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LONDON’S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

VISUAL IDENTITY

contents 1. UCL’s visual identity

PAGE

2. Using the UCL banner Best practice Identity elements Using the banner The strapline Departmental standalone logos

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3. Colour palette & typefaces Typefaces Colour palette Colour tints & legibilty

13

4. Using images 5. Working with partners Core branding elements Using the standalone logo UCL-led partnerships Equal partnerships

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6. Internal sub-brands Positioning internal logos

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7. Stationery & specifications Stationery Adding titles Measurements: A4 A3 A5 A6 8. ACCESSIBILITY

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3

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38

1. UCL’s Visual Identity

3

The UCL visual identity

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

Introduction

The importance of a visual identity

UCL is a large and complex institution, which represents many things to many different people. Over time, a number of different symbols and logos sprang up to represent UCL, and this started to affect our ability to communicate our work in a consistent and unified way.

UCL is an internationally and instantly recognised brand.

Research and consultation with people in the audiences we are trying to reach – including prospective students, funding bodies, partner organisations and business leaders – confirmed that there was confusion outside the organisation about UCL, and that some of the groundbreaking research and teaching excellence taking place here was going unnoticed by the outside world.

A specific department, school or faculty may not be as widely recognised. By not using the UCL brand properly, in communications, online or in print, the kudos of being associated with and part of UCL is lost, as well as affecting UCL’s overall professional appearance and reputation.

There are three key elements to the UCL visual identity: 1. All UCL materials should carry the UCL banner. 2. All UCL materials should use either Helvetica, Arial or Garamond font. 3. Only colours in the UCL colour palette should be used.

The extensive UCL colour palette, and both sans serif and serif fonts, allow for countless variation and, with creative input, a look for individual departments or projects can be created that compliment and adhere to the UCL guidelines.

As a result, a visual identity was created for UCL to strengthen our ability to gain greater recognition for the work we do and the impact that we have, both in the UK and globally. Over the past few months, we have held more than 50 hours of discussion with key people all across UCL to find out how the visual identity has been working and what can be done to increase its use across the university. On these pages, you will find everything you need to use the elements of the UCL visual identity, along with advice, artwork and templates to ensure that UCL’s profile remains high and that all areas of our work are well and consistently represented to the outside world.

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2. using the UCL banner

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The UCL visual identity How the UCL banner works

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

How the UCL banner works •

The UCL identity is not designed to work as a standalone logo.

It works as a viewfinder, where the image or colour beneath is always visible through the letters ‘UCL’.

The UCL visual identity is used as a banner spanning the top or side of the page.

It is recommended that a black banner is used, however, if chosen with care, any banner in the UCL colour palette can be used.

Please ensure that there is sufficient contrast between the banner and background image or colour.

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The UCL visual identity Banner elements

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

About the banner elements •

The UCL logo consists of the letters ‘UCL’, which work as cut-outs, and the UCL portico.

Please note, the portico is always solid white (or black on light colour banners), not cutout.

The portico has fixed proportions in relation to the letters UCL.

Never separate the portico from the letters or change the proportions.

Always use the logo artwork supplied, and avoid contorting the proportions.

To avoid this when manipulating the banner in any programme, hold the shift key while resizing. This will ‘lock’ the proportions.

UCL PORTICO

Never use the letters without the portico.

UCL LETTERS

Never change the proportions of the portico or letters.

7 Never use the letters reversed.

7

7 Never use the portico without the letters.

7 7

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Using the UCL banner

Using the UCL banner •

The UCL logo requires clear space around it to prevent any graphic element interfering with its integrity.

Always keep a clear space around the logo as shown on the right.

Use the building to define the clear space area. There is not a set measurement for this, as the clear space will increase or decrease proportionally with the size of the logo.

Never put another logo in the banner. Other logos can be placed at the bottom of the page, if necessary.

Never add words to the banner to make a ‘logo’. Follow the labelling system by placing titles in the top left-hand corner. Full details can be found in Specifications: Strapline (page 10).

Do not alter the UCL banner.

Please use the artwork available at:

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

CHANGING THE WORL

Never put another logo in the banner.

7

Never add words to the banner to make a ‘logo’. Follow the labelling system by placing titles on the top left hand corner. LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Another Logo

CHANGING THE WORLD Research at UCL

Department name

CHANGING THE WORLD

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Research at UCL

8

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Using the UCL banner

Do not alter the UCL banner

Please use the artwork available at: www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The letters ‘UCL’ should always act as cut-out. To ensure this, always use the EPS version for print, and PNG version for all electronic and online usage.

Always keep the correct proportion between the letters and building.

Always use the portico and letters together.

Always place the banner at the top (or side) of the page.

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LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

CHANGING

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GLOBAL UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY LONDON'S GLOBAL

THE WORLD RESEARCH AT UCL

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LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Never distort the letters and building.

LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Never use the letters without the building, or vice versa.

7 7

7 LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

LONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

7 Never place the bar anywhere but at the top or left side of the page.

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity The strapline

The strapline •

The strapline ‘London’s Global University’ should be used in core UCL communications. This will help to position UCL as a world-leading university.

If you prefer, the name of your department can be inserted into the banner using Arial typeface.

UCL should always be referred to as ‘UCL’. ‘University College London’ should only be used as part of the postal address.

The strapline has a standard size and position, and should be used on all core communications.

For information about size and positioning see Specifications: (page 8).

DEFAULT STRAPLINE london's global university

ALTERNATIVE STRAPLINE

DEPARTMENT/ FACULTY/ LAB NAME

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Departmental standalone logos

About the departmental standalone logo •

This may be used in applications such as co-branding ventures specific to a particular department or centre.

The diagrams on the right shows how the departmental logo artwork should be set up. You must follow the sizes and positioning shown here.

Type should be set in Arial bold uppercase, left-aligned.

When the width of the logo is 30mm set type size 9pt with 9.5pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). If you are using a smaller or larger logo, type should be scaled in proportiion with the logo.

30mm

Department names may be added to the standalone logo.

Text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line.

Creating a small-use departmental logo

Examples

2.5mm

CENTRE FOR PAEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES & MICROBIOLOGY

20mm

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit sed do

Development & ALUMNI RELATIONs Office

Small-use departmental logo clear space hebrew & jewish studies

On this page are examples of how the logos work with different length departmental names.

Laws

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit sed do

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3. COLOUR PALETTE & TYPEFACEs

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Colour palette & typeface

The primary UCL typeface is Helvetica or Arial and must be used on all communications. Helvetica and Arial are very similar (see right) meaning that use of either font will keep the UCL visual identity intact. Generally speaking, Helvetica is thought to look better on printed materials – but Arial is perfectly fine if you do not have access to the Helvetica font. We also use Garamond as a secondary typeface. This should only be used in the body of the text, in complex documents which need an extra typeface for text hierarchy. Garamond should never be used in the banner. All type should be left-aligned, and never centred or right-aligned. Only use italics for titles e.g. the Guardian newspaper. Use the bolder weights for highlighting points and for text hierarchy. For accessibility (use by people with any kind of visual impairment) you should use a font size of 12pt or larger whenever possible. If you would like more information on accessibility, please contact the UCL Disability Centre: www.ucl.ac.uk/disability

Helvetica (neue)

ARIAL

Light abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Light abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Regular abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Regular abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Medium abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy

Medium abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Bold abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

Bold abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

GARAMOND Light abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Regular abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Medium abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy Bold abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Colour palette

UCL has a full colour palette, which allows for flexibility. Different messages can be expressed by using soft or vibrant colours.

Tints of these colours can also be used to give more options of colours. See: Colour palette tints (page 15).

Do not use any other colours.

Consult Identity elements: Colour legibility (page 21) when choosing colours for text.

When sending artwork for professional printing, ensure the print company matches the colours to Pantone chips. A print test is always recommended, to ensure colour matching.

Use Pantone references when sending material to printers for publication (CP for coated paper, UP for uncoated), RGB for on screen and data projection material and HEX for websites. Mid Purple and Blue Celeste are UCL’s traditional colours.

Dark Green

mid green

bright green

light green

Yellow

Pantone 5815 CP / 5815 UP

Pantone 7495 CP / 583 UP

Pantone 390 CP / 388 UP

Pantone 7493 CP / 7493 UP

Pantone 7408 CP / 7404 UP

RGB: 85 80 37  Hex: #555025

RGB: 143 153 62  Hex: #8F993E

RGB: 181 189 0  Hex: #B5BD00

RGB: 187 197 146  Hex: #BBC592

RGB: 246 190 0  Hex: #F6BE00

Dark Red

MID RED

BRIGHT RED

LIGHT Red

Orange

Pantone 7421 CP / 222 UP

Pantone 7622 CP / 1807 UP

Pantone 199 CP / 199 UP

Pantone 179 CP / 1795 UP

Pantone 716 CP / 716 UP

RGB: 101 29 50  Hex: #651D32

RGB: 147 39 44  Hex: #93272C

RGB: 213 0 0  Hex: #D50032

RGB: 224 60 49  Hex: #93272C

RGB: 234 118 0  Hex: #EA7600

Dark Purple

MID Purple *

BRIGHT Pink

Light Purple

GREY

Pantone 7448 CP / 7447 UP

Pantone 2607 CP / 2607 UP

Pantone 215 CP / 214 UP

Pantone 5225 CP / 5225 UP

Pantone Warm Grey 8CP Warm Grey 8UP

RGB: 75 56 76  Hex: #4B384C

RGB: 80 7 120  Hex: #500778

RGB: 172 20 90  Hex: #AC145A

RGB: 198 176 188  Hex: #C6B0BC

RGB: 140 130 121  Hex: #8C8279

Dark blue

MID blue

BRIGHT blue

light blue

BLUE CELESTE *

Pantone 548 CP / 548 UP

Pantone 295 CP /295 UP

Pantone 7711 CP / 3135 UP

Pantone 550 CP / 550 UP

Pantone 635 CP / 635 UP

RGB: 0 61 76  Hex: #003D4C

RGB: 0 40 85  Hex: #002855

RGB: 0 151 169  Hex: #0097A9

RGB: 155 184 211  Hex: #9BB8D3

RGB: 164 219 232 Hex: #A4DBE8

Dark BROWN

stone

black

WHITE

Pantone 476 CP / 476 UP

Pantone 7527 CP / 7527 UP

RGB: 78 54 41  Hex: #4E3629

RGB: 214 210 196  Hex: #D6D2C4

*Traditional UCL colours

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Colour tints

This diagram illustrates the huge variety of colours acheivable by using tints of the UCL colour palette.

The text on the colour blocks demonstrates how legible black or white text will be on the particular colour.

Take care to ensure that there is sufficient contrast for your text to be legible. For example, blue text on a blue background is very difficult for many people to read. See the Accessibilty section (p38) for more information.

Dark Green

MID BRIGHT LIGHT Green Green Green

DARK RED

MID RED

BRIGHT ORANGE YELLOW DARK MID BRIGHT LIGHT GREY Red PURPLE PURPLE PURPLE PURPLE

DARK BLUE

MID BLUE

BRIGHT LIGHT BLUE BLUE

STONE BROWN

BLACK

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4. USING IMAGES

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Selecting imagery

Selecting imagery •

Imagery should reflect our core idea of expanding horizons, especially on the front of any communications. An interesting front cover can hook the reader and make them read further.

It is important to look through the UCL banner and see something interesting and engaging.

Our imagery should be vibrant and aspirational. It should convey a sense of exploration and discovery, of looking at things differently and making an impact.

When showing people it is more interesting to show them engaged in an activity, especially if its relevant to the content and/or their work or studies, than a straight forward ‘passport’ photo.

One image should be used on the front cover of your document or brochure. One strong image has a much bigger impact than a montage of images, which can cause confusion.

A good source of images is the UCL Imagestore: www.imagestore.ucl.ac.uk

Adding interest •

Odd angles and unusual crops can add interest to an average image.

Remember, we do not always have to use images. For example, using a solid colour with an engaging title can be a powerful alternative for a brochure front cover.

It is important when using digital imagery in printed publications, PowerPoint and online that you are aware of the file size of your image and also the image resolution.

For guidance on the use of digital images: www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

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5. working with partners

18

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Working with partners

A lot of UCL’s work is done in partnership with other organisations. When this happens, both organisations need to be represented on any materials or communications, so that the relationship is presented properly and accurately.

Equal partners Professor Malcolm Grant CBE, President & Provost, UCL Martin Paisner CBE, Chairman, Weizmann UK have great pleasure in inviting

UCL is a well-respected organisation with an international reputation for excellence.

to a reception and dinner to celebrate the first day of the 2010 Weizmann UK Making Connections Symposium The Cosmic Enigma: Cosmology & Particle Astrophysics conducted in partnership with UCL.

It is important that we present our branded materials in a consistent and coherent way, so we can protect that reputation and build trust with our audiences.

Tuesday 22 June 2010 UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 18.30 Reception – Flaxman Gallery 19.00 Dinner – Terrace Restaurant 21.30 Carriages RSVP: TBC Dress: Lounge suits

This is especially important in co-branding situations. These guidelines provide help and support for designing in these situations.

UCL dominant partner

Multiple partners

POPULATION HEALTH SCIENCES

Before you begin Please familiarise yourself with the UCL Identity Style Guide and use it alongside this document. The UCL Identity Style Guide is available to download at:

MEDICAL HEALTH RESEARCH REPORT 2012

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity UCL core branding elements

For UCL-led communications, always use the UCL banner across the top of printed communications, with the partner logo(s) placed at the lower left corner.

For websites, place partner logos in the left-hand column.

For equal partnerships, and partnerships led by other organisations, the standalone logo should be used.

Standalone logo

Colour palette (see p15 for full breakdowns)

Fonts

Helvetica (Neue) abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

UCL banner

Arial abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Garamond abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

20

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Using the standalone logo

Using the UCL standalone logo with partner logos and a descriptor

The examples on the left show how to add descriptors to the UCL standalone logo, when it appears with other logos.

Give logos equal prominence, and provide sufficient space between them.

Descriptors can be used to help describe the relationship between UCL and our partners. It often gives UCL a chance to define our role in a clearer way.

Here are some suggestions of how to describe co-branding relationships:

UCL standalone logo with partner logo and descriptor – examples A UCL and Partner Brand initiative In collaboration with

A UCL partnership

A research initiative with

In partnership with In association with An initiative with In collaboration with A UCL initiative A UCL and Partner Brand initiative Sponsored by UCL Enabled by UCL

If the logo will be placed on a busy background image, place it on a bounding box, as in the examples on the right.

21

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Working with partners

UCL-led partnerships UCL communications acknowledging partner involvement The UCL banner should always be used at the top of the website/document cover, to illustrate the dominant partner.

Place the other logo(s) in the lower left-hand corner using the document margins.

The other logos should be arranged on a horizontal axis (see below).

Ensure these logos have equal prominence.

On websites, place partner logos on the left-hand column

Examples: A4 report

A5 landscape leaflet

london’s global university

uCl leaFlet WitH eXternal Partners

uCl broCHure WitH eXternal Partners LONDON’S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Online Area Heading

Place partner logos on a horizontal axis:

DL leaflet LONDON’S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

uCl leaFlet WitH eXternal Partners

22

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Working with partners

Equal partnerships Joint communications acknowledging equal partnerships •

Use both UCL and your partner(s) logos with equal prominence.

Place logos in the lower right-hand corner, using the document margins.

The logos should be arranged on a horizontal axis for print, or stacked for online.

Always ensure the logos are clearly visible against the background. Place logos on a plain, coloured box for busy backgrounds.

Wherever possible, the UCL standalone logo should be positioned in the right-hand corner, to give it more prominence.

Examples: A5 landscape leaflet

A4 report NEW VENTURE IDENTITY NAME

neW venture identity

broCHure title teXt loruM iPsuM dalore seCretariat

PaMPHlet title teXt loruM iPsuM dalore seCretariat

Online PRINT: Place logos on a horizontal axis DL leaflet neW venture identity

ONLINE: Stack the logos

leaFlet title teXt loruM iPsuM dalore seCretariat

23

6. internal sub-brands

24

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Internal sub-logos: best practice

Internal sub-logos can dilute the UCL brand, look too busy and cause the reader/user to become confused about the origin, and even the authenticity, of the communication material. A specific and sophisticated look can be created by the use of colour, images and typography specific to a certain department or project rather than a logo. These examples show how and where exisiting internal sub-logos should be positioned on various communications.

Pull-up banner

Leaflet

UCL GRAND CHALLENGES

Intercultural Interaction The complex relationships between people, cultures and communities are continually evolving. The UCL Grand Challenge of Intercultural Interaction considers the factors that shape our lives, and brings together our collective knowledge, creativity and insight to find solutions. The programme investigates subjects including ethnicity, religion and cultural heritage, and issues affecting democracy, communities and civil society across the world. By enabling cross-disciplinary research we aim to transform knowledge into wisdom, share best practice and influence global debate and policy. To find out more about the programme and forthcoming events, and sign up for our newsletter, visit: www.ucl.ac.uk/intercultural-interaction

The UCL banner should always be present at the top of the material, with the sub-logo using the fonts and colours from the UCL Visual Identity. If it is felt that a sub-logo is absolutely necessary, please contact UCL Communications in the first instance for guidance.

Website

25

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Internal sub-branding

Positioning internal logos

Print

• Print

Position the sub-logo in the lower-right corner

Online Area Heading

london’s global university

• Online

Position the logo in the upper right-hand column. A descriptor may be used to clarify the relationship. See: Adding a descriptor with partner brand logos (page 21).

uCl broCHure WitH internal Co-brand

• Sizing

The sub-logo should be a maximum of 20 percent of the size of the UCL banner.

26

7. STationery & specifications

27

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Stationery

UCL stationery

Business Cards

UCL stationery has been developed to create consistency across the organisation.

Department or partner logos should never be placed on the front of a business card

Professor John Smith

Professor John Smith

Head of Department UCL Department

Head of Department UCL Department

3

University College London Gower Street London WC1E 6BT Tel: +44(0)20 7679 2000 j.smith@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/department

Pre-printed stationery can be ordered through the UCL printing contractors:

www.ucl.ac.uk/procurement/agreements /reprographics Templates for these materials and more are available to download from the website:

Letterheads

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

•

External partner logos can be placed at the bottom i.e. NHS Trust or a funding body

•

Internal /departmental logos should never be placed on the letterhead. Never place any logo in the UCL banner

7

Compliment slips

•

•

7

University College London Gower Street London WC1E 6BT Tel: +44(0)20 7679 2000 j.smith@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/department

Department or partner logos should never be placed on the front of a compliment slip

Never put another logo in the bar

8&/ '(9(/230(17 &25325$7(&20081,&$7,2162)),&(

8QLYHUVLW\&ROOHJH/RQGRQ*RZHU6WUHHW/RQGRQ:&(%7 7HO  )D[   ZZZXFODFXNGHYHORSPHQW Another Logo

:LWKFRPSOLPHQWV

3

8&/ '(9(/230(17 &25325$7(&20081,&$7,2162)),&(

8QLYHUVLW\&ROOHJH/RQGRQ*RZHU6WUHHW/RQGRQ:&(%7 7HO  )D[   ZZZXFODFXNGHYHORSPHQW

7

LOGO :LWKFRPSOLPHQWV

3

LOGO

7

INTERNAL LOGO

28

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Adding titles

Only ever put the titling in the typeface, size and positioning specified.

UCL Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

3

Do not put the labelling anywhere but the specified position

Do not centre the labelling.

7

UCL Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

7

UCL Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

7

Do not increase the type size. Always use the typeface and type size specified.

UCL Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

7

Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

7

Centre for cardiovascular biology & medicine

29

www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Measurements – A4 portrait, horizontal bar

Measurements The following pages contain the measurements and specifications for various standard document sizes. These must be followed at all times.

Non-standard sizes When designing to a non-standard page size, refer to the examples given here and then apply the same principles to adapt the design. Make sure the bar is not too big or too small.

90mm 10mm

80mm

10mm

1

UCL CENTRE FOR PAEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES & MICROBIOLOGY

2

12mm 20mm 40mm 20mm

3

A4 portrait, horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 10pt with 11.5pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). 2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line.This approximately the width of the UCL logo. 3. Text/titles etc. should sit within the blue dotted box.

210mm x 297mm

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The UCL visual identity Measurements – A4 landscape, horizontal bar

Measurements A4 landscape – horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 10pt with 11.5pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). 2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line.

110mm 10mm

100mm

12mm

10mm

1

UCL CENTRE FOR PAEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES & MICROBIOLOGY

2 20mm

3. Text/titles etc. should sit within the blue dotted box.

40mm 20mm

3

297mm x 210mm

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The UCL visual identity Measurements – A3 portrait, horizontal bar

Measurements A3 portrait – horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 14pt with 16pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). 2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted box. This box is approximately the width of the UCL logo area.

125mm 10mm

115mm

17mm

10mm

1

30mm

UCL CENTRE FOR PAEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES & MICROBIOLOGY

2

27mm 57mm 30mm

3

3. Text/titles etc. should sit within the blue dotted box.

297mm x 420mm

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Measurements – A3 landscape, horizontal bar

Measurements A3 landscape, horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 14pt with 16pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). 2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line.This box is approximately the size of the UCL logo.

125mm 10mm

115mm

17mm

10mm

1

UCL CENTRE FOR PAEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASES & MICROBIOLOGY

2

24mm 52mm 28mm

3. Text/titles etc should sit within the blue box. 3

420mm x 297mm

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Measurements – A5 portrait, horizontal bar

Measurements A5 portrait, horizontal bar

75mm 8mm

67mm

10mm

8mm

1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 9pt with 10pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text).

1

14mm

UCL Centre for paediatric infectious diseases & microbiology

2

14mm 28mm 14mm

2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line. 3. Text/titles etc. should sit within the blue box.

3

148mm x 210mm

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www.ucl.ac.uk/visual-identity

The UCL visual identity Measurements – A5 landscape, horizontal bar

Measurements A5 landscape, horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 9pt with 10pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text). 2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line. 3. Text/titles etc. should sit within the blue box.

78mm 8mm

70mm

10mm

8mm UCL Centre for paediatric infectious diseases & microbiology

1 2

13mm 28mm

12mm 15mm

3

210mm x 148mm

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The UCL visual identity Measurements – A6 portrait, horizontal bar

Measurements A6 portrait, horizontal bar 1. Type should be set in Arial bold. Use type size 8pt with 9pt leading (leading is the space between lines of text).

6mm

50mm

6mm

12mm

UCL Centre for paediatric infectious diseases & microbiology

6mm 9mm 20mm 11mm

2. Labelling text should be restricted to the field marked by the pink dotted line. 3. Text/titles etc should sit within the blue box.

105mm x 148mm

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8. ACCESSIBility

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The UCL visual identity Accessibility

Accessibility It is important when you are producing your communications that they are clear and easy for people to use. Thought should be given to make sure materials are accessible to disabled people. The following recommendations are adapted from the RNIB guidelines on producing ‘clear print’.

Type size Use a type size between 12 to 14 point. 14 point type will be more legible to people with sight problems.

Contrast

Type weight

Setting text

People with sight problems often prefer bold or semi-bold weights to normal ones. Avoid light type weights.

Avoid fitting text around images if this means that lines of text start in a different place, and are therefore difficult to find.

Line length Ideally, line length should be between 60-70 letters per line. Lines that are too long or too short tire the eyes. The same applies to sentence and paragraph lengths, which should also be neither too long nor too short.

Word spacing and alignment Keep to the same amount of space between each word. Do not condense or stretch lines of type.

The better the contrast between the background and the text, the more legible the text will be. Note that the contrast will be affected by the size and weight of the type. Black text on white background provides the best contrast.

Aligning text to the left margin makes it easy to find the start and finish of each line, and keeps the spaces even between words.

Type styles

Avoid justified text, as the uneven word spacing can make reading more difficult for people with sight problems.

Capital letters and italicised text are both generally harder to read. A word or two in capitals is fine but avoid the use of capitals for continuous text. Avoid italic text where an alternative emphasis, such as bolder weights, is available.

Leading The space between one line of type and the next (known as leading) is important. As a general rule, the space should be 1.5 to 2 times the space between words on a line.

Columns Make sure the margins between columns of text clearly separate the text. If space is limited, use a vertical rule.

Set text horizontally as text set vertically is extremely difficult for a partially-sighted reader to follow. Avoid setting text over images, for example photographs. This will affect the contrast and, if a partially-sighted person is avoiding images, they will miss the text.

Navigational aids It is helpful if recurring features, such as headings and page numbers, are always in the same place. A contents list and rules to separate different sections are also useful. Leave a space between paragraphs, as dividing the text up gives the eye a break and makes reading easier. If you need further help in producing accessible materials please contact: UCL Disability Centre Telephone: +44 (0)20 7679 0100 (UCL internal: 30100)

Reversing type If using white type, make sure the background colour is dark enough to provide sufficient contrast.

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UCL Visual Identity