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Spring 2009

A magazine for alumni & friends of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Sustainability an emerging focus of research, teaching, and action by faculty, staff, and students

MESSAGE FROM

J e a n F . M a c C o r m ac k

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elcome to the spring issue of UMass Dartmouth, in which our writers, editors, and photographers focus on the efforts of our students, faculty, and staff to build a sustainable community, one that rejects the concept that long-term degradation of our environment is worth short-term material gain. On our campus, thanks to some very dedicated individuals— from the Green Navigators to our facilities staff to faculty from every college — we are saving more energy and recycling more trash, hosting middle school students at a sustainable city design camp, and convening important dialogues about our use of finite resources. Beyond Ring Road, we are working to protect coastlines, develop renewable energy technology, create recyclable roadway materials, balance the economic and environmental interests of commercial fishing, gauge the impacts of climate change, improve health care in some of the world’s poorest villages, and create art that raises awareness about the fragility of the planet. The work of sustainability is now marbled throughout the intellectual and social life of our campus because it is the right thing to do. But we also know it is good business. We all know that we are living at a time of scarce resources and have an obligation — as today’s stewards of the university— to use wisely these resources on behalf of our students and the Commonwealth. We also recognize that a university’s environmental track record is a real factor when young people are making their college choices. Clearly, sustainability has become a way of life for us. I look forward to the new ideas and actions that will spring from this fast-emerging initiative in the coming years.

Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

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his issue of UMass Dartmouth focuses on the impressive ways in which UMass Dartmouth is putting into practice the principles of sustainability. The magazine presents snapshot profiles of the people, programs, and projects that have brought the university recognition for its leadership on this front. We also include in this issue the report of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation, recognizing those whose generous support of UMass Dartmouth enables the university to provide distinctive, invaluable initiatives.

Around the campanile Two Corsair coaches make history with 500th win

New Charlton College of Business dean a proven innovator

John T. Hoey ’00 (Boston) Assistant Chancellor for Public Affairs

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Campus makes presidential honor roll for civic engagement 3

A true community bank, Bristol County Savings donates $30,000 for mentoring initiative

We welcome letters from our readers, and encourage your feedback. You can email your comments to publicaffairs @umassd.edu or mail them to Public Affairs, Rm 331A, Foster Administration, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth ma 02747-2300. Managing Editor

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Nobel Prize recipient brings message of courage and reconciliation

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Feature stories Blue, Gold, and Green— Sustainability movement takes hold on campus

Assistant Chancellor of Advancement

Michael Eatough

Director of Alumni Relations

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Annual Report of the Foundation

Mary Ellen DeFrias ’94

Designer

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Alumni news

Rachel Cocroft Writer/Editor

Class notes

Diane H. Hartnett

Contributing Writers

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2008 alum collaborates with nature

Susan Gonsalves ’86, Frank Smith

Photographers

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D. Confar, Jennifer White ’07 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #0015-139) Volume 13, Number 2, May 2009

Alumni Class Notes Students pitch in to support sustainability initiatives on campus such as spring clean-up day, Recyclemania, and the Green Games, sponsored by the Green Navigators. Students created posters with a sustainability message, such as the one above by Michael Fink, as part of Professor David Chapman's sophomore design class.

Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Cover: Design Professor Spencer Ladd took the cover photograph at the Easton community gardens. His interest in sustainability has taken him to Ecuador; story on page 18.

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University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once in March, once in May, twice in June, once in July, once in August, and twice in November by the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300 Periodicals postage paid at New Bedford, ma 02740 Postmaster: Send address corrections to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, ma 02747-2300

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Basketball Coach Brian Baptiste

With historic 500-win records, coaches epitomize sustained excellence Two Corsair coaches make history with 500 wins in the same year

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rian Baptiste, men’s basketball coach, and John Rolli, ice hockey coach, reached career milestones earlier this year when each recorded 500 victories with their respective teams. Baptiste, who has been at UMass Dartmouth 26 years, set his record in the squad’s victory over UMass Boston in the first round of the Little East Conference. Rolli, at UMass Dartmouth for 25 years, reached his milestone when the Corsairs beat Johnson & Wales in the final game of the regular season. By the end of this season, Rolli had compiled a record of 500-136-23 and Baptiste, 504-214. Both Corsair teams went into tournament play after excellent seasons. The hockey team lost to Fitchburg State, 3-2, in the ECAC Northeast quarter-final playoff game.

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The final record for the team for the season was 16-8-2. The basketball team had an outstanding season. For the 10th consecutive year, it advanced to the Little East Conference Final Four, and defeated nemesis Rhode Island College, 62-53, for the championship. Going on to NCAA Division III competition, the Corsairs beat Baruch College and Worcester Polytechnic Institute to advance to the Sweet Sixteen round of play for the first time in eight seasons. In the semi-final playoff tilt against DeSales College of Allentown, PA, the Corsairs lost, 67-59. The basketball team finished the season tying two records: their 27 victories equal their most wins ever in a season, while the 31 games they played also ties a single-season mark.

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photo courtesy of Ithaca College, photo by Sheryl Sinkow Photography

Charlton College included in Princeton Review’s “best” list The Charlton College of Business is an outstanding business school, according to The Princeton Review’s 2009 edition of its Best 296 Business Schools. “We are pleased to recommend UMass Dartmouth to readers of our book and users of our website as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn an MBA,” said Vice President of Publishing Robert Franek. “We select schools for this book based on our high regard for their academic programs and offerings, institutional data we collect from the schools, and the candid opinions of students attending them who rate and report on their campus experiences at the schools.” In profiling UMass Dartmouth, Review editors describe the school as “building its reputation, giving students a great deal of pride in feeling that they are a part of something that will be much bigger in the future.” They note that the university “excels at providing its mix of local part-timers and international full-timers a convenient MBA program that can be completed in as little as one year or as many as five years.” Graduate students praise their program’s “fine academic facilities and equipment” as well as the school’s “favorable student-professor ratio.” They describe administrators and professors as “very helpful and nice,” adding that they make “everything easier to understand.” The net result is a “satisfying academic experience.”

Dr. Susan Engelkemeyer named as Charlton’s new dean Dr. Susan Engelkemeyer, formerly dean of the School of Business and

Hockey Coach John Rolli

management professor at Ithaca College, has been named dean of the Charlton College of Business. “Dr. Engelkemeyer will bring tremendous energy, experience and innovation to the Charlton College as it continues to expand and evolve in a rapidly changing business school environment,” said Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack. Her many accomplishments “are a reflection of her area of scholarship, the management of complex organizations,’’ added Provost Anthony Garro. Dr. Engelkemeyer was a Babson College faculty member for 14 years, and also held a senior administrative position with the American Association for Higher Education in Washington D.C. At Ithaca, she provided the leadership that brought initial international accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) to the School of Business. She also emphasized the development of innovative curricula with a global focus and integration of the professional disciplines and the liberal arts. During her tenure, the Ithaca School of Business earned its first listing in Princeton Review’s 282 Best Business Schools, with number six ranking in the Best Administered category in 2007. The new dean also played an instrumental role in the fund-raising campaign for the Dorothy D. and Roy H. Park Center for Business and Sustainable Enterprise,

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which opened in 2008 with platinum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design status. It is the first business school building in the world to achieve this status. Engelkemeyer succeeds Eileen Peacock, who is assuming a position with the AACSB.

University’s community service merits special recognition UMass Dartmouth has earned a place on the “President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll” because of its exemplary service efforts and service to America’s communities. The Corporation for National and Community Service announced the distinction in February. Launched in 2006, the Honor Roll is the highest federal recognition a school can achieve for its commitment to service learning and civic

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engagement. Honorees were chosen based on criteria that included: scope and innovation of service projects, percentage of student participation in service activities, incentives for service, and the extent to which the school offers academic service-learning courses. “UMass Dartmouth takes great pride in the service that its students, faculty, and staff provide to the community,” Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack said. “I want to congratulate all of our students, faculty, and staff who have tirelessly served in so many ways, from inspiring children to read, to protecting our fragile coastline, to incubating new businesses and so much more.” UMass Dartmouth was one of only six schools honored with Presidential Awards. Another 83 were named as Honor Roll With Distinction members, and 546 schools, as Honor Roll members. Among the highlights of the UMass Dartmouth community engagement portfolio are: n the September 2008 establishment of the School of Education, Public Policy and Civic Engagement, designed to mobilize and coordinate university teaching and research assets to address significant education and social challenges in the region; n adoption of a requirement that all students have a service-learning experience by 2012; n establishment of the School for Marine Science and Technology, Star Store Arts Campus, and a continuing education center in New Bedford, and siting of the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center, a continuing education center, and a future Bio-Manufacturing Center in Fall River; n formation of the SouthCoast Development Partnership and SouthCoast Education Compact to mobilize academic, business, and government sectors to approach challenges and opportunities in a regional manner; n existence of an active America Reads program in which UMass Dartmouth students provide thousands of hours of reading assistance and other service to inner city children. The Honor Roll is a program on which

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the corporation collaborates with the Department of Education, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation. The President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll is presented during the annual conference of the American Council on Education. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching previously elected UMass Dartmouth for its 2008 Community Engagement Classification. The university joined 118 other U.S. schools in receiving the designation. Recent studies have underlined the importance of service learning and volunteering to college students. In 2006, 2.8 million college students gave more than 297 million hours of volunteer service, according to the Corporation’s Volunteering in America 2007 study. Expanding campus incentives for service is part of a larger initiative to spur higher levels of volunteering by college students.

Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack accepts a check for $30,000 from Dennis Kelly, Bristol County Savings Bank President.

Bristol County Savings awards university $30,000 for initiative on mentoring The Bristol County Savings Charitable Foundation has awarded UMass Dartmouth

a three-year $30,000 grant to expand a program through which university students act as mentors for youngsters in New Bedford middle and high schools. The Leadership For Educational Attainment Developed through Service program aims to give younger students guidance and models for leadership, community service, and educational accomplishments. The program is now underway in New Bedford’s Normandin and Keith middle schools, and the grant will allow its expansion to the Roosevelt Middle School and New Bedford High School. “The university is a powerful engine of social and economic development in our region, and we believe this partnership will have a transformative impact on children in New Bedford by encouraging them to work hard at their education and serve their community,” said Bank President Dennis Kelly. The program works to increase civic engagement among New Bedford public school students; increase the leadership skills of both the university students and their younger counterparts; expand the engagement of grade school students with their schools to prevent future dropouts; and strengthen the younger students’ awareness of, and aspiration to, college-level studies. The program is designed to confront the region’s educational attainment challenges, which are critical for economic improvement. Nearly one third of SouthCoast residents 25 years of age and older do not have a high school diploma, compared to 15.2 percent statewide. The university is training a group of students who will intervene in the New Bedford schools, serving both as service coordinators and models of educational attainment. UMass Dartmouth will track the service activities of the grade school students involved in the program over the course of the grant period to gauge the number of hours of service performed. These students will also be required to prepare a polished presentation outlining their community service projects. This will be given on campus during an end-ofthe-year LEADS celebration/graduation ceremony with family, friends, and community, school, and university representatives.

New s of N ote Southern Poverty Law Center co-founder keynotes Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast; two activists honored Morris Dees, veteran civil rights activist and co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, was the keynote speaker at the university’s seventh annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast in February. Honored with Drum Major Awards for their work in the spirit of the deceased civil rights leader were: n Dr. Irving Fradkin, a Fall River native who founded Dollars For Scholars, which has blossomed into a nationwide scholarship program that has distributed more than $1.5 billion to more than 1.5 million students; n Carol Spencer, director of UMass Dartmouth’s College Now, the 40-yearold alternative admissions initiative which has helped more than 1,000 students complete a college education they may have been unable to pursue otherwise. Dees has been active in the civil rights movement for more than 40 years. An

Morris Dees, co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, was the keynote speaker at the seventh annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast and Award Ceremony.

evening of contemplation while snowed in at a Cincinnati airport inspired him to forsake his work as a publisher and become involved in a new mission. Now chief trial counsel for the highly-regarded Southern Poverty Law Center, Dees has been in the forefront of litigation against hate groups and racism. In his pioneering role, he filed suit to stop construction of a white university in an Alabama city that

Talking with Nobel recipient Rigoberta Menchú Tum are (l-r) Labor Center Director José Soler, Manuel Ruiz and Anibal Lucas of Organización Maya K’iche of New Bedford, Professor Lisa Knauer, and Ibrahim Conteh, a UMass Dartmouth student from Sierra Leone.

already had a predominantly black state college. In 1969, he filed suit to integrate the all-white Montgomery YMCA. A recipient of numerous awards, Dees wrote A Season For Justice, his autobiography, in 1991, which the American Bar Association re-released in 2001 as A Lawyer’s Journey: The Morris Dees Story. His second book, Hate on Trial: The Case Against America’s Most Dangerous Neo-Nazi, chronicles the trial and $12.5 million judgment against white supremacist Tom Metzger and his White Aryan Resistance group for their responsibility in the beating death of a young black student in Portland, Oregon.

Nobel Prize recipient describes Guatemalan struggles The native Mayans of Guatemala continue to battle racism and genocide, while their persecutors suffer few consequences. That was one message that Rigoberta Menchú Tum, a survivor of Guatemala’s civil war and the 1992 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, brought to the filled main auditorium in April. Many in the audience were Mayans who have settled in New Bedford. An indigenous Guatemalan, Menchú Tum was a witness to, and survivor of, the massacres of the Guatemalan civil

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war during the 1970s and 1980s, which claimed the lives of most of her family. As a member of the Maya K’iche ethnic group, she has much in common with the majority of Guatemalans living in this area. Dr. Lisa Maya Knauer, professor of sociology/ anthropology whose research centers on local Guatemalan and Salvadoran groups, brought Menchú Tum to the university. In her speech, Menchú Tum recounted the Mayans' impressive history, thus making their inability to secure basic human rights even more ironic and unfair. The Mayans have been systematically excluded from any positions within government or industry, said Menchú Tum, and generally live in fear. She asked the audience to understand the difficult conditions facing Mayans who have immigrated to America, and singled out José Soler, director of the university’s Labor Education Center, for his work on behalf of those immigrants. Menchú Tum's life is recounted in I, Rigoberta Menchú. She received the Nobel for her steadfast work on behalf of the Mayans, and has served in various capacities with United Nations groups. She now heads the Rigoberta Menchú Tum Foundation, which develops projects in education, self-sufficient and sustainable economies for local communities, civic engagement, and human rights.

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Blue, Gold, By the time the refinish job on the Tripp Athletic Center Dave Ferguson, facilities director, proudly explains the new gas lines in the university

in the building were still asking when work would start.

power plant where natural gas has become

They hadn’t smelled that usual polyurethane scent,

the principal fuel. The gas service and combustion controls mean cleaner fuel for the boiler plant’s interior and for its emissions. An added bonus: NSTAR covered the roughly $250,000 cost of upgrading the gas lines.

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gymnasium floor was completed last summer, some staff

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recalled David Ferguson, director of facilities. Because the university had switched to the “green, water-based version,” the expected odor was missing. It’s a small, yet telling, example of the numerous ways in

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UMass Dartmouth faculty, staff, and students embrace sustainability through research, teaching, and action

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which UMass Dartmouth has embraced and is practicing the concept of “sustainability.” Over the past two years, the university has made a multi-faceted, wholehearted commitment to becoming more green, more conservation-minded, and more environmentally sensitive. The signs are everywhere: blue recycling bins in virtually all offices, recycling bags for resident students, timing sensors for lights, lower-flow showerheads, and a boiler plant whose new gas component means cleaner fuel and emissions. On the academic front, an inter-disciplinary sustainability studies program has been introduced, while faculty are engaged in research that responds to a variety of environmental challenges. Those signs serve to define sustainability at its most basic

By Diane Hartnett

level: the protection and wise use of resources. “The traditional definition centers on meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to care for themselves,” explained Susan Jennings, director of the Office of Campus and Community Sustainability. “Today, we see it as something of a three-legged stool­— that sustainability is a matter of financial viability, ecological health, and social equity.” Working on that definition, sustainability manifests itself at UMass Dartmouth in ways that go well beyond recycling cans and lowering thermostats. A nursing professor, for example, researches sustainable health care for the world’s needy, while at the School for Marine Science and Technology, faculty explore ways to sustain fish stocks without ruining the fisherman’s liveliU M a s s

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Energy Savings for Fiscal Year 2009

hood. A computer specialist oversees a film proposals on how they would work with series on the movement’s socio-economic UMass Dartmouth to manage waste better implications, and the Portuguese Studies yet preserve a profit margin for themselves. Department hosts a program on pollution “So in the end, we would both win.” in the Amazon. While plans were in place before it The university has also carved out a occurred, the economic meltdown has given major role for itself in the region’s conservanew urgency to efforts to stem energy use. Nearly $600,000 in savings had been realtion efforts. The two-year-old sustainability Last year’s “sustainability summer office has taken the lead in developing projized at publication time through, among camp” drew 40 middle school ects with and for cities and towns. University other things, updated equipment and conyoungsters to campus, where they administrators and local communities have trols, thermostat turndowns, new sensors designed cities with sustainable designed mutually-beneficial arrangements and light timers, the two-week campus features. “Blueland,” for example, in areas such as recycling and the disposal recess between Christmas and New Year’s, had laws against non-biodegradof waste. and an intense conservation mind-set. ables, and “North Awesome” was Particularly noteworthy about the The ever-rising savings figure has been distinguished by the wind turbines university’s sustainability initiative is the displayed in a gauge on the university home on its mountains. Campers also incorporation of an academic component. page and at the campus entrance. Such a disvisited the New Bedford landfill Mindful of its core mission, the university play constitutes a type of “reporting” that is and wastewater treatment facility. heeded the advice of numerous faculty who extremely valuable in gathering support, on The sustainability office plans to wanted education to constitute a major eleand off campus, according to Management run the camp again this summer. ment of any sustainability plan. Professor Adam Sulkowski, who teaches a To register, please contact Kathleen T here is another distinctive characterisgraduate-level sustainability class. “It’s very Christianson, 508.910.6484 or tic of sustainability at UMass Dartmouth: encouraging to see that we’re adopting the kchristianson@umassd.edu the convening of faculty, staff, administrabest practices of private corporations.” tion, and students, working together with Sulkowski is working with the adminis“mutual respect and appreciation,” said Jennings. tration to develop an annual “triple bottom line” report, meaAnd from English Professor Jerry Blitefield: “This has suring and reporting the campus’ societal, economic, and envibrought to the forefront people who labor behind ronmental impacts. “We have to say to our stakeholders that the scenes, are not often recognized, really know we’re taking every step we can to save their money,” he said. their stuff, and are articulate about it.” Sustainability will be practiced more frequently and more $647,000 GOAL Facilities director Ferguson is one such person. readily as awareness of its benefits grows, Sulkowski believes. Since arriving at UMass Dartmouth nearly three He is also convinced that its place in university curricula $575,000 years ago, he has observed a major upturn in supthroughout the world will only increase. Traveling in Warsaw currently port for sustainability, making it easier to enact a last summer, he met a human resources director for a global variety of measures. corporation. After mentioning his sustainability course, “she “We’ve totally revamped recycling, for examtold me that she has no interest in applicants unless they know ple,” so that the now-familiar blue tub seems to about sustainability.” be everywhere and resident students engage in Dr. Robert Peck, College of Engineering dean, has a similar single-stream recycling. More significantly, the conviction about the rightful place of sustainability studies, university, town of Dartmouth, and the Greater particularly in engineering programs. “Engineers are problemNew Bedford Refuse District jointly developed a solvers. Technology is an integral part of the whole process of recycling program that has benefitted all three. sustainability.” There is a growing demand for engineers who The district provided large, roll-off dumpsters for have been taught to be sensitive to the environment and know recyclables, while the town provided funds for how to use resources prudently. Peck encourages faculty to recycling containers and totes. Dartmouth proweave sustainability into their course offerings, and says accredvides the university with trucking services at no itation associations now take note of sustainability education. cost, and receives the revenues from the recyclables. “And the students are very interested in this,” as evidenced Since its July 1 start, the arrangement has meant by the number of recent senior engineering design projects with more than 25 tons of materials have been recycled. sustainable technology at their core. “We want our graduates to “We have gone to a ‘resource management’ attibe good citizens. Part of that is having an awareness of what is tude, and that’s a big change,” said Ferguson. happening around you,” he said. Resource management involves closer scrutiny of Peck, closely involved with sustainability efforts since coming what kind of waste is generated, and exploration of to UMass Dartmouth in ‘08, proposed the campus assessment improved methods to manage or reduce that waste. project now underway. Nine committees are examining activiCurrently, the university is weighing several haulers’ ties and conditions within specific areas of the university, such

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Among the sustainability projects on campus is installation of a meteorological tower (MET) to gauge the potential of wind as an energy source.

as energy sources, conservation measures, position inspired her to try gardening; she The Office of Campus and water consumption and wastewater mandiscovered, to her own surprise, “I actually Community Sustainability has agement, and green custodial practices. It is like it.” become a major resource for an ambitious undertaking, and the results Some people fear that today’s fiscal straits the area’s sustainability activities, will guide the university's future direction have made sustainability a bandwagon issue, most notably by organizing on sustainability in all of its aspects. one whose popularity may wane as the econquarterly regional exchanges The project further links all segments of omy improves. Jennings is more optimistic, that encourage discussion and the university community, giving even more seeing a commitment among young people, collaborative action on topics structure to the sustainability efforts. It as evidenced by the heavy enrollment in such as sustainable health care, may also bring into focus leadership opporsustainability courses. “Students don't see food security, and regional rail tunities for UMass Dartmouth, particularly this as a matter of taking away stuff. They transportation. Through its in the academic arena, Peck suggests. see that sustainability is concerned with less newsletter and weekly online Growing up in Los Angeles, Peck became consumerism, having your needs met by livalmanac, the office publicizes both knowledgeable and concerned about ing in a neighborhood, and having a sense numerous events and programs the environment. “I could see the impact of purpose." that center on recycling, energy, that a huge urban area has on the environPolitical science major Brittany Filker conservation, and sustainability. ment…. I also developed a strong apprebacks her on that. Filker has taken several ciation for the wilderness. I was, and am, a sustainability classes “because they are really camper. I’ve always been very environmentally conscious — relevant to what is going on today in the world. You don’t have it’s a personal interest.” to have a background in environmental science to understand David Ferguson says much the same thing: “I love the outwhat is happening and why this is important. doors. I want to protect the environment, so that my daughter "I think a large amount of students are engaged, and as stucan enjoy it, so we can all enjoy it.” dents become older, they become more responsible about recyIn combining their professional and personal personae, Peck cling and conservation and causes such as this.” and Ferguson are typical of many individuals involved with the Diane Hartnett is a writer in the Publications Office university’s sustainability work. “They talk about this as the favorite part of their job. They enjoy it,” said Jennings, whose

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Among the UMass Dartmouth interns at the GreatPoint Energy plant in Fall River are (front, l-r) Warren Gaudreau (supervisor of the intern team), Matthew Bach, Briana Flocco, Jill Mercik, Jeff Towers; (back row , l-r) Brandon Cardoza, Justin McKennon, Brent Cordeiro, Michael Lenzuolo.

Clean energy technology is mission of university partnership with GreatPoint Energy Eight engineering students are learning about the development of clean energy technology thanks to a partnership between UMass Dartmouth and GreatPoint Energy, a company that converts coal, petroleum coke, and biomass into clean natural gas. The company is using some of the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Center to continue development of its “hydromethanation” technology. The collaboration, in combination with GreatPoint Energy’s commissioning of the Mayflower Clean Energy Center, a first-of-its-kind gasification demonstration plant in Somerset, signifies the firm’s commitment to make Massachusetts a major center for clean energy technology, research, and development. Hydromethanation also allows other technologies, such as carbon capture and sequestration, to be tested at the facility, according to Daniel Goldman, GreatPoint Energy’s executive vice president and chief financial officer. “We are extremely proud and excited to contribute to the education of UMass Dartmouth students who will get firsthand experience working with our engineering team to develop cleaner, more efficient methods for producing energy. This partnership between UMass Dartmouth and GreatPoint Energy is intended to foster the next generation

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Hydromethanation is a highly efficient process by which natural gas is produced through the reaction of steam and carbonaceous solids in the presence of a catalyst. The process enables the conversion of low-cost feedstock such as coal, petroleum coke, and biomass into clean, high-purity methane. GreatPoint Energy plans to build, own, and operate large-scale natural gas production facilities strategically located at the intersection of natural gas pipelines and low-cost feedstock, as well as at locations where the CO2 that is produced and captured can be geologically sequestered. When combined with power generation, GreatPoint Energy offers a life-cycle carbon footprint that is lower than any other form of conventional power generation technology. GreatPoint has raised $140 million to date and is backed by leading investors such as Suncor Energy, Dow Chemical Company, AES Corp., and Peabody Energy, as well as major financial institutions and venture capital firms. of clean energy innovators and we are pleased to play a role that leverages our Mayflower project for the betterment of the Commonwealth.” The interns are excited about gaining insight that will prepare them for careers in the emerging green economy. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be part of an up and coming

company that is paving the way for future energy production,” said Justin McKennon, an electrical engineering and mathematics major from Springfield. “It has been, and will continue to be, one of the best experiences of my life.” McKennon has learned about pipes, tools, boilers, pressure and all the troubleshooting that goes into such a large scale project. “I usually shadow the full-time employees and learn procedure and protocol. When things go wrong, I help fix them or learn how to fix them in hopes that I’ll be able to fix them on my own someday.” Jill Mercik, an electrical engineering major from Belchertown, had an internship last summer with Northeast Utilities, which sparked her interest in energy conservation and ‘going green.’ She sees the GreatPoint Energy experience as an opportunity to expand on that. “What’s nice about working at GreatPoint is that the work changes everyday,” Mercik said. “I have helped with maintenance, repair, and testing of different equipment in the tower as well as helping to build the company’s internal website.” Brent Cordeiro, a mechanical engineering senior from Dartmouth, makes the “rounds” with the company’s engineers, checking gauges and ensuring that the equipment is functioning properly. His duties also involve miscellaneous tasks to help the plant operate smoothly on a day-to-day basis. “So far, the experience has been very positive,” Cordeiro said. “The employees are patient and are more than happy to explain what is going on to us.” Michael Lenzuolo, an electrical engineering major from Mendon, said that he has learned much about plant operation and synthesis by observing the final construction and daily operation. “I wanted to do something novel, something that had never been done before. I also saw a lot of potential in this company. I feel their process is a great step in the direction of green energy.” Other interns include mechanical engineering majors Matthew Bach, Dartmouth; Brandon Cardoza, Westport; and Briana Flocco, Wrentham; and electrical engineering major

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Jeffrey Towers, Pocasset. “This is a great partnership that pairs one of our leading clean energy companies and our state university to train the engineers this vital new industry needs for the future,” said Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Ian Bowles.

Sustainability measures are critical part of global health care initiatives, says Nursing Professor Jeanne Leffers When nurses provide health care and medical aid in impoverished countries, they must ask themselves: can our work be sustained? So believes Nursing Professor Jeanne Leffers, whose field of expertise centers on global and environmental health issues. After 12 trips to impoverished countries — Uganda being the most recent — Dr. Leffers has a singular perspective on sustainability as it relates to health care. “Obviously, you can’t sustain healthy populations without looking at, and taking care of, the earth and vice versa,” said Leffers. That conviction, as well as her long-standing interest in public and environmental health, prompted her to join other faculty in developing UMass Dartmouth’s sustainability studies program. She was one of the five professors who taught the spring ’07 inaugural Topics in Sustainability course that centered on the connection between food and sustainability. In her teaching stint, Leffers focused on the threat to a population’s long-term health and stability posed by, among other things, malnutrition, unsafe food practices, and an unhealthy environment. Leffers has seen all of those in her trips to poor, undeveloped regions, where she and other health professionals bring medical attention and advice to persons generally deprived of both. That work has raised a concern: “More and more health care providers go on a mission to another country to provide services, but some do not have the components to insure the work can be sustained. “Sustainability has to be a part, or you can do more harm than good. What we do should be driven by the needs of

Elizabeth Ayebare Ombeva, BSN, RN, pediatric clinical instructor (above left) with Makerere University nursing students at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. (inset) Dr. Jeanne Leffers with Charles Osingada, MS, RN, director of Makerere’s Department of Nursing.

the people, rather than the attitude that ‘we’re a savior for these people.’ We have to deal with issues that involve, for example, short-term, rural clinics that are established and bring care but with no plan for continuity of the clinic’s work.” Leffers traveled to Uganda last year through Health Volunteers Overseas, a national organization that bolsters the sustainability level of aid missions through its “teach the teachers” emphasis. Leffers advised on the nursing curriculum and taught pediatric nursing faculty, who in turn can teach prospective Ugandan nurses how to give modern nursing care in less than ideal settings. She also worked with nurses at Mulago Hospital, and, during a return trip to Uganda in January, brought educational materials that “were relevant to their particular situations.” Via the Internet, Leffers continues her consultant role with faculty at Makerere University’s Department of Nursing. Sustainability has become a critical issue in public health, said Leffers, owing largely to the dire situations in many countries and the increased number of well-intentioned, yet short-lived, initiatives of aid. “Most of the literature stresses that you must plan for sustainability. What happens when people, and money, go away? How will the help be sustained? “There’s also the issue of teaching.

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You cannot simply say, ‘do this because it is the better way.’ Rather, you show that you value their perspective and you share expertise, presenting evidence that indicates there may be a better way. “You also have to deal with the reality that, if a community does not have access to a particular piece of equipment or item, what is the best way then that it can effect this ‘better way?’ “And how can we empower people to advocate for the improvements they need? That’s all part of sustainability.”

Engineering students get global perspective on conservation measures and energy usage Ten engineering majors took advantage of an innovative, intense study abroad program during this year’s winter break to study renewable energy, European-style. The group spent three weeks at International Winter University, held at the University of Kassel, Germany, exploring topics that ranged from solar and wind energy, to rational energy usage, from a German and European perspective. What they learned in class was bolstered by the knowledge they acquired by living with German families and seeing firsthand that country’s conservation practices. Acquiring an international perspective on matters such as renewable energy is an invaluable part of a contemporary

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engineering education, said Dr. Tesfay Meressi, associate dean of the Engineering College. “Many of our students understand engineering as a global profession and recognize the importance of studying abroad in today’s increasingly interdependent world.” For senior mechanical engineering major Steve Boyko, “we are heading into a time where renewable energy sources are more and more important. This program gave us the opportunity to learn what other countries have been and are doing.” Boyko and the other nine students spent five days a week, for three weeks, in class. While they studied German language and culture for several hours a week, the bulk of their time was spent on engineering and energy-related subjects. With other students from throughout the globe, they explored the status of —

Engineering students at the Institute for Solar Energy Supply Technology in Kassel, Germany.

and potential for— solar, wind, and hydro power. “We talked about a lot of different aspects. For example, we learned about energy generation in terms of its regional aspect and transmission difficulties across regions. We also learned about the business side of energy, something that engineers are not always expected to consider but is very important,” said Boyko. “It definitely broadened my perspective. I want a career in the crane and rigging industry, and that will involve dealing with international products.” Living with German families and traveling throughout the area gave students less formal, but equally valuable, insights into energy conservation measures in other countries. In Boyko’s

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Civil Engineering Professor Walaa Mogawer (right)

UMass Dartmouth faculty are engaged in a variety of research projects that have sustainability aspects or implications. Paul Calvert, co-director of biomedical engineering and materials and textiles professor, is exploring “biomimicry,” in which natural designs and processes are explored to solve human problems; for example, can we “mimic” the tough adhesive with which blue mussels attach themselves to rocks? Civil Engineering Professor Walaa Mogawer is analyzing ways to lengthen the life of roadways through recycled, environmentallyfriendly materials. And SMAST faculty are leading multi-faceted research projects into the impact of climate change on marine life.

opinion, “they’re pretty far ahead of us.” Automobiles are generally far smaller, and public transportation more popular and efficient. “They also make it easier for you to recycle,” said Boyko. Cans and bottles can be returned, individually, virtually anywhere and the customer is reimbursed on the spot. “You’d be on the train and when you finish your Coke, you just return it there and get your 25 cents.” The ubiquitous public trash cans have four openings to accept, separately, glass, paper, plastic, and other items. Residents automatically shut off their water heaters when leaving their homes in the morning; light timers and switches are placed at both ends of a stairwell so “the lights turn off automatically and you don’t have to remember it. “It seems that being conservation-

minded comes more naturally there.” A similar experience organized by the International Programs Office enabled other students to spend two weeks in Wolfsburg, Germany, this month, exploring alternate energy systems in European Union countries and visiting the Wolfsburg Volkswagen headquarters located in that city.

Students stepping up for conservation and recycling initiatives 10 large boxes of food, and 50 bags of clothing. What students left behind when they departed from the residence halls last spring has inspired an impressive recycling project. The Housing and Residential Life Office worked with the Student Senate and United Way to transfer those disposed items to community groups. This year, a similar effort is underway so that area shelters and centers will benefit, said Robin Brow, the office’s operations manager. In both the residence halls and the dining areas, the university has embarked on a variety of such sustainability initiatives. More and more students are engaging in recycling practices, are enthusiastic about conservation measures, and are joining organized efforts to make UMass Dartmouth more green. • Following a successful four-hall pilot program, all residence halls have gone to “single-stream” recycling, which is expected to keep nearly 70 tons of recyclables out of landfills. Students place their recyclable items—cans, plastic bottles, newspapers, even binders—into blue, reusable tote bags that are then emptied into giant dumpsters. This “all in one place” approach makes it easier for students to embrace recycling and thus reduce waste on campus. • In the new Green Navigators program, students are developing and implementing projects and campaigns to interest and involve more of their peers in recycling and conservation. The first group of navigators has emphasized education, traveling throughout residence halls to talk with students and answer questions. • The university signed on to “Recycle-

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Green Navigators who assisted the RecycleMania program are: (front l-r) Mike Hain, Lauren Watka, Christie Mullen; (back l-r) Olivia Campbell, Chris Azevedo, Luai Elamir, Danielle Lavoie, Joan DeJesus.

Mania” this year, competing with 500plus schools to determine which can collect the largest amount of recyclables and generate the least trash. A smaller competition pitted UMass Dartmouth’s residence halls against one another, with Oak Glen coming out ahead. • In the four original halls, new water aerators have reduced water usage by 1,600 gallons daily. LED lighting of exit signs has meant a $6,800 annual savings. Hall lights are on sensor timers. • Sodexho-operated dining facilities now send nearly 200 pounds of pre-consumer food waste a week to nearby SilverBrook Farm. Commuter cafeteria diners can purchase $5 reusable eco-clam shells for take-out food. A switch to green cleaners has substantially reduced water and energy usage in the dishroom. Brow said student participation in recycling and complementary measures “has been great. We’re seeing more and more of it. It’s been mainly an issue of education and getting the word out. Interest has definitely grown, especially with the Green Navigators program.”

Students use recycling, conservation to learn principles of management Sound management principles… responsible business practices…collaboration and consensus…recycling, conservation, environmental awareness… community outreach. All of these come together in Professor Kellyann Berube Kowalski’s “Developing and Managing Work Teams” course, where the environment is the ve-

hicle for teaching business majors about teamwork and performance. Combining theoretical knowledge and practical application, the class uses an innovative, yet academically challenging, way to prepare seniors for a business world that emphasizes a group approach to projects. • The spring class, divided into teams and partnering with community groups, constructs floats that are environmentally-themed and “people-powered” for the April Earth Day parade held in downtown New Bedford on AHA! (Art, History & Architecture) evening. Floats must use recycled materials as much as possible and the overall project must demonstrate “sustainability,” or what Kowalksi calls a “lasting effect.” Students have been pretty ingenious; one group designed a Noah’s Ark with youngsters from the Boys & Girls’ Club dressed as endangered animals. • The fall class, again in teams, works with a school in New Bedford or Dartmouth, as well as those communities’ recycling coordinator, to develop projects celebrating America Recycles Day. Students teach one or more classes about the value of recycling, and discuss ways the youngsters can incorporate conservation measures into their lives. Last semester, one team had fifth graders write a “book” on the subject, then read that book to first-grade classes. Recyclable materials were turned into musical instruments, toys, and craft items in other classes. “The management majors do enjoy it, and a lot will say it was a great experience,” said Kowalski, an ’87 UMass

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Dartmouth graduate. Yet it is a demanding course, with reading assignments, 10 quizzes, several written and oral presentations on the projects, and a reflection paper on the dynamics, effectiveness, and success —or lack thereof—of their teams. “By their senior year, students know about teamwork but they need the opportunity to actually work in teams,” Kowalski explained. “This class helps them learn about leadership, how to assess skills of the team members, how to translate a plan into action, how to resolve conflict. “More and more business organizations work in a team mode. Efforts are collaborative. These projects enable students to see that the whole is more than the sum of the parts. “There is a side benefit, of course, for the environment,” said Kowalski. In designing the course, she wanted students to tackle meaningful issues, and Deirdre Healy, community service coordinator, suggested that projects center on environmental issues. That makes sense given that “more and more companies are making a commitment to sustainability and are focused on being ‘green,’” Kowalski said. The link to community groups is also In developing their senior year design projects, engineering students increasingly focus on sustainability and have proposed ventures the university might use. One group looked into solar power for the campus with a rooftop device that, accompanied by special software, measures sunlight intensity. Another group investigated wind power via an anemometer tracking wind speed on top of Hickory Hall. valuable, said Kowalski; students are putting into practice one of the fundamental concepts of the Charlton College curriculum—“that we want business to act responsibly, be a good citizen, and give to the community.” “It was an awesome experience,” said senior Danielle Carew, whose five-member team spent much of last

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Myriam Jeannis with poster showing children who have been helped through the efforts of the Haitian American Student Association.

fall with fifth graders at New Bedford’s Ottiwell School. After several class discussions with the university students, the Ottiwell pupils designed a book with text and drawings on recycling. “The fifth graders really wanted to learn more about recycling. With that as the subject, you can go in a lot of different ways in developing programs,” said Carew, who endorses recycling as a focal point because of its timely and meaningful nature. “I think we worked well as a team, although each of us is very different from one another. The project helped us learn about communication and how to manage our time.”

For nursing major, recycling means aid to native country There’s a lot more to recycling than cans of soda and plastic bottles. Ask student Myriam Jeannis, whose rescue mission proves just that. Alarmed by the devastation wrought by hurricanes in her native Haiti, Jeannis has spearheaded campaigns on and off campus to aid the impoverished country. She and fellow students in the Haitian American Student Association regularly collect donated clothing and items such as books, games, and toys that, recycled, are improving life for Haitians. With generous support from UMass

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Dartmouth students and employees, the campaigns have had remarkable results: the association funds school supplies for roughly 90 children in Haiti, and now covers the school bills for 20 of them. “We always say that we can’t help everyone, but we can make a change in one person’s life. Then that will continue so that more lives can be changed,” explained Jeannis, who carries a double major in nursing and French. Six years ago, at the age of 18, Jeannis left her hometown of Gonaives to settle in Boston. After graduating from Hyde Park High School, she entered UMass Dartmouth through the alternative admissions program College Now. One day during her freshman year, she and friend O’Mara Antoine, a junior engineering major, were having one of their continuing conversations about Haiti’s dire situation—homes and schools toppled, an unhealthy environment, and widespread despair. “I just thought, ‘why don’t we do something to help out?’” Jeannis recalled. Encouraged by College Now counselors and Community Service Office Director Deirdre Healy, she organized different initiatives and concentrated on rounding up educational materials for Haitian youngsters. Among the more successful efforts on campus is the spring “dorm-storming,” when Haitian Student Association members visit the residence halls for donations of items and money. “We have so much support here on campus. Students here are very, very helpful and generous, and we get a lot of support from the resident assistants,” said Jeannis, herself an RA. Jeannis brought her first collection of recyclables to Haiti in the summer of ’07. Last summer, 10 other students accompanied her, staying at Port-au-Prince and traveling daily to Gonaives. There the students took on various tasks: distributing articles, teaching and reading to youngsters, helping on construction projects, and, in Jeannis’ case, assisting at a medical clinic. Students intend to repeat the two-week trip this summer. “It’s so rewarding to go there and see all the children learning and reading

because they are able to go to school,” said Jeannis. “I feel that we are doing what that old saying is about. We could give a child the fish. But by helping them with school, we are teaching them how to fish.”

Challenging students to consider different viewpoints heightens the appeal of sustainability classes Do we consider the natural world “feminine,” which would explain terms such as “Mother Nature?” And if that’s the case, do we then think of the environment as “submissive,” subject to the whims of a male-dominated society? Questions like these crop up regularly during the professor-student dialogue in “Topics in Sustainability,” one of the core courses of the university’s increasingly popular minor in sustainability. Recognizing sustainability as an emerging, important academic field, 30-plus faculty from 25 disciplines— from civil engineering, to philosophy, to graphic design—came together two years ago to develop the minor and teach the approximately 17 courses now offered. This interdisciplinary nature represents a key strength of the minor, giving it depth

UMass Dartmouth is one of the 600-plus schools that have signed the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, thereby pledging to take a variety of steps to achieve “climate neutrality.” Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack endorsed the commitment in the spring of ‘07. and bolstering its appeal to students. “It’s really interesting because we’re studying the subject from different aspects. The course has five distinct modules and I enjoy the conversations and the debates,” said student David Neitz, history major, sustainability minor, and ardent environmentalist. The minor encompasses a “Topics

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in Sustainability” course and a seminar, and an array of electives, such as “Designing for the Environment,” “Planet Earth,” “Environmental Science and Business,” and “Social Impact of Science and Technology.” Students in the classes come from a range of majors, and professors from a variety of disciplines. And in the foundational Topics course, five professors alternate teaching stints, examining the sustainability implications of one specific subject, such as water or food; this past semester, the subject was “Perception, Representations, and The World,” with faculty from English, philosophy, design, marketing, and economics teaching. The result: students explore sustainability as a multi-dimensional issue that shapes and relates to virtually every aspect of life. “We want this minor to be academic in nature,” explained Professor Jerry Blitefield, who was instrumental in the minor’s establishment and was lead-off instructor for the spring ‘09 sustainability topics class. “We want students to develop their critical thinking, and get them to see there are consequences to their actions and decisions. “In terms of critical thinking, sustainability crosses so many disciplines. It works well as a minor because we want everyone to think that the subject is theirs.” As an English professor, Blitefield can explore the rhetoric aspects of sustainability, “looking at how we are persuaded to engage in certain behaviors. Why do we want what we want, like bigger cars, bigger houses?” Or he can tackle it from a literature perspective: “How are our interpretations of nature influenced by literature?” The courses are not intended to promote any political position, he said. “As an academic, I don’t want that role.” In one class this spring, Blitefield and the 25 students first debated popular perspectives of the physical world. In the 19th century, for example, the wilderness was something to be “tamed,” whereas today, people talk of “living close to nature” in positive terms. Later, students discussed images each had chosen that reflect their perceptions, and concerns, regarding the environment.

The Farmers Market is one of the most popular autumn events on campus, with growers and consumers from throughout the region discovering the university as an ideal venue for buying and selling fresh produce. The market will begin its third year this fall.

For David Neitz, that image came from the poster for “Wall-E,” the 2008 animated film that centers on a single robot cleaning up a trashed planet Earth. The message for Neitz was “we are ruining our earth. Humans are reliant on technology to clean up after them, but this is saying that ultimately you have to clean up after yourself.” The flourishing interest in being “green” is not the only reason that sustainability courses are routinely overenrolled, Blitefeld suggested. “There are students who see there is a future in this, that there are actual careers. Corporations have recognized that sustainability is important. They’re developing green products and they have to do marketing. We have business students who are not only involved in green issues, they also want to do marketing.” The subject matter, and the rigor of the courses, appealed to sophomore Brittany Filker. “Sustainability is really relevant with all that’s going on today, particularly in light of the financial crisis,” said the political science major. “I think society is at a crossroads now, and I feel we all have a responsibility to learn more about this. “The topics course is great. Students don’t have to have a background in

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environmental science to understand the subject, and it’s relevant to all sorts of people. In class this week, with (Philosophy) Professor Jennifer Mulnix, we talked about ethics and the debate was over flooding a forest with the ecosystem suffering in order to provide hydroelectric power. It was a question of which is the greater good. “Normally, I’d be on the side of the environment, but this wasn’t so easy. I love that. It made me think in a different way, learn a different perspective. “For me, that’s a successful class.”

“Rooftop gardens” have been tested in the past year, as the university examines ways to expand more sustainable plantings. Last fall, test beds were placed atop the Violette Building, with varying combinations of plants and substrates. Undergrad Lauren Watka and graduate student Tom Paine have been evaluating the beds, to determine which combinations are best from a sustainability perspective and could be planted on top of the connector between the Campus Center and Foster Administration Building.

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16 Brian Howes

Kevin Stokesbury

Mark Altabet

Sustainability issues at the heart of work done by scientists at SMAST

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he educator scientists at the School for Marine Science and Technology daily confront core issues of sustainability as they conduct their research. Their work involving estuaries, fisheries, and the challenges to aquatic systems frequently raises basic questions on the continuing balancing act between the preservation of the natural world and human needs. Three of those scientists speak about their fields of expertise, and the sustainability aspect thereof­­, in the following pieces.

Preserving the coastline “All around the world,” Brian Howes said, “we are seeing significant declines in coastal systems. Our job is to figure out how people can continue to live there and still maintain the quality of environment that drew them to the coast in the first place.” The SMAST professor has been studying estuaries long enough to remember a different time. “When I entered this field, we spent our time trying to determine which estuaries had to be protected and which had to be restored, and if there was a problem, what was causing it. “Now nearly all our estuaries are beyond simply needing protection; they all are in various stages of decline and require remediation.” Howes is director of the Coastal Systems Program, the scientific arm of the Massachusetts Estuaries Project, which is assessing the nitrogen status of 89 Massachusetts estuaries, coastal basins

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where salt and fresh water mix. Nitrogen is the prime culprit in estuarine degradation. It is a crucial nutrient, but an excess sparks a cascade of negative effects, ultimately threatening everything we value in the system. And most Massachusetts estuaries have been absorbing excess nitrogen for a long time. “Without restoration,” said Howes, “we face wholesale loss of these critical resources, and of the fish, shellfish, and bird life that depend on them. On the other hand, the up side is that once we restore them, we know how to maintain them in perpetuity. “And there are a number of options available to us in our search for the cheapest route to restoration—not just building treatment plants and sewers, but opening channels, managing stormwater…. Even restoring freshwater ponds and wetlands can reduce the nitrogen load that reaches the estuary. Several of our more innovative restoration technologies —‘green solutions’ that don’t require sewering or treatment plants —are now in their first implementation so that we can refine them for regional use. “Our group is providing quantitative restoration targets with a high degree of accuracy. And we are moving forward with solutions, right now. A number of communities are already working on restoration. For several estuaries, the fixes are in place, or being put in place, that will restore them over the next several years.”

Balancing the economic and environmental challenges of commercial fishing For Dr. Kevin Stokesbury, a string of “fundamental questions” comprises the focus of his work. “How many sea scallops are out there? How fast do they grow? How many young are produced per year? How fast do they die? How many can you harvest? How many can you harvest sustainably? “We try to use new scientific methods and techniques to better estimate those numbers,” he said. “Without that information, you’ll never get at sustainability.” Stokesbury grew up in rural Nova Scotia, where he learned early lessons about sustainability on his grandfather’s farm. “Farmers practice their own version of rotational management, leaving a field fallow every few years so that it can rejuvenate.” He arrived at UMass Dartmouth in 1998 with an impressive range of experience, having worked with scallops, sea urchins, lobsters, seaweeds, and several finfish species. But among Massachusetts fisheries, scalloping is king, and scalloping was in trouble here. Stokesbury was soon leading the SMAST surveys that have played such a significant role in the rebounding of the sea scallop fishery. Not satisfied with the uncertainties of traditional trawl sampling, he and colleague Prof. Brian Rothschild, collaborating with industry, devised an innovative video survey system that is

17 The Coastal Systems Group gathers samples at Chilmark Pond, Martha's Vineyard, for the Massachusetts Estuaries Project.

used for annual surveys of the entire U.S. Atlantic sea scallop resource. Now associate professor and chair of the Department of Fisheries Oceanography, Stokesbury remains dedicated to his research. His research group at SMAST is simultaneously conducting studies into the biology, behavior, and ecology of the sea scallop. “The better we know the sea scallop,” he said, “the better we can manage it to the benefit of both the ecosystem and the industry that depends on it. “We have to preserve what’s there, but we also have to harvest it before it dies of old age. Achieving that balance is the key to sustaining both the fish stocks and the fishing industry.”

Predicting the impacts of global warming Mark Altabet heads SMAST’s Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory, which specializes in measuring stable isotope ratios, a technique which can reveal otherwise inaccessible clues about the source and transformation of the material under analysis. A central theme of his research involves a better understanding of the nitrogen cycle, its past and present behavior, and the impact of human activity upon it. “Where population is concentrated along rivers and at the coast,” Altabet said, “there are large inputs of nitrogen to coastal aquatic systems. Extra nutrient input might sound like a good thing, but it throws the system out of balance.

It lowers the oxygen in near-bottom waters, affecting benthic organisms, such as clams and oysters, negatively impacting recreational uses, and damaging the overall environment. “There are still major unanswered questions regarding how nitrogen inputs lower dissolved oxygen levels. Our new work in Long Island Sound (funded this year by the EPA/Sea Grant) will try to tease apart the physical contributions from the biological contributions to oxygen depletion.” In parallel with this work, Altabet's group is also studying the interactions between marine biogeochemistry and climate change, looking at modern ocean processes and reconstructing past changes in the marine nitrogen cycle in relation to past climate change. Their recent and current work off the Peruvian coast along the Peru margin focuses on variability on scales from hundreds to tens of thousands of years. “To predict the future impacts of global warming,” Altabet said, “we need to understand past natural variability so that we don’t confuse natural effects with anthropogenic effects. One of the possible effects of global warming may be to greatly expand low-oxygen zones in the ocean. The Peru margin has a natural region of low-oxygen waters that is very climate-sensitive. To address this issue, we are working to understand the mechanisms linking climate change to the extent of the low-oxygen region.”

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Design professor using art to raise awareness of Ecuador’s issues of sustainability, ecosystem Photographing community gardens in his Easton hometown, Design Professor Spencer Ladd realized it was a “therapeutic” activity he was witnessing. No one depended on the food to survive, and considerable amounts were often left to rot. “It started me thinking. How are gardens used by people really who need them? Where in the world do they really matter?” Ladd found his answers in Ecuador’s northern Andes, where he has traveled extensively to photograph rural farmers who rely on their small farms and gardens to sustain themselves and their families. What is happening in the Andes is a snapshot version of global sustainability issues, said Ladd. How does a community support itself in the present yet preserve its natural resources for future generations? What happens when the promise of better jobs for poor people threatens the environment? Ladd is using art to explore these issues, believing that the artist can contribute to sustainability awareness as much as any scientist or engineer. Working both on his own and with an Andean consortium, Ladd has been photographing the Ecuadoran people and lands over the past 18 months. The visual documentation serves to illuminate in dramatic fashion critical sustainability questions. “I’ve thought very hard and for a long

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Design Professor Spencer Ladd, who believes art can enlighten people about sustainability issues throughout the world, has traveled to Ecuador to photograph that country's land and residents. Above photo shows a home ruined by flooding in Imbabura; the photo below shows the organic sustainable mountain garden of Geronimo Ramos Valverde and Maria Dolores Rogero Lara, Perbuelia, Imbabura, Ecuador.

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time about the ways in which visual communication can effect social change, especially in terms of the environment. Now I have the opportunity to do that.” Motivated by his Easton observations, Ladd began research that eventually took him to Imbabura, Ecuador, located in what Conservation International labels a tropical Andes “hotspot.” Ladd has traveled to Imbabura three times (most recently in January), spending 10 to 14 days on each trip. With help from environmentalist and Imbabura resident Nicholas Peter Shear, Ladd visits farmers who have “truly kitchen gardens in that the kitchen door really does open up on to them. “This is an area of high biodiversity. The Andes is like a quilted pattern of farms. The land has mostly been cultivated and there is little of pristine nature left. Most mountain farmers are poor, and some lack education in sustainability practices.” The degree of poverty is matched by the fragility of the ecosystem, said Ladd, thus spawning the typical debates over how best to use natural resources­— to sustain the present residents or to protect them for future generations. Simultaneously, mining, timber, and narcotics interests, along with increased urbanization, are threatening those resources. “Yet, awareness of the importance of mountain agriculture appears to be limited,” said Ladd, who hopes his photographs can trigger an emotional response that would lead to greater understanding and advocacy. “The photos represent the people and places in a way that is clear and easy to understand. We need to educate both the indigenous people and the world in general. I feel these can help the scientific community make its message more compelling.” Ladd’s Andean initiative serves also to enlighten his design students. “I want them to reconsider what some may think a graphic designer can do. This shows them that the designer does not work only in advertising or for commercial enterprises. Why can’t the designer advocate for something?” Ladd, who exhibited his work on campus in 2007, brings his photos of the Andean paramo (the fragile mountain ecozone) to next month's World Paramo Congress, which will draw roughly 700 people from the U.S., South America, and Africa to Loja, Ecuador. “When students ask if an artist can use art to also be an advocate, I can show them what I’ve done, and demonstrate that your work as an artist can be used beyond your profession.”

within reach.

Donors enjoyed the opportunity to meet the students who benefit from their generosity at the first Scholarship Luncheon, held in April. Shown in larger photo, College of Engineering Associate Dean Tesfay Meressi (far left), student Noemi Chiriac, who holds the Brenda Karnasiewicz Scholarship, and Connie Karnasiewicz. Dr. Richard Ward (inset), former business college dean, talks with Stephanie Mireku ’11, recipient of the Cecilia B. Ward Memorial Scholarship.

Dear alumni, parents, and friends,

n $1 million pledge from the 3R’s Foundation to support

On behalf of Chancellor Jean F. MacCormack and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation for fiscal year 2008, which lists individuals and companies who have made contributions to the university from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008. The list of donors provided in this Annual Report represents an impressive cross section of alumni, parents, friends, staff, faculty, and corporations, foundations, and organizations who collectively committed more than $6.8 million towards the education of the next generation of leaders enrolled at UMass Dartmouth. You may think that this list simply provides information on last year’s donors, but over time I hope you come to realize that it offers so much more. Each and every name signifies a contribution that enables the university to remove financial barriers for students; improve technology and resources; ensure the retention of top faculty; and provide an affordable quality education for more than 8,300 students. Moreover, every name represents an opportunity that a student might otherwise not have without the support of generous benefactors and friends. This accessibility, combined with a world-class education, is what differentiates a UMass Dartmouth education from all others. UMass Dartmouth is fortunate to have so many supporters among its constituency and this Annual Report is a testament to this commitment. A mong the many generous contributions UMass Dartmouth received in fiscal year 2008, a few noteworthy commitments warrant special recognition: n $1 million pledge from the Robert F. Stoico/First Fed

Charitable Foundation to support the Claire T. Carney Library and to endow the Robert F. Stoico Scholarship;

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the establishment of the Center for Indic Studies Education Initiative;

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UM ass D artmouth A nnual R eport 2008

world class.

n $250,000 pledge from the Prince Henry Society

of Massachusetts in support of the Ferreira-Mendes Portuguese-American Archives; n $354,284 in–kind contribution from the New Bedford

fishing fleet in support of SMAST’s scallop research. These transformational gifts illustrate the importance of visionary leaders who recognize the special significance of investing in education and the impact it has on community members, local businesses, and all of southeastern Massachusetts. The scope of the programs supported by these leadership gifts also exemplifies the international approach that UMass Dartmouth embraces in order to provide an education that is truly global in nature. T he future of UMass Dartmouth shines very brightly, despite the diminishing support the state provides to the school each year. Over the last 20 years, support from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has dropped from 72% to roughly 23% of the university’s annual operating budget. Conversely, support from our constituency continues to grow and we are humbled by the generosity of our alumni, parents, friends, and local community, especially during these unstable economic times. Thank you again for your unwavering support. Your investment allows UMass Dartmouth to offer the best education possible so that our students can make their own important contributions toward making our world a better place for all. Sincerely, Michael J. Eatough Assistant Chancellor of Advancement

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The following list includes donors to the Annual Campaign alphabetically according to their giving levels for donations received between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008. A special thank you to those who have joined the Chancellor’s Circle by contributing $1,000 or more in a single year.

Benefactor

Patron

Anonymous Donna M. O’Connor Living Trust Regional Government of the Azores Suffolk Construction Company, Inc.

Professor Robin A. Robinson St. Anne’s Credit Union Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ‘00 Dr. Richard David Stone ‘68 Star Holdings Limited Partnership Mr. and Mrs. Frank Teixeira

Distinguished Patron Advisor Charitable Gift Fund Combined Jewish Philanthropies Luso-American Development Foundation Rockland Trust Mark and Elisia Saab Family Fund The Charles Irwin Travelli Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert Watkins, Jr. ’02 Major Patron Mr. Anthony F. Andrade ‘04 BankFive Bristol County Savings Charitable Foundation, Inc. Ms. Otilia S. Ferreira ‘87 Mr. Charles J. Hoff Friends of Donald R. Watson LMP Realty Trust Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Mr. Luis Pedroso Mr. Dennis Rezendes Southeastern Mass Partnership Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Melvin B. Yoken Patron Anonymous (2) Alice S. Ayling Scholarship Foundation Bank of America Joseph Baptista Trust Citizens-Union Savings Bank Coca-Cola Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Providence Colonial Wholesale Beverage Jessie B. Cox Charitable Trust Henry H. Crapo Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Downey The Jarabek Family Lantz Law, Inc. Lockheed Martin, Inc. G. Lopes Construction, Inc. Estate of Ms. Fatima Martins Millennium bcpbank

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Gold Mentor Acushnet Company Allergan Mr. Daniel E. Bogan ‘59, ‘04 Bristol Community College Mr. Earle P. Charlton II ‘96 Comcast Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts Cove Charitable Trust Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. and Mrs. John P. Ferreira First Bristol Corporation Mrs. Maria D. Furman ‘76 Gladys M. Rezendes Memorial Scholarship Fund Global Montello Group Corporation Grimshaw-Gudewicz Charitable Foundation J & J Materials Corporation Karam Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr. James J. Karam ‘71, ‘01 Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 Dr. Thomas Lawton ‘53 Lighthouse Masonry, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Quinn St. Anne’s Hospital Mr. Kevin C. Santos ‘81 Ms. Koreen A. Santos Sodexho, Inc. Southcoast Hospitals Group Sylvia & Company Insurance Agency, Inc. University of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc. Blue Mentor ABC Disposal Service, Inc. Alan and Ruth Ades Charitable Trust AFFS, Inc. Alkermes Corporation Dr. Cynthia M. Alves ‘84 Attorney Alan A. Amaral ‘69 Dr. Lisa F. Antonelli ‘79 Ms. Maureen S. Armstrong Babbitt Steam Specialty Company

Baldwin Brothers, Inc. Beauregard, Burke & Franco Mr. Bruce H. Black ‘86 Chancellor Professor Donald Boerth Borden & Remington Corporation Boucher & Heureux, Inc. Professor Joseph A. Bronstad Mr. Ralph A. Brown Dr. and Mrs. Arthur D. Burke Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 Century Food Service, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Paul Chervinsky Chancellor Professor Lester W. Cory ‘63 Mr. Charles A. Costa The Cranston Foundation of Cranston Print Works Company Craven & Ober Policy Strategists, LLC Dr. Thomas J. Curry ‘64 Dartmouth Mall Mr. and Mrs. Allan W. Ditchfield Jean Doyle Charitable Gift Fund Mr. Michael P. Duarte ‘80 Eastern Bank Eastern Fisheries, Inc. Egan Family Foundation Mr. Mark Eisenberg Mr. and Mrs. Roy Enoksen Drs. Louis and Frances Esposito Fall River Ford, Inc. Fall River United Jewish Appeal, Inc. Mr. Joseph H. Feitelberg ‘03 Fontaine Yacht Holdings, LLC Mr. Richard C. Fontaine, Jr. ‘86 Ms. Irene V. Fonseca Ms. Catherine A. Fortier-Barnes Mr. John A. Freeman ‘58 Mr. and Mrs. John J. Galiher ‘84 Mr. John H. Gallant Kenneth T. and Mildred S. Gammons Charitable Foundation, Inc. Mr. Fernando J. Garcia ‘69 Global Glass of New England, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Mahesh Goyal Dr. Robert W. Green Mr. Lawrence C. Hall Mr. and Mrs. Warren Hathaway Mr. John G. Hawes ‘66 Dr. Brian T. Helgeland ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Norman G. Hildreth, Jr. ‘85 Sheriff Thomas M. Hodgson Dr. William Hogan ‘70 Professor Catherine Houser Joseph W. Houth Charitable Trust IKON Office Solutions Jewish Federation of Greater New Bedford, Inc. Mr. William T. Kennedy ‘03

Mr. Glen B. Kessler and Ms. Sarah Kaput Mr. Rodney T. King ‘50 Lafrance Hospitality Company Ed Lambert Election Committee Dr. Susan C. Lane Ms. Joyce M. LeBlanc ‘89 Fred and Sarah Lipsky Foundation Mr. Sumner B. MacDonald ‘58 Macx, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Amine B. Maalouf The MacLean Charitable Foundation The Honorable and Mrs. William Q. MacLean, Jr. ‘80 W.B. Mason Company, Inc. Ms. Carolee S. Matsumoto Mr. Gerald J. Mauretti ‘65 Brian and Cindy McGreevy ‘78, ‘79 Mr. Michael W. Metzler Committee to Elect Mark C. Montigny Mr. John D. Moore ‘96 and Mrs. Elizabeth Isherwood Moore ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins Mr. Thomas A. Munroe ‘73 Neto Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr. Manuel F. Neto Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Nickerson ‘76 Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Oliveira Mr. Manuel R. Pavao Dean Eileen Peacock Plumbers & Gasfitters Local 12 Boston Mr. Donald H. Ramsbottom Mr. David J. Raposa Mrs. Janice H. Reynolds ‘82 Mr. Carl Ribeiro Ms. June Roche ‘60, ‘77 Mr. Todd E. Semple ‘06 Mr. Julian Silva Mr. Robert Soares Soares Sanitation Pumping, Inc. Southcoast Endodontics, PC Sperian Protection USA, Inc. The Standard-Times Mrs. Mary M. Sullivan TeamOps, LLC Ms. Kathleen M. Torrens Truesdale Hospital Nurses Alumnae Association, Inc. Mr. John E. Tuttle ‘63 UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association UMass Dartmouth Library Associates UMass Dartmouth Student Affairs Mr. Joseph Sequeira Vera Dr. Antone C. Vieira, Jr. ‘68 Mr. Carlton M. Viveiros ‘82

U M a s s

within reach.

Mr. Fredric T. Walder ‘79 Chancellor Professor Emeritus Richard J. Ward Mr. and Mrs. Sumner J. Waring, Jr. ‘80 Drs. John and Sharon Weiner Mr. J. Charles West ‘78 Ms. Patricia A. White ‘77 Mr. Myron Wilner Ms. Elizabeth Winiarz Mr. Jeffrey A. Wolfman Donald G. Wood ‘60, ‘70 and Sandra D. Wood Mr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Xavier ‘72 Clement Yaeger Trust Fund Dr. Donald L. Zekan Mentor Mr. Richard H. Aubut ‘75 Mrs. Carol A. Bardwell ‘76 Bobcat of Cape Cod, Inc. Ms. Jane K. Booth ‘65 Mr. Leonard V. Brophy, Jr. ‘78 Mr. Wendell S. Brown Bufftree Building Company Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan D. Chace ‘81, ‘88 Mr. Jifeng Chen ‘95 and Ms. Bilian Li ‘97 Mrs. Ann-Marie S. Chin Mrs. Dana Christensen ‘85 Mr. Scott W. Costa ‘78 Mr. Thomas G. Davis Ms. Jonna L. Dondero ‘92 Dr. and Mrs. John P. Dowd Mrs. Eudora Carvalho Dronge ‘42 Dyneon, LLC Mr. Terry R. Farias ‘68 Robert B. Feingold & Associates, P.C. Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Mr. Donald A. Foster ‘72 Ms. Christine Frizzell Maria Furman Family Fund Dr. James A. Golen ‘65 Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Goodspeed Dr. and Mrs. Charles J. Gormley II Mr. Bernard H. Gould Dr. Qiushuang Guo ‘97 and Ms. Congfeng Yang ‘98 Mr. Stephen T. Hall ‘93 Mrs. Pamela A. Haller ‘88 Ms. Patricia A. Heath International Compliance Systems, Inc. Mr. Ruoming Jia ‘92 Mr. Michael Johnson ‘92 Karam Financial Group

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Mr. James F. Kelley Ms. Judith A. Kelley KPMG The Honorable and Mrs. Manuel Kyriakakis ‘87 Mr. Frederic J. Lamoureux ‘51 Mr. Robert G. Lavoie ‘63 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Lenhardt Ms. Brenda C. Livingston ‘96 Mr. Eugene Lonergan Mr. Francis J. Lynch III Attorney Robert J. Marchand ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Martin New England Business Bulletin New England Construction Company, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Theodore J. Ondrick, Jr. Ms. Mary Ann Partridge ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Pickette, Jr. Mr. Paul Pinault ‘73 Precix, Inc. Mrs. Rita T. Raymond Regal Floor Covering, Inc. Mrs. Claire V. Robinson ‘78 Mr. Robert K. Sheridan Shin-Etsu Silicones of America Mr. Paul T. Silva Mr. and Mrs. Amit K. Singh Mr. David A. Sluter ‘75 Dr. George S. Smith Mr. Charles E. Spencer ‘93 Lt. Col. Audrey Stebenne, USAF (Ret.) ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Clay V. Stites Ms. Charlotte P. Sudduth Superior Title & Closing Services, LLC Swansea Mall Ms. Lisa Szargowicz ‘85 Ms. Pearl R. Szatek ‘78 Professor Doris Thibault UMass Faculty Federation, Local 1895, AFT, AFL-CIO Ms. Nanette Vega ‘96 Mr. Henry B. Wainer Sid Wainer & Son Mr. Eric S. Watson ‘73 Mr. Rongwei Xuan ‘98 and Ms. Hui Hu ‘01 Mr. Baosen Zhou ‘97 and Ms. Lan Cheng ‘00

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Campanile Society Mr. Christopher S. Adey ‘90 Mr. Brian Alves ‘85 Mr. Mark R. Amaral ‘86 Mrs. Maureen A. Anness ‘73 Mr. Orville G. Bailey ‘87

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The dividends of investing in a UMass Dartmouth scholarship

Scholarship recipient Jonathan McHale studies in the Claire T. Carney Library.

W

ithout the financial aid he has received from UMass Dartmouth, a college education would never have been possible, says senior Jonathan McHale. The mechanical engineering major is among the university’s most committed and accomplished students. That is evidenced by his receipt of the Charles Irwin Travelli, Lady Eccles Fund, Robert W. Thompson, and Alumni Association scholarships. “I wouldn’t have been able to go to college at all,” explains

Mr. George Barboza ‘59 Mr. and Mrs. Manny Barboza Mr. and Mrs. Rutgers Barclay Mr. and Mrs. John Beaulieu Mr. Paul A. Bessette ‘85 Mr. Ralph A. Boardman ‘63 Mr. William J. Boles, Jr. ‘74 Ms. Kimberly E. Botelho ‘07 Mr. James A. Botellio ‘59 Dr. John R. Brazil Mr. Donald J. Brody ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. James F. Buckley ‘81 Peter and Tia Bullard Mr. Brian C. Burgoyne ‘75 C F Marketing, LLC Mr. John N. Cabral ‘94 Mr. Stephen M. Camara ‘77 Mr. James L. Canavan, Jr. ‘75 Mr. John M. Canto ‘57

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Mr. H. Jay Carney Mr. William G. Catlow ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Richard Charlot Mr. Lawrence R. Chartier ‘85 Mr. Jianrong Chen ‘99 Ms. Wen Chen ‘95 Mrs. Donna M. Cook ‘81 Coolidge-Boreiko Family Fund Professor David J. Creamer ‘58 Mr. Robert C. Crowley ‘79 Mr. Daniel daLuz ‘63 Mr. Eugene P. Damm, Jr. ‘56 Ms. Mary B. Davidson Ms. Pamela A. Davol ‘86 Mr. Kenneth DeCosta ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Delano ‘57 Ms. Dianne M. Devlin ‘83 Mr. Paul J. Drolet ‘75 Mr. Robert F. Edwards ‘82

McHale, who grew up in New Bedford and graduated from Greater New Bedford Vocational Technical High School. His mother is a single parent who has worked hard through the years, but could not have covered the costs of college. Yet McHale says there was “absolutely” no question that he would be the first person in his family to complete college. UMass Dartmouth gave him the opportunity to attain his goals, thanks to those who have established and supported scholarship assistance. “In my first year, I received enough aid so that I could be a commuter student. Then additional scholarships made it possible for me to live on campus, and that has definitely been valuable to me as a student. “I think living on campus motivates me more to do my work. It’s much easier to get to the engineering lab at any time when you live on campus, or call up a friend and say, ‘Do you want to study together?'" A tutor at the Math and Business Center for three semesters, McHale is a resident assistant at Aspen Hall this year, “and I’ve quadrupled the number of my friends by becoming one.” His UMass Dartmouth education “has definitely helped me discover who I am. Also, I’ve had some excellent professors. “I feel strongly that we need to put more money into education. We need to have people who are more educated, with greater skills and technological knowledge. That is how we’ll improve ourselves and our country. People should absolutely invest in education.” To learn how to establish a scholarship, or contribute to a UMass Dartmouth fund, visit www.umassd.edu/institutional_ advancement or call 508.999.8200.

Mrs. Linda K. Egan ‘80 Mr. James Farrar Mr. Antonio M. Fernandes ‘85 Ms. Jessica Fernandes ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. Benedict J. Fiasconaro, Jr. Ms. Pamela W. Fingleton Fire Protection Services Flagraphics Mr. John E. Foster, Jr. ‘57 Mr. James E. French ‘78 Mrs. Kathleen B. Friar ‘78 Friends of Ray Barrows Community Service Book Fund Ms. Marilyn L. Fritzemeier ‘04 Mr. Charles Funches ‘76 Ms. Brenda Galligan Professor Avijit Gangopadhyay Mr. Stephen F. Gardiner ‘74

Dr. Anthony J. Garro Mr. Douglas K. Gentile ‘85 Mr. Edwin B. Gentle III ‘94 Mrs. Linda R. Gouveia ‘77 Mrs. Kathy L. Grandmaison ‘73 Ms. Suzan H. Greenup Mr. John C. Gregson ‘68 Mr. John E. Grenier, Jr. ‘74 Mr. Henry A. Guay ‘65 Mr. Arthur R. Guindeira ‘06 Ms. Susan M. Hansen ‘78 Ms. Melissa E. Haskell Mr. John T. Hoey Mr. Ronald A. House ‘64 HUB International Feitelberg Mr. John Hughes ‘87 Ms. Susan Hughes Instrument Technology, Inc. Ms. Donna A. Jeffers

Mr. Arthur G. Johnson ‘83 Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Wolfhard E. Kern Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kradin Mr. and Mrs. Tony Lafuente Mr. Patrick Lahy Mr. Howard J. Lazerowich ‘78 Mr. John R. Ledwidge ‘67 Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Lee Mr. David C. Leinberry, Jr. ‘84 Mr. Armindo P. Louro ‘77 Matthew J. Macy Memorial Fund Dr. and Mrs. Mark A. Mahoney Robert J. Marchand, Esq. Mr. David F. Marcille ‘84 Ms. Anne P. Marks ‘75 Mr. Paul G. Martins ‘78 Ms. Karen L. McCloskey ‘87 Mr. Frederick B. McDonald ‘55 Ms. Bonnie McKenzie Mr. Bruce J. Medeiros ‘97 Mid-Massachusetts Renovating, Inc. Dr. David Milstone Ms. Louise B. Mitchell ‘81 Mr. John J. Morse Mr. Robert N. Mullen ‘82 Mr. John M. Murphy ‘81 Mr. Mark C. Murphy Mr. Louis E. Mutty ‘84 Mr. Donald E. Napert ‘77 Mr. Phillip W. Nimeskern, Jr. ‘77 Ms. Christine Nounou ‘74 Mr. George W. Noyes Mr. John J. O’Connor Mr. Robert E. O’Hare ‘80 Mr. Frank R. Oliver ‘79 Mr. Henry A. Openshaw, Jr. ‘02 Ms. Susan F. Paladino Mr. Lewis C. Palmer II ‘63 Ms. Eileen Parise ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Steven Parker Mr. Joseph E. Parola ‘82 Mrs. Susan L. Payne ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Kent B. Pelissier Mr. and Mrs. John S. Penney, Jr. Mr. Joe Perry ‘72 Mr. Clinton E. Pires ‘75 Mr. Donald H. Plant ‘61 Mr. Curtis E. Pollitt ‘77 Mrs. Jayne Brady Prescott ‘79 Mr. Joseph D. Raposa ‘52 Mr. Milton Rhodes ‘41 Mr. F. Paul Richards ‘74 Mr. Mark Steven Roberts Mr. Fradique A. Rocha ‘77 Dr. Dennis B. Roderick Dr. Wendy A. Rogers ‘85 Ms. Marie Rosen Mr. Matthew D. Ryckebusch

Ms. Margaret E. Sabens ‘96 Santos Family Foundation Dr. and Mrs. George P. Santos Mr. Joaquim Santos ‘72 Mr. Calvin Siegal Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Smith ‘80 Ms. Diane D. Souza ‘79 Mr. Robert J. Souza ‘76 Mr. Anatoliy Stein Mr. Gustav H. Szabo ‘78 Mr. Charles G. Taylor ‘65 Mrs. Sheila K. Tully ‘87 Mrs. Gayle M. Ulrich ‘85 United Way of Greater New Bedford, Inc. Ms. Dolores L. Vieira ‘05 Mr. Paul L. Vigeant ‘74 Mr. Richard C. Walker ‘74 Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler Mr. David A. Webster ‘71 Dr. Suzanne R. Westfall ‘75 Ms. Majorie Williams Mr. Mitchell M. Winkler ‘80 Mr. David F. Wood ‘72 Ms. Sijia Wu ‘86 Ms. Jenny Xifaras ‘60 Mrs. Joyce L. Youngberg ‘68 Mr. Charles P. Young Ms. Karen A. Zahorsky ‘78 Century Club Mr. and Mrs. Robert Abruzzio Ms. Mary G. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Emmanuel Aguiar Ms. Stacey Ahern Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Alaownis ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. James Alfred Mr. Brian A. Alosi ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Alpert Alpert Consulting, LLC Ms. Arline G. Alpert Mr. Michael J. Ambrosini ‘70 American Productions and Inventory Control Society Mr. and Mrs. David Ames, Jr. Ms. Cynthia A. Anderson ‘75 Ms. Mary I. Andrade ‘81 Ms. Christine Andrews Mrs. Susanne V. Andrews Mrs. Patricia Aneni-Onajide ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Annunziato ‘81, ‘82 Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. Arena Mr. and Mrs. Mark J. Arpino Mr. Richard J. Arsenault ‘95 Mr. Normand G. Audette ‘72 U M a s s

within reach.

Mr. Randall Aguiar ‘77 Mr. Jeffrey M. August ‘89 Ms. Mary August-Freitas Mr. John L. Aumann ‘75 Mrs. Elizabeth A. Bahrns ‘75 Mr. Shreyas Ramchandra Bapat ‘04 Mr. and Mrs. David Barclay ‘82, ‘70 Professor Diane Barense Ms. Christina Barkley Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Barnes ‘73 Chancellor Professor Nora Ganim Barnes Mr. Paul R. Barrette ‘70 Ms. Alda M. Barron Mr. and Mrs. Joaquim C. Barros ‘89, ‘85 Dr. Clyde W. Barrow Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Barry Ms. Louise Racine Bastarache ‘78 Mr. Douglas J. Bator ‘80 Mr. John E. Bauer ‘84 Ms. Evelyn J. Baum Mrs. Marianne E. Beardsley ‘87 Mr. Jak Beardsworth ‘69 Mrs. Sheila Beckeman ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Carl Becker Mr. Tom A. Becker ‘96 Mrs. Cynthia A. Behan ‘77 Mr. John J. Belli ‘76 Ms. Ray-Ann Belliveau Mr. Manuel Benevides ‘81 Mr. Arnold H. Bennett ‘62 Mr. Thomas A. Benoit ‘81 Mr. Peter L. Berdos, Jr. ‘85 Professor Heidi M. Berggren Mr. Tobe Berkovitz Dr. Gail L. Berman-Martin Mr. Mark J. Bernardo ‘92 Ms. Kathleen Billings Mr. Ronald M. Biron Dr. James J. Bisagni Mr. John D. Bisbano, Jr. ‘88 Mr. George A. Bishop III ‘60 Mrs. Anne C. Bisson ‘81 Mr. Carl C. Bjornson ‘80 Mrs. Anne M. Blackington ‘81 Blair Agency, Inc. Mr. Ernest J. Blais ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Blanchard Mrs. Therese A. Bonelli Mr. Bruce P. Boni ‘60 Mr. Edward L. Booth ‘76 Ms. Marietta E. Booth ‘73 Mr. Steven A. Borges ‘80 Ms. Jovita Borges Mr. William B. Borges ‘48 Mr. Daniel S. Botelho ‘04 Mr. and Mrs. John Botelho Mr. John A. Botelho ‘77

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Mr. John P. Botelho, Jr. ‘93 Mr. John D. Bowen ‘61 Mr. Bruce P. Branchaud ‘76 Mrs. Nancy S. Brandon ‘85 Ms. Maria D. Brigida-Gil ‘80 Mr. Bruce H. Brown ‘71 Mr. Gary Brown ‘76 Ms. Sharon D. Brown ‘77 Ms. Christina M. Bruen Mr. Bruce H. Buckley ‘60 J. F. Burke Consultants Mr. Patrick E. Burke ‘90 Dr. Richard T. Burke Mr. Stephen J. Burke ‘81 Mrs. Jane E. Burnem-Burns ‘86 Mr. Edward Cabral ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. George M. Cabral ‘92, ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Steven M. Cabral Mrs. Karen M. Caddell ‘85 Ms. Wei Cai Mr. Joseph T. Callaghan, Jr. ‘62 Mr. Paul M. Camara ‘69 Dr. Wayne J. Camara ‘78 Ms. Dianne L. Cameron ‘05 Mrs. Lauren A. Cammann ‘85 Mr. Peter L. Cantone, Jr. ‘76 Mr. Dennis M. Canulla ‘81 Mr. Yiqun Cao ‘00 Mr. Joseph Carando ‘53 Mr. Mark Carchidi Mr. Wayne M. Cardoza ‘70 Mr. Paul A. Cardullo ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Carlozzi ‘69 Mr. Mark H. Carney Mr. Gregory K. Carignan ‘80 Mr. Jeffrey Carignan ‘81 Ms. Pamela Carignan ‘83 Mr. David W. Carreau ‘55 Mr. Alan R. Carrier ‘71 Mr. Robert N. Carroll ‘94 Ms. Mary C. Cassidy ‘77 Mr. Jose S. Castelo Castle Mortgage Brokerage Mrs. Alice Castro ‘78 Ms. Kathleen B. Castro ‘74 Ms. Linda B. Caulkins Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Cayer Mr. Timothy J. Chace ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. William A. Chace ‘92, ‘81 Mr. Ashok Ruman Charry ‘00 Mr. Everett Charves ‘52 Mr. Kevin A. Chaves ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Cherneys Mr. Thomas J. Chmura Mr. Neil T. Churchill ‘81 Ms. Patricia M. Ciavola ‘82

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Cinnamon Fern Env. Design & Construction Mr. Oliver P. Cipollini, Jr. ‘78 Mr. Francis P. Clegg ‘73 Ms. Susan S. Coakley ‘88 Mr. David W. Coble ‘79 Mrs. Cindee Cognetta ‘89 Ms. Lee Herstoff Cohen Mr. James Collins ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. James M. Comalli Mrs. Roslyn Comenitz ‘76 Mr. Michael J. Conley ‘06 Mr. Peter D. Connolly Ms. Joan M. Connor ‘85 Ms. Vanessa Cooley Ms. Janie C. Coolidge Coonamessett Farm, Inc. Mr. Christopher B. Cooney ‘90 Mr. Stephen J. Cordeiro ‘74 Mr. Leonard W. Coriaty ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Ernest R. Cormier Mr. John F. Cornwell ‘59 Mr. Stephen J. Correa ‘73 Mr. Richard P. Correia ‘73 Mrs. Gladys S. Cory ‘59 Mr. Carlos A. Costa ‘78 Dr. Susan T. Costa ‘72 Coughlin Associates Ms. Christine M. Coughlin ‘82 Mr. Daniel F. Coughlin ‘79 Professor Alden W. Counsell ‘42 Mr. Paul J. Coutinho ‘94 Ms. Maria F. Crivello ‘80 Colonel Ronald J. Cruz, USMC (Ret.) ‘69 Mrs. Victoria R. Cunningham Ms. Phyllis A. Currier Mr. Edward M. Cusson ‘61 Mr. Kurt R. Dahlberg ‘73 Mr. Joseph L. Damasio, Jr. ‘98 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Danforth Mr. Fredric C. Danhauser ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Emmanuel DaPonte Mr. Patrick A. Davis ‘80 Mr. Thomas A. Davol, Jr. ‘62 Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Dawkins Mr. Raymond B. Deane ‘95 Mr. Robert F. Deans ‘70 Mr. Stephen J. Decesare ‘78 Mr. Paul E. Deciccio ‘63 Mr. Paul J. DeCoste, Jr. ‘84 Mrs. Mary Ellen A. DeFrias ‘94 Mr. Joseph DeMarco ‘63 Mr. Joao-Luis DeMedeiros ‘97 Mr. Joe F. DeMedeiros ‘99 Mr. James F. deMelo ‘72 Ms. Carolyn J. DeMoranville Ms. Debora J. DePaola ‘74 Mr. Rodney P. DeRego ‘67

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Ms. Monica A. DeSalvo ‘87 Mr. Jevon K. Desena ‘91 Mr. Paul R. Desforges ‘62 Mr. Arthur L. Deych ‘05 Ms. Lolita Dias ‘91 Mr. Ronald J. Dias ‘66 Ms. Joan W. Dickson Mrs. Linda S. Dillon ‘75 Mr. Matthew D. Dimock ‘94 Mr. John J. Dinn ‘84 Ms. Nancy Dipilato Professor Nancy M. Dluhy Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dobias Ms. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ‘03 Mr. James F. Donnelly, Jr. ‘67 Ms. Suzanne T. Donovan ‘82 Mr. Hu Dou ‘99 Mr. James A. Doucet ‘55 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dougherty Professor Daryll C. Dowty ‘78 Ms. Irene M. Doyle ‘79 Mr. William J. Doyle ‘86 Mrs. Heather MacDonald Draz ‘91 Mr. Robert P. Duarte Mr. Richard J. Dube ‘59 Mr. Donald M. Duberger ‘87 Mr. Douglas D. Ducharme ‘01 Mr. Paul E. Duchemin, Jr. Mr. Donald J. Dufault ‘86 Mrs. Laura Duffy ‘74 Ms. Moira H. Duffy Ms. Diane Duffy-Patyjewicz Attorney Roger J. Dugal ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. John Dugan Mr. Joseph C. Duggan ‘69 Mr. Bradley K. Dunkelberger ‘91 Mr. Brendan N. Durand ‘05 Mrs. Annette L. Dwyer Mr. Theodore J. Dziedzic ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. John Early EBSCO Industries Mrs. Ellen V. Eggeman Ms. Kathryn A. Egnaczak ‘05 Mrs. Jacqueline E. Einstein ‘91 Mrs. Beatrice A. Ellett ‘76 Mr. Joseph P. Ellis ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Enos Sander and Ray Epstein Charitable Foundation Mr. Selwyn Epstein Dr. and Mrs. Paul M. Ernsting ‘83, ‘82 Mr. Amos O. Fakulujo ‘82 M. Olanrele A. Fakulujo Mr. Xiaolong Fang ‘96 Mr. Charles L. Faria ‘69 Dr. John W. Farrington ‘66 Mr. Norman A. Faucher ‘60 Mrs. Sandra E. Faulkner ‘83

Ms. Debra A. Fazekas ‘76 Mr. Kevin J. Feeney ‘89 Mr. Patrick R. Fernsten ‘03 Ms. Ellen Ferrante Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ferrara Ms. Susan N. Ferrara Mrs. Christine Ferreira ‘74 Mr. Scott M. Ferson ‘87 Mr. Richard S. Fine ‘76 Mr. Barry S. Fineberg ‘76 Ms. Lenna F. Finger Mr. James P. Finglas ‘63 Mr. Alan B. Fink ‘76 Mrs. Joyce B. Finkenstadt ‘60 Mr. K. Thomas Finley Dr. John Finnie Mr. Barry O. Fisher ‘73 Chancellor Professor Elaine M. Fisher Mrs. Deborah Fitton Mrs. Pamela C. Fitton ‘71 Professor Edward J. Fitzpatrick, Jr. Flavors of New England Mr. Martin W. Flinn ‘79 Mr. Richard W. Flood ‘65 Ms. Bridget A. Flynn Mr. Thomas R. Flynn ‘62 Dr. and Mrs. Michael T. Foley Ms. Paulette J. Fontaine ‘79 Mr. James T. Fox ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Frazier Dr. Janet L. Freedman R. J. Freel Associates Mr. Robert J. Freel ‘69 Mr. James C. Freeman ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Floriano Freitas Mr. Michael D. Freyermuth ‘81 Attorney and Mrs. Thomas S. Friar ‘61, ‘65 Mr. William Fugman, Jr. ‘92 Mr. Thomas Fuller Mr. Michael A. Furtado ‘80 Mr. Kristopher G. Furtney ‘80 Mr. Stephen P. Gabel ‘75 Mr. Robert W. Gagne ‘54 Mr. John C. Gagnon ‘74 Mr. Roger J. Gagnon ‘61 Mr. Donald M. Gale ‘79 Mrs. Eugene Galkowski Mr. Kevin F. Galligan ‘77 Dr. Robert R. Gamache ‘73 Ms. Diane I. Garbetti ‘72 Mrs. Wendy M. Garcia ‘75 Ms. Catherine H. Gardner Reverend F. Richard Garland ‘85 Mr. Justin H. Garrison ‘04 Ms. Molly Garrison Ms. Diane J. Gauvin ‘79 Mr. Kurt Gent ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Geremia

Ms. Paige M. Gibbs Mr. Thomas M. Gibney ‘86 Mr. Tom Gidwitz and Dr. Gail Davidson Mr. and Mrs. Christopher A. Giffin Ms. Kim Gifford Mrs. Evelyn P. Gifun ‘86 Mr. James R. Gilbert ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Gill Ms. Priscilla Gay Gillespie ‘06 Mr. Jay N. Gillis ‘84 Professor and Mrs. Harold L. Gilmore Mrs. Peggy-Lynn Giunta ‘83 Colonel Peter C. Giusti, USAF (Ret.) ‘65 Ms. Patricia L. Goguen Mr. and Mrs. David Golden Stanley M. Goldstein Trust Ms. Roberta J. Gomes Mr. Jose C. Gonsalves ‘69 Ms. Susan M. Gonsalves ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Gorda ‘79, ‘77 Mr. Earl S. Gordon ‘54 Mr. Douglas S. Gould ‘84 Mr. Jeffrey E. Gould ‘79 Mr. Arthur Goyette, Jr. ‘82 Ms. Laura R. Grace ‘85 Mr. Antonio B. Gracia, Jr. ‘50 Ms. Catherine L. Graham Ms. Kathryn L. Gramling Dr. Lawrence W. Gray ‘77 Mr. Samuel P.M. Gray Mr. and Mrs. Dana E. Green Ms. Kathleen J. Greene ‘76 Ms. Virginia R. Greenzang ‘73 Mr. Daniel I. Greer ‘92 Mr. James E. Greichen ‘53 Mr. David C. Greim ‘79 Ms. Diane M. Guidebeck ‘97 Mr. Paul B. Guillet ‘79 Ms. Susan Gunther Mr. William B. Gurney ‘77 Mr. Mark J. Hahn ‘75 Mr. William R. Haigis ‘84 Mrs. Kate Randall Haley Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Hale Mr. William E. Hall, Jr. ‘65 Ms. Debra M. Halligan ‘94 Mrs. Karen A. Halloran ‘79 Ms. Marilyn B. Halter Mr. David P. Handleman ‘91 Mrs. Claire M. Hanify Mr. Robert J. Harpham ‘73 Mr. Gregg F. Harrison ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Steven V. Hartel Dr. Sandra J. Hathaway ‘80 Mr. William R. Hathaway ‘77

Ms. Lorraine Roy Hawkes ‘71 Mr. Raymond F. Haworth ‘51 Mr. Ziqiang He ‘98 Mrs. Sharyn L. Hennessey ‘69 Mr. John A. Hickey ‘91 Mr. James M. Hickox ‘77 Mr. Jonathan E. Hird Dr. Alan W. Hirshfeld Ms. Yvonne Hitchens Mr. Thomas C. Hoder ‘95 Ms. Janice L. Hodson ‘84 Mr. Timothy L. Hoffman ‘77 Mrs. Carol Ann Hokans ‘82 Ms. Melinda M. Holland ‘90 Professor Memory Holloway Mrs. Marilyn E. Hopkins ‘86 Ms. Marilyn J. Howcroft Mr. William T. Howell, Jr. ‘79 Mrs. Megan G. Hoye ‘97 Chancellor Professor Jong-Ping Hsu Mr. Richard Huey ‘76 and Ms. Catherine H. Reid-Huey ‘78 Mr. Daniel E. Hughes ‘89 Ms. Stephanie A. Hulbig ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Branden J. Humphrey Ms. E. Jacqueline Hunt ‘76 Mr. Arthur J. Hurley ‘95 Mrs. Doreen M. Sylvia Hutchinson ‘88 Mrs. Nancy L. Ibarra ‘77 Mr. Warren L. Ide ‘75 Mr. Virginus O. Iheyinwa ‘72 Inglese Management Service, Inc. Mr. Peter J. Inglese, Sr. ‘59 Mrs. Gail Isaksen ‘67 Mr. Harold Israel Isserlis ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Eric Jacobs Mr. Michael T. Jamgochian ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Chantal Jean-Pierre Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Jencks Mr. David A. Jennings ‘76 Mr. David W. Johnson ‘75 Ms. Judith D. Johnson Mr. Stephen C. Johnson ‘68 Ms. Debra L. Jones ‘84 Dr. Julius Jones Ms. Joyce A. Jordan Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Jordan Ms. Violet F. Jordan Ms. Joyce Josefson Mrs. Yen M. Kadish ‘00 Ms. Kristin L. Kadlec ‘03 Mr. Bruce V. Kane ‘81 Mr. John Kane ‘88 Ms. Lynne K. Kane Mr. Walter O. Kangas ‘74 Mr. Justin T. Kaput Mr. and Mrs. Glen A. Kashgegian Mr. Boris Katan ‘84

Mr. Chester J. Kawa, Jr. ‘65 Mr. William F. Keating, Jr. ‘62 Mr. and Mrs. Michael Keenan Mrs. Ann E. Keener ‘72 Mr. Mark W. Keighley ‘88 Mrs. Kerry J. Kelleher ‘96 Mr. William J. Kelleher ‘71 Ms. Sarah R. Kelley Ms. Lisa Kendall Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Kenney Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Kessler Mr. Thomas Khoury ‘78 Vice Chancellor Jean Kim Dr. Yong K. Kim Mr. Duff D. Kirklewski ‘77 Mr. Jonathan P. Klaren ‘94 Mr. Mahmoud K. Kobeissi ‘79 Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Gerard M. Koot Mr. Cesar R. Kothe ‘86 Mr. Ivan M. Kranich ‘49 Ms. Susan T. Krumholz Mr. Christopher T. Kuehn ‘93 Mr. Zheng-Jie Kuo ‘99 Ms. Frances Kut ‘75 L. J. Trust Mr. Jeffrey B. Lafleur Ms. Jiening Lai ‘92 Ms. Lillian B. Lamoureau Mr. Paul K. Lamoureux ‘72 Mrs. Lynn M. Landry ‘82 Mr. Joseph A. Lane ‘60 Ms. Kathy E. Langford Mr. Bruce W. Larson ‘74 Mr. Sebastian A. Lassalle Mr. James R. Laurila ‘85 Mr. Mark A. Lavallee ‘84 Mr. Alvin C. Lavoie ‘77 Mr. Robert W. Lavoie ‘61 Mr. Brian A. Lawton ‘78 Mr. Joseph R. Leal ‘40 Mr. Robert E. Lebeau ‘70 Attorney J. Louis LeBlanc ‘62 Mr. Michael J. Leblanc ‘07 Dr. Susan J. Leclair ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. J. Philip Lee Mrs. Denise Legee ‘82 Mr. William F. Leger ‘61 Ms. Elizabeth R. Lehr ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. John Leimert Mr. Michael R. Lemay ‘82 Ms. Gail LeMay Mr. Fernando A. Lemos ‘79 Mr. Richard C. Letendre ‘80 Mrs. Nenling Leung Dr. and Mrs. Clinton N. Levin Mr. and Mrs. Melvin H. Levin Ms. Diana Levy Mr. Frederick J. Lewis ‘79

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within reach.

Mr. Joseph M. Lewis ‘82 Mr. Christopher Limerick, Jr. ‘50 Mrs. Susan D. Lincoln Dr. Rita Linggood Mrs. Jamie Linve ‘84 Mr. Kenneth D. Lipman Mr. William G. Lisk ‘77 Little People’s College, Inc. Mr. Russell R. Locke ‘94 Ms. Nanette Defeo Longley ‘76 Mr. Dennis J. Lopes ‘74 Ms. Rosa Neto Lopes Mr. Gennaro R. Lopriore ‘56 S. Loranger Mr. Paul A. Lovett, Jr. ‘78 Mr. Michael P. Lucas ‘80 Mr. Thomas C. Lucier ‘92 Ms. Katherine M. Lukas ‘00 Mr. and Mrs. Murray J. Lukoff Mr. Robert F. Lundgren ‘77 Mrs. Susie B. Narciso Lydon ‘92 Mr. Patrick T. Lynch ‘79 Judge Demarest Lloyd MacDonald Mr. John G. Machado ‘91 Ms. Susan M. Mackiewicz ‘82 Mr. Edwin L. Maclean ‘79 Mr. Glenn S. MacNaught ‘83 Mr. Joseph R. Macrina ‘87 Mrs. Christine A. Mahoney ‘84 Mail Boxes, Etc. Ms. Carol A. Mailloux Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass Mr. Paul Maitoza ‘75 Mr. Christopher Makepeace Mr. Donald M. Makie ‘74 Mrs. Anne E. Manzi ‘42 Ms. Jacqueline F. Marmen ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Vincent Marron Ms. Janet N. Marshall Mr. Alan W. Martel ‘78 Martins Painting & Home Improvements Mr. Abel R. Massa ‘78 Mr. Hank Mastey Duncan H. and Louise Safe Mauran Fund Mr. Eric E. Mayer ‘90 Mrs. Theresa A. McAvoy ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. James D. McBratney Mr. Daniel McCarthy ‘81 Mr. James J. McCarthy ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCarthy Mr. and Mrs. Stephen E. McCarthy

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Mr. Hugh R. McCartney III ‘77 Ms. Donna L. McClung ‘79 Ms. Danielle Poyant McCue ‘89 Ms. Janice R. McDonough ‘93 Mr. Mark B. McDonough ‘74 Mr. Jerry B. McGinnis ‘68 Mr. Thomas F. Mcguire, Jr. ‘71 Mr. Andrew McGuirk ‘72 Mr. Kenison A. McIntosh ‘59 Mr. Jay M. McKinnon ‘93 Mr. Robert C. McLaughlin, Jr. ‘61 Mr. and Mrs. George F. McMahon Mr. and Mrs. Jerome McManus Mr. Richard J. McNeil ‘96 Mr. John McSweeney Mr. Brian J. Mcvane ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. David Meczywor Mr. John Medeiros ‘60 Ms. Mickey Medeiros Mr. Norman S. Medeiros ‘93 Mr. Raymond Medeiros ‘64 Ms. Cheryl A. Mello ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Vencelo D. Mello ‘71, ‘73 Mr. Andrew M. Mendes Mr. Edward J. Mendes ‘65 Mr. James Mendes ‘83 Ms. Elaine R. Meredith ‘81 Mr. Robert W. Michaud ‘68 Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski Mrs. Beth Paul Milham ‘92 Ms. Elizabeth A. Miller ‘55 Howard M. Miller Law Offices Ms. Julia M. Miller ‘89 Ms. Angela M. Millette ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Dudley L. Milliken Mr. Paul T. Miniacci ‘63 Mr. Michael E. Minior ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Mitchell Mr. Frederick M. Moehle ‘80 Mrs. Linda B. Monchik Ms. Cheryl A. Moniz Mr. Paul P. Moore ‘85 Mr. John M. Moreira ‘84 Ms. Samantha L. Morris ‘98 Ms. Joanne E. Morrison ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. David Morrow Mrs. Barbara Mucciardi ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Mullen Mr. Cornelius J. Murphy, Jr. ‘52 Ms. Kelly A. Murphy ‘94 Mr. Edward M. Musmon ‘81 Mr. Ronald V. Nadeau ‘72 Professor Mary B. Nanopoulos Mr. William S. Napolitano ‘78 National Council of Jewish Women, N.B. Section

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Mr. Mark A. Nault ‘95 Mr. Hugh J. Neenan ‘78 Mr. Kenneth L. Nichols ‘64 Mr. Paul A. Nolin ‘70 Ms. Linda Nutter ‘05 Mrs. Louann M. Nygaard ‘83 Attorney Marion P. O’Brien Mrs. Shirley Carreiro Ochipa ‘73 Mr. Michael J. O’Connor ‘68 Ms. Frances S. O’Donnell Mr. and Mrs. John O’Donnell Mr. Gary F. O’Grady ‘78 Mr. Paul N. Olenik ‘95 Mr. Bruce J. Oliveira ‘98 Ms. Lisa Onofrey Mr. Kevin R. O’Reilly ‘83 Ms. Ellen A. Osborn ‘74 Ms. Patricia Osborne Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey W. Osuch ‘83, ‘04 Mr. Joseph Pacheco ‘66 Mrs. Melissa A. Palmer ‘93 Palmyra General Med Practice, PLLC Mr. Frank Panarelli Dr. Richard Panofsky Mrs. June Paoline ‘70 Ms. Juli Parker Ms. Catherine A. Partridge ‘79 Mrs. Mary M. Pasquale ‘89 Dr. Joyce Y. Passos Mr. Samit A. Patel ‘02 Mr. Joseph Patyjewski ‘71 Mr. Julien F. Paul ‘47 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Paulding Mr. Joseph G. Paulo ‘93 Mr. Robert M. Payer ‘67 Mr. George A. Peck ‘80 Dean Robert E. Peck Mr. Gregory A. Pelagio ‘66 Reverend John J. Pennington, Jr. ‘65 Mr. Andrew B. Peppard Mr. Manuel F. Pereira Mr. Joel D. Perlin ‘75 Mrs. Lorraine T. Perry ‘55 Mr. Thomas R. Perry ‘68 Mrs. Rose A. Perry ‘76 Mrs. Diane C. Phillips ‘84 Ms. Linda Phillips ‘69 Ms. Charlene Picard Mr. Russell Pichette, Jr. ‘75 Ms. June M. Pina ‘72 Ms. Donna J. Pineau ‘83 Mrs. Kathleen M. Poirier ‘07 Polish Women’s Business & Professional Club Ms. Arlene Pombo ‘00 Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Pontbriand ‘89, ‘76

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Mr. William J. Porter, Jr. ‘73 Mr. and Mrs. John P. Powel Mr. John B. Powers, Jr. ‘95 Mr. Richard W. Purdy ‘03 Mr. Ronald K. Purdy ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. James E. Raftery Dr. Murali Rajagopalan Dr. Ismael Ramirez-Soto Mrs. Elise T. Ramos ‘81 Mr. Gordon Ramsbottom ‘78 Mr. Joseph D. Rando ‘85 Mrs. Anne J. Rantuccio ‘77 Ms. Pamela J. Ras ‘88 Ms. Jennifer L. Raxter ‘98 Mr. Jeffrey S. Reback ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Kinley T. Reddy Ms. Ann M. Reed ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Lance W. Reed Mr. Jose Rego Mr. Kevin R. Ribeiro ‘00 Ms. Susan Richey Ms. Andrea Riggillo-Masia Ms. Deborah C. Robbins Mr. Richard Robbins Ms. Martha Ann Robertshaw ‘79 Mr. Donn L. Robidoux ‘75 Mr. William J. Rocha ‘92 and Mrs. Maureen Flanagan Rocha ‘85 Mr. David J. Rodrigues ‘77 Mr. Edward J. Rogers ‘82 Mr. Craig E. Rousseau ‘93 Route 28 Auto Center Mr. Kevin M. Rowles ‘77 Ms. Armanda R. Rowlett Dr. Matthew H. and Mrs. Francine M. Roy ‘89 Mr. Robert J. Russell ‘69 Mrs. Cathy A. Russo ‘84 Mrs. Elaine Varelas Ryan ‘79 Ms. Judith A. Ryder Mr. Girard L. St. Amand ‘70 Mrs. Nicole St. Pierre ‘98 Mr. Howard W. Salden ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. James D. Salvo Mr. Robert M. Sanda ‘91 Mr. Craig L. Santos ‘95 Mr. David A. Sarro ‘03 Ms. Michelle Sauve ‘04 Mrs. Diane Scheffler ‘84 Ms. Lea A. Schneider ‘83 Mr. Gilbert N. Schofield ‘51 Mr. and Mrs. Derrick R. Schull Ms. Ida B. Schwalb Ms. Kathleen Scieszka ‘97 Ms. Lorelei A. Scionti ‘82 Professor Emeritus Joseph N. Scionti

Ms. Julie E. Scleparis ‘85 Scribner L. Fauver Trust Ms. Jennifer A. Sears ‘92 Mrs. Suzanne T. Semedo ‘82 Ms. Joanne M. Seymour Mr. Pankaj K. Shah Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Shapiro Mrs. Judith Ganson Shaw ‘60 Mr. Walter F. Shea ‘75 Mr. Kevin T. Sheedy ‘97 Ms. Christine A. Sheehan ‘02 Ms. Briana E. Sheldon Mr. James M. Shevlin ‘82 Ms. Susan Shubitowski ‘86 Mr. Henry J. Siegel ‘49 Mrs. Meredith M. Simas ‘88 Ms. Janine E. Simmons ‘75 Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Simons, Jr. Mr. Michael Sitarz ‘72 Nuttakorn Siwapornchai Mrs. Edith R. Skinner ‘83 Ms. Betty Slade Mr. David A. Sluter ‘75 Dr. Walter Smietana ‘64 Ms. Katherine V. Smith Mr. Robert D. Smith Mrs. Virginia M. Smith ‘84 Mrs. Louise E. Snyder ‘69 Mr. James J. Soares ‘66 Mr. and Mrs. Asher M. Soloman Mr. Donald M. Sorenson ‘72 Ms. Rebecca Sorkin Ms. Denise M. Soucy ‘86 Mr. George M. Sousa ‘05 Mr. Joseph L. Sousa ‘82 Mr. John S. Souza ‘50 Ms. Patricia A. Spellman ‘92 Ms. Cathleen N. Spiegel ‘75 Mr. Gregory Spiker ‘77 Mr. Michael Slapik ‘75 Mrs. Lois E. Spirlet ‘81 Mr. Kevin J. Spratt ‘89 Mr. Peter Stavropulos Steam Turbine Engineering and Maintenance, Inc. Mr. Charles A. Stefanini ‘91 Mr. Neil A. Steinmeyer ‘93 Mr. Gregory R. Stidsen ‘71 Ms. Irene C. Stokes Stokes Woodworking Company, Inc. Mr. John R. Stratford ‘54 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin J. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Sullivan Sunseekers, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Sutherland Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Sylvia ‘80

Mr. Paul E. Sylvia ‘74 Mr. Michael L. Szydlowski ‘64 Mr. Frederick L. Taber ‘70 Mr. Steven W. Taber ‘77 Ms. Denise M. Tailby ‘01 Mr. Durval M. Tavares ‘81 Mr. Donald F. Taylor ‘54 Mr. William J. Taylor ‘67 Mr. Antonio A. Teixeira ‘78 Ms. Donna M. Theodore ‘86 Mr. Gordon R. Thomas ‘70 Mr. Joseph G. Thomas, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Karen M. Thorson ‘85 Dr. Adrian R. Tio Ms. Elaine Tisdale Asselin Mrs. Debora J. Tobojka ‘79 Dr. Linus Travers The Honorable Philip B. Travis ‘63 Norris H. Tripp Company, Inc. Mr. Stephen S. Trond ‘55 Ms. Kathleen F. Trumbull ‘86 Mr. Michael F. Trznadel, Jr. ‘76 Ms. Theresa Sin Ting Tsoi ‘89 Ms. Lynn C. Turner ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Turpin Dr. Kenneth E. Udas ‘86 Ms. Melanie Ullman UMass Dartmouth Financial Aid Office Staff UMass President’s Office United Way of Rhode Island Mr. Robert A. Vanstone ‘56 Mr. Joseph A. Varao ‘82 Mr. Harvey D. Varnet ‘69 Mrs. Claudette B. Veary ‘69 Mr. Eduardo Velazquez ‘77 Mrs. Dawn C. Ventura ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. James M. Verdier Mr. Joseph D. Verri ‘92 Mr. Michael J. Vertente ‘87 Mr. Luis M. Viana ‘81 Mrs. Lisa M. Vickers ‘89 Mr. Chad Vieira Mr. and Mrs. Scott Vieira Mr. Gary W. Vincent ‘81 Ms. Karyn D. Vincent ‘85 Ms. Anna Lisa Marie Vust ‘07 Mrs. Leona B. Walder Mr. Samuel Walder ‘52 Ms. Diane J. Walder ‘73 Mr. Timothy P. Walsh ‘78 Mrs. Nancy A. Walsh-Sayles ‘98 Ms. Xiaodou Wang ‘97 Mr. Roger V. Ward ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. Steven F. Ward Wareham Nurse-Midwives, P.C. Mr. and Mrs. Danny Warren Ms. Susan Warren ‘76

within reach.

Watkins Scholarship Fund enables students to reach the goal line

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s a former running back for Ohio State University and the Chicago Bears, Robert “Bobby” Watkins, Jr. had a knack for finding the end zone. Today, Watkins helps UMass Dartmouth students reach for a different goal line through the Bobby and Rillis Watkins Scholarship Fund. Established in 2007 by Watkins with his wife Rillis, the scholarship fund helps students who participated in high school football receive an education at UMass Dartmouth. “I love football and I realize it provided me with the opportunity to get a great education. But not everyone can play at the most competitive levels, so I wanted to establish a scholarship that allows students who enjoyed the game as much as I did to get an education that will prepare them for the future, regardless of their on-field ability,” says Watkins. A New Bedford native, Watkins was one of the first AfricanAmericans to play football for both Ohio State and the Chicago Bears. When his playing days ended, Watkins used his education to become the Vice President of Marketing and Sales for John E. Seagram and Sons. He lived in New York City and Chicago for most of his career, but decided to move back to the New Bedford area when he retired in 2000. Since then, Watkins has been involved with UMass Dartmouth through various volunteer opportunities. He was chairman of the university’s Blue Ribbon Commission on Athletics and is now a member of the UMass Dartmouth Foundation Board of Directors. Although Watkins’ on-field achievements are notable (including a Rose Bowl win for the 1954 unbeaten Ohio State team), his off-field activities are equally impressive. He is recognized as a scholar in the works of Scottish poet Robert Burns and has spoken at international meetings on the poet. Watkins takes considerable pride in his background, and is a student of

Ms. Anne S. Watson Mr. Kenneth P. Watts ‘97 Mrs. Linda R. Webber Ms. Cecelia M. Weeks ‘96 Mrs. Jean A. Weiller ‘56 Mr. and Mrs. David E. Weite Ms. Lorna A. Welding ‘79 Mr. Stephen J. Wesley ‘85 Mr. Brian G. West ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Westfall Mr. David F. Westgate Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Whelan Mr. John S. Whitaker ‘82 Ms. Patricia J. Whitaker ‘73 Mr. John W. Whitehead ‘64 Mrs. Judith G. White

Mr. Robert M. Whitehead ‘66 Mr. John F. Whiteside ‘52 Mr. Maurice Wiernicki ‘81 Mr. David Wilbur Mr. Donald F. Wilbur ‘54 Ms. Mary R. Wilczek ‘91 Mrs. Jean E. Williams ‘90 Mrs. Linda B. Williams Mr. Alton R. Wilson ‘65 Mr. Francis P. Wilson ‘62 Mrs. Theresa A. Winsor ‘73 Ms. Celine T. Woiszwillo ‘07 Mr. Daniel J. Wood ‘92 Mr. Edward B. Wood ‘50 Mr. Malcolm D. Woodward III ‘78 Mr. Walter J. Wordell ‘60

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Robert “Bobby” Watkins Jr. (left) with Chancellor Professor James Griffith

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American history with a special emphasis on the Civil War. Throughout the years, Watkins has spoken fondly of the value of a UMass Dartmouth education, and the need to provide new generations of students with the same educational opportunities. “As costs continue to escalate, students will really have a hard time paying for education. Through scholarships, students can obtain a golden opportunity to change their future and to be as good as they possibly can. “If you have the resources and desire to help students reach goals they would otherwise be unable to reach, that is really special. Education is truly the great equalizer and UMass Dartmouth excels at offering students tremendous opportunities.”

WTH Engineering, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. David Xavier Margaret D. Xifaras, Esq. Mr. Jun Xu ‘96 Mr. Robert B. Yates ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Anton Yereniuk Ms. Susan L. Young YWCA Mr. Philip J. Zasadny ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Zeman Mr. Jinyuan Zhou ‘91 Ms. Susan Senesac Zipoli ‘92 Dr. Rosemary A. Zurawel ‘73 Mr. Dirk A. Zwart ‘77

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Contributor 20 Acre Purchase Corporation Action for Boston Community Development, Inc. Acushnet Fence Mr. and Mrs. David Adam Mr. Gary N. Adams ‘84 Ms. Joan R. Adaskin Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Aducci ‘81 Ms. Michele E. Agostinho ‘99 Mrs. Vidalia M. Aguiar ‘88 Professor Marie L. Ahearn Ms. Cristina Mello Ajemian ‘78 Mr. Christopher J. Alderman ‘92

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Mr. and Mrs. Scott Alegria Ms. Clairna J. Alexandre Jean Mrs. Parveen S. Ali Mr. Eugene F. Allen ‘87 Attorney and Mrs. Leo D. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Scott H. Allen Ms. Maria F. Alves ‘84 Mr. Stephen J. Alves ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. Craig Amaral Mrs. Dori E. Amico Mr. Richard H. Amundson ‘03 Ms. Gail L. Anderson ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Isaiah O. Anifowose Mr. John V. Anselmo ‘69 Mrs. Donna L. Antaya Mr. Dimitrios Antonopoulos ‘73 Mrs. Andrea S. Arquette ‘01 Mr. John R. Arrington ‘73 Ms. Doreen M. Arruda Ms. Loretta G. Arsenault ‘82 Mr. Gary Ashworth ‘81 Mrs. Jennifer L. Ashworth ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Rick Askenase Aucella Associates Mr. Phillip E. Aucella ‘74 Mrs. Joan N. Audley ‘78 Mrs. Jeanne L. Avila ‘87 Mrs. Maureen F. Avila ‘59 Mrs. M. Constance Azadnia ‘91 Mrs. Claudette A. Azar ‘89 Mrs. Patricia R. Bailey-Lindsey ‘74 Mr. James A. Baird ‘52 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Baker Mrs. Nancy J. Baldwin Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Baltayan Ms. Maria R. Baptista ‘97 Mr. Kenneth J. Barber ‘78 Mr. Michael J. Barber ‘62 Mr. Daniel Barboza ‘75 Mr. Wayne Barker ‘68 Mr. James H. Barnett Ms. Joanne Barone Ms. Susan J. Barrett ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Barron Mr. and Mrs. David Barry Mr. John K. Bassett ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Peter K. Bates Ms. Kerry L. Bauer ‘04 Ms. Cindy Baxter Mr. Thomas A. Beal ‘86 Mr. Nathaniel M. Beale ‘77 Mr. Denis R. Beaudoin ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Beaudoin Mr. Thomas M. Bell ‘98 Ms. Beverly A. Belli ‘85 Mr. Carlos O. Benavides Mr. James F. Beneduci ‘75 Mr. Joseph V. Benevides, Jr. ‘78

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Ms. Patricia Ann Benner ‘00 Ms. Candice J. Bennett ‘03 Mr. Everett H. Bennett ‘56 Mrs. Elizabeth Benoit ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Benoit Mr. and Mrs. Stephen B. Benoit Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery Berenson Mr. Richard H. Bergman ‘71 Ms. Damaris Berner ‘81 Mr. Henry L. Bernier ‘71 Ms. Kristen M. Berry ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Berube Ms. Myra R. Besen ‘75 Bethlehem Mini Storage, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Betley Mr. Bradford R. Bibeau ‘77 Ms. Sandra Bilodeau ‘04 Mr. Kevin M. Black ‘85 Miss Cheryl A. Blackburn ‘05 Mr. Andrew D. Blake ‘85 Mr. Brian N. Blanchette ‘97 Mr. Joseph R. Blanchette ‘57 Ms. Ruth Blount Ms. Anita Boivin ‘97 Mr. Hans Bok ‘96 Mr. Shawn Bolarinho ‘06 Ms. Jeanne M. Bonneau ‘63 Mr. David R. Borges ‘92 Mr. Ronald James Borges ‘75 Mr. Paul A. Borkman ‘60 Mr. Jeffrey P. Bosworth ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Boucher Ms. Alexandria E. Boudreau ‘79 Mr. Lionel M. Bourassa ‘63 Ms. Mary L. Bowen ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Willard Bowen Ms. Susan Boyajian ‘97 Ms. Judith A. Boyce ‘81 Mr. John Bradford ‘85 Ms. Lucia Braga Mr. John H. Braun ‘74 Ms. Kathleen R. Bredimus ‘70 Ms. Jane Bregoli ‘90 Mr. Michael Brennan ‘84 Mr. Ronald A. Bridge ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Briere Mr. Louis A. Briganti Mr. Steven T. Briggs Ms. Lillian C. Brisebois ‘70 Ms. Lauren A. Brissette ‘84 Mrs. Jane V. Brito ‘87 Mr. John L. Broadford ‘96 Ms. Janet Brodeur Ms. Jane Brookins ‘82 Ms. Janet A. Broughton Attorney Clement Brown ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Earl E. Brown, Jr. Mrs. Lori B. Brown ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. David A. Brownell

Mr. Robert N. Brunelle ‘96 Mr. Clark E. Bryan ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bryan Ms. Ann M. Buccelli Ms. Susan M. Buchan ‘72 Ms. Patricia P. Buckley ‘85 Building Medics, Inc. Ms. Susan Bumpus ‘84 Mr. Jeffrey H. Bunce ‘76 Mr. Jeffrey P. Burdzel ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Burrows Mr. and Mrs. David C. Bush Ms. Laura J. Bush ‘89 Captain Thomas L. Bushy ‘99 Mrs. Nancy J. Byron ‘71 Mr. Leonard Cabeceiras ‘81 Mr. John E. Cadorette ‘86 Mr. Matthew G. Cadorette ‘91 Mr. Christopher J. Cahill ‘94 Ms. Donna M. Calderbank ‘80 Calligraphy For Your Fancy Ms. Michelle Camara ‘96 Mr. Jason S. Campbell ‘90 Mr. Richard Carbonaro ‘51 Mr. Daniel R. Cardoza ‘99 Mr. Michael P. Carfagna ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Carlozzi Mr. John R. Carr ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Carr Mrs. Tammy E. Carreiro ‘88 Mr. Kenneth R. Carrier ‘67 Mr. Thomas J. Carroll ‘60 Mr. Thomas Cartin ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Casale Mr. Carlos A. Casanova ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Casey Ms. Veronica A. Casey ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. George Cavanaugh Mr. and Mrs. John T. Cederholm CEI Builders, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Peter F. Cenedella Ms. Patricia A. Chace Mr. Raymond A. Chace, Jr. ‘79 Mr. Andrew J. Chagnon ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Mark S. Chalas Professor Vijama R. Chalivendra Mr. William D. Chamberlain ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Chang Mr. Herbert C. Chao ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Charette Ms. Judith Charron Mr. John A. Chatfield ‘82 Ms. Dinh Le Mary Chau ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. David Chausse Mr. Arthur J. Chaves ‘78 Mrs. Nancy J. Childs ‘73 Mrs. Lisa A. Chisholm ‘91 Mr. William A. Chouinard ‘66 Ms. Janet L. Chrisos ‘80

Mrs. Carolyn J. Christian ‘66 Mrs. Angela M. Chumack Mrs. Gloria A. Ciaffone ‘76 Mr. Richard J. Cichon ‘94 Mr. David W. Ciszkowski ‘97 Ms. Maureen Clark Dr. Julie A. Cleare Mrs. Cheryl A. Cleary Ms. Sandra J. Coelho ‘82 Mr. George A. Collard ‘91 Mr. G. Normand Collet ‘60 Ms. Paula G. Collins ‘85 Mr. Gregg M. Comeau ‘94 Ms. Judy L. Concepcion ‘75 Mr. Darin D. Conforti ‘90 Mrs. Monica B. Connolly ‘87 Ms. Donna Lee Connors Mrs. Colleen C. Considine ‘75 Consultation and Counseling of Clinton County Ms. Dyanne F. Cooney ‘95 Mr. Andrew Corcoran Ms. Goodie M.J. Corriveau ‘77 Ms. Cynthia M. Costa ‘83 Ms. Inge Costa ‘07 Mr. John M. Costa ‘95 Mr. Michael E. Costa ‘80 Mr. Robert M. Costa ‘01 Mr. Thomas F. Costa ‘85 Mr. William J. Cote ‘73 Mr. Nuno M. Couto ‘97 Mrs. Angela S. Couture ‘93 Mrs. Gloria T. Craven ‘77 Mr. William C. Cray ‘77 Mr. Joseph R. Crimmins, Jr. ‘81 Mr. Jonathan M. Croll ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Cronin Mr. and Mrs. Marshall W. Cross Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Cross, Jr. Mrs. Louise D. Croteau ‘91 Ms. Giselle C. Crowell ‘87 Mr. Joseph D. Crowell ‘87 Mr. Gary W. Crowley ‘77 Mr. Ronald E. Crowley ‘88 Ms. Sandra C. Cunha ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cunningham, Jr. Ms. Marcia Cunningham Ms. Mary E. Curtis ‘88 Mr. Donald R. Czekanski ‘75 Dakota Laboratories, Inc. Mr. Craig H. D’amario ‘87 Mr. Joseph M. Dana ‘95 Ms. Judy J. Dandison ‘98 Mrs. Melissa M. Danforth ‘93 Mr. Andrew G. Dangelas ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Daponte Ms. Susan E. Darbyshire ‘81 Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Dars ‘04

Mr. Walter E. Davis ‘70 Ms. Sharon A. Day ‘70 Mr. Mark R. Deardon ‘88 Mr. Joseph J. Delude ‘74 Mr. Thomas Delvecchio ‘91 Ms. Mary E. DeMello ‘03 Mr. Robert G. DeMello ‘65 Mr. Joseph Demoura ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Denette Dr. Daniel B. DeOliveira ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas DePalo Ms. Lorraine H. DePonte ‘89 Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Derbyshire Mrs. Marianne B. DeSouza ‘84 Ms. Lisa DeTora Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dexter Ms. Joan Di Pippo ‘01 Ms. Jane E. DiBiasio ‘00 Mr. Anthony Dichiara ‘03 Ms. Linda J. Dickerson ‘70 Mr. Robert M. Dillon Mr. William T. Dion ‘96 Ms. JoAnn M. Diverdi-Miller ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Divine Mr. and Mrs. Sean Dixon Ms. Beverly Do Carmo ‘76 Ms. Dagmar Dockery ‘04 Ms. Eileen T. D’Oliveira ‘81 Mr. Lee S. Donohue ‘89 Mr. and Mrs. James T. Donovan Ms. Mary E. Dore ‘85 Mrs. Karen M. Dorgan ‘75 Ms. Maureen A. Dorsey ‘83 Ms. Joann M. Downs ‘86 Mrs. Carol Doyle ‘80 Ms. Serena M. Doyle ‘86 Mr. Peter A. Draymore ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Rene H. Drouin, Jr. ‘70, ‘80 Ms. Paula M. Duarte ‘90 Mrs. Bernice R. Dubitsky ‘70 Mr. Timothy Duffy Ms. Michelle J. Dufour ‘72 Mr. Charles W. Dunham, Jr. ‘85 Mr. Wesley Dunham Ms. Denise I. Dunn ‘74 Ms. Jennifer J. Dunn ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Duval ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan E. Elliott Mr. Charles M. Ely ‘78 Mr. George A. Emmanuel ‘04 Ms. Susan C. English ‘91 Mr. Bill Erickson ‘80 Mr. David L. Erickson ‘86 Ms. Joanne B. Esancy ‘80 Mrs. Jane S. Eslinger ‘72 Chancellor Professor Lee E. Estes ‘65 Mr. Antonio F. Esteves ‘80 Mr. William R. Etchells ‘55

Ms. Elizabeth Fagan Ms. Joan M. Fallon ‘73 Dr. Qinguo Fan Mrs. Maureen J. Fanning ‘71 Mr. Stephen J. Fanning ‘80 Mrs. Joyce C. Faria ‘78 Ms. Linda A. Farrell ‘70 Mr. Ian T. Farrington ‘02 Mr. Geoffrey Faucher ‘04 Mr. William C. Faye ‘80 Mr. Dave Fernandes ‘91 Mr. and Mrs. Gregg Fernandes Mr. Joseph D. Fernandes ‘05 Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Fernandes Mr. and Mrs. John Ferreira Mr. Michael J. Ferreira ‘77 Mr. Silvino C. Ferreira ‘77 Ms. Phyllis J. Figueiredo ‘87 Mrs. Deborah B. Findley ‘84 Mr. Stephen J. Fish ‘05 Mr. Ernest J. Fisher Mr. Richard W. Fisher Ms. Paula Fitzpatrick Mr. Kirk J. Fitzsimmons ‘93 Mr. David A. Flanagan ‘81 Mr. Kenneth S. Flood ‘87 Mr. Edmund T. Folger ‘75 Mr. David L. Fontaine ‘77 Ms. Maria C. Fontes Mr. James P. Forance ‘84 Mrs. Faith B. Ford ‘42 Ms. Shirley A. Fortes

U M a s s

within reach.

Mr. and Mrs. David W. Fowle ‘73 Mr. Edward F. Fowler, Jr. ‘77 Mr. Daryl S. Fredette Mr. Paul H. Fredette ‘71 Mr. Eric L. Freitas ‘86 Mr. Rui E. Frias ‘98 Dr. and Mrs. Peter Friedman Mr. Walter A. Frost, Jr. ‘72 Mrs. Nina J. Fulton-Tolken ‘75 Mrs. Eileen A. Furlong ‘78 Ms. Jodi M. Furlong ‘92 Mr. John E. Furtado ‘68 Ms. Jane F. Gagne ‘81 Mrs. Susan R. Galeros ‘75 Mr. Daniel C. Gallagher ‘85 Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Gallagher Mr. Aaron Gamboa ‘92 Mr. David A. Ganley ‘82 Mr. Robert M. Gaouette ‘00 Ms. Alice Garczynski Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Garczynski Mrs. Rita M. Gardner ‘83 Ms. Debra Gatchell Ms. Valerie Gately ‘82 Ms. Donna Gautreau Mr. Marcel W. Gautreau ‘70 Mr. David W. Gavigan ‘61 Mrs. Lisa A. Gay ‘84 Professor Michael J. Geiger Mr. Robert D. Gemme ‘84 Mr. Paul Geoghegan ‘78 Ms. Karen A. Geraci ‘83

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F o u n d a t i o n

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Giaimo, Jr. Mr. Robert O. Gibb, Jr. ‘80 Mr. Christopher J. Gibson ‘93 Mrs. Pamela A. Gilzinger Mr. and Mrs. Onofrio Gironda Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Girouard Mr. Russell Giroux ‘05 Ms. Judith A. Giusti ‘99 Mrs. Patricia A. Gomes ‘78 Mr. David J. Goncalves ‘94 Mrs. Lori Gonsalves Mr. William T. Goodwin ‘75 Professor Emeritus Fryderyk E. Gorczyca ‘58 Mrs. Margaret T. Goslin ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. George A. Gould III Mr. Dennis M. Grant ‘75 Dr. and Mrs. Alan R. Greaves Mrs. Judith F. Green ‘80 Ms. Lois Greenbaumb Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Greenburg Mr. Henry D. Greenlaw ‘39 Ms. Suzanne Grenier Mr. Roy F. Grieder, Jr. ‘73 Mrs. Cheryl A. Guerra ‘80 Mrs. Laura Ferro Gula ‘71 Mrs. Jill A. Guthrie ‘90 Ms. Stephanie Hackett Ms. Nan Haffenreffer ‘03 Mr. and Mrs. Howard Haggas Mrs. Anne M. Hall ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. David Hall Ms. Eileen M. Hall ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hall Mr. John F. Halloran ‘79 Mrs. Diane B. Halstead ‘71 Mrs. Carolyn W. Hamel Mrs. Paula A. Hamel ‘87 Mr. Bradford George Hammel ‘78 Ms. Barbara B. Hanley Mr. and Mrs. Neal Hanlon Mr. J. Michael Hannon ‘62 Mr. Richard D. Hansen Mr. Ted W. Hardman ‘72 Mr. Michael F. Harrington ‘77 Ms. Marie E.B. Hartley ‘05 Mr. Barry E. Haskell ‘71 Ms. Judith A. Haskell ‘90 Ms. Judith Havens Ms. Bernadette R. Hawes ‘79 Mr. Crispin D. Hesford ‘74 Mrs. Therese Jo Hickey ‘94 Mr. Kevin Hines ‘82 Ms. Lisa G. Hird ‘98 Ms. Claire E. Hodsdon Mr. Michael J. Hogan ‘89 Mr. Michael E. Hogarty ‘88 Mrs. Susan M. Holland ‘92 Mr. Ernest P. Holt, Jr. ‘56

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Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hopkins Mr. Walter R. Horak ‘95 Mr. Elliott Horowitz ‘48 Mr. and Mrs. James Houghton Mr. Robert T. Houghton, Jr. ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Dennis M. Howard Mr. Lee Howarth and Ms. MaryAnne Del Conte Mr. George C. Howayeck, Sr. ‘55 Mr. Ronald W. Hoy ‘64 Professor Maureen A. Hull Ms. Jennifer J. Hurley ‘99 Mrs. Mary M. Hurst ‘98 Dr. Donna Huse Mrs. Gina M. Hyde ‘82 R. Ibara Trust Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. Ide Italtrade Partners of New England, LLC Mrs. Carole Jackson Dr. Edward Jackson Mr. Russell R. Jackson ‘68 Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan W. Jaffe Mr. Gregory P. Jarosik ‘79 Ms. Janet M. Jenkins Mr. Mark E. Jenkins ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Johnson ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Johnson Mr. and Mrs. David J. Joly Ms. Maryellen Jones ‘83 Dr. Sandra Ann Gracia Jones ‘74 Mrs. Linda A. Kaldeck ‘69 Mr. George C. Kalivas ‘06 Ms. Elizabeth A. Karam ‘77 Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Katseroubas Mrs. Nancy C. Keane ‘65 Ms. Jennifer M. Keenan ‘94 Attorney David Keighley ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Kelley Ms. Maureen T. Kelliher Mr. Edward M. Kelly ‘65 Mr. James V. Kelly ‘84 Mrs. Lori Marie Kelly ‘93 Mr. John C. Keppel ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Kilmer Mr. and Mrs. John J. Kinsella, Jr. Mr. Jay C. Kivowitz ‘91 Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kizik Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Knightly Dr. Richard W. Kocon ‘63 Mr. Ronald M. Koontz ‘93 Mr. Paul J. Kostek ‘79 Mr. David R. Krall ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. Russell R. Kroszner ‘77 Mr. Robert A. Kugler Mr. Scott E. Kulpa ‘85 Mrs. Sylvia L. Kulpa ‘90 Ms. Riva Kuznets-Ahern

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Mr. Joseph H. Kynoch Mrs. Janice E. Labrosse ‘88 Mr. John J. Lacasse ‘84 Mr. George J. LaFontaine ‘90 Mr. Neil M. LaFrance ‘76 Mrs. Pauline L. Lally ‘80 Mr. John T. Lambert ‘04 Mr. Henry C. Lamontagne ‘68 Mrs. Mary Ann Lamontagne ‘01 Dr. Nancy Lamontagne ‘65 Mr. Scott L. Lamontagne ‘84 Mr. Walter E. Landry ‘80 Lane Design, Inc. Mr. William H. Lane ‘78 Langer Associates, Inc. Mr. John W. Langer ‘72 Ms. Mary K. Langevin ‘98 Mr. and Ms. Robert O. Laprise ‘71, ‘68 Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Laramee Mr. Jeffrey P. Larivee ‘77 Ms. Lisa C. Larsen Ms. Kim M. Lauder ‘82 Mr. Robert M. Lavery ‘70 Mr. Bruce S. Lavoie ‘98 Ms. Sara-Jane Lawrence ‘75 Mrs. Celeste E. Le Boeuf ‘67 Mr. Michael G. Leandro ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Paul LeBlanc Ms. Elaine Leboeuf Mr. Henry J. Lebreux, Jr. ‘81 Ms. Amy L. Leduc ‘78 Ms. Carol B. Leduc ‘89 Ms. Carole A. Lees ‘98

Mr. Richard J. Legan ‘02 Mr. Charles P. Legassie Ms. Mary L. Leger ‘06 Mr. Patrick H. LePage ‘99 Mr. Robert H. LeRoyer ‘86 Ms. Monica A. Lesniak ‘86 Mr. Paul E. Letourneau ‘83 Ms. Kathleen Levesque Mr. Paul R. Levesque ‘00 Mr. Anthony J. Lewandowski ‘85 Mrs. Jane McCaulley Limonciello ‘86 Ms. Stephanie A. Lipka ‘02 Mr. Stephen J. Liuzzi ‘84 Stephen J. Liuzzi Construction Corporation Mr. Alan W. Loomis ‘76 Mr. Brian F. Louro ‘84 Mr. Christopher Ludwig ‘84 Ms. Marilyn M. Lynds ‘78 Ms. Suzanne J. Lyons ‘98 Ms. Theresa M. Lyons Ms. Polly-Ann MacDonald Mrs. Sidney MacDonald ‘81 Ms. Jessica K. Macedo ‘03 Mr. Rodney F. Mach ‘79 Mr. Alan Machado ‘70 Mr. Robert D. Machado ‘68 Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. MacInnis, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. MacLellan Ms. Ivy Smith MacMahon ‘80 Ms. Susan Maddron Mr. John A. Magnan ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Lance Magnell Dr. and Mrs. Dwight R. Magovern

Ms. Deborah A. Maguire ‘88 Mr. Peter L. Maguire ‘70 Mr. Michael Mahoney Ms. Jacqueline A. Maillet ‘05 Ms. Deborah Majewski Mrs. Janice E. Makris ‘85 Mr. Paul D. Malcolm ‘57 Ms. Margaret M. Malkoski ‘82 Mr. Howard L. Mallowes IV ‘02 Mr. Matthew D. Maloney ‘98 Mr. Michael S. Manchester ‘67 Mrs. Debra A. Mancini ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence P. Manduke Mann Farms, Inc. Mr. Peter Marafino ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Gary E. Marcelynas Mr. Scott Marchessault ‘92 Ms. Kathleen M. Marcille ‘90 Mr. Donald G. Marcotte ‘96 Ms. Risha H. Margolis ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Marotta Ms. Ana E. Marques ‘93 Mr. Daniel A. Marques ‘92 Mr. William H. Marsden ‘54 Mrs. Janice E. Marshall ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Steven R. Marshall Ms. Gale Martell Mr. Paul A. Martin ‘84 Ms. Mary Martins ‘79 Chancellor Professor Giulio Massano Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Masse Mr. Maurice R. Masse ‘71 Ms. Suzanne E. Masten ‘97 Ms. Lisa D. Masterson ‘06 Ms. Susan S. Mattie ‘80 Mr. Joseph G. Mayall ‘03 Mr. Stephen D. McBride ‘04 Mrs. Ann B. McCarthy ‘02 Mr. Brian E. McCarthy ‘80 Mr. James P. McCarthy Mr. Michael G. McCarthy, Jr. ‘99 Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. McClallen Mr. Donald F. McCormack ‘85 Mr. Frederick E. McCullough ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. McDonald Mr. Harold W. McGill ‘69 Mrs. Arlene Kostek McGonagle ‘98 Mr. Robert J. McGrath ‘89 Mrs. Kathryn A. McGreevy ‘79 Mr. John S. McKenzie ‘75 Mr. John F. McLaughlin ‘72 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. McMahon, Sr. Mrs. Erin McManus ‘93 Ms. Carolyn A. McSweeney ‘89 Mr. Bruce F. Meacham ‘71 Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Medeiros ‘59, ‘79 Mr. Dennis Medeiros

Mr. John Medeiros ‘70 Mrs. Kiley Medeiros ‘99 Mr. Manuel M. Medeiros ‘72 Mr. Paul E. Medeiros ‘70 Mr. Ricardo D. Medeiros ‘91 Mr. Robert D. Medeiros Mr. Olio Di Melli Ms. Barbara A. Mello Mr. David Mello ‘70 Mrs. Deborah A. Mello ‘79 Mr. Philip W. Mello ‘75 Mr. William A. Mello ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. John S. Melo Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Menapace Mr. Richard C. Menard ‘69 Mr. Richard R. Menard ‘92 Ms. Kathleen M. Mendes Ms. Ruth E. Mendonca Mr. Anthony Mercadante ‘81 Mr. Alan B. Mercer, Sr. ‘48 Mr. Steven Merrill ‘80 Mrs. Anne Marie Messier ‘84 Mr. Neal D. Meyers ‘89 Mr. Gary A. Michael ‘79 Mrs. Heidi A. Michaelis ‘86 Mr. Peter A. Michno ‘85 Mr. James C. Miczek ‘76 Ms. Regina Gardner Milan ‘83 Ms. Marcia Miller Mr. Jon E. Mills ‘90 Ms. Bernadette Miner Mrs. Ann Miranda ‘86 Mrs. Erin J. Mitchell ‘99 Colonel Donald F. Mofford ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. James M. Moores Mrs. Karla T. Moran ‘68 Mrs. Sandra T. Moreira ‘71 Ms. Alison G. Moriarty ‘03 Mrs. Christine Oliveira Morrison ‘01 Mr. Daniel J. Morrison ‘57 Ms. Joann T. Motha ‘89 Mrs. M. Teresa Mozaz ‘94 MPC Properties, LLC Mr. Joseph P. Mroczka ‘81 Ms. Diane Mulcahy ‘77 Ms. Ann M. Mullen ‘80 Ms. Kathleen Muller Mr. James M. Mumma III ‘97 Mr. Earle R. Munroe ‘60 Mrs. Anne L. Murphy ‘82 Dr. Daniel J. Murphy ‘60 Ms. Grace M. Murphy ‘02 Ms. Jean S. Murray ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Murray Mr. Marcel M. Nadeau ‘63 Ms. Patricia Neary Hale ‘79 Mr. and Mrs. John H. Neergaard, Jr. Mrs. Diane M. Newell ‘87 Mr. James A. Newkirk ‘76

Newport Gas Light Company Mrs. Doreen A. Newsham ‘78 Mrs. Linda Neyhart ‘72 Mr. Trai V. Nguyen ‘98 Mrs. Cynthia S. Niederhelman ‘61 Mrs. Sharon Nikosey ‘83 Mrs. Kerri M. Nixon ‘98 Ms. Gina M. Nolan Mr. and Mrs. Robert Nolan Mr. Thomas E. Noonan ‘84 Mr. Robert Nosal ‘80 Mrs. Debra M. Noschese ‘81 Reverend James R. Nunes ‘83 Mr. Jack O’Brien Ms. Lynne M. O’Brien ‘80 Ms. Shea-Lynn M. Ocampo ‘06 Mr. Alan O’Connell Mrs. Nancy A. O’Connell ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Odell Mr. James O’Doherty ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. John J. O’Donoghue Mr. Adam O’Dwyer ‘89 Ms. Ruth Ann E. Oftring ‘80 Mr. Daniel A. Ojala ‘93 Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. O’Keefe Ms. Carol Ann Oliveira ‘84 Mr. David M. Oliveira Mr. and Mrs. Lael Oliveira Ms. Rosa B.S.S. Olivier ‘77 Ms. Debora J. O’Reilly ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Miguel Ortega Ms. Margaret M. O’Toole ‘81 Mr. Paul H. Ouellette ‘87 Ms. Carolyn Marie Ouimet ‘04 Mr. Daniel Pacheco ‘64 Mr. John H. Pacheco ‘63 Ms. Kathleen Paiva ‘82 Mr. Clifford W. Palm ‘41 Mr. Randall Palmer Mr. Arthur P. Paradice ‘75 Mr. Christopher A. Pare ‘97 Ms. Amy B. Parelman Ms. Michelle A. Parent ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Parker Mr. Robert V. Partington ‘50 Mr. George M. Pavao Mr. Peter L. Pederzani ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Larry Pellegrini Mr. Brian C. Pelletier ‘64 Ms. Carolyn M. Peloquin ‘92 Ms. Patricia A. Pelton Mr. and Mrs. Tom Pelton Mr. Thomas J. Pendergast III ‘95 Ms. Joan L. Pepin ‘73 Mr. John P. Pereira, Jr. ‘64 Mr. Barry W. Perkins ‘72 Mrs. Judith A. Perry ‘82 Ms. Joyce Perry ‘71 Mrs. Geraldine A. Perry-Lopes ‘69

U M a s s

within reach.

Mr. James B. Persons Mrs. Lauralyn Persson ‘74 Mr. Norman W. Peterson ‘88 Mr. Steven Petti Steven R. Petti, Inc. Mr. Robert Piazza ‘77 Ms. Marguerite C. Picard ‘79 Mr. Robert M. Pielech ‘71 Mr. David Kendall Pierce ‘95 Mr. Donald I. Pierce, Jr. ‘53 Ms. Donna M. Pierce ‘86 Mr. Jonathan J. Pike ‘91 Ms. Heidi L. Piknick ‘94 Mr. David J. Pimental ‘63 Mr. Mark A. Pina Ms. Kelly A. Pitts ‘88 Walter M. Platt, Jr. Living Trust Ms. Patricia Pleshaw Mr. John M. Plourde ‘64 Mr. Vincent D. Plourde ‘80 Plumbers Local No. 12 Education Fund Mr. Randall B. Pollard ‘53 Mr. Paul M. Potvin ‘04 Mr. Richard V. Poyant ‘80 Mrs. Jaime T. Princiotta ‘87 Promptus Communications, Inc. Mr. John M. Putnam Mr. David E. Puza ‘75 Mrs. Edith V. Pye-Nieratka Ms. Karen A. Quintin ‘80 Ms. Catherine Raeke Mr. James P. Ragan ‘83 Ms. Amy A. Raitto ‘03 Mrs. Catherine A. Raker ‘89 Ms. Linda J. Ramrath Mr. Luis M. Raposo ‘83 Ms. Susan Rapoza ‘88 Mr. Marc R. Ratte ‘76 Ms. Karen A. Raymond ‘80 Mr. and Mrs. Ricky A. Raymond Mr. Russell J. Raymond ‘85 Mr. David Raymundo Renee Raymondo Insurance Agency, Inc. Mr. Paul D. Reardon ‘81 Mr. John R. Reed ‘80 Ms. Doris J. Reekie Mr. Ronald J. Rego ‘75 Ms. Ann Upjohn Reimels ‘83 Ms. Elizabeth M. Reis ‘03 Mrs. Lynn Ann Resendes ‘96 Mrs. Judi Rewinski Mr. Arthur Richard Ms. Carol A. Richards ‘79 Mr. Raymond C. Richardson, Jr. ‘57 Dr. Harold F. Riley ‘37 Mrs. Yvonne L. Riley ‘92 Ms. Brenda Lee Ripley ‘84

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F o u n d a t i o n

Ms. Jennifer C. Robbins ‘00 Ms. Charlene M. Robillard ‘78 Mr. John G. Rocha ‘52 Mr. and Mrs. Charles Roche Mr. William Roche ‘75 Mrs. Ida M. Roderick ‘56 Mrs. Marilyn J. Roderick ‘56 Mr. Michael J. Roderick ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Aldino V. Rodrigues Mrs. Brenda M. Rodrigues ‘87 Mr. and Mrs. Mark Rodrigues Mr. Mark A. Rodrigues ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Pedro M. Rodriguez Mrs. Donna M. Rogers ‘81 Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Rogers Mr. Richard F. Rogers ‘50 Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth S. Rollins Mrs. Ayako Miyata Rooney ‘70 Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose Mr. William B. Ross ‘63 Ms. Cathleen M. Roughan ‘81 Ms. Carole C. Roy ‘03 Mr. Donat B. Roy ‘66 Mr. Leo F. Roy Mr. and Mrs. William Rudolph Mrs. Diane Rusk Mr. William M. Russell ‘85 Mr. Robert J. Ryan ‘72 Mr. Howard L. Sacks ‘81 Ms. Jayne T. St. Pierre ‘81 Mr. David A. St. Yves ‘78 Ms. Denise M. St. Yves ‘74 Mr. William A. Samaras ‘76 Mrs. Maria Carminda Santos ‘87 Mr. Jeffrey J. Sardinha ‘90 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sauer Christopher T. Saunders Campaign Committee Ms. Paula A. Saunders ‘74 Mr. Robert D. Saunders Ms. Megan E. Scanlan ‘06 Mr. and Mrs. Rainier G. Scheer Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schmid III Mrs. Carolyn A. Schreeder ‘86 Mr. Frank J. Schultz ‘69 Mrs. Sandra M. Schutt ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Scully Ms. Laura E. Seabury ‘94 Mr. and Mrs. Herb R. Segien Mr. Waldemar L. Sender ‘91 Mrs. Cynthia D. Sequino ‘72 Mrs. Elise M. Servant ‘73 Mrs. Kathleen Shannon ‘83 Mr. Robert Sharples ‘75 Mr. Wayne S. Shaw ‘88 Mrs. Jennifer A. Shea-Smyth ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. James F. Sheehan Mr. and Mrs. Leo Shellmer Mr. Gary R. Shepherd ‘78

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Mr. Allen C. Sherman ‘76 Mr. and Mrs. Kevin A. Shine Mr. Richard H. Showalter, Jr. ‘73 Mr. William A. Sicard ‘90 Mr. James Silva ‘79 Mr. Robert J. Silva ‘67 Mr. Kevin Silveira ‘95 Mr. Thomas Silveria ‘96 Mr. and Mrs. Mark Silverman Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Silvia Mr. Robert S. Silvia ‘86 Mr. Edward J. Simmons, Sr. ‘89 Mr. Leo N. Sirois ‘72 Ms. Kathleen Sitarz ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Joel Sklar Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Smiley Mr. Robert A. Smith ‘51 Mrs. Sylvia M. Smith ‘89 Ms. Theresa Smith Mr. Richard J. Snow ‘80 Mrs. Claudia A. Soares ‘73 Mr. Edward J. Sojka ‘79 Mr. Peter H. Sokol ‘83 Mr. Donald R. Sorelle ‘71 Mr. John Souza, Jr. ‘60 Ms. Linda L. Souza ‘95 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Souza ‘91, ‘75 Mr. Richard F. Souza Ms. Karen A. Sowa ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Sparrow Mr. Dick S. Sproul ‘71 Mrs. Sylvia Anne Stager ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Staiger Ms. Virginia Staugaitis Mr. and Mrs. John W. Stewart, Jr. Mr. Steven M. Strandberg ‘88 Mr. and Mrs. Paul Strittmatter Mr. George W. Stuart, Jr. ‘76 Ms. Deva Suckerman Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. Sullivan Mrs. Christin Sullivan ‘71 Mrs. Ellie Sullivan ‘78 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Sullivan Ms. Rolande Sullivan ‘80 Mrs. Joanna A. Sunderland ‘73 Mr. Lee A. Sunderland ‘63 Mr. Dennis R. Surprenant ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Darryll Swenson Mr. Paul G. Swiszcz ‘81 Mr. Thadeuz F. Swiszcz Mr. Glenn C. Sylvia ‘82 Mr. and Mrs. Peter Szala Mr. Carl W. Taber ‘75 Ms. Marian R. Tansey ‘04 Mr. Joseph J. Tarantino ‘84 Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Tardy Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tartaglia Mrs. Karen E. Tavares Mr. Thomas B. Tavares ‘64 Mrs. Cheryl P. Tavernelli ‘84 UMass

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Ms. Theresa D. Taylor ‘81 Mr. Peter F. Thadeio ‘82 Mr. Paul E. Theberge ‘58 Ms. Linda A. Thivierge ‘82 Mr. John Thomas ‘84 Mrs. Karen M. Thomas ‘85 Ms. Coreen A. Thompson ‘83 Mr. John R. Thompson ‘88 Mrs. Melody R. Thompson ‘00 Mrs. Antoinette Tocci Mr. and Mrs. Robert Tordella Williams Ms. Patricia E. Tourigny ‘01 Mrs. Deborah K. Trahan ‘76 Mr. Kevin M. Travis ‘64 Mrs. Carrie L. Tremko ‘79 Mr. William L. Trepanier ‘83 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Trogele Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Tromp Ms. Cherie A. Trout ‘95 Mr. Daniel J. Tschaen ‘77 Dr. and Mrs. Albin F. Turbak ‘51 Mr. Douglas J. Turner ‘69 Mrs. Gayle Turner ‘73 Mr. Kevin Turner ‘97 Dr. Jeffrey E. Twarog ‘70 University of Cincinnati Mr. John M. Vaccaro ‘85 Mr. Kevin Valente ‘04 Mr. Daniel Vasconcellos ‘82 Mrs. Sally Ann Ventura ‘86 Mr. Michael A. Vieira ‘77 Mr. Stephen A. Vieira ‘63 Mrs. Christine P. Vieira-Salters ‘75 Ms. Patrice M. Vineis ‘01 Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Violante Dr. Joan M. Vitello-Cicciu ‘78 Ms. Andrea J. Viveros ‘05 Dr. Donna M. Viveiros ‘77 Mr. Dennis M. Walsh ‘75 Mr. Richard D. Walsh ‘76 Mr. Bruce H. Walter ‘76 Mr. Robert J. Ward Mr. Richard C. Waring ‘69 Mr. and Mrs. William R. Washburn Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Watson III Mrs. Joanna M. Weeks ‘79 Mrs. Donna L. Wegge ‘86 Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Weibel Ms. Linda M. Wells ‘70 Ms. Patricia A. Welsh ‘73 Mr. Robert Westland Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Weston Ms. Priscilla L. Wheatley ‘03 Ms. Michelle M. White ‘90 Professor D. Steven White Mr. Brian K. Wienzek ‘83 Mrs. Susan M. Wilbur ‘89 Mr. James F. Wilcox III ‘91 Mr. Charles F. Wilkinson ‘81

Ms. Elizabeth A. Williams ‘63 Mr. and Mrs. James Williams Mrs. Jennifer Morgan Williams ‘93 Ms. Maria F. B. Williams ‘97 Mr. John S. Wilson Dr. Paul F. Wilson ‘61 Ms. Megan M. Winter ‘88 Mrs. Nancy L. Witherell ‘74 Mr. and Mrs. David Woodacre Mrs. Audra Wright ‘91 Dr. and Mrs. Chang Ning Wu Ms. Lori A. Wukawitz ‘92 Mr. and Mrs. Blaine L. Young Ms. Nancy A. Ziccardi ‘91 Ms. Linda R. Zieper Mrs. Jan R. Ziter ‘77 Mr. Michael A. Zizza ‘87 Mr. Richard E. Zoino ‘65 Ms. Paula L. Zwahlen Gifts-in-Kind Anonymous ASTRAZENECA Mr. Leonard V. Brophy, Jr. ‘78 Dr. and Mrs. Christopher Brungardt Chancellor Professor and Mrs. Chi-Hau Chen Dr. and Mrs. Peter Friedman M. Gay-Tech Service Dr. Barbara H. Noel Reynolds DeWalt Printing, Inc. SMAST Scallop Vessel Professor Emeritus J. Donald Smith Honor/Memorial Gifts The following list includes donors who designated gifts In Honor of or In Memory of their loved ones. In Honor of Ms. Joan R. Adaskin Barbara and Sidney Kaplan In Memory of Manuel Oliveira Araujo Ms. Kimberly J. Casey ‘97 In Memory of Mariano Jose Araujo Ms. Kimberly J. Casey ‘97 In Honor of Ms. Hilary Carney Badoian Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Memory of Jim and Helena Barnes Mr. Bruce E. Barnes ‘73

In Memory of John and Virginia Berg Mr. John A. Freeman ‘58 In Memory of Maria Zulmira Bettencourt Ms. Kimberly J. Casey ‘97 In Memory of Joao Blum and Maria C. Costa Mr. Manuel R. Pavao In Memory of Ms. Nancy-Jean Bock Mr. Thadeuz F. Swiszcz In Memory of Mr. Jonathan A. Briggs Mr. Paul C. Briggs ‘82 In Memory of Mrs. Barbara Bushell Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Ms. Helen “Jean” Cadden Mr. Tobe Berkovitz Mr. and Mrs. John E. Hill, Jr. Ms. Virginia G. Morgan Ms. Florrie B. Smith In Memory of Ms. Marie-Luise Cambra Ms. Cecelia M. Weeks ‘96 In Memory of Mr. Richard “Dick” Canning Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Honor of Ms. Colleen Claire Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Honor of Mr. Michael Carney Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Memory of Mr. Carlos Carreiro Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dubrawski, Jr. Ms. Maureen T. Kelliher In Memory of Mrs. Frances L. Charlton Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. Stephen Chytilo Mr. Thadeuz F. Swiszcz

In Honor of Chancellor Professor Lester W. Cory ‘63 Mr. Donald F. Wilbur ‘54 In Memory of Joe Costa Ms. Patricia L. Goguen In Memory of John and Melinda Costa Mr. Charles A. Costa In Honor of Ms. Molly Cote Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins In Memory of Ms. Irene Erickson Croteau Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Memory of Mr. James Desrosiers Little People’s College, Inc. In Memory of Professor Roger J. Deveau ‘65 UMass Faculty Federation, Local 1895, AFT, AFL-CIO In Memory of Ms. Ella B. DiMatteo Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Memory of Mr. A. Robert Draymore Mr. Peter A. Draymore ‘79 In Memory of Mrs. Emily Eccles Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Honor of Mr. Christopher F. Egan Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Honor of Ms. Brenna Carney Ferrick Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Memory of Dr. Mary Leite Fonseca ‘74 Ms. Irene V. Fonseca In Honor of Mr. Chuck Fontaine Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins In Honor of Dr. Janet L. Freedman Barbara and Sidney Kaplan

within reach.

In Memory of Mr. Jesse B. Frizzell Ms. Christine Frizzell

In Memory of Mr. Harold “Dusty” Harang Ms. Joan R. Adaskin

In Memory of Mr. Harold Korolenko Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Honor of Mrs. Maria D. Furman ‘76 Mr. George W. Noyes

In Memory of Ms. Kelly Harkins Ms. Lisa B. Wolf

In Memory of Ms. Rita Labonte Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90

In Memory of Mrs. Maria Olivia Furtado Ms. Gina M. Nolan

In Memory of Mrs. Edith Hertzbach Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Memory of Ms. Ramona Lapidas Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

In Honor of Ms. Mary G. Furtado Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski

In Memory of Mr. Robert Andrew Holstead, Sr. Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

In Memory of Mrs. Adele Larschan Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Honor of Dean Donald C. Howard ‘08 Mrs. Sheila Beckeman ‘80 Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 Mr. Paul J. Drolet ‘75 Mr. Charles L. Faria ‘69 Dr. Sandra J. Hathaway ‘80 Mr. Richard C. Waring ‘69

In Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Lassoff Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Memory of Mr. Ed Galarza Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass In Honor of Jane and Gerald Gidwitz Mr. Tom Gidwitz and Dr. Gail Davidson In Memory of Mrs. Lucy P. Gonet Mr. and Mrs. Peter Szala In Memory of Mrs. Maria C. Pacheco Gouveia Ms. Elaine Tisdale Asselin In Memory of Ms. Jeannette Greenwood Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90 In Memory of Mr. Kenneth P. Griffin Sperian Protection USA, Inc. In Memory of Mr. Dennis J. Grillo Mr. Paul R. Desforges ‘62 In Memory of Ms. Marian Walsh Habicht Professor Louise A. Habicht In Memory of Mr. Joe Hamburger Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. John Hansberry Ms. Nancy DiPilato Mr. Donald A. Foster ‘72

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In Honor of Mrs. Edith A. Kameron Mrs. Claire T. Carney ‘73, ‘90

In Memory of Mr. Hervin R. Lavoie Mr. Robert G. Lavoie ‘63 In Memory of Mr. Eurico R. Leite Little People’s College, Inc.

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In Memory of Mr. C. Eric Lindell Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kugler

In Memory of Mr. Harold Kaplan Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mrs. Emily Kaput Mr. Thomas Fuller Ms. Alice Garczynski Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Garczynski Mr. John C. Gorey Kaputs Auto Body Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Kessler Ms. Barbara E. Kubacki Mr. Jack O’Brien Ms. Nancy J. Smith Mr. and Mrs. William D. Wells In Honor of the wedding of Sarah Kaput and Glen Kessler Ms. Lenna F. Finger Mr. Matthew Kohn and Ms. Jodi Boyle In Honor of Ms. Mary Kavanaugh Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins

In Honor of Dr. Jean F. MacCormack Mr. Mark Eisenberg Mr. Chad Vieira In Honor of Mr. Joseph Madigan Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Mrs. Gertrude B. Magnuski Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass In Memory of Ms. Florence Mello Little People’s College, Inc. In Memory of Ms. June Miller Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mr. Joseph I. Mulligan, Jr. Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

In Memory of Ms. Rosemary Kieron Mr. Paul T. Miniacci ‘63 D a r t m o u t h

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In Memory of Mr. Roger P. Nadeau ‘56 Mr. Marcel M. Nadeau ‘63

In Memory of Mr. Laurance A. Read Ms. Carol Nelson

In Memory of Mr. Thomas Stewart Mr. Mark H. Carney

In Memory of Mrs. Sarah Naftoly Mrs. Myra J. Goldberg Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Memory of Mr. Joseph S. Rego, Jr. ‘68 Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

In Memory of Mr. John A. Szivos Mrs. Rita T. Raymond

In Memory of Mr. Armand A. Rheaume Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91

In Memory of Ms. Jane Tulin Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler

In Memory of Mr. Kenneth A. Rose Mr. and Mrs. Vincent DiMaiolo, Jr. Dr. James A. Golen ‘65 Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose Mr. and Mrs. James C. Rose

In Memory of Mrs. Clare J. Vancini Dr. and Mrs. John P. Dowd

In Memory of Mr. Constantine Nanopoulos ‘54 Professor Mary B. Nanopoulos In Memory of Mr. Thomas Nee Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Mr. Pete Nelson Ms. Joan R. Adaskin In Memory of Mrs. Josephine Oliveira Ms. Elaine Tisdale Asselin In Honor of Mr. Bob O’Toole Mr. Christopher Turek ‘78 In Memory of Ms. Evangelina and Mr. Ernest Pacheco Ms. Elaine Tisdale Asselin In Memory of Mrs. Claire Pearl Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Mrs. Pamela Pelletier Mr. Robert S. Karam ‘67, ‘91 In Honor of Mr. Manuel F. Pereira Ms. Catherine A. Fortier-Barnes In Memory of Mr. Belfred F. Pina ‘69 Ms. June M. Pina ‘72 In Honor of Mr. Andy Pollack Mr. Thomas Lincoln In Memory of Mr. Jay Porter Maintenance & Custodial Mass Fed at UMass

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In Memory of Mr. Armand Santos Mr. Robert P. Duarte In Memory of Mr. Marshall M. Sawyer, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Alan R. Greaves In Memory of Ms. Judith Schretzman Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Mr. Louis Simeone’ 84 Professor Paul J. Parente ‘54 In Honor of Ms. Natalie Sine Mr. and Mrs. Kevin M. Mullins In Memory of Mr. Phillip Sittnick Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Rose In Memory of Mr. Brian F. Smith ‘02 Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Smith ‘80 In Honor of SMU Business Faculty Mr. Louis E. Mutty ‘84 In Memory of Ms. Lucy Staiti Mr. and Mrs. William M. Harrop In Honor of Ms. Gloria Steinem Ms. Charlotte P. Sudduth

In Memory of Mr. Paul P. Vancini Dr. and Mrs. John P. Dowd In Memory of Mr. Frank Vera (Francisco Vieira Dias) Mr. Joseph Sequeira Vera In Memory of Mr. Joseph Vera (Jose Vieira Dias) Mr. Joseph Sequeira Vera In Memory of Mr. Felix B. Waxler Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Honor of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy R. Waxler Mrs. Myra J. Goldberg In Memory of Mr. Jonathan Blake Waxler Dr. and Mrs. Robert P. Waxler In Memory of Mr. Donald C. Whelan Ms. Mona Provencher In Memory of Ms. Isabelle Hazner Wojnar Professor Emeritus Walter E. A. Mierzejewski In Memory of Ai-Kuei Wu Lin Mrs. Rita T. Raymond To view the list of donors to the Annual Campaign visit: www.umassd.edu/institutional_ advancement/foundation

Matching Gift Companies AIM Investments Bank of America Bechtel Group, Inc. The Chubb Corporation Cisco Systems Foundation Covidien Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, Inc. DTE Energy Foundation Eaton Vance Management Exxon Education Foundation Factory Mutual Engineering & Research Service Bureau Fidelity Investments FM Global Foundation Foxboro Company Geico Companies General Electric Company Hachette Book Group USA John Hancock Mutual Life Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc. Harvey Hubbell Foundation International Business Machines Corporation ITW Foundation Jacobs Engineering Group Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Lam Research Corporation Lockheed Martin Corporation Merck Company Foundation Metropolitan Life Foundation Philip Morris Match Companies National Grid USA Service Company, Inc. National Starch & Chemical Foundation, Inc. Northeast Utilities NSTAR Foundation Oracle, Inc. Pearson Education Procter & Gamble Company Raytheon Company Rockwell Collins Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation Shell Oil Stop & Shop, Inc. Sun Life of Canada SunTrust Mid Atlantic Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Texas Instruments, Inc. TurboCare, Inc. Tyco Electronics Corporation Unilever United States Foundation, Inc. United Technologies Corporation Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. Verizon Verizon Foundation

within reach.

Ways to Give

Advancement Staff

Alumni Relations Staff

Cash Many of the gifts received by the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are in the form of cash —usually by check. Increasingly, some alumni and friends have chosen to make their gifts to the Annual Fund using a major credit card. This allows the donor to take advantage of any benefits awarded by the credit card company such as frequent flyer miles, bonus points, etc. Both types of gifts are simple to make and are immediately available for use by the university.

Assistant Chancellor Michael J. Eatough

Director of Alumni Relations Mary Ellen A. DeFrias ’94

Assistant Vice Chancellor and Senior Philanthropic Officer Louise Mitchell

Administrative Assistant Nancy J. Tooley ’99

Securities Gifts of appreciated stocks, bonds and mutual funds offer distinct advantages to the donor while benefiting the UMass Dartmouth Foundation. In the case of such gifts, the donor can earn a charitable income tax deduction and eliminate all or a large portion of the capital gains tax that the donor would otherwise be required to pay if the securities were sold.

Executive Office Director Barbara A. Compton

Vice President Dr. Anthony J. Garro V.C. Academic Affairs/Provost

Administrative Assistant Juanita Lopez ’95

Chairman Mr. Gerald Mauretti ‘65

Administrative Assistant Gina M. Nolan

Vice Chairman Mr. Robert S. Karam ’67, ‘91

Senior Programmer Analyst Michael J. O’Leary

Treasurer/Clerk Mr. Frank B. Sousa, Jr. ‘00

Accountant Charlene Picard

Senior Philanthropic Officer Donald H. Ramsbottom Director of Donor Relations Tia Bullard

Gifts-in-Kind These donations to the UMass Dartmouth Foundation are not direct, monetary contributions; they may consist of real estate and other assets including antiques, paintings, rare books, and equipment. Gifts-in-kind may offer particular tax advantages, depending upon the circumstances of the donor. We suggest that the donor consult with professional counsel for advice on such gifts.

Director of Prospect Management Jennifer L. Raxter ’98 Data Entry Operator Paula Silvia

Honor or Memorial Gifts Family or friends can make these gifts to benefit UMass Dartmouth and honor campus community members or loved ones.

Administrative Assistant Elaine Tisdale Asselin

To make a donation, contact the Advancement Office at 508.999.8200 or give online at umassd.edu/donate

The University firmly supports the concept of equal opportunity without regard to an individual’s race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status as it applies to his/her employment, admission to and participation in the University’s programs and activities, provision of services, and selection of vendors who provide services or products to the University.

President Dr. Jean F. MacCormack, Chancellor

Mrs. Maria D. Furman ‘76 Mr. William E. Giblin ’57, ‘06 Mrs. Elizabeth Isherwood-Moore ‘80 Mr. William T. Kennedy ‘03 Mr. Thomas A. Lambalot ‘85 Ms. June Roche ’60, ‘77 Ms. Koreen A. Santos Mr. Anthony R. Sapienza Mr. Robert F. Stoico Mr. Robert Watkins, Jr. ‘02 Mr. Myron Wilner Mr. Ronald M. Xavier ‘72 Attorney Margaret Xifaras ‘78

Ex Officio Members Professor Michael Baum Dr. Jean Kim Ms. Judith Lima ‘87

Statement of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action UMass Dartmouth wholeheartedly supports and encourages the development of action programs designed to promote the employment and advancement of women, Blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, persons with disabilities, and Vietnamera veterans as a means of assuring compliance with the provisions of campus Affirmative Action plans.

UMass Dartmouth Foundation Board of Directors

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The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant Chancellor for Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Outreach, Foster Administration Building, Room 305, UMass Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747 508.910.6405 Inquiries concerning the application of nondiscrimination policies may also be referred to the Regional Director, Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, J.W. McCormack Building, Room 222, Boston, MA 02109

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Other Officers Ms. Deborah McLaughlin Assistant Treasurer Mr. Michael Eatough Assistant Clerk Honorary Directors Mr. Alan Ades ‘96 Mrs. Charlotte G. Babbitt Mr. Patrick Carney Mr. Kevin Champagne Dr. Peter H. Cressy Mr. W. Dale Jones Mr. James J. Karam ’71, ‘01 Mr. Harold G. Lash Ms. Karen G. Lloyd ‘86 Honorable William Q. MacLean, Jr. ‘80 Mrs. Jean E. Whelan A n n u a l

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Class Notes

We want to hear from you —send us your news—www.umassd.edu/alumni/ or Alumni Association, 285 Old Westport Rd., N. Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300

Join your friends online:

’30s

umassd.edu/alumni

Roger Gentilhomme ’33, cotton manufacturing, Falmouth/ Dunedin, won the Florida Senior Games State Championship gold medal for bowling in December. He has qualified for the 2009 Summer National Senior Games in San Francisco where he will compete in the 100+ division. He has won five national gold medals in tennis and two more in bowling over the past 13 years, and was the 2006 Florida Senior Games Male Athlete of the Year. He has three children, thirteen grandchildren, and nineteen greatgrandchildren, and also enjoys playing cards and ballroom dancing. Michael Poster ’39, chemistry, Croton on Hudson, NY, is still on the “go,” swimming daily laps, sculpting, reading, and staying excited over politics.

’50s

William Marsden ‘54, chemistry, Orleans, worked as a dyer in mills in Fall River and New Bedford for 4 years; spent 12 years as a product development engineer at Ludlow Textiles in twines, carpets, and non-wovens; and worked for 26 years at the Wool Bureau in Long Island and Manhattan as a production and marketing development engineer. In his last two jobs, he traveled to all but four or five states in the U.S. and also to Canada, England, and Germany. He retired in 1996 and moved from Long Island to Eastham. He was a Habitat for Humanity carpenter from 1998 to 2006 and has been a 10-year member of Friends of Nickerson State Park, where he and his wife have camped for 40 years, and are now joined annually by “kids, grand-kids, and great grand-kids.”

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Becoming part of our online community means you can stay up-to-date about what’s going on at UMass Dartmouth, learn about alumni programs and projects, submit news about yourself as well as photos, visit group pages, and maintain a personal profile page. Become a part of our powerful network of 40,000 alumni worldwide and stay connected.

Bernard Forcier ‘59, management, East Falmouth, completed 20 years of teaching railroad track and roadway fundamentals, inspection, and maintenance for the Army Corps of Engineers. The eight-day course was attended by Civil Service personnel, Army reservists, and contractors from stateside bases and bases in Alaska, Germany, and Korea.

’60s

James Harrison ’67, management, Port Charlotte, FL, has been teaching for 41 years and runs a kindergarten-Grade 5 technology lab at Memorial Elementary School in Arcadia.

Robert D. Machado ‘68, mathematics, Tustin, CA, and his wife have become first-time grandparents. He is vice president of Broadway in the Park for the Tustin Area Council for Fine Arts. Robert Snigger ’68, textile technology, Temple, TX, is executive director of St. Vincent de Paul of Greater Temple, Inc. The Texas ministry assists the

community’s needy with financial assistance and a food pantry, with more than 1,000 people helped each month. Mary-Ann Boyce ’69, history, North Cape May, NJ, was elected Associate Fellow in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, class of 2008. Since 2000, she has been a senior project engineer with L-3 Communications C2S2 at the William J. Hughes FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City International Airport. Boyce, who worked on Terminal, Oceanic, and EnRoute air traffic control systems, is involved with testing new hardware and software for radars in the EnRoute domain. Dan Goyette ’73, English, River Hills, WI, began his work in financial aid in 1971 at SMTI, then worked at the University of Idaho and the College of Lake County in Illinois. He was director of financial aid at Marquette University for 27 years before retiring in 2006. Because of health care costs, he returned to work

as director at Alverno College. Goyette writes he will be forever in debt to Jerry Coutinho, who retired in 2001 after many years at UMass Dartmouth, as he was Goyette’s first and best mentor.

’70s

Paul Saint Laurent ’72, fine arts, Hollywood, FL, is a self-employed lifelong artist. He was a jewelry sculptor for industry in R.I. and a teacher at the jewelry institute for many years. He had a store/art gallery in Boston and spent a year in Sri Lanka as a technical consultant employed by the United Nations. His website, www.paulsaintlaurent.com, features many of his pieces. He writes that he is very grateful that his SMU education prepared him well for being an artist and leading a wonderful full life. Elizabeth ‘Betsy’ Weaver Rundle ’73, nursing, went to Edinburgh, Scotland, to work at Royal Infirmary in August 1973, and after completing a year’s course in Theatre Nursing became a Theatre Sister in Vascular Surgery. She married

Cl ass N otes her husband John, a urologist, in Edinburgh in 1978. She has two children, Emma, a vet, and David, a barrister. She lives in Poole, Dorset, and received her bachelor’s degree in archaeology in 2003 from Bournemouth University, where she is a research fellow in marine archaeology. She can be reached at ERundle@ bournemouth.ac.uk Joseph DeLude ’74, history, Seekonk, and his wife Nancy retired in July 2008 and are spending their time traveling both in the US and abroad. Ronald G. Reeves ’74, English, Seekonk, retired as head of the reference department at the Barrington (RI) Public Library after nearly 32 years. Gerald LePage ’75, psychology, Somerset, received a master’s degree from Salve Regina University, and is a financial sales representa-

tive at Barnum Financial Group. He previously worked at Burney Company and at LPL Financial. William Watts ’75, marine biology, Orange, CT, teaches chemistry and marine biology at Branford High School, and his wife Cheryl is a nurse at Yale Hospital in New Haven. They have three sons, one of whom, Sam, is an engineering student at UMass Dartmouth. Rev. Dr. Walter Dziordz, M.I.C., ’77, sociology/anthropology, Darien, IL, is pastor of Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church, on the outskirts of Chicago. The parish has 4,000 families and a school of 410 students. He belongs to the order of the Congregation of Marians of the Immaculate Conception. Dr. Michael J. Laney ’77, political science, Cleveland, TN, is director of the 100 Black Men scholarship committee and is a professor of telecommunications at Lee Uni-

versity. Laney writes he is proud of its new mentoring program for girls in grades six through eight, which he says is one of the area’s most effective such initiatives.

licensing program at Framingham State College and teaches elementary reading with learning disabled students at the Learning Prep School in West Newton.

Claudia Grace ’78, creative writing, New Bedford, earned her master’s degree in creative writing at Brown University, served as a poet in residence at Bristol Community College, and is artistic director of ACCESS Art Corp. International, a non-profit dedicated to promoting the city’s artistic, cultural, and maritime heritage. Grace is a poet, playwright, translator, and documentary film producer.

Janet Morris ‘78, textile design/ handweaving, Westport, CT, is the design director for Tradewinds Imports, a home textile import company.

Philip Graham ’78, accounting, and Deborah Udall Graham ’79, marine biology, Mansfield, CT, have two sons, one a student at Fairfield University and the other at Hofstra University. Donna Malliaros ’78, psychology, Milton, completed the teacher

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’80s

Herve H. Letourneau ‘81, accounting, Wichita, KS, is a semi-retired employee of Hilton Wichita Airport Hotel.

Robert Camara ’82, accounting, Acushnet, is senior vice president and chief financial officer for St. Anne’s Credit Union. Martha McGrath ’83, marketing, Framingham, is vice president of sales for Andin International. Her son is a freshman at UMass Dartmouth.

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David D. Gavin ’84, political science, Maynard, was elected to the town’s board of selectmen and was previously vice chairman of the finance committee. He and his wife, Stephanie, have two daughters, Molly and Lily.

Regional clubs for alumni being formed Reaching out to the many graduates who have put down roots in different areas of the country, UMass Dartmouth has begun establishing regional alumni clubs. The first club, in Washington, DC, will be launched with an after-work gathering on Monday, June 22, followed by a Red Sox/ Washington Nationals game in Nationals Park the next evening, June 23. To attend either event, and to receive more information about DC club membership, contact Mary Ellen DeFrias, alumni relations director, at mdefrias@umassd.edu; call 508.999.8020; or go to umassd.edu/alumni to join the online community. Tampa/Sarasota, Ft. Myers/Naples, Southern California, New York City, and Boston are eyed as prospective locations for more clubs, which will keep you connected to your alma mater and classmates. If you would like to become involved in forming a club in your area, please contact Mary Ellen DeFrias through the email or phone contacts above.

Homecoming Weekend September 25-27— come back, relive

Donald McCormack ’85, electrical engineering, Newport, is a technical director at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport. He oversees $1.2 billion in Navy undersea warfare program funding and a staff of 2,500. He is proud to have worked on advancements in the heavyweight torpedoes in use today. McDonald was recently honored for his center work with the prestigious Bud Gifford Leadership Award, for which he was nominated by his colleagues. Jeanne Avila ’87, accounting, Dartmouth, and husband Michael have been married for 25 years. Their oldest son, Daniel, attends UMass Dartmouth; daughter Kelsey, Rhode Island College; and son Zachary, Dartmouth Middle School. Avila is the controller at Stephen & Co. Chris Lane ’89, history, Chicopee, is an evaluation team leader for the Springfield public school system and a member of the Air Force Reserve. Chris would love to hear from alums on the UMass Dartmouth Facebook page. Jeffrey B. Wall ’89, electrical engineering, Westport, works as a senior engineer.

’90s

Michael J. Flagg ’90, business management, Woodstock, GA, is vice president of sales at Stratus Healthcare Radiology. He began his career placing radiologists for KRON Medical in 1991, and then developed provider networks for Maxicare Health Plans commercial and Medicaid divisions. Flagg spent the last 10 years of his career with Jackson and Coker where he held several director positions.

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Brian Zahn ’90, illustration, Chandler, AZ, aka Coach Brian, owns “A NEW VIEW, TO A NEW YOU, LLC” which specializes in self-awareness, goals, relationship, and happiness coaching nationwide. He has been featured on national radio shows and in newspaper articles, and publishes the monthly “From the Coach’s Corner” column. Michael Fogarty ’93, sociology, Fall River, married Melissa Dennis ’93, art education, in Newport, RI. Both work at Durfee High School, Fall River. Kimberly Dennis-Thorman ‘94, accounting, Swansea, and Douglas Thorman had quadruplets, two girls and two boys, in June at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. She also has a son and a niece, and is a tax accountant for Bank of America in Providence. James Boyle ’94, political science, New Bedford, is employer relations director in the Cooperative Education Department at Northeastern University. He previously was assistant director of economic development at the Greater Boston Chamber. He lives in New Bedford with his wife, Maureen Sullivan Boyle ’92, and two children. Scott Diogenes ’94, management, Carver & Luxembourg, LU, is the vice president-unit head of program management for State Street Bank in Luxembourg. Michael Taylor ’95, accounting, North Attleboro, has opened his practice in that town. He earned a master’s degree in taxation at Bentley College, and lives in Cumberland, RI, with his wife and three children. Daniel Chouinard ’96, mechanical engineering, Canton, married Deidre Elliott of Norwood last November. He is a mechanical engineer at Bose Corporation and has enrolled in the high-tech MBA program at Northeastern University. Deidre is a physical therapist with Harvard Vanguard.

Cl ass N otes

Steve Murray and farm co-manager Kelly O'Neill spread compost in preparation for spring planting. Inside the greenhouse at left, Murray explained that he runs his hand over seedlings to strengthen them, mimicking the wind the plants will encounter when transplanted outdoors.

Steve Murray ’08, puts his physics background to good use with sustainable organic farming practices at Kettle Pond Farm

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tephen Murray, who graduated last spring with a degree in physics, feels the key to organic farming is collaborating with nature instead of trying to control it. Murray, manager of Kettle Pond Farm in Berkley, said that as a grower, he asks, “‘How can we cooperate with plants to get the best of both worlds? Do I provide different minerals?’ I want to help the plants, not exert power over them.” Kettle Pond Farm, incorporated as a non-profit organization in 2008, focuses on educating the community about the importance of local agriculture, sustainable land stewardship, and open space conservation. Two-and-a-half of the 35 acres of farmland are used for growing crops organically. With co-manager Kelly O'Neill, as well as an education coordinator and three interns, Murray has been preparing for the Community Supportive Agriculture summer season. A typical day involves seeding parsley, celery, and onions, feeding the chickens, watering plants, and monitoring greenhouse temperatures. In mid-April, he plants peas and brings out the tractor to turn the soil. The farm features numerous varieties of “a full monty” of vegetables including garlic, squash, beets, tomatoes, potatoes, basil, cabbage, all greens, and edible and non-edible flowers. Murray explained that customers of all ages purchase a membership to the farm which entitles them to a share of the season’s produce for 20 weeks. Each week, the shareholders collect their portion of the harvest, thereby getting a fair deal on vegetables while simultaneously supporting local farmers. On weekends, a stand is open and Murray also participates in the autumn Farmers Market at UMass Dartmouth. Educational programs such as “Wonders of Water” and the “Learning and Giving Garden” are offered throughout the season. “Small organic farms bring us truer to our roots. We’re able to hit

all stops. It’s a more interactive type of farming where you have to think more. `How can I decrease the amount of horn worms without spraying?’ `How do I best fit certain crops into this space?’ I’m constantly problemsolving. To grasp agricultural concepts, you have to go back to those scientific abilities. Physics has helped.” A summer internship at Kettle Pond Farm during his junior year changed Murray’s career path. Plans for a Ph.D. in physics, or graduate studies in acoustics, were dropped. “I had a change of heart. I wanted to do something more significant that could impact my fellow brothers and sisters.” Murray also tutors students of various ages in chemistry, math, and physics. His involvement with The Social Change Society on campus proved life-altering. The student club aims to connect participants with the idea of global responsibility through action and awareness about human rights, economic justice, and sustainability. “That’s what got me thinking about the environment and how it impacts everything else. I didn’t want to talk about it — I wanted to do something.” During his freshmen year, he also worked on the solar decathlon project and participated in cross country and track. Murray envisions owning a farm In 10 or 15 years, or perhaps remaining at Kettle Pond Farm. He foresees community organizing, teaching agriculture classes, and doing his part to preserve the natural environment as priorities. “I want to feed people healthy food...maybe write a book...and do right by the land. That way, everyone is a winner.” More information about Kettle Park Farm and Community Supportive Agriculture can be found at www.kettlepondfarm.com Susan Gonsalves ’86 is a writer for the university.

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Alumni news

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Join us on campus this fall, Oct. 3-4, for a weekend of fun for all ages

Christine DeMelo ’00, art history, Firenze, Italia, is a tour guide for Art Viva educating people about the architecture, history, and culture of Florence. She is also the coordinator of the Elderhostel program run by Trinity College, Hartford, overseeing programs throughout Italy. Brianne Como ’03, biology/marine biology, Fall River, enjoyed spending the summer at the beach and poolside with her son and vacationing in Vermont. She is a lab associate technician at Amgen. Kathy Lee Dombrowski ’03, visual design, Walnut Creek, CA, worked as a consultant for Lesley University’s Raiser’s Edge database in donor research and benchmarking prior to moving to California.

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Jason Zelesky ’96, English, Barre, and his wife, Alyssa Haskins Zelesky, have three children, Aidan, Brady, and Avah. He is associate dean of students at Clark University in Worcester. Kristine Matthews Resendes ’97, sociology, Fall River, and Ernest Resendes ’97, illustration, had a daughter, Grace Frances, this past January. They have another daughter, Nora Faith. Andre Gabryjelski ‘99, management, Haverhill, works for Fallon Community Health Plan. Eli Munkholm ’99, marketing, Lynn, writes, “Hey what’s up, class of ‘99? After college, I moved to Seattle for five months, a great experience. Seattle is a beautiful city, especially in the summertime. I returned in 2001

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after a couple of sales jobs, most recently as an account manager for Red Bull energy drink. I’m still involved in baseball. I coached for a couple of years at Endicott College and Salem State, but now I’m an AAU coach at a training facility, started by some of my high school friends, called Legends. I play on some semi-pro teams in the summer, although it gets a little harder each year, haha. Hope to hear from some of my classmates. Take care!”

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Jennifer Gonsalves ’00, English, New Bedford, earned her master’s degree in community planning from URI, and is supervisor of the Roger Williams National Memorial. Her career with the National Park Service began with the dedication of the New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park in 1998.

Nadege Hold ’04, nursing, Dorchester, was slated to travel to Las Matas de Farfan, Dominican Republic, this past April, as part of a volunteer project in which she and others will administer primary care services in rural areas. Her website http://nursehold.weebly.com gives more information. Michael Mahoney ’05, history, Fall River, married Kelley Hayes, Seekonk, last June. He is employed by the YMCA in Fall River, and she works in the UMass Dartmouth Admissions Office. Erica Notarianni ’06, political science, Johnston, RI, is a legal assistant at Textron Financial in Providence and attends New England School of Law in Boston. Jamie Eubanks ’06, accounting, New Bedford, is an in-charge accountant with the CPA firm of Hodgson, Pratt & Associates. Kyle Carney ’07, economics, Seekonk, attended the Super Bowl in Tampa Bay, by serving on the grounds crew that prepared the field at Raymond James Stadium.

Deaths March–September ’08 Marcelle Soares ’27 Albert W. Borden ’45 D. Dennis Moniz ’49 George E. Auclair Floyd L. Carr ’56 Donald P. Setters ’56 Warren P. Harting ‘60 Raymond A. Chartier Col. Raymond A. Rainville James M. Boyle ’62 Hilary F. White, Jr., ’66 William C. Kraihanzel ’68 Evelyn R. Burke ’71 Richard P. Nadeau ’71 Susan L. Sumner ’77 William L. Wilde Jr., ’75 Ronald A. Breault ’78 James P. Lavoie ’86 Steven A. Mello ’92 Gustave “Gus” LaStaiti ’98 HD Richard Hall Leland III, ’07 *Faculty/Staff/Friends of UMass Dartmouth Mary Ann Ainley, staff Ascanio Michael Rossi, faculty Dr. Joseph Sauro, faculty

Michael Close ’07, illustration, Fall River, opened a storefront art gallery on Main Street in that city. Catherine West ’07, English/ writing and communications, Mashpee, is the vacation club manager at InnSeason Resorts, West Yarmouth. Marielle Sardella ’08, history, Providence, moved to historic Federal Hill and joined the Providence Women’s Rugby Club, which went undefeated this season and won the New England Conference. The team took fifth place in the 139-team national, Division II competition in Orlando. Krista Naddaff ’08, communications and rhetoric, also is a member of the team.

Kerriann Virgo ’10, biology major “I have a great relationship with my professors, who all really know you. The faculty give you inspiration, so you think, ‘I could make vaccines, or I could study cells.’ The professors here are passionate about what they do. “For people who have given to the university, I say, ‘Thanks so much.’”

Henry Wilcox ’12, painting major “I greatly appreciate the Daniel and Helen Currier Scholarship which I received. Any amount of money that a student receives is so important and it will help me greatly with my bills. “I think it’s great that people are so generous. By giving donations for scholarships, you are definitely making an investment in your community.”

Endow a UMass Dartmouth scholarship for the students of tomorrow

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roviding an affordable world-class education opportunity has been the mission of UMass Dartmouth, and our 40,000-plus graduates can attest to it as a goal reached. Throughout its history, the university has worked to break down the financial barriers for students who want to attend college and pursue careers that benefit both themselves and their communities. Ensuring that students can do that has been, and continues to be, our highest priority. To help families provide a college education for their children, UMass Dartmouth awards more than $15 million in financial aid to roughly 70 percent of our students. The university wants to continue assisting students and their familes, and we encourage UMass Dartmouth’s alumni and friends to consider endowing a scholarship fund.

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You can establish an endowed scholarship with a minimum $25,000 contribution, payable in increments over five or fewer years. You may note a preference on how your contribution will be used. Many donors ask that their scholarship be awarded, when possible, to students in a particular major or from a specific community. Approximately four percent of the fund’s principal is awarded to a student each year, ensuring that your contribution will have a significant and positive impact on that student’s education.

If qualified, committed students are to continue receiving the high-quality education for which UMass Dartmouth is known, we need your assistance.

To establish an endowed scholarship, please contact Assistant Chancellor of Advancement Michael Eatough at 508.999.8311 or meatough@umassd.edu

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Job, family and go back to school? Sure, it’s a balancing act. There’s no trick to getting a degree. It’s hard work, especially if you’re holding down a job and have a family. Who has the time? For that you need a level headed approach that makes taking classes convenient—and affordable. That’s what you’ll find with the Graduate Studies program and Professional and Continuing Education courses at UMass Dartmouth. Choose from a wide range of subjects in business, fine arts, engineering, nursing, marine sciences, and education. Or focus on one of our more than 25 graduate degree and certificate programs like our Charlton College MBA, Master of Arts in Teaching, Initial Teacher Licensure, Master of Arts in Psychology­— Applied Behavior Analysis Option, Master of Public Policy, and PhD programs in areas like Biomedical Engineering and Bio-Tech. Best of all, UMass Dartmouth offers a great balance of top quality education at a price that won’t upset your equilibrium. Learn more about the Graduate Studies or Professional and Continuing Education program at UMass Dartmouth by visiting umassd.edu. See how we’re putting world class education within reach.

World Class. Within Reach.


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