportion of core chemistry courses, with extensive opportunities to specialise −− Combined degrees include modules in the ‘with’ subject in years three and four

−− Year three is spent in Southampton on advanced chemistry courses and an independent research project −− Possibility of an assessed, external research placement anywhere in the world, July–December of year four −− A short research experience and choice of advanced chemistry courses in the final semester −− A leading skills development programme throughout MChem Chemistry with one-year placement F102 −− Year three may be spent on an assessed UK industry placement −− Year four includes some core and elective advanced chemistry courses and an independent research project

Top 10 in university league tables published by the Times and the Guardian Students graduating in 2009 expressed a higher overall level of satisfaction with their course than any other students studying chemistry in the UK A unique, flexible six-month or one-year placement scheme One of 25 European universities in Group of Excellence for quality in research: www.excellenceranking.eu A teaching programme delivered by worldclass researchers in a multimillion-pound chemistry complex

Typical course content −− Fundamentals of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry −− Advanced subject specialisation (eg natural product synthesis, materials chemistry, nanoscience, electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry, laser spectroscopy, environmental chemistry, X-ray crystallography) −− Relevant and topical laboratory teaching −− At least one independent research opportunity −− Possibility of an industrial research placement −− Skills training relevant to all potential careers

Career opportunities −− Research, discovery and medicinal chemistry −− Analytical and quality control science −− Process chemistry and technology −− Environmental science −− Marketing and brand management −− Financial risk analysis, accounting and audit management −− Information management, technology and consultancy −− Patent law −− Teaching and university lecturing −− Scientific editing and publishing

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Chemistry go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr David Read, Director of Undergraduate Admissions, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Chemistry Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4118 Email: chem@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/chemistry

Civil engineering applies science, mathematics, design and creativity in order to solve problems of critical importance to society – today and in the future – across the construction, maintenance and management of infrastructure. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA (excluding general studies and critical thinking), including mathematics and a science subject (preferably physics but biology, chemistry, geography, geology and environmental studies also considered) IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including mathematics and a science subject with a minimum of 6 points in each.

We tend to take for granted the buildings we live and work in, the roads, railways and airports that allow us to travel, the water we use. It is professional civil engineers who make all this possible, and who are called on to find solutions to the major challenges facing the world in the future, such as the effects of climate change and sea-level rise, finding sustainable sources of energy and dealing with congestion.

The civil engineering industry provides excellent employment opportunities. Our degrees are fully accredited by the Institution of Civil Engineers and Average applicants per place: 10 the Institution of Structural Engineers, providing the Please note that our entry requirements may change first stage in a recognised career path to Chartered or so please refer to www.civil.southampton.ac.uk Incorporated Engineer status. for the latest information Intake: 90

Selection process: UCAS application (interview may be required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Civil Engineering

BEng Civil Engineering | H200 | 3 years

76

MEng Civil Engineering | H201 | 4 years MEng Civil Engineering and Architecture | H2K1 | 4 years MEng Civil Engineering with a Year in Industry | H202 | 5 years BEng/MEng Civil Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

“I chose civil engineering at Southampton purely for the passion and excitement passed on by the staff on the open days. Everyone you spoke to was enthusiastic and was willing to share knowledge on a friendly level. ” Catherine Hives MEng Civil Engineering graduate, 2009

Millau viaduct, France – students build a model of this structure during their first-year field course

BEng Civil Engineering H200 −− Obtain a solid engineering knowledge base −− Gain key transferable skills −− Accredited for Incorporated Engineer status −− Can lead to further study or employment

MEng Civil Engineering with a Year in Industry H202 −− Academic content as for H201 −− Integrated year in industry between years two and three −− Acquire valuable work experience −− Gain insight into the real-world application of your academic studies

MEng Civil Engineering H201

Key facts

−− Fully accredited for Chartered Engineer status −− Comprehensive coverage of civil engineering −− Emphasis on design, teamwork and management −− Opportunity to specialise in year four

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise placed Southampton in an elite group in the civil engineering unit of assessment. On a ‘medals table’ basis, we were ranked second in the UK, reflecting both the high quality and volume of our research. Our grade point average was equivalent to the top 5* rating in the 2001 RAE.

MEng Civil Engineering and Architecture H2K1

Teaching by leading experts in their fields

−− Academic content as for H201 −− Part-taught by practising architects −− Learn to design flagship buildings −− Understand how architects and engineers work together −− Small classes in a multidisciplinary environment −− Preparation for ARB Part 1 by interview

Career opportunities −− Consulting engineer −− Local authority engineer −− Construction manager −− Project manager −− Civil servant −− Banking/financial services −− Management consultancy −− Postgraduate study −− Academic teaching and research

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Civil Engineering and the Environment go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Emphasis on project and design work First-rate facilities Excellent career prospects

Typical course content −− Structures −− Hydraulics −− Geology −− Geotechnics −− Materials −− Design −− Surveying −− Management −− Water resources −− Engineering mathematics

What to do next Contact the Admissions Tutor for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Civil Engineering and the Environment Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4651 Email: admissions@civil.soton.ac.uk www.civil.southampton.ac.uk

Computer science is at the foundation of most of the systems and processes on which our modern world relies. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA, including mathematics IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in mathematics Intake: 80 Average applicants per place: 10 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Computer Science | G400 | 3 years

Computer Science & Software Engineering

MEng Computer Science | G401 | 4 years

78

MEng Computer Science with Artificial Intelligence | G4GR | 4 years MEng Computer Science with Distributed Systems and Networks | G4G5 | 4 years MEng Computer Science with Image and Multimedia Systems | G450 | 4 years MEng Computer Science with Mobile and Secure Systems | G421 | 4 years BEng Software Engineering | G4G6 | 3 years MEng Software Engineering | G600 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

From entertainment and business to global challenges, computing power and resources are being harnessed to transform our world. We offer one of the widest programmes of courses and modules available. On all our programmes you will explore the essential development tools used by software architects: programming languages; development environments; and modelling tools for specification, analysis and design of software systems. You will learn the latest methodologies in capturing requirements, structuring applications and data, and achieving thorough program testing. All our degrees are accredited by the British Computer Society and transfer is possible up to the end of year two. During the first two years of your course you will experience software engineering in labs, lectures, and a group project covering the areas of databases, compilers and operating systems and networks. In your third year you will undertake your own research project, designing and implementing a substantial piece of software and writing a project report. If you choose to take the four-year MEng degree course, you will undertake a group design project for an industrial client in your final year. The projects are designed to help you acquire a wide range of skills – teamwork, project planning, applying your learning to design and build problems, time-management, presentation, and working to a brief – which will stand you in good stead as you move into your career. BSc Computer Science G400

“There is a culture of quality and innovation in the school that feeds through to the students. Since moving on and starting work, it is clear how well my degree has prepared me.” Chris Gell MEng Computer Science graduate, 2008, now working at M&G Investments

This programme is taught from a software engineering standpoint, with the emphasis on producing working software systems, underpinned by a mathematical base. MEng Computer Science G401 Same structure and content as G400 in years one and two −− Two 10-week work placements in industry between years two and three, and years three and four −− Courses in industrial applications, individual design and research projects, and specialisation in technical areas in years three and four

ECS has one of the best undergraduate computer labs in the UK

MEng Computer Science with Artificial Intelligence G4GR Undertaking specialist courses similar to those for G401, you will also begin to understand practical industrial applications of artificial intelligence and undertake individual research projects. MEng Computer Science with Distributed Systems and Networks G4G5 Undertaking specialist courses similar to those for G401, you will also begin to understand practical industrial applications of distributed systems and networks, and undertake individual research projects. MEng Computer Science with Image and Multimedia Systems G450

More emphasis on practical information technology and professional issues.

−− Computers and networks −− Artificial intelligence −− Hypertext and web technologies −− Scripting languages

MEng Software Engineering G600

Career opportunities

BEng Software Engineering G4G6 Similar structure and content as G400

Key facts

Major employers worldwide are keen to employ our graduates − in system development, information technology and communications in the IT sector, and in the finance, service, communications and entertainment industries.

World-leading school, pioneer of many of the most important advances in computer science and web technology in the last 10 years

The School has strong relationships with employers, runs its own Careers Hub website (www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/careers) and holds its own annual careers fair.

Top five school in the UK (the Guardian and the Times league tables)

Scholarships

Along with the options available for the MEng Computer Science, years three and four provide opportunities for advanced software development.

Undertaking specialist courses similar to those for G401, you will also broaden your interests in practical industrial applications, group work and individual design projects.

Ranked second in the UK for research quality in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. Generous scholarships, outstanding computing facilities and helpdesks, and excellent learning resources

MEng Computer Science with Mobile and Secure Systems G421

Typical course content

This new course focuses on two of the most exciting areas of emerging technologies. Special features of the course include dedicated additional laboratory modules to familiarise students with hand-held low-power devices using group gaming exercises and other investigative scenarios.

−− Practical programming −− Applications and systems −− Software engineering −− Distributed computing −− Computational systems −− Theory of computing

For information on scholarships in the School of Electronics and Computer Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr David Millard, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Departmental booklet and video podcasts available. School of Electronics and Computer Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2969 Email: ucas@ecs.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ecs

Have you ever wondered what causes offensive and antisocial behaviour? Would you like to study crime and the responses to it in the media and other social institutions? Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB or ABBb (when an additional AS level has been studied), plus GCSE mathematics and English at grade C or above IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 30 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application (interview as required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) | LM39 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) | LL36 | 3 years | see page 60 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) | LC3V | 3 years | see page 82 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) | L310 | 3 years | see page 62

Criminology

Located at Highfield Campus

80

Are there such things as ‘cultures’ of crime? What are the consequences of how people perceive the ‘criminal’ social world around them? Although you will specialise in criminology, the overall Applied Social Sciences degree programme has been carefully crafted to offer four degree pathways that enable you to enjoy the specialised challenge of your own discipline while you study optional modules from the others, encouraging you to study the social world beyond a criminological focus. This enables you to explore the connections and differences between your main studies in criminology and wider social factors from the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, sociology and social policy, as you create a degree suited for your intended future career.

“The multidisciplinary approach of this programme deepens your understanding of criminology by drawing together myriad social phenomena, from crime in society, to witchcraft, to welfare, all enmeshed within the social fabric that is our world.” Matt Fitt BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) graduate

Perceptions of crime and criminal justice

Further information, including a typical module breakdown of the degree over three years, can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/ appsocsci

Key facts

Career opportunities

Optional choices from other pathways, with increasing specialisation in criminology each year

The Criminology pathway allows you to explore the development of criminology, its range of perspectives, and their applications to specific areas of crime and criminal justice, including comparisons with the experiences of different countries.

Provides an invaluable range of skills and knowledge of the social sciences and their applications

−− Central and local government −− Voluntary sector −− Research −− Human resources −− Social services and social work −− Journalism and media −− Police service and probation work −− Private security and the prison service −− Postgraduate research and study

−−Throughout all three years there is a wide range of optional modules from other applied social sciences pathways, with increasing specialisation in criminology −−Introductory year one offers a range of optional courses −−In year three you will write a dissertation linked to criminology, on a research topic of your choice

Offers specialised intellectual insight into crime and society

Dedicated, friendly and approachable staff

Typical course content −− Social thought in context −− The making of psychology −− Society and crime: sociological perspectives −− Social problems and social policy −− Perspectives in criminology −− Crime, social change and society −− Psychological applications to crime and criminal justice −− Youth, crime and society −− Penology −− Sexuality and intimacy −− Issues in law enforcement and social control −− Dissertation project

What to do next Contact Nick Rayner, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2512 Email: sspucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

Explore the development of psychology and criminology, with their range of perspectives and applications, to specific areas of crime and criminal justice, including the experiences of different countries and cultures. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB or ABBb (when an additional AS level has been studied), plus GCSE mathematics and English at grade C or above) IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 35 Average applicants per place: 8

Criminology & Psychological Studies

Selection process: UCAS application (interview as required)

82

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) | LC3V | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Anthropology) | LL36 | 3 years | see page 60 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology) | LM39 | 3 years | see page 80 BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (General Pathway) | L310 | 3 years | see page 62 Located at Highfield Campus

Although you will specialise in criminology and psychological studies, the overall Applied Social Sciences degree programme has been carefully crafted to offer four degree pathways that enable you to enjoy the specialised challenge of your own discipline while you study optional courses from the others. This will encourage you to study the social world beyond a criminological and psychological focus, enabling you to explore the connections and differences between your main studies and wider social and global factors from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology and social policy, as you create a degree suited for your intended future career. Further information, including a typical module breakdown of the degree over three years, can be found at www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

“This pathway has given me useful insights into the conception and perception of crime across different societies and epochs. As a foreign student, I have found that staff and students are friendly and understanding, while being aware of the differences that can exist between cultures and societies.� Richard Kapend BSc (Social Sciences) Applied Social Sciences (Criminology and Psychological Studies) graduate

What are the psychological motivators behind crime?

The Criminology and psychological studies pathway in applied social sciences provides an exceptional opportunity to study the psychological motivations behind offensive and antisocial behaviour. You will explore the unique aspects of each discipline within a complementary approach. The psychological studies content of the pathway enables you to investigate topics and issues of central relevance to the applied social sciences and criminology from a psychological perspective. The central focus of your studies in psychology will be social issues in applied settings, rooted in key theories and methods of psychology. −−Optional modules from other applied social sciences pathways are available throughout all three years, with increasing specialisation in criminology and psychological studies −−Introductory year one offers a range of optional modules −−In year three you will write a dissertation linked to criminology and psychological studies, on a research topic of your choice

Key facts

Career opportunities

Optional choices from other pathways, with increasing specialisation in criminology and psychological studies each year

−− Police work −− Probation work −− Prison service and private security −− Central and local government −− Voluntary sector −− Research −− Human resources −− Social services and social work −− Journalism and the media −− Postgraduate research and study

Provides an invaluable range of skills and knowledge of the social sciences and their applications Dedicated, friendly and approachable staff More modules in psychology than any other applied social sciences pathway

Typical course content −− The making of psychology −− Individuals in society −− The psychology of groups −− Psychological disorders −− Contemporary issues in psycho-social studies −− Social science perspectives −− Introduction to criminology −− Perspectives in criminology −− Psychological applications to crime and criminal justice −− Youth, crime and society −− Penology

What to do next Contact Nick Rayner, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2512 Email: sspucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/appsocsci

We all take economic decisions every day and are affected by other people’s decisions at a local, national and global level. Economics is the study of these decisions and actions, and of the way economic processes work. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Intake: 110 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Some questions obviously involve economics. Should you study economics at university? To answer this question, you need to compare the costs and benefits of your decision. Should you start investing in a pension now? The answer to this question is yes, if the expected benefits from a higher pension (discounted to take into account that they occur in the future) outweigh the costs of missing out on spending money and consuming today.

Some questions do not appear to involve economics, but actually do. Should you vote? There are a number of ways to think about this question: a straight economics MEcon Economics view contrasts the costs of voting (reading manifestos, | L101 | 4 years watching party political broadcasts, going to the polling station) with the benefits, where those benefits are BSc (Social Sciences) Accounting and Economics weighted by the probability that your single vote will | NL41 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Actuarial Science make a difference to the overall election outcome. Of course, economics is extremely important for | L1N3 | 3 years governments and policy makers as well. Should there BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Finance be a minimum wage? Do certain industries need to be | L1NH | 3 years regulated? Does foreign aid actually help developing BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Management countries? Are house prices out of control? Should Sciences students pay for university education? All these policy | L112 | 3 years questions require economics as a key input. BSc (Social Sciences) Economics | L100 | 3 years

Economics

BA Economics and Philosophy* | VL51 | 3 years | see page 171

84

BSc Mathematics with Economics | G1L1 | 3 years | see page 149 BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Economics | LL12 | 3 years | see page 179 BSc (Social Sciences) Politics, Philosophy and Economics | subject to validation | 3 years | see page 179 Located at Highfield Campus *Located at Highfield and Avenue Campuses

Economics helps us to think in the right way about a wide range of problems. Consider whether a university degree increases earnings. A non-economist might just look at whether university graduates earn more on average. An economist recognises a crucial difficulty: perhaps more able people go to university. Then the question becomes: what proportion of the higher earnings is due to the greater ability of those going to university, and what proportion is due to the education they receive when they get there?

Is the stock market just a lottery?

By studying a degree in economics, you will gain in-depth knowledge of the discipline, along with key problem-solving, communication and data-analysis skills. Your research and project management skills will be developed through the supervised dissertation of 8,000 words, which is a crucial part of all programmes (making up 25 per cent of the final year).

will be taught by leading economists with international reputations in their fields. The Economics Division at the University of Southampton has strengths in all the main areas of economics.

All our degree programmes provide comprehensive training in economic analysis and quantitative methods, equipping you with the skills and expertise demanded by employers in industry and finance.

This programme studies economics in great depth, through a core of microeconomics (principles and applied), macroeconomic (principles and policy), and econometrics. You can choose between a number of pathways to reflect your background and interests. For example, if you are considering progressing to a master’s degree in economics, you can choose to continue with Microeconomic theory and Topics in macroeconomics in year three. If you enjoy investigating the quantitative principles underlying econometric techniques, you may replace the two Econometric methods courses with three modules: Statistical theory, Econometrics, and Applied econometrics.

We offer two types of programme: single honours, for those who want to specialise in economics; and joint honours, for those who want to combine their interest in economics with another subject (subject to some restrictions, students can transfer between programmes). Particular emphasis is given to new developments in economics (eg the economics of information, game theory, credible macroeconomic policy, the measurement of inequality and the analysis of financial data), so our programmes provide an excellent grounding for any career, including that of professional economist. You

BSc (Social Sciences) Economics L100 A level mathematics at grade B or above required

MEcon Economics L101 A level mathematics at grade B or above required Our master’s degree offers an alternative to a three-year undergraduate programme plus a one-year MSc. The course develops the conceptual, analytical and research

skills needed by a professional economist, enabling you to apply economic analysis to policy problems and build in-depth knowledge of the workings of the economy. Only one dissertation is required. BSc (Social Sciences) Accounting and Economics NL41 AS level mathematics at grade C or above required Combining economics with a detailed study of accountancy, this degree is ideal if you wish to pursue a career in accountancy, and provides exemptions from professional accounting examinations. The accounting and related management components are taught by the School of Management. BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Actuarial Science L1N3 A level mathematics at grade A required If you like mathematics, enjoy problem solving and are curious about financial issues, this programme is for you. Years one and two cover three core themes − economics, statistics and demography − and form the basis for the actuarial core and options which constitute a major part of years two and three. The degree provides exemptions from up to eight of the core technical (CT) professional exams. The actuarial modules are taught in common with the Mathematics with Actuarial Studies programme.

“Economics seemed like an ideal choice after my A levels. Having not studied economics before, I felt it was something new and interesting. I also felt that it would be an excellent degree to provide a gateway into the financial working sector upon graduating.�

86

Continued

Economics

Victoria Watkinson | BSc Economics graduate, 2009

BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Finance L1NH A level mathematics at grade B or above required This degree programme combines a firm grounding in economics with the theoretical and empirical analysis of financial markets and institutions. The programme will suit you if you are interested in building a thorough understanding of the world of finance, either as preparation for a career in a financial institution or simply to understand better the world in which we live. BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Management Sciences L112 AS level mathematics at grade C required The economics and management approaches in this degree programme complement and enhance each other. Your studies in economics will consider the actions of economic agents (individuals, firms and governments), while your studies in management will show you the best way to organise and run a corporate enterprise, private or public, as viewed from within. How does the corporation choose prices, stock levels and marketing strategy? How does it organise its financial control procedures and deploy human resources? The programme also provides some exemptions from professional accounting examinations, and is taught jointly with the School of Management.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Among the top-ranked economics departments in the UK in three consecutive Research Assessment Exercises. Economics and econometrics ranked eleventh nationally in 2008

−− Banking −− Insurance and reinsurance −− Accountancy −− Market research −− Economist (employers include Close links with the actuarial profession the Government Economic Service, and the insurance industry banks, consultancies and the financial services sector) A range of first-year modules for those without economics and/or mathematics −− Actuary A level −− Financial analyst −− NHS administrator BSc Accounting and Economics accredited by the accountancy profession −− Money market dealer and modules in our BSc Economics and Actuarial Science accredited by the Institute of Actuaries Economic Review, a magazine for A and AS level students, is edited by staff in the division

Typical course content −− A core of macroeconomics and microeconomics, both theory and applied, plus econometrics −− Quantitative material at several levels −− Core modules for some programmes also available as options in others (eg Industrial economics, Portfolio theory, Managerial decisions, Statistical methods of insurance, Financial accounting, Principles of finance, Empirical finance) −− Development economics, International trade, Public economics and Labour economics as options

What to do next Contact the Undergraduate Admissions Administrator for more information. A detailed brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4746 Email: ecucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton. ac.uk/economics

The BA Education and Training (PCET) – equivalent to one year of full-time study at third-year degree level – was designed specifically for practitioners who do not already hold an undergraduate degree. Typical entry requirements The BA Education and Training (PCET) is equivalent to a one-year, full-time programme at third-year degree level. Candidates must have completed work equivalent to the first two years of a full-time honours degree. The primary qualification for entry is our Certificate in Education (PCET) Intake: 25 Average applicants per place: 5 Selection process: Application form and interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure may be required if a placement is required outside the individual’s place of work

This course provides an academic route of progression for non-graduate practitioners currently working in post-compulsory education and training. Achieving graduate status will assist your career progression and open up new opportunities in all areas of the field. It is particularly relevant to the work and careers of lecturers, instructors and trainers in post-compulsory education and training. The programme comprises challenging work, based on further, higher, adult and continuing education, both in the UK and overseas. It is designed to build on and complement the skills and understanding you have already developed, with an increasing academic and research-based orientation.

Degree | Duration

88

Applications are made directly to the University, or to Bournemouth and Poole College. Applications for the Isle of Wight College should be made through the University. Application forms may be downloaded from our website at www.southampton.ac.uk/education Located at the University of Southampton, Bournemouth and Poole College, and Isle of Wight College

Post-Compulsory

Education & Training

BA Education and Training (PCET) | 2 years (part-time)

“Most of our students are mature professionals, teaching in a variety of organisations. They see the University of Southampton as providing them with a flexible opportunity to obtain a degree. Our BA enables them to fulfil their personal ambitions and employment potential.” Alan Harding Programme Director, Education and Training (PCET)

Build on the skills and understanding you have already developed

Key facts

Career opportunities

Scholarships

Allows Certificate of Education students to achieve degree status

−− Student support −− Adult education −− Community education −− Further education −− Health services −− Uniformed services −− Work-based training programmes −− Educational management −− School guidance −− Training roles

For information on scholarships in the School of Education go to www.southampton.ac.uk/education_ funding

Teaching and assessment rooted in your own experiences Excellent career progression Allows you to earn while you learn Experienced tutors

Typical course content −− Management −− Social context −− Learning theory −− Philosophy −− Policy analysis −− Individual research project

What to do next Contact the School of Education for more information. A detailed course brochure is available on the School’s website. School of Education Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3477 Email: educate@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/education

If you are a graduate working as a teaching assistant, or you have some credits from higher-level study and are looking to attain qualified teacher status, this programme will prepare you to teach within the primary age range. Typical entry requirements This programme seeks to recruit students with at least 220 CAT credits, with some experience of working with children, preferably in an early years/ primary school setting. You will also need GCSE mathematics, English and a science subject at grades A*−C or equivalent Intake: 30 Selection process: Application form and interview, including a five-minute presentation and spelling test; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure will be required

90

BA Education and Training (Primary) with Qualified Teacher Status | 2 years Applications are made directly to the University. Application forms may be downloaded from our website at www.southampton.ac.uk/education Located at Highfield Campus

with Qualified Teacher Status

Education & Training (Primary)

Degree | Duration

The course provides a way forward for those students who have completed an FdA in a related subject, such as our FdA Working with Children, or who have 220 CAT credits from higher-level study in a related area. The programme is full-time over two years, with classes taking place on one whole day and an evening per week. There is an additional expectation that periods of between one and six weeks will be spent on school-based training in an appropriate school throughout the two years. You will explore the main psychological and philosophical perspectives necessary to develop excellent educational practice that is both creative and critical. The programme consists of six units, each of which carries 20 credits at level 6. You will also complete a research project, which carries 40 credits.

“It’s great seeing students grow in confidence as trainee teachers, and rewarding to see them complete the degree and become excellent, caring and well-qualified primary teachers. Some are already thinking about moving on to undertake postgraduate studies.” Dr Jasmine Rhamie Lecturer in Primary Education

Classes take place one afternoon and evening per week

Key facts

Typical course content

Scholarships

Provides a flexible route into teaching

−− Learning theory −− Social context −− Philosophy −− Management −− Policy analysis −− QTS studies −− Research project −− School-based training

For information on scholarships in the School of Education go to www.southampton.ac.uk/education_ funding

Allows you to work as you train Provides you with an honours degree as well as Qualified Teaching Status (QTS) Qualifies you to teach across two consecutive age ranges between Foundation Stage, Key Stage 1 or Key Stage 1/Key Stage 2 Recent Ofsted inspection awarded grade 2 (good) for provision

What to do next Contact the School of Education for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Education Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7253 Email: educate@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/education

Electrical engineering concerns anything that involves electrical power, from the electromagnetics of superconducting systems to the principles of power generation and transmission, and the development of more efficient and sustainable energy sources. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including mathematics and physics IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in mathematics and physics at higher level Intake: 20 Average applicants per place: 9 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng Electrical Engineering | H620 | 3 years MEng Electrical Engineering | H601 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100

Electrical Engineering

Located at Highfield Campus

92

Our programmes are broad, based on solid physics and mathematics, and include many different elements that complement traditional power engineering. It is this combination of breadth, fundamentals and their application which gives these courses their strength. Not only is electrical engineering a fascinating and relevant discipline, but our graduates are in great demand. According to the Independent, “Over 90 per cent of recruiters [in electricity and power supply companies] are looking specifically for electrical engineers”, and with an electrical engineering degree from the University of Southampton, your career prospects will be first class. You will be taught by staff with up-to-date knowledge of industrial problems, ensuring that theory is illustrated with understanding derived from practical experience. Our courses are accredited by the Institute of Engineering and Technology, and all students are eligible for generous funding and sponsorship from the UK Power Academy: www.theiet.org/poweracademy

“Current students of electrical engineering have really timed it right – the job opportunities are amazing. We’ve got to invest in the UK power industry for the next 40 years, and there are challenging and financially very rewarding careers out there.” Professor Alun Vaughan Electrical Power Engineering

The new ECS electrical engineering lab

BEng Electrical Engineering H620

To find out more about student life in the School of Electronics and Computer Science, read our student blogs at www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/admissions/ ug/blogs

This programme covers topics ranging from the technologies of electrical power and control to microelectronics and computing. You will work on systems which interface electronics and computers with aircraft, electric cars and renewable Key facts Second in the UK for electrical and energy sources. electromechanical engineering −− Wide range of technical subjects (the Times and the Guardian, 2010) covered in year one, in common with other degrees in the School, enabling you to transfer between programmes in this year −− Focus on core subjects in year two, with opportunity to tailor your studies to meet your interests in year three, including options from outside the School −− Project work allows you to work at the frontier of knowledge with one of our research groups

World-leading school, with its own high-voltage laboratory Member of the UK Power Academy 97.5 per cent of research deemed “world class” or “of international standing” in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Generous scholarships, outstanding electrical engineering lab and computing facilities and helpdesks, and excellent learning resources

MEng Electrical Engineering H601

Typical course content

This programme enhances the BEng material with a selection of courses, including more advanced engineering topics, management studies, law and group projects, in which you will tackle wide-ranging engineering problems.

−− Applied electromagnetics −− Circuits −− Control and systems engineering −− Electrical machine dynamics −− Electrical materials −− Electronics −− High-voltage engineering −− Mathematics −− Power electronics −− Power systems engineering

−− Years one and two are the same as for H620, allowing for transfer between the two courses during this time −− Emphasis on independent learning in years three and four −− Group design project in year four, to design and construct a product needed by industry

Career opportunities The School has excellent relationships with employers, runs its own Careers Hub website (ecs.soton.ac.uk/careers) and holds its own annual careers fair. We have one of the best employment rates in the UK. −− Electricity supply industry −− Major electrical companies −− Government departments −− Software houses −− Research and development −− Management −− Business and finance

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Electronics and Computer Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr David Swaffield, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Course brochure and video podcasts available. School of Electronics and Computer Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2969 Email: ucas@ecs.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ecs

Electromechanical engineering is concerned with systems ranging from micro-machines to powerful industrial robots, all relying on mechanical elements, electrical power, sensing and control to produce a useful device. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including mathematics and physics IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in mathematics and physics at higher level Intake: 20 Average applicants per place: 9 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Electromechanical Engineering

BEng Electromechanical Engineering | HH36 | 3 years

94

MEng Electromechanical Engineering | HHH6 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

“If you’re looking to head into engineering, but you’re not sure about what to specialise in, this is the course to take! From a broad base, it provides the opportunity to specialise later in the degree, making possible a wide range of careers in engineering and other fields.” Steve Gough MEng Electromechanical Engineering graduate, 2007; Power Academy Scholar

A modern jet airliner is an excellent example of a large electromechanical device. Electrical power and electronic control have to be converted into real mechanical work to enable the pilot to adjust the rudder, ailerons and elevators, and control the plane. At the same time, monitoring the plane’s response involves sensing mechanical movements and forces, and converting these into information signals for electronic systems to display. This degree programme was developed in response to the needs of industry, and includes a wide range of complementary topics from the related disciplines of mechanical engineering, electronics, control theory and power engineering. It is this combination of breadth, fundamentals and applications that gives our courses their strength. Our programmes are accredited by the Institute of Engineering and Technology, and all students are eligible for generous funding and sponsorship from the UK Power Academy: www.theiet.org/poweracademy

For his Part 3 project Wayne Tubby built a low-cost robot platform capable of negotiating rough terrain

BEng Electromechanical Engineering HH36 This programme is broad-based, integrating the study of electrical power, mechanical elements to convert that power into motion, electronics, control theory and computing. Theory is illustrated with understanding derived from practical experience and project work, which is a major component and is often linked with industrial activity. −− Wide range of technical subjects covered in year one, in common with other degrees in the School, enabling you to transfer between programmes in this year −− Mixture of electrical and mechanical subjects in year two, with supporting mathematics −− Opportunity to tailor your studies to meet your interests in year three, including options such as technical law, management, modern languages and advanced mathematics MEng Electromechanical Engineering HHH6 This programme enhances the BEng material with a selection of courses which include more advanced engineering topics, management studies, law and group projects, in which you will tackle wideranging engineering problems, requiring an understanding of mechanics as well as power engineering. −− Years one and two are the same as for HH36, allowing for transfer between the two courses during this time

−− Emphasis on independent learning in years three and four −− Group design project in year four, to design and construct a product needed by industry

Career opportunities

Key facts

−− Engineering systems −− Electricity supply industry −− Major electrical companies −− Government departments −− Software houses −− Research and development −− Management −− Business and finance

Ranked number two in the UK for electrical and electromechanical engineering (the Times and the Guardian, 2010) World-leading school, with its own high-voltage laboratory Member of the UK Power Academy 97.5 per cent of research deemed “world class” or “of international standing” in the Research Assessment Exercise 2008 Generous scholarships, outstanding electromechanical lab and computing facilities and helpdesks, and excellent learning resources

The School has strong relationships with employers, runs its own Careers Hub website (www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/careers) and holds its own annual careers fair.

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Electronics and Computer Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Typical course content −− Automation and robotics −− Circuits −− Electromechanical design −− Electronics −− Engineering design and manufacture −− Linear engineering systems −− Materials −− Mathematics −− Mechanics of solids −− Power transmission and vibration

What to do next Contact Dr David Swaffield, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Course brochure and video podcasts available. School of Electronics and Computer Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2969 Email: ucas@ecs.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ecs

Electronics and electronic systems have become the enabling technology of the material world, with devices becoming smaller, cheaper, and faster. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA, including mathematics and a physical science, preferably physics IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including 6 in mathematics and a physical science at higher level Intake: 75 Average applicants per place: 6−7 Selection process: UCAS application and interview

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng Electronic Engineering | H610 | 3 years MEng Electronic Engineering | H603 | 4 years MEng Electronic Engineering with Artificial Intelligence | H6G7 | 4 years MEng Electronic Engineering with Computer Systems | H6G4 | 4 years MEng Electronic Engineering with Nanotechnology | H611 | 4 years

Electronic Engineering

MEng Electronic Engineering with Optical Communications | H680 | 4 years

96

MEng Electronic Engineering with Power Systems | H690 | 4 years MEng Electronic Engineering with Wireless Communications | H641 | 4 years MEng Electronic Engineering with Mobile and Secure Systems | H691 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

This revolution has brought us mobile phones, MP3 players, satnav and hand-helds. Increasingly, electronics are playing a part in medicine and the biological sciences. As devices become smaller, they can be implanted in people to monitor heart conditions and deliver insulin. In the future, they may be used to seek out and destroy viruses. Our courses will involve you in all aspects of designing modern electronic systems, through a mixture of theory and practical demonstrations, laboratory work, group coursework and a challenging personal project. All our courses are accredited by the Institute of Engineering and Technology, and are recognised by the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS), which provides sponsored places as part of officer training in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces. We offer generous scholarships and have outstanding electronic and computing facilities. BEng Electronic Engineering H610 This popular course will provide you with the skills to work in any area of the electronics industry. −− Years one and two cover the basic theory and practice essential to any chartered engineer, with year two consolidating the basic skills of a modern electronic engineer −− Year three allows you to tailor the programme to suit your interests, and includes an individual project

“In ECS you’re benchmarking yourself with really bright and committed people from all over the world, and it gives you a better focus on your work. The whole experience for me was a rollercoaster of learning and personal development – and lots of fun.” Sean Nuzum MEng Electronic Engineering; UK Student of the Year 2008

The world’s cheapest swarm robots were designed and built by ECS Electronic Engineering students on the Bio-Inspired Robotics course

MEng Electronic Engineering H603 This degree will equip you with the wide range of skills required for a career in electronics and information engineering. −− Years one and two follow H610 −− Specialist options in years three and four will take you to the leading edge of technology sought by industry −− There is an opportunity to study abroad for one or two semesters MEng Electronic Engineering with Artificial Intelligence H6G7 Core content as for H610 This programme provides a thorough grounding in electronic engineering, plus advanced topics in years three and four (eg adaptive systems, artificial intelligence, advanced computer graphics and computational intelligence). MEng Electronic Engineering with Computer Systems H6G4 Content and structure similar to H6G7 Specialist modules in years three and four include computer networks, advanced computer architecture, applied parallel and concurrent programming and computational modelling. MEng Electronic Engineering with Nanotechnology H611 Content and structure similar to H6G7 Specialist modules in years three and four include integrated circuit design, digital system synthesis, VLSI design, silicon technology and devices, and nanotechnology. MEng Electronic Engineering with Optical Communications H680 Content and structure similar to H6G7

Specialist modules in years three and four include optoelectronics, optical fibre communications, and integrated and non-linear optics. MEng Electronic Engineering with Power Systems H690 This course aims to produce engineers who can tackle the challenge of designing modern power systems for tomorrow’s world. Students are eligible for funding under the Power Academy Scheme. MEng Electronic Engineering with Wireless Communications H641 Content and structure similar to H6G7 Specialist modules in years three and four include signal processing, speech communications, personal multimedia communications, radio communications engineering, sonar and computer vision. MEng Electronic Engineering with Mobile and Secure Systems H691 Core content similar to H610 The focus of this stream is on aspects of hardware and software design for mobile systems which have constrained power and signal processing ability with wireless channels as the chief means of external communication. Specialist labs are conducted in the first two years to familiarise students with hand-held low-power devices using group gaming exercises and other scenarios.

Key facts World-leading school, pioneer of many of the most important advances in electronics and microelectronics in the last 30 years Ranked number two for electronics in the UK (the Times and the Guardian, 2010)

New £100 million interdisciplinary clean room opened in 2008 97.5 per cent of research in electronics in the School is rated “world class” or “of international standing” (RAE, 2008)

Typical course content −− C and C# programming −− Analogue and digital circuit design −− Solid state electronics −− Design and test of digital systems −− Control and systems engineering −− Radio communication −− Computer networks −− Nanotechnology −− Group design project −− Individual research project

Career opportunities 97 per cent of our graduates had graduate-level jobs within six months of graduation in 2008. The School has excellent relationships with employers, with its own ECS Careers Hub website (www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/careers) and annual careers fair.

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Electronics and Computer Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr Nick Harris, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Course brochure and video podcasts available. School of Electronics and Computer Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2969 Email: ucas@ecs.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ecs

Southampton is the UK’s leading university for engineering, and is highly rated for the quality of its research and teaching. Our degrees provide breadth and depth of study, enabling our graduates to follow a wide variety of careers in engineering and other professions. Typical entry requirements See individual programmes for details of typical entry requirements.

The four engineering schools within the Faculty of Engineering, Science and Mathematics are: −−Civil Engineering and the Environment −−Electronics and Computer Science

Subject areas

−−Engineering Sciences

Acoustical Engineering | see page 56

−−Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

Aeronautics and Astronautics | see page 58

Key facts

Engineering at Southampton

Civil Engineering | see page 76

98

Computer Science and Software Engineering | see page 78 Electrical Engineering | see page 92 Electromechanical Engineering | see page 94 Electronic Engineering | see page 96 Environmental Engineering | see page 106 Mechanical Engineering | see page 152 Ship Science | see page 188

Our four engineering schools offer a world-class environment for research and education All our degrees are accredited for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status A range of programmes with a choice of specialisations in later years Opportunity to study for both BEng and MEng programmes in most disciplines, with flexible degree paths

Career opportunities −− Our degree programmes provide you with the skills and knowledge to compete for the most senior positions in industry −− Many of our graduates go on to obtain higher degrees and enjoy successful careers in research and academia −− The Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) sends sponsored trainee officers from the three armed services and the civil service to Southampton to study engineering

SPI Lasers UK Ltd, University of Southampton spin-out company

The Foundation Year is the first year of a four- or five-year programme leading to a degree in any of our engineering, computer science, physics or geophysics disciplines. Successful completion of the year guarantees progression to our degree programmes. Typical entry requirements A levels: BBB BTEC National Diploma: DDM IB: 3o points, 16 at higher level Intake: 80 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application (additional information may also be required, such as a mathematics test)

BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years BSc/MEng Computer Science with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years BSc Geophysical Sciences/MGeophys Geophysics with Foundation Year | F662 | 4/5 years BSc/MPhys Physics with Foundation Year | F301 | 4/5 years Located at Highfield Campus

Foundation Year

Engineering/Physics/Geophysics

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

100

This programme may suit you if you are studying for A levels in subjects different from those normally required for an engineering or physical science degree, or for a BTEC National Certificate or Diploma. It may also interest you if you are a mature applicant, with skills and experience from employment, or if you come from part of the world where the education system is different from the British A level system. We may also consider your application if you have taken mathematics and physics at A level but circumstances beyond your control (eg serious illness or personal problems) have led to lower grades than your high predictions. This full-time programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, tutorials, laboratory sessions and private study. Assessment is mainly by unseen written examination and a variety of coursework assignments. There is a strong emphasis on problem solving and the application of mathematics.

“The most rewarding part of my job is supporting the students as they develop their academic skills, and watching them grow in confidence at the same time.� Sandra Conway Foundation Year Student Support Manager

Foundation Year students in a laboratory

Key facts

Typical course content

Scholarships

A route to a degree in engineering, computer science, physics or geophysics for students without the traditional entry qualifications

−− Mathematics −− Academic and communication skills −− Computer applications −− Electricity and electronics −− Engineering principles −− Laboratory work −− Mechanical science

For information on scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

All students taught on our Highfield Campus Mature and international students welcome Supportive learning environment Excellent dedicated facilities

What to do next Contact Dr A Barney, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A course leaflet is available. Engineering/Physics/ Geophysics Foundation Year Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3113 Email: foundyr@southampton.ac.uk www.esm.soton.ac.uk/foundation

English can be a particularly satisfying degree course, giving you the chance to use your imagination and creativity as well as your intelligence. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including an A in English literature or language and literature IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in higher level English Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA English | Q300 | 3 years BA English and French | QR31 | 4 years BA English and German | QR32 | 4 years BA English and History | QV31 | 3 years BA English and Music | QW33 | 3 years BA English and Philosophy | QV35 | 3 years BA English and Spanish | QR34 | 4 years BA Film and English | QW36 | 3 years | see page 115

English

Located at Avenue Campus

102

The best reason for choosing to study English literature is that you enjoy it and are good at it – you read widely, are not afraid of intellectual challenges and have a feeling for words. English at Southampton covers a broad timespan, from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century, with an emphasis on the relationship of literature to its historical and cultural context. Our academic staff are active researchers at the cutting edge of their fields. Through our teaching we provide first-hand access to recent discoveries, new theories and current debates in English studies. We value face-to-face contact with students and support all our courses with web-based learning resources, as well as important electronic research tools and licences, such as Early English Books Online. BA English Q300 Year one introduces general areas of study, theoretical approaches and practical skills, laying the foundation for deeper study of the areas of literature and cultural theory that interest you most in your second and final years. −− Two English double modules and four single modules in year one −− A range of modules in your second and final year, and a final-year dissertation on a topic of your choice −− Option to take 25 per cent of your programme in an alternative subject

“I loved the huge choice available when choosing modules; there were always some that I knew I’d love. The lecturers obviously wanted to be teaching us interesting subjects that we’d enjoy, and they did!”

BA English and French QR31 BA English and German QR32 BA English and Spanish QR34

Lisa Thompson BA Film and English graduate, 2006

−− Two core English courses and core modules from your other subject in year one −− Choice of modules from both subjects in your second and final years, with the option to take up to 25 per cent of your programme in an alternative subject

These combined degrees provide a broader understanding of the literature and critical theory aspects of your English studies, while emphasising linguistic training and the study of contemporary culture. You will spend year three in a country where your chosen language is spoken.

Students enjoying their lecture

Key facts

Career opportunities

BA English and History QV31

A wide range of options, including groundbreaking work in international writing, film studies and creative writing

Of our 2008 graduates, 83 per cent are currently in paid work or further education.

Combined degree structure as for QR31/ QR32/QR34

Rated 2.8 out of 4 in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise

Previous graduates have found employment in:

This wide-ranging programme draws on the growing emphasis on historical and cultural context in English studies, which has led to increasingly strong links between the two subjects, particularly in the area of Jewish studies and the eighteenth century.

92 per cent of students agreed that the overall quality of the English course was good in the National Student Survey (2008)

BA English and Music QW33

A close association with Chawton House Library and Study Centre – housing an extensive collection of women’s writing

−− Media −− Journalism −− Creative writing −− Theatre −− Publishing −− Advertising −− Law −− Civil service −− Teaching −− Postgraduate study −− Specialist training for specific career paths (eg accredited journalism courses)

−− Dissertation on a topic of your choice in either of your main subjects in your final year

Combined degree structure as for QR31/ QR32/QR34 This innovative programme explores the interconnections between the two disciplines, through the study of such aspects as the lyric, opera, musical and film. The music element of the degree combines technical studies with historical and critical perspectives, and includes modules on the music business and new musical technology. BA English and Philosophy QV35

The opportunity to study a language, plus student exchanges with Frankfurt, Lausanne, Barcelona and Cracow

Typical course content −− Narrative and culture −− Critical theory −− Introduction to stage and screen −− Poetic language −− Film studies −− Creative writing −− Postcolonial literature −− Medieval and Renaissance literature

Combined degree structure as for QR31/ QR32/QR34 Philosophy offers a range of philosophical styles, making it possible to explore the theoretical links between English and philosophy, reinforced by the substantial element of critical theory in the English course.

What to do next Contact Bella Millett or Shelley Cobb, Admissions Tutors, or Danni Sarony, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2736 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/english

Creativity and innovation are key to sustaining competition in a global economy, but generating new ideas is not enough. Entrepreneurship encompasses the successful exploitation of new ideas and the application of knowledge in new areas. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, plus GCSE mathematics grade B or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application (interview in special circumstances)

Entrepreneurship is about realising the potential of opportunities profitably, either within an existing organisation or by creating a new venture. Entrepreneurial behaviour requires a mindset that is always striving for improvement to keep ahead of the competition. Entrepreneurial qualities have never been more in demand by employers and are vital for those wishing to start a business themselves.

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Management with Entrepreneurship | N290 | 3 years BSc Management | N201 | 3 years | see page 142 BSc Management Sciences | N200 | 3 years | see page 144 International Foundation Year in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences (including School of Management programmes) | LMV0 | 1 year | see page 136

Entrepreneurship

Located at Highfield Campus

104

BSc Management with Entrepreneurship N290 A degree in management with entrepreneurship could enable you to operate at a strategic level within a variety of organisations, or even to set up your own company. It will also develop your key skills, such as problem solving, communication, self-management and teamwork. This degree provides a broad appreciation of management theory and practice from a number of different perspectives, combined with specialist knowledge of entrepreneurship. The programme places entrepreneurship in its broader managerial and organisational context.

“Entrepreneurial qualities have never been more in demand by companies seeking to employ well-qualified, innovative graduates. Being able to create and seize entrepreneurial opportunities is a valuable skill that could give you a competitive advantage in business today.� Dr Lorraine Warren Senior Lecturer in Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Exploiting new ideas

−− The management element of the programme explores the basic theoretical principles in key areas such as organisational behaviour, finance, marketing, operations and project management −− A central theme is entrepreneurial behaviour and how this relates to innovation, opportunity recognition and development, and new venture creation −− You will be able to choose optional modules from the School of Management, as well as a language or other approved subjects

Key facts One of the UK’s leading management schools In 2009, 76 per cent of School of Management students achieved firstclass or upper second-class degrees Our student society, ManSoc, is one of the largest academic societies affiliated to the Students’ Union

Typical course content −− Accounting −− Entrepreneurial management −− Entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviour −− Information systems and information technology −− Management analysis −− Managing innovation −− Managing opportunity −− Marketing −− New venture creation and development −− Operations management

−− A small number of students go on to establish their own business −− Recent recruiters of School of Management students include PricewaterhouseCoopers, BT, Barclays, Sainsbury’s, Ernst & Young and Deloitte

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Management go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Career opportunities −− The School of Management has close links with business −− Many of our graduates go on to professional training and graduate management schemes −− A range of career options are available, in management, accounting, finance, banking and retail

What to do next Visit the School of Management’s website for more information. School of Management Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5507 Email: mgtmail3@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ management

With a growing global population, the pressures on our increasingly scarce natural resources have never been greater. Typical entry requirements A level: AAA (excluding general studies and critical thinking), including mathematics and a science subject, preferably physics but biology, chemistry, geography, geology and environmental studies also considered IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level. To include mathematics and a science subject at higher level, with a minimum of 6 points in each Intake: 90 Average applicants per place: 10 Please note that our entry requirements may change. Please refer to www.southampton.ac.uk/civil for the latest information Selection process: UCAS application (interview may be required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Environmental Engineering

MEng Environmental Engineering | H251 | 4 years

106

MEng Environmental Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

A common question often raised relates to the difference between civil engineering and environmental engineering. First, it is important to understand that both civil and environmental engineering deal with providing solutions to issues faced by society: transporting goods, people, water, oil, gas, and providing infrastructure in the form of buildings and public spaces for work, housing and recreation. Most engineering relies on using resources. Civil engineering uses natural resources such as land, water, sea and other raw materials for construction. Environmental engineering is unique in that it offers solutions to problems arising out of the use of these resources. With a growing global population, the pressures on our increasingly scarce natural resources have never been greater. The MEng Environmental Engineering is fully accredited for Chartered Engineer status. The programme offers comprehensive coverage of environmental engineering, with an emphasis on design, teamwork and management, and the opportunity to gain key transferable skills.

“Southampton is one of the leading universities in the country for environmental engineering. It will give you a universally renowned and respected degree.” Peter Andrews MEng Environmental Engineering, 2009

Wind power is a renewable form of energy generation

Key facts

Typical course content

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise placed Southampton in an elite group in the civil engineering unit of assessment. On a ‘medals table’ basis, we were ranked second in the UK, reflecting both the high quality and volume of our research. Our grade point average was equivalent to the top 5* rating in the 2001 RAE

−− Mechanics −− Hydraulics −− Geology −− Geotechnics −− Environmental chemistry −− Design −− Surveying −− Water resources −− Environmental management −− Engineering mathematics

Teaching by leading experts in their fields Wide variety of optional modules First-rate facilities Excellent career prospects

−− Management consultancy −− Postgraduate study −− Academic teaching and research

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Civil Engineering and the Environment go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Career opportunities −− Consulting engineer −− Local authority engineer −− Environment Agency engineer −− Construction manager −− Project manager −− Civil servant −− Banking/financial services

What to do next Contact the Admissions Tutor for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Civil Engineering and the Environment Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4651 Email: admissions@civil.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/civil

Environmental scientists are the professionals who help us address the problems we face – now and in the future – managing our natural environment sustainably and seeking to balance this with economic and social concerns. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB–ABB, including two science subjects (from geography, biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, psychology, geology and environmental studies) and excluding general studies and critical thinking IB: 34–32 points, 17–16 at higher level, with a minimum of 12–10 points from the following science subjects at higher level: biology, chemistry, physics, geography, psychology and mathematics Intake: 60–65 Average applicants per place: 5 Selection process: Interview and visit day for suitable applicants

Environmental Sciences

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

108

BSc Environmental Sciences | F900 | 3 years MEnvSci Environmental Sciences | F902 | 4 years BSc/MEnvSci Environmental Sciences with Foundation Year | F903 | 4/5 years | see page 186 Located at Highfield Campus, with some options available at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

Such problems have become regular headline news items over the last few years, and include climate change, tsunamis, deforestation, pollution, destruction of wildlife, earthquakes and genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Our challenging degree programmes provide interdisciplinary knowledge, embracing geography, biology, ocean and earth science, and environmental science, and our diverse pathway system allows you to make your own choices about your areas of speciality. Our graduates are adaptable, knowledgeable professionals, with rewarding and worthwhile career prospects. Our annual surveys consistently report that over 80 per cent of our graduates are using their degree in their chosen career, 18 months after graduation.

“My degree, choice of modules and the volunteering I completed provided me with the experience I needed to get the job I am doing today. I am extremely glad I took my degree at the University of Southampton. I wouldn’t have wanted to do it anywhere else.” Matt Rake BSc Environmental Sciences graduate

Environmental Sciences students have plenty of opportunities to do fieldwork

BSc Environmental Sciences F900

Key facts

Career opportunities

A levels: ABB, including two science subjects IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level

Consistently rated well above national average for overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey

−− Environmental management for business −− Water resources and pollution control −− Sustainable energy −− Wildlife conservation and ecological management −− Environmental education −− Consultancy (in areas such as environmental impact assessment, wildlife management and contaminated land) −− Sustainable waste management −− Planning, local government and sustainability policy −− Academic teaching and research −− Environmental regulation and enforcement −− Overseas development projects

−− Core modules in environmental sciences, ecology, geography, statistics, ocean and earth science −− Year two modules in environmental impact assessment, pollution and environmental law −− Two field courses, leading to an independent research project in year three −− Lectures from guest speakers working in environmental fields

MEnvSci Environmental Sciences F902 A levels: AAB, including two science subjects IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level −− As for F900 in years one and two −− Work placement module in final year −− Two field courses −− Advanced level independent research project −− Lectures from guest speakers working in environmental fields

Flexible programme and wide range of options Two residential field courses – free in year one Study abroad option in Canada The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise placed Southampton in an elite group in the civil engineering unit of assessment. On a ‘medals table’ basis, we were ranked second in the UK, reflecting both the high quality and volume of our research. Our grade point average was equivalent to the top 5* rating in the 2001 RAE

Typical course content −− Biodiversity and conservation −− Chemistry and environmental pollution −− Physical and aquatic environments −− Global environmental change −− Sustainable development and managing impacts −− Environmental law and politics −− Coastal management −− Recycling and waste management

What to do next Contact Simon Kemp, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Civil Engineering and the Environment Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4651 Email: admissions@civil.soton.ac.uk www.civil.southampton.ac.uk/es

Our Fashion and Textile Design programme values its strong industry links and majors in developing employable graduates. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB, including an art-related subject IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 125 Average applicants per place: 4 Selection process: We place priority on a portfolio interview, which allows students to demonstrate their artistic ability and can override standard entry requirements. Portfolio guidance can be found on our website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa Application deadline: 24 March 2011. Early applications are welcomed. We will conduct portfolio interviews from November onwards

Our Fashion and Textile Design programme offers students an exciting range of learning opportunities across the dynamic subject areas of fashion design, knitwear, woven textiles and printed textiles. During year one you will be encouraged to explore the subject areas of fashion and textile design through a series of creative projects, workshops, seminars, lectures and study trips. These are designed to expand your knowledge and understanding as you acquire the fundamental practical and intellectual skills that will underpin your specialist pathway choice in year two.

Fashion & Textile Design

During year two you will work in your chosen specialist pathways and will have the opportunity to build on your introductory knowledge of the subject areas of For the most up-to-date admission information fashion design, knitwear or textile design in printed please check the UCAS website at www.ucas.ac.uk or textiles or woven textiles. Typically, you will undertake the School website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa more advanced projects and explore your chosen subject in more depth, which may include working on Degree | UCAS code | Duration industry-linked projects or competitions. Year two students also have the opportunity to undertake an BA Fashion and Textile Design exchange module with one of our partner institutions | WJ24 | 3 years in Europe, USA or Asia. Located at Winchester School of Art

110

“I really enjoyed my time at Winchester School of Art, especially putting together my collection in the third year. I came second in the international competition, 4CF, judged by Peter Jensen, Sophia Malig and Robert Cary Williams, and I won the Mulberry Accessories Award at graduate fashion week which resulted in a placement with the company.� Verity Pemberton Graduate, 2009

The third year will allow you to confirm your subject specialist knowledge and skills at a more advanced level by working to externally set briefs or producing a self-initiated body of work before completing a final major project for presentation and exhibition to a public audience with a supporting professional portfolio. Fashion design students benefit from an extensive range of industrial sewing machines, multi-thread overlockers for woven and knitted fabrics, professional dress stands for mens and womenswear, as well as a fusible press and vacuum presses.

Garment from final-year collection by graduate Verity Pemberton Photographed by Rob Smith

Our knitwear students have access to a range of sophisticated knitting machines, including our newly acquired computerised Shima Seiki knitting machines across three gauges, as well as a variety of singleand double-bed Dubied knitting machines, linkers and manual knitting machines. Students working in printed textiles have access to a variety of dedicated print studios and computer suites, which include our Mimaki digital printer. Heat transfer printing and hand screen printing on large tables with adjoining screen exposing rooms and dye labs are also available. Our woven textiles studios are supported with a state-of-the-art jacquard loom as well as a variety of computerised AVL dobby looms and manual table looms to support a choice of weaving techniques and finishes.

Key facts Graduate destinations to fashion and textile design companies including Mulberry, Alexander McQueen, Burberry, Liberty, Chloe, Peter Jensen, Rachel Rowberry, Kath Kidston, Cole & Sons, Idaho Design, Mud Pie, Erdem, ID magazine, Griffin Clothing and the Arcadia Group Fully equipped studios with industrystandard machinery and accessories Flexible programme provides a broad base before specialising Institutional subscriptions to specialist fashion trend and forecasting services Internationally recognised teaching staff, with diverse research interests

Typical course content −− Practical workshops −− National and international competitions −− Work experience and placement opportunities −− Exchange opportunities with partner institutions in Europe, USA and Asia

−− Core choice modules in: Enterprise; Art of marketing and branding; Visual culture; Museums and galleries; and Digital practices and theory

Career opportunities −− Fashion design −− Visual merchandising −− Product development −− Textile/fashion merchandising −− Knit, weave and print design for interiors or fashion

Scholarships For information on Winchester School of Art scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Marketing and Recruitment Office for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. Winchester School of Art Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7005 Email: askwsa@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

The pervasiveness of modern communication, news media and digital technologies, along with the challenging issues that face society today, have changed the way we view fashion. Our Fashion Marketing programme addresses these changes. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 50 Selection process: UCAS application Application deadline: 24 March 2011. Early applications are welcomed For the most up-to-date admission information please check UCAS website at www.ucas.ac.uk or our School website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Fashion Marketing | WN25 | 3 years

Fashion Marketing

Located at Winchester School of Art

112

Fashion Marketing is a brand new programme at BA level, which exploits the School’s existing specialist expertise in a range of disciplines to meet the specific marketing challenges and opportunities presented by the world of fashion. The programme has been designed by our Arts and Design Management Group, with significant input from the Fashion and Textile Design programme and is delivered jointly by the two. The programme provides professional preparation for students wishing to pursue a wide range of roles in fashion marketing, from small, nascent fashion enterprises to complex, international fashion brands. As such, it balances theoretical knowledge and practical skills, and offers

“The luxury fashion sector that Winchester focuses upon is dominated by privately owned businesses requiring the right skills and experience in their staff to advance under highly competitive and high-risk business conditions. Winchester School of Art is well positioned to nurture the skills, passion and creativity needed to succeed in these businesses. This degree offers the opportunities to develop an area of expertise that can launch graduates into the highly coveted management roles of international fashion brands.” Dr David Birks Programme Leader Director of Enterprise

Garment from final-year collection by graduate Bethany Ansbro Photographed by Rob Smith

a thorough understanding of fashion marketing theory and a critical appreciation of visual communications. Built upon the core principles of marketing, the programme covers areas such as: fashion brand development and brand design issues; product development and range planning; fashion retailing, merchandising and buying; experiential marketing in fashion; the impact of technological developments on fashion marketing; luxury and lifestyle offerings; fashion communications, promotions, press and public relations; fashion consumer psychology; ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ fashion movements; ethical and sustainability issues in fashion; quantitative and qualitative fashion research; and forecasting.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Teaching from a new, dedicated Lectra Suite

−− Trend forecasting/fashion research −− Styling −− Journalism −− Marketing −− Buying −− Merchandising −− Fashion PR

Industry-standard computing facilities and software Distinguished visiting fellow and guest speakers Institutional subscriptions to specialist fashion trend and forecasting services

Typical course content −− Workshops −− Tutorials −− Study visits −− Live projects −− Business simulations −− Exchange module with partner institutions in Europe, the USA or Asia

Scholarships For information on Winchester School of Art scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Marketing and Recruitment Office for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. Winchester School of Art Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7005 Email: askwsa@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

Film studies is an exciting and challenging subject that provides a critical understanding of film as popular entertainment, theoretical discipline, industry and art form. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB IB: 34 point, 17 at higher level, including 6 in higher level music Selection process: UCAS application and some interviews Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Film Studies | P303 | 3 years BA Film and English | QW36 | 3 years BA Film and French | RW16 | 4 years BA Film and German | RW26 | 4 years BA Film and History | WV61 | 3 years BA Film and Philosophy | WV65 | 3 years BA Film and Spanish | RW46 | 4 years Located at Avenue Campus

“My time at Southampton was invaluable in developing my critical approach to film-making, which is vital for anyone who wants a career in the creative side of the industry.”

Film

Daniel Greenway BA Film and French graduate, 2003, worked on the major Hollywood productions Batman Begins and The Da Vinci Code

114

Looking back to film’s nineteenth-century origins and forward to today’s innovations in digital technology, you will explore the role of cinema across different social, historical and cultural contexts. You will study a diverse range of filmmakers and influential movements, from Alfred Hitchcock to Pedro Almodóvar, and from German expressionism to contemporary US cinema. Film studies employs a multitude of interpretive tools, from sociological approaches to close textual analysis. Our programmes build a series of key skills valued by employers, including interpersonal communication, organisation and time-management abilities, and also offer you the opportunity to conduct primary research in archives and libraries around the country. Other specific skills include writing and oral presentation skills. Our practical modules on the BA Film Studies programme will familiarise you with essential film-making and editing skills. The Avenue Library houses a comprehensive, diverse collection of films (approximately 4,000 DVDs and 2,000 videos, with many more at our Harley and Winchester libraries) from around the world. We also offer excellent film-making resources, including a purpose-built Mac creative suite for video production and editing, consisting of nine Mac Pro machines, each with two 20" monitors, post-production software (Apple’s Final Cut Studio®) and connections to VHS/ DVD players. There is a thriving film culture both on and off campus, and the Students’ Union has an active Film Society and an award-winning film-making society – Wessex Films.

Television and film are just two of the career pathways you may follow

BA Film Studies P303

BA Film and History WV61

Typical course content

You can select from a wide range of innovative modules. Alongside knowledge of the critical theoretical debates in film studies, you can develop practical skills, such as film-making. You have the option to take 25 per cent of your programme in an alternative subject.

Combined degree structure as for QW36

−− Popular film genres −− Film aesthetics −− Cinema pre-history −− Critical theories, cultural history −− World cinema −− Hollywood −− European film −− Cinematography −− Video production −− Creative writing/screenwriting

−− Year one offers a grounding in how to read film, covering key debates in film theory and cinema history −− Specialist practical option modules in years two and three in documentary film-making or scriptwriting −− Individually supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice in year three BA Film and English QW36 The close collaboration between film and English gives this programme a strong intellectual coherence, while the textual and theoretical skills you will learn are designed to complement each other. −− Two compulsory double modules in year one, with the option of 25 per cent in a third subject in years two and three −− 50/50 split between the subjects, with a dissertation in either in year three BA Film and French RW16 BA Film and German RW26 BA Film and Spanish RW46 Combined degree structure as for QW36 In these combined degrees you can study French/German/Spanish with film across a range of historical periods with the option to specialise in European cinema. Our emphasis is on the specific cultural context in which the films were produced, as well as the work of key film-makers and their influence on cinema as a whole. This is a four-year programme which includes a year spent studying abroad.

This programme combines the study of two closely related disciplines. Historical and political context forms an important part of the approach in core film modules, such as Hollywood in the 1930s. The optional module, Developments in documentary film-making, is likely to be of particular interest. BA Film and Philosophy WV65 Combined degree structure as for QW36 This combined degree builds on research and teaching strengths in both areas, producing a successful and challenging course combination that benefits in particular from film’s interest in aesthetics and philosophy.

Key facts Ranked UK number one in The Guardian University Guide 2009 in the subject category ‘Media Studies, communication and librarianship’, Southampton achieved a perfect teaching score, the most generous expenditure per student, and the most favourable staff/student ratio

Career opportunities −− Press −− Radio −− Television −− Film −− Creative industries, including advertising −− Online journalism −− Teaching/academia −− Industry −− Civil service −− Postgraduate study −− Commerce

Teaching from world-class researchers and eminent published experts Comprehensive audio-visual facilities and excellent teaching/screening venues Rated UK number one in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise

What to do next Contact Michael Williams, Admissions Tutor, or Thom Bull, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2736 Email: humanities@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/film

Our Fine Art programme offers innovative study, which is broad-based and inclusive, encompassing all aspects of contemporary art, theory and practice. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB, including an art-related subject IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 90 Average applicants per place: 3 Selection process: We place priority on a portfolio interview, which allows students to demonstrate their artistic ability and can override standard entry requirements. Portfolio guidance can be found on our website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa Application deadline: 24 March 2011. Early applications are welcomed. We will conduct portfolio interviews from November onwards For the most up-to-date admission information please check the UCAS website at www.ucas.ac.uk or the School website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

As artists we relish the opportunity to grow, develop and change. We actively seek new experiences and the opportunity to extend our knowledge and skills. We conjure value through our imaginative engagement with the world, and we see the possibilities and poetry in making new relationships between images and objects, people, places and information. Our Fine Art programme reflects the excitement and optimism of these possibilities. Experimentation in the widest possible range of materials and media is encouraged and students are supported to realise their ambitions across a broad range of making skills, 2D, 3D and 4D. Our staff bring extensive experience of art practice and the art world to the development of your creative identity through painting, sculpture, photography, video, printmaking,

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Fine Art | W190 | 3 years Located at Winchester School of Art

“Winchester School of Art provides the ideal environment for creative risk-taking, with plenty of opportunities for students to get involved in shaping the learning experience and setting in motion their own initiatives. Over the past three years my work has changed dramatically in its level of critical engagement and ambition, mainly due to the support and enthusiasm of the staff.�

Fine Art

Jennifer Jarmen BA Fine Art graduate, 2009

116

Degree show preparation

installation and performance art, new media and web-based projects. You will have the opportunity to develop in-depth skills in your chosen medium. In your first semester you will be introduced to the many possible directions for your work through an integrated programme of projects, workshops and lectures. The emphasis is on getting settled and experiencing new ideas and skills through a range of projects that combine playful experimentation with critical reflection. In semester two you will be given more time to direct your own practice and research, choosing from a range of specialist workshops. The second year is a time to initiate ambitious ideas. You will determine the direction of your work and find your voice, whether in a specialist medium or through interdisciplinary practice. In your third year you will consolidate your practice in preparation for the final major project in semester two, through the presentation of an

exhibition, a screening or an event, to demonstrate your ambition and realise your ideas at a fully professional level. Our Fine Art programme offers a thorough preparation for life as a professional artist and for employment opportunities in the art world and beyond. Key facts Hands-on teaching from renowned practising artists Broad-based interdisciplinary and specialist study Extensive workshop facilities and well-resourced studios with your own workspace

−− Core choice modules in: Enterprise; Art of marketing and branding; Visual culture; Museums and galleries; and Digital practices and theory −− Final-year degree show to showcase your work

Career opportunities −− Freelance art and design −− Theatre design −− Arts journalism −− Further study to PhD level

Scholarships For information on Winchester School of Art scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Inspiring programme of guest speakers, including leading contemporary artists, critics and curators

Typical course content

What to do next

−− Individual and group tutorials −− Practical workshops −− Optional international study trip −− Weekly open lectures from visiting artists −− Guided study trips to London

Contact the Marketing and Recruitment Office for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. Winchester School of Art Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7005 Email: askwsa@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

French is a key international language, native to France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada and the French Caribbean, and an official language in much of Africa and Asia. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including grade B or above in French IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level (additional experience and qualifications will be taken into account) Selection process: UCAS application and one-to-one interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA French | R120 | 4 years BA French and German | RR12 | 4 years BA French and Music | RW13 | 4 years BA French and Philosophy | RV15 | 4 years BA French and Portuguese | RR15 | 4 years BA French and Spanish | RR14 | 4 years BA Politics and French | LR21 | 4 years BSc Management Sciences and French | NRF1 | 4 years

There are many clichés about French culture. It is the culture of great literature and even better food, of intellectuals and art cinema, of political protest movements and anti-Americanism. Or is it? Studying French at Southampton is an ideal way to get inside the language, culture and society of France and other French-speaking countries. And you might be surprised by what you find… Many universities offer the opportunity to study French in some form, but each has its own approach. At Southampton, the emphasis is on choice. You can complement your language learning with modules on French history and contemporary society, French literature and film, or French linguistic studies. You can choose to combine these areas of study for a broad-based curriculum, or to focus on the area that interests you most. Throughout your degree you will also be encouraged to cultivate an awareness of the place of French language and culture in the wider international context.

BA English and French | QR31 | 4 years | see page 102 BA Film and French | RW16 | 4 years | see page 115 BA French (Linguistic Studies) | R101 | 4 years | see page 140 BA French and German (Linguistic Studies) | RRC2 | 4 years | see page 140 BA French and History | RV11 | 4 years | see page 133 BA French and Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | RRC4 | 4 years | see page 140 BSc Mathematics with French | G1R1 | 4 years | see page 149 MOcean Oceanography with French | F7R1 | 4 years | see page 167

French

Located at Avenue Campus

118

For more combined honours language degrees, including linguistics and European studies, please see page 140

“My course was very interesting and challenging. For my French classes, I not only studied French language, but also various aspects related to France. I learned about French politics, economy and culture. All the lecturers are very helpful and friendly.” Natalia Zdulska BA Politics and French graduate, 2009

Montreal, Québec

In year one you will be allocated to a stage of language proficiency in our unique system of seven language levels. This is designed to place you at the stage most appropriate to develop your spoken and written skills, enabling you to make rapid progress in your chosen language.

Key facts

You can spend your year abroad as an English language assistant in a school, studying at one of our partner universities or on a work placement. Most students choose a European country, but many go further afield – to Québec or La Réunion, for example. The administrative organisation of your year abroad is carried out by our International Exchange Administrator, and you will be assigned a supervisor who will look after you during this year.

Opportunity to learn another language from scratch, such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Russian or Polish

We place great importance on the development of graduate skills vital for future employment through the integration of transferable skills into learning and teaching, in particular the language skills and strategy training for all first-years.

Modern languages at Southampton has been ranked in the top five universities by the Guardian for the last four years and we were third in 2009 Rated in the top 10 modern languages departments in the country in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2008)

Modern languages at Southampton was in the top two for European studies in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise A wide range of learning and teaching resources is available, including multimedia labs, electronic whiteboards and language-specific resource rooms

Typical course content −− In all years of study you will benefit from the wide range of resources (including extensive electronic and televisual facilities) offered by the Centre for Language Study, which works closely with the HEFCE National Subject Centre for Language, Linguistics and Area Studies, hosted at Southampton −− Year one modules provide an introduction to the study of cultural forms, political and historical issues, and linguistic issues −− In years two and four you will have the opportunity to concentrate on your own particular interests, selecting from a range of more specialised units on Spanish- and Portuguesespeaking societies

−− A special unit in year two will prepare you for your year abroad in year three, and for the academic work you will complete during this year −− Your year abroad is an opportunity to improve your linguistic and cultural proficiency in your chosen language, and to demonstrate your ability to work independently over a sustained period

Career opportunities Employment figures from 2008 show that 95 per cent of language graduates found a job six months after graduation. −− Recent graduates have found jobs in management, banking, marketing, public relations, European institutions, local government, the civil service, radio, television, publishing, translation and teaching −− Others go on to postgraduate courses in European studies, politics, international finance, law, management, education, translating, interpreting and librarianship

What to do next Contact Irina Nelson, Admissions Tutor, or Natasha Renwick-Meikle, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2256 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ml

Geography is an exciting discipline, with a dynamic contribution to make to understanding both natural and social environments. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including A in geography IB: 34, 17 at higher level Intake: 175 Average applicants per place: 7 Selection process: UCAS application (interview may be required)

BSc Geography with Geology | FF68 | 3 years

In addition to lectures and tutorials, there are excellent opportunities for fieldwork and practical investigation, both within the UK and beyond. We offer specialised facilities to support your learning, including two environmental process laboratories and state-of-the-art GIS and earth observation facilities. The University library has recently undergone a £12 million refurbishment and provides excellent resources for geographers.

BSc Geography with Oceanography | F8F7 | 3 years

BA Geography L700

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Geography | L700 | 3 years BSc Geography | F800 | 3 years

BA Archaeology and Geography | VL47 | 3 years | see page 65 BSc Geology with Physical Geography | F6F8 | 3 years | see page 123 BSc Oceanography with Physical Geography | F7F8 | 3 years | see page 167 BSc (Social Sciences) Population and Geography | subject to validation | 3 years | see page 180

Geography

Located at Highfield Campus

120

Geography is a subject that engages directly with important contemporary concerns – issues such as globalisation, climate change, environmental management and cultural transformation – while allowing you to acquire a range of skills that are highly valued in the marketplace. You will engage with cutting-edge debates during your studies, developing a thorough understanding of the processes that are shaping the future of our planet.

−− A broad foundation in year one, with the opportunity to specialise in human geography in years two and three −− Opportunity to select units from outside the School of Geography in years one and two −− Individual research project in year three

“Studying physical geography at Southampton has been an excellent experience. The course has been interesting and varied and encompasses a wide range of topics which suit different interests. The field trips are hugely enjoyable and have provided the opportunity to work on some cuttingedge research. All the staff are supportive and approachable, while Southampton itself is situated in a beautiful part of the country.” Rob Squirrell BSc Geography graduate, 2009

Physical geography students on a third-year field class in the Swiss Alps

BSc Geography F800

Key facts

−− Basic degree structure as for L700, but with the opportunity to specialise in physical geography in years two and three −− Individual research project in year three

Dynamic, modern programmes with a wide choice of units

BSc Geography with Geology FF68 A levels: another science subject (eg biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics) required

Exchange opportunities in Europe, Canada and Singapore Excellent teaching. Results of the 2008 National Student Survey placed us in the top 10 in the sector. Within the Russell Group, we were top for physical geography and in the top five for human geography

−− Year one focuses on physical geography and geology, with the opportunity to pursue advanced units in each subject in years two and three −− An exciting opportunity for students fascinated by geomorphology and geological processes −− Balance of units is approximately twothirds geography, one-third geology

Consistently in the top 10 in league tables

BSc Geography with Oceanography F8F7

−− Geomorphological processes −− Global and local environmental change −− Economy, culture and space −− Globalisation and uneven development −− Science, nature and geographical thought −− Glaciers and glaciation −− River basin management −− Cultural geographies of globalisation −− Palaeoecology and landscape change −− Geographies of health and healthcare −− Introductory and advanced GIS −− Geopolitics

Typical entry requirements as for FF68 −− Year one focuses on physical geography and oceanography, with the opportunity to pursue advanced units in each discipline in years two and three −− An exciting opportunity for students fascinated by terrestrial and ocean environments −− Balance of units is approximately two-thirds geography, one-third oceanography

In the 2008 RAE, almost all our research was judged as being “of international standing” and 20 per cent was classed as “world leading” Excellent opportunities for fieldwork in the UK and abroad

Typical course content

−− Global climate change −− Physical geography in environmental management

Career opportunities −− Environmental management and consultancy −− City and regional planning −− Retail management −− Hydrology and water resources −− Civil service −− Accountancy −− Financial services −− Property development −− Market research −− Social policy −− Local and central government

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Geography go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Admissions Secretary for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Geography Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3760 Email: gg-admissions@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/geography

Your planet needs you. Study geology and you could soon be exploring for new economic resources or informing policy on global climate change. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–BBB IB: 36–30 points, 18–16 at higher level Intake: 60 Average applicants per place: 5 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Geology | F600 | 3 years MGeol Geology | F601 | 4 years MGeol Geology (with study abroad) | F603 | 4 years BSc Geology with Marine Biology | F6C1 | 3 years BSc Geology with Physical Geography | F6F8 | 3 years MOcean Ocean, Earth and Climate Science | F790 | 4 years BSc/MGeol Geology with Foundation Year | F602 | 4/5 years | see page 186 Located at Waterfront Campus, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS)

A degree in geology provides one of the most exciting, dynamic and relevant scientific learning experiences, studying the nature, dynamics and evolution of the physical, chemical and biological processes operating on Earth over the past 4 billion years. Training in geology and scientific methodology, plus key transferable skills, means that our graduates are in great demand. Residential and one-day field courses are integrated into all our programmes. Current residential fieldwork destinations are South Wales, Yorkshire, southern Spain and Tenerife. BSc Geology F600 A levels: BBB, including two sciences (mathematics and geography acceptable) IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level Comprehensive, cutting-edge training in the major areas of Earth science is delivered through a combination of lectures and laboratory classes. There are numerous residential training courses in the UK and Europe, and a major five-week mapping project in Europe at the end of year two. MGeol Geology F601 A levels: ABB, including two science subjects (mathematics and geography acceptable) IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level

Geology

This degree is designed to equip you for a research career in Earth science. Years one and two follow the BSc Geology and years three and four focus on research.

122

“The skills I learned at Southampton, especially on the Master of Geology course, are very well respected by Neftex, so much so that Southampton geologists are now their biggest intake of new employees and interns.” Christine Fildes Master of Geology graduate, 2008, currently working with Neftex Petroleum Consultants Ltd

Third-year students studying volcanic processes in Tenerife

MGeol Geology (with study abroad) F603

MOcean Ocean, Earth and Climate Science F790

A levels: AAA in three science subjects A levels: ABB, to include mathematics and (mathematics and geography acceptable) two other sciences IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level This programme provides intensive training in Earth science, plus the chance to study at one of the USA’s powerhouse universities during year three. BSc Geology with Marine Biology F6C1 A levels: BBB, including biology and one other science or mathematics subject IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level A unique subject combination in the UK, this degree offers a choice of pathways: macro-organism (marine invertebrates and their ecology) or micro-organism/ palaeoceanography (plankton systems and climate change). You can undertake a five-week independent mapping project or laboratory or field-based research.

This new programme has been designed to provide a broad and complete education in Earth and marine system science, examining the way in which the Earth functions as a system, to determine our environment and climate.

Key facts Geology is taught at the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) NOCS has been ranked ninth best geoscience institution in the world (Times Higher Education, 2009) and the highest such UK institution offering undergraduate geology courses

BSc Geology with Physical Geography F6F8

Modern, purpose-built £50 million centre, with an international reputation for cutting-edge research

A levels: BBB, including geography and one other science or mathematics subject IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level

We provide a variety of bursaries, in addition to those available from the University

This integrated interdisciplinary programme examines the dynamic internal and surficial physical processes on our planet. You will have the choice of a five-week independent mapping project or undertaking laboratory or field-based research.

−− An advanced research project forms a major component of the final year in four-year programmes, focusing on cutting-edge topics in Earth science

Career opportunities −− Hydrocarbons and mineral exploration industries −− Environmental consultancies −− Geological monitoring and surveying −− Engineering geology −− Hydrogeology −− Remote sensing −− Museums −− Teaching −− Civil service and government organisations −− Postgraduate studies

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Ocean and Earth Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Typical course content −− Common introductory modules in year one promote flexibility within and between programmes −− Year two focuses on developing comprehensive geological understanding −− Year three allows for specialisation, with a focus on independent work and research, with a five-week independent mapping project undertaken by most students

What to do next Contact Dr Ian Harding or Dr Rex Taylor, Admissions Tutors, for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. School of Ocean and Earth Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2681 Email: ugenquiry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/soes

Geophysics is a broad subject, exploring fundamental questions about the Earth’s system. Working at the intersection of many sciences, geophysicists tackle issues related to the future sustainability of our resources. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–BBB IB: 36–30 points, 18–16 at higher level Intake: 12–15 Average applicants per place: 5 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Geophysical Sciences | F640 | 3 years MGeophys Geophysics | F660 | 4 years MGeophys Geophysics (with study abroad) | F661 | 4 years BSc Geophysical Sciences/MGeophys Geophysics with Foundation Year/Geophysics with Foundation Year | F662 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Waterfront Campus, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS)

Embracing physics, mathematics, planetary science, geology, environmental science, oceanography and meteorology, academic researchers study topics ranging from the driving forces behind plate tectonics to the processes that control the flows within our oceans and atmosphere. Geophysicists also confront challenges as diverse as the search for traditional energy and mineral resources; environmental monitoring, including nuclear test-ban treaties; assessing and mitigating natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanoes; and managing the world’s water resources. Residential and one-day field courses are fully integrated into all our degree programmes, allowing the practical application of knowledge gained in the lab. Current residential fieldwork destinations are Brittany, South Wales and Yorkshire, with the option of Tenerife. The programme has strong links to industry, through a combination of summer placements, one-year industry placements and the opportunity to undertake research work on real industry data in years three and four.

Geophysics

BSc Geophysical Sciences F640

124

“After graduating I took up an internship with Rio Tinto, and was subsequently offered my current job, responsible for geophysics on their West Africa diamond exploration programme.” James Alderman Master of Geophysics, 2005

A levels: BBB, including mathematics and physics IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level, including mathematics and physics This programme provides a solid grounding in geology, physics and mathematics, with the choice of a wide variety of modules, to shape your degree to match your interests.

A student collecting data in Brittany on the third-year geophysics field course

MGeophys Geophysics F660 A levels: ABB, including mathematics and physics IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including mathematics and physics Providing comprehensive training in all aspects of geophysics, this programme will enable you to apply your knowledge (either through research or applied approaches) in a wide variety of geophysical contexts: the Earth, oceans and atmosphere. MGeophys Geophysics (with study abroad) F661 A levels: AAA, including mathematics, physics and another science IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including mathematics and physics This programme provides the opportunity to spend part of year three studying at one of the USA’s powerhouse universities.

Key facts Geophysics is recognised by government and industry as one of the key disciplines for the effective future management of our planet NOCS is the largest single grouping of marine and Earth scientists in the UK, and one of the largest in Europe

Our taught programmes are nationally recognised for their quality and innovation (accreditation from the Geological Society of London) The programme has strong and established links with a wide range of industry partners

Typical course content −− Common introductory modules (from the Schools of Ocean and Earth Science, Mathematics, and Physics and Astronomy) in year one promote flexibility within and between programmes −− Year two builds on this foundation with a series of more applied geophysical, geological and oceanographic modules, allowing you to choose the specific discipline emphasis that interests you −− Year three allows specialisation in areas of interest, with an increased focus on independent work and research −− A major component of the final year in four-year programmes is an advanced research project, actively contributing to the research output of the School

Career opportunities −− Training in geophysics provides an invaluable set of core skills in Earth sciences, physics and mathematics, along with key personal and transferable skills

−− Exploration geophysicist for oil, gas and mineral companies −− Hydrography for private, public and military organisations (site investigation surveys for offshore structures such as oil and gas platforms, pipelines, wind farms, sea defences) −− Meteorology −− Oceanography −− General environmental and hazard monitoring −− Archaeological geophysics −− IT −− Teaching −− Civil service and other government organisations −− Postgraduate studies

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Ocean and Earth Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr Tim Henstock, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed prospectus is available from the School. School of Ocean and Earth Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2681 Email: ugenquiry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/soes

Spoken by over 120 million people and of growing importance in Central and Eastern Europe, German opens up numerous opportunities for language graduates. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including German IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level (additional experience and qualifications will be taken into account) Selection process: UCAS application and one-to-one interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA German | R220 | 4 years BA German and Music | RW23 | 4 years BA German and Philosophy | RV25 | 4 years BA German and Spanish | RR24 | 4 years BA Politics and German | LR22 | 4 years BSc Management Sciences and German | NR22 | 4 years BA English and German | QR32 | 4 years | see page 102 BA Film and German | RW26 | 4 years | see page 115 BA French and German | RR12 | 4 years | see page 118 BA French and German (Linguistic Studies) | RRC2 | 4 years | see page 140 BA German (Linguistic Studies) | R201 | 4 years | see page 140 BA German and History | RV21 | 4 years | see page 133

German

BA German and Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | RRF4 | 4 years | see page 140

126

BSc Mathematics with German | G1R2 | 4 years | see page 149 Located at Avenue Campus For more combined honours language degrees, including linguistics and European studies, please see page 140

An integral member of the European Union, with a fascinating and distinctive culture and the world’s third largest economy, Germany is at the heart of Europe. Studying modern languages opens your mind to different people and cultures. You will learn to adapt to new surroundings during your year abroad and develop a range of practical skills which you can use in almost any career – a second language is a demonstrable asset that will give you the edge over your competitors. We place great importance on the development of graduate skills vital for future employment, through the integration of transferable skills into learning and teaching, in particular the language skills and strategy training for all first years. Our programmes offer considerable choice, although language learning will be a core component throughout your course. In year one you will be allocated to a stage of language proficiency in our unique system of seven language levels. This is designed to place you at the stage most appropriate to develop your spoken and written skills, enabling you to make rapid progress in your chosen language.

“We are encouraged to look into many aspects of language, not just learning how to speak it. The lecturers are friendly and helpful, going far beyond their duties to make studying a really enjoyable experience.” Michelle Turner BA German and Spanish, recent graduate

Munich, Germany

You can spend your year abroad as an English language assistant in a school, studying at one of our partner universities or on a work placement. Most students choose Germany, but we also have places in Austria and occasionally we send students to the German part of Switzerland. The administrative organisation of your year abroad is carried out by our International Exchange Administrator, and you will be assigned a supervisor who will look after you during this year. Throughout your degree you will be encouraged to cultivate awareness of the place and role of the Germanspeaking countries you have chosen to study in the wider European and global context. Key facts Modern languages at Southampton has been ranked in the top five universities by the Guardian for the last four years and we were third in 2009 Rated in the top 10 modern languages departments in the country in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2008) Opportunity to learn another language from scratch, such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Russian or Polish Modern languages at Southampton was in the top two for European studies in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise A wide range of learning and teaching resources are available, including multimedia labs, electronic whiteboards and language-specific resource rooms

Typical course content

Career opportunities

−− Employment figures from 2008 show −− In all years of study you will benefit that 95 per cent of language graduates from the wide range of teaching and found a job six months after graduation learning resources (including extensive electronic and televisual facilities) −− Recent graduates have found jobs offered by the Centre for Language in management, banking, marketing, Study, which works closely with the public relations, European institutions, HEFCE National Subject Centre for local government, the civil service, Language, Linguistics and Area Studies, radio, television, publishing, translation hosted at Southampton and teaching −− Year one will introduce you to German −− Others go on to postgraduate literature and culture, German history courses in European studies, and society, and linguistics. These options politics, international finance, law, will be complemented by introductions management, education, translating, to cultural expression, social and political interpreting and librarianship history, and linguistic issues −− In years two and four you will choose language- and field-specific courses which draw material from all the languages and cultures studied in the modern languages department −− A special unit in year two will prepare you for your year abroad in year three, and for the academic work you will complete during this year −− Your year abroad is an opportunity to improve linguistic and cultural proficiency in your chosen language and to demonstrate your ability to work independently over a sustained period

What to do next Contact Irina Nelson, Admissions Tutor, or Natasha Renwick-Meikle, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2256 Email: humanities@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ml

Our Graphic Arts programme recognises the global influence of design, and aims to develop confident, independent professionals who will become the shapers of the shifting creative landscape across a range of industries. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB, including an art-related subject IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 110 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: We place priority on a portfolio interview, which allows students to demonstrate their creative ability and can override standard entry requirements. Portfolio guidance can be found on our website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa Application deadline: 24 March 2011. Early applications are welcomed. We will conduct portfolio interviews from November onwards For the most up-to-date admission information please check the UCAS website at www.ucas.ac.uk or the School website at www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

The programme is studio-based, has timetabled teaching and an emphasis on experimentation and individual innovation, questioning the contexts and forms of contemporary communication. Studio practice is underpinned by introductions to design history and theory, and engagement with current ideas and issues. Our staff are designers and researchers from a range of backgrounds in commercial practice. We have carefully chosen partners in industry and high-profile visiting practitioners, illustrators, photographers, designers and animators who bring their work and professional experience to the programme. The first year, level 1, is broad-based, with tuition across the full range of graphic arts disciplines. At level 2, you will choose to follow one of the four discipline-specific pathways: Graphic design, Illustration, Photography or Motion graphics.

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Graphic Arts | W210 | 3 years

Graphic Arts

Located at Winchester School of Art

128

“I love photography but wanted to do a design-based course, which the graphic arts programme offers. We’ve had visitors like Holly Wales, who illustrates for advertising and magazines, and the typographer Andrew Byrom, who came from California just to give us a lecture and set us a project.” Simon Holmes Graphic Arts student

Architectural publication design by graduate Lucy Grafton Green

Graphic design This pathway offers access to the full range of essential professional communication skills: control of word and image; digital imaging and design for print, including magazine and book publishing, and for the web; print processes and production; multilingual typography; corporate identity; advertising design and production; advertising strategy; project management and communication. Illustration This pathway covers applied and commercial image-making. You will be encouraged to define your personal approach to illustration and your own visual language, and learn how to construct narrative and meaning visually in a variety of cultural contexts. The programme offers insight into the professional requirements and business aspects of the illustration field, and the role of a working freelance illustrator, as well as crucial technical skills: drawing, in its widest sense; characterisation; digital imaging; editorial illustration and sequential illustration. Photography This pathway offers introductory and advanced practical workshops, using an excellent range of photographic equipment. It will encourage definition of your personal approach to photography based on a thorough understanding of all aspects of the medium: reportage and documentary photography; studio photography; digital image manipulation; lighting and studio lighting; traditional

and non-traditional processing and printing techniques; the construction of meaning; and the wider cultural contexts for photography. Visiting lecturers range from experimental fine artists to studio fashion photographers. Motion graphics This pathway addresses animation in applied and commercial contexts such as branding, identity and advertising. You will develop a variety of skills, starting with illustration, drawing and characterisation, digital imaging, editing and sound editing in time-based media applications. You will experiment with a range of visual solutions in response to text or narrative, and then combine digital and analogue production skills to bring narrative, sound and movement together in animated sequences. You will be encouraged to define your own approach and learn how to construct narrative and meaning visually in a variety of cultural contexts.

Key facts Extensive resources available in computing, photography, digital printing and time-based media Own workspace within a fully equipped studio with wi-fi and Macintosh work stations. Live projects and placement opportunities Professional practice delivered by industry professionals Subsidies for professional tools such as an Apple laptop or digital SLR camera

Membership of the industry-renowned D&AD award scheme

Typical course content −− Core choice modules in: Enterprise; Art of marketing and branding; Visual culture; Museums and galleries; and Digital practices and theory −− Impressive guest lecture series, featuring high-profile illustrators, photographers, designers and animators −− Timetabled teaching −− Specialist projects and workshops −− Major publishing project in the first year

Career opportunities −− Graphic design and advertising −− Animation/motion −− Illustration −− Publishing −− Interactive design

Scholarships For information on Winchester School of Art scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Marketing and Recruitment Office for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. Winchester School of Art Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7005 Email: askwsa@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

Health and social care offers exciting, flexible learning opportunities, whether you are already working in this field or considering a career change. Typical entry requirements See individual programmes for details of typical entry requirements Intake: 60 (Fd/Sc), 20 (BSc) Average applicants per place: 2 (Fd/Sc) Selection process: Interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required Degree | UCAS code | Duration Fd/Sc Health and Social Care | B900 | 2 years (full-time), 3 years (part-time) BSc Health and Social Care | L510 | 1 year (full-time), also available part-time Fd/Sc located at: −− Highfield Campus/Totton College (year one) −− Highfield Campus (year two)

Health & Social Care

BSc located at Highfield Campus

130

“After being out of full-time education for a number of years, I had the opportunity to study full-time on the Foundation degree course. During my two years of studying, I have gained confidence in my ability to learn and enjoyed the learning process.” Jenny Fitzhenry Fd/Sc Health and Social Care graduate, 2006

Our “enterprising foundation degree” (Quality Assurance Agency, 2006), developed in collaboration with local health and social care employers, was designed in response to employers’ workforce developments. New career opportunities for intermediate level practitioner roles are opening up in many areas of practice, such as Rehabilitation and Children and Families services. Successful completion of the Foundation degree enables you to apply to ‘top up’ to a BSc Health and Social Care, as well as a number of other professional programmes, including occupational therapy, physiotherapy, social work, nursing, podiatry and audiology. The BSc Health and Social Care provides an attractive alternative route to an honours degree and increased opportunities in the workplace. It also provides a level 3 exit award for students holding intermediate degrees (or equivalent) in subjects related to health and social care. The programme is designed to meet the needs of experienced practitioners who wish to broaden their knowledge and understanding of theoretical and policy issues, including research methods. Fd/Sc Health and Social Care B900 Portfolio of related work/personal caring experience; or one A level in an appropriate subject, plus five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English language; or AVCE/GNVQ/BTEC/NVQ level 3 in a health- or social care-related subject; or access in an appropriate subject The Fd/Sc is a vocational qualification with a strong emphasis on study skills and work-based learning, designed around the needs of a broad and non-traditional student group. Over 150 students have now graduated and progressed to new roles in the workforce or higher education programmes. During year one you can choose between studying at our partner college, Totton College, or at the University, where all students study in their second year. Students join other health and social care students from the Universities of Southampton and Portsmouth for interprofessional learning projects during year two.

Turning ‘care’ into a ‘career’

BSc Health and Social Care L510

Key facts

Career opportunities

Direct entry via a foundation degree in a relevant subject, or 240 CAT credits in related subjects, or a special admissions route (developed through a portfolio of evidence and interview) is available to applicants with alternative academic or professional qualifications, or within the University of Southampton (including the Fd/Sc Health and Social Care)

Tuition fees for UK/EU students of the Fd/Sc may be paid by the local Strategic Health Authority

Fd/Sc: −− Award holders appeal to employers who require flexibility, problem-solving ability, a broad knowledge base and a range of patient-focused skills at intermediate level, spanning traditional health professional roles −− Graduates may wish to enter health or social care management, or pursue a related honours programme in areas such as policy or public health BSc: −− Opportunities to progress further through NHS Agenda for Change career framework and new careers in social services or the independent sector −− Access to a range of postgraduate programmes −− Entry qualification for accelerated nursing and physiotherapy programmes at the University of Southampton

Inspired by students and graduates of the Foundation programme, this degree has been designed, with career development in mind, for health and social care practitioners who are looking to take on increased responsibility. It provides a strong research focus applied to practice. You will be introduced to health and social care as contested concepts, and encouraged to examine the range of factors “which have the potential to influence health and wellbeing” (Quality Assurance Agency, 2008). The programme’s unique characteristic is the rigorous exploration of what constitutes ‘evidence’, and how this concept informs and challenges everyday practice.

Skills for Health uses the Fd/Sc programme as an example of good practice on their website New associate practitioner posts in many local services cite the Fd/Sc as an essential qualification BSc available full-time or part-time, enabling you to continue working while you complete the degree The BSc is run on one day of the week in the afternoon and evening

Typical course content −− Personal development planning −− Interprofessional learning −− Safe practice (Fd/Sc) −− Human structure and function (Fd/Sc) −− Working with people (Fd/Sc) −− Applying evidence in practice (Fd/Sc) −− Professional pathway units: audiology, nursing and social work (Fd/Sc) −− Research proposal and dissertation (BSc) −− Independent work-based study (BSc)

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5500 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

History explores a rich array of past cultures – ancient, medieval and modern. It sharpens your insight into how societies functioned in the past, encouraging a more critical awareness of the problems of the present. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including grade A in history and excluding general studies IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including 6 in higher level history Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA History | V100 | 3 years BA French and History | RV11 | 4 years

BA Modern History and Politics | VL12 | 3 years BA Spanish and History | RV41 | 4 years

BA History V100

BA Archaeology and History | VV41 | 3 years | see page 65 BA English and History | QV31 | 3 years | see page 103 BA Film and History | WV61 | 3 years | see page 115 BA Philosophy and History | VV51 | 3 years | see page 171

History

We offer students the chance to take part in our innovative ‘group project’ course, which provides a unique opportunity to work as a team and to present the results of your research to the general public. We welcome applications from all those who are enthusiastic about exploring the past, and who share with us a desire to interpret it imaginatively from the perspective of the present.

BA German and History | RV21 | 4 years

132

Our degree programmes encourage you to pursue your own historical interests while developing critical thinking and communication skills for postuniversity life. The study of history at Southampton encompasses a range of skills valued by employers. You will learn to absorb, analyse and assess a wide variety of viewpoints, and express arguments in oral and written form, thinking and working independently and in cooperation with others.

Located at Avenue Campus

From year one, this programme guides you through a series of core skills and methods, while slowly encouraging your development as an independent researcher. −− In your second year you will choose from a wide range of ancient, medieval or modern options, and undertake a group project involving creative research −− In your final year you will study a key historical theme, accompanied by a piece of independent research on a topic of your choice −− In all three years you have the option to take 25 per cent of your programme in another subject

History students at Avenue Campus

BA French and History RV11 BA German and History RV21 BA Spanish and History RV41 The modern languages department provides a lively and well-equipped academic environment, emphasising effective linguistic training and the study of contemporary European culture. −− There are two compulsory and two optional modules from each subject in year one, with the option of 25 per cent in a third subject −− You will spend year three in a country where your chosen language is spoken −− In the final year there is a 50/50 split between the subjects, with a dissertation in either BA Modern History and Politics VL12 Combined degree structure as for RV11/RV21/RV41 This is the most popular of the combined history degrees, and includes core skills courses and a range of options in politics, alongside complementary history courses exploring state structures and political ideologies in British, European, American and Asian contexts.

Key facts

Career opportunities

History at Southampton was rated seventh in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise

−− Media −− Publishing −− Advertising −− Law −− Accountancy −− Banking −− Teaching −− Museums −− Library and archive work −− Civil service, including the diplomatic service −− Further professional training

We possess many collections of original historical documents, including the Wellington, Palmerston and Mountbatten papers and the Parkes Archives 92 per cent of students agreed that the overall quality of the History course was good in the National Student Survey (2008) The chance to spend a year studying at universities abroad, including France, Holland, Poland and Canada Courses in many fields rarely taught in most other UK universities, such as East and Central European history, South East Asian history and Jewish history

What to do next Contact Dr Adrian Smith, Admissions Tutor, or Lenia Batten, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2211 Email: humanities@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/history

In a world where e-commerce, mobile communications and 24-hour working are an increasingly important aspect of business operations, companies are looking for adaptable IT professionals who understand organisations as much as the systems they use. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB–BBB IB: 32–30 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 30

Information Technology in Organisations

Average applicants per place: 5

134

Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Today’s business community particularly needs graduates who understand people and the organisations they work in, as well as the information technology that they use. This distinctive degree programme – one of only a few offered in the UK – is designed to provide you with this unique perspective, and to prepare you for a career as a flexible IT professional, whether as an IT manager in a small business or part of a larger team in a corporate setting. Study is focused around seven themes:

BSc Information Technology in Organisations | G560 | 3 years

−−Information systems: looks at the timely delivery of relevant information

MComp Information Technology in Organisations | G500 | 4 years

−−Computers and networks: provides you with the confidence that comes from understanding how computers and networks operate

Located at Highfield Campus

“The course gave me a great understanding of project management and software development. The degree focuses on the real world, with opportunities for all sorts of different people – you don’t have to be a programmer! The ITO staff are very helpful and approachable, and their research experience informs the teaching, making the material cutting edge.” Russell Newman BSc Information Technology in Organisations, 2009

−−Applications development: nurtures your programming skills in the context of modern, internet-worked systems −−Information and communication skills: enables you to develop practical communication and IT skills −−Management: shows you what is required to manage −−Professional development: deals with operating as a professional in the industry −−Human issues: puts people first in designing systems for the real world Throughout your studies you will acquire the broad grounding you will need to be an adaptable IT professional in today’s challenging and changing technological world. The teaching on this course places a strong emphasis on discussion, analysis and reflection on technical practice, and uses a variety of teaching methods, including team-building and management-related activities.

Third-year ITO students designed and developed their own game to demonstrate their understanding of e-learning

Fundamental issues, techniques and implementations covered include: the development and deployment of industrial and commercial systems, especially the growing trend in e-business and e-commerce; the effects of IT on society; security of IT systems; and e-learning, including the use of games. The optional taught modules enable you to continue with a balance of technology and management or to follow a route that concentrates more on technology or management.

Key facts

Career opportunities

World-leading school, which has pioneered many of the most important advances in computer science and web technology in the last 10 years

This course is specifically geared to the use of IT in organisations, so graduates will be able to use their skills in any sector in which IT plays an important part, from finance to leisure and entertainment.

Typical course content

Scholarships

This course is offered both as a three-year bachelor’s programme, or as an integrated master’s programme over four years. The MComp fully meets the academic requirements of the British Computer Society allowing you to achieve Chartered IT Professional status in the shortest time.

−− Industrial and commercial systems −− Security in IT −− Management and communication skills −− Professional development −− Human issues and human-centred computer systems −− Information system design −− Computers and networks −− E-learning systems −− Applications development −− Web-based development

For information on scholarships in the School of Electronics and Computer Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Top five school in the UK (the Guardian and the Times league tables, 2010)

The School has strong relationships with employers, and ITO graduates Ranked number two in computer science are particularly in demand for their and IT in the 2008 Research Assessment understanding of organisations and their Exercise practical abilities in the workplace. The Generous scholarships, outstanding School has its own Careers Hub website computing facilities and helpdesks, (www.ecs.soton.ac.ui/careers) and runs and excellent learning resources its own annual careers fair.

What to do next Contact Dr Mike Wald, Admissions Tutor, for more information. Course brochure and video podcasts available. School of Electronics and Computer Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2969 Email: ucas@ecs.soton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ecs

The International Foundation Year provides a route to selected undergraduate degree programmes in law, management, economics, social sciences, humanities, the arts, and psychology. The Foundation Year may be for you if you are a capable student with normally 11 or 12 years of Applicants for this programme schooling in your own country, want to study at a UK should normally: university but need a year to adapt to the UK higher −− Be a recent high school graduate (or be due to graduate at the end of the current academic year) educational system, or are a suitably experienced −− Have (or expect to receive) an excellent final grade and mature student and do not have the required English language level for entry to an undergraduate or grade point average −− Have a good intermediate level of English language programme. Typical entry requirements

proficiency (minimum IELTS 5.5 /IBTOEFC 71) Selection process: UCAS application or direct application to the University. Application forms are available at www.southampton.ac.uk/cls/ english/foundation.html

International Foundation Year

Include on your application the undergraduate degree course that you hope to transfer to after completing the International Foundation Year programme

136

Degree | UCAS code | Duration International Foundation Year in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences (including School of Management programmes) | LMV0 | 1 year Located at Avenue Campus

The Foundation Year offers an intensive language and study skills programme to prepare you for your chosen discipline. In addition, you will have a year-long personal research project, which will be a topic from your chosen degree area, where possible supported by the School you wish to progress to. Successful completion of the International Foundation Year means that you will automatically gain a place on your chosen undergraduate programme providing you achieve the progression mark set by the relevant School. The University has several campuses; your courses will be held at Avenue and Highfield Campuses. Highfield Campus is the main campus of the University, giving you access to all the facilities available. Avenue Campus, a short walk away, is home to University’s long-established Centre for Language Study, which is well equipped with multimedia and hypermedia learning materials and a cafeteria. The majority of your classes will be held at Avenue Campus. The International Foundation Year is a modular programme. By the end of the year you will have gained: the linguistic competence to deal with your undergraduate degree; effective academic study skills; an understanding of the demands and requirements of British university life; and an introduction to key areas and concepts through courses from your chosen field of academic study.

International students taking a break in the Library café

You will take a total of eight modules, spread equally across two semesters. In each semester, you will choose one module from a range of options, in addition to completing three core modules outlined below. Modules for ALL students English language (double module – semesters one and two) Our unique system of seven language levels, designed to place you at the stage most appropriate to develop your spoken and written skills, will enable you to make rapid progress in English. Academic study skills (double module – semesters one and two) This module will ensure that you are familiar with a range of essential study methods required at university. It will also develop your awareness of the academic conventions observed in higher education in the UK, and encourage you to become more autonomous in your approach to learning.

Contemporary Britain (single module – semester one) This module will provide you with an insight into Britain and the British in the twenty-first century. It introduces methods of studying, and the cultural and social ‘background knowledge’ that British students take for granted, which forms a starting point for many introductory courses relating to Britain in other disciplines. The global society (single module – semester two) In this module you will examine various aspects of globalisation and the effects of this phenomenon on the cultural, economic, political and social life of both the UK and the wider world. You will investigate and attempt to define exactly what is meant by globalisation and how the process manifests itself in different parts of the world.

Key facts The University of Southampton was rated in the top 10 modern languages departments in the country in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2008) An opportunity to learn another language from scratch, such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, French, Polish or Russian An opportunity to progress to the degree of your choice in a school of high academic repute

Typical course content Core modules: −− English language −− Academic study skills −− Contemporary Britain −− The global society Subject-specific modules include:

−− Economics −− History and politics −− Law Subject-specific modules If you are going on to study management, −− Management −− Mathematics and statistics law, arts/humanities, languages or −− Critical thinking economics, you will have the choice of two more subject- specific modules −− Languages during the year: eg Understanding law; Mathematics and statistics; Mathematics for economists; Art and design skills; Understanding management and organisations; and Understanding film. If you are not going to study in these What to do next areas, you can select from any of the modules you are interested in. Contact Pat Maier, Director of Foundation Year, at pjm@southampton.ac.uk School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2256 Email: ifyp@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/cls/ english/foundation.html

How has the law responded to the digital revolution? What is crime? Does intellectual property law adequately protect human creativity and innovation? Are we legally entitled to healthcare? Who really controls a company – the directors, the shareholders, or both? Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–AAB IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level Intake: 155 (UK/EU), 25 (international) Average applicants per place: 7-8 Selection process: UCAS application (interview and test may be required for non-standard entry, eg mature applicants and those from widening participation programmes such as Pathways to Law)

Degree | UCAS code | Duration LLB Law | M100 | 3 years LLB Law (accelerated programme) | M101 | 2 years LLB Law (European Legal Studies) | M125 | 4 years LLB Law (International Legal Studies) | M130 | 4 years LLB (Maritime Law) | subject to validation | 3 years

Law

Located at Highfield Campus

138

These are a few of the many challenging legal issues which you might have to think about while studying law. As a law student, you will learn how to write and speak confidently, concisely and precisely. You will understand the need to pay close attention to detail and to check and research all facts. You will learn how to develop critical analysis and problem-solving abilities, together with team-building, negotiation, advocacy and professional skills. Careers The international reputation of the School of Law is high among employers because of the emphasis placed on the development of academic, personal and professional skills. The study of law is suitable not only for those wishing to undertake professional training to become solicitors and barristers, but also for those who want to establish careers in commerce and industry, the media, journalism and politics.

“The knowledge and expertise of world-leading academics at the cutting edge of their fields meant that you came out of classes inspired and with an understanding of the law you could not get from anywhere else.” Thomas Webber LLB Law graduate, 2008

Students prepare for a mooting competition

All our LLB programmes are formally accredited by the Law Society of England & Wales and the Bar Council of England & Wales as qualifying law degrees for students wishing to undertake further professional training to become a solicitor or barrister. Teaching The School of Law holds the highest possible ratings for excellence in teaching from the UK Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. All our students receive first-rate teaching and optimum contact time in small groups. The School has a dedicated law library with specialist law librarians, and students have access to extensive online legal research facilities. Pastoral care The welfare of our cosmopolitan student body is a priority for us, and the School is renowned for a friendly and supportive atmosphere, which ensures that all our students are able to maximise their potential. LLB Law M100 This core programme is suitable for all undergraduates from the UK and overseas. −− In year one, you will study four compulsory units (Legal systems and reasoning, Constitutional law, Criminal law, Contract law), together with mooting and team-building programmes −− In year two, there are four more compulsory units (Land law, Equity and trusts, Tort law, Law of the European Union). There is also a compulsory employability skills programme

−− Year three includes one compulsory unit (Legal research and writing), which comprises a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic which you will choose, plus your choice of four full optional units, or three full optional units plus two half options. LLB Law (accelerated programme) M101 This programme is suitable for graduates in other subjects who would like to move quickly into the legal professions. On this programme you will study all the compulsory units listed in the core LLB, along with the professional skills programmes. No optional units are available. LLB Law (European Legal Studies) M125 This programme is suitable for students who have good language skills and who would like to study law in another European jurisdiction. Years one and two are the same as those of the core LLB programme. At the end of year two, you will spend a full academic year at one of our designated universities within the EU. You will then return to the UK to complete your final year, which is the same as that of the core LLB. LLB Law (International Legal Studies) M130 This programme is suitable for those students who would like to study in a jurisdiction outside the EU. Years one and two are the same as those of the core LLB programme. In year three, you will spend an additional full academic year overseas at one of our designated universities, for example, in Hong Kong, Singapore, Ottawa, Canada,

or Chile. You will then return to the UK to complete your final year, which is the same as that of the core LLB. LLB (Maritime Law) (subject to validation) An excellent foundation for a career in international maritime law, commerce and related industries. We specialise in the field of Maritime Law with our internationally renowned Institute of Maritime Law, which is the research base of many of the leading maritime lawyers in the world. See our website for details.

Key facts In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise 95 per cent of the School of Law’s research output was judged to be “of international quality” Ranked 15th in the UK High levels of student satisfaction (National Student Survey, 2008) National Mooting Competition finalists (2006, 2005, 2007) Home to one of the UK’s leading academic law journals, Legal Studies

Scholarships For information on achievement awards and international scholarships in the School of Law go to the undergraduate opportunities section at www.southampton.ac.uk/law

What to do next Contact the School of Law for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. School of Law Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2596 Email: undergrad.law@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/law

We offer a range of programmes that are quite different in outlook from many more traditional modern languages degrees. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including B or above in a relevant language IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level (additional experience and qualifications will be taken into account) Selection process: UCAS application and one-to-one interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration Languages: BA Language and Society | QL33 | 4 years BA Language Learning | Q100 | 4 years BA Languages and Contemporary European Studies | R900 | 4 years BA Modern Languages | R990 | 4 years Linguistics: BA French (Linguistic Studies) | R101 | 4 years BA French and German (Linguistic Studies) | RRC2 | 4 years

Linguistics & Languages

BA French and Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | RRC4 | 4 years

140

BA German (Linguistic Studies) | R201 | 4 years BA German and Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | RRF4 | 4 years BA Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | R401 | 4 years International students only: BA Applied English Language Studies | Q310 | 3 years BA Languages and Contemporary European Studies (with British Studies) | Q390 | 3 years BA Languages and Contemporary European Studies (English) | R9Q3 | 3 years Located at Avenue Campus

We aim to make all our graduates highly proficient linguists, capable of working in a wide range of challenging careers at an international level. There is a great emphasis on choice, reflected in the broad range of courses – including linguistic studies, film and television studies, social and political studies, and literary studies – allowing you to specialise or opt for more general coverage. Your year abroad provides an opportunity to improve your linguistic and cultural proficiency in your chosen language and to demonstrate your ability to work independently over a sustained period – an invaluable asset when entering the job market. The administrative organisation of your year abroad is carried out by our International Exchange Administrator, and you will be assigned a supervisor who will look after you during this year. You can spend your year abroad as an English language assistant in a school, studying at one of our partner universities or on a work placement. Languages and Contemporary European Studies students can choose to find a work placement or go to a university – they have priority in the allocation of Erasmus places.

Students practising their language skills in one of our multimedia labs

BA Language and Society QL33

BA Modern Languages R990

Typical course content

This degree combines the two popular strands of linguistic studies and social and political studies, building on an area of considerable expertise and research activity in the School.

This course allows you to study three languages, from French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Chinese, Japanese and Russian.

−− In year one you will be allocated to a stage of language proficiency in our unique system of seven language levels. This is designed to place you at the stage most appropriate to develop your spoken and written skills, enabling you to make rapid progress −− A special unit in year two will prepare you for your year abroad in year three, and for the academic work you will complete during this year

BA Language Learning Q100 You will study two languages, as well as a range of courses in linguistics and applied linguistics, gaining a broad understanding of how different languages are structured and used. You will study in detail how languages are acquired and taught. BA Languages and Contemporary European Studies R900 This successful programme is unique to Southampton and combines many of the attractions of a modern languages degree with a wide range of social and cultural studies. It is one of the few European studies courses based within a modern languages programme. −− You will study two languages (from French, German, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian). You must have an A level in one of these −− Variations of the programme are available for EU and international students who wish to learn about British culture, society and the English language, with advanced English as the first language

−− Except for English, all the languages can be studied from scratch −− You can choose one or two optional courses per semester relating to the languages you are studying

Linguistics Linguistics is the study of language in all its forms and is concerned with the many different facets of language, from the physical properties of sound waves in speech to the social context in which conversations are embedded. The various branches of linguistics explore how languages are structured, what they have in common, the differences between them, how they are acquired and used, and how they change over time.

Key facts Modern languages at Southampton has been ranked in the top five universities by the Guardian for the last four years and we were third in 2009

Career opportunities −− Employment figures from 2008 show that 95 per cent of language graduates found a job six months after graduation −− Recent graduates have found jobs in management, banking, marketing, public relations, European institutions, local government, the civil service, radio, television, publishing, translation and teaching −− Others go on to postgraduate courses in European studies, politics, international finance, law, management, education, translating, interpreting and librarianship

Rated in the top 10 modern languages departments in the country in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2008) Opportunity to learn another language from scratch, such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Russian or Polish

What to do next

Modern languages at Southampton was in the top two for European studies in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise

Contact Irina Nelson, Admissions Tutor, or Natasha Renwick-Meikle, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available.

A wide range of learning and teaching resources are available, including multimedia labs, electronic whiteboards and language-specific resource rooms

School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2256 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ml

Management is concerned with planning, organising, leading and controlling human activity in the context of all organisations, whether private or public sector, large or small, new or existing. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, plus GCSE mathematics grade B or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application (interview in special circumstances)

A central task of management is to establish appropriate objectives and optimise the deployment of the human, financial and physical resources available to the organisation in order to meet these objectives. BSc Management N201

BSc Management | N201 | 3 years

A degree in management could enable you to operate at a strategic level within a variety of organisations, developing key skills such as problem solving, communication, selfmanagement and teamwork.

BSc Management Sciences | N200 | 3 years | see page 144

This degree provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of management.

BSc Management with Entrepreneurship | N290 | 3 years | see page 104

−− You will develop an understanding of key management functions and have the opportunity to apply core management skills −− The programme adopts a behavioural approach to management, with an emphasis on qualitative aspects −− You will be able to choose optional modules from a range offered by the School of Management, as well as a language or other approved subjects, throughout the course

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

International Foundation Year in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences (including School of Management programmes) | LMV0 | 1 year | see page 136

Management

Located at Highfield Campus

142

“The best part about studying in the School of Management is the support that the academic and administrative staff offer. The lecturers also provide very useful, real-life examples from their careers in business, which allows you to gain a good understanding of how theories are used in the workplace.” Yuliya Monashok BSc Management graduate, 2007

Yuliya Monashok working on a group project in the Hartley Library

Key facts

Career opportunities

Scholarships

One of the UK’s leading management schools

−− The School of Management has close links with business −− Many of our graduates go on to professional training and graduate management schemes −− A range of career options are available, in management, accounting, finance, banking and retail −− A small number of students go on to establish their own business −− Recent recruiters of School of Management students include PricewaterhouseCoopers, BT, Barclays, Sainsbury’s, Ernst & Young and Deloitte

For information on scholarships in the School of Management go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

In 2009, 76 per cent of School of Management students achieved firstclass or upper second-class degrees Our student society, ManSoc, is one of the largest academic societies affiliated to the Students’ Union

Typical course content −− Accounting −− Human resource management −− Information systems and information technology −− Management analysis −− Managerial decisions −− Marketing −− Operations management −− Project management −− Strategy

What to do next Visit the School of Management’s website for more information. School of Management Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5507 Email: mgtmail3@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ management

Management scientists apply a rational, analytical approach to management in order to improve the performance of organisations. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, plus GCSE mathematics grade B or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application (interview in special circumstances) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Management Sciences | N200 | 3 years BSc Management Sciences and Accounting | NN24 | 3 years BSc Accounting and Finance | N400 | 3 years | see page 54 BSc (Social Sciences) Economics and Management Sciences | L112 | 3 years | see page 87 BSc Management | N201 | 3 years | see page 142 BSc Management Sciences and French | NRF1 | 4 years | see page 118 BSc Management Sciences and German | NR22 | 4 years | see page 126

Using modelling, simulation and other analytical techniques, a management sciences perspective can identify alternative strategies and guide practical action. The associated decisions are frequently complex and entail considerable uncertainty, not least because of limited information, time and resources, and the motives of different stakeholders. Our degree programmes provide the skills to operate at a strategic level within a variety of organisations, developing key skills such as problem solving, communication, self-management and teamwork. BSc Management Sciences N200 This flexible programme allows you to specialise in areas that are of particular interest to you. −− A wide range of optional modules in mathematical and non-mathematical management sciences are available −− You will explore managerial decision-making processes and commonly used management science techniques, assessing the means by which people and systems can be managed to improve organisational performance −− You will be able to choose optional modules from a range offered by the School of Management, as well as a language or other approved subjects, throughout the course

Management Sciences

BSc Management Sciences and Spanish | NR24 | 4 years | see page 194

144

BSc Management with Entrepreneurship | N290 | 3 years | see page 104 BSc Mathematics with Management Sciences | G1N2 | 3 years | see page 149 BA Music and Management Sciences | WN32 | 3 years | see page 159 International Foundation Year in Arts, Humanities, Law and Social Sciences (including School of Management programmes) | LMV0 | 1 year | see page 136 Located at Highfield Campus

“I chose to study at Southampton because I was looking for a degree programme that was flexible and offered a wide range of options to choose from, as well as a university and school that had good links with business.” Emma Davies BSc Management Sciences graduate, 2007

Emma Davies socialising in the Students’ Union

BSc Management Sciences and Accounting NN24 Covering the breadth of these two key subjects, this degree offers increasing choice as you progress. −− You will explore various aspects of decision-making and consider the behavioural elements of management sciences and accounting −− You will learn to understand, apply and critically evaluate current and alternative accounting and management science practices −− You will be able to choose optional modules from those offered by the School of Management, as well as a language or other approved subjects

Key facts One of the UK’s leading management schools In 2009, 76 per cent of School of Management students achieved first-class or upper second-class degrees Our student society, ManSoc, is one of the largest academic societies affiliated to the Students’ Union Home to one of the largest and most prestigious management science research centres in the UK, CORMSIS

Typical course content

Scholarships

−− Business simulation −− Financial and management accounting −− Information systems and information technology −− Management analysis −− Managerial decisions −− Operations management −− Optimisation −− Problem structuring −− Risk management −− Strategy

For information on scholarships in the School of Management go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Career opportunities −− The School of Management has close links with business −− Many of our graduates go on to professional training and graduate management schemes −− A range of career options are available, in management, accounting, finance, banking and retail −− A small number of students go on to establish their own business −− Recent recruiters of School of Management students include PricewaterhouseCoopers, BT, Barclays, Sainsbury’s, Ernst & Young and Deloitte

What to do next Visit the School of Management’s website for more information. School of Management Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5507 Email: mgtmail3@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ management

Marine biology embraces the study of all forms of life in the oceans, covering a broad range of topics, from the global distribution of marine organisms to individual molecules that drive metabolic and ecological processes. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–ABB IB: 36–32 points, 18–16 at higher level Intake: 50 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: UCAS application and interview

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Marine Biology with Oceanography | F7C1 | 3 years MMarBiol Marine Biology | F703 | 4 years MMarBiol Marine Biology (with study abroad) | F704 | 4 years MMBio/MBfy Marine Biology with Foundation Year | F705 | 4–5 years | See page 186

Marine Biology

Located at Waterfront Campus, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS)

146

As well as studying the ecology of individual or groups of species in their habitat, marine biologists use plants and animals to understand complex processes in the marine environment, including man’s impact on the sea through pollution, fishing and the effects of climate change. Marine organisms often prove more sensitive to change than the most sophisticated instruments. Our programmes cover all aspects of the marine biosphere, specifically in relation to the chemical and physical aspects of oceanography, from the tropics to the deep ocean. Training on our two research vessels and at our shore-based laboratories will provide you with the theory and practical experience of data collection and processing, preparing you for a career in marine biology.

“I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Southampton and have no doubt that the excellent theoretical and practical training provided enabled me to achieve a competitive PhD position at the Marine Research Institute and University of Iceland, Reykjavik.” Heidi Pardoe BSc Marine Biology with Oceanography graduate, 2005

Marine biology students about to snorkel at North Rock, Bermuda

BSc Marine Biology with Oceanography F7C1

MMarBiol Marine Biology (with study abroad) F704

A levels: ABB, including biology and one other science subject or mathematics IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level

A levels: AAA, including biology and two other science subjects or mathematics IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level

This programme develops a broad knowledge base, setting the biology of marine organisms in an oceanographic and ecological context, beginning with key biological concepts and basic oceanography.

This programme provides intensive training in marine biology, plus the chance to study at one of the top universities outside the UK during year three.

−− Intertidal ecology field course at the end of year one −− Independent research project in year three MMarBiol Marine Biology F703 A levels: ABB, including biology and two other science subjects or mathematics IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level Providing a detailed understanding of marine biology within an oceanographic context, this programme prepares you for a research career in marine biology. −− Specialist module in research development in year three −− Field course in tropical marine biology, an advanced independent research project and modules in deep-sea ecology, ecological modelling and reproductive biology in year four

Key facts NOCS is Europe’s leading centre for the study of marine and Earth science Highest ranked among UK institutions, with a strong focus on marine science You will experience science at sea in our 22 metre research vessel, RV Callista

Career opportunities −− Marine research −− Fisheries management −− Environmental consultancy −− Environment Agency −− Environmental NGO −− DEFRA −− CEFAS −− Aquaculture −− Journalism −− Marine conservation −− Postgraduate studies (PhD, MRes, MSc)

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Ocean and Earth Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Highly rated for student satisfaction in graduate survey (2009) Programmes recognised for excellence and innovation by external examiners

Typical course content −− Marine invertebrates −− Marine ecology −− Physical and chemical oceanography −− Marine vertebrates −− Primary production processes −− Benthic ecology −− Intertidal field course −− Ecophysiology −− Fisheries and aquaculture −− Zooplankton ecology −− Marine molecular biology

What to do next Contact Dr Antony Jensen, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. School of Ocean and Earth Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2681 Email: ugenquiry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/soes

Mathematicians develop important analytical skills and problem-solving strategies to assess a broad range of issues in commerce, science and the arts. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including 6 in higher level mathematics Intake: 160 Average applicants per place: 9–10 Selection process: UCAS application

Mathematics

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

148

BSc Mathematics | G100 | 3 years MMath Mathematics | G103 | 4 years BSc Mathematical Studies | G120 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with French | G1R1 | 4 years BSc Mathematics with German | G1R2 | 4 years BSc Mathematics with Spanish | G1R4 | 4 years BSc Mathematics with Actuarial Science | G1N3 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Astronomy | G1F5 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Biology | G1C1 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Computer Science | G1G4 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Economics | G1L1 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Finance | G1NH | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Management Sciences | G1N2 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Music | G1W3 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Operational Research | G1GF | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Physics | G1F3 | 3 years BSc Mathematics with Statistics | G1G3 | 3 years Located at Highfield Campus

Mathematical models and simulations, and the interpretation of their results, are being called on increasingly in global decisions, as business, politics and management all become more quantitative in their methods. The application of mathematics is also in demand in the social sciences, particularly economics, where mathematical tools are used to formulate models of the complex interactions in an economic system – in situations as significant as the effect on UK inflation of joining the European single currency.

“The School of Mathematics at the University of Southampton is one of the few academic schools I’ve experienced which really goes all out to provide the best possible for its students. It truly is an international experience.” Wan Hsien Heah BSc Mathematics with Actuarial Studies Science graduate, 2008; Golden Jubilee Scholar

A computer simulation of the vortical wake produced by the airflow over a moving insect wing

BSc Mathematics G100 A levels: AAA, including mathematics IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including 6 in mathematics This programme will develop your mathematical knowledge and problemsolving skills while allowing you to pursue your own interests, selecting specialist options from a wide range or broadening your area of study in year three. MMath Mathematics G103 Typical entry requirements as for G100 This degree develops your skills and knowledge beyond the BSc, allowing you to study topics in pure or applied mathematics in greater depth. BSc Mathematical Studies G120 Typical entry requirements as for G100 This is our most flexible programme. Throughout the degree you can study subjects outside mathematics, such as physics, computing, philosophy, music and languages. BSc Mathematics with French/ German/Spanish G1R1/G1R2/G1R4 Typical entry requirements as for G100, including relevant language Alongside your mathematics studies, this degree will prepare you to conduct yourself professionally in a foreign language and culture. You will spend year three abroad in a country where your chosen language is spoken.

BSc Mathematics with Actuarial Science G1N3

BSc Mathematics with Economics G1L1

Typical entry requirements as for G100

Typical entry requirements as for G100

This degree provides a strong education in mathematics, statistics and actuarial science. We are one of the few universities to hold a substantial exemption recognition agreement with the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries, reducing the average time taken to qualify as an actuary after your degree.

This degree will provide you with a strong command of quantitative techniques, as used by government departments, banks, financial institutions and industrial companies.

BSc Mathematics with Astronomy G1F5 Typical entry requirements as for G100, preferably with physics This programme will provide you with the mathematical knowledge and skills to develop your interest in astronomy. BSc Mathematics with Biology G1C1 Typical entry requirements as for G100, including biology This degree is for those with an interest in biological or medical sciences, allowing you to develop your knowledge of biology alongside your primary interest in mathematics. BSc Mathematics with Computer Science G1G4 Typical entry requirements as for G100 This programme is designed for students with a background in computing and an interest in commerce or industry. The modular structure combines flexibility with a unified study framework.

BSc Mathematics with Finance G1NH Typical entry requirements as for G100 This programme provides an excellent grounding in finance, while developing the quantitative skills used in commerce and throughout the finance industry. BSc Mathematics with Management Sciences G1N2 Typical entry requirements as for G100 This degree will provide you with the analytical skills and techniques to tackle the wide range of problems that arise in managerial decision-making. The flexible modular structure allows you to select the options that suit your interests.

Making it all add up New mathematics centre The University of Southampton is taking a leading role in the government’s National Further Mathematics Network initiative, by hosting the Further Mathematics Centre for the Hampshire and Isle of Wight region at its Highfield Campus. The aim of the initiative is to raise awareness among students, parents, schools, colleges and universities of the benefits of studying mathematics and further mathematics in the sixth form. The Centre will offer support to students who continue with mathematics after the age of 16, and to their teachers. The number of UK students taking further mathematics qualifications fell from around 15,000 in the early 1980s to 5,000 by the late 1990s. Professor Adam Wheeler, Deputy Vice-Chancellor at the University of Southampton and Professor of Industrial Applied Mathematics, says: “Maths is a profound way of understanding the world and a powerful tool for solving real problems. It can also lead to an interesting career – for example, Southampton maths graduates are now working in Formula One racing. This new centre at Southampton will play a key role in persuading young people of the fun and excitement of maths, as well as its sheer usefulness.”

Continued

Mathematics

Further information can be found on the Further Mathematics Network website: www.fmnetwork.org.uk

150

Southampton maths graduates are now working in Formula One racing

BSc Mathematics with Music G1W3 Typical entry requirements as for G100, including music Mathematics and music have a particular affinity, perhaps because they are both concerned, to a certain extent, with exploring structure. This programme will develop your problem-solving skills and build on your musical experience, combining technical studies with historical and critical work. BSc Mathematics with Operational Research G1GF Typical entry requirements as for G100 This programme introduces the most important methods used to solve mathematical problems, equipping you with skills and expertise valued by a wide range of businesses and organisations. BSc Mathematics with Physics G1F3 Typical entry requirements as for G100, including physics Physics uses mathematics to make predictions about the world, and many areas of mathematics have advanced through the need to address physical problems. The structure of this unified programme allows you to choose which areas of both subjects you wish to specialise in.

BSc Mathematics with Statistics G1G3 Typical entry requirements as for G100 Training in statistics offers a unique range of challenges and provides opportunities to work on a variety of significant problems across industry, environmental science, medical research and government. You will develop the necessary communications, mathematical and statistical skills for a career as a statistician.

Key facts Ranked third in UK for quality of research outputs in applied mathematics. Ranked second in the UK for research power in statistics and operational research (RAE, 2008) One of the largest mathematics departments in the UK Wide range of degrees, with flexibility to transfer between programmes Generous scholarship scheme for UK/EU and international students Large international cohort

Typical course content −− Calculus −− Algebra −− Geometry −− Statistics −− Differential equations −− Abstract algebra −− Number theory −− Fluid dynamics −− Communicating and researching mathematics

Career opportunities −− Financial analyst −− Actuary −− Statistician −− Underwriter −− Management consultant −− Banker −− Broker −− Accountant −− Crime analyst −− Medical researcher

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Mathematics go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr J H Renshaw, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Mathematics Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5154 Email: ugmaths@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/maths

Mechanical engineering encompasses a broad range of disciplines. It is vital to every aspect of our daily lives – you can see it at work all around you. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA, including mathematics and physics (general studies not accepted), plus GCSE English language grade C or above IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, including a total of 12 in mathematics and physics at higher level Intake: 60 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng Mechanical Engineering | H300 | 3 years MEng Mechanical Engineering | H301 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Advanced Materials | HJ35 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Aerospace | HH34 | 4 years

Mechanical Engineering

MEng Mechanical Engineering/Automotive | H390 | 4 years

152

MEng Mechanical Engineering/Bioengineering | HH38 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Engineering Management | HN32 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Mechatronics | HH37 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Naval Engineering | HH35 | 4 years MEng Mechanical Engineering/Sustainable Energy Systems | HH32 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus

Mechanical engineering is a challenging and exciting subject that covers a wide range of technical activities, including the design of machines, conversion of energy, manufacturing processes, medical engineering and microsystems technology. Using computer-aided design and manufacturing, mechanical engineers research, develop, design, manufacture and test tools, engines, machines and other mechanical devices for a wide range of applications, from the automotive and aerospace fields to biomedical and microsystems. Design exercises form an integral part of our programmes, developing a breadth of understanding to equip you with the wide range of skills needed by today’s professional engineer. Our programmes are highly valued by sponsors and employers, and are recognised by the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) for officer training in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces. All our master’s (MEng) programmes provide a direct route of entry to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status. −−You will work on design activities that relate theory to practice and combine analytical skills and creativity in the solution of real engineering problems −−In year three you will undertake an individual project, ranging from design studies to open-ended research, which may be sponsored by industry −−In year four you will work on a major group design project, applying your knowledge to a practical engineering problem

“I chose mechanical engineering because of Southampton’s reputation in specialised areas of engineering, and to keep my career options open. I was motivated to stay on to carry out postgraduate research on a bioengineering project with a real industrial goal.” Alex Dickinson MEng Mechanical Engineering graduate, 2006

Fourth-year group design projects enable you to apply your knowledge to a practical engineering problem

BEng Mechanical Engineering H300 This is a broad programme of study, with design an important theme in all three years. MEng Mechanical Engineering H301 Following a broad-based foundation, in years three and four you will have the opportunity to specialise or to continue with an interdisciplinary theme. MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Advanced Materials HJ35 Study the selection of appropriate materials in design and manufacture, along with an understanding of how these materials behave in service. MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Aerospace HH34 Develop expertise in aerospace systems while maintaining the broad-based engineering background associated with mechanical engineering. MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Automotive H390

MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Mechatronics HH37 Explore the challenges at the interface between mechanical engineering and electronics, through sensors and instrumentation, control and signal processing, and automation and robotics. MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Naval Engineering HH35 Developed in conjunction with the Royal Navy to provide detailed understanding of marine systems engineering while maintaining a broad-based mechanical engineering background. MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Sustainable Energy Systems HH32 Gain an overview of modern energy technologies, including renewable energy sources, fuel cells, nuclear engineering and energy economics.

Key facts Number one in The Guardian University Guide 2010 for mechanical engineering

Strong links with industry provide Study specialist modules designed to excellent opportunities for work prepare you for a career in the automotive experience and employment sector, while maintaining a broad-based 96 per cent of students were satisfied mechanical engineering background. with the quality of their course (National Student Survey, 2008) MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Bioengineering HH38 84 per cent gained graduate employment within six months of graduation Explore the challenges faced in the compared to the national average of design, development and testing of 76 per cent (HESA data, 2006/7) medical devices – one of the fastest growing engineering sectors. Opportunities to study abroad MEng Mechanical Engineering/ Engineering Management HN32 Acquire the technical skills to understand, design and manufacture new products, and the expertise to manage the process, people and finances.

Our degrees are accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), and our MEng programmes provide a direct route to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status

The School of Engineering Sciences has been awarded an ExxonMobil Award in recognition of Excellence in Engineering teaching

Typical course content −− Engineering design −− Engineering materials −− Mechanics of solids −− Fluid mechanics and thermodynamics −− Electrical systems −− Law and management −− Automobile systems −− Orthopaedic biomechanics −− Fuel cells and photovoltaic systems −− Aircraft propulsion

Career opportunities −− Automotive and aerospace engineering −− Biomedical engineering −− Marine and offshore industry −− Defence and armed forces −− Research and development (in universities and industry) −− Engineering consultancy −− Information technology −− Management consultancy −− Materials engineering −− Financial services

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Engineering Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr Prasanth Nair, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Engineering Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2840 Email: admissions@mech. southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ses/mech

The School of Medicine at Southampton is one of the leading medical schools in the UK, providing a broad education for the study of health and disease. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA, to include chemistry (see opposite for more details and graduate entry and widening access programmes) IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, with a minimum of 6 in chemistry at higher or standard level Intake: 206 (BM5), 40 (BM4), 30 (BM6) Average applicants per place: 14 (BM5), 26 (BM4), 14 (BM6) Selection process: UCAS application, UKCAT, enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required. Selected applicants will be interviewed and/or may take part in an interactive activity Degree | UCAS code | Duration BM Medicine and BMedSc (BM5) | A100 | 5 years BM Medicine (BM4, graduate entry) | A101 | 4 years BM Medicine and BMedSc (BM6, widening access) | A102 | 6 years Located at Highfield Campus and Southampton General Hospital Campus and NHS trusts across the region

Medicine

“I can’t believe how comfortable and settled I feel at Southampton. The course is great, the best thing being how supportive the School is, always reassuring you that if you have any problems they’ll be there for you.”

154

Daisy Hills Fourth-year medical student

Our degrees represent the first stage in a rewarding career as a doctor. You will gain practical experience from the very beginning, having contact with patients in a variety of clinical settings. Once you have successfully completed your programme, you can progress to employment in the NHS and the Foundation Programme (a two-year training programme for newly qualified doctors). We have three Bachelor of Medicine programmes. BM5 is the standard five-year programme. If you already have a degree, our four-year programme (BM4) will allow you to draw on your existing knowledge and experience as you begin your training as a doctor. If you are able to meet our eligibility criteria specifically designed to widen access to medicine (see website for details), our six-year programme (BM6) may be the right degree for you. Upon graduation from our BM5 and BM6 programmes, as well as a Bachelor of Medicine degree, you will be awarded a Bachelor of Medical Sciences degree. BM5 and BM6 students also have the possibility of gaining an intercalated master’s degree by taking an additional year of study. Our application process Through references and your UCAS personal statement, you should demonstrate that you have initiative, are self-motivated, literate and articulate. You must show that you are able to interact successfully with people, particularly in health and social care settings (for example, through personal/family experience, paid or voluntary work or work shadowing). You must also complete the UK Clinical Aptitude Test in advance of making your application, the results of which will be used in the selection process. See www.ukcat.ac.uk As part of the selection procedure the School will require all selected applicants to take part in an interactive activity. Selected mature (non-graduate) and international applicants for BM5 and international applicants for BM4 will be interviewed. All selected BM6 applicants must also attend interview and satisfy two

Medical student on placement

eligibility criteria. Graduate and international applicants are not eligible to apply for the BM6 programme. As part of the selection procedure, the School may require selected applicants to take part in an interactive activity. Confirmation and continued registration on all our programmes is subject to satisfactory health screening, as well as a satisfactory Criminal Record Bureau disclosure, both of which are confidential. BM Medicine and BMedSc (BM5) A100 A levels: AAA, to include chemistry. Alternatively, AS chemistry and biology/ human biology can be offered at grades AA in addition to grades AAA at A level. General studies is not acceptable, and subjects with overlap of material, such as biology/sports studies or mathematics/ further mathematics, may not be considered in combination. In addition, seven GCSEs at grade B or above are required, including mathematics, English and double award science (or equivalent) IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level, with a minimum of 6 in chemistry at higher or standard level. Applicants can offer chemistry at standard level, providing they are offering one other science subject at higher or standard level −− Integrated, systems-based course −− Research project in year four, with eight weeks’ elective clinical apprenticeship in year five, with experience in a variety of hospitals and in community and general practices

BM Medicine (BM4, graduate entry) A101 Degree: upper second-class honours degree in any subject A levels: chemistry or AS level chemistry and biology/human biology at grade E or above, plus GCSE English, mathematics and double award science at grade C or above (or equivalent) −− Learning based on clinical topics in years one and two −− Clinical experience two or three times a week in years one and two −− Learning supported by small-group work BM Medicine and BMedSc (BM6, widening access) A102 A levels: E in chemistry, or AS level chemistry and biology/human biology at grades EE or above. Alternatively AS chemistry and biology /human biology can be offered at grade B or above in addition to grades CCC at A level. General studies is not acceptable, and subjects with material that overlaps, such as biology/sports studies, mathematics/ further mathematics, may not be offered in combination at A level. In addition, five GCSEs at grade C or above are required, including English, mathematics and double award science (or equivalent) −− Guaranteed place on BM5 (conditional on satisfactory completion of year zero) −− Clinical placements in a variety of healthcare settings from week two of the course −− Full-time course timetabled over three days −− A small-group setting, with 30 students −− Extensive tutorial and pastoral support

Key facts Clinical experience from year one State-of-the-art facilities and extensive NHS infrastructure investment Residential attachments in the south of England Upon graduation from our BM5 and BM6 programmes, as well as a Bachelor of Medicine degree, you will also be awarded a Bachelor of Medical Sciences degree BM5 and BM6 students have the possibility of gaining an intercalated master’s degree by taking an additional year of study Widening access programme (BM6) identified as an example of good practice by the Department of Health

Career opportunities Following provisional registration with the General Medical Council, graduates have the option of a range of medical careers. The School of Medicine’s stimulating, open and supportive environment will prepare you to become a competent practitioner in a modern, changing health service, with the capability to follow a career in a wide range of specialties.

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Medicine go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Visit us online for more information or to download a School brochure. BM Admissions Office Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4408 Email: bmadmissions@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/medicine

Pregnancy and birth are major events in the life of a woman and her family. Midwives are involved in all aspects of maternity care and have a key role in helping women to have the best experiences and health outcomes. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB Intake: 27 Average applicants per place: 25 Selection process: UCAS application, interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BMid Midwifery | B720 | 3 years Located at Highfield Campus

Midwifery

“I chose Southampton because of its excellent reputation within nursing and midwifery. The clinical placement, offering hands-on experience, begins early on in the course. Academic staff provide great personal support across all clinical and academic issues.”

156

Jo Clarke BMid Midwifery graduate, 2008

From early pregnancy through to the first weeks after birth, midwives work with women and their families to give advice and identify healthcare needs. As a student midwife, you will undertake programmes specifically designed to develop and achieve the competencies, skills and knowledge required to register as a midwife with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). The programme will prepare you for your future career by enhancing your understanding of the roles of different professionals in a team-based service. You will spend time working in interprofessional groups with students from 10 other health and social care programmes. −−Your timetable is structured into placements and study blocks, each lasting several weeks. This provides you with continuity of experience, particularly when on placement −−Integrating theory with the practical aspects of the programme is a fundamental principle of midwife training. To help reinforce your learning you will have client contact very early in the course −−Year three provides the opportunity to work side by side with a qualified midwife, sharing responsibility for a small number of clients, including antenatal, labour and postnatal care

The next generation is in your hands

Key facts

Typical course content

Career opportunities

No tuition fees are payable for UK/EU residents

−− Midwifery practice −− Professional studies −− Life sciences −− Social sciences −− Developing autonomous practice −− Interprofessional education −− Clinical practice

−− NHS hospitals −− NHS community units −− Independent sector −− International

Means-tested NHS bursary for UK residents of up to £4,000 50 per cent theory, 50 per cent practical midwifery experience, with hands-on experience from year one Become a registered midwife on successful completion of the programme State-of-the-art virtual interactive practice suite

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5500 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

Southampton has one of the largest and most diverse music programmes in the UK, offering a high degree of flexibility and student choice. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB, including grade B or above in music, plus grade 8 ABRSM , Rockschool or Trinity IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including 6 in higher level music, plus grade 8 ABRSM, Rockschool or Trinity Selection process: UCAS application. Those offered places are invited to attend a visit day, which features a range of talks and other events, and multiple opportunities to ask questions Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Music | W300 | 3 years BA Music and Management Sciences | WN32 | 3 years BA English and Music | QW33 | 3 years | see page 103 BA French and Music | RW13 | 4 years | see page 118 BA German and Music | RW23 | 4 years | see page 126 BA Spanish and Music | RW43 | 4 years | see page 194 BSc Acoustics and Music | HW73 | 3 years | see page 57 BSc Mathematics with Music | G1W3 | 3 years | see page 151

Music

Located at Highfield Campus

158

“I wanted my degree to broaden my understanding of music, so the flexibility of the course structure at Southampton was what appealed to me. The city is really friendly towards students and the level of interaction with tutors is fantastic.” Rupert Cross BA Music graduate, 2006

Our undergraduate course includes performance, composition and musicology, and embraces a wide range of musical styles and traditions, from western classical music to commercial music, jazz and pop. We also offer options in music business, music therapy and community music. A Music degree from Southampton can prepare you for a variety of careers, both within and outside music. Our alumni are successful in broadcasting, performance, education, music therapy, composition, commercial music and information technology, among other areas. The Turner Sims Concert Hall, one of the best purpose-built recital halls in southern England, is located on campus and provides a centre for student musical activity. Opportunities for performance are plentiful: in addition to degree-related solo and ensemble performance courses, the department sponsors a series of lively student and professional lunchtime concerts at the Turner Sims during term. The ancient city centre church of St Michael the Archangel supports Cantores Michaelis, a group of eight paid choral scholars and two voluntary lay clerks, auditioned and selected from the University. There are, in addition, a number of scholarships for accompanists, organists, keyboard players and other instrumentalists. For full details go to www. southampton.ac.uk/music/about/scholarships.html The Students’ Union supports a broad range of student performing groups, including orchestras and vocal and theatre music ensembles, in which music students play major roles.

Opportunities for performance are plentiful. Music sponsors a lively series of student and professional concerts at the Turner Sims

BA Music W300

Key facts

A core programme of musical studies in year one is followed by free choice from a wide range of options in years two and three. You may also choose to take 25 per cent of your programme in an alternative subject. The focus is on three main themes:

95 per cent of students agreed that the overall quality of the Music course was good in the National Student Survey (2008), which is well above the national average

−− History and criticism: introduces analytical and repertory studies, and sociological topics, from the medieval period to the present day −− Performance: supports instrumental and vocal performance (solo or ensemble) in classical, jazz and pop styles, with 24 hours of fully funded individual tuition per year for solo performers, plus fortnightly master classes, professional workshops and group coaching −− Composition: includes extensive project work and advanced studio techniques, leading to the submission of a collection of original compositions, either classical or commercial BA Music and Management Sciences WN32 In addition to the musical studies described above, this programme develops your understanding of key management functions, with an opportunity to apply management skills such as problem solving, teamwork, communication, numeracy and selfmanagement. −− 50/50 split between the subjects in each year, or the option of 25 per cent in a third subject −− A core programme of management sciences in years one and two, with a free choice of music options −− In year three, a free choice from a wide range of options in both subjects

Flexible course structure allows you to tailor your programme to your needs, across performance, composition and academic music study Purpose-built concert hall (Turner Sims) supporting the most extensive series of professional concerts and workshops of any UK university Dedicated keyboard room, percussion room, jazz and pop rehearsal room, nine further teaching and ensemble rehearsal rooms, 16 practice rooms, three electronic studios plus live room, and 16 networked multimedia workstations

To read about our former students and their current careers visit www.southampton.ac.uk/music/about/ alumni.html

Career opportunities −− Postgraduate studies −− Teaching −− Performance −− Production −− Arts administration −− Artistic and financial management −− Media −− Accountancy −− Computer programming

Scholarships For information on scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Many large-scale Students’ Union performing groups (orchestras, bands, choirs and theatre groups), in addition to music ensembles

Typical course content −− Performance: early music; classical and contemporary art music; jazz and pop −− Composition: free composition (classical and/or commercial, television and film) −− Orchestration and arranging −− Songwriting −− Historical and critical topics: music history and analysis from the Middle Ages to the present; world music; jazz and pop; issues in sociology and contemporary culture −− Music business −− Music therapy and community music For more information go to www.southampton.ac.uk/music/ undergrad/undergraduatecourses.html

What to do next Contact the Admissions Coordinator for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2736 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/music

Science is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary, with employers and governments seeking scientists with skills spanning traditional subject definitions. This degree will produce scientists well prepared to meet such challenges. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA (two science subjects plus mathematics) IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level (mathematics at higher level required) Intake: 20 Selection process: UCAS application and interview. Please apply early as interview dates are allocated on the basis of subjects selected Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Natural Sciences | CFG0 | 3 years MNatSci Natural Sciences | FGC0 | 4 years Located at Boldrewood and Highfield Campuses and the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

We have developed the Natural Sciences programme for candidates who are looking for an adaptable degree course that provides academic challenge, diversity and flexibility, while maintaining the intellectual rigour and excellent education expected by candidates and their future employers.

The course allows you to pursue a combination of two or three science subjects, with all subjects studied in each year of the degree. Maintaining learning in two or more key sciences at all levels of your degree provides you with interdisciplinary training that reflects the multifaceted nature of many aspects of modern science, in terms of both research and industrial application. With many advances in modern sciences taking place at the boundaries of traditional disciplines, this programme will provide you with the qualifications and skills to contribute to this development.

Natural Sciences

“I like NatSci at Southampton because it has been very easy to choose options and excellent guidance is given on what fits your course.

160

I’ve been able to meet people from different subjects and have done loads of practical work. There is also lots of support and a good relationship with tutors.” Ishna Mistry MNatSci student reading Chemical Biology with Biology

Face details of blue barred parrotfish, Scarus ghobban, Bali, Indonesia

You will select a major subject area, which will provide you with a home school. You will also choose minor subjects, which may change as your interests develop. Mathematics is available to complement subjects where necessary. Preferred major and minor combinations −− Biochemistry with Chemical Biology −− Biology with Marine Ecology −− Biomedical Sciences with Chemical Biology −− Chemical Biology with Biomedical Sciences −− Chemical Biology with Physics −− Marine Ecology with Biology −− Marine Ecology with Chemical Biology −− Oceans and Climate with Physics −− Physics with Chemical Biology −− Physics with Structural and Materials Chemistry −− Structural and Materials Chemistry with Environmental Science −− Structural and Materials Chemistry with Physics −− Synthetic Chemistry with Biochemistry −− Synthetic Chemistry with Earth Science It may be possible to construct a degree programme with other combinations but this would be subject to timetabling restrictions. A case would need to be made for the chosen combination on

scientific and educational grounds before a candidate could be accepted for such a combination. Candidates who are interested in a combination of Earth Sciences with Physics are advised to apply for the Geophysics degree programme and those interested in the combination of Environmental Science with Biology are advised to apply for the Environmental Science degree programme, as both degree programmes are interdisciplinary and the timetable is well established Course structure −− Year one: 38 per cent major subject area, 50 per cent minor subject(s), 12 per cent mathematics −− Year two: 50 per cent major subject area, plus 50 per cent one or two minor subjects −− Year three (BSc): 50 per cent major subject area, 25 per cent minor subject, 25 per cent interdisciplinary project −− Year three (MNatSci): 50 per cent major subject area, including a research project, 50 per cent minor subject(s) −− Year four (MNatSci): 50 per cent major subject area, 25 per cent minor subject, 25 per cent interdisciplinary project

Key facts Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with research projects in years three and four, including an interdisciplinary project reflecting your choice of major and minor subject areas

Excellent reputation for teaching and research, with more than 90 per cent of our research activity internationally recognised Friendly staff and modern facilities

Career opportunities −− Postgraduate study −− Teacher training −− Medicine −− Industry −− Journalism −− Marketing and brand management −− Financial risk analysis, accounting and audit management −− Information management, technology and consultancy −− Patent law −− Other science-based careers

Scholarships For information on scholarships please contact the Admissions Tutor for Natural Sciences: natsci@southampton.ac.uk

What to do next Contact the Natural Sciences Admissions Tutor at the Natural Sciences Degree Office for more information. School of Chemistry Email: natsci@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/natsci

We offer a range of exciting, challenging programmes, designed to ensure that the nurses of the future are able to meet the healthcare needs of the twenty-first century. Typical entry requirements A levels: BN3 – BBC; Diploma with Advanced Studies – BC Intake: 520 Average applicants per place: 15 Selection process: UCAS application, interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required

Degree/course | UCAS code | Duration Adult Nursing BN3 | B745 | 3 years Diploma with Advanced Studies | 3060 | 3 years *BN4 | 4 years | subject to validation Child Nursing BN3 | B735 | 3 years Diploma with Advanced Studies | 3360 | 3 years *BN4 | 4 years | subject to validation Learning Disability Nursing BN3 | B761 | 3 years Diploma with Advanced Studies | 3260 | 3 years *BN4 | 4 years | subject to validation Mental Health Nursing BN3 | B760 | 3 years Diploma with Advanced Studies | 3160 | 3 years *BN4 | 4 years | subject to validation Located at Highfield Campus (also Portsmouth, Winchester, Basingstoke and Isle of Wight) *From 2011 a widening participation into Nursing four-year programme (BN4) will be available, pending approval and validation, for applicants who do not meet the typical entry requirements. We anticipate that further details will be available from July 2010.

Nursing

For further information please contact the admissions team on +44 (0)23 8059 5500 or email healthsciences@southampton.ac.uk

162

Nursing is about caring for people. You will learn to look after people’s psychological needs as well as treating their physical problems. A major feature of all our programmes is early patient contact, so whichever branch of nursing you choose, you will soon find yourself working with real patients, with full placements commencing in the first semester and covering a wide range of situations in both hospital and community settings. Across all our programmes you will spend time working in interprofessional groups with students from 10 other health and social care programmes. All our programmes lead to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC).

“By going into placement in the first year I gained so much confidence in providing nursing care, and have really enjoyed being given the responsibility to look after children ranging from newborns to teenagers.” Catrina Lock Third-year Child Nursing student

Nursing – a career, not just a qualification

BN3 Adult Nursing B745

BN3 Mental Health Nursing B760

Typical course content

Adult Nursing Diploma with Advanced Nursing – a career, Studies 3060 not just a qualification Adult Nursing is about caring for all people with acute healthcare needs and those with longer-term and palliative care requirements.

Mental Health Nursing Diploma with Advanced Studies 3160

−− Nursing practice −− Life sciences −− Social sciences −− Professional practice −− Study skills and information technology −− Interprofessional education −− Clinical skills practice −− Developing skills for registration

BN3 Child Nursing B735 Child Nursing Diploma with Advanced Studies 3360 As a child nurse you will look after children and provide crucial support to their families. Children are not just mini adults – their bodies and minds work in very different ways. The work of a children’s nurse is varied, and may range from the intensive care of premature babies to promoting the health of adolescents in community settings.

Mental health nurses care for people with mental health problems, in both hospital and community settings. You will help clients to overcome health problems, to come to terms with their difficulties and to live as normal a life as possible.

Key facts

Career opportunities

No tuition fees are payable for any nursing programme for UK/EU residents

−− NHS hospitals −− NHS community settings −− Nursing homes −− Independent sector −− International

NHS bursaries of up to £6,500 for diploma with advanced study courses, and meanstested bursaries for degree programmes State-of-the-art virtual interactive practice suite

50 per cent theory, 50 per cent practical BN3 Learning Disability Nursing B761 nursing experience, with hands-on Learning Disability Nursing Diploma with experience from year one Advanced Studies 3260 Become a registered nurse on People with learning difficulties have a wide range of needs and live varied lives. You will work with people who have intellectual impairments, to improve their quality of life and promote their wellbeing.

completion of the programme

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5500 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

Occupational therapy is an exciting and rewarding profession, which will suit creative and motivated individuals who enjoy challenges and excel at problem solving. This programme will prepare you for practice in an ever-changing healthcare system. When people become ill, disabled or lack opportunities, they may lose the ability to carry A levels: BBB, including one science subject out everyday activities. As an occupational therapist, IB: 28 points, 16 at higher level you will assess the physical, mental and social needs Intake: 40–50 (NHS-funded, full-time), 5 (NHSof the individual, and consider the best way to help funded, part-time). There may be opportunities for a them achieve their personal goals, regain lost skills small number of international/self-funded students and live life to the best of their ability. Typical entry requirements

Average applicants per place: 8–9

Selection process: UCAS application for the full-time programme; applications are made directly to the School for the part-time programme and will include an interview for shortlisted applicants; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required for all successful applicants Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Occupational Therapy

BSc Occupational Therapy | B920 | 3 years (full-time)

164

BSc Occupational Therapy (part-time) | direct application to School only | 4 years Located at Highfield Campus

Occupational therapists work with people of all ages, in an increasing range of health, social and private care settings. Clinical areas include physical rehabilitation, mental health, learning disabilities, social services and education, as well as non-traditional areas such as work with homeless people and in prisons. Graduates of the Occupational Therapy programme obtain professional qualifications and are eligible for membership of the British Association of Occupational Therapists and to apply for registration with the Health Professions Council.

“Southampton has a fantastic social scene and excellent facilities for teaching occupational therapy.” Emma Joslin Third-year Occupational Therapy student

Occupational therapists improve the quality of life for their clients

A range of teaching and assessment methods are used throughout the programme. These encompass working effectively with clients, their families and other health professionals, critically examining your own practice and managing your work competently. You will go on to develop the skills and knowledge you will need to work in a range of practice settings, and you will study the management and research skills required to equip you for future professional practice as a clinician, educator, evaluator and manager.

nationally recognised initiative has been supported by the Department of Health and is described as “leading edge”. It involves health professions students from the Universities of Southampton and Portsmouth.

This programme offers a combination of academic study and integrated fieldwork placements, which take place across a range of health and social care settings throughout the programme, starting in year one.

Strong links with local practitioners further enhance student learning

Students also participate in the interprofessional learning programme, where they have the opportunity to learn and work with other healthcare students, developing an understanding of the roles of different professionals while working on a range of health- and social care-related projects. This

Key facts Shared modules with physiotherapy and podiatry students, and an interprofessional learning initiative unique to health professions students at the Universities of Southampton and Portsmouth Academic staff are active researchers and experts in their fields

−− Management skills −− Professional practice −− Ethics

Career opportunities With a recognised increasing need for occupational therapists, due to an ageing population and to developments in health and social care, career prospects within the profession are excellent. Many students return to the University during their careers to continue their professional development. To meet this demand, the School offers short courses, MSc, PhD and clinical doctorate programmes on a full- and part-time basis.

Course and tuition fees for all UK/EU students are paid by the Department of Health

Typical course content −− Anatomy −− Physiology −− Psychology −− Sociology −− Physical rehabilitation −− Mental health −− Learning disabilities −− Research skills

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5261 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

Oceanography is the science of exploration, offering insights into physical, chemical and biological processes throughout the marine environment. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAA–BBB IB: 36–30 points, 18–16 at higher level Intake: 50 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Oceanography | F710 | 3 years MOcean Oceanography | F700 | 4 years MOcean Oceanography (with study abroad) | F702 | 4 years MOcean Ocean, Earth and Climate Science | F790 | 4 years BSc Ocean Chemistry | FF71 | 3 years BSc Oceanography with Physical Geography | F7F8 | 3 years MOcean Oceanography with French | F7R1 | 4 years BSc/MOcean Oceanography with Foundation Year | F701 | 4/5 years | see page 186

Oceanography

Located at Waterfront Campus, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS)

166

Studying oceanography will allow you to contribute to the future use and care of the ocean system. We actively involve undergraduates in our research output and regularly publish student work in scientific journals of international standing. The programme has strong links to industry, through summer placements, one-year industry placements and the opportunity to undertake research on real industry data, and for master’s students to apply for an industrysponsored final year. BSc Oceanography F710 A levels: BBB, including two science subjects (mathematics acceptable) IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level This programme offers a thorough understanding of the physical, geological, chemical and biological processes in the ocean system. MOcean Oceanography F700 A levels: ABB, including two science subjects (mathematics acceptable) IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level This programme is specifically designed to equip you for a career in ocean science. Years one and two follow the BSc Oceanography, and years three and four focus primarily on research.

“The knowledge and skills provided by my degree at NOCS has proved essential for starting a career in marine sciences.” Julie Doran Master of Oceanography, 2006, now working as a marine scientist for Seastar Survey Ltd, Southampton

Research Vessel Callista arriving at NOCS

MOcean Oceanography (with study abroad) F702

BSc Oceanography with Physical Geography F7F8

Typical course content

−− Common introductory modules in year one promote flexibility within and between programmes −− Residential and one-day field courses allow practical application of knowledge This interdisciplinary programme provides − − Year three allows for specialisation, coherent training in ocean science and with an increased focus on its integration with land-based studies. independent work and research −− An advanced research project forms MOcean Oceanography with a major component of the final year in French F7R1 four-year programmes A levels: ABB, including at least two science subjects and French at A or AS Career opportunities level (A* GCSE French may be accepted) − − University research laboratories IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level −− Marine environmental consultancies This programme is appropriate if and industrially funded organisations you wish to pursue a marine science −− Industry (port authorities, aggregate career in mainland Europe. Year three extraction, geophysical survey) is undertaken at the Université de − − Government-funded laboratories Bordeaux-1. −− IT Key facts −− Teaching The largest single UK grouping of marine −− Postgraduate studies (PhD, MSc, MRes) and Earth scientists, at Europe’s leading −− Science journalism centre for marine and Earth science studies

A levels: AAA in three science subjects A levels: BBB, including geography and (mathematics and geography acceptable) one science or mathematics IB: 36 points, 18 at higher level IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level This programme provides intensive training in ocean sciences, combined with an opportunity to spend part of year three studying at one of the powerhouse universities in the USA. MOcean Ocean, Earth and Climate Science F790 A levels: ABB, to include mathematics and two other sciences IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level This new programme has been designed to provide a broad and complete education in Earth and marine system science, examining the way in which the Earth functions as a system, to determine our environment and climate. BSc Ocean Chemistry FF71 A levels: BBB, including B or above in chemistry and one other science or mathematics IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level This programme develops pure chemistry knowledge to apply to the broad range of interdisciplinary science of oceanography.

Our taught programmes are nationally recognised for their quality and innovation The excellence of our extensive fieldwork programme receives regular national recognition

Scholarships

For information on scholarships in the School of Ocean and Earth Science go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

Modern, purpose-built £50 million centre, with an international reputation for cutting-edge research We provide a variety of bursaries, in addition to those available from the University

What to do next Contact Dr Debora IglesiasRodriguez, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed School prospectus is available. School of Ocean and Earth Science Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2681 Email: ugenquiry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/soes

Recent advances in pharmacology – the study of how drugs interact with living tissues – have resulted in improved treatments for diseases such as Aids, Alzheimer’s, depression, heart failure and malaria. Typical entry requirements GCSEs: Grades A–C in English, mathematics and science. If you lack these formal qualifications, your aptitude for the course will be assessed at interview. International students whose first language is not English must have already attained the necessary standard in English, such as 6.5 in IELTS

Our degree programme has a strong emphasis on neuroscience and neuropharmacology, focusing on the molecular aspects of how pharmacological agents work. We provide specialist training in pharmacology from year two, and offer a year out in industry for students who want to gain experience working in the pharmaceutical industry.

A levels: If offering three science A levels: 300 points from three A levels = BBB If offering two science A levels: 320 points from three A levels = ABB

Our staff are involved in pharmacological research into brain damage and recovery relating to stroke, developmental biology, oncology and the development of new antibiotics, the selective toxicity of antiparasitic For pharmacology degrees chemistry must be drugs, and neuropharmacology, including the offered at A level (minimum grade B) with at least mechanisms underpinning alcoholism. Alongside one other A level science subject. A level science research-led teaching, you will have access to worldsubjects considered include biology, human biology, class laboratories for your final-year project. physics, mathematics, psychology IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including chemistry Intake: 30 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application (all applicants who receive an offer are invited to visit the School)

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

Pharmacology

BSc Pharmacology | B210 | 3 years

168

BSc Pharmacology with Foundation Year | CB71 | 4 years | see page 186 Located at Highfield Campus

This programme provides broad training in pharmacology and related subjects. Through core topics, you will be introduced to the major concepts and principles of pharmacology in years one and two, with the opportunity to specialise in year three. In year three you will also complete a research project in an area of your choice.

“It was a brilliant degree, well organised and taught by very experienced and professional staff. I enjoyed it so much and learned a great deal. The facilities at Southampton are excellent and the campus is beautiful. I had a excellent time in the city.” Faaria Manzoor BSc Pharmacology graduate

Working in one of our laboratories

Key facts

Typical course content

Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with opportunity to choose options from other disciplines alongside core pharmacology modules

−− Molecular basis of life −− Cellular and genetic mechanisms −− General pharmacology −− Molecular and cellular biochemistry −− Neuroscience −− Molecular biology −− Medical biotechnology −− Molecular basis of disease −− Molecular pharmacology −− Neuropharmacology of CNS disorders −− Selective toxicity

Option of working in pharmaceutical industry for a year Third-year project undertaken as part of a research team working at the cutting edge of pharmacology

Career opportunities −− Pharmaceutical industry −− Postgraduate research training −− Scientific officer in medical laboratories −− Teaching

−− Forensic science −− Legal profession −− Business management −− Medicine

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Biological Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Administrative Assistant for Admissions for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Biological Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7755 Email: bsentry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci

“The great virtue of philosophy is that it teaches not what to think, but how to think – philosophy is, in commercial jargon, the ultimate ‘transferable work skill’– and it could nowadays be the passport to a successful, varied career.” (the Times) Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Selection process: UCAS application and interview Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Philosophy | V500 | 3 years BA Economics and Philosophy | VL51 | 3 years BA Philosophy and History | VV51 | 3 years BA Philosophy and Mathematics | VG51 | 3 years BA Philosophy and Politics | VL52 | 3 years BA Philosophy and Sociology | VL53 | 3 years BA English and Philosophy | QV35 | 3 years | see page 103 BA Film and Philosophy | WV65 | 3 years | see page 115

Philosophy

BA French and Philosophy | RV15 | 4 years | see page 118

170

BA German and Philosophy | RV25 | 4 years | see page 126 BA Spanish and Philosophy | RV45 BSc (Social Sciences) Politics, Philosophy and Economics | subject to validation | 3 years | see page 179 Located at Avenue Campus

Philosophy is the most ancient of academic disciplines, yet the uncertainties of modern living make the traditional philosophical challenges even more pressing in the twenty-first century. The study of philosophy gives you an unparalleled opportunity to develop your ability to think clearly, critically and consistently, to understand varying points of view, to organise ideas and to work cooperatively with others – skills much in demand by employers. BA Philosophy V500 You will have every opportunity to develop your own thoughts on philosophical issues and to engage in philosophical debate. −− Year one offers lecture-based modules focusing on central themes, designed for students new to philosophy as well as those who have some familiarity with the subject, alongside staff-led tutorials involving three to five students −− In year two you will take two core modules in the history of philosophy, accompanied by small-group seminars, and choose from a range of optional modules −− You will write a dissertation in your final year, as well as taking further optional modules

“Southampton is a brilliant place to go to university. The city is great and I thoroughly enjoy my course. All my teaching staff are excellent and the facilities are fantastic.” Marcella Mathis Second-year Philosophy student

Student researching in the University’s Hartley Library

BA Economics and Philosophy VL51

BA Philosophy and Sociology VL53

Typical course content

These are both subjects requiring rigorous analytical thought, exploring fundamental questions about human welfare and social justice.

Combined degree structure as for VL51

−− Ethics and value theory −− Philosophy of mind and language −− Philosophy of action −− Philosophy of film −− Philosophy of mathematics −− Philosophy of religion −− Aesthetics −− Kant, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Sartre

−− There are four modules from each subject every year, or you can substitute one module from a third subject −− In year three your dissertation may be in either subject BA Philosophy and History VV51 Combined degree structure as for VL51 This programme builds on our strengths in both areas, benefiting in particular from historiography in history and from philosophy’s interest in the history of ideas. BA Philosophy and Mathematics VG51 Combined degree structure as for VL51 Mathematics has always had a special relationship with philosophy: some of the greatest mathematicians have been philosophers, and vice versa. This programme enables you to explore that relationship in depth. BA Philosophy and Politics VL52 Combined degree structure as for VL51 This programme provides you with the opportunity to focus on fundamental questions concerning the legitimacy of the state, the nature of freedom and government, rights, and the relationship between politics, law and morality.

This programme explores human nature, the relationship between the individual and society, and the nature of social institutions.

Key facts Unusually wide range of courses, with much of our teaching conducted in genuinely small groups The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise deemed 100 per cent of research activity to be “internationally recognised”, with 40 per cent of that activity further evaluated as either “internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour” or “world leading” Ranked first in the UK and fourth internationally for research in the philosophy of art, and first in the UK and fifth internationally for research in nineteenth century continental philosophy (peer-reviewed Philosophical Gourmet Report, 2009) Awarded an Arts and Humanities Research Council grant of £300,000+ in 2007, to fund a three-year research project on Nietzsche and modern moral philosophy

Career opportunities −− Advertising −− Civil service −− Education −− Film and television −− Information technology −− Journalism −− Law −− Management

What to do next Contact Dr Daniel Whiting, Admissions Tutor, or Theresa Cook, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3400 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/philosophy

The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to excellence in research and teaching, providing an in-depth understanding of modern physics. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including mathematics and physics IB: 36-34 points, 18-17 at higher level Intake: 120 Average applicants per place: 6 Selection process: UCAS application, with invitation to visit the School

Physics & Astronomy

Degree | UCAS code | Duration

172

BSc Physics | F300 | 3 years MPhys Physics | F303 | 4 years BSc Physics with Astronomy | F3F5 | 3 years MPhys Physics with Astronomy | F3FM | 4 years MPhys Physics with Astronomy (with year abroad)* | 4 years BSc Physics with Mathematics | F3G1 | 3 years MPhys Physics with Mathematics | F3GC | 4 years BSc Physics with Photonics | F368 | 3 years MPhys Physics with Photonics | F369 | 4 years BSc Physics with Space Science | F3F9 | 3 years MPhys Physics with Space Science | F3FX | 4 years MPhys Physics with Nanotechnology | F390 | 4 years MPhys Particle Physics (with year abroad)* | 4 years MPhys Physics with a Year of Experimental Research* | 4 years BSc/MPhys Physics with Foundation Year | F301 | 4/5 years | see page 100 Located at Highfield Campus *Candidates should apply for these degree programmes via the F3FM programme.

The School is one of just five UK physics departments to have had over half its work ranked as “world leading” or “internationally excellent” in each of the last two Research Assessment Exercises. All our courses are taught by experts in their fields. Our programmes are designed around problem-based learning, rather than just acquiring knowledge. Year one modules include small-group tutorials and mini-projects, and encourage free thought and problem solving. You will learn the core tools of relativity, quantum mechanics and electromagnetism, and how these theories can be used to describe the universe precisely, from galaxies to subatomic particles. You will also push the boundaries of design of materials and technology, from nanotechnology and superconductivity to photonics. Flagship programmes Our first-class MPhys students have the opportunity to spend their final year immersed in a research environment. Astronomers go to the Harvard Smithsonian Institute in the USA, particle physicists to CERN, Geneva, and quantum materials physicists use our world-class photonics labs and clean rooms in Southampton. Students interested in these options should apply for our MPhys programmes F303 or F3FM. Places on these programmes are limited but are open for competition to our top students at the end of second year. BSc/MPhys Physics F300/F303 A levels: AAB Core modules include the study of classical and orbital mechanics, the quantum world of atomic, nuclear and particle physics, quantum physics of materials, light as an electromagnetic wave and photonics. −− All BSc programmes are based on a core physics curriculum, with the MPhys furthering these studies and developing professional skills −− 25 per cent of each programme consists of optional courses, which can be chosen from the specialist courses listed below, or from courses across all University departments

Astronomers from the School have achieved a notable first with their recent discovery of a black hole in the halo of our Milky Way

BSc/MPhys Physics with Astronomy F3F5/F3FM Entry requirements and basic degree structure as for F300/F303 Our astronomy group specialises in high-energy astronomy and the study of compact objects. The course includes stellar evolution, galaxies and cosmology, and a field trip to Tenerife in year two. MPhys Physics with Astronomy (with year abroad) This specialised degree covers the core material of the MPhys Physics with Astronomy programme, with the addition of a year of research at the Harvard Smithsonian Institute in the USA. BSc/MPhys Physics with Mathematics F3G1/F3GC Entry requirements and basic degree structure as for F300/F303 The Theoretical Physics Group and the School of Mathematics support your studies. Topics include general relativity, number theory and mathematics of finance. BSc/MPhys Physics with Photonics F368/F369 Entry requirements and basic degree structure as for F300/F303 We work with Southampton’s Optoelectronics Research Centre, Britain’s leading university-based research centre in photonics. Courses include practical photonics and light and matter.

There is a field trip to Tenerife in year two. Modules include astronautics, spacecraft systems and design, and remote sensing. MPhys Physics with Nanotechnology F390 Entry requirements and basic degree structure as for F300/F303 This highly interdisciplinary programme incorporates electronics, chemistry and biochemistry. Options include nanotechnology and molecular basis of life. MPhys Particle Physics (with year abroad) This four-year course follows MPhys Physics programme, but with accelerated learning in particle physics. The final year is spent at CERN in Geneva performing research. Physics with a Year of Experimental Research For students interested in quantum materials physics, there is the opportunity to spend the final year in our world-class clean room facilities and photonics labs as part of our research groups.

Key facts Ranked fifth for teaching quality (the Guardian, 2008) Physical science at Southampton was voted top of the elite Russell Group of universities by our graduating students (National Student Survey, 2008)

BSc/MPhys Physics with Space Science F3F9/F3FX

Staff include 18 professors and four Fellows of the Royal Society

Entry requirements and basic degree structure as for F300/F303

Newly refurbished labs, observatory

Combining the expertise of the Schools of Engineering and Oceanography, you will study the design of space missions.

Special programme for international physics students to spend a year at Southampton as part of their studies

Typical course content −− Relativity −− Orbital motion −− Quantum mechanics −− Atomic physics −− Nuclear physics −− Particle physics −− Electromagnetism and light −− Computer techniques −− Science in history −− One-year experimental or theoretical project

Career opportunities −− PhD studies −− High-tech industry −− Software and hardware computer science −− Medical physics −− Scientific journalism −− Patent law −− Management −− Finance −− Teaching

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Physics and Astronomy go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships (up to five scholarships are awarded annually to first-year UK/EU applicants)

What to do next Contact Professor Nick Evans, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Physics and Astronomy Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2068 Email: entry.phys@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/phys

At the heart of this science-based profession is the exercise of clinical judgement and informed interpretation – a physiotherapist is a clinician, educator, evaluator and manager. We offer thorough preparation for all these roles. Typical entry requirements A levels: ABBb IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 35 (NHS-funded, full-time), 5 (NHS-funded, part-time), 25 (NHS-funded MSc pre-reg). There may be opportunities for a small number of international/self-funding students Average applicants per place: 15 Selection process: UCAS application for the full-time programme; applications are made directly to the School for the part-time programme; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required Those students with an appropriate degree (at least upper second-class) may wish to consider the twoyear MSc pre-registration degree in physiotherapy

The programme is designed to equip you with the skills to practise as a competent physiotherapist in an ever-changing healthcare system. This encompasses working effectively with clients and their families, and with other health professionals, as well as critically examining your own practice and managing your work competently. We also aim to prepare you for continuing your professional development once you are qualified. Graduates of the physiotherapy programme obtain professional qualifications and are eligible to apply for state registration with the Health Professions Council and for membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. In 2008, 28 per cent of physiotherapy students achieved a first-class degree and 68 per cent an upper second-class degree.

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Physiotherapy | B160 | 3 years BSc Physiotherapy (part-time) | direct application to School only | 4 years

Physiotherapy

Located at Highfield Campus

174

“I have always wanted to study physio, and Southampton was always the place I wanted to go to. It’s fantastic. The nightlife is great, the people are friendly and I’m really enjoying my course.” Kirsty Burrows Third-year Physiotherapy student

Practical skills form an important part of the course

A combination of academic study and clinical placements is designed to integrate theory with experience. Teaching methods are varied, depending on the nature of the module, and include lectures, project work in groups and selfdirected study. You will be assessed on your academic work as well as your clinical placements, using a variety of methods, including written exams, essays, oral presentations, practical exams and development of a research protocol. Clinical placements occur in blocks throughout the programme. You will also be given the opportunity to learn and work with other healthcare students, developing an understanding of the roles of different professionals in a teambased service. This initiative has been recognised by the Department of Health as “leading edge”, and the School has been recognised nationally for its development of interprofessional learning.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Programme professionally accredited by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

The most likely destination for recently qualified graduates is within the NHS, although there are many other opportunities, in private practice, sport and industry. Some graduates go on to postgraduate study.

Varied teaching methods and shared learning opportunities School rated “commendable” in last review by the Quality Assurance Agency for all three areas: learning and teaching; student progression; and learning resources and their utilisation Full-time and part-time routes Course and tuition fees for all UK/EU students are paid by the Department of Health

Typical course content −− Anatomy −− Physiology −− Psychosocial sciences −− Ethics −− Neurology −− Cardiorespiratory/musculoskeletal rehabilitation −− Practical skills

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5500 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

This programme will challenge you academically, practically and personally, preparing you thoroughly for professional practice and ultimately providing you with a rewarding career in an exciting, developing healthcare profession. Podiatry specialises in the management of disease and disorder of the lower limb, undertaking treatments A levels: BBB, including one science subject that involve the foot and ankle. The foot is a highly IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level complex structure, which can develop problems Intake: 35 (NHS-funded). There may be opportunities affecting a patient’s overall health and wellbeing. for a small number of international/self-funding Podiatrists are trained to diagnose, devise treatment students plans and carry out treatment for all age groups. Typical entry requirements

Average applicants per place: 4

Selection process: UCAS application and interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Podiatry | B985 | 3 years Located at Highfield Campus

Patient management ranges from nail and skin pathologies and nail surgery to the mechanical correction of gait and posture, and more complex surgical techniques. Imagine how rewarding it is to treat a patient with painful feet and see them walk out of your clinic pain free, maintaining their mobility and independence; or being able to prescribe or manufacture corrective devices for people with walking and running problems.

“We have a great team of podiatry staff, whose whole aim is to ensure that all our students achieve their full potential and goals.�

Podiatry

Cathy Bowen Lecturer in Podiatry

176

Analysis of foot in action

This flexible modular programme, with six units in each semester, has three days of lectures and clinical attendance and two days of private study throughout the course. You will gain qualifications in local anaesthesia and prescription-only medicines, as well as carrying out nail surgery. During clinical placements you will work with professional colleagues in community and hospital settings, including the Southampton Podiatry Centre, a purpose-built community clinic with an interdisciplinary approach to patient care and the most up-todate equipment. We have excellent links with NHS podiatry colleagues, enabling you to undertake clinically relevant research and ensuring structured, high-quality teaching on clinical placement, as well as contact with patients at an early stage. This programme is unique in offering clinical placements in specialisms such as podiatric surgery, dermatology, diabetes, rheumatology and biomechanics.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Shared modules with occupational therapy and physiotherapy students

−− NHS (generalist, specialist, podiatric surgeon or consultant, management in community clinics, hospitals, GP practices, residential homes, mobile surgeries) −− Private practice, in your own practice or as a visiting podiatrist −− Retail and leisure industry −− Education and research (eg lectureship or postgraduate study – MSc, MPhil/ PhD, DClin) −− Specialist in health promotion, rheumatology, diabetes, biomechanics and orthotic services

Interprofessional learning initiative unique to health professions students at the Universities of Southampton and Portsmouth Staff have national and international expertise in dermatology, diabetes, wound healing and rheumatology Course and tuition fees for all UK/EU students are paid by the Department of Health

Typical course content −− Clinical practice and management −− Foundation sciences and anatomy −− Communication and professional issues −− Collaborative learning (across up to 10 different health disciplines) −− Pathology, medicine and pharmacology −− Research

What to do next Contact the School of Health Sciences for more information. A detailed course prospectus is available. School of Health Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 5500 Email: healthsciences@ southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ healthsciences

National decisions can have international consequences, and global processes affect the policies of individual governments, touching all our lives. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, or ABBb accepted when an additional AS level has been studied IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level Intake: 90 Average applicants per place: 6

How does globalisation affect the distribution of political power? Is the world entering a new period of danger, conflict and instability? Are citizens more apathetic about politics today than in the past? The study of politics and international relations helps us to understand the forces shaping global, national and local politics and why our world is as it is today.

Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and International Relations | L260 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) International Relations | L250 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Politics | L200 | 3 years

Politics & International Relations

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Economics | LL12 | 3 years

178

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Sociology | LL32 | 3 years BSc (Social Sciences) Politics, Philosophy and Economics | subject to validation | 3 years BA Languages and Contemporary European Studies* | R900 | 4 years | see page 141 BA Modern History and Politics* | VL12 | 3 years | see page 133 BA Philosophy and Politics* | VL52 | 3 years | see page 171 BA Politics and French* | LR21 | 4 years | see page 118 BA Politics and German* | LR22 | 4 years | see page 126 BA Politics and Spanish/Portuguese and Latin American Studies* | RL42 | 4 years | see page 194 Located at Highfield Campus *Located at Highfield and Avenue Campuses

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and International Relations L260 GCSE mathematics and English grade C or above This programme provides a comprehensive grounding in global politics along with the more traditional disciplines of political theory and comparative politics. Year one modules include: Introduction to international relations, Political systems, Introduction to political theory, and Issues in contemporary politics. In year two you will study modules including: International political analysis, Political theory, Democracy and the modern state, and Research methods, as well as choosing optional modules. In the final year you are free to select from a range of modules reflecting the specialist interests of teaching staff and to complete a dissertation in any area of politics or international relations.

“I particularly liked the dynamic between students and academic staff. The academics were not only at the forefront of their fields, which is interesting in itself, but there was an enjoyable sense of equality, where you could challenge, disagree or expand upon their views during discussion.� Ben Walker BSc (Social Sciences) Politics graduate, 2009, now Cabinet Member for Safeguarding Children, Southampton City Council

How are societies governed and where does political power lie?

BSc (Social Sciences) International Relations L250

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Sociology LL32

Typical entry requirements as for L260

Typical entry requirements as for L260

This programme places more emphasis on the study of global politics, including economic, military, diplomatic, security, social and environmental issues. Similar in structure to L260, you will take an additional core module in Globalisation in year two and write a dissertation on any area of international relations.

Similar in structure to LL12, this programme allows you to tailor the combination of disciplines to match your interests. Sociology focuses on identity, representations, power and interaction in society. In year three you can choose to write your dissertation in either subject.

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics L200 Typical entry requirements as for L260 This degree offers a firm grounding within the three main areas of political theory, comparative politics and international relations. It has a similar structure to L260, but gives you increased freedom and flexibility to choose specialist modules and to select a dissertation topic. BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Economics LL12 AS mathematics grade C and GCSE English grade C or above. This programme provides a thorough grounding in both subjects, with a range of optional modules allowing you to select specialist areas to suit your interests. In year three you can write your dissertation in either subject.

BSc (Social Sciences) Politics, Philosophy and Economics (subject to validation) A levels: at least grade B in mathematics We hope to offer this degree for October 2011. This three-year programme provides a thorough grounding in the main methods and debates within the disciplines of politics, philosophy and economics. In year three you can choose to specialise in one discipline, or you can continue to study a mixture of two or more of the subject areas. For further information on this programme, please contact the Admissions Administrator.

Typical course content −− Democracy and the state −− Political theory −− International political analysis −− Research methods −− Power and politics in the UK −− Environmental politics −− Arms control and disarmament −− Globalisation −− The politics of migration −− American power and world order

Career opportunities −− Management in industry and commerce −− Media −− Parliament −− Civil service −− Local government −− International organisations −− Higher education sector −− Teaching −− Officer entry to the armed services

Key facts Over 60 years of experience teaching politics and international relations Ranked third for learning resources in the National Student Survey (2008) Study abroad opportunities in Germany, Poland and the USA

What to do next Contact the Undergraduate Admissions Administrator for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2511 Email: poucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/politics

“The hungry world cannot be fed until and unless the growth of its resources and the growth of its population come into balance.” Lyndon B Johnson, 36th American President

Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 15 Average applicants per place: 5 Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Population and Geography | subject to validation | 3 years For all other geography degree programmes see page 120

Population and Geography

Located at Highfield Campus

180

Population and Geography is a joint degree programme that focuses on the mechanisms that drive changes in populations (births, deaths and migration), and their implications for society and nature. To do this, it is necessary to understand a broad and complex range of social, spatial, economic, political and biological factors that contribute to population dynamics across the world. By studying population processes in both the developed and developing world, the links between population, geography and development, poverty, environmental and social change are explored. The course is multidisciplinary and based on a core set of theories and techniques. Questions that face society and policy makers are discussed. For example, what are the causes and consequences of international migration? What can we do about global inequalities in health? Are the numbers of children born in developed and developing countries sustainable? How long can we expect to live after retirement? This degree will also equip you with key transferable skills highly prized by employers, such as report writing, presentation skills, data analysis and research abilities.

“What is exciting about our degree programme is that our students learn about the ways populations change and how that will affect lives, careers, societies and nations. Learning how to study these changes means developing crucial skills that businesses and organisations are increasingly seeking in an ever more competitive international workplace.” Professor Nyovani Madise Demography and Social Statistics

Population and Geography will involve a combination of compulsory and optional modules, with some flexibility to develop your studies in other disciplines such as economics, sociology or environmental sciences.

How will global growth affect our environment?

−−There are eight modules each year

Typical course content

Career opportunities

−−Modules incorporate lectures, seminars, tutorials and computer workshops, as well as self-directed reading and study

−− Population and society −− Economy, culture and space −− Introduction to demographic methods −− Geographical skills −− Population in developing societies −− Globalisation and uneven development −− Population processes in the developed world −− Research methods in the social sciences −− Migration −− Geographies of wellbeing −− Population and the environment −− Reproductive health −− Introductory geographic information systems

−− National and local governmental institutions −− UK-based and overseas development organisations −− Office for National Statistics −− Finance −− Marketing −− Market research −− Commerce −− Postgraduate studies (master’s, PhD)

−−In year three you will undertake a detailed project of your choice and complete a dissertation on an aspect of population and geography that interests you Key facts A leading centre of demography, highly active in both research and teaching Friendly, open atmosphere, highly praised by past students Study abroad opportunities in Finland, France, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands

What to do next Contact the Undergraduate Admissions Administrator for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 4746 Email: stucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/socstats

Psychology is the scientific study of human behaviour and mental functioning. Psychologists are interested in how people think, feel and act – from interactions between neurons to interactions between people. Our degree introduces you to the various areas covered by contemporary psychology – clinical, A levels: AAB cognitive, developmental, health, learning and IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level social. Developing your skills in a wide range of Intake: 150 research methods, you will be able to specialise in those areas of psychology that you find particularly Average applicants per place: 10 Selection process: UCAS application and/or interview; interesting or relevant to your future career goals. enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and Psychology is taught and studied as a science. Our BSc satisfactory health screening are required programme offers you the opportunity to discover how scientific methods can be used to understand human thought processes, emotions and behaviour. Typical entry requirements

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Psychology | C800 | 3 years Located at Highfield Campus

“I enjoyed the total learning experience provided within the School of Psychology. The engaging lecturers, the beautiful surroundings and excellent facilities all combined to make my time here very enjoyable.”

Psychology

Hannah Brown Third-year Psychology student

182

In year one you will explore the foundations that support psychological theory, research methods and analysis, and you will be introduced to practical psychology experiments. Year two covers material from six key research areas: cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, biological psychology, learning and behaviour, social psychology, and personality psychology. Year three offers the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice, with seminars based on individual reading and open discussion of the latest research. You will also undertake a research project in your final year, with the best example awarded a prize by the School.

Many psychology courses include assignments that are completed by small teams in an informal setting

Key facts

Typical course content

Scholarships

The first degree programme in the UK to receive unconditional accreditation from the British Psychological Society (2005)

−− Introduction to psychology −− Research methods and data analysis −− Psychology laboratory −− Thinking psychologically −− Forensic psychology −− Attachment and personal relationships −− Cognitive neuroscience

For information on scholarships in the School of Psychology go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

The School of Psychology is one of the foremost research-led psychology centres in the UK, ranked eighth in the UK in the 2008 RAE, with a grade point average of 2.7 weighted by the 39 academic staff contributing to it (HEFCE and the Guardian) Graduates are eligible for membership and registration with the British Psychological Society The School of Psychology is home to a number of leading research centres, including the recently founded Centre for Clinical Applications of Health Psychology

Career opportunities −− Clinical psychology −− Educational psychology −− Forensic psychology −− Health psychology −− Occupational psychology −− Human resources −− Advertising −− Market research −− Postgraduate study

What to do next Contact Mrs Tina Birring, Admissions Secretary, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Psychology Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2619/3995 Email: tb@southampton.ac.uk; kms@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/psychology

Southampton is one of the UK’s leading universities for science, and is highly rated for the quality of its research and teaching. We place a strong emphasis on sustainability and the environment – key themes for industry. Typical entry requirements See individual programmes for details of typical entry requirements. Subject areas Biochemistry | see page 68 Biology | see page 70 Biomedical Sciences | see page 72 Chemistry | see page 74 Environmental Sciences | see page 108 Geology | see page 122 Geophysics | see page 124 Marine Biology | see page 146 Oceanography | see page 166 Pharmacology | see page 168

Science at Southampton

Physics and Astronomy | see page 172

184

Zoology | see page 202

Our degrees provide breadth and depth of study, enabling our graduates to follow a wide variety of careers in scientific and other professions. The five science schools within the University of Southampton in the Faculty of Engineering, Science and Mathematics and the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences are: −−Biological Sciences −−Chemistry −−Civil Engineering and the Environment −−Ocean and Earth Science −−Physics and Astronomy Key facts Our science schools offer a world-class environment for research and education A range of programmes, with a wide choice of specialist modules Opportunity to study for both BSc and master’s programmes in most disciplines, with a variety of flexible degree paths

Career opportunities −− Our degree programmes provide you with the skills and knowledge to compete for the most senior positions in industry −− Many of our graduates go on to obtain higher degrees and enjoy successful careers in research and academia −− The Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) sends sponsored trainee officers from the three armed services and the civil service to Southampton to study science

Putting the theory of science to practical use in the laboratory

The Foundation Year is the first year of a four- or five-year programme leading to a degree in one of a range of scientific disciplines. Successful completion of the year guarantees progression to our degree programmes. Typical entry requirements A levels: BBB IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 30 Average applicants per place: 10 Selection process: UCAS application (additional information may be required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Biochemistry/Pharmacology with Foundation Year | CB71 | 4 years BSc Biology/Zoology with Foundation Year | C108 | 4 years BSc Biomedical Sciences with Foundation Year | CB71 | 4 years BSc/MChem Chemistry with Foundation Year | F108 | 4 years BSc/MEnvSci Environmental Sciences with Foundation Year | F903 | 4/5 years BSc/MGeol Geology with Foundation Year | F602 | 4/5 years

Foundation Year

Science

MMBio/MBfy Marine Biology with Foundation Year | F705 | 4/5years

186

BSc/MOcean Oceanography with Foundation Year | F701 | 4/5 years

This programme may suit you if you are studying for A levels in subjects different from those normally required for these degrees. It may also interest you if you are a mature applicant, with skills and experience from employment, or if you come from a part of the world where the education system is different from the British A level system. We may also consider your application if you have taken appropriate A level subjects for these degrees, but circumstances beyond your control (eg serious illness or personal problems) have led to lower grades than your high predictions. This full-time programme is delivered at Eastleigh College, through a combination of lectures, workshops, tutorials, laboratory sessions and private study. Assessment is mainly by unseen written examination and a variety of coursework assignments.

“It is nice to be involved with and work alongside enthusiastic students who are training to be future scientists. The Foundation Year encourages learning and creates an interesting and exciting learning environment for all involved.� Adam C Stone Teaching Technician

Students enjoying the process of discovery and learning through experimentation

Key facts

Typical course content

A route to a degree in a science subject for students without the traditional entry qualifications

−− Academic and communication skills −− Biology −− Chemistry −− IT −− Mathematics

Taught at nearby Eastleigh College Mature and international students welcome Supportive learning environment Excellent dedicated facilities

Scholarships For information on scholarships go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr A Barney, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A course leaflet is available. Science Foundation Year Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 9442 Email: foundyr@southampton.ac.uk www.esm.soton.ac.uk/foundation

Ship science studies the engineering behind vehicles and structures that use the ocean for transport, recreation and harnessing marine resources. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including mathematics and physics (general studies not accepted), plus GCSE English language grade C or above IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level, including a total of 12 in mathematics and physics Intake: 40 Average applicants per place: 4 Selection process: UCAS application Degree | UCAS code | Duration BEng Ship Science | J640 | 3 years MEng Ship Science | J641 | 4 years MEng Ship Science/Advanced Materials | J644 | 4 years MEng Ship Science/Engineering Management | JN62 | 4 years MEng Ship Science/Naval Architecture | J642 | 4 years MEng Ship Science/Naval Engineering | H500 | 4 years MEng Ship Science/Yacht and Small Craft | J643 | 4 years BEng/MEng Engineering with Foundation Year | H008 | 4/5 years | see page 100

Ship Science

Located at Highfield Campus

188

Our programmes provide a challenging, first principles approach to naval architecture and marine engineering. The professional naval architect or marine engineer is responsible for the design, construction and repair of cruise liners, high-speed ferries, container ships, oil tankers, sailing yachts, luxury motor craft, lifeboats, hydrofoils, hovercraft, submarines and underwater vehicles, as well as fixed or floating offshore structures. Maritime design projects will form an integral part of your study, with opportunities to become involved in leading-edge research. Recent projects include the design of a vessel to compete in Weymouth Speed Week, yacht design innovations for the Volvo Ocean Race, kite-powered ships, and using inspiration from nature for performance enhancements to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Our programmes are recognised by the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) for officer training in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces. −−In year one you will study the physical principles that are translated by mathematical application into engineering science and design practice −−In year two you will study the behaviour of structures in a fluid, the propulsion power needed for marine vehicles, ship behaviour in both calm water and waves, and management

“I chose Southampton for its good reputation. The Ship Science degree has given me the skills and the confidence to follow any career in the marine industry. On graduation, I joined AP Moller-Maersk in Copenhagen.” Oscar Hellstrom MEng Ship Science/Yacht and Small Craft graduate, 2007

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) offers summer placements for our students

−−In year three you will select options, and complete individual research and a small-group ship design project −−In year four you will work on a major group design project, applying your knowledge to a practical engineering problem BEng Ship Science J640 A wide-ranging programme of study, maritime design is an important theme throughout. MEng Ship Science J641 This degree offers broader coverage of fundamental engineering subjects within the context of ship science. MEng Ship Science/ Advanced Materials J644 Offers in-depth knowledge of materials used in the design and manufacture of marine craft, along with an understanding of how those materials behave over the vessel’s life. MEng Ship Science/Engineering Management JN62 This programme is designed to enable professional engineers to fast-track into key management positions in the maritime industry.

MEng Ship Science/Naval Engineering H500 Designed in collaboration with the Royal Navy, this programme focuses on the analysis and specification of marine engineering systems used on board ships and other marine structures, enabling a career as a seagoing engineering officer or in the defence industry. MEng Ship Science/Yacht and Small Craft J643 Specialise in the analysis, design and performance of yachts, small craft and other high-performance vessels.

Key facts Number one in The Guardian University Guide 2010 for mechanically-based engineering, which includes naval architecture and maritime technology Our students are actively sought by leading marine companies for sponsorship and work placements All our master’s programmes provide a direct route of entry to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status, and are accredited by the Royal Institution of Naval Architects and the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology The chief designer of the luxury cruise liner Queen Mary 2, Stephen Payne, is one of our graduates

MEng Ship Science/Naval Architecture J642

Friendly and informal learning environment

Study core naval architecture subjects in depth, with computing and computeraided design featuring strongly throughout.

The School of Engineering Sciences has been awarded an ExxonMobil Award in recognition of Excellence in Engineering Teaching

Typical course content −− Ship hydrostatics and stability −− Ship design −− Marine engineering −− Ocean wave and fluid dynamics −− Naval architecture −− Computational methods for ship design −− Ship resistance and propeller design −− Design of sailing yachts and highperformance craft −− Advanced materials for marine structures −− Ship motions and manoeuvrability

Career opportunities −− Yacht designer −− Naval architect −− Ship building and repair −− Marine engineer −− Marine surveyor −− Industrial research consultant −− Management or IT −− Ship classification −− Engineer in Royal Navy −− Postgraduate study

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Engineering Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact Dr James Blake, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Engineering Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2840 Email: ugship@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ses/ship

Social work is all about people. If you are quick-thinking, thorough, persuasive, interested in people and absolutely committed to achieving what you set out to do, then you may have what it takes to make a difference. Typical entry requirements A levels: BCC IB: 28 points, 13 at higher level Intake: 51 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: Interview; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure and satisfactory health screening are required Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Social Work | L500 | 3 years Located at Highfield Campus

“All the staff are so passionate in their fields and they will go out of their way to help in any way.�

Social Work

Claire Fry BSc Social Work student

190

A career in social work is demanding, but extremely rewarding. As a social worker you will work alongside nurses, teachers, physiotherapists and other professionals, in a responsible position which requires training and professionalism. Our programme provides the academic knowledge, experience and practical skills to ensure that you are intellectually well equipped and professionally competent for a career in any area of social work, statutory, voluntary or independent. The degree incorporates relevant foundation studies in sociology, social policy and social statistics, providing you with a thorough grounding in the academic and professional discipline of social work, while placing great emphasis on practical experience. You will undertake 200 days of directed academic learning and 200 placement days in practice, developing an understanding of social work theory and research, intervention methods, evaluation and reflection, and research methodologies. Practice learning experience takes place in years two and three, and you will write a dissertation in your final year. This degree is accredited by the General Social Care Council (GSCC), the governing body for social work in England and Wales. Students are assessed against the criteria set out in the National Occupational Standards. More than 70 per cent of our recent graduates gained a first- or upper second-class degree.

Social Work student studying in the Hartley Library

Key facts Involved in professional social work training since 1937 Degree accredited by the General Social Care Council, the governing body for social work in England and Wales Provides high-quality learning opportunities in a range of statutory and voluntary agencies as a result of strong local partnership arrangements with local social work agencies Ranked in the top 10 UK universities for teaching and learning resources in the National Student Survey (2008)

Typical course content −− Introductory social work −− Collaborative working Transformations of the modern world −− Introduction to quantitative methods

−− Ethics, values and empowering practice −− Social problems and social policy −− Social work with adults −− Social work with children and families −− Social work law, practice and the courts −− Research for social work −− Practice methodologies I & II

Funding The majority of our students receive NHS bursaries. To find out more visit www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students

Career opportunities −− Excellent preparation for a career in any area of social work −− Nationally there is a high demand for well-trained social workers −− A social work qualification provides excellent preparation for a career in a variety of related professions, such as counselling, public sector management and personnel

What to do next Contact Shirley Jackson, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 3202/2565 Email: swsucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/sws

How should we deal with educational failure, crime, racism, poverty, homelessness? Why do inequalities related to gender, race and class persist? What role should identity, family, community and the nation state play in our globalising world? Typical entry requirements A levels: ABB or ABBb (when an additional AS level has been studied), plus GCSE mathematics and English at grade C or above IB: 33 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 50 Average applicants per place: 4 Selection process: UCAS application (interview may be required) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Social Sciences) Sociology | L300 | 3 years

Sociology & Social Policy

BSc (Social Sciences) Sociology and Social Policy | LL34 | 3 years

192

BA (Social Sciences) Philosophy and Sociology* | VL53 | 3 years | see page 171 BSc (Social Sciences) Politics and Sociology | LL32 | 3 years | see page 179 Located at Highfield Campus *Located at Highfield and Avenue Campuses

If you have asked yourself such questions, then a degree in sociology or social policy may be the right choice for you. These two closely related disciplines focus on social institutions, social inequalities and social transformations. Sociologists explore identity, representations, power and interaction in society, while social policy academics consider people’s needs and how they are met (or not) by the state and the market. Transferable skills are an integral component of our programmes, making our degrees highly relevant and valued in today’s evolving job market. Our graduates are well placed in local government, policing, teaching, retail and media-related careers.

“The Sociology and Social Policy Division is full of extremely passionate academics who really encourage you with your own studies. They work hard to support you through your degree, and are always very approachable if you have a question.” Sophie Forster BSc (Social Sciences) Sociology graduate, 2009

Second-year Sociology and Social Policy lecture

BSc (Social Sciences) Sociology L300 This programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature of the relationship between individuals, groups and social institutions; the social processes underpinning social change and stability; the relationship between sociological argument and evidence; and the distinctive character of sociology in relation to other forms of understanding. −− Broad base of core materials in year one −− Research methods and optional modules to reflect individual interests in year two −− Seminar-based optional modules, drawing on individual reading, group presentations and open discussion of the latest research in year three Students also complete a dissertation on a research topic of their choice, the best of which is awarded a prize by the School. BSc (Social Sciences) Sociology and Social Policy LL34 Basic degree structure as for L300 This programme offers an awareness of social diversity and inequality, and their impact on people’s lives, as well as an understanding of the key concepts and theories used to comprehend human needs and social welfare.

Key facts

Career opportunities

In the 2008 RAE, Southampton was ranked third in the country for social policy and administration

−− Civil service −− Management −− Police officer −− Housing officer −− Teacher −− Social worker −− Marketing executive −− Chartered accountant −− Media executive −− Journalist −− Health administrator −− Political researcher

100 per cent of our Sociology and Social Policy final-year students said they would recommend the University to a friend or relative (UG Student Experience Questionnaire, 2009) Opportunities to study abroad through the ERASMUS scheme in the EU, and in the USA with the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Typical course content −− Sociology of everyday life −− Transformations in the modern world −− Analysing social policy −− Social problems and social policy −− Education and society −− Crime and society −− Gender and the mass media −− Research methods and skills −− Youth and society −− The body and society −− Race and society

What to do next Contact Nick Rayner, Admissions Tutor, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Social Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2512 Email: sspucas@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/sociology

At Southampton you can develop your language skills to the full, and deepen your understanding of Spanish- and Portuguesespeaking societies and cultures. Typical entry requirements A levels: AAB, including grade B or above in Spanish IB: 34 points, 17 at higher level (additional experience and qualifications will be taken into account)

Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies

Selection process: UCAS application and one-to-one interview

194

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BA Spanish | R420 | 4 years BA Spanish and Latin American Studies | RTK7 | 4 years BA Spanish and Portuguese | RR45 | 4 years BA Politics and Spanish/Portuguese and Latin American Studies | RL42 | 4 years BA The Spanish-speaking World | R430 | 4 years BSc Management Sciences and Spanish | NR24 | 4 years BA English and Spanish | QR34 | 4 years | see page 102 BA Film and Spanish | RW46 | 4 years | see page 115 BA French and Portuguese | RR15 | 4 years | see page 118 BA French and Spanish | RR14 | 4 years | see page 118 BA German and Spanish | RR24 | 4 years | see page 126 BA German and Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | RRF4 | 4 years | see page 140 BA Spanish (Linguistic Studies) | R401 | 4 years | see page 140 BA Spanish and History | RV41 | 4 years | see page 133 BSc Mathematics with Spanish | GR14 | 4 years | see page 149 BA Spanish and Music | RW43 | 4 years | see page 158 BA Spanish and Philosophy | RV45 | 4 years | see page 170 Located at Avenue Campus For more combined honours language degrees, including linguistics and European studies, please see page 140

We offer a wide range of courses in three main areas – Spanish studies, Spanish American studies (including Latinos in the USA), and Portuguese and Brazilian studies – focusing particularly on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We are strong in several major areas of Latin American studies, in particular, cultural studies, sociolinguistics, history and politics. Latin American courses are available to all students who study Spanish and/or Portuguese, and you may choose to spend your third year in Latin America. Year one provides a foundation for further study. You will be allocated to an appropriate stage of language proficiency in our unique system of seven language levels, enabling you to develop the four fundamental practical skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

“My degree at Southampton allowed me to go to Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, as an Erasmus student. I perfected my Spanish in a lovely, historical city.” Amel Nisrine Lamamra BA Politics and Spanish graduate, 2007

Cibeles Fountain, Madrid

You can spend your year abroad as an English language assistant in a school, studying at one of our partner universities or on a work placement. Countries where you can spend this year include Spain, Portugal, Mexico, Chile, Venezuela and Brazil. If you study two languages, you will normally spend the year abroad in one country, rather than splitting it between the two. The administrative organisation of your year abroad is carried out by our International Exchange Administrator, and you will be assigned a supervisor who will look after you during this year. We place great importance on the development of graduate skills vital for future employment through the integration of transferable skills into learning and teaching, in particular the language skills and strategy training for all first-years. Key facts Modern languages at Southampton has been ranked in the top five universities by the Guardian for the last four years and we were third in 2009 Rated in the top 10 modern languages departments in the country in the National Student Satisfaction Survey (2008) Opportunity to learn another language from scratch, such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Russian or Polish

Modern languages at Southampton was in the top two for European studies in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise A wide range of learning and teaching resources are available, including multimedia labs, electronic whiteboards and language-specific resource rooms

Typical course content −− In all years of study you will benefit from the wide range of resources (including extensive electronic and televisual facilities) offered by the Centre for Language Study, which works closely with the HEFCE National Subject Centre for Language, Linguistics and Area Studies, hosted at Southampton −− Year one units provide an introduction to the study of cultural forms, political and historical issues, and linguistic issues −− In years two and four you will have the opportunity to concentrate on your own particular interests, selecting from a range of more specialised units on Spanish- and Portuguesespeaking societies −− A special unit in year two will prepare you for your year abroad in year three, and for the academic work you will complete during this year −− Your year abroad is an opportunity to improve your linguistic and cultural proficiency in your chosen language, and to demonstrate your ability to work independently over a sustained period

Career opportunities −− Employment figures from 2005 show that more than 94 per cent of language graduates found a job six months after graduation −− Recent graduates have found jobs in management, banking, marketing, public relations, European institutions, local government, the civil service, radio, television, publishing, translation and teaching −− Others go on to postgraduate courses in European law, politics, international finance, management, education, translating, interpreting and librarianship

What to do next Contact Irina Nelson, Admissions Tutor, or Natasha Renwick-Meikle, Admissions Coordinator, for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Humanities Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 2256 Email: humanities@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/ml

Sport plays a significant role in contemporary society, demonstrated by government policy, the size of the sports economy and sports media, sport’s links to health and wellbeing, and its role in education and youth work. Also, with the prospect of the Olympic Games on our doorstep, sport has never been more prominent in the UK. Typical entry requirements A levels: BBB IB: 30 points, 16 at higher level Intake: 80–100 Average applicants per place: 8 Selection process: UCAS application (interview possible); enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure may be required

Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc (Hons) Sport Studies | LN32 | 3 years

Sport Studies

Located at Highfield Campus

196

Our sport degree was established in the early 1990s and we have become one of the leading providers of undergraduate sport courses in the region. The programme enables students to study key subjects within the area of sport according to their particular interests and career aspirations. The subject areas available are: Sport and health science The foundation of human performance and health is explored through the study of physiology, psychology and movement analysis, leading to an understanding of how the body and mind work in relation to physical activity, sport and health.

“Studying at Southampton gave me a solid theoretical and practical understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of sport studies. It also gave me so many different skills, which were key to making me more employable and enabled me to continue my studies at master’s level.” Christopher Stock BSc Sport Studies graduate, 2006

Enhance your CV through volunteering

History and sociology of sport This is studied through a variety of topics covering sociology, history, cultural and other sport issues. Coaching and teaching This is covered through the study of topics that emphasise coaching theory, practice and policy directly relevant to sports coaches and physical education teachers. Management and development of sport This is explored through the study of issues such as policy, strategy, finance, marketing and sports development. Compulsory modules in year one ensure that all students engage in all key subject areas, providing a strong foundation before selecting option modules and pathway specialisms. The programme prepares students for a variety of potential employment and further study destinations, and gives students sport-specific knowledge and key skills for entry into sport-related employment or further study. The development of key transferable skills also enables students to pursue non-sport-related careers (see career opportunities).

A key feature of the programme is the opportunity to personalise areas of the curriculum and to pursue career-relevant experiences. This can be achieved through the Personal development planning module, the choice of option modules and the selection of topic area for the final-year dissertation. Key facts All sport-related disciplines covered Option to specialise

Career opportunities −− Sport science support posts (laboratory technician, researcher) −− Sports development officer −− Employment with national governing bodies or local government −− Sports coaching −− Fitness instructor −− Teaching (following PGCE) −− Sports promotion and marketing −− Armed forces/police −− Graduate scheme for managers −− Further study (master’s or PhD)

State of the art human performance laboratory Opportunity to enhance your CV (vocational experience, volunteering, coaching courses) Access to the University’s excellent sporting facilities

Typical course content −− Sport science −− Physical activity and health −− Coaching theory and concepts −− Policy and strategy of sport −− Sports development −− Management science −− History and sociology of sport −− Sport legislation and risk management −− Research methods

What to do next Contact the School of Education for more information. A detailed brochure is available. School of Education Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7253 Email: educate@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/education

The FdA Working With Children is designed for those working in a range of educational support and care roles in early years and primary school settings, offering you the chance to further your learning and career development. Typical entry requirements

An innovative programme when it was set up six years ago, this FdA is now a well-established part-time course. It responds to national policy initiatives that require extended and enhanced qualifications in all areas of support work with children.

Applicants will normally be employed as a teaching/ learning support/early years assistant, childminder, playworker or similar, and have completed a core qualification equivalent to NVQ3 in a relevant area. Competence in English and mathematics is essential (GCSE grade C or above). Applicants will demonstrate The course offers the opportunity to enhance your readiness for undertaking the course and studying professional skills and knowledge in a higher education at HE level Intake: 40 Selection process: Applications are made directly to the University; enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure may be required (if a placement is needed outside the individual’s place of work) Degree | Duration

context, helping to prepare you for gaining the status of a higher level teaching assistant or early years professional. The programme provides progression from relevant NVQ3 qualifications, and students who successfully complete the foundation degree are able to progress to the School of Education’s BA (Hons) course. This includes an option to work towards qualified teacher status (QTS) for suitable candidates.

The course requires attendance at college or university one day per week through the academic year Located at a partner further education college (part one) and Highfield Campus (part two)

Foundation Degree Arts

Working With Children

FdA Working With Children | 3 years (part-time)

198

“This course allows me to work and study and still have quality time for family life. Southampton has very good education programmes – the lecturers are human and very approachable. Go for it. It’s a great way to gain an education and still have fun.” Theresa Meany FdA Working With Children graduate

Lead the way to a life of discovery

This programme will provide you with the necessary knowledge and understanding for the care and education of children in early years and primary settings. The course will equip you with the professional and practical skills and competencies that are required by current workforce development initiatives. Part one units are taught at our partner further education colleges, where you will follow a generic course underpinned by work-based learning, focusing on learning and development throughout early and later childhood. In part two you will follow a more specialised programme at the University, including a range of optional units relating to early years settings and the work of primary schools. You will also undertake a workbased project.

Key facts

Career opportunities

DfCSF Sure Start sector-endorsed foundation degree

Successful completion of the course will provide opportunities for significant career enhancement. With improved knowledge, skills and understanding, you will be able to apply for a range of more senior positions.

Highly experienced course tutors, with wide-ranging subject knowledge and teaching expertise A carefully blended curriculum of compulsory units and specialised options Strong emphasis on work-based learning throughout Well-developed links with employers and employer organisations

Typical course content −− Children’s learning and development −− Values in the care and education of children −− Policy contexts of working with children −− Supporting children with special needs −− Curriculum in the early and primary years −− Behaviour management −− Workplace organisation and management −− Curriculum subject courses −− Managing the early years environment −− Work-based project

What to do next Contact the School of Education for more information. A detailed departmental booklet is available. School of Education Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7253 Email: educate@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/education

The BA (Hons) Working with Young People in Communities leads to a nationally recognised youth work qualification through a part-time study route. The programme will provide you with the specialist technical knowledge and skills sought by employers.

Working With Young People in Communities

Typical entry requirements

200

Applicants will normally be employed for a minimum of eight hours per week in a setting where they are working directly with young people. They will also normally have completed or be near to completing a basic qualification (for example, local youth work qualification) equivalent to NVQ 2/3. You will need the support of your employer, who will be expected to provide supervision of your work-based learning. Applicants will need to demonstrate at interview their readiness to undertake the course and to study at HE level Intake: 30 Selection process: Applications are made directly to the University; an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure will be required

Degree | Duration BA (Hons) Working with Young People in Communities | subject to validation | 4/5 years (part-time) Attendance at the University is approximately fortnightly through the academic year, plus an additional three-day block each year Located at Highfield Campus

Developed jointly by the School of Education and local youth and community work providers, the programme is designed to produce well-qualified workers who are recognised for their competence and professionalism. The BA (Hons) is a new innovative programme which builds on the success of the highly regarded Foundation Degree in Youth Work. It is relevant for all those working with young people in the full range of formal and informal settings. The course will enhance your professional knowledge and allow you to develop your practice within a higher education framework. The programme provides progression from local qualifications (for example, at NVQ 2/3) and their equivalents.

“I wanted to expand my knowledge in order to develop my practice with the young people I meet in my job. It’s a great course and I’ve learned a lot. The more you’re prepared to put in, the more you will learn and enjoy.” Peter Stokes Youth Work student

Aeronautics and Astronautics graduates are flying high! ©Airbus S.A.S - photo by exm company / P.Maschet

Working With Young People in Communities (BA Hons) has a strong emphasis on work-based learning

You will study a range of modules exploring young people’s development and the practice of working with young people in contemporary Britain. −−Part one concentrates on faceto-face practice and includes work on equalities, group work and developing young people’s learning

Key facts

Career opportunities

Professionally accredited by the National Youth Agency

Successful completion of the course will provide opportunities for significant career enhancement. With improved knowledge, skills and understanding, you will be able to apply for a range of more senior positions.

Highly experienced course tutors, with wide-ranging professional and research experience with young people Strong emphasis on work-based learning throughout Highly relevant and up-to-date course content linked to the full range of work settings and incorporating current local and national policy

−−Part two provides you with the knowledge and understanding that underpin high-quality youth work Strong links with professional and its management, including organisations (statutory and voluntary) working with other agencies providing services for young people −−Part three will require you to undertake a work-based project, providing you with experience of research skills and evidence-led practice −−Taught units are extended through work-based learning, which is supervised by an experienced professional

Typical course content −− Equality, fair treatment and antidiscriminatory practice −− Young people’s learning and informal education −− Adolescent development −− Working with individuals −− Working with groups −− Policy influencing young people’s lives −− Community and global contexts when working with young people −− Interagency working −− Managing people and resources −− Creating and assuring quality youth work −− Work-based project −− Ethical issues

What to do next Contact the School of Education for more information. A detailed departmental booklet is available. School of Education Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7253 Email: educate@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/education

Zoology is the study of animals − their molecular biology, cell biology and physiology, as well as ‘whole organism’ aspects such as their behaviour and ecology. Southampton offers an ideal location for zoological studies. Typical entry requirements GCSEs: Grades A–C in English, mathematics and science. If you lack these formal qualifications, your aptitude for the course will be assessed at interview. International students whose first language is not English must have already attained the necessary standard in English, such as 6.5 in IELTS A levels: If offering three science A levels: 300 points from three A levels = BBB. If offering two science A levels: 320 points from three A levels = ABB For zoology degrees biology must be offered at A level (minimum grade B) with at least one other A level science subject. A level science subjects considered include chemistry, physics, mathematics, psychology, environmental science IB: 32 points, 16 at higher level, including biology Intake: 30 Average applicants per place: 7 UCAS application (all applicants receiving an offer are invited to visit the School) Degree | UCAS code | Duration BSc Zoology | C300 | 3 years BSc Zoology with Foundation Year | C108 | 4 years | see page 186

Zoology

Located at Highfield Campus

202

We provide training across a wide range of animal biology (including invertebrates and humans), in the pure aspects of zoology and its applications to the many facets of modern life. You will explore the subject at different levels, from molecules to cells, individual organisms, populations, species and ecosystems, right through to the global environment. Teaching is research-led and our staff are involved in a number of interdisciplinary projects, including foetal development and health, animal conservation and risk assessment of GM technology. Learning about such exciting topics helps our students develop into proficient, well-informed zoologists. Over 50 per cent of our graduates embark on jobs or further training in areas related to zoology, although the range of key skills you will acquire, including written and oral communication, numeracy and the ability to think scientifically, are valued in many careers.

“I really enjoyed my Zoology course, particularly the field trip to Spain, where I made most of my friends. I really felt at home in Southampton and the pastoral care at the School of Biological Sciences was fantastic. I got all the help I needed from my tutor and supervisor. It’s great to know when you are starting out that you’ll get support like that.” Andy Stewart BSc Zoology graduate

Central American red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas

This degree provides broad training in the zoological sciences. The flexible nature of the programme allows you to select units from other disciplines, including oceanography, computer sciences and languages, with the opportunity to specialise in cell/developmental or ecological/ evolutionary zoology in year three. You can also choose between a laboratory-based or field research project, with fieldwork undertaken in the UK or abroad.

Key facts

Career opportunities

Flexible, interdisciplinary programme, with opportunity to choose modules from other disciplines and change degree in year one

−− Postgraduate study −− Teacher training −− Conservation and the environment −− Agriculture −− Industry −− Journalism

Field trip to Spain in year one Year three project undertaken as part of a research team working at the cutting edge of zoology

Typical course content −− Molecular basis of life −− Field course in Spain −− Cellular and genetic mechanisms −− Diversity of life −− Ecology and evolution −− Animal behaviour −− Biodiversity and conservation −− Neuroscience −− Animal development −− Immunology

Scholarships For information on scholarships in the School of Biological Sciences go to www.southampton.ac.uk/scholarships

What to do next Contact the Administrative Assistant for Admissions for more information. A detailed course brochure is available. School of Biological Sciences Tel: +44 (0)23 8059 7755 Email: bsentry@southampton.ac.uk www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci

How to get here By road

By rail

By coach

Southampton M3 – exit M3 at junction 14, following signs for Southampton (A33). Follow the A33 into Bassett Avenue and follow map/signs to University campuses.

Fast trains from London and Bournemouth/Weymouth stop at Winchester, Southampton Central and Southampton Airport Parkway. Trains from Portsmouth and Bristol/South Wales stop at Southampton Central. The uni-link U1 bus service runs between Southampton Central and Southampton Airport Parkway via the University.

Southampton coach station is at Western Esplanade, in the city centre. uni-link U1A buses connect the University’s Southampton campuses and the city centre.

M27 (west or east) – leave M27 at junction 5 (Southampton Airport) and follow map/ signs to University campuses. Winchester M3 – exit M3 at junction 9 or 10.

204

By air Southampton International Airport is about 20 minutes from the Southampton campuses by bus or taxi. There is a full UK domestic service, as well as flights to mainland Europe and the Channel Islands.

Terms of use

Force majeure

The University of Southampton will use all reasonable efforts to deliver advertised programmes and other services and facilities in accordance with the descriptions set out in the prospectuses, student handbooks, welcome guides and website. It will provide students with the tuition and learning support and other services and facilities so described with reasonable care and skill.

The University will not be held liable for any loss, damage or expense resulting from any delay, variation or failure in the provision of programmes of study, services or facilities arising from circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control, including (but not limited to) war or threat of war, riot, civil strife, terrorist activity, industrial dispute, natural or nuclear disaster, adverse weather conditions, interruption in power supplies or other services for any reason, fire, boycott or telecommunications failure.

The University undertakes a continuous review of its programmes, services and facilities to ensure quality enhancement. The University is also largely funded through public and charitable means and is required to manage these funds in an efficient and cost-effective way for the benefit of the whole of the University community. The University, therefore, reserves the right if it considers it to be necessary: −− to alter the timetable, location, number of classes, content or method of delivery of programmes of study and/or examination processes, provided such alterations are reasonable; −− to make reasonable variations to the content and syllabus of programmes of study (including in relation to placements) −− to suspend or discontinue programmes of study (for example, because a key member of staff is unwell or leaves the University) −− to make changes to its statutes, ordinances, regulations, policies and procedures which the University reasonably considers necessary (for example, in the light of changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators). Such changes if significant will normally come into force at the beginning of the following academic year or, if fundamental to the programme, will normally come into force with effect from the next cohort of students −− to discontinue programmes of study or to combine or merge them with others (for example, because too few students apply to join the programme for it to be viable) 1. Change or discontinuance of programmes If the University discontinues or combines a programme of study or changes it significantly: A. In the event that the University has not made an offer of a place or before an applicant has accepted an offer: (i) The University will inform applicants at the earliest possible opportunity of the discontinuation or change. (ii) An applicant will be entitled to withdraw his or her application by informing the University in writing within a reasonable time of being told of the discontinuation or change, failing which the University will withdraw its offer of a place. B. In the event that an offer has been accepted but prior to the student enrolling, the student may either: (i) withdraw from the University and be given an appropriate refund of tuition fees and deposits, or (ii) transfer to another available programme (if any) as may be offered by the University for which the student is qualified If in these circumstances the student wishes to withdraw from the University and to apply for a programme at a different university, the University shall use its reasonable endeavours to assist the student. C. In the event that a student has enrolled, the University will use reasonable endeavours to teach the programme out but cannot guarantee to do so. If the University cannot teach out a programme of study, it will use its reasonable endeavours to facilitate the transfer of a student to an equivalent programme for which the student is qualified and which has places available within the University or at a different university. 2. Changes to services or facilities The University will make available to students such learning support and other services and facilities as it considers appropriate, but may vary what it provides from time to time (for example, the University may consider it desirable to change the way it provides library or IT support). 3. Financial or other losses The University will not be held liable for any direct or indirect financial or other losses or damage arising from such discontinuations, changes to or mergers of any programme of study, service or facility. Upon acceptance by an applicant of an offer of a place at the University, the relationship between the applicant and the University becomes contractual. In entering into that contract, neither the student nor the University intends that any of the terms of the contract will be enforceable by virtue of the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 by any person not a party to it.

In the event that such circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the University arise, it will use all reasonable endeavours to minimise disruption as far as it is practical to do so provided that such endeavours do not undermine the University’s Quality Assurance requirements.

© University of Southampton 2010

A copy of this prospectus and the University’s current information for students with disabilities and specific learning difficulties can be made available, on request, in alternative formats, such as electronic, large print, Braille or audio tape, and, in some cases, other languages. For further information, please contact the Enquiries Office or Enabling Services.

Index 206

A

B

E

Accommodation 36 Accounting (see Accounting and Finance; Economics; Management Sciences) Accounting and Finance 54 Acoustical Engineering 56 Acoustics 56, 66 Acoustics and Music 57 Actuarial Science 85, 149 Advanced Materials (see Aeronautics and Astronautics; Mechanical Engineering; Ship Science) Advice and Information Centre, Students’ Union 53 Aeronautics 58 Aerospace (see Mechanical Engineering) Aerospace Engineering 58 Air Squadron 52 Allowances and grants 45 Alumni 50 Ancillary Learning Support 50 Anthropology 60 Applied Social Sciences – General Pathway 62 Applying to the University 46 Archaeology 64 Architecture 77 Art (see Fashion and Textile Design; Fine Art; Graphic Arts) Art galleries 28 Artificial Intelligence (see Computer Science; Electronic Engineering) Arts and entertainment 26, 28 Assessment 49 Assistive Technology Service 50 Astronautics 58 Astronomy 149, 172 Audiology 66 Automotive (see Mechanical Engineering)

Biochemistry 68 Bioengineering (see Mechanical Engineering) Biology 70 Biomedical Sciences 72 British Studies 136 Bursaries 44 Business (see Entrepreneurship; Management; Management Sciences)

Economics 84, 149, 171, 179 Education and Training (Post-Compulsory) 88 Education and Training (Primary) with Qualified Teacher Status 90 Electrical Engineering 92 Electromechanical Engineering 94 Electronic Engineering 96 Employability 22 Enabling services 51 Engineering Foundation Year 100 Engineering Introduction 98 Engineering Management (see Aeronautics and Astronautics; Mechanical Engineering; Ship Science) English 102 English language requirements 47 Enterprise and entrepreneurship 14 Entrepreneurship 104 Environmental Engineering 1 06 Environmental Sciences 108 Erasmus exchange programme 53

C Campus tours 27 Campuses 24 Careers fairs (UCAS and higher education) 27, 53 Career Destinations 50 Centre for Language Study 50 Chaplaincy 52 Chemistry 74 Children, Working With (Foundation Degree) 198 Cinemas 26, 35 City of Southampton 34 Civil Engineering 76 Clubs and societies 26 Computer Science 78 Computer Science Foundation Year 100 Computer Systems 97 Computing facilities 52 Concert Hall, Turner Sims 28 Contemporary European Studies 141 Counselling Service 51 Criminology 80, 82

D Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme (DTUS) 22, 44 Dental services 51 Design (see Fashion and Textile Design; Fine Art, Graphic Arts Directions, travel 204 Directory of services 50 Disability Service 51 Distributed Systems and Networks 79 Doctors and dentists 51 Dyslexia services 51

F Fashion and Textile Design 110 Fashion Marketing 112 Fees and loans 42 Film 114 Finance (see Accounting and Finance; Economics; Mathematics) Finances and living costs 43, 52 Fine Art 116 First Support Team 52 Foundation Year: – Computer Science 100 – Engineering 100 – Geophysics 100 – International 136 – Physics 100 – Science 186 French 118 Freshers’ Week 27

G

M

P

Geography 120, 180 Geology 122 Geophysical Sciences 124 Geophysics 124 Geophysics Foundation Year 100 German 126 Grants 44 Graphic Arts 128 Graphic Design 129

Maintenance grants 45 Management 142 Management Sciences 144 Maps 204 Marine Biology 146 Mathematics 148 Mature students 46, 52 Mechanical Engineering 152 Mechatronics (see Mechanical Engineering) Medicinal Science 74 Medicine 154 Meet and greet service 41 Midwifery 156 Military units 52 Mobile and Secure Systems 97 Modern History 132 Modern Languages 118, 126, 141, 194 Motion graphics 129 Multimedia Systems 79 Music 56, 158

Painting 116 Pharmacology 168 Philosophy 170, 179 Photography 116 Photonics 173 Physical Geography 167 Physics 172 Physics Foundation Year 100 Physiotherapy 174 Podiatry 176 Politics 178 Population and Geography 180 Portuguese 194 Power Academy 92, 94, 97 Power Systems 97 Printmaking 116 Psychological Studies 82 Psychology 182

H Halls of residence Health and Social Care Health practices History

36 130 51 132

I Illustration 129 Image and Multimedia Systems 79 Information Technology in Organisations 134 International English Language Test Score (IELTS) 47 International Foundation Year 136 International Relations 178 International students 40 IT facilities 52

L Language and Society Language Learning Language Resource Centre Language Studies Latin American Studies Law Learning support Library, Hartley Library services Linguistic Studies Living costs Loans

141 141 50 140 194 138 50 32 32 140 43 43

N Nanotechnology 97, 173 National Oceanography Centre, Southampton 24, 32 Natural Sciences 160 Naval Architecture 189 Naval Engineering (see Mechanical Engineering; Ship Science) New Forest 34 Nightline 52 Nursery 52 Nursing 162

O Occupational Therapy Ocean, Earth and Climate Science Ocean Chemistry Oceanography Officers’ Training Corps Open days Operational Research Optical Communications

164 167 167 166 52 27 151 97

Q Qualifications required Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)

46 90

R Religion Research centres Robotics (see Mechanical Engineering) Royal Navy Unit

52 16

52

S Scholarships 44 Science Foundation Year 186 Science Introduction 184 Sculpture 116 Ship Science 188 Social Policy 192 Social Work 190 Sociology 192 Software Engineering 78 Southampton and region 34 Space Science 173 Space Systems Engineering 59 Spanish 194 Sport Studies 196 Sports facilities 30, 53 Statistics (see Mathematics) Student loans 43 Student Recruitment and Outreach Team 53

Student Services Centre 53 Students’ Union 26, 53 Studying abroad 53 Sustainable Energy Systems (see Mechanical Engineering)

T Teaching Temporary work Terms of use Textile design Theatres Thunderer Squadron Tours, campus Transport Tuition fees

49 43 205 110 28 22 27 53 42

V Visas Visits

41 27

W Welcome programme 41 Wessex Needs Assessment Centre 53 Widening participation 46 Winchester School of Art 24, 32 Winchester, City of 34 Wireless Communications 97 Working With Children (Foundation Degree) 198 Working With Young People in Communities 200

Y Yacht and Small Craft (see Ship Science) Year abroad Youth Work

53 200

Z Zoology

202

prospenq@southampton.ac.uk

global@southampton.ac.uk

When finished with this document please recycle it.


Undergraduate Prospectus 2011