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COURSE CATALOG

Professional Master of Engineering Program Graduate Certificate in Engineering Program Office of Advanced Engineering

www.advancedengineering.umd.edu

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND The University of Maryland College Park is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland. With a mandate to become nationally and internationally recognized for excellence in research and the advancement of knowledge, College Park serves as the primary statewide center for graduate education and research. It also offers an extensive array of services and programs to federal and state governments, business and industry throughout the world. College Park is strategically located in the thriving Washington-Baltimore corridor, one of the most prosperous and fast-growing technology areas in the United States. Forty minutes from Baltimore’s industrial and trade center, and thirty minutes from Annapolis, the state capital, the campus enjoys close liaisons between government, business and industry which enrich the student experience through applied research, internships, and career opportunities. The University is an ideal setting for teaching and learning about the world we live in and the world we are in the process of creating.

MESSAGE TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS Thank you for your interest in continuing your engineering education at the University of Maryland. In the A. James Clark School of Engineering we have created an Office of Advanced Engineering Education (OAEE) to encompass all of our practice-oriented graduate education programs, short courses, workshops, license reviews, etc. The primary emphasis of OAEE is the Professional Master of Engineering Program and the Graduate Certificate in Engineering Program. These programs provide working engineers and technical professionals with the opportunity to continue their education and training at one of the best engineering graduate schools in the nation. Our main offering is the Professional Master of Engineering (ENPM) Program, which offers the Master of Engineering (M. Eng.) degree for the practicing engineer and has been developed by the engineering faculty of the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. It is a practice oriented, part-time graduate program designed to a ssist engineers and technical professionals in the development of their careers and to provide the expertise needed in the rapidly changing business, government, and industrial environments. Late afternoon and evening classes are taught by the College Park faculty and experienced adjunct faculty at the College Park campus, designated learning centers in Maryland, and online. The M.Eng. degree requires 30 credits of coursework as opposed to the Master of Science (M.S.) degree that requires 24 credits of coursework plus six credits of thesis (thesis option), or 30 credits of coursework, a written comprehensive examination, plus a scholarly paper (non-thesis option). The M.Eng. degree is not normally undertaken by those wishing to eventually pursue a Ph.D. degree. Typically, the M.S. degree is recommended for those individuals who wish to pursue research experience on their way towards a Ph.D. degree. Our other graduate program is the Graduate Certificate in Engineering (GCEN), a postbaccalaureate degree which allows engineers at any level (bachelor, master, doctoral) the opportunity to focus their education in a highly specialized area. The GCEN requires the completion of only 12 credits of coursework in a prescribed academic option. This program can be used as a stepping-stone to the ENPM program for a student who may not be willing at first to undertake the task of pursuing a master’s program, but later decides to complete the additional courses required to obtain the Master of Engineering degree. We trust that you will find either one of our programs to be a convenient way to earn an engineering graduate degree, to “retool” and keep current with the latest technological developments in your field, or perhaps to develop a new area of expertise so as to further your career. For the most up-to-date information, please visit our website at www.oaee.umd.edu. If you have any comments or suggestions for improving our programs, please feel free to contact us. We look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely,

Dr. George Syrmos Executive Director

TABLE OF CONTENTS Program Administration 1 Academic Calendar 1 Academic Advisors 2 Program Admissions 4 Application Deadlines 4 International Student Application Deadlines 4 Transfer Credits 4 Inclusion of Credits from M.S. Programs at UMCP 4 Degree Requirements 5 Seigel Learning Center 5 DETS Regional Education Sites 5 Tuition 6 Financial Aid 6 PROGRAM OPTIONS AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 7 Aerospace Engineering (PMAE) (Z053) 7 Bioengineering (PMBI) (Z054) 13 Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (PMCH) (Z055) 16 Civil and Environmental Engineering (PMCE) (Z056) 20 Environmental and Water Resources Core 20 Geotechnical and Pavements Core 21 Structures Core 23 Transportation Core 25 Cybersecurity Engineering (PMCY) (Z073) 27 Electrical and Computer Engineering (PMEE) (Z057) 31 Communications and Signal Processing Core 31 Computer Engineering Core 32 Software Engineering Core (Z065) 33 Energetic Concepts (MEEC*) (Z073*) 36 Environmental Engineering (PMEN) (Z058) 39 Fire Protection Engineering (PMFP) (Z059) 43 Fire Protection Engineering Online (ENGF*) (Z049*) 45 Materials Science Engineering (PMMS) (Z060) 47 Mechanical Engineering (PMME) (Z061) 51 Energy and the Environment Core 51 General Mechanical Core 55 Nuclear Engineering (PMNU) (Z062) 63 Nuclear Engineering Online (MENU*) (Z050*) 65 Project Management (PMPM) (Z063) 66 Project Management Online (MEPM*) (Z040*) 70 Reliability Engineering (PMRE) (Z064) 71 Reliability Engineering Online (MERE*) (Z042*) 74 Sustainable Energy Engineering (PMSU) (Z066) 75 Sustainable Energy Engineering Online (MEEE*) (Z082*) 78 Systems Engineering (PMSE) (Z067) 79 Master of Engineering program codes begin with “PM”, Graduate Certificate program codes begin with “Z”, Online programs *

A. James Clark School of Engineering The Clark School of Engineering, situated on the rolling, 1,500-acre University of Maryland campus in College Park, Md., is one of the premier engineering schools in the U.S., with graduate and undergraduate education programs ranked in or near the Top 20. In the U.S. News & World Report 2013 Best Graduate Schools ranking, the Clark School jumped from 22nd to 18th place, 9th among public schools. The Clark School has 21 faculty members inducted into the National Academy of Engineering. The school, which offers 13 graduate programs and 12 undergraduate programs, including degree and certification programs tailored for working professionals, is home to one of the most vibrant research programs in the country. The Clark School garnered research awards of $171 million in the last year. With emphasis in key areas such as energy, nanotechnology and materials, bioengineering, robotics, communications and networking, life cycle and reliability engineering, project management, intelligent transportation systems and aerospace, the Clark School is leading the way toward the next generations of engineering advances.

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION University of Maryland A. James Clark School of Engineering Office of Advanced Engineering Education 2105 J.M. Patterson Building College Park, Maryland 20742 Dr. George Syrmos Executive Director 301-405-3633 | Email: syrmos@umd.edu Paul A. Easterling Director 301-405-3017 | Email: peaster@umd.edu Neela Balkissoon Coordinator, Admissions & Professional Programs 301-405-7200 | Email: nbalkiss@umd.edu Vinette Brown-Darlington Coordinator, Academic Outreach 301-405-1098 | Email: vbrownda@umd.edu Sarah Hirschman Libes Coordinator, Academic Affairs 301-405-1101 | Email: slibes@umd.edu Sheri Shelton, Coordinator, Business Affairs 301-405-2355 Email: sshelton@umd.edu Lauren Jackson, Program Management Specialist 301-405-0362 | Email: ljacks10@umd.edu

ACADEMIC CALENDAR To view the latest academic calendar go to http://www.testudo.umd.edu/acad_cal/calendarlinks.html.

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ACADEMIC ADVISORS Aerospace Engineering Aerospace Dr. William Fourney, Professor 1123E Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-1129 - Email: four@umd.edu Space Systems Dr. Mary Bowden, Visting Professor 3146 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-0011 - Email: bowden@umd.edu Bioengineering Dr. Tracy Chung 2330A Kim Engineering Building Phone 301 405 5407 - Email: bioe-grad@umd.edu Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Dr. Srinivasa R. Raghavan, Associate Chair and Graduate Program Director 1227C Chemical & Nuclear Engineering Building Phone 301-405-8164 - Email: sraghava@umd.edu Civil and Environmental Engineering Mr. Al Santos, Director of Student Services 1173A Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-1977 - Email: asantos@umd.edu Cybersecurity Engineering Dr. Michel Cukier, Associate Director for Education, Maryland Cybersecurity Center 0151E Glenn L. Martin Hall 301.314.2804 - Email: mcukier@umd.edu Electrical and Computer Engineering Computer Engineering and Software Engineering Dr. Gang Qu , Associate Professor 1417 A.V. Williams Building Phone 301-405-6703 - Email: gangqu@umd.edu Communications & Signal Processing Dr. Mehdi Kalantari Khandani, Associate Research Scientist 1365 A.V. Williams Bldg. Phone 301-405-6622 - Email: mehkalan@umd.edu Energetic Concepts Dr. James Short, Visiting Professor 2140 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-5246 - Email: james.short@cecd.umd.edu

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Fire Protection Engineering Dr. James Milke, Professor and Assistant Chair 3104F J.M. Patterson Bldg. Phone 301-405-3995 - Email: milke@umd.edu Materials Science and Engineering Dr. Kathleen Hart, Assistant Director of Student Services 1113 Chemical & Nuclear Engineering Bldg. Phone 301-405-5268 - Email: hart@umd.edu Dr. Manfred R. Wuttig, Professor 1110C Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Bldg. Phone 301-405-5212 - Email: wuttig@umd.edu Mechanical Engineering Dr. Hugh Bruck, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies 2174 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-8711 - Email: bruck@umd.edu Ms. Lee Ellen Harper, Assistant Director of Graduate Studies 2178 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-8601 - Email: leharper@umd.edu Nuclear Engineering Dr. Robert M. Briber, Professor & Chair 2135 Chemical & Nuclear Engineering Building Phone 301-405-7313 - Email: ennu-meng_adivsing@umd.edu Dr. Kathleen Hart, Assistant Director of Student Services 1113 Chemical & Nuclear Engineering Bldg. Phone 301-405-5268 - Email: ennu-meng_adivsing@umd.edu Reliability Engineering Dr. Ali Mosleh, Professor 0151F Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-5215 - Email: mosleh@umd.edu Sustainable Energy Engineering Dr. Hugh Bruck, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies 2174 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-8711 - Email: bruck@umd.edu Ms. Lee Ellen Harper, Assistant Director of Graduate Studies 2178 Glenn L. Martin Hall Phone 301-405-8601 - Email: leharper@umd.edu Systems Engineering Dr. George Syrmos, Executive Director 2105 J.M. Patterson Bldg. Phone 301-405-3633 - Email: syrmos@umd.edu A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAMS The Professional Master of Engineering (ENPM) Program is open to qualified applicants holding an accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering or a related field. In addition to submitting an online Graduate School admission application, an official copy of the applicant’s college transcripts and three letters of recommendation are required for evaluation. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may be admitted on a provisional basis if they have demonstrated a satisfactory performance in another graduate program and/or their work experience has been salutary. Applicants with foreign credentials must submit academic records in the original language with literal English translations. Allow at least three months for evaluation of foreign credentials. The Graduate Certificate in Engineering (GCEN) Program is open to qualified applicants holding a regionally accredited baccalaureate degree in engineering or a related field. In addition to submitting an online Graduate School admission application with fee, an official copy of the applicant’s college transcripts is required for evaluation. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA of less than 3.0 may be admitted on a provisional basis if they have demonstrated a satisfactory experience in another graduate program and/or their work experience has been salutary. In that case, two recommendation letters are required as well. Due to its brief nature, foreign applicants will not be considered for admission to the campus based GCEN program, as student visa cannot be awarded. APPLICATION DEADLINES Preferred Final

SPRING December 15 January 10

FALL August 1 August 15

SUMMER May 1 May 15

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICATION DEADLINES

SPRING FALL August 1 February 1

TRANSFER OF CREDITS A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level course credits with a grade of at least a “B” earned at an accredited institution prior to or after matriculation in the Graduate School may be applied toward master degrees at the University of Maryland. All courses requested for transfer must have been taken with five years of the student’s planned graduation date. The courses cannot be from a completed degree program. The Graduate School will submit transfer work done overseas to the Study Abroad Office for validation. No transfer of credits are allowed for the GCEN program. INCLUSION OF CREDITS FROM M.S. PROGRAMS AT UMCP Students who are accepted into the ENPM Program, and who are matriculated at UMCP in an M.S. program in engineering, may include a number of courses as determined by the ENPM Program. Courses over five years old have to be revalidated by the ENPM Program. Coursework over seven years old at the time of graduation cannot be accepted.

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DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The student chooses an area of concentration offered by an engineering department and completes 30 credit hours of approved coursework with an average grade of B. The coursework, which allows up to 12 credits at the 400-level, must be approved by the program’s departmental faculty advisor. ARNOLD E. SEIGEL LEARNING CENTER More and more of the courses offered in the ENPM/GCEN programs are being made available online or through web-enhanced curriculum. Courses are available for download, web-streaming, or as pod-casts and can be viewed on tablets, PCs, or mobile devices world-wide. Students and faculty engage in live video-chats, can work synchronously outside the classroom on projects, and deliver group presentations to enhance their educational experience beyond the traditional classroom lectures or reading assignments. Thanks to the Clark School’s Distance Education Technology and Services (DETS) staff and the new state-of-the-technology Arnold Seigel Learning Center, which features six video-teleconferencing classroom studios with capacity from 17 to 122 seats, students can receive the highest quality distance education available. Innovative lighting, acoustics, and video-based tools together with dedicated technical directors for each course deliver distance or blended instruction in real-time and on-demand. DETS REGIONAL EDUCATION SITES A number of courses originating from the College Park campus are taught via video teleconferencing through the Distance Education Technology and Services (DETS) to regional education sites around the State of Maryland. In addition to these public sites there are several private sites located at large industrial and government facilities. Call Mr. Marty Ronning at (301) 405-4899 for more information. Frostburg State University Northeast Maryland Higher Education Center Southern Maryland Higher Education Center UMCP Instructional Video Network University of Maryland – Eastern Shore Universities at Shady Grove University System of Maryland at Hagerstown

Frostburg, MD Aberdeen, MD California, MD College Park, MD Princess Anne, MD Rockville, MD Hagerstown, MD

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TUITION Students in this program pay a special tuition rate. This rate is not fully covered by graduate assistantships, fellowships or the tuition remission plan for spouses and dependent children of faculty and staff. Additional graduate student fees are charged for on campus courses and at DETS sites. For the latest tuition and fees go to http://www.oaee.umd.edu/grad/tuition-fees.html. FINANCIAL AID This program does not provide assistantships or fellowships. Loans, work-study and need-based grants for citizens and permanent residents with demonstrated financial need may submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February 15 to the Financial Aid Office.

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PROGRAM OPTIONS AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AEROSPACE ENGINEERING The following are the recommended core courses in aerospace engineering. Some of these courses may be replaced by the technical electives listed and by other approved technical courses that meet the student’s professional interests.

Admission Requirements: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in Aerospace Engineering from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics are required to be considered for admission. ◊ Completed applications are reviewed and considered for admission on a case-by-case basis. ◊ Applicants without an Aerospace Engineering Degree; applicants with other related engineering backgrounds can apply. Please review the Aerospace Engineering Department’s graduate program prerequisites page for a list of these undergraduate courses. Foundation Courses The following courses are designed to prepare new students to successfully complete their academic program. ENPM 620 is for students who have not taken mathematics courses in several years and want to renew their skills. It may also be used for students who had less than acceptable academic performance in their mathematics courses at the undergraduate level. ENPM 672 is for students without a formal academic background in thermal systems engineering and may wish to transition to an area that requires a fundamental understanding. Please note that these courses may be counted as technical electives with the prior approval of the academic advisor. ENPM 620 Computer Aided Engineering Analysis (3) Computer assisted approach to the solution of engineering problems. Review and extension of under-graduate material in applied mathematics including vector analysis and vector calculus, analytical and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, analytical and numerical solutions of linear, partial differential equations, and probability and statistics. ENPM 672 Fundamentals for Thermal Systems (3) This course is a highly compacted introduction to three thermal engineering courses and is intended for those who did not major in mechanical of chemical engineering as an under-graduate. It also may be valuable for anyone who has been away from formal academics for longer than five years. Its purpose is to provide a background needed for understanding more advanced courses in applied thermal energy systems. Included in this course is an introduction to thermodynamics, fluid me-chanics and heat transfer. Aerospace Engineering Core ENAE 601 Astrodynamics (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 404 and ENAE 441. Mathematics and applications of orbit theory, building upon the foundations developed in ENAE 404 and ENAE

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441. Topics include two body orbits, solutions of Kepler’s equation, the two-point boundary value problems, rendezvous techniques, and Encke’s method. ENAE 602 Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics and Control (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 404 and ENAE432. Rigid body rotational dynamics of spacecraft; forced and unforced motion, torques produced by the orbital environment; orbit/attitude coupling; gas jet, momentum wheel, and magnetic torque actuators. Elementary feedback attitude regulators and algorithms for linear and nonlinear attitude tracking. ENAE 641 Linear System Dynamics (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 432. Linear systems; state space, multiinput, multi-output models; eigenstructure; controllability, observability, singular value analysis; multivariable Nyquist condition; observer design; introduction to Kalman filtering. Full state feedback techniques including pole placement and LQR/LQG techniques; introduction to loop shaping and robustness. ENAE 642 Atmospheric Flight Control (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 432 and ENAE 403, or equivalents. Exposure to flight guidance and control. Draws heavily from vehicle dynamics as well as feedback theory, and careful treatment of the non-linear aspects of the problem is critical. Conventional synthesis techniques are stressed, although modern methods are not ignored. Multivariable system analysis is included, along with flight-control design objectives and hardware limitations. Emphasis on aircraft and missiles. ENAE 651 Smart Structures (3) Topics related to the analysis, design, and implementation of smart structures and systems: modeling of beams and plates with induced strain actuation; shape memory alloys; electro-rheological fluids; magnetostrictor and electrostricter actuators and fiber optic sensors. ENAE 652 Computational Structural Mechanics (3) Prerequisite: permission of the department. Fundamentals of structural mechanics and computational modeling. Finite element modeling of two- and three-dimensional solids, plates and shells. Geometrically nonlinear behavior. Structural stability such as buckling and postbuckling. ENAE 654 Mechanics of Composite Structures (3) Prerequisite: permission of both department and/or instructor. Corequisite: ENAE 423 or equivalent. An introduction to structures composed of composite materials and their applications in aerospace. In particular, filamentary composite materials are studied. Material types and fabrication techniques, material properties, micromechanics, anisotropic elasticity, introduction to failure concepts. ENAE 655 Structural Dynamics (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 423 or permission of department. Advanced principles of dynamics necessary for structural analysis; solutions of eigenvalue problems for discrete and continuous elastic systems, solutions to forced response boundary value problems by direct, modal, and transform methods. ENAE 670 Fundamentals of Aerodynamics (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Introduction to aerodynamics for aerospace engineering students specializing in fields other than aerodynamics. Broad coverage of flight regimes. Inviscid theory, incompressible theory, subsonic compressible flow, linearized supersonic flow, hypersonic flow, viscous flows, Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layer theories. ENAE 684 Computational Fluid Dynamics I (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Partial differential equations applied to flow modelling, fundamental numerical techniques for the solution of these equations, elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations, elements of finite difference solutions, explicit and implicit techniques. Applications to fundamental flow problems. 8

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ENAE 696 Spacecraft Thermal Design (3) Thermal sources in space. Black-body radiation; absorptivity and emissivity; radiative thermal equilibrium. Mutually radiating plates, view angles, and interior conduction. Techniques of spacecraft thermal analysis; approaches to passive and active thermal control. ENAE 741 Interplanetary Navigation and Guidance (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 432 and ENAE 601. Interplanetary trajectory construction; patched and multiconic techniques. Methods of orbit and attitude determination; applied Kalman filtering. Guidance algorithms and B-plane targeting. Interplanetary navigation utilizing in situ and radio techniques. Technical Electives ENPM 652 Applied Finite Element Methods (3) This course is aimed at engineering and science students with little or no previous knowledge of the Finite Element Method. The course deliberately attempts to keep the mathematics of the subject as straightforward as possible. It is assumed that the students understand the basic concepts and equations of elasticity and thermal heat flow, and is familiar with simple matrix algebra. The course will cover stress and thermal analysis problems, and will include the use of the ALGOR finite element code for doing examples and homework solutions. The basic problem solving procedure will be developed for using finite element computer codes. ENPM 671 Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3) To instill understanding of the fundamental mechanical models of behavior for structural components. To enumerate the stress resultant formulations of various shapes subjected to axial, torsional and bending loads. To evaluate and interpret the analyses based on the applied principles and the assumptions made. ENAE 631 Helicopter Aerodynamics I (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 311 and ENAE 414 or permission of both department and instructor. A history of rotary-wing aircraft, introduction to hovering theory, hovering and axial flight performance, factors affecting hovering and vertical flight performance, autorotation in vertical descent, concepts of blade motion and control, aerodynamics of forward flight, forward flight performance, operational envelope, and introduction to rotor acoustics. ENAE 632 Helicopter Aerodynamics II (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 631 and ENAE 311 and ENAE 414 or equivalent and permission of the department. Basic aerodynamic design issues associated with main rotors and tail rotors, discussion of detailed aerodynamic characteristics of rotor airfoils, modeling of rotor airfoil characteristics, review of classical methods of modeling unsteady aerodynamics, the problem of dynamic stall, review of methods of rotor analysis, physical description and modeling of rotor vortical wakes, discussion of aerodynamic interactional phenomena on rotorcraft, advanced rotor tip design, physics and modeling of rotor acoustics. ENAE 633 Helicopter Dynamics (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 631 and permission of the department. Flap dynamics. Mathematical methods to solve rotor dynamics problems. Flap-lag-torsion dynamics and identify structural and inertial coupling terms. Overview on rotary wing unsteady aerodynamics. Basic theory of blade aeroelastic stability and ground and air resonance stability, vibration analyses and suppression. ENAE 634 Helicopter Design (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 631 and permission of the department. Principles and practice of the preliminary design of helicopters and similar rotary wing aircrafts. Design trend studies, configuration selection and sizing methods, performance and handling qualities analyses, structural concepts, vibration reduction and noise. Required independent design project conforming to a standard helicopter request for proposal (RFP). A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ENAE 635 Helicopter Stability and Control (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 631 and ENAE 642 or permission of department. Advanced dynamics as required to model rotorcraft for flight dynamic studies. Development of helicopter simulation models and specifications of handling qualities. Methods for calculation of trim, poles, frequency response, and free flight response to pilot inputs. ENAE 644 Optimal Control of Aerospace Systems (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 432, ENAE 403 or ENAE 404, or equivalents. Formal optimization of linear and non-linear dynamic systems, developed rigorously via the calculus of variations - first and second variations. Treatment of dynamic constraints, terminal conditions, fixed and free final times. Numerical techniques to the non-linear optimization problem are stressed. Investigation of optimal aerodynamic shapes, trajectory optimization, optimal flight guidance. Final project includes numerical analysis. ENAE 653 Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Continua (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 652 or equivalent. Finite element formulation of nonlinear and time dependent processes. Introduction to tensors, nonlinear elasticity, plasticity and creep. Application to nonlinear solids including aerospace structures, such as shells undergoing finite rotations. ENAE 656 Aeroelasticity (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 655 or permission of department. Topics in aeroelasticity: wing divergence; aileron reversal; flexibility effects on aircraft stability derivatives; wing, empennage and aircraft flutter; panel flutter; aircraft gust response; and aeroservoelasticity of airplanes. ENAE 661 Advanced Propulsion I (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 455 and ENAE 457. Special problems of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. ENAE 662 Advanced Propulsion II (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 455 and ENAE 457. Special problems of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet, rocket and ramjet engines. Plasma, ion and nuclear propulsion for space vehicles. ENAE 674 Aerodynamics of Compressible Fluids (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 471 or permission of department. One-dimensional flow of a perfect compressible fluid. Shock waves. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible flow. Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two-dimensional isotropic flow. Linearized theory of three-dimensional potential flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical potential flow. One-dimensional flow with friction and heat addition. ENAE 681 Engineering Optimization (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Methods for unconstrained and constrained minimization of functions of several variables. Sensitivity analysis for systems of algebraic equations, eigenvalue problems, and systems of ordinary differential equations. Methods for transformation of an optimization problem into a sequence of approximate problems. Optimum design sensitivity analysis. ENAE 682 Hypersonic Aerodynamics (3) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Hypersonic shock and expansion waves, Newtonian theory, Mach methods, numerical solutions to hypersonic inviscid flows, hypersonic boundary layer theory, viscous interactions, numerical solutions to hypersonic viscous flows. Applications to hypersonic vehicles. ENAE 683 High Temperature Gas Dynamics (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Aspects of physical chemistry and statistical thermodynamics necessary for the analysis of high temperature flows, equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemically reacting flows, shock waves, nozzle flows, viscous chemically reacting flow, blunt body flows, chemically reacting boundary layers, elements of

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radiative gas dynamics and applications to hypersonic vehicles. ENAE 685 Computational Fluid Dynamics II (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 684 or permission of department. Continuation of ENAE 684. Basic algorithms for the numerical solution of two and three dimensional inviscid and viscous flows. Applications to internal and external flow problems. ENAE 691 Satellite Design (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 483. Systems design of Earth-orbiting satellites, including geostationary communications satellites and low Earth orbit constellations. Basics of orbital motion, communications, and instrument design. Spacecraft systems, structuraldesign, thermal design, power generation, and attitude determination and control. Launch vehicle interfacing and mission operations. ENAE 692 Introduction to Space Robotics (3) Analysis techniques for manipulator kinematics and dynamics. DH parameters, serial and parallel manipulators, approaches to redundancy. Applications of robots to space operations, including manipulators on free-flying bases, satellite servicing, and planetary surface mobility. Sensors, actuators, and mechanism design. Command and control with humans in the loop. ENAE 694 Spacecraft Communications (3) Brief overview of satellite orbits. Radio frequency communications, noise, and bandwidth limitations. Link budget analysis. Modulation and multiplexing approaches, multiple access systems. Satellite transponder and Earth station technology. ENAE 697 Space Human Factors and Life Support (3) Engineering requirements supporting humans in space. Life support design: radiation effects and mitigation strategies; requirements for atmosphere; water, food, and temperature control. Accommodations for human productivity in space: physical and psychological requirements; work station design; and safety implication of system architectures. Design and operations for extra-vehicular activity. ENAE 742 Robust Multivariable Control (3) Prerequisites: ENAE 432 or equivalent, plus graduate-level exposure to linear systems and linear algebra. Limitations on achievable performance in multivariable feedback systems due to uncertainty. Singular values, matrix norms, multivariable Nyquist stability theory, uncertainty modeling in aerospace systems. Loopshaping, generalization of Bode design principles. Characterizing the uncertainty, robustness and performance analysis, and synthesis, primarily in the frequency domain. Current research directions. Aerospace examples are used to complement the theory. ENAE 743 Applied Nonlinear Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 641. Modern methods of analysis and synthesis of multivariable nonlinear control techniques for aircraft, spacecraft, and space manipulator systems. Topics include passivity and Lyapunov theory, feedback linearization, nonlinear observers, Hamiltonian methods, robust controller design, and an introduction to adaptive nonlinear control methods. ENAE 757 Advanced Structural Dynamics (3) Prerequisites: ENAE655 or equivalent; ENAE644or equivalent; ENAE651 or equivalent. This course will demonstrate the practical application of Smart Materials and Spatially Distributed Transducers to the design and control of advanced structures. The course will be focused toward the active control of continuum structures using advance Spatially Distributed Parameter System control techniques and concepts. Effective system parameterizations will be used to reduce distributed parameter system models to classical canonical state space form for the purpose of robust adaptive structure design. Application case studies, including morphing structures will be employed as necessary to enhance the students intuition and understanding of Distributed Parameter Systems. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ENAE 788 Selected Topics in Aerospace Engineering 1-3 credits. Courses available as technical electives with approval from the academic advisor. ENAE 791 Launch and Entry Vehicle Design (3) Prerequisite: ENAE 601. Design of aerospace vehicles for atmospheric transit to and from space. Generic formulation of atmospheric flight dynamics. Ballistic and lifting entry trajectories. Estimation of vehicle aerodynamic properties and aerothermodynamic heating. Entry thermal protection design. Trajectory analysis of sounding rockets and orbital launch vehicles. Serial, parallel, and hybrid multistaging schemes, optimal multistaging. Constrained trajectory optimization. Launch vehicle economic and reliability analysis, flight termination systems, sensors and actuators.

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BIOENGINEERING Students must take seven courses from the Bioengineering courses listed below. Three technical electives may be selected from the courses below or courses from other academic departments. The only guideline for the selection of elective courses is that they be part of an integrated program of study. All core and technical elective course selections will be taken with the prior approval of the academic advisor.

Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or related field; Biology, Chemistry, Physics, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III and Differential Equations) and Thermodynamics are required to be considered for admission. Non-engineering majors must have completed mathematics courses through Differential Equations. Foundation Course The following course is designed to prepare new students to successfully complete their academic program. ENPM 672 is for students without a formal academic background in thermal engineering or physical chemistry) and may wish to transition to an area that requires a fundamental understanding. Please note that this courses may be counted as a technical elective with the prior approval of the academic advisor. ENPM 672 Fundamentals for Thermal Systems (3) This course is a highly compacted introduction to three thermal engineering courses and is intended for those who did not major in mechanical of chemical engineering as an undergraduate. It also may be valuable for anyone who has been away from formal academics for longer than five years. Its purpose is to provide a background needed for understanding more advanced courses in applied thermal energy systems. Included in this course is an introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Bioengineering Core BIOE 601 Biomolecular and Cellular Rate Processes (3) Presentation of techniques for characterizing and manipulating non-linear biochemical reaction networks. Advanced topics toinclude mathematical modeling of the dynamics of biological systems; separation techniques forheat sensitive biologically active materials; and rate processes in cellular and biomolecular systems. Methods are applied to current biotechnological systems, some include: recombinant bacteria; plant, insect and mammalian cells; and transformed cell lines. BIOE 602 Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics (3) Introduction to the fundamentals of biomechanics including force analysis, mechanics of deformable bodies, stress and strain, multiaxial deformations, stress analysis, and viscoelasticity. Biomechanics of soft and hard tissues . BIOE 604 Transport Phenomena in Bioengineering Systems (3) A study of the transport processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer applied to biological organisms and systems, using analogical and systems approaches. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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BIOE 612 Physiological Evaluation of Bioengineering Designs (3) Bioengineering-based designs of biomaterials, biomedical devices, imaging and drug delivery agents, tissue engineering, and prosthetics (among others), offer the opportunity to improve health care. This course is aimed at providing knowledge to lead bioengineering designs on the basis of biocompatibility and to provide tools to assess their patho-physiological impact in biological systems. BIOE 631 Biosensor Techniques, Instrumentation, and Applications (3) A thorough review of fundamental concepts of biosensing systems, principles of common detection methods, and modern applications of biosensors. Primarily literature driven. Students will obtain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge biosensing techniques, the instrumentation used, and the application space. Students also will develop skills in using current literature as a source of knowledge. BIOE 632 Biophotonic Imaging and Microscopy; (3) Principles and instrumentation of various biomedical optical techniques, including fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, confocal and multiphoton microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and diffuse optical tomography. Biomedical applications will also be discussed. Technical Electives BIOE 603: Quantitative Cell Physiology (3) Introduction to the electrophysiology of the cell membrane. Development of mathematical models of different types of ionic membrane currents and fluid compartment models, culminating in the development of functional whole-cell models for neurons and muscle (cardiac, skeletal and smooth muscle) cells. Characterization of volume conductor boundary value problems encountered in electrophysiology consisting of the adequate description of the bioelectric current source and the volume conductor (surrounding tissue) medium. BIOE 611: Tissue Engineering (3) A review of the fundamental principles involved in the design of engineered tissues and organs. Both biological and engineering fundamentals will be considered. We recommend one advanced biology course and one advanced engineering math course prior to taking BIOE 611. BIOE640 Polymer Physics (3) Graduate course covering theoretical aspects of the behavior of polymeric materials. It covers statistical properties and thermodynamics of single chain and multichain systems. BIOE 645 Advanced Engineering Start Up Ventures (3) Covers principles and practices important to engineering startup ventures, especially those involving bioengineering and medical device enterprises, and includes the preparation of business plans and tools used to obtain funding. BIOE 653: Advanced Biomaterials (3) Examine the relationship between structure and function of biomaterials. Study physical properties of synthetic and natural biomaterials. Understand molecular level interactions between biomolecules and biomaterials to design novel biomaterials with desirable characteristics. Application of biomaterials as implants, drug delivery systems, biosensors, and scaffold materials for tissue engineering will be covered. BIOE 689: Special Topics in Bioengineering (3) Unrestricted Electives (3 Courses, 9 Credits) Three more unrestricted elective courses will be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. Please note that not all courses are offered every semester. The list below provides examples of courses taken by our students in the past. Additionally, extra restricted electives courses (more than 6 credit requirement) may also be used as unrestricted electives. Two more unrestricted elective courses (6 credits) will be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor. 14

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BIOE689A Protein Design and Engineering BIOE689B: Biological Mass Spectrometry BIOE 689D: Computational Molecular Bioengineering BIOE 689E: Microscopic Structure and Function of Cells, Tissue and Organs BIOE 689F: Feynman Lectures for Applications in Bioengineering BIOE689L: Metabolic Pathway Engineering

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CHEMICAL and BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING The following four core courses are offered by the Department of Chemical and BiomolecularEngineering. In addition to the core courses, students may select technical electives approved by an advisor. The only guideline for the selection of electives is that the electives be part of an integrated program of study. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a closely related discipline; Computer Science, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or Physical Sciences from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. (*CHBE 301, 302, 422, 424 or equivalent). Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Core ENCH 610 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3) Advanced application of the general thermodynamic methods to chemical engineering problems. First and second law consequences; estimation and correlation of thermodynamic properties; phase and chemical reaction equilibria. ENCH 620 Methods of Engineering Analysis (3) Application of selected mathematical techniques to the analysis and solution of engineering problems; included are the applications of matrices, vectors, tensors, differential equations, integral transforms, and probability methods to such problems as unsteady heat transfer, transient phenomena in mass transfer operations, stagewise processes, chemical reactors, process control, and nuclear reactor physics. ENCH 630 Transport Phenomena (3) Momentum, heat and mass transfer theory at both the continuum and microscopic levels. Steady and unsteady state; creeping and laminar flows; viscous and inviscid flows; transport at interfaces; lubrication theory; boundary layer theory; forced and natural convection; with specific application to complex and biological chemical engineering processes. ENCH 640 Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics (3) The theory and application of chemical reaction kinetics to the design of “real” chemical reactors, including: (a) non-isothermal reactors: simultaneous solution of molar and energy balances, reactor stability and multiple steady states; (b) non-ideal reactors: residence time distributions and reactor flow models; (c) heterogeneous reactors: simultaneous mass transfer and reaction in porous catalysts, overall effectiveness factors. In addition, kinetics and reactor design in biochemical engineering, polymerization processes, and chemical vapor deposition processes will be introduced. Technical Electives The following constitutes only a sample of the courses which may be used as technical electives. ENPM 626 Thermal Destruction Technology (3) Prerequisite: ENME 332 and ENME 232. Thermal destruction, incineration and combustion processes. Emphasis is on solid wastes and their composition, current and advanced destruction technologies, guidelines on design and operation,

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and environmental pollution. ENPM 627 Environmental Risk Analysis (3) The fundamental methodology for analyzing environmental risk is described with examples for selected applications. Key elements of the environmental risk methodology include: (1) source term and release characterization, (2) migration of contaminants in various media, (3) exposure assessment, (4) dose-response evaluation, (5) risk characterization, and (6) risk management. Also included will be an introduction to uncertainty analysis, stakeholder participation, and risk communication. Environmental laws and regulations will only be included if time permits. This course intends to provide students with the basic skills and knowledge needed to manage, evaluate, or perform environmental risk assessments and risk analyses. ENPM 637 Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering (3) An examination of biological principles directly affecting man and his environment, with particular emphasis on microbiological interactions in environmental engineering related to air, water and land systems; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes. ENPM 653 Environmental Law for Engineers and Scientists (3) Introduction to the basics in environmental law including the language and methods of the law, and the Constitution as the basis of the American legal system. Exposure to how lawyers think and approach environmental engineering problems. Case studies used extensively. ENPM 655 Contaminant Transport and Fate in the Environment (3) Prerequisites: Calculus, General Physics, General Chemistry, or permission of instructor. This class covers the physical and chemical behaviors of pollutants in surface water and subsurface environment. Emphasis will be on interactions between organic contaminants and natural geological matrixes and relevant issues including groundwater transport and subsurface remediation. ENPM 657 Sustainable Uses of Resources and Minimization of Waste (3) Material and energy use concepts are presented and examined that promote sustainable use of resources and aid in minimizing wastes. Concepts are addressed to find solutions to concerns such as: excessive municipal and industrial solid waste generation, landfill closures, exposure to toxic wastes, as well as, impacts of continued world population growth, consequences of additional carbon dioxide releases to the atmosphere, lack of sustainable use of food, water, energy, and soil, expected effects concerning climate change (global warming), and what will happen if the backlog of technology continues to shrink. Life cycle assessments, sustainable use strategies and industrial ecology approaches are some of the solutions considered as needed to meet future resources demands. ENPM 664 Chemical and Biological Detection (3) Introduction to hardware (instrumentation) and software (data analysis algorithm) aspects of chemical and biological detection. Physical measurements, chemical sensors, biosensors, optical sensor components, signal conditioning and analysis, chemometrics, image analysis, applications. ENPM 808 Computational Methods in Environmental Engineering (3) Introduction to the use of microcomputers and the familiarization with computer tools that aid in the numerical solution of environmental engineering problems. Operating systems, networks, numerical methods, programming, spreadsheets, numerical and symbolic computation, software and hardware interface, data acquisition. ENCH 454 Chemical Process Analysis and Optimization (3) Prerequisites: MATH 246, ENCH 426, and ENCH 440. Applications of mathematical models to the analysis and optimization of chemical processes. Models based on transport, chemical kinetics and other chemical engineering A. James Clark School of Engineering

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principles will be employed. Emphasis on evaluation of process alternatives. ENCH 471 Particle Science and Technology (3) Credit will only be granted for one of thefollowing: ENCH 468I or ENCH 471. Theory and modeling techniques for particle formation and particle size distribution dynamics. Science and technology of multiphase systems, powder and aerosol technology. Industrial, environmental and occupational applications: dry powder delivery of drugs, aerosol generation methods, nanoparticles, biowarfare agent detection, dry powder mixing, particulate emissions. Design particle synthesis and processing systems, particle removal systems. ENCH 482 Biochemical Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 440. Introduction to biochemicaland microbiological applications to commercial and engineering processes, including industrial fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, food and pharmaceutical processing and resulting waste treatment. Enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics and mass transfer. ENCH 483 Bioseparations (3) Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENCH 483 or ENCH 468A . Engineering fundamentals of separations and purification of biological molecules. Case studies and examples illustrate principles and practice of centrifugation, precipitation, crystallization, filtration, membrane separations, chromatography, and affinity separation of recombinant proteins and other biomolecules. Process scale-up and economics of biotechnology products and processes. ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Science (3) Prerequisites: ENCH 424 and ENCH 440. The elements of the chemistry, physics, processing methods, and engineering applications of polymers. ENCH 496 Processing of Polymer Materials (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 424. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENCH 496 or ENMA 496. A comprehensive analysis of the operations carried out on polymeric materials to increase their utility. Conversion operations such as molding, extrusion, blending, film forming, and calendaring. Development of engineering skills required to practice in the high polymer industry. ENCH 735 Chemical Process Dynamics and Control (3) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Dynamic response of continuous and sampled-data processes; feedback and feedforward control; model uncertainty; Internal Model Control structure; robustness with respect to modeling error; control of multi-input multi-output processes; decentralized control; Relative Gain Array; Process Resiliency. ENCH 736 Model Based Process Control (3) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Step and impulse response models; state space models; model predictive control formulation; online optimization; state feedback; Kalman filter; disturbance estimation; constrained processes; onlinear process models. ENCH 737 Chemical Process Optimization (3) Techniques of modern optimization theory as applied to chemical engineering problems. Optimization of single and multivariable systems with and without constraints. Application of partial optimization techniques to complex chemical engineering processes. ENCH 739 Modern Computing Techniques in Process Engineering (3) Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Presentation of recent developments in computing techniques in the context of chemical engineering problems. Symbolic computation and artificial intelligence, neural networks, data filtering and statistical treatment of data. ENCH 751 Turbulent and Multiphase Transport Phenomena (3) Prerequisite: ENCH620 and ENCH630. Basic equations and statistical theories for transport of heat, mass, and momentum in

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turbulent fluids with applications to processing equipment. Fundamental equations of multiphase flow for dilute systems with applications to particles, drops and bubbles. Current approaches for analysis of concentrated suspensions including deterministic models and population balance approaches. ENCH 762 Advanced Biochemical Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCH 482 or permission of both department and instructor. Advanced topics to include use of a digital computer for mathematical modeling of the dynamics of biological systems; separation techniques for heat sensitive biologically active materials; and transport phenomena in biological systems. ENCH781 Polymer Reaction Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCH640; or permission of instructor. Advanced topics in polymerization kinetics, reactor design and analysis; addition and step-growth polymerization; homogeneous and heterogeneous polymerization; photopolymerization; reactor dynamics; optimal operation and control of industrial polymerization reactors.  

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CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING The following five core areas are offered by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In addition to the recommended courses in a given core area, the student may select technical electives approved by an advisor. The only guideline for the selection of electives is that the electives be part of an integrated program of study. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; preferably Civil and Environmental, however other engineering degrees may be considered, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations) are required to be considered for admission. Specific prerequisite requirements for specialization: ◊ Environmental & Water Resources: Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, ENCE 310, 411, 412, 431, 432, or equivalent ◊ Geotechnical & Pavements: ENCE 340, 441, 447, or equivalent ◊ Structures: ENCE 353, 454, 455, or equivalent ◊ Transportation: ENCE 370, 470, 472, or equivalent Environmental and Water Resources Core ENCE 630 Environmental and Water Resource Systems I (3) The application of statistical and systems engineering techniques in the analysis of engineering data. Methods of formulating and calibrating models are presented. The fundamentals of statistical decision making are addressed. Central topics discussed are hypothesis testing and regression modeling. ENCE 631 Hydrologic and Nonpoint Pollution Models (3) A detailed analysis of the physicalprocesses controlling the spatial distribution of runoff and constituent transport during rainfall and snowmelt events. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of the processes and translating this understanding into practical models that can be used for runof simulation, stormwater management, and environmental impact assessment. ENCE 634 River Engineering (3) The application of fundamentals of hydrology and hydraulicsto engineering analysis and design questions focused on rivers and the watersheds they drain. The course examines issues of flood and drought flows, sediment transport, and water quality. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of watershed behavior in the face of land use change –particularly urbanization. ENCE 635 Geographic Information Systems for Watershed Analysis (3) Emphasis is on the use of GIS to support the analysis and modeling tasks associated with watershed planning and management. This course familiarizes the student with fundamentals of GIS data models, projections, and coordinate systems. Students develop a set of GIS- based alogrithms solving common engineering problems in hydrology. Internet data sources and GPS technology are also covered.

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ENCE 637 Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering (3) An exposition of biological principles directly affecting man and the environment; assay, control and treatment of biological agents in water, sewage and air; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes. ENCE 650 Process Dynamics in Environmental Systems (3) The fundamentals of heterogeneous equilibria, rates of environmental reactions, and flow and material transport or presented. Applications of these principles will be presented to small and large scale environmental problems involving liquid, gas, and solid phases. Both natural and engineered environmental systems will be examined. ENCE 651 Chemistry of Natural Waters (3) Application of principles from chemical thermodynamics and kinetics to the study and interpretation of the chemical composition of natural waters is rationalized by considering metal ion solubility controls, pH, carbonate equilibria, adsorption reactions, redox reactions and the kinetics of oxygenation reactions which occur in natural water environments. ENCE 655 Environmental Behavior of Organic Pollutants (3) Introduction to the scientific data needed and methods currently available to assess the environmental risk of organic chemicals. Applications of principles from chemical thermodynamics will be used to study phase-transfer processes of organic pollutants in the environment (solid/water, solid/air, water/air). Physicalchemical properties of organic pollutants will be used to estimate partitioning. ENCE 688 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering (3) Advanced topics selected by the faculty from the current literature of civil engineering to suit the needs and background of students. May be taken for repeated credit when identified by topic title. ENCE 688U Hazardous Waste Management (3) Review of environmental laws and regulations related to hazardous waste management, and the study of the technologies utilized to remediate hazardous waste sites. ENCE 688W Stream Response to Waste Discharge (3) The response of fresh waters to the introduction of organic and inorganic wastes will be discussed as it affects the use of water for industrial and potable supplies. ENCE 730 Environmental and Water Resource Systems II (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 630 or permission of instructor. Advanced topics in operational research. Applications to complex environmental and water resource systems. The use of systems simulation and probabalistic modeling. Geotechnical and Pavements Core ENCE 441 Foundation Design (3) Critical review of classical lateral earth pressure theories, analysis of retaining walls and reinforced earth walls, subsurface explorations, bearing capacity and settlement of shallow foundations, design of deep foundations that includes both pile foundations and drilled shafts. ENCE 447 Pavement Engineering (3) Fundamental principles underlying the design, construction, maintenance and repair, and management of highway and airfield pavement systems. Pavement performance (functional/structural; elevation); pavement mechanics (multi-layered elastic theory; slab theory); pavement materials (properties and characterization); environmental effects; current rigid and flexible design methods (new/rehabilitation); construction (new construction; A. James Clark School of Engineering

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maintenance/repair; rehabilitation); economic evaluation; pavement management. ENCE 640 Advanced Soil Mechanics (3) Introduction to the use of elastic theory in stress and displacement solutions to geotechnical engineering (soil and rock mechanics). Classical settlement (consolidation) and compressibility theories, including finite difference solution for vertical and radial drainage. ENCE 641 Advanced Foundation Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 441 or equivalent. Review of soil properties and subsurface exploration, evaluation and design of shallow foundations, including settlement and bearing capacity of spread footings and mats. Discussion of methods of soil improvement. Analysis and design of deep foundations including single pile, pile load testing, pile group actions, and drilled shaft foundation for both vertical and horizontal loads. Load and resistance factor design concepts applied to these systems. ENCE 643 Theory of Soil Strength (3) Prerequisite: ENCE340; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department. Restriction: Permission of instructor. Shear strength of cohesive and cohesionless soils is analyzed using the critical state soil mechanics theory of soil strength. Conventional laboratory strength tests, Mohr-Coulomb representation of soil strength, and recommended design parameters. ENCE 644 Advanced Pavement and Civil Engineering Materials (3) Dynamic material characterization. Elastic, plastic and viscoelastic behavior, energy analysis. Physical and mechanical properties, NDT. Performance analysis such creep, fatigue, and durability. Recent developments in aggregate evaluation. Portland cement concrete, high performance concrete, conventional and modifield asphalt binders and mixture. Polymers and composites, geotextiles, smart and self-healing materials, recycled and reclaimed materials. ENCE 645 Geotechnical Waste Disposal (3) Fundamental aspects of geotechnical engineering that apply to problems of waste containment and remediation, basic principles of containment systems, compacted clay liners and clay mineralogy, hydraulic conductivity of compacted soils, methods of laboratory and field hydraulic conductivity measurements, design of waste containment systems, landfill settlement, geosynthetic liners, waste compatibility, contaminant transport through liners, leachate collection systems, gas collection systems, covers and caps. ENCE 646 Geosynthetic Engineering (3) Use of geosynthetics in geotechnical and geoenviromental construction, evaluation of fundamental, long lasting principles related to the geosynthetics that can be employed in the design, design methodologies with geosynthetics, discussion of properties and behavior of geosynthetics in a laboratory setting, measurement and quantification of geomechanical and hydraulic behavior of various geosynthetics. ENCE 647 Slope Stability and Seepage (3) Theoretical and practical aspects of seepage effects, and groundwater flow, review of shear strength principles, flow through porous media, hydraulic conductivity, flow nets, determination of water pressure, seepage forces and quantity of seepage, laboratory and field tests for shear strength, infinite slopes, block analysis, method of slices, seismic analysis of slopes, effective and total stress analysis, computer program for slope stability analysis, slope stability problems in waste disposal, construction excavations, reinforced embankments, embankments on soft ground. ENCE 740 Computation Geomechanics (3) In-depth treatment of standard numerical analysis techniques for stress analysis and fluid flow problems in geomechanics. Emphasis on the underlying theoretical formulations, practical applications, and potential pitfalls in each numerical technique. A variety of realistic geomechanics problems is solved using student-developed and existing computer 22

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programs. ENCE 741 Earth Retaining Structures (3) Introduction to types and uses of earth retaining structures, and lateral earth pressure concepts and theories. Analysis and design of retaining walls and shoring structures and their bracing systems. These include retaining walls, mechanically stabilized earth walls, cantilever and anchored sheet piling, cellular cofferdams, braced cuts, soil nailing, and the design of tiebacks and anchors. Load and resistance factor design concepts applied to these systems. ENCE 743 Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering (3) Review of theory of vibration and wave propagation in elastic media. Field and laboratory methods for determining dynamic soil properties. Analysis and design of soil-foundation systems subjected to machinery generated vibrations and methods of foundation isolation. Earthquake causes, magnitude and intensity, seismic hazard evaluation, NEHRP site classification, site response analyses and ground motion amplification, liquefaction and response of earth structures. ENCE 744 QA/QC and Specifications for Highway Materials (3) Factorial Experiments and Analysis. Materials, Variability Components: Inherent and Testing Variability. Quality, Control/ Quality Assurance: Analysis Methods, Assurance Plans and Components. Specifications for Asphalt and Concrete Materials: Method, End-Result, Performance Based. Life Cycle Analysis and Performance Modeling Techniques. Use of Advanced Statistical Analysis for Material Properties Monitoring and Performance Predictions: ANOVA, Time Series, Spatial Data Analysis. Advanced Highway Materials including Polymer Modified and High Performance Asphalt and Concrete. ENCE 745 Geoenvironmental Site Remediation (3) Analysis of various techniques for remediation of contaminated media, applicable regulations and methods of field reconnaissance, invasive and non-invasive methods of site characterization, geophysical techniques, geoenvironmental monitoring, monitoring in the unsaturated zone, vertical cut-off walls, caps, soil vapor extraction systems, air sparging, permeable reactive walls, waste stabilization and solidification systems, electro-kinetic remediation. ENCE 747 Infrastructure and Pavement Management Systems (3) Pavement and infrastructure management, system engineering. Condition evaluation and rating, non-destructive methods, performance evaluation and modeling, economic analysis, cost and benefits. Pavement management systems (PMS): overview, a framework for system design, project and network PMS, pavement condition and SHRP surveys, costs and benefits of improved levels of pavement management, PMS case studies. Use of geographic information systems (GIS), system concepts applied to design. Implementation of maintenance management systems. Bridge management systems: inspection, rating, benefits. Building management systems: critical issues, private and public ownership, life cycle cost. Infrastructure management systems. Structures Core ENCE 610 Fundamentals of Structural Analysis (3) Cartesian tensor notation. Linear forms of the general equilibrium, compatibility, and constitutive equations. The calculus of variations. The principles of virtual work and complementary virtual work. Self-adjoint problem formulations. ENCE 611 Finite Element Methods (3) Formerly ENCE 661 Basic principles and fundamental concepts of the finite element method. Consideration of geometric and material nonlinearities, convergence, mesh gradation and computational procedures in analysis. Applications to plane stress

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and plane strain, plates and shells, eigenvalue problems, axisymmetric stress analysis, and other problems in civil engineering. ENCE 613 Structural Dynamics (3) Formerly ENCE 653 Analysis of the dynamic response of structures and structural components subjected to impact load, transient load, and ground excitations; study of single degree-of-freedom and multi degree-of-freedom systems in classical closed form solution and approximate numerical solution; solution in the frequency domain and the use of finite element method. ENCE 614 Computer Methods in Engineering (3) UNIX programming environment, C programming, matrices, data structures, sets and set operations, parsing techniques, interactive window systems, applications to engineering. ENCE 615 Structural Reliability (3) Probability and statistics. Fundamentals of uncertainty analysis. Fundamentals of structural reliability. Reliability-based design. Simulation and variance reduction techniques. Fuzzy sets and applications. ENCE 616 Plates and Shells (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 410 or equivalent. Formerly ENCE 652. Medium thick plate theory, Von-Karman’s plate theory, orthotropic plates; approximate methods; buckling; membrane theory of shells, bending theory of shells and shell deformations. ENCE 710 Steel Structures I (3) Formerly ENCE 656 Moment connections of beams andcolumns. Wind bracing connections. Plate girders. Floor systems for buildings. Strengthening of beams and trusses. Corrosion control. Fatigue and fracture. ENCE 711 Steel Structures II (3) Formerly ENCE 655. Plastic analysis and design of beams, rigid frames, eccentrically braced frames, and plates. Design of light-gauge cold-formed members. ENCE 712 Masonry Structures (3) Analysis, design and construction of masonry structures. Analysis and design of beams, columns and pilasters, non-load bearing walls, load bearing walls, and shear walls. High rise building design. Composite masonry. Prestressed and post-tensioned masonry. Energy considerations, passive solar design of masonry structures. Recent developments in masonry research. ENCE 713 Concrete Structures I (3) Formerly ENCE 753. The behavior and strength of reinforced concrete members under combined loadings, including the effects of creep, shrinkage and temperature. Mechanisms of shear resistance and design procedures for bond, shear and diagonal tension. Elastic and ultimate strength analysis and design of slabs. Columns in multistory frames. Applications to reinforced concrete structures. ENCE 714 Concrete Structures II (3) Formerly ENCE 754. Fundamental concepts of prestressed concrete. Analysis and design of flexural members including composite and continuous beams with emphasis on load balancing technique. Ultimate strength design for shear. Design of post tensioned flat slabs. Various applications of prestressing including tension members, compression members, circular prestressing, frames and folded plates. ENCE 715 Earthquake Engineering (3) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Formerly ENCE 755. Review of SDOF and MDOF structural dynamics; characteristics of earthquakes; philosophies of seismic design; elastic and inelastic response spectra; design for ductility; principles of capacity design; design of structural systems requiring special performance criteria. ENCE 716 Forensic Engineering (3) Application of the art and science of engineering in the jurisprudence system. Includes the investigation of the physical causes of accidents and othersources of claims and litigation, preparation of engineering reports, testimony at hearings and trials 24

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in administrative or judicial proceedings, and the rendition of advisory opinions to assist the resolution of disputes affecting life and property. Study of the process of failure investigation from initial site visit, through report preparation to adjudication. Emphasis on lessons learned from failures. ENCE 717 Bridge Structures (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 255, ENCE 355, and differential equations. Recommended: ENCE 455. Formerly ENCE 751. The design and rating of bridge structures in accordance with the AASHTO WSD, LFD, ALFD, and LRFD specifications. Development of the basic strength and performance requirements as defined within AASHTO, area and various foreign codes. Projects requiring the design, rating and ultimate strength evaluations will be assigned for all of the predominate construction types including: simple and continuous span, straight and horizontally curved, non-composite and composite w and box section superstructure elements. ENCE 718 Advanced Structural Systems (3) Formerly ENCE 750. Review of classical determinate and indeterminate analysis technique; multistory buildings; space structures; suspension bridges and cables structures; arches; long span bridges. Transportation Core ENPM 808 Geographic Information System Applications (3) Geographic Information System(GIS) applications in solving engineering problems such as optimal facility location, highway alignment optimization, environmental impact analysis, and engineering economic analysis. Exploiting spatial characteristics of a GIS for engineering applications. Role of a GIS in mapping and database management. Intelligent real world GIS applications in automated decision making and expert system development. ENPM 808 Intelligent Optimization Using Artificial Intelligence (3) Application of intelligent optimization techniques in solving complex engineering problems. Detailed discussion of four such techniques: genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, neural networks, and Tabu search. Example problems from civil, electrical, mechanical, manufacturing, and systems engineering will be discussed. ENCE 670 Highway Characteristics and Measurements (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 470 or permission of both department and instructor. The study of the fundamental traits and behavior patterns of road users and their vehicles in traffic. The basic characteristics of the pedestrian, the driver, the vehicle, traffic volume and speed, stream flow and intersection operation, parking, and accidents. ENCE 672 Regional Transportation Planning (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 471 or permission of both department and instructor. Factors involved and the components of the process for planning statewide and regional transportation systems, encompassing all modes. Transportation planning studies, statewide traffic models, investment models, programming and scheduling. ENCE 673 Urban Transportation (3) The contemporary methodology of urban transportation planning. The urban transportation planning process, interdependence between the urban transportation system and the activity system, urban travel demand models, evaluation of urban transportation alternatives and their implementation. ENCE 674 Urban Transit Planning and Rail Transportation Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 471or permission of both department and instructor. Basic engineering and components of conventional and high-speed railroads and of air cushion and other high-speed new technology. The study of urban rail and bus transit. The characteristics of the vehicle, the supporting way, and the

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terminal requirements will be evaluated with respect to system performance, capacity, cost, and level of service. ENCE675 Airport Planning and Design (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 471 or permission of both department and instructor. The planning and design of airports including site selection, runway configuration, geometric and structural design of the landing area, and terminal facilities. Methods of financing airports, estimates of aeronautical demand, air traffic control, and airport lighting are also studied. ENCE676 Highway Traffic Flow Theory (3) Prerequisites: ENCE 461 and ENCE 462; or permission of instructor. An examination of physical and statistical laws that are used to represent traffic flow phenomena. Deterministic models including heat flow, fluid flow, and energy-momentum analogies, car following models, and acceleration noise. Stochastic approaches using independent and Markov processes, Queuing models, and probability distributions. ENCE 677 Quantitative Methods in Transportation Engineering (3) Applications of operations research and management science models to the planning, design and operations of various types of transportation systems. Equilibrium traffic assignment, network design, fleet assignment, fleet routing, crew scheduling, simulation, and queuing theory. ENCE681 Freight Transportation Analysis (3) Application of operations research and system analysis methods to freight transportation systems. Cost and output analysis, terminal location, freight transportation demand models, freight transportation network equilibrium models and analytic models for analyzing the operations of rail, motor carrier, water carrier and air cargo systems.

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CYBERSECURITY ENGINEERING This option, offered in collaboration with Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, and the Maryland Cybersecurity Center, recommends six core courses and four technical electives. Specifically, the Cybersecurity students could take all six courses from this area, a minimum of two courses from the Cybersecurity Technical Electives, and if appropriate two courses from the Other Technical Electives. The elective courses are selected by the student, but require the approval of their academic advisor prior to registering. Admissions Requirements ◊ Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in Engineering, Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, or Physics, from an accredited institution. ◊ If you have a degree in a closely related field of study (i.e. Information Technology, Information Assurance, Computer Information Systems) we require at least one (1) of the following certifications: CompTIA Security+, GIAC GSEC, or Certified Ethical Hacker certification is required Cybersecurity Core ENPM 691 Programming in C for Cybersecurity Applications (3) This course teaches the fundamentals of programming in C and the skills including data structures and algorithms that students need for solving typical telecommunication engineering problems in cyber security area by writing programs in C. Control flow statement, arrays, pointers and dynamic memory allocation will be reviewed. Developing data structures such as queues, stacks and linked lists and network applications including sockets, packet sniffing in C will be discussed. The course concludes with an introduction to data encryption and basic programming technics for addressing data security related issues. In addition to the weekly reading and programming assignments, students are required to complete a final project and make a presentation. Students taking this course do not need to have any previous programming experience. ENPM 808 Secure Operating Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 691 Programming in C for Cybersecurity Applications, CMSC 106 Introduction to C Programming, or permission of the instructor. Operating systems are the basic building block on which programmers build applications and on which security-minded professionals rely, whether they are monitoring activity on a computer, testing applications for security, or determining how malicious code affected their network. This course covers advanced topics in operating systems including process management and communication, remote procedure calls, memory management (including shared memory and virtual memory), checkpointing and recovery, file system, I/O subsystem and device management, distributed file systems and security. The course consists of reading and discussing research papers and includes a course project. Please note: This course assumes knowledge of C programming and a previous operating systems class or knowledge in various issues such as process management, process synchronization, the critical section problem, CPU scheduling, memory management, secondary storage management. ENPM 808 Networks and Protocols (3) This course provides a deep understanding of TCP/ IP protocol suit and routing in the internet. The course topics are: overview of TCP/IP, basics of IP protocol, basics of TCP protocol, Network Address Translation (NAT), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Internet Protocol Security (IPsec), Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), Domain Name Service (DNS), IPv6,

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Concepts of routing (Bellman-Ford and Dijkstra algorithms), Routing Information Protocol (RIP), Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP), Enhance Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP), and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). ENPM 693 Network Security (3) This course provides the necessary foundation on network security and an in-depth review of commonly-used security mechanisms and techniques. Specific topics that will be covered include network attacks, firewalls, intrusion detection and response, security protocols (in particular, IPsec, SSL, and Kerberos), Denial of Service (DoS) attacks/ detection/ prevention, viruses and worms, DNS, email & Voice Over IP (VoIP) security, wireless infrastructure security, web security, and privacy. ENPM 808 Information Assurance (3) The first half of lectures provides an overview of cybersecurity. One third of these lectures focuses on the fundamentals of cybersecurity like authentication, access control, and security models. The second third focuses on the practice of cybersecurity using Unix and Windows NT as case studies. The last third is dedicated to security in distributed systems including network security, and World Wide Web security. The second half of the lectures focuses on the information assurance process. First, information assets are enumerated and classified. Second, the main vulnerabilities and threats are identified. Third, a risk assessment is conducted by considering the probability and impact of the undesired events. Finally, a risk management plan is developed that includes countermeasures involving mitigating, eliminating, accepting, or transferring the risks, and considers prevention, detection, and response. ENPM 808 Cybersecurity Capstone (3) Prerequisites: completion of Cybersecurity core curriculum. A comprehensive review of the cybersecurity core curriculum using baseline Intrusion & Detection System (IDS) tools and recognizing simple attack signatures: network based, host based, and multiple sources in a hands-on lab. Cyber exercises include a look into vectors and scenarios that can be used to replicate real-world network events; correlation between various tools and event logs that allows students to practice the “art” of protecting and defending a virtual enclave environment in realistic situations. Students will identify attack types and apply appropriate controls to mitigate and defend against attack vectors. Students will use IDS tools in a cyber-modeling environment, to engage in the detection of intrusions under the stresses and pressures of a realistic attack environment. Cybersecurity Technical Electives ENPM 808 Secure Software Testing & Construction (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 691 Programming in C for Cybersecurity Applications, CMSC 106 Introduction to C Programming, or permission of the instructor. As software gets more complex, there is even more potential for vulnerabilities to remain in the production version. While traditional and emerging software testing methods are very good at detecting a large majority of “bugs” in the software, modifications to the methods are necessary to ensure vulnerabilities related to security are discovered and mitigated prior to release. In industry, there is also a cost-benefit analysis that determines the limits to pre-release testing, further enforcing the need to uniquely identify security vulnerabilities, potentially prioritizing their correction over other vulnerabilities. This course will cover methods of building security in from the beginning of development and testing the resulting software to ensure security vulnerabilities are detected. The course will use a mixture of textbook principles and research papers to cover the concepts. Students will also complete a course project.

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ENPM 808 Security Tools for Information Security (3) Prerequisites: familiarity with Linux and Windows operating systems, as well as TCP/IP and basic networking concepts. Students will perform host- and network-based security tasks relating to security, investigation, compliance verification and auditing using a wide selection of commonly used tools on both Windows and Linux platforms, with emphasis on open source tools. ENPM 808 Digital Forensics and Incidence Response (3) Prerequisites: intermediate Windows and Linux skills, familiarity with file system concepts. Students will implement a robust incident response methodology, including proper forensic handling of evidence, and cover legal aspects of national and international law regarding forensics. The bulk of the course covers evidence acquisition, preservation, analysis and reporting on multiple platforms. ENPM 808 Reverse Software Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 691 Programming in C for Cybersecurity Applications, CMSC 106 Introduction to C Programming, or permission of the instructor. This course provides in-depth, hands-on training for reverse engineering tools, including the IDA Pro disassembler, the Wireshark network protocol analyzer, debuggers, and binary tools. Students will become familiar with the x86 instruction set through both assembly programming and disassembly. Class exercises include revealing back doors and exploiting buffer overflows. Each student will develop a network-based application and in turn reverse engineer and exploit one of their peer’s completed applications. Other Technical Electives ENPM 631 TCP/IP Networking (3) To describe how IP datagram travels through the internet and are routed from the source to the destination. To introduce the two transport protocols: UDP and TCP, the proper context to use each one, and related parameters and issues. To cover some other protocols, closely related to the TCP/IP that are responsible for the seamless operation of the Internet. ENPM 632 Advanced TCP/IP Networks (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 602. Topics to be covered are: Address resolution protocol (ARP); Error and control messages (ICMP); Internet Protocol (IP); Addressing classes; Classless and subnet address extensions (CIDR); User datagram protocol (UDP); Transport Control Protocol (TCP); TCP performance; Flow control; Congestion management; Routing protocols; Internet multicasting (IGMP); Network address translation (NAT); IPv6; Domain Name Service (DNS); Virtual LANs (VLAN); Applications (Telnet, FTP, ‌); The Socket Interface. ENPM 611 Software Engineering (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language. This course covers software engineering, concepts, methods, and practices important to both the theorist and the practitioner. The entire range of responsibilities expected of a software engineer is presented. The fundamental areas of requirements development, software design, programming languages, and testing are covered extensively. Sessions on supporting areas such as systems engineering, project management, and software estimation are also included. ENPM 612 System & Software Requirements (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language. This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of requirements development. Students will recognize the place of requirements, how to work with users, requirements methods and techniques, the various requirements types, how to set requirements

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development schedules, requirements evolution, how to model and prototype requirements, how to evaluate and manage risk in requirements, techniques to test requirements, how to manage the requirements process, and how to write an effective requirements document. ENPM 613 Software Design and Implementation (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language and ENPM 611 or ENPM 612. This course covers software design concepts and practices within the field important to both the practitioner and the theorist. Architectural and detailed designs are included for batch, client/server, and real-time systems. Design considerations for structured, object-oriented, and Web-based systems are covered. Design of databases, user interfaces, forms, and reports are also included. Implementation issues that affect the design, including error handling, performance, and inter-process communication, are presented. ENPM 614 Software Testing and Maintenance (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 612 or ENPM 613. This course covers aspects of software development after coding is completed. Students will understand the various levels of testing, techniques for creating test data, how to manage test cases and scenarios, testing strategies and methods, testing batch, client/server, real-time, and Internet systems, and the development of an effective test plan. Software maintenance will include the creation of easily maintained software; preventive maintenance, corrective maintenance, and enhancements; configuration management practices; and assuring quality in software maintenance. ENPM 641 Systems Concepts, Issues and Processes (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. This course (along with ENPM 642) is an introduction to the professional and academic aspects of systems engineering. Topics include models of system lifecycle development, synthesis and design of engineering systems, abstract system representations, visual modeling and unified modeling language (UML), introduction to requirements engineering, systems performance assessment, issues in synthesis and design, design for system lifecycle, approaches to system redesign in response to changes in requirements, reliability, trade-off analysis, and optimization-based design. ENPM 642 Systems Requirements, Design and Trade-Off Analysis (3) Prerequisites: ENPM 641 and permission of department. This course builds on material covered in ENPM 641, emphasizing the topics of requirements engineering and design and trade-off analysis. This pair of courses serves as an introduction to the professional and academic aspects of systems engineering. Liberal use will be made of concepts from the first course, ENPM641, including models of system lifecycle development, synthesis and design of engineering systems, visual modeling and unified modeling language (UML), requirements engineering, systems performance assessment, issues in synthesis and design, design for system lifecycle, approaches to system redesign in response to changes in requirements, reliability, trade-off analysis, and optimization-based design.

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ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING This option, offered by Electrical and Computer Engineering, recommends six core courses and four technical electives. Specifically, the Communication and Signal Processing option students could take all six courses from this area, or a minimum of four courses from this area and up to two courses from either Computer or Software Engineering. The Computer Engineering option students could either take five courses from that area and one course from Software Engineering or they could take four courses from Software Engineering and two courses from Computer Engineering. The major and minor core areas are selected by the student. Students should consult with their advisor prior to registering. Software Engineering is available as a GCEN only. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; Computer, Electrical, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations) are required to be considered for admission. Specific prerequisite requirements for specialization: ◊ Communications & Signal Processing: ENEE 204 or 205, ENEE 322, 324, 420 & 425, or equivalent ◊ Computer Engineering: ENEE 150, 244, 350, 440 & 446, or equivalent Communication and Signal Processing Core ENPM 600 Probability and Stochastic Processes for Engineers (3) Prerequisite: undergraduate introduction to discrete and continuous probability. Axioms of probability; conditional probability and Bayes’ rule; random variables, probability distributions and densities; functions of random variables; definition of stochastic process; stationary processes, correlation functions, and power spectral densities; stochastic processes and linear systems; estimation and optimum filtering. Applications in communication and control systems, signal processing, and detection and estimation. ENPM 601 Analog and Digital Communication Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 600 or equivalent. Analog modulation methods including AM, DSBSC-AM, SSB, and QAM; effects of noise in analog modulation systems. Digital communication methods for the infinite bandwidth additive white Gaussian noise channel: PAM, QAM, PSK, FSK modulation; optimum receivers using the MAP principle; phase-locked loops; error probabilities. Digital communication over bandlimited channels: intersymbol interference and Nyquist’s criterion, adaptive equalizers, symbol clock and carrier recovery systems, trellis coding. Spread spectrum systems: direct sequence modulation and frequency hopping. ENPM 602 Data Networks (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 324 or equivalent. Principles of network design, circuit switching and packet switching, OSI Reference Model: parity and cyclic redundancy check codes; retransmission request protocols; Markov chains and queuing models for delay analysis; multiaccess communication, local area networks, Ethernet and Token Ring standards; routing, flow control, internetworking; higher layer functions and protocols. Software tools for network

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simulation and performance analysis will be used. ENPM 603 Theory and Applications of Digital Signal Processing (3) Prerequisite: undergraduate introduction to discrete-time systems. Uniform sampling and the sampling theorem; the Z-transform and discrete-time system analysis; multi-rate systems; discrete-time random processes; methods for designing FIR and IIR digital filters; effects of quantization and finite work-length; the DFT and FFT; power spectrum estimation. ENPM 604 Wireless Communication Networks (3) Prerequisites: ENEE 420 and ENEE 426 or equivalent. Design and analysis of wireless communication systems. Aspects of radio propagation, signal strength, multipath propagation, fading, diversity reception, cell shapes. Modulation and coding for the mobile radio channel including FDMA, TDMA, and CDMA. Multiaccess issues including frequency allocation, channel reuse, and power control. System level issues including traffic engineering, blocking, network design and optimization, channel allocation control, handoffs, mobility management, registration and tracking, signaling and user location database management. Examples of existing analog and emerging digital cellular standards. ENPM 605 Information Theory and Coding (3) The purpose of this course is to study communication systems from a mathematical viewpoint and within the framework set up by Claude Shannon in 1948. This is achieved by viewing the information being communicated and also the noise and other disturbances in a communication system as stochastic processes and phenomena. Information theory then shows, through a number of elegant coding theorems, the optimum performance that can be achieved with any communication system. Both problems of data compression and error correction coding will be studied. Part of the course will be devoted to practical coding techniques and a few applications. ENPM 606 Linear Control Systems (3) Simulation and modeling, linear systems theory, specifications, structures and limitations, feedback system stability in terms of loop gain, classical design, and state feedback. Computer Engineering Core ENEE 645 Compilers and Optimization (3) ENEE350 or CMSC216; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department. Credit only granted for: ENEE645 or ENEE759C. Formerly: ENEE759C. The compilation, linking and loading process. Using lexical analyzers and parsers. Intermediate forms. Global, stack and heap objects, and their addressing modes. Stack implementation. Control flow analysis and optimization. Dataflow analysis and optimization including Static, single assignment. Alias analysis. ENPM 607 Computer System Design and Architecture (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 446 or equivalent. Principles of computer design and cost/performance factors; instruction set design and implementation, RISC vs. CISC instruction sets; control unit and pipeline design; floatingpoint arithmetic; memory hierarchy designs, caches, memory interleaving, virtual memory; I/O deviceinterconnections to CPUs and main memory. Additional topics include parallel system designs, SIMD, MIMD, SPMD; interconnection networks for processors and memories; optimization of pipeline operations; superscalar architectures, power management techniques. ENPM 609 Microprocessor-Based Design (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate logic design course; computer architecture; programming course or programming experience. Introduction to microprocessor components, software, and tools. Architectures, instruction sets, and assembly

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language programming for a commercial microprocessor family. Real-time programming techniques. Peripheral chips such as parallel ports, counter-timers, DMA controllers, interrupt controllers, and serial communication units. Design projects emphasizing integrated hardware and software solutions to engineering problems. ENPM 610 Digital VLSI Design (3) An introduction to the design and performance limits of VLSI circuits. Topics include VLSI digital design issues, testing techniques, fabrication techniques, layout, device physics, performance limits, stray resistance and capacitance, and computer-aided design tools. ENPM 675 Operating System Design (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 350 or equivalent Programming experience in C, C++, or Java. Overview (Introduction, Organization), Process Management (Processes and Threads, Process Scheduling, Process Synchronization and Communication), Memory Management (Main Memory, Virtual Memory), Storage Management (File System, I/O System), Protection and Security. ENPM808 Embedded Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 150 or equivalent (recommended), ENEE 244 or equivalent (required), and ENEE 350 or equivalent (required). Introduction to embedded systems design and evaluation: requirements, specification, architecture, hardware and software components, integration and performance evaluation. Topics include instruction sets, CPU, embedded computing platform, program design and analysis, operating systems, hardware accelators, multiprocessors, networks, and system analysis. Real-life embedded systems design examples will be used throughput the course to illustrate these concepts. Software Engineering Core ENPM 611 Software Engineering (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language. This course covers software engineering, concepts, methods, and practices important to both the theorist and the practitioner. The entire range of responsibilities expected of a software engineer is presented. The fundamental areas of requirements development, software design, programming languages, and testing are covered extensively. Sessions on supporting areas such as systems engineering, project management, and software estimation are also included. ENPM 612 System & Software Requirements (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language. This course focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of requirements development. Students will recognize the place of requirements, how to work with users, requirements methods and techniques, the various requirements types, how to set requirements development schedules, requirements evolution, how to model and prototype requirements, how to evaluate and manage risk in requirements, techniques to test requirements, how to manage the requirements process, and how to write an effective requirements document. ENPM 613 Software Design and Implementation (3) Prerequisite: Competency in a programming language and ENPM 611 or ENPM 612. This course covers software design concepts and practices within the field important to both the practitioner and the theorist. Architectural and detailed designs are included for batch, client/server, and real-time systems. Design considerations for structured, object-oriented, and Web-based systems are covered. Design of databases, user interfaces, forms, and reports are also included. Implementation issues that affect the design, including error handling, performance, and inter-process communication, are presented.

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ENPM 614 Software Testing and Maintenance (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 612 or ENPM 613. This course covers aspects of software development after coding is completed. Students will understand the various levels of testing, techniques for creating test data, how to manage test cases and scenarios, testing strategies and methods, testing batch, client/server, real-time, and Internet systems, and the development of an effective test plan. Software maintenance will include the creation of easily maintained software; preventive maintenance, corrective maintenance, and enhancements; configuration management practices; and assuring quality in software maintenance. Technical Electives ENPM 631 TCP/IP Networking (3) To describe how IP datagram travels through the internet and are routed from the source to the destination. To introduce the two transport protocols: UDP and TCP, the proper context to use each one, and related parameters and issues. To cover some other protocols, closely related to the TCP/IP that are responsible for the seamless operation of the Internet. ENPM 632 Advanced TCP/IP Networks (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 602. Topics to be covered are: Address resolution protocol (ARP); Error and control messages (ICMP); Internet Protocol (IP); Addressing classes; Classless and subnet address extensions (CIDR); User datagram protocol (UDP); Transport Control Protocol (TCP); TCP performance; Flow control; Congestion management; Routing protocols; Internet multicasting (IGMP); Network address translation (NAT); IPv6; Domain Name Service (DNS); Virtual LANs (VLAN); Applications (Telnet, FTP, ‌); The Socket Interface. ENPM 676 VLSI Testing and Design for Testability (3) Prerequisite: ENEE 244 or equivalent. This course will cover the major topics of VLSI Test Process and Equipment, Faults and Fault Modeling, Fault Simulation, Combinational Logic APTG, Sequential Logic ATPG, Iddq Testing, Function Testing, Memory Testing, Delay Testing, Design for Testability, Built-In Self-Test (BIST), Boundary Scan. ENPM 677 Wireless Sensor Networks (3) This course focuses on networking aspects, protocols ENPM 677 Wireless Sensor Networks (3) This course focuses on networking aspects, protocols and architectures for Wireless Sensor Networks. Provides a thorough description of the most important issues and questions that have to be addressed in a wireless sensor neto work. and architectures for Wireless Sensor Networks. Provides a thorough description of the most important issues and questions that have to be addressed in a wireless sensor network. ENPM 693 Network Security (3) Prerequisite: An operating systems and/or network protocol course or equivalent. Introduction to various approaches to design; specify and verify security protocols used in large systems and networks; familiarization with some current technologies. Security threats and countermeasures, communication security and basic encryption techniques, authentication protocols, data confidentiality and integrity, analysis of cryptographic protocols, and access control in large systems and networks. ENPM 808 Satellite Communication Systems (3) This course is intended as a graduate level course to study the architecture and design of the modern satellite communication system. The first part includes an overview of satellite communication systems and a review of communication theory. The second part of the course includes Earth station design, radio link analysis and regulatory requirements. The third part of the course will cover multiple access, focusing on the TDMA scheme. The last part of the course introduces satellite applications with a focus on IP over satellite. An overview of various VSAT and mobile satellite systems will also be included. ENPM 808 Video Processing (3) Prerequisite: A senior or graduate level DSP course. The course

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teaches digital video processing methods and some main video coding standards. More specifically, the course covers basics of analog and digital video, Fourier analysis for video signals, spatiotemporal sampling, 2-D and 3-D motion estimation, video compression methods, MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 standards, error resilience in video compression, H.263 video telephony and streaming video. ENPM 808 Principles of Radar I (3) This introductory course in modern technology provides working knowledge or relevant basic principles. Fundamental concepts applicable to all modern radars are addressed and explained. Fourier transforms are discussed briefly , but in sufficient detail for study and comprehension or current complex waveforms. ENPM 808 Principles of Radar II (3) Prerequisites: Radar I, or its equivalent, or significant radar experience. This course acquaints the student with advanced radar principles with emphasis on radar antennas and corresponding signal processing techniques. Students also explore the interconnection between radar antenna and digital signal processing and current technological trends. ENPM 808 Object-Oriented Programming and Data Structures (3) This course is intended for those who require a programming course prior to being able to take ENPM 611, 612, 613, or 614. It provides an introduction to programming in Java, object-oriented programming techniques, and introductory data structures. Topics include basic control structures and data types; classes, inheritance, and polymorphism; basic data structures such as lists, trees, sets, and maps; and Java library classes, Programming projects reinforce these concepts via designing, building, testing, and debugging medium-sized software systems and learning to use relevant tools. ENPM 808 Wireless Communications: Concepts and Technologies (3) This course will cover advanced topics in wireless communications for voice, data, and multimedia. We begin with a brief overview of current wireless systems and standards. We then characterize the wireless channel, including path loss for different environments, random log-normal shadowing due to signal attenuation, and the flat and frequency-selective properties of multipath fading. Next we examine the fundamental capacity limits of wireless channels and the characteristics of the capacity-achieving transmission strategies. The course then covers an overview of wireless networks, including multiple and random access techniques, WLANs, cellular system design, and ad-hoc network design. Applications for these systems, including the evolution of cell phones and PDAs, smart homes and appliances, sensor networks, and automated highways and skyways, will also be discussed. ENPM808 Design and Synthesis of Digital Systems (3) Design methodology for modern digital systems is based heavily on use of hardware description languages (HDLs), such as Verilog and VHDL, and use of automated synthesis from HDL programs into implementations on .eld programmable gate array (FPGA), and application-speci.c integrated circuit (ASIC) platforms. This trend towards HDL-based digital system design has been driven by the complexity of modern digital integrated circuits, and advances in the simulation and synthesis capabilities provided by electronic design automation (EDA) tools. This course will introduce students to HDL-based design of modern digital systems, and will cover in depth the design and implementation of digital systems using the Verilog HDL. Students will learn fundamental concepts of the Verilog language; modeling of complex digital systems; simulation and veri.cation; and Verilog coding styles for synthesis. Hands-on experience will be developed through practical designs, exercises, and projects. Students will use state-of-theart EDA tools to design, simulate, and test digital systems. The latter part of the course will focus on customized programmable platforms such as graphics processors (GPUs) multicore platforms and FPGAs as well as coding, building, and debugging for such platforms.

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ENERGETIC CONCEPTS This in an online program in Energetics, a branch of the physical science of mechanics, which deals primarily with energy and its transformations. Energetics research is the underpinning of the development of explosives and propellants. Energetics has clear applicability to military R&D, including the development of explosives technology, undersea weapons, and pilot ejection devices. Other applications are in space exploration, fire suppression, anti-terrorism, and cartridge actuated devices such as door openers and automobile air bags. Each student is required to complete thirty credits of approved course work or ten courses where each course represents three credits. Five of these courses must be from the Energetic Concepts core curriculum. Five additional technical electives courses may be taken from Energetic Concepts or through our other distance learning programs (Project Management, Reliability Engineering Sustainable Energy Engineering, Nuclear Engineering or Fire Protection Engineering) or on campus with the approval of the academic advisor. Two of the elective courses may be taken at the undergraduate (400) level for graduate credits. ENPM 808 Special Projects in Energetics may be repeated for a total of six graduate credits. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; Civil and Environmental, Mechanical, Chemical and Biomolecular, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Energetic Concepts Core ENPM 681 Shockwave Physics I (3) Covers the early history of the field becoming a scientificdiscipline, conservation equations for one-dimensional plane steady shocks, impedance matching, contact discontinuities, experimental techniques, thermodynamics of steady shocks, equations of state, one dimensional detonation theories, thermal explosions, techniques to measure steady detonation wave properties, sensitivity tests, and error analysis. ENPM 682 Shockwave Physics II (3) Elastic-plastic solids, phase transitions, porous solids, materials with time-dependent properties, detonation waves in Ideal explosives, detonation waves in cylinders of non-ideal explosives, shock initiation of high explosives, experimental techniques for measuring detonation wave properties, Lagrangian coordinate system, ramp wave and radiation dynamic loading of material. ENPM 683 Chemistry of Energetic Materials (3) Overview of Functional groups of energeticmolecules, Important properties in energetic molecules, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics –how do they differ chemically, Estimation of properties of EMs, Relationship between performance of explosives and energetic ingredients, Assessment of sensitivity of EMs, Thermal stability of energetic materials, Nitrocellulose and stabilizers, Chemistry of Nonideal explosives, Reactive materials, Polymorphism in energetics, Acidity and basicity of energetic materials, Crystal properties and sensitivity, Destruction of energetic materials – alkaline hydrolysis.

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ENPM 808 Fundamentals of Solid-Propellant Combustion (3) There is a broad usage of solid propellant in various propulsion and gas generation systems. Engineers and scientist working on such systems are continuously challenged by problems involving complicated thermochemical processes. The specific objectives of this course are to present historical state-of-the-art developments of various aspects of solid propellant combustion and suggest future research areas by identifying technological gaps in the different areas of solid propellant combustion. ENPM 684 Rocket Propulsion (3) Review of basic rocket propulsion principles includingperformance, design, analysis, nozzle theory, and thermodynamic relationships. Students will conduct performance analyses of solid, liquid, and hybrid rocket motors. Design projects will be focused to allow students to develop a basic understanding for the challenges associated with the design of chemical rocket engines/motors. We will examine the classification of solid and liquid propellants/fuels/oxidizers and their combustion characteristics. ENME 707 Combustion & Reacting Flows (3) Review of basic chemical thermodynamics principles ( 1’st, 2’nd law). Students will be introduced to the concepts of mass transfer so that they can eventually solve reaction-diffusion problems later in the term. We will spend considerable time developing the foundations of chemical kinetics and combustion chemistry. Examples of the chemistry of polluting emission will be discussed as well as unusual non-tradition combustion chemistries. We then introduce the concepts of prototype reactors ( batch, plug-flow and perfectly stirred reactors) and then develop the theory of laminar premixed and diffusion flames. We will discuss two-phase combustion processes. E.g. Droplet burning and burning of solids. Other special topics will include statistical mechanical description of reaction rate theory. Technical Electives ENPM 661 Introduction to the Structure of Materials (3) The basic concepts of crystalline and amorphous materials are introduced. Crystal structure analysis is reviewed. Other topics include: x-ray diffraction, electron energy bands, metallic structure, elastic waves, semiconductors and superconductivity. ENPM 662 Introductory Thermodynamics of Materials (3) The basic thermodynamic laws are applied to materials science. Phase transformations in materials and thermodynamic properties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials are introduced. Concepts related to phase diagrams are applied to real material systems. ENPM 808 Special Projects in Energetics (3) Each student will select a special project in energetics of interest to the students. An outline and expected output will be agreed upon by the instructor and students. The student will work independently and submit a mid-term progress report and a final report. The final grade will be based upon the final report. This course may be repeated for a total of six credits. ENPM 808 Introduction to MEMS (3) Introduction to MEMS; Commercial & Military applications/successes; MEMS materials; MEMS fabrication techniques and processes; MEMSdesign, actuation, and sensing; MEMS packaging; Hermeticity of MEMS; metrology and reliability; and final project. ENCH 471 Particle Science and Technology (3) Theory and modeling techniques for particleformation and particle size distribution dynamics. Science and technology of multiphase systems, powder and aerosol technology. Industrial, environmental, and occupational applications:

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dry powder delivery of drugs, aerosol generation methods, nanoparticles, biowarfare agent detection, dry powder mixing, particulate emissions. Design particle synthesis and processing systems, particle removal systems. ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Science (3) The elements of the chemistry, physics, processing methods, and engineering applications of polymers.

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ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Courses are offered by the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, and the Mechanical Engineering Department. Students select one of these academic departments as their major department for advising. Choose seven of the following core courses plus three technical electives. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; Civil and Environmental, Mechanical, Chemical and Biomolecular, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Environmental Engineering Core ENPM 620 Computer-Aided Engineering Analysis (3) Computer assisted approach to the solution of engineering problems. Review and extension of undergraduate material in applied mathematics including vector analysis and vector calculus, analytical and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, analytical and numerical solutions of linear, partial differential equations, and probability and statistics. ENPM 621 Heat Pump and Refrigeration Systems Design Analysis (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermal engineering of heat pump and refrigeration systems and thermal systems modeling. Thermodynamics and heat transfer. Cycle analysis, alternative refrigerants, graphical analysis using property charts. Analysis of applications including space conditioning, food preservation manufacturing, heat recovery and cogeneration. ENPM 622 Energy Conversion I – Stationary Power Applications (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics, or ENPM 672 Fundamentals of Thermal Systems, or permission of the instructor. Thermal engineering of modern power generation systems. Cycle analysis of various modern power generation technologies including gas turbine, combined cycle, waste burning, and cogeneration. Energy storage and energy transport. ENPM 623 Control of Combustion Generated Air Pollution (3) Analysis of the sources and mechanisms of combustion generated air pollution. Air pollution due to internal combustionengines, power generation and industrial emissions. Techniques to minimize and control emission. Acid rain, ozone, plume analysis, scrubbing, filtering. ENPM 624 Renewable Energy Applications (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamicsand undergraduate heat transfer. Thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of renewable energy sources for heating, power generation and transportation. Wind energy, solar thermal, photovoltaic, biomass, waste burning and OTEC. Broad overview of the growing use of renewable energy sources in the world economy with detailed analysis of specific applications. ENPM 625 Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning of Buildings (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermodynamic, heat transfer

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and fluid flow analysis of building systems. Psychrometric analysis, cooling and heating load calculation, equipment sizing, diagnosis of system problems. Equipment analysis including VAV, hydronic, cooling towers, radiant heating, humidification, dehumidification. ENPM 626 Thermal Destruction Technology (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermal destruction, incineration and combustion processes. Emphasis is on solid wastes and their composition, current and advanced destruction technologies, guidelines on design and operation, and environmental pollution. ENPM 627 Environmental Risk Analysis (3) Fundamentals of environmental protection. Risk identification, characterization, assessment and management in compliance programs related to environmental laws and regulations. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substances Control Act and Clean Water Act. Technology basis of Clean Air Act and Superfund and options for compliance. Expert systems for environmental applications. Elements of life cycle analysis risk assessment. Risk reduction through multimedia emission evaluation and voluntary programs. ENPM 633 Aquatic Chemistry Concepts (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 433 or permission of bothdepartment and instructor. Development of the theoretical basis for understanding the chemical behavior of aquatic systems, with an emphasis on problem solving. Principles of inorganic and physical chemistry applied to quantitative description of processes in natural waters: Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of electrolyte solutions, carbon dioxide/carbonate systems; dissolution and precipitation, metal-ligand complexes, and oxidation/reduction. ENPM 634 Indoor Air Quality Engineering (3) Fundamentals of building ventilation; ventilation and indoor environmental measurement; indoor contaminants and mass balance; ASHRAE standards; indoor environmental quality; building design; psychrometrics and HVAC system design. ENPM 635 Design and Analysis of Thermal Systems (3) The focus of this course deals with the numerical evaluation of the inevitable trade-offs associated with any thermodynamic or heat transfer system. A distinction will be made between workable and optimal systems. For workable systems problems, several laborious manual solutions will be required to ensure that the physics of the system and solution techniques are well understood. A primary analytical tool that will be used for system simulation and evaluation will be an engineering equation solver (EES) program. Although no computer language will be required for simulations, prior experience with windows and spreadsheets will be helpful. Optimal system analysis will include one calculus method and one search method. Applications will include power and refrigeration systems, electronics cooling, distillation columns, dehumidifying coils, and co-generation systems. Student performance will be based largely on manual and computer based take-home problems, some of which will include system performance modeling. ENPM 636 Unit Operations of Environmental Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENCE 315 or permission of both department and instructor. Properties and quality criteria of drinking water as related to health are interpreted by a chemical and biological approach. Legal aspects of water use and handling are considered. Theory and application of aeration, sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, desalinization, corrosion and corrosion control are among topics to be considered. ENPM 637 Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering (3) An examination of biological principles directly affecting man and his environment, with particular emphasis on microbiological interactions in environmental engineering related to air, water and land systems; microbiology and biochemistry of aerobic and anaerobic treatment processes for aqueous wastes.

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ENPM 651 Heat Transfer for Modern Applications (3) Most heat transfer texts used in introductory courses contain far more material than is possible to cover in one semester. The intention of this second course is to extend the student’s understanding of the subject by utilizing the fundamental relationships that have been derived from first principles to obtain numerical solutions to somewhat more complex (realistic) applications. ENPM 653 Environmental Law for Engineers and Scientists (3) Introduction to the basics inenvironmental law including the language and methods of the law, and the Constitution as the basis of the American legal system. Exposure to how lawyers think and approach environmental engineering problems. Case studies used extensively. ENPM 655 Contaminant Transport and Fate in the Environment (3) Prerequisites: Calculus, General Physics, General Chemistry, or permission of instructor. This class covers the physical and chemical behaviors of pollutants in surface water and subsurface environment. Emphasis will be on interactions between organic contaminants and natural geological matrixes and relevant issues including groundwater transport and subsurface remediation. ENPM 657 Sustainable Use of Resources and Minimization of Wastes (3) Material and energy use concepts are presented and examined that promote sustainable use of resources and aid in minimizing wastes. Concepts are addressed to find solutions to concerns such as: excessive municipal and industrial solid waste generation, landfill closures, exposure to toxic wastes, as well as, impacts of continued world population growth, consequences of additional carbon dioxide releases to the atmosphere, lack of sustainable use of food, water, energy, and soil, expected effects concerning climate change (global warming), and what will happen if the backlog of technology continues to shrink. Life cycle assessments, sustainable use strategies and industrial ecology approaches are some of the solutions considered as needed to meet future resources demands. ENPM 664 Chemical and Biological Detection (3) Introduction to hardware (instrumentation) and software (data analysis algorithm) aspects of chemical and biological detection. Physical measurements, chemical sensors, biosensors, optical sensor components, signal conditioning and analysis, chemometrics, image analysis, applications. ENPM 665 Building Control Systems (3) This course will focus on providing guidance and expertise to engineers who are designing control equipment and systems for building heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. It will also cover issues related to control system commissioning, fault detection and diagnoses, and optimization. The implementation of direct digital control systems and building networks will be addressed, along with issues related to indoor air quality and environmental performance. ENPM 666 Groundwater Hydrology and Pollution Control (3) A study of factors affecting groundwater systems including theories and mechanisms governing the groundwater movement and groundwater quality, with particular emphasis on groundwater hydrology and groundwater quality protection in maintaining a sustainable groundwater resource. ENPM 680 Aquatic Chemical Kinetics (3) The objective of this course is to strengthen the understanding of reaction mechanisms and specific reaction rates in natural and engineered water system (fresh water, atmospheric water, porous water and ocean). The class will also introduce innovative researches developed in water technology. ENPM 808 Computational Methods in Environmental Engineering (3) Introduction to the use

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of microcomputers and the familiarization with computer tools that aid in the numerical solution of environmental engineering problems. Operating systems, networks, numerical methods, programming, spreadsheets, numerical and symbolic computation, software and hardware interface, data acquisition. ENCE 630 Environmental and Water Resources Systems I (3) Application of statistical and systems engineering techniques in the analysis of information necessary for the design or characterization of environmental or hydrologic processes; emphasis on the fundamental considerations that control the design of information collection programs, data interpretation, and the evolution of simulation models used to support the decision-making process. Technical Electives The three electives may be taken from the environmental engineering core courses or from approved courses offered by the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, and the Mechanical Engineering Department.

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FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING Two specialized areas of study comprise the subject matter for the option. The first area, called the fire protection core, focuses on engineering principles concerned with basic processes of fire behavior, prediction of fire development, the combustion of materials and furnishings, the effects of fire on structures and the environment, and on the law. A second area of study is the risk analysis core. This involves application of simulation and risk analysis to the predictive and analytical procedures for assessment of the hazards and the probabilities of potential fire incidents. The degree requirement is to complete ten approved courses, which should include five fire protection core courses, three risk analysis core courses, and two elective courses as listed. Other substitutes are possible by permission of the department, e.g. certain courses in environmental engineering, probability-statistics, thermal science, etc. Admission Requirements ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a related field from an accredited institution ◊ Courses in differential equations, structural mechanics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer Fire Protection Engineering Core ENFP 415 Fire Dymanics (3) Prerequisites: ENCH 300 or ENME 320, ENFP 300, and ENFP 312 or permission of department. Introduction to premixed and diffusion flames; ignition, flame spread and rate of burning; fire plumes; flame radiation. ENFP 425 Fire Modeling (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Introduction to current fire modeling techniques for building fire safety assessment. Application of various computer-based fire models to representative problems. ENFP 435 Law and Technology (3) Responding to natural and manufactured building hazards requires a complex legal environment, including regulation and liability. Key topics include the use of model codes, administrative regulation, retrospective codes, federal preemption, arson, performance based codes, risk based regulation, engineering malpractice, product liability anddisaster investigation. ENFP 611 Fire Induced Flows (3) Recommended prerequisite or co-requisite: ENFP 415. Theoretical basis is presented for fire induced buoyancy driven flows, plumes, ceiling jets, ventflows, and compartment flows. Dimensional analysis for correlations and scale model applications. Smoke movement and combustion products. ENFP 613 Human Response to Fire (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Fractional effective dose (FED) methods for predicting time to incapacitation and death of fires for use in fire safety engineering calculations. Physiology and toxicology of fire effluent components, decomposition chemistry of common materials, standard experimental approaches. Predictive models of material production rates. People movement characteristics related to building evacuation. Formulation and application of evacuation models. Human behavior factors affecting response of people to fire situations.

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ENFP 620 - Fire Dynamics Laboratory (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Experiments in diffusion flame combustion, thermal rates of release. Ignition, propagation, temperature, heat flux measurement-monitoring techniques. Modeling variables. ENFP 621 Analytical Procedures of Structural Fire Protection (3) Prerequisite: ENFP 405. Analysis procedures for structural components of wood, steel, concrete, composites. Structural capabilities, modifications under fire induced exposures. Calculations, computer models for predicting fire resistance ratings of structural components. ENFP 622 Advanced Fire Protection Risk Assessment (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Definition, evaluation of the fire risk to a process, facility or area. Prevention, intervention, control, suppression strategies. Resource allocation, queuing theory, decision priority, cost analysis. ENFP 625 Advanced Fire Modeling (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Validity, utility, reliability of current computer models. Applications of models in risk assessment, underwriting, loss prediction, hazard analysis. Development and validation of specific application models. ENFP 627 Smoke Detection and Management (3) Engineering principles applicable to the design and analysis of smoke management systems. Assessment of hazard posed by smoke. Forces affecting smoke movement. Airflow analysis in buildings. Review of performance characteristics of smoke management systems. ENRE 467 System Safety Engineering (3) Prerequisites: MATH 246 and PHYS 263 or permission of department. Role of system safety, the language of system safety, and programs for achieving safety such as the problem solving process, safety criteria, safety descriptors, check list timeliness elements, safety training, hazard analysis, and uncertainty in safety measurements. Time phased indicators, hazard nomenclature, hazard mode and effect analysis, hazard classification, hazard probability, survival rate, distributions applied to human performance. ENRE 600 Reliability Engineering (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENRE 620. Organization, management and communication concepts in reliability engineering. Mechanisms and physicsof failure, methods for failure-rate determination. Methods of design for reliability and maintainability. Life cycle costing and equipment sparing policies. Measuring reliability for improvement. ENRE 602 Reliability Analysis (3) Prerequisite or Corequisite: ENRE 620. Principal methods of reliability analysis, including fault tree and reliability block diagrams; Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA); event tree construction and evaluation; reliability data collection and analysis; methods of modeling systems for reliability analysis. Focus on problems related to process industries, fossil-fueled power plant availability, and other systems of concern to engineers. Technical Electives The following is a sample of elective courses: Advanced Reliability Engineering, Fire Protection & the Environment, Fire Induced Flow Analysis, and Risk Assessment for Engineers.

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FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING ONLINE This is an online graduate program in applied fire safety science and engineering. The curriculum supports the emerging international movement toward performance-based approaches to building fire safety analysis and design, which includes evaluation and integration of fire protection systems for high-rise structures and industrial complexes; analysis of the level of fire protection applicable to commercial and residential buildings, nuclear power plants and aerospace vehicles; and the research of fire propagation, detection and suppression, with the physiological and psychological effects on humans and their responses. This program features chat rooms, threaded discussions and full access to the University of Maryland library services. The degree is earned by completing the ten courses listed below. ENFP 613 Human Response to Fire (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. Fractional effective dose (FED) methods for predicting time to incapacitation and death of fires for use in fire safety engineering calculations. Physiology and toxicology of fire effluent components, decomposition chemistry of common materials, standard experimental approaches. Predictive models of material production rates. People movement characteristics related to building evacuation. Formulation and application of evacuation models. Human behavior factors affecting response of people to fire situations. ENFP 621 Analytical Procedures of Structural Fire Protection (3) Prerequisite: ENFP 405. Analysis procedures for structural components of wood, steel, concrete, composites. Structural capabilities, modifications under fire induced exposures. Calculations, computer models for predicting fire resistance ratings of structural components. ENFP 625 Advanced Fire Modeling (3) Analysis procedures for structural components of wood, steel, concrete and composites. Structural capabilities and modifications under fire induced exposures. Calculations, computer models for predicting fire resistance ratings of structural components. ENFP 627 Smoke Detection and Management (3) Engineering principles applicable to the design and analysis of smoke management systems. Assessment of hazard posed by smoke. Forces affecting smoke movement. Airflow analysis in buildings. Review of performance characteristics of smoke management systems. ENFP 651 Advanced Fire Dynamics (3) (Formerly 629A) Premixed and diffusion flames; ignition, flame spread and rate of burning; fire plumes; flame radiation. ENFP 652 Fire Assessment Methods (3) (Formerly offered as ENFP629B) Evaluation of ignition, flame spread, rate of heat release and smoke production of furnishings and interior finish materials. ENFP 653 Advanced Fire Suppression (3) (Formerly offered as ENFP 629C) Mechanisms of flame extinction, suppression agent screening tests, droplet evaporation, fundamentals of sprinkler systems, fundamentals of water mist systems, fundamentals of gaseous agents, fundamentals of foam systems, Novel suppression experiments and technologies. ENFP 661 Forensic Fire Analysis (3) (Formerly offered as ENFP629D) - Techniques for the identification of ignition and propagation variables in fire incidents. Failure analysis procedures with temporal reconstruction. Computer models for fire reconstruction.

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ENFP 662 - Performance-Based Design (3) (Formerly offered as ENFP629E) Fire protection design goals and objectives, performance criteria and scenario selection. Evaluation of performance including interaction of fire and evacuation models. Safety factors, documentation procedures and application issues. Case studies. ENFP 663 Advanced Fire Risk Modeling (3) (Formerly offered as ENFP629R) Fundamentals of fire risk modeling from both theoretical and applied perspectives. A detailed case study on fire risk is presented in the first module as an introduction to the different technical topics covered in the course. Subsequent modules will cover modeling techniques for specific elements of fire risk assessment. Throughout the course, students apply the theoretical concepts through the use of current computer-based risk techniques to gain a better understanding of the uses and limitations of these techniques.

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MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING This option, offered by the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, requires three core courses, three special topics courses which are individualized project courses in electronic materials, polymers and structural materials, and four technical electives. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a closely related discipline; Computer Science, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or Physical Sciences from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Materials Science and Engineering Core ENPM 661 Nanometer Structure of Materials (3) (Cross-listed with ENMA 650) The structural aspects of crystalline and amorphous solids and relationships to bonding types. Point and space groups. Summary of diffraction theory and practice. The reciprocal lattice. Relationships of the microscopically measured properties to crystal symmetry. Structural aspects of defects in crystalline solids. ENPM 662 Thermodynamics in Materials (3) (Cross-listed with ENMA 660) Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of engineering solids. Cohesion, thermodynamic properties. Theory of solid solutions. Thermodynamics of mechanical, electrical, and magnetic phenomena in solids. Chemical thermodynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamic properties of polycrystalline and polyphase materials. Thermodynamics of defects in solids. ENPM 663 Kinetics of Reactions in Materials (3) (Cross-listed with ENMA 661). The theory of thermally activated processes in solids as applied to diffusion, nucleation and interface motion. Cooperative and diffusionless transformations. Applications selected from processes such as allotropic transformations, precipitation, martensite formation, solidification, ordering, and corrosion. Technical Electives ENMA 620 Polymer Physics (3) The thermodynamics, structure, morphology and properties of polymers. Developing an understanding of the relationships between theory and observed behavior in polymeric materials. ENMA621 Advanced Design Composite Materials (3) Restriction: Permission of ENGRMaterials Science & Engineering department. Credit only granted for: ENMA621 or ENMA698A. Formerly: ENMA698A. Fundamentals of design, processing, and selection of composite materials for structural applications are covered. The topics include a review of all classes of engineering materials, an in-depth analysis of micro and macro mechanical behavior including interactions at the two-phase interfaces, modeling of composite morphologies for optimal microstructures, material aspects, cost considerations, processing methods- including consideration of chemical reactions, stability of the interfaces and material selection.

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ENMA 624 Radiation Engineering (3) Ionizing radiation, radiation dosimetry and sensors, radiation processing, radiation effects on; polymers, metals, semiconductors, liquid, and gas, radiation in advance manufacturing, radiation-physical technology. ENMA 625 Biomaterials (3) Examination of materials used in humans and other biological systems in terms of the relationships between structure, fundamental properties and functional behavior. Replacement materials such as implants, assistive devices such as insulin pumps and pacemakers, drug delivery systems, biosensors, engineered materials such as artificial skin and bone growth scaffolds, and biocompatibility will be covered. ENMA 626 Fundamentals of Failure Mechanisms (3) Advanced failure mechanisms in reliability engineering will be taught from a basic materials and defects point of view. The methods of predicting the physics of failure of devices, materials, components and systems are reviewed. The main emphasis will be given to basic degradation mechanisms through understanding the physics, chemistry, and mechanics of such mechanisms. Mechanical failures are introduced through understanding fatigue, creep and yielding in materials, devices and components. The principles of cumulative damage and mechanical yielding theory are taught. The concepts of reliability growth, accelerated life testing, environmental testing are introduced. Physical, chemical and thermal related failures are introduced through a basic understanding of degradation mechanisms such as diffusion, electromigration, defects and defect migration. The failure mechanisms in basic material types will be taught. Failure mechanisms observed in real electronic devices and electronic packaging will also be presented. Problems related to manufacturing, and microelectronics will be analyzed. Mechanical failures are emphasized from the point of view of complex fatigue theory. ENMA 630 Advanced Nanosized Materials: Synthesis and Utilization (3) This course is an advanced course covering practical aspects of nanoscale materials fabrication and utilization. It presents various approaches for the synthesis of nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes, and discusses the unique properties observed in these structures and devices made with them. ENMA 640 Advanced Nanoprocessing of Materials with Plasmas (3) Plasmas are used to control the micro-and nanoscale level structure of materials including patterning at the mico-and nanoscale level using plasma etching techniques. The course establishes the scientific understanding required for the efficient production of nano-structure using plasma techniques. ENMA 641: Nanotechnology Characterization (3) This course covers techniques to characterize the properties of materials whose characteristic dimensions are a few to a few hundred nanometers, including “conventional” nanocrystalline materials, but concentrating on “novel” nanomaterials: carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, quantum wires, and quantum wells. The emphasis is on recent results from the scientific literature concerning those properties that make nanostructures interesting: quantum effects, novel transport phenomena, enhanced mechanical properties associated with localization and with small crystallite size. ENMA 642 Current Trends in Nanomaterials (3) Prerequisite: Permission of the department. This course gives a historical and contemporary perspective of the trends of development of nanomaterials. Having characteristic dimensions in the range of 1-100 nanometers, these materials are difficult to synthesize and characterize but are nevertheless at the forefront of science and technology in many fields. Through detailed analysis of the current literature, all students will develop a sense for not only where the science and technology has come but also where it is going. ENMA643 Advanced Photonic Materials (3) Restriction: Permission of ENGR-Materials Science & Engineering department. Credit only granted for: ENMA698Z, ENRE648Z, or ENMA643. Formerly:

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ENMA698Z. The understanding of the basic optical processes in photonic devices and systems compsed of waveguides, light emitting diodes and lasers, as well as modulators is developed. Lectures on basic degradation mechanisms of such systems will be presented. The area of organic based LED reliability will be covered from the point of view of the stability of the organic-inorganic interface. ENMA 644 Advanced Ceramics (3) Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Introduces basic concepts such as crystal chemistry, defect chemistry and ternary phase equilibria which can also be used to illustrate the various types of advanced ceramics ( superconductors; superionic conductors; dielectrics including ferroelectrics; optical materials; high temperature structural materials; etc.) and allow an understanding of their behaviors. ENMA 645 Advanced Liquid Crystals (3) Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Liquid crystals and their applications, role in biology, and nanometer structure. ENMA 662 Advanced Smart Materials (3) The course will cover the three ferroic materials, ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and ferroelastic (also known as Shape Memory Alloy, SMA) as well as materials that are simultaneously ferromagnetic and ferrolectric etc. Their similarities and differences will be identified and their atomic level and crystal structure examined. Phase transformations are very important and will be treated in some detail. Applications, e.g. permanent magnets, electronic magnetic materials, digital storage elements, actuators and sensors as well as SMAs for vision glasses, self-adjusting valves and the like will be covered. ENMA 671 Defects in Materials (3) The nature and interactions of defects in crystalline solids, with primary emphasis on dislocations. The elastic and electric fields associated with dislocations. Effects of imperfections on mechanical and physical properties. ENMA 680 Experimental Methods in Materials Science (3) Experimental Methods in Materials Science (3) Methods of measuring the structural aspects of materials. Optical and electrical techniques. Resonance methods. Electrical, optical and magnetic measurements. Theory of diffraction of electrons, neutrons and X-rays. Strong emphasis on study of defects in solids. Short range order, thermal vibrations, stacking faults. ENMA 681 Diffraction Techniques in Materials Science (3) Diffraction Techniques in Materials Science (3) Theory of diffraction of electrons, neutrons and X-rays. Strong emphasis on diffraction methods as applied to the study of defects in solids. Short range order, thermal vibrations, stacking faults, microstrain. ENMA 682 Electron Microscopy for Research (3) This course will give an introduction of the basic principles of operation for modern electron microscopes. Details will be given on the construction of microscopes, their basic operation, and the types of questions that can be addressed with an electron microscope. Emphasis will be placed on a conceptual understanding of the underlying theories. Where appropriate, mathematical descriptions will be utilized. Upon completion of this course, students will be expected to have a basic understanding sufficient to give interpretations of microscopy images and to suggest the correct tool or approach for certain research studies. ENMA 683 Structural Determination Laboratory (1) The operation of an electron microscope is covered. TEM techniques that are used to characterize the structure, defects and composition of a sample are presented and used to study a variety of materials. These techniques are: electron diffraction patterns, bright/dark field imaging, high resolution lattic imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Also covers different sample preparation techniques for TEM. The goal is that the students become independent users of the TEM. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ENMA 684 Advanced Finite Element Modeling (3) A brief review of mechanical behavior of materials, introduction to Finite Element Modeling (FEM), and procedures for predicting mechanical behavior of materials by FEM using computer software (at present ANSYS). The FEM procedures include, setting up the model, mesh generation, data input and interpretation of the results. ENMA 685 Advanced Electrical and Optical Materials (3) The course will familiarize the students with basic and state of the art knowledge of some technologically relevant topics in materials engineering and applied physics, including dielectric/ferroelectric materials, magnetic materials, superconductors, multiferroic materials and optical materials with an underlying emphasis on thin film and device fabrication technology. Fundamental physical properties and descriptions of different materials and their applications are included. Discussions will include new developments in the fields. ENMA687 Nanoscale Photonics and Applications (3) Credit only granted for: ENMA687 or ENMA698Z. Formerly: ENMA698Z. Advanced topics in photonics including optical ray propogation, LEDS and the interaction of light in nanostructured materials for optoelectronic applications will be covered. ENMA 698 Special Topics in Materials Science (3) Several special topics courses are offered each semester. Check Testudo for specific courses. Recently offered courses include the following:

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING There are two core areas offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering. The normal course plan consists of five courses from one core area, ENPM 620, and four technical electives. Special programs can also be arranged for those students with broad interests in mechanical engineering. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; Civil and Environmental, Mechanical, Chemical and Biomolecular, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Additional specific prerequisite requirement for specialization: ◊ General Mechanical: Strength of Materials/Structural Mechanics Foundation Courses The following courses are designed to prepare new students to successfully complete their academic program. ENPM 620 is for students who have not taken mathematics courses in several years and want to renew their skills. It may also be used for students who had less than acceptable academic performance in their mathematics courses at the undergraduate level. ENPM 672 is for students without a formal academic background in thermal engineering and may wish to transition to an area that requires a fundamental understanding. Please note that these courses may be counted as technical electives with the prior approval of the academic advisor. ENPM 620 Computer Aided Engineering Analysis (3) Computer assisted approach to the solution of engineering problems. Review and extension of undergraduate material in applied mathematics including vector analysis and vector calculus, analytical and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, analytical and numerical solutions of linear, partial differential equations, and probability and statistics. ENPM 672 Fundamentals for Thermal Systems (3) This course is a highly compacted introduction to three thermal engineering courses and is intended for those who did not major in mechanical of chemical engineering as an undergraduate. It also may be valuable for anyone who has been away from formal academics for longer than five years. Its purpose is to provide a background needed for understanding more advanced courses in applied thermal energy systems. Included in this course is an introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Energy and the Environment Core ENPM 621 Heat Pump and Refrigeration Systems Design Analysis (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermal engineering of heat pump and refrigeration systems and thermal systems modeling. Thermodynamics and heat transfer. Cycle analysis, alternative refrigerants, graphical analysis using property charts. Analysis of applications such as space conditioning, food preservation manufacturing, heat recovery and cogeneration. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ENPM 622 Energy Conversion I – Stationary Power (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics, or ENPM 672 Fundamentals of Thermal Systems, or permission of the instructor. Thermal engineering of modern power generation systems. Cycle analysis of various modern power generation technologies including gas turbine, combined cycle, waste burning, and cogeneration. Energy storage and energy transport. ENPM 623 Control of Combustion Generated Air Pollution (3) Analysis of the sources and mechanisms of combustion generated air pollution. Air pollution due to internal combustion engines, power generation and industrial emissions. Techniques to minimize and control emissions. Acid rain, ozone, plume analysis, scrubbing, filtering. ENPM 624 Renewable Energy Applications (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of renewable energy sources for heating, power generation and transportation. Wind energy, solar thermal, photovoltaic, biomass, waste burning and OTEC. Broad overview of the growing use of renewable energy sources in the world economy with detailed analysis of specific applications. ENPM 625 Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning of Buildings (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermodynamic, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis of building systems. Psychometric analysis, cooling and heating load calculation, equipment sizing, diagnosis of system problems. Equipment analysis including VAV, hydronic, cooling towers, radiant heating, humidification, dehumidification. ENPM 626 Thermal Destruction Technology (3) Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics and undergraduate heat transfer. Thermal destruction, incineration and combustion processes. Emphasis is on solid wastes and their composition, current and advanced destruction technologies, guidelines on design and operation, and environmental pollution. ENPM 627 Environmental Risk Analysis (3) Fundamentals of environmental protection. Riskidentification, characterization, assessment and management in compliance programs related toenvironmental laws and regulations. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substances Control Act and Clean Water Act. Technology basis of Clean Air Act and Superfund and options for compliance. Expert systems for environmental applications. Elements of life cycle analysis in risk assessment. Risk reduction through multimedia emission evaluation and voluntary programs. ENPM 635 Design and Analysis of Thermal Systems (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate thermodynamics and heat transfer. The focus of this course deals with the numerical evaluation of the inevitable trade-offs associated with any thermodynamic or heat transfer system. A distinction will be made between workable and optimal systems. For workable systems problems, several laborious manual solutions will be required to ensure that the physics of the system and solution techniques are well understood. A primary analytical tool that will be used for system simulation and evaluation will be an engineering equation solver (EES) program. Although no computer language will be required for simulations, prior experience with windows and spreadsheets will be helpful. Optimal system analysis will include one calculus method and one search method. Applications will include power and refrigeration systems, electronics cooling, distillation columns, dehumidifying coils, and co-generation systems. Student performance will be based largely on manual and computer based take-home problems, some of which will include system performance modeling. ENPM 651 Heat Transfer for Modern Applications (3) Prerequisite: ENPM 635 or equivalent. Advanced course in heat transfer application analysis. Extends the introductory treatment by

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utilizing fundamental relationships to obtain numerical solutions to real-world applications. Course will include the full range of thermal system analysis but will focus largely on heat transfer aspects. ENPM 654 Energy Systems Management (3) Covers the application of energy efficient technologies, analysis procedures and implementation techniques, including lighting, motors,energy conservation and demand side management. The course will cover the latest innovation in energy efficient equipment and applications, primarily in the buildings and industrial areas. Topics will include both new installations and retrofit activities, with an emphasis on methods for evaluating the energy and cost savings potential of different design options or equipment alternatives. ENPM 656 Energy Conversion II (3) Mobility Applications (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics, or ENPM 672 Fundamentals of Thermal Systems, or permission of the instructor. Important fuel – engine aspects of mobile power of modern and advanced automotive (i.e. self-propelled) vehicles. Thermochemical principles of energy, material and chemical balances are used to determine performance characteristics of mobility fuel alternatives including fossil fuels, biofuels, synfuels, and hydrogen. Emphasis is given to state of the art and emerging energy conversion science and technologies related to IC engines and fuel cells. The interface between fuel combustion chemistry and generated power and pollutants are addressed. The practical aspects of design and operation of various alternatives for mobility power regarding impacts and tradeoffs to power, torque, efficiency, fuel consumption, as well as the generation of air pollutants are also considered for several fuel alternatives. ENPM 665 Building Control Systems (3) This course focus on design of control equipment and systems for building heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. It covers issue related to control systems commissioning, fault detection and diagnoses, and optimization. The implementation of direct digital control systems and building networks is addressed, along with issues related to indoor air quality and environmental performance. Formerly ENPM 808F. ENPM 808 Applied Thermodynamics (3) The course focuses on an analytical system performance technique known as Availability or Exergy Analysis, which is based on the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. It focuses on traditional power and refrigeration systems. Non-traditional power generation systems are considered by way of a special project and will include a description of the state-of-the art selected topic (e.g., wind or solar power, fuel cell, etc.) and a second law performance analysis of a prototype system which will be presented. In addition to the power system topics, the availability analysis will be applied to combustion and psychrometric processes. ENME 808A Phase Change Hear Transfer (3) Utilizing phase change during heat transfer can be very attractive since large amounts of heat can be removed with relatively small temperature differences. These processes can be important during the operation of high power devices, such as nuclear reactors, electronic cooling, and x-ray sources. The course will cover the fundamentals of phase change heat transfer and its application to numerous technologies. Topics include the basic thermodynamic relations, contact line mechanics, pool boiling, flow boiling, spray cooling, instrumentation, and experimental techniques. Technical Electives ENME 631 Advanced Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer (3) Prerequisites: ENME 315,321 and 700 (at least concurrent) or equivalent or permission of instructor. Theory of conduction and radiation. Diffused and directional poly- and mono-chromatic sources. Quantitative optics. Radiation in enclosures. Participating media. Integro-differential equations. Multi-dimensional, transient and steady state conduction. Phase change. Coordinate system transformations. ENME A. James Clark School of Engineering

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632 Advanced Convection Heat Transfer (3) Prerequisites: ENME 315, 321, 342, 343, and 700 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Statement of conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Laminar and turbulent heat transfer in ducts, separated flows, and natural convection. Heat and mass transfer in laminar boundary layers. Nucleate boiling, film boiling, leidenfrost transition, and critical heat flux. Interfacial phase change processes; evaporation, condensation, industrial applications such as cooling towers, condensers. Heat exchanger design. ENME 633 Advanced Classical Thermodynamics (3) Prerequisite: ENME 315 or equivalent or permission of instructor. This course will focus on the interactions between molecules, which govern thermodynamics relevant to engineering. This course will develop an appreciation for both classical and statistical approaches to thermodynamics for understanding topics such as phase change, wetting of surfaces, chemical reactions, adsorption, and electrochemical processes. The course will investigate statistical approaches and molecular simulation tools to understand how microscopic analysis can be translated to macroscopic problems. ENME 635 Analysis of Energy Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENME 633 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Rankine cycles with non-azeotropic working fluid mixtures, two-, multi- and variable stage absorption cycles and vapor compression cycles with solution circuits. Power generation cycles with working fluid mixtures. Development of rules for finding all possible cycles suiting a given application or the selection of the best alternative. ENME 646 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer II (3) Prerequisites: ENME 632, 640 and 700 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous flow problems. Solutions of potential flow problems euler equations, boundary layer equations and navier-stokes equations. Applications to turbulent flows. ENME 647 Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer (3) Prerequisites: ENME 321 and 342 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Boiling and condensation in stationary systems, phase change heat transfer phenomenology, analysis and correlations. Fundamentals of two-phase flow natural circulation in thermal hydraulic multi-loop systems with applications to nuclear reactors safety. Multiphase flow fundamentals. Critical flow rates. Convective boiling and condensation. Multiphase flow and heat transfer applications in power and process industries. ENME 706 Impact of Energy Conservation on the Environment (3) Prerequisite: thermodynamics (graduate level) ENME 633. This course begins with a review of the energy flow diagram of the us and discusses the current status of energy production, transportation and consumption. This is followed by an introduction to environmental issues that are caused through energy conversion: ozone depletion, global warming and air quality issues. Based on this background information, the students then develop, through classroom discussions, student presentations and lectures, alternative energy conversion concepts, assess their performance in design projects, and evaluate the potential environmental, infrastructure and cost impacts. The course focuses extensively and in considerable detail on the understanding and application of the latest energy conversion technologies. ENME 707 Combustion and Reacting Flow (3) Prerequisites: ENME 320 (thermodynamics), ENME 331 (fluid mechanics), ENME 332 (heat transfer) or equivalent. This course covers thermochemistry and chemical kinetics of reacting flows in depth. In particular, we focus on the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels in both a phenomenological and mechanistic approach. The course covers the specifics of premixed and nonpremixed flame systems, as well as ignition and extinction. Combustion modeling with equilibrium and chemical kinetics methods will be addressed. Environmental impact and emissions minimization will be covered in detail. Finally, the 54

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course will cover available combustion diagnostic methods and their application in laboratory and real-world systems. ENME 712 Measurement, Instrumentation, and Data Analysis for Thermo-Fluid Processes (3) This course is designed to offer systematic coverage of the methodologies for measurement and data analysis of thermal and fluid processes at the graduate level. The course materials will cover three broad categories: (1) fundamentals of thermal and fluid processes in single phase and multi phase flows as related to this course; (2) measurement/instrumentation techniques for measurement of basic quantities such as pressure, temperature, flow rate, heat flux, etc.; And (3) experimental design and planning, sources of errors in measurements, and uncertainty analysis. General Mechanical Core ENPM 652 Applied Finite Element Methods (3) This course is aimed at engineering and science students with little or no previous knowledge of the Finite Element Method. The course deliberately attempts to keep the mathematics of the subject as straightforward as possible. It is assumed that the students understand the basic concepts and equations of elasticity and thermal heat flow, and is familiar with simple matrix algebra. The course will cover stress and thermal analysis problems, and will include the use of the ALGOR finite element code for doing examples and homework solutions. The basic problem solving procedure will be developed for using finite element computer codes. ENPM 671 Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3) To instill understanding of the fundamental mechanical models of behavior for structural components. To enumerate the stress resultant formulations of various shapes subjected to axial, torsional and bending loads. To evaluate and interpret the analyses based on the applied principles and the assumptions made. ENME 605 Advanced Systems Control (3) Prerequisite: ENME 403 or permission of instructor. Modern control theory for both continuous and discrete systems. State space representation is reviewed and the concepts of controllability and observability are discussed. Design methods of deterministic observers are presented and optimal control theory is formulated. Control techniques for modifying system characteristics are discussed. ENME 610 Engineering Optimization I (3) Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied aspects of static, deterministic and smooth optimization in engineering design and manufacturing. Topics include formulation of engineering optimization problems, optimization methods applied to unconstrained and constrained functions of one or more variables, solution evaluation and sensitivity analysis, and practicalities in engineering optimization modeling and methods. ENME 640 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (3) Prerequisite: Math 462 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Equations governing the conservation of mass, momentum, vorticity and energy in fluid flows. Equations are illustrated by analyzing a number of simple flows. Emphasis on physical understanding facilitating the study of advanced topics in fluid mechanics. ENME 662 Linear Vibrations (3) Prerequisite: ENME 361 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Development of equations governing small oscillations of discrete and spatially continuous systems. Newton’s equations, Hamilton’s principle, and Lagrange’s equations. Free and forced vibrations of mechanical systems. Modal analysis. Finite element discretization and reductions of continuous systems. Numerical methods. Random vibrations. ENME 677 Elasticity of Advanced Materials and Structures (3) Prerequisites: MATH 462, ENME 670. Review of field equations and constitutive laws for linear elasticity, linearized boundary value problems; two-dimensional problems, biharmonic equation, Airy stress function, Neou’s method, A. James Clark School of Engineering

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plane stress and plane strain analysis, torsion and flexure, inverse and semi-inverse methods, Saint-Venant’s principle, thermoelastic problems; three-dimensional problems, Kelvin’s solution, the Boussinesq and Cerruti problems, Hertzian contact; energy methods; wave propagation; applications to advanced materials and structures (e.g., smart structures, multifunctional and functionally graded materials). Technical Electives ENME 600 Engineering Design Methods (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This is an introductory graduate level course in critical thinking about formal methods for design in mechanical engineering. Course participants gain background in these methods and the creative potential each offers to designers. Participants will formulate, present, and discuss their own opinions on the value and appropriate use of design materials for mechanical engineering. ENME 601 Manufacturing Systems Design and Control (3) Modeling and analysis techniques needed to design and control manufacturing systems. Deterministic and stochastic models, including discrete-event simulation and queuing systems. Applications of modeling and analysis. ENME 602 MEMS Device Physics and Design (3) Science, design, and device physics of micromachined sensors and actuators. Transduction mechanisms, scaling laws, and microscale physics of MEMS components. ENME 603 Advanced Mechanics and Robot Manipulators (3) Analysis of spatial mechanisms and robot manipulators. The kinematics and dynamics of multi-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems are analyzed in detail. The main emphasis is on open-loop manipulators. Other mechanical systems such as closed-loop linkages, epicyclic gear drives, wrist mechanisms and tendon-driven robotic hands are covered. ENME 604 Systematic Design of Mechanisms (3) Prerequisite: Undergraduate kinematics. Design of mechanisms from conceptual and dimensional points of view. Systematic methods of synthesis are introduced. The main emphasis is on planar mechanisms. A brief introduction to the kinematics of spatial mechanisms is also covered. ENME 606 Nonlinear Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENME 605 or permission of instructor. Analysis and synthesis of nonlinear dynamical systems. The stability problem and the synthesis of regulators for nonlinear processes are discussed using various approaches. Emphasis is placed on mechanical, electro-mechanical and aerospace applications. ENME 608 Engineering Decision Making (3) An introduction to structured decision making, including several decision analysis and product design selection methods. Individual and group decision making methods, organization and structure of decision making, and selection under uncertainty. Main topics will include: methods for modeling decisions, uncertainty, and preferences. ENME 611 Geometric Modeling by CAD/CAM Applications (3) This course introduces the underlying concepts behind three dimensional (3D) geometric modeling systems for curves, surfaces and solid bodies. It will cover: (1) geometric representation of three dimensional solid objects; (2) curve and surface representation; (3) geometric algorithms for curves, surfaces, and solids; and (4) real-world applications of geometric modeling. Advanced topics such as feature recognition, cutter path generation for numerical control machining, collision detection in robot path planning, and STEP standard for product data representation will also be introduced.

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ENME 614 Advanced Production Control Techniques (3) Prerequisite: ENME 411 or consent of the instructor. Advanced techniques for quantitative and qualitative decision making in a modern manufacturing environment. A hierarchical architecture for the control and the performance evaluation of a manufacturing system serves as the framework for addressing various complex operational problems. Students are expected to analyze and solve a real industrial problem by collaborating with a local manufacturing company. ENME 620 Design for Manufacture (3) Prerequisite: ENME 600 or permission of instructor. Approaches and analysis methods for the concurrent design of quality products. Covers the following: axiomatic and systematic approaches to design and assembly, engineering properties of materials, manufacturing processes and their corresponding design rules, cost estimation, and factorial analysis and Taguchi’s contributions. ENME 621 Advanced Topics in Control Systems: Robust & Adaptive Linear Control (3) Prerequisite: ENME 605 or permission of instructor. Analysis and synthesis problems of systems with uncertain dynamics. Two approaches are examined: robust control of linear plants and adaptive control. The latest theoretical advancements in these areas are applied to several case studies of mechanical electro-mechanical and aerospace systems. ENME 623 Analysis of Machingin Systems (3) Prerequisites: ENME 605 and ENME 662. Metal cutting principles, mathematical modeling of machining systems methods to perform dynamic analysis of machining systems and practical applications. ENME 625 Multidisciplinary Optimization (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Overview of single– and multi–level design optimization concepts and techniques with emphasis on multidisciplinary engineering design problems. Topics include single- and multilevel optimality conditions, hierarchic and nonhierarchic modes, and multi-level post optimality sensitivity analysis. Students are expected to work on a semester-long project. ENME 627 Manufacturing with Polymers (3) Prerequisite: ENME 412 or permission of instructor. The basic engineering approach for the processing of modern polymers and an introduction to the key properties of polymers for processing. Topics covered include morphology and structure of polymers, characterization of mixtures and mixing, elementary steps in polymer processing, screw extrusion and computer-aided engineering in injection molding. ENME 641 Viscous FLow (3) Prerequisite: ENME 640 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Fluid flows where viscous effects play a significant role. Examples of steady and unsteady flows with exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Boundary layer theory. Stability of laminar flows and their transition to turbulence. ENME 642 Hydrodynamics I (3) Prerequisite: ENME 640 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Exposition of classical and current methods used in analysis of inviscid, incompressible flows. ENME 644 Fundamentals of Acoustics (3) Prerequisite: ENME 360 or equivalent. This course covers the fundamental principles of acoustics allowing the students to go on to more advancedcourses in acoustics, such as underwater sound propagation, active noise control, or radiation and scattering from elastic structures. ENME 661 Dynamic Behavior of Materials & Structures (3) Response of materials and structures to dynamic loading events. Topics include: theory of wave propagation, plane waves, wave guides, dispersion relations, shock waves, equations of state, dynamic deformation mechanisms, adiabatic shear banding, dynamic fracture. Computational methods for modeling the dynamic response of A. James Clark School of Engineering

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structures will also be addressed. ENME 664 Dynamics (3) Prerequisite: ENES 221 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Kinematics in plane and space; Dynamics of particles, system of particles, and rigid bodies. Holonomic and non-holonomic constraints. Newton’s equations, D’Alembert’s principle, Hamilton’s principle, and equations of Lagrange. Impact and collisions. Stability of equilibria. ENME 665 Advanced Topics in Vibrations (3) Prerequisite: ENME 662 or permission of instructor. Nonlinear oscillations and dynamics of mechanical and structural systems. Classical methods, geometrical, computational, and analytical methods. Bifurcations of equilibrium and periodic solutions; chaos. ENME 666 Modal Analysis and Testing (3) Prerequisite: ENME 662 or permission of instructor. Development of linear discrete models of mechanical systems and structures, forced response using modal summation and state space models, digital signal processing, model testing techniques, modal parameters estimation, model refinement using modal test data. ENME 667 Turbulence Simulations (3) Credit only granted for: ENME667 or ENME808Q. Formerly: ENME808Q. The objective is to teach students the role and limitations of numerical methods for the solution of turbulent flows. Emphasis will be placed on the development of best practices to validate the numerical results. Applications to incompressible, compressible and reacting flows will be discussed. ENME 670 Continuum Mechanics (3) Mechanics of deformable bodies, finite deformation and strain measures, kinematics of continua and global and local balance laws. Thermodynamics of continua, first and second laws. Introduction to constitutive theory for elastic solids, viscous fluids and memory dependent materials. Examples of exact solutions for linear and hyper elastic solids and Stokesian fluids. ENME 671 Deformable Bodies (3) Credit only granted for: ENME671, ENME808Y, or ENME489Y. Formerly: ENME808Y. Covers advanced concepts in material behavior, including plasticity, fracture, fatigue, and time-dependent material behavior. Concepts will be developed mathematically and completely in 3-D using tensorial analysis. ENME 672 Composite Materials (3) Micro mechanics of advanced composites with passive and active reinforcements, mathematical models and engineering implications, effective properties, damage mechanics, and recent advances in “adaptive” or “smart” composites. ENME 673 Energy and Variational Methods in Applied Mechanics (3) Application of variational principles to mechanics. Includes virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, Castigliano’s generalized complementary energy, and the principles of Hellinger-Reissner and HamiltonLegendre transforms and the foundations of the calculus of variations. Singularities and stability in potential energy function. Applications to rigid, linear and non-linear elastic, and non-conservative examples. Approximation techniques such as Ritz, Petrov-Galerkin, least-squares, etc. Presents the basis for the finite element method. ENME 674 Finite Element Methods (3) Theory and application of finite element methods for mechanical engineering problems such as stress analysis, thermal and fluid flow analysis, electromagnetic field analysis and coupled boundary-value problems for “smart” or “adaptive” structure applications, and stochastic finite element methods. ENME675 Mathematical Introduction to Robotics (3) Credit only granted for: ENME675 or ENME808V. Formerly: ENME808V. Designed to provide graduate students with some of the 58

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concepts in robotics from a mathematical viewpoint, including introduction to group theory and basics of SO(3) and SE(3) group applied to robotics; rigid boy motion; manipulator kinematics; introduction to holonomic & non-holonomic constraints; dynamics of robot manipulators. ENME 678 Fracture Mechanics (3) Advanced treatment of fracture mechanics covering the analysis concepts for determining the stress intensity factors for various types of cracks. Advanced experimental methods for evaluation of materials or structures for fracture toughness. Analysis of moving cracks and the statistical analysis of fracture strength. Illustrative fracture control plans are treated to show the engineering applications of fracture mechanics. ENME 680 Experimental Mechancis (3) Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in instrumentation or equivalent. Advanced methods of measurement in solid and fluid mechanics. Topics covered include scientific photography, moire, photoelasticity, strain gages, interferometry, holography, speckle, NDT techniques, shock and vibration, and laser anemometry. ENME 684 Modeling Material Behavior (3) Prerequisite: ENME 670 or permission of instructor. Constitutive equations for the response of solids to loads, heat, etc. based on the balance laws, frame invariance, and the application of thermodynamics to solids. Non-linear elasticity with heat conduction and dissipation. Linear and non-linear non-isothermal viscoelasticity with the elasticviscoelastic correspondence principle. Classical plasticity and current viscoplasticity using internal state variables. Maxwell equal areas rule, phase change, and metastability and stability of equilibrium states. Boundary value problems. Introduction to current research areas. ENME 690 Mechanical Fundamentals of Electronic Systems (3) An understanding of the fundamental mechanical principles used in design of electronic devices and their integration into electronic systems will be provided. Focus will be placed on the effect of materials compatibility, thermal stress, mechanical stress, and environmental exposure on product performance, durability and cost. Both electronic devices and package assemblies will be considered. Analysis of package assemblies to understand thermal and mechanical stress effects will be emphasized through student projects. ENME 693 High Density Electronic Assemblies and Interconnects (3) This course presents the mechanical fundamentals needed to address reliability issues in high-density electronic assemblies. Potential failure sites and the potential failure mechanisms are discussed for electronic interconnects at all packaging levels from the die to electronic boxes, with special emphasis on thermomechanical durability issues in surface mount interconnects. Models are presented to relate interconnect degradation & aging to loss of electrical performance. Design methods topreve nt failures within the life cycle are developed. ENME695 Failure Mechanisms and Reliability (3) This course will present classical reliability concepts and definitions based on statistical analysis of observed failure distributions. Techniques to improve reliability, based on the study of root-cause failure mechanisms, will be presented; based on knowledge of the life-cycle loadprofile, product architecture and material properties. Techniques toprev ent operational failures through robust design and manufacturing practices will be discussed. Students will gain the fundamentals and skills in the field of reliability as it directly pertains to the designand the manufacture of electrical, mechanical, andelectomechanical products. ENME700 Advanced Mechanical Engineering Analysis I (3) An advanced, unified approach to the solution of mechanical engineering problems, emphasis is on the formulation and solution of equilibrium, eigenvalue and propagation problems. Review and extension of undergraduate material in applied mathematics with emphasis on problems in heat transfer, vibrations, fluid flow and stress

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analysis which may be formulated and solved by classical procedures. ENME 704 Active Vibration Control (3) Prerequisites: ENME 602, ENME 662 or equivalent. This course aims at introducing the basic principles of the finite element method and applying it to plain beams and beams treated with piezoelectric actuators and sensors. The basic concepts of structural parameter identification are presented with emphasis on Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and Auto-regression models (AR). Different active control algorithms are then applied to beams/ piezo-actuator systems. Among these algorithms are: direct velocity feedback, impedance matching control, modal control methods and sliding mode controllers. Particular focus is given to feed forward Leat Mean Square (LMS) algorithms and filtered-X LMS. Optimal placement strategies of sensors and actuators are then introduced and applied to beam/piezo-actuator systems. ENME 710 Applied Finite Elements (3) Prerequisites: ENME 331, ENME 332. Application of finite element methods to the solution of engineering problems - such as stress analysis, thermal conductivity, fluid flow analysis, electro-magnetic field analysis and coupled boundary value problems. Emphasis is on the application of the techniques to the solution of problems. Basic theory is covered at the beginning of the course. ENME 711 Vibration Damping (3) Prerequisite: ENME 662 or equivalent. This course aims at introducing the different damping models that describe the behavior of viscoelastic materials. Emphasis will be placed on modeling the dynamics of simple structures (beams, plates and shells) with Passive Constrained Layer Damping (PCLD). Considerations will also be given to other types of surface treatments such as Magnetic Constrained Layer Damping (MCLD), Shunted Network Constrained Layer Damping (SNCLD), Active Constrained Layer Damping (ACLD) and Electrorheological Constrained Layer Damping (ECLD). Energy dissipation characteristics of the damping treatments will be presented analytically and by using the modal strain energy approach as applied to finite element models of vibrating structure. ENME 713 Nanoparticle Aerosol Dynamics (3) Restriction: Permission of instructor. Also offered as: CHEM608. Credit only granted for: ENME713 or ENME808M. Formerly: ENME808M. Covers the basic science of nanoparticle formation, growth, and transport; the science and engineering of measurement; and the environmental impact and industrial use of nanoparticles. ENME 715 Design in Electronic Product Development (3) Recommended: ENME473 or ENME690; and Knowledge of mathematical program language. Credit only granted for: ENME715 or ENME808Z. Formerly: ENME808Z. Introduces students to the design methodologies and design tools used to create electronic systems; merges technology, analysis, and design concepts into a methodology for designing an electronic product. ENME 765 Thermal Issues in Electronic Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENME331 and ENME332. Corequisite: Concurrently enrolled in ENME473; or students who have taken courses with similar or comparable course content may contact the department. This course addresses a range of thermal issues associated with electronic products life cycle. Computational modeling approaches for various levels of system hierarchy. Advanced thermal management concepts including: single phase and phase change liquid immersion, heat pipes, and thermoelectrics. ENME 770 Life Cycle Cost and System Sustainment Analysis (3) This course melds elements of traditional engineering economics with manufacturing process and sustainment modeling, and life cycle cost management concepts to form a practical foundation for predicting the cost of products and systems. Various manufacturing cost analysis methods will be presented including: processflow, parametric, cost of ownership, and activity based costing. The effects of learning curves, data uncertainty, test and rework processes, and defects will be considered. Aspects of system sustainment including the impact on the life cycle (and life cycle costs) of reliability, maintenance, 60

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environmental impact, and obsolscence will be treated. ENME775 Manufacturing Technologies for Electronic Systems (3) Prerequisite: ENME690. This highly multi-disciplinary course presents the mechanical fundamentals of manufacturing processes used in electronics assemblies. The emphasis is on quantitative modeling of the intrinsic impact that processing has on structure, properties, performance and durability. Students will learn how to quantitatively model many of the key manufacturing steps from mechanistic first principles, so that sensitivity studies and process optimization can be performed in a precise manner. Processes considered include: wafer-level processes such as polishing, lithography, etching and dicing; packaging operations such as die attachment, wirebonding, flip chip bonding, and plastic encapsulation; multilevel high-density substrate fabrication processes; assembly processes such as reflow and wave soldering of surface-mount components to electronic substrates. ENME780 Mechanical Design of High Temperature and High Power Electronics (3) Prerequisite: ENME382, ENME473, or ENME690. This course will discuss issues related to silicon power device selection (IGBT, MCT, GTO, etc.), the characteristics of silicon device operation at temperatures greater thatn 125C, and the advantages of devices based on SOI and SiC. It will also discuss passive components and packaging materials selection for distributing and controlling power, focusing on the critical limitations to use of many passive components and packaging materials at elevated temperatures. In addition it will cover packaging techniques and analysis to minimize the temperature elevation caused by power dissipation. Finally, models for failure mechanisms in high temperature and high power electronics will be presented together with a discussion of design options to mitigate their occurrence. ENME 808C System-Level MEMS Design and Simulation (3) Hands-on utilization of MEMS computer aided design tools at the systems level. Students will perform design, simulation, and analysis projects using these software tools. Extended design projects involving commercial MEMS services, such as MUMPs and MOSIS foundry technologies, provide experience with design, layout, and simulation of devices for real-world applications. Applications to be covered include microsensors, microfluidics and bioMEMs, and optical microsystems. ENME 808K MEMS and Microfabrication Technologies I (3) This course presents a broad overview of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and microfabrication technologies. Both traditional and emerging microfabrication techniques for microsensors, microactuator, and nanotechnology will be introduced. Both silicon and non-silicon microfabrication will be covered. ENME 808L MEMS and Microfabrication Technologies II (3) Prerequisite: ENME 808K. This course will cover the fundamental basis of MEMS and microsystems technology. This is a broad, demanding course that provides a classroom overview as well as design and laboratory components. ENME 808? is part 2 of a 2-semester course (part one is ENME 808K). In the second semester, the course will go into greater depth. We have been fortunate to be able to offer a laboratory component in this course through the generous sponsorship by Northrop Grumman Corporation, which covers the cost. You will have the opportunity to gain real-life research experience in microfabrication. ENME 808N Active Polymer Materials (3) This course will cover active materials, including gels, conjugated polymers, IPMC, piezoelectrics, and electrostrictives. Actuation mechanisms will be reviewed (pH change, electric field, etc.) We will consider metrics for evaluating performance as well as their applications in MEMS, bio-mimetic devices, robotics, macro-structures, and optics. As substantial part of the course will be devoted to characterization techniques (stress, strain, SEM, TEM, AFM, x-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, XPS, EDS, HPLC, FTIR, Auger, SIMS, TGA, UV-Vis-NIR, profilometry, ellipsometry, electrochemistry). Modeling and system identification for A. James Clark School of Engineering

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understanding the physical mechanisms of actuation will also be covered. ENME 808P Random Vibrations of Structural Systems (3) Prerequisites: ENME 361, ENME 392, or the equivalent, and a working knowledge of MATLAB. Introduction to statistical concepts and mathematical methods used to model, analyze, and predict the response of mechanical, aeronautical, and civil structural systems to externally applied random excitations. These methods will be applied to the design and analysis of such systems to resist failures due to the effects of mechanical disturbances, wind and turbulence, earthquakes, transportation environments, and ocean wave loading. The student may select from a wide range of graduate level offerings. The program incorporates significant flexibility in choosing electives. The first step in creating a program is to consult with your advisor to create a course plan. For example, students interested in environmental engineering may take their electives in the Environmental and Water Resources Core offered by the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department.

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NUCLEAR ENGINEERING This option, offered by the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, requires five core courses and five electives. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a closely related discipline; Computer Science, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or Physical Sciences from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Foundation Course The following course is designed to prepare new students to successfully complete their academic program. ENPM 672 is for students without a formal academic background in thermal engineering and may wish to transition to an area that requires a fundamental understanding. Please note that this courses may be counted as a technical elective with the prior approval of the academic advisor. ENPM 672 Fundamentals for Thermal Systems (3) This course is a highly compacted introduction to three thermal engineering courses and is intended for those who did not major in mechanical of chemical engineering as an undergraduate. It also may be valuable for anyone who has been away from formal academics for longer than five years. Its purpose is to provide a background needed for understanding more advanced courses in applied thermal energy systems. Included in this course is an introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Nuclear Engineering Core ENME 430 Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Engineering (3) Fundamental aspects of nuclear physics and nuclear engineering, including nuclear interactions; various types of radiation and their effects on materials and humans; and basic reactor physics topics, including simplified theory of reactor criticality. ENNU 620 Mathematical Techniques for Engineering Analysis and Modeling (3) Probability and probability distributions; statistics; ordinary differential equations; linear algebra and vectors; Laplace transforms; Fourier analysis; boundary value problems; series solutions to differential equations; partial differential equations; numerical methods. ENNU 648F Severe Nuclear Accidents (3) Introduction to nuclear physics. Neutron transport theory and approximations. The diffusion approximation, and multi group diffusion theory. Neutron slowing down theory and thermalization. Fundamentals of nuclear reactor kinetics. ENNU 648K Reactor Physics and Engineering (3) Introduction to nuclear physics. Neutron transport theory and approximations. The diffusion approximation, and multigroup diffusion theory. Neutron slowing down theory and thermalization. Fundamentals of nuclear reactor kinetics.

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ENNU 655 Radiation Engineering (3) Ionizing radiation, radiation dosimetry and sensors, radiation processing, radiation effects on: polymers, metals, semiconductors, liquids, and gases. Radiation in advanced manufacturing. Radiation-physical technology. This course provides an in-depth knowledge on the uses of ionizing radiation in advanced manufacturing of polymeric materials and composites, lithography, environmental remediation of toxic materials, sterilization, medicine, and radiation effects on materials and electronics. Technical Electives ENPM 808 Innovative Reactor Design (3) Nuclear reactor design is a study of invention to overcome ostacles and innovation in optimizing safety and overall system performance. The objective of this course is to analyze how design challenges of the past were overcome and to project how new applications for nuclear reactor technology may emerge based on innovative design concepts. ENPM 808 Nuclear Reactor Dynamics and Control (3) To provide the topics necessary to understand the dynamics and control of the nuclear reactor. Although the course will be primarily taught from the perspective of the most commonly deployed power reactor design, the pressurized water reactor (PWR), the dynamics associated with other power reactor designs will also be discussed. A major portion of the course will be devoted to describing, qualitatively and quantitatively, how a reactor safely controls itself and inherently provides load-following capability and what factors contribute to reactor accidents, such as experienced at Three Mile Island in 1979. The course project will be a Matlab/Simulink simulation of a commercial power plant providing the essential dynamics observed during selected operating scenarios. The students will be guided through the model’s development as the course progresses; using data from the specified plant’s design documentation. ENME 431 Nuclear Reactor Systems and Safety (3) Power reactor system design and analysis, including system specifications and modes of plant operation. Thermal hydraulic response of plant systems. Accident analysis and impact of emergency systems. Containment thermal hydraulic analysis. ENME 489T Nuclear Reactor Design (3) Principles of nuclear reactor engineering as applied to reactor power plants. This includes nuclear reactor system design (reactor types and functional requirements of reactor systems), nuclear reactor materials (fuels, moderators, coolants, cladding and structural materials), nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics, nuclear reactor shielding, nuclear reactor mechanical design (pressure vessels, piping, fuel), nuclear reactor safety analysis (types of accidents that must be considered during nuclear reactor design) and nuclear reactor accident consequence analysis (estimation of dose rates following a nuclear reactor accident). ENNU 648A Reactor Operations (3) The design and operation of nuclear reactors will be examined at multiple levels of sophistication using reactor concepts that include power from nuclear fission, criticality, reactor control and safety, modifications of reactivity, and energy removal. All operation of the TRIGA reactor will be conducted by the class attendees under the supervision of USNRC licensed operators. ENNU 648B Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety (3) This new course will cover the design and process associated with each step of the nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel scope to be discussed in this course includes the following: Mining and milling, Refining and Conversion, Enrichment, Fuel Fabrication,

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including mixed oxide fuel (or MOX), Storage (wet and dry) of spent fuel, Transportation of spent fuel, Low level waste, High level waste interim storage and final disposal ENNU 648M Degradation of Materials (3) The goals of this course are to achieve a comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms of the degradation of engineering materials. At the end of the course, the students will understand various degradation mechanisms that can be induced from thermal, mechanical, UV, and ionizing radiation on polymers, metals, semiconductors, and organic/aqueous materials. The goals of this course are also extended to cover the applications of degradation of materials in advanced manufacturing and environmental remediation. The course also provides a detailed series of lectures on radiation-induced corrosion in radiation fields. ONLINE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING This is an online graduate program in Nuclear Engineering. The curriculum has been designed by the faculty in the Clark School of Engineering to meet the needs of working engineers and technical professionals. This program features live streaming audio/video, chat rooms with student/faculty interaction, access to past lectures during the semester, threaded discussions, and full access to the University of Maryland library services. The degree requirements and course content are the same as the campus-based Nuclear Engineering graduate program, but offered in an on-line format to meet your geographic and scheduling needs.

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PROJECT MANAGEMENT This option, offered by the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering requires five core courses and five elective courses . Admissions Requirements ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a related field from an accredited institution ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, Differential Equations and/or one course in Statistics) are required to be considered for application Project Management Core ENCE 661 Project Cost Accounting & Finance (3) Effective engineering project managers have complete command of their project costs. This course reviews the fundamentals of accounting, examines project cost accounting principles, applications, and impact on profitability; examines the principles of activity based costing; covers the elements involved in cash management; introduces the framework for how projects are financed and the potential impact financing has on the projects; and a framework for evaluating PC based systems and what resources are needed for an effective project cost system. ENCE 662 Introduction to Project Management (3) Introduction to engineering project management including: overview and concepts of project management (principles, body of knowledge, strategies); planning successful projects (defining, specifying, delivery options, scheduling, budgeting); implementing (organizing the team, work assignments, team building, effective leadership); executing (performance measurement, maintaining the schedule, adjustments/ mid-course corrections, record keeping, status reporting, communications, managing conflict, time management); and closeout (performance measurement, contract documentation, data transfer, lessons learned, administrative closure). ENCE 664 Legal Aspects of Engineering Design & Construction (3) Examines ways in which the legal system affects the design and construction process, focusing on contract types and the relationships between the parties in different delivery systems. Topics include contract law, the relationships between parties, tort and negligence law, and statutory principles affecting construction. ENCE 665 Managing Project Teams (3) Examines managing engineering project teams and understanding effective communications. Course includes: team performance; team building; leadership; motivation; organizational and team dynamics; conflict management; change management; and understanding communication process models. ENCE 667 Project Performance Measurement (3) Examination of various techniques and models used to measure the performance of projects. Topics will include: critical path method (CPM), Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT), Gantt charts, project crashing, resource management, capital allocation, forecasting, hypothesis testing, regression analysis, learning curve analysis, goal programming, Monte Carlo simulation, the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), Pareto optimality and tradeoff curves as well as basics in linear programming and uncertainty modeling.

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Technical Electives Please note: 400 Level courses are not available online. ENCE 420 Construction Equipment and Methods (3) Evaluation and selection of equipment and methods for construction of projects, including earthmoving, paving, steel and concrete construction, formwork, trenching, cofferdams, rock excavation, tunneling, site preparation, and organization. ENCE 421 Legal Aspects of Engineering Practice (3) This course presents the study of legal principles relevant to engineering design and construction contracts. Specific subjects covered include engineering contracts, torts, agency, product liabilities, sales and warranties, professional liability, labor laws, surety and insurance, expert testimony, mediation and arbitration, intellectual property, patents and copyrights, and ethics. ENCE 422 Project Cost Accounting & Economics (3) This course: reviews the fundamentals of accounting; examines project cost accounting principles as they apply to project management; project cost accounting; reading financial statements; cash management; cash flow analysis; depreciation and taxes; and impact on profitability; examines the principles of activity based costing; net present value analysis; introduces the framework for project performance measurement, cost performance indices, and earned value analysis. ENCE 423 Project Scheduling, Planning and Control (3) Application of planning and scheduling techniques for construction work; introduction to resource leveling and time-cost tradeoffs; cost estimating, cost indices, parametric estimates, and unit price estimates. ENCE 600 The Project Management Office: Execution Across Boundaries (3) This course begins with a review of the projects cultural environment in order to understand the context of executing projects globally. Emphasis will be given for the project office’s role in stakeholders’ engagement and management in the planning and execution aspects of projects. The course will also highlight the role of the Project office in the virtual and agile management of project delivery; the fundamentals of communication across different cultural boundaries; in addition to the importance of matrixed business alliances. Course assignments will be based upon a course project with specific deliverables. Students have the opportunity to work together throughout the semester to accomplish their deliverables while taking into consideration the nuances of the factors required in excellent project office delivering across the complex boundaries of the countries and regions that their projects could cross. There will be a strong emphasis on using lessons learned to empower future continued success in delivering within different projects, cultures, and settings. ENCE 601 Program and Portfolio Management (3) A view of managing projects from an organizational perspective will be presented. The principle areas of discussion will be strategic alignment, marshalling organizational assets through an enterprise project office, portfolio management, and program management. Using a case study approach, students will explore the importance of using organizational strategies to align projects, how to use an enterprise project office as a governance process, and apply practices to create portfolios and programs to leverage organizational assets. Principle topics will include establishing a governance process, project selection techniques, project portfolio methodology, and application of project practices to program management. ENCE 602 Project Procurement Management (3) Formerly 688P. This course presents fundamental concepts and techniques for project acquisition and procurement. Students are introduced to the PMBOK Guide six-step procurement process and expected to develop an in-depth understanding of project evaluation, planning, financing, contracting, negotiation, and procurement execution. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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The course will also cover emerging methods, principles, and practices in infrastructure project procurement, including Public-Private Partnerships, Carbon project procurement, and Clean Development Mechanism, etc. ENCE 603 Management Science Applications in Project Management (3) The fundamentals of Management Science techniques in Project Management including: linear and integer programming, goal programming, multi-objective optimization, simulation, decision analysis, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), deterministic and stochastic dynamic programming. Applications will be drawn from the Critical Path Method (CPM), resource management, and other areas of Project management. ENCE 605 Evolving as a Project Leader (3) ENCE 665 is a required prerequisite – no exceptions! Projects are now used by many organizations for the implementation of strategic initiatives. This means that project managers must be able to do more than manage, organize, and control. They must be able to lead the project team and its stakeholders through change. This course builds on the foundation created in ENCE 665 Managing Project Teams: Enhancing Individual & Team Productivity. It explores 1) leadership theory and evolution; 2) the role of leadership on project teams; 3) you as a leader; and, 4) your personal development as a project leader. ENCE 607 Real Estate Development & Planning for the Project Manager (3) Real estate investment and development is fundamentally the acquisition, financing, construction, leasing, and disposition of land and buildings. Successful development is a function of business planning, management of economic risk, entrepreneurial spirit, timing, experience, and education. While many courses examine the traditional elements of project management, few courses prepare students for the complex interaction of property acquisition, financing, design, and construction. In the evolution of construction management, owners award projects to the construction team that demonstrates a comprehensive grasp of the investment process, identifies and evaluates the impact of construction and design issues in a timely and meaningful manner, and offers valuable insight and information. To succeed and be valued by owners, the construction manager must recognize the mechanics and perils of real estate investment and communicate in the language of development. ENCE 622 IT Project Management Fundamentals (3) This course puts emphasis on the differences between PM fundamentals and the requirements for IT project management, and does not cover the basics. This course has a strong focuses on project success factors; components of IT projects; relationship to systems engineering techniques; applicability of standards; risk management; schedule management and controlling scope; configuration management; testing techniques; specification and prototyping; selecting and using 3rd party software; and intellectual property rights. ENCE 623 Introduction to Advanced Scheduling (3) This course teaches students about the various scheduling approaches that are currently being used in the design and construction industry: how to plan a project by defining items of work for the project, setting up calendars & activity coding structure, creating activities & relationships between them, and assigning resources to activities using CPM scheduling software. On completion of the schedule, students will learn how to organize, format and filter the schedule, as well as assign target schedules for managing and troubleshooting the project and communicate the schedule by setting up reports, using Primavera Post Office & Email and the Web Publishing Wizard. ENCE 624 Managing Projects in a Dynamic Environment (3) Experience has shown that excellent project managers function at a level well beyond the classic linear mindset of traditional project management. “Simultaneous managers” subscribe to the rational and scientific approach but also adopt a new mindset of flexibility, one of expecting goals and means to be resolved simultaneously

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and interactively rather than sequentially. This course examines the 9 principles simultaneous managers use interdependently, and presents a theory of project management that is intellectually rigorous and consistent with pragmatic knowledge. ENCE 625 Project Administration (3) This course examines the principals of project administration procedures, specifically addressing the project administration responsibilities of the project manager/ project engineer in engineering, design, and construction industries. The course takes a project team approach for improved job efficiency, outlining a project team operation in which the office project administrator delegates to the greatest possible extent all those project administrative functions that can be done more efficiently in the field. The class also addresses the responsibilities and risks that a project administrative manager is likely to encounter. The course is suitable for students, engineering and design professionals, project managers, experienced contract administrators, and owners interested in the special administrative problems of engineering or construction. ENCE 626 Web-based Project Management (3) This course discusses applications of the world wide web and e-business approaches to managing engineering projects and distributed project teams. Reviewing the historical and technical background of the web, web tools, and associated information technology, this course investigates concepts underlying knowledge management and the use of KM systems to support engineering organizations, including project communications, knowledge archiving, and e-learning. This course covers topics related to data management and the extension of data management, query, and retrieval in web environments, OLAP, and OLTP; ERP systems solutions and applications to project management, collaborative engineering, managing virtual teams, security in project management systems, and online procurement and vending. ENCE 627 Project Risk Assessment & Decision Analysis (3) This course is an introduction to identifying, analyzing, assessing, and managing risks inherent to engineering projects. Students will learn about probability modeling, choice and value theory, schedule and cost risk, risk mitigation and transfer, and contract considerations of project risk. Examples are drawn from construction, software development, systems integration, and other large engineering projects, and cover probability basics, subjective probability, statistical data analysis, introduction to decision theory, Monte Carlo simulation, value of information, and risk-based decision making. ENCE 663 Management of Design & Construction Organizations (3) This course covers the management of design and construction organizations at the company, project and activity levels. Topics covered include legal organizational frameworks; strategic planning; functional planning (including marketing, project and activity planning); organization; implementation; control; compensation, benefits, and incentives. The course includes case study analysis and selection of appropriate project delivery systems and related forms of agreement. ENCE 666 Cost Engineering & Control (3) This course covers analytical techniques for project estimation and cost control, including site investigation, quantity takeoff, work analysis, and bid preparation, examination of popular software, systematic cost control, the fundamentals of different types of cost estimation, and appropriate applications of each. Case studies on cost engineering and controls during the life cycle of a project using simulation techniques to analyze and prepare the estimate, bid, control budget, change order process, schedule impacts, and cost impacts will also be used to reinforce cost engineering techniques. ENCE 722 Market, Spatial, and Traffic Equilibrium Models in Project Engineering (3) This course is an introduction to equilibrium models involving economics and engineering, concentrating on models involving markets (Nash-Cournot, etc.) wherein activities are spatially diverse as well as those involving energy activities or traffic flow. Areas covered include: review of relevant optimization theory; presentation of the nonlinear complementarity problem (NCP) and variational A. James Clark School of Engineering

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inequality problem (VIP) formats to solve equilibrium problems as well as introduction to existence and uniqueness results; review of relevant game theory notions; presentation of specific models for market, spatial, energy, and traffic equilibrium problems; and presentations for algorithms to solve these equilibrium problems. ENCE 723 Project Decision Making with Competing Objectives (3) This course is an introduction to the theory and algorithms behind optimization under competing objectives, also called “multiobjective optimization.” This course explores the concepts of dominated solutions, Pareto optimal or “efficient” solutions, as well as developing theory for general nonlinear multi-objective optimization problems, but concentrates the majority of effort on the linear case for the algorithms. The course also considers other multi-objective models such as goal programming to solve problems with competing objectives. ENCE 724 Nonlinear Programming in Project Management (3) This course provides mathematically rigorous motivation and introduction to nonlinear programming theory relevant to numerous problems in economics, engineering, and other disciplines. The course will focus on models necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality of nonlinear programs. Project Management Online This is an online graduate program in Project Management. The curriculum is accredited by the Project Management Institute (www.pmi.org) and is the only engineering program in the U.S. to receive this accreditation. This program features chat rooms, threaded discussions and full access to the University of Maryland library services. The degree requirements and course content are the same as the campus-based Project Management graduate programs, but offered in an on-line format to meet your geographic and scheduling needs.

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RELIABILITY ENGINEERING This interdisciplinary option is offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Typical areas of study include topics such as the mechanisms and physics of failure, methods of design for reliability, maintainability engineering, life cycle costing and equipment sparing policies. There are five core courses required in reliability engineering and five technical electives. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a closely related discipline; Computer Science, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or Physical Sciences from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations) are required to be considered for admission. Reliability Engineering Core ENRE 600 Fundamentals of Failure Mechanisms (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 620 Organization, management and communication concepts in reliability engineering. Mechanisms and physics of failure, methods for failure-rate determination. Methods of design for reliability and maintainability. Life cycle costing and equipment sparing policies. Measuring reliability for improvement. Those sections that begin with a letter are taught via ITV and are not intended for College Park campus students. ENRE 602 Reliability Analysis (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 620 Principal methods of reliability analysis, including fault tree and reliability block diagrams, method of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA); event tree construction and evaluation; reliability data collection and analysis; methods of modeling systems for reliability analysis. Focus on systems of concern to all engineers, such as, problems related to process industries, fossil-fueled power plant availability, and other subjects. Methods of quality control and assurance. ENRE 620 Mathematical Techniques of Reliability Engineering (3) Basic probability and statistics; application of selected mathematical techniques in analyzing and solving reliability engineering problems. Applications of matrices, vectors, tensors, differential equations, integral transforms, and probabilistic methods to a wide range of reliability related problems. ENRE 641 Accelerated Testing (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 663 or permission of instructor. Models for life testing at constant stress. Graphical and analytical analysis methods. Test plans for accelerated testing. Competing failure modes and size effects. Models and data analyses for step and time varying stresses. Optimization of test plans. ENRE 653 Advanced Reliability and Maintainability Engineering (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 600. Reliability and maintainability concepts in conceptual, development, production, and deployment phases of industrial products. Costing of reliability, methods of obtaining approximate reliability estimates and confidence limits. Methods of reliability testing-current research and developments in the area of reliability engineering. Modern CAD techniques in reliability design, thermal analysis of circuit boards, vibration analysis, maintainability analysis, and preventive maintenance methods. Or

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ENRE 655 Advanced Methods in Reliability Modeling (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 602 credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENRE 655 or ENRE 665. Formerly ENRE 665. Bayesian methods and applications, estimation of rare event frequencies, uncertainty analysis and propagation methods, reliability analysis of dynamic systems, analysis of dependent failures, reliability of repairable systems, human reliability analysis methods, and theory of logic diagrams and application to systems reliability. Technical Electives Approved courses in reliability engineering or approved technical electives in other programs such as systems engineering, electronic packaging materials and manufacturing, and mechanical engineering. ENPM 808 Engineering Reliability & Risk Assessment (3) With ever-increasing frequency, aerospace professionals are being tasked with quantifying the reliability and the subsequent risk of aerospace systems. This is most evident in the engineering efforts for maintaining aging aircraft systems. Indeed, denumerable reliability and risk are the very core problems of the RCM (reliability centered maintenance) concept. Without objectively calculated reliability and risk assessments, life extension issues become clouded in vaguely expressed uncertainties. The vagueness engenders a lack of confidence in the knowledge base, which in turn engenders substantial conservatism in the decision-making process. ENRE 452 Software Testing (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 114 or 214, and either CMSC/MATH 475 or MATH 461; or permission of department. Topics covered include: testing methods for unit testing, integration testing, and system testing; structural testing (flowgraphs and data-flows); functional testing (behavioral models and textual descriptions); deterministic and statistical generation of inputs; and testing of object-oriented programs. ENRE625 Materials Selection and Mechanical Reliability (3) Credit only granted for: ENRE625 or ENRE648L. Formerly: ENRE648L. Topics include: microstructure development, mechanical properties of metals, plymers, ceramics, composites and semiconductors, fracture, fatigue, creep, fractography and failure analysis. ENRE 640 Collection and Analysis of Reliability Data (3) Prerequisites: CMSC 114 or 214, and either CMSC/MATH 475 or MATH 461; or permission of department. Topics covered include: testing methods for unit testing, integration testing, and system testing; structural testing (flowgraphs and data-flows); functional testing (behavioral models and textual descriptions); deterministic and statistical generation of inputs; and testing of object-oriented programs. ENRE 642 Reliability Engineering Management (3) Unifying systems perspective of reliability engineering management. Design, development and management of organizations and reliability programs including: management of systems evaluation and test protocols, development of risk management-mitigation processes, and management of functional tasks performed by reliability engineers. ENRE 643 Advanced Product Assurance (3) Prerequisites: ENRE 600 and ENRE 602 or permission of instructor. Product assurance policies, objectives, and management. Material acquisition management, quality control documents and product assurance costing. Design input and process control, advanced testing technology, regression methods, and nondestructive testing. Simulation techniques, CAD/CAE methods. Software quality management, software documentation, and software testing methods. Total quality management. 72

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ENRE 644 Bayesian Reliability Analysis (3) Prerequisites: ENRE 600 and ENRE 602. Foundations of Bayesian statistical inference, Bayesian inference in reliability, performing a Bayesian reliability analysis, Bayesian decision and estimation theory, prior distributions such as non-informative, conjugate, beta, gamma, and negative log gamma, estimation methods based on attribute life test data for estimating failure rates and survival probabilities. System reliability assessment and methods of assigning prior distribution. Empirical Bayes reliability estimates (implicitly or explicitly estimated priors). ENRE 645 Human Reliability Analysis (3) Prerequisites: ENRE 600 and ENRE 602; or permission of department. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: ENRE 645, or ENSE 606. Methods of solving practical human reliability problems, the THERP, SLIM, OAT, and SHARP methods, performance shaping factors, human machine systems analysis, distribution of human performance. and uncertainty bounds, skill levels, source of human error probability data, examples and case studies. ENRE 646 Maintainability Engineering (3) Role of maintainability in readiness and profitability. Design principles, including fault-tolerant design, FMECA for maintainability, maintainability quantification, establishing testability requirements, establishing hardware and software requirements, and reliability-centered maintenance. ENRE 661 Microelectronics Device Reliability (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 600. This course develops an approach to continuous improvement of reliability of semiconductor devices. Topics covered include: Introduction to device technology, degradation mechanisms, optoelectronic components, power device reliability, and accelerated testing. ENRE 670 Risk Assessment for Engineers I (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 602. Why study risk, sources of risk, probabilistic risk assessment procedure, factors affecting risk acceptance, statistical risk acceptance analysis, psychometric risk acceptance, perception of risk, comparison or risks, consequence analysis, risk benefit assessment. Risk analysis performed for light water reactors, chemical industry, and dams. Class projects on risk management concepts. ENRE 671 Risk Assessment for Engineers II (3) Prerequisite: ENRE 670.The course covers advanced techniques for performing quantitative risk assessment. The fundamental theory of systems risk modeling, methods for vulnerability identification, risk scenario development, and probability assessment are presented. Also covered are methods for risk results presentation, and several example applications. ENRE 681 Software Quality Assurance (3) Topics covered will include: QA roles in the software lifecycle, government and industry standards/methodologies, quality system scoring, quality system management, quality analysis metrics and tools for assessment. The principles of software configuration management, software testing, and maintenance will also be covered. A laboratory with software quality analysis tools is used. ENRE 683 Software Safety (3) The focus is on major software safety standards in government and industry, the software safety lifecycle, and detailed coverage in safety requirements-specification, analysis and design, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis, designing for fault tolerance, and formal methods techniques for developing high assurance software. A laboratory with software tools is used. ENRE 684 Information Security (3) This course is divided into three major components: overview, detailed concepts, and implementation techniques. The topics to be covered are: general security concerns and concepts from both a technical and management point of view, principles of A. James Clark School of Engineering

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security, architectures, access control and multi-level security, trojan horses, covert channels, trap doors, hardware security mechanisms, security models, security kernels, formal specifications and verification, networks and distribution systems and risk analysis. ONLINE RELIABILITY ENGINEERING This is an online graduate program in Reliability Engineering. The curriculum has been designed by the faculty in the Clark School of Engineering to meet the needs of working engineers and technical professionals. This program features live streaming audio/video, chat rooms with student/ faculty interaction, access to past lectures during the semester, threaded discussions, and full access to the University of Maryland library services. The degree requirements and course content are the same as the campus-based Reliability Engineering graduate program, but offered in an on-line format to meet your geographic and scheduling needs.

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SUSTAINABLE ENERGY ENGINEERING Consists of six core courses with different elective sets developed to allow the student to focus on their individual needs. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering; Civil and Environmental, Mechanical, Chemical and Biomolecular, from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations), and Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat Transfer are required to be considered for admission. Foundation Courses The following courses are designed to prepare new students to successfully complete their academic program. ENPM 620 is for students who have not taken mathematics courses in several years and want to renew their skills. It may also be used for students who had less than acceptable academic performance in their mathematics courses at the undergraduate level. ENPM 672 is for students without a formal academic background in thermal engineering and may wish to transition to an area that requires a fundamental understanding. Please note that these courses may be counted as technical electives with the prior approval of the academic advisor. ENPM 620 Computer Aided Engineering Analysis (3) Computer assisted approach to the solution of engineering problems. Review and extension of undergraduate material in applied mathematics including vector analysis and vector calculus, analytical and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, analytical and numerical solutions of linear, partial differential equations, and probability and statistics. ENPM 672 Fundamentals for Thermal Systems (3) This course is a highly compacted introduction to three thermal engineering courses and is intended for those who did not major in mechanical of chemical engineering as an undergraduate. It also may be valuable for anyone who has been away from formal academics for longer than five years. Its purpose is to provide a background needed for understanding more advanced courses in applied thermal energy systems. Included in this course is an introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Sustainable Energy Engineering Core ENME 701 Sustainable Energy Conversion and the Environment (3) Recommended: ENME633. Credit only granted for: ENME701, ENME706 or ENME808D. Formerly: ENME706 and ENME808D. Discussion of the major sources and end-uses of energy in our society with particular emphasis on renewable energy production and utilization. Introduces a range innovative technologies and discusses them in the context of the current energy infrastructure. Renewable sources such as wind and solar are discussed in detail. Particular attention is paid to the environmental impact of the various forms of energy.

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ENPM 622 Energy Conversion I – Stationary Power (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics, or ENPM 672 Fundamentals of Thermal Systems, or permission of the instructor. Electrical power from generation, through transmission and distribution to consumption. Thermochemical principles of energy, material and chemical balances are used to determine performance characteristics of stationary fuel alternatives including clean coal and biomass and burning waste. Cycle analysis of various modern power generation technologies including fluidized bed steam generators, gas turbines, combined cycles, fuel cells and cogeneration are compared. The impact of choices regarding energy generation, transmission, distribution and consumption as well as potential air pollution are also considered. ENPM 624 Renewable Energy Applications (3) Thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of renewable energy sources for heating, power generation and transportation. Wind energy, solar thermal, photovoltaic, biomass, waste burning and OTEC. Broad overview of the growing use of renewable energy sources in the world economy with detailed analysis of specific applications. ENPM 627 Environmental Risk Analysis (3) Fundamental methodology for analyzing environmental risk with examples for selected applications. Key elements include: (1) source term and release characterization, (2) migration of contaminants in various media, (3) exposure assessment, (4) dose-response evaluation, (5) risk characterization, and (6) risk management. Also included will be an introduction to uncertainty analysis and environmental laws and regulations. Students will gain the basic skills and knowledge needed to manage, evaluate, or perform environmental risk assessments and risk analysis. ENPM 656 Energy Conversion II - Mobility Applications (3) Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Mechanics, or ENPM 672 Fundamentals of Thermal Systems, or permission of the instructor. This course presents the scientific and engineering basis for design, manufacture, and operation of thermal conversion technologies utilized for mobility power generation. The interface between fuel combustion chemistry and generated power are addressed. The practical aspects of design and operation of various alternatives for power are compared. The impact of choices with regard to power and fuel alternatives as well as air pollution potential is also considered. Technical Electives ENCH 648K Advanced Fuel Cells and Batteries (3) Reducing or eliminating the dependency on petroleum is a major element of US energy research activities. Batteries are a key technology for todays and tomorrow’s electronic devices and electrical hybrid vehicle. Fuel cells are a key element in a future hydrogen economy, offering the potential to revolutionize current power technologies and to solve the major energy security and environmental challenges that face America today. Fuel cells and batteries are in massive and rapidly growing demand as the power source for stationary systems, portable devices and electric vehicles. Fuel cells and batteries are efficient, vibration free, noiseless, environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional energy sources. The lecture will start from the basic electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, with emphasis on electrochemical techniques, fundamental principle of batteries and fuel cells, mass transport processes and performance of various battery and fuel cell technologies. Fuel cell and battery design, system integration, synthesis of electrode materials and catalysts will be presented. A survey of the cutting-edge technologies for fuel cells and batteries will also be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to tour the Fuel Cell and Battery Lab in Chemistry Building.

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ENCH 648L Photovoltaics: Solar Energy (3) The total usable solar energy flux at the Earth’s surface is by some estimates more than enough to meet current world energy needs. However, harnessing this source in a fashion that is economically competitive with other sources of energy presents many challenges. This course will emphasize the following topics: basic physics of light/material interactions, recent laboratory scale developments in photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical technologies, manufacturing of photovoltaic materials, and photovoltaic systems design and integration with existing power generation/distribution infrastructure.Additional topics to be covered include solar heating, solar thermal power generation and photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation. Upon completion of the class students will be able to calculate electrical power, thermal power, or hydrogen production rates, at the device scale. At the systems level, students will be able to use thermodynamic efficiency to perform an economics based comparison, and will also be able to assess system reliability and perform a lifecycle analysis on the system. ENPM 650 Solar Thermal Energy Applications (3) This course would cover the full range of technologies that utilize solar radiation for heating, cooling, lighting and electrical power generation, excluding photovoltaic applications. Topics include: Solar radiation calculations and predictions; Solar spectral characteristics, and diffuse and direct solar radiation; Passive solar applications; Heating; Daylighting; Thermal storage; Fenestration systems; Architectural design; Active solar applications for heating; Solar collectors; Water-based systems; ir-based systems; Domestic hot water heating; Space heating; Process heating; Cooling systems; Flat plate versus concentrating collectors; Fixed versus tracking collector systems; Solar thermal electrical power generation; Dish/Stirling engine systems; Linear concentrator systems; Power tower systems; Thermal storage; Combined cycle applications; Systems design and integration; Control systems and system operation; and Performance calculations and predictions. ENPM 660 Wind Energy Engineering (3) The course will treat four central topics in wind energy engineering: the nature of wind energy as a resource for generating electricity; the aerodynamics of wind turbines by which the wind energy is converted into mechanical energy; the mechanics and dynamics of the wind energy system (tower, rotor, hub, drive train, and generator); and the electrical aspects of wind turbines. Additional topics to be included in the course include: Wind turbine design; wind turbine control; wind turbine siting, system design, and integration; Wind energy system economics; and wind energy systems environmental impacts and aspects. The course is intended to pass along substantial subject matter knowledge and skills, it can only be treated as an introduction to this extensive, multidisciplinary topic. However, students are expected to emerge with a substantial knowledge of wind energy systems and the methods used to analyze such systems. ENPM 808 Ocean Energy Harvesting (3) The course will cover the challenges and rewards from harvesting energy offshore. An overview of developments in Offshore Wind Energy, Tidal Energy, Wave energy systems, Thermal Energy Conversion OTEC systems as well as smaller scale flow extraction energy technology is presented. course covers three levels of evaluation. Level 1 Estimation of the available energy based on models of the wave, and wind environment. Characteristic equations and parameters are introduced which allow linkage to coastal 2 Energy Conversion estimation for life cycle operation. Laboratory, pilot and full scale installation results for harvesting systems are discussed. Examples are presented to provide realistic energy harvesting estimates for systems. Level 3 techno-economic analysis is introduced to illustrate how to evaluate the viability of these systems current and higher regional electrical rates $/kw. The main cost driver is offshore installation costs. A review cost reduction schemes is introduced to illustrate the near-term possibilities. The course aim is to provide the student suitable background to understand the energy harvesting potential from different coastal sites. A. James Clark School of Engineering

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ENPM808 Advanced Energy Audit (3) Students are expected to have prior knowledge of advanced undergraduate basic thermodynamics, heat transfer, and thermal transport processes. Knowledge of electrical systems and controls is desirable. This course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to perform an energy audit on commercial and residential buildings. Energy accounting procedures for electrical, mechanical and HVAC systems will be covered in detail, along with lifecycle costing analysis. Fundamental building science principles will be introduced in the context of energy auditing. Students will gain hands on experience conducting a residential energy audit and will gain experience conducting a commercial energy audit through theoretical exercises. Annual building simulation tools, such as EnergyPlus and eQuest, will be introduced. Successful completion of this course will equip students with the terminology, knowledge and practical experience necessary to perform energy audits in both residential and commercial buildings. Other Technical Electives Sets NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Electives ENME 430 Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Engineering ENME 431 Reactor Systems & Safety ENME 489T Nuclear Reactor Design ENNU 648K Reactor Physics and Engineering ENNU 648M Degradation of Materials ENMA 655 Radiation Engineering ENERGY SYSTEMS Electives ENPM 623 Control of Combustion Generated Air Pollution ENPM 635 Design and Analysis of Thermal Systems ENPM 641 Systems Concepts, Issues and Processes ENPM 642 Systems Requirements, Design and Trade-Off Analysis ENPM 651 Heat Transfer for Modern Applications ENPM 654 Energy Systems Management ENME 635 Energy Systems Analysis RELIABILITY ENGINEERING Electives ENRE 447 Fundamentals of Reliability Engineering ENRE 600 Fundamentals of Failure Mechanisms ENRE 602 Reliability Analysis ENRE 620 Mathematical Techniques for Engineers ENRE 670 Risk Assessment for Engineers I ENRE 671 Risk Assessment for Engineers II ONLINE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY ENGINEERING This is an online graduate program in Sustainable Energy Engineering. The curriculum has been designed by the faculty in the Clark School of Engineering to meet the needs of working engineers and technical professionals. This program features live streaming audio/video, chat rooms with student/faculty interaction, access to past lectures during the semester, threaded discussions, and full access to the University of Maryland library services. The degree requirements and course content are the same as the campus-based Sustainable Energy Engineering graduate program, but offered in an on-line format to meet your geographic and scheduling needs.

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SYSTEMS ENGINEERING This option, offered by the Institute for Systems Research, requires three courses from the systems engineering core, three courses from the management core, and four electives. Admission Requirements Full admission as a degree seeking student requires the following prerequisites: ◊ A bachelor’s degree, GPA of 3.0 or better, in engineering or a closely related discipline; Computer Science, Physics, Applied Mathematics, or Physical Sciences from an accredited institution. ◊ Courses in mathematics (Calculus I, II, III, & Differential Equations) are required to be considered for admission. Systems Engineering Core ENPM 641 Systems Concepts, Issues and Processes (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. This course (along with ENPM 642) is an introduction to the professional and academic aspects of systems engineering. Topics include models of system lifecycle development, synthesis and design of engineering systems, abstract system representations, visual modeling and unified modeling language (UML), introduction to requirements engineering, systems performance assessment, issues in synthesis and design, design for system lifecycle, approaches to system redesign in response to changes in requirements, reliability, trade-off analysis, and optimization-based design. ENPM 642 Systems Requirements, Design and Trade-Off Analysis (3) Prerequisites: ENPM 641 and permission of department. This course builds on material covered in ENPM 641, emphasizing the topics of requirements engineering and design and trade-off analysis. This pair of courses serves as an introduction to the professional and academic aspects of systems engineering. Liberal use will be made of concepts from the first course, ENPM641, including models of system lifecycle development, synthesis and design of engineering systems, visual modeling and unified modeling language (UML), requirements engineering, systems performance assessment, issues in synthesis and design, design for system lifecycle, approaches to system redesign in response to changes in requirements, reliability, trade-off analysis, and optimization-based design. ENPM 643 Systems Projects, Validation, and Verification (3) Prerequisites: ENPM 642 and permission of department. This course builds on material covered in ENPM 641 and ENPM 642. Students will work in teams on semester-long projects in systems engineering design, using the modeling framework developed in the preceding two courses in the sequence to explore system designs that are subjected to various forms of testing. Students will be using all of the concepts from prior courses, as well as topics introduced in this class including validation and verification, model checking, testing, and integration. ENPM 644 Human Factors in Systems Engineering (3) Prerequisite: permission of department. This course covers the general principles of human factors, or ergonomics as it is sometimes called. Human Factors (HF) is an interdisciplinary approach toward dealing with issues related to people in systems. It focuses on consideration of the characteristics of human beings in the design of systems and devices of all kinds. It concerns itself with the assignment of appropriate functions for humans and machines - whether the people serve as operators, maintainers, or users of the system or device. The goal of HFs is to achieve compatibility in the design of interactive systems of people, machines, and environments to ensure their effectiveness, safety and ease of use.ENPM 646 System Life Cycle Cost Analysis and Risk Management (3) This course covers topics related to estimating the costs and risks incurred through the lifetimes of projects, products and systems. In addition, treatment is

A. James Clark School of Engineering

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given to methods that determine the drivers of costs and risks and then propose the most effective alternatives to reducing them. The course covers relevant analytic tools from probability and statistics and also important managerial and organizational concepts. Extensive use will be made of case studies and examples from industry and government. ENPM 647 System Quality and Robustness Analysis (3) This course covers systems engineering approaches for creating optimal and robust engineering systems and for quality assurance. It provides an overview of the important tools for quality analysis and quality management of engineering systems. These tools are commonly used in companies and organizations. Focus will be placed on the Baldrige National Quality Program, ISO 9000 certification, 6-sigma systems, and Deming total quality management to examine how high quality standards are sustained and customer requirements and satisfactions are ensured. The Taguchi method for robust analysis and design is covered and applied to case studies. Issues of flexible design over the system life cycle are addressed. Statistical process control, international standards of sampling, and design

Technical Electives The four elective courses can be chosen from other areas such as: project management, information systems, software engineering, computer and software systems, distributed systems, control systems, communication and networking systems, signal processing systems, process systems, manufacturing systems, and operations research.

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Office of Advanced Engineering Education

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OAEE Course Catalog