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Public events at UCL: Januar y–April 2014

www.ucl.ac.uk/events

Welcome to UCL’s public events booklet, showcasing a range of public talks, lectures, exhibitions, workshops, film screenings and performances taking place at the university throughout spring 2014. Bring your sandwiches and hear leading academics discuss their research at the UCL Lunch Hour Lectures. Topics covered this term include the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles, the death of the high street and whether passwords actually provide adequate cyber security (p.19–24). While you are on campus, try our new UCL Audio Tour app, available from the iTunes App Store and Google Play. Learn more about the Bloomsbury campus and the remarkable people who have studied, worked and lived here. The events here are only a small selection of what’s on offer: for more information on each event or for a full listing, please visit our online events calendar:

www.ucl.ac.uk/events

Cover image © Hergé-Moulinsart 2014 See page 2 for event details of the ‘Tintin at 85’ symposium. Fri 10 Jan | 9am–7pm

Talks

02

Activities

15

Lunch Hour Lectures

19

Performances

25

Exhibitions

30

Events diary

34

Venues/Maps itions

36 Please note: all events are free and open to all, unless otherwise stated. Watch online www.youtube.com/UCLTV http://itunes.ucl.ac.uk Read our blog http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events Subscribe to our newsletter events@ucl.ac.uk Follow on Twitter @UCLEvents

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Talks Lectures Discussions

Tintin at 85 This one-day symposium brings together scholars and Tintinologists to discuss The Adventures of Tintin from their first appearance in Le Petit Vingtième to the recent Hollywood film. In keeping with Hergé’s commitment to children’s causes, conference proceeds will be donated to children’s charity, The Art Room. Fri 10 Jan | 9am–7pm | symposium Roberts Building wai.ue.10@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7849 428 351

Show ‘n’ tell We have invited UCL PhD students to showcase one object from the museum’s collection of 68,000 and tell you what they know about it. David Curnick has a self-professed interest in sharks, tuna, coral and sloths – come along to find out what he has chosen. Thurs 16 Jan | 1–2pm | talk UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

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Egypt awakened: the Petrie pops up at UCL Art Museum This talk considers Egyptian students who attended the UCL Slade School of Fine Art, focusing on the interwar period and modernist artists in Egypt, as well as how the rise of Egyptian nationalism and expression of identity changed the way that antiquities were excavated by foreign archaeologists including Flinders Petrie. Tues 21 Jan | 1–2pm | talk UCL Art Museum events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Bringing the dark to light: memory of the Holocaust in post-communist Europe Today, the Holocaust has become the universal icon of evil. Most recently, some have claimed it as an international paradigm of human rights. This presentation discusses the major stages of the process of restoration of memory of the Holocaust in post-communist Europe. Tues 21 Jan | 6–7.30pm | lecture G6 Lecture Theatre, UCL Institute of Archaeology s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

The complexity of decision-making UCL Honorary Professor Noreena Hertz discusses her book Eyes Wide Open, which considers how to improve decision-making and manage information excess. Chaired by Professor Jo Wolff (UCL Philosophy) with panellists including Dr Claire Craig (Deputy Head, Government Office for Science). Tues 21 Jan | 6–8.30pm | panel discussion Pre-booking essential Cruciform Lecture Theatre 1 dan.martin@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 3840

‘Show ‘n’ tell’, 16 January 1–2pm.

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Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Translation in history: translations Stones and symbolism: and literature in ancient Mesopotamia Petrie Museum pops up in UCL’s ‘Rock Room’ Dr Martin Worthington (University of Cambridge) will introduce non-specialists to the rich bodies of writings that attest to practices of translations in and out of Sumerian, Babylonian and Assyrian. The sources considered will include Lugal-e and the Epic of Gilgamesh. Thurs 23 Jan | 6–7.30pm | talk Pre-booking essential G6 Lecture Theatre UCL Institute of Archaeology g.brodie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1317

This seminar aims to address issues of why some stones were valued over others during antiquity and the power of source and symbolism. It will take the form of an object-handling session. Wed 29 Jan | 6–7.30pm | talk UCL Rock Room events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Inaugural lecture: For an anthropology of history

Making capitalism fit for society: discussion with Colin Crouch

Professor Charles Stewart (UCL Anthropology) will ask whether heightened recognition of alternative regimes of historical practice might alter the western understanding of history. What is needed are ethnographic studies of how the past is known, understood and represented in world societies past and present.

In his book, Professor Crouch offers ways of challenging neo-liberalism. The book builds on the ideas in Post-Democracy (2004) that he has been developing and advocating, which have attracted considerable attention in Germany, Austria and Scandinavia where its proposals are being debated across the political left.

Tues 28 Jan | 6.30–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre t.rickards@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138 04

Thurs 30 Jan | 5.30–7pm | talk Pre-booking essential 131 AV Hill Lecture Theatre, Medical Sciences and Anatomy Building d.kraniotis@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4902

Pop-up talk: Ferguson’s Gang

Translation: art and word

Join Anna Hutton-North, author of Ferguson’s Gang – The Maidens behind the Masks, for a talk about the women who hit the headlines in the 1930s by anonymously bringing sacks full of money to National Trust offices to save historic properties. Her book has now uncovered how the gang met and fought in order to save England’s heritage.

What is the art of translation? Elise Aru, Timothy Mathews and Sharon Morris will discuss how translation has made them think, affected how they understand works of art and how translation has inspired works of art. The event will conclude with a translation workshop by Manuela Perteghella and Eugenia Loffredo.

Tues 4 Feb | 1–2pm | talk UCL Art Museum m.rouleau@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Wed 5 Feb | 7–9pm | talk Roberts Foyer G02, Roberts Building deborah.martin@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3107

Inaugural lecture: Transporting Skies Professor Susan Collins (UCL Slade School of Fine Art) will present a number of artworks that, each in different ways, rely on an ‘open system’ or structure for their realisation. It will also explore issues raised by the works including the relationship between time, landscape and technology. Tues 4 Feb | 6.30–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre t.rickards@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 1346

Transporting Skies, 4 February.

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Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Translation in history: Toledo as a centre of translation in the 12th & 13th centuries

Democracies and dictatorships in Latin America: emergence, survival and fall

Toledo was Europe’s principal centre for the translation of texts from Arabic into Latin in philosophy, medicine, mathematics, alchemy and magic. Professor Charles Burnett of the Warburg Institute will show how the translations reflect a context of collaboration and exchanges.

This talk, by Scott Mainwaring, is based on his very recently published book, co-authored by Aníbal Perez-Liñán. The book offers the first extended analysis of regime emergence, survival and breakdown of all 20 Latin American countries over an extended time.

Thurs 6 Feb | 6–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential G6 Lecture Theatre, UCL Institute of Archaeology g.brodie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1317

Wed 12 Feb | 5.30–7.30pm | talk Pre-booking essential Lecture Theatre 103, UCL Institute of the Americas ucl-ia@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721

Ancient plays for modern minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

Ancient plays for modern minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

Dr Rosa Andújar will discuss the comedies of Aristophanes (c. 446–c. 386 BC) in their original ancient Athenian context, with particular attention given to Clouds. Part of UCL Greek & Latin’s ‘Ancient Plays for Modern Minds’ programme, which complements the 2014 Classical Play, Aristophanes’ Clouds: www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/classical-play

Dr Jenny Bryan will discuss philosophy in fifth-century BC Athens, with particular attention given to Socrates and his portrayal in Aristophanes. Part of UCL Greek & Latin’s ‘Ancient Plays for Modern Minds’ programme, which complements the 2014 Classical Play, Aristophanes’ Clouds: www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/classical-play

Tues 11 Feb | 6–7pm | lecture Pre-booking essential B01 Main Lecture Theatre, Bentham House r.andujar@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 7522

Wed 12 Feb | 6–7pm | lecture Pre-booking essential G6 Lecture Theatre, UCL Institute of Archaeology r.andujar@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 7522

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Ancient plays for modern minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

Jews and the making of the modern cultural industry

Award-winning historian, author and broadcaster Bettany Hughes will discuss Athens in the fifth century BC, with particular reference to Socrates. Part of UCL Greek & Latin’s ‘Ancient Plays for Modern Minds’ programme, which complements the 2014 Classical Play, Aristophanes’ Clouds: www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/classical-play

From the middle of the 19th century, a burgeoning cultural industry developed in Europe and North America: publishers, a music industry, the theatre and, in the early 20th century, the film industry. This lecture seeks to establish the extent of the Jewish contribution to these developments and the causes behind it.

Thurs 13 Feb | 6–7pm Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre r.andujar@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 7522

Thurs 13 Feb | 6.45–8pm | lecture Garwood Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Time-based media in conversation: how to stop worrying and love (running) On the eve of Valentine’s Day, let’s talk about love – specifically, why we should fall in love with running. Join artist and UCL Slade School PhD graduate Kai Syng Tan as she explores the ways in which running can empower us to re-imagine our reality. Thurs 13 Feb | 6.30–7.30pm | talk UCL Art Museum m.rouleau@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540 Translation in history, 6 February.

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Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Death by hair: from colonial south-west Africa to Nazi Germany

The Eleanor Roosevelt Annual Lecture

Frequently in history, the colour and texture of hair has been used to judge individuals and groups as ‘racially valueless’. The UCL Galton Collection holds a rare hair colour chart, manufactured in the early 20th century as a ‘standard’ scale for hair hierarchy and now dubbed a ‘killing machine’.

Eleanor Roosevelt had very significant influence in shaping Franklin D. Roosevelt’s willingness to appoint influential women to important positions in New Deal programmes. Key figures included Molly Dewson and Frances Perkins. However, its foremost member was the First Lady, even though she never held an administrative post.

Sat 15 Feb | 2–5pm | talk Pre-booking essential Haldane Room c.reeves@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3160

Thurs 20 Feb | 6–8pm | lecture Pre-booking essential UCL Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre ucl-ia@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721

Defining desire: labels and sex in ancient and modern worlds

Inaugural lecture: Growing societies: the archaeo-botany of food production and globalisation of agriculture

The Petrie pops up in the UCL Institute of Archaeology. John J. Johnston will explore how sexuality has been classified or not, including a presentation on ‘Sex and history: talking sex with objects from the past’ project by Jennifer Grove (University of Exeter) and ‘Queer time capsules’ by Tim Redfern/ Timberlina. Part of UCL Diversity Month and LGBT History month. Thurs 20 Feb | 6–8pm | talk G6 Lecture Theatre, UCL Institute of Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk | +44 (0)20 7679 4138 08

Professor Dorian Fuller considers recent insights on the transition from wild plant gathering to farming, using examples from India, south-west Asia, China and Africa. Tues 25 Feb | 6:30–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre t.rickards@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 1346

Focus on the positive Worried about the world’s problems? Here’s a chance to hear solutions and decide which ones will get funded. For a very special edition, the Grant Museum welcomes some of UCL’s inspiring researchers who will tackle the big issues of today, inspired by the collection. Thurs 27 Feb | 7–8.30pm | talk Tickets £5 on the door, which will go to charity UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Redcliffe Salaman, President of the Jewish Historical Society of England Redcliffe Salaman’s life (1874– 1955) spanned major events in the modern history of the Jewish people and his presidency of the Historical Society was influential for a variety of reasons that will be memorably described in this lecture. Thurs 27 Feb | 6.45–8pm | lecture Chadwick Lecture Theatre Chadwick Building s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Translation in history: The art of 譯 (yì): 3,000 years of Chinese translation Translation from and into Chinese has played an influential role in the development of Chinese civilisation. Nicky Harman’s talk will give an overview of those 3,000 years and will show how translation problems perceived and discussed centuries ago are still relevant today. Thurs 27 Feb | 6–7.30pm | talk Pre-booking essential G6 Lecture Theatre, UCL Institute of Archaeology g.brodie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1317

Growing societies: the archaeo-botany of food production and globalisation of agriculture, 25 February.

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Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Inaugural lecture: A Godforsaken country: Assyria after 614BC For more than 300 years, the Assyrian Empire exercised hegemony over the ancient world – until the seventh century BC, when it suddenly vanished. This lecture by Professor Karen Radner (UCL History) analyses the significance of a raid on a temple at the empire’s heart in 614 BC and its political and social impact.

Show ‘n’ tell We have invited UCL PhD students to showcase one object from the museum’s collection of 68,000 objects and tell you what they know about it. Alison Fairbrass will be joining us after having rummaged through the drawers to find her object. Find out more about Alison’s research in how urban building design can support biodiversity.

Tues 4 Mar | 6.30–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre t.rickards@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 1346

Thurs 6 Mar | 1–2pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Labour movements and democratisation in Latin America: Mexico in comparative perspective

China and freedom of speech: new systems for accountability of the press

Kevin J. Middlebrook analyses how, in contrast to the recent experiences of many Latin American countries, the organised labour movement in Mexico has not been a force for democratisation. This seminar presentation will examine the reasons for Mexican ‘exceptionalism’. Wed 5 Mar | 5.30–7.30pm | seminar Pre-booking essential Lecture Theatre 103 UCL Institute of the Americas ucl-ia@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721 10

UCL’s China Centre for Health & Humanity and Centre for Transnational History invite you to an evening with John Kampfner, ex-editor of the New Statesman and high-profile author and commentator. John will discuss China, freedom of speech and how to ensure an appropriate system for the accountability of the press. Thurs 6 Mar | 6.30–8.30pm | talk Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre history.office@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7678 1340

Why isn’t my professor black?

Gallery talk: Edna Manley

There are just 50 (0.4%) black British professors out of more than 14,000 in the UK – a number that has barely changed in eight years. This shows a striking disparity with the proportion of black students (6%), which has increased steadily each year. What does it mean when the generation that produces knowledge is so unrepresentative of the generation that consumes it?

Marking International Women’s Day, Dr Gemma Romain talks about Jamaican sculptor Edna Manley, whose work responded to living in colonial Jamaica, witnessing the struggles for nationhood and independence from Britain. Influenced by African art, including that of ancient Egypt, Manley created sculptures representing the diversity of Jamaican life and struggles.

Mon 10 Mar | 5.30–7pm | talk Pre-booking essential 25 Gordon Street, E28 Harrie Massey LT s.bharadva@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 3991

Sat 15 Mar | 3–4pm | talk UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

The postwar quest for justice: Jewish honor courts in Poland and in the displaced persons camps Using unstudied documents from honor courts in Poland, Germany, Austria and Italy, this lecture will discuss how, through turning to these Jewish courts for redress, Holocaust survivors were not only attempting to ostracise alleged Jewish collaborators, but also were signalling their personal investment in the Jewish community’s postwar self-renewal. Thurs 13 Mar | 6.45–8pm | lecture Chadwick Lecture Theatre, Chadwick Building s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

A Godforsaken country: Assyria after 614BC, 4 March. 11

Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Federalism or break-up: the UK from Parnell to Salmond

What’s Jewish about Jewish folklore?

For the annual UCL Neale Lecture, Professor David Marquand FBA will speak on this highly topical theme. It promises to be an exciting and illuminating talk, especially as the date of the Scottish referendum approaches.

Jewish folklore is intimately bound up with the countries in which Jews lived and eastern European folk tales and legends. This lecture attempts to extricate what is inherently Jewish about the many and varied stories that still live in historical memory and how they interweave with other traditions.

Wed 19 Mar | 6–7pm | lecture Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre history.office@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7678 1340

Housman Lecture 2014: Ovid as a literary historian At the end of his writing career, Ovid was increasingly prompted to look back over his life as he attempted to create a framework for understanding recent Roman literature and his place within it. Professor Denis Feeney (Princeton University) examines how he did this and who his most important models were. Thurs 20 Mar | 6–8pm | lecture Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre g.manuwald@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4575

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Thurs 20 Mar | 6.45–8pm | lecture G22 Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Transnational Americas: Latin American perspectives on recent trends in pan-American migration By 2050, 100 million persons in the US will be of Latin American descent. In recent years, 14 million left Central America to make the often dangerous journey to ‘El Norte’. This lecture examines recent trends in migration from a Latin American perspective and considers the social, political and economic consequences. Tue 25 Mar | 6.30–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre t.rickards@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 1346

Translation in history: the translation of a saint: Santa Rosa de Lima Santa Rosa de Lima (1586–1617) was the inaugural saint of the Americas. Professor Stephen Hart (UCL) looks at the role played by translation in the canonising transformation of the original testimonies of her life (recorded in Spanish) into the first official biography written in Latin. Thurs 27 Mar | 6–7.30pm | lecture Pre-booking essential G6 Lecture Theatre UCL Institute of Archaeology g.brodie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1317

Christobal Mendez alias David Mendez: the puzzling saga of a 17th-century converso The conversos of the Spanish Inquisition became ostensibly Christian but buried their Jewish roots. Their origins became disguised in a variety of obscure ways and continued to be hidden and then surface in surprising situations for many centuries. This lecture examines one particular case and traces its story. Thurs 27 Mar | 6.45–8pm | lecture Chadwick Lecture Theatre, Chadwick Building s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Animal, vegetable, mineral We have some amazing objects here at UCL Museums, we know what they are (mostly), but will our panel of experts? Join us for the return of this recreation of the classic TV panel game as our experts try to identify mystery specimens and artefacts from our fantastic collections. Thurs 27 Mar | 6.30–9pm | talk JZ Young Lecture Theatre Anatomy Building zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052 Animal, vegetable, mineral, 27 March.

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Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Book launch – World Film Locations: Toronto & Vancouver This book reveals the relationship between the city and cinema using a predominately visual approach. The juxtaposition of the images with insightful essays helps to demonstrate the role that cities have played in many hit films and encourages readers to frame an understanding of Toronto, Vancouver and the world around us. Sat 5 Apr | 5–9pm | talk Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre wai.ue.10@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7849 428 351

The development of the AngloJewish novel by women writers in the 19th century Nineteenth-century Britain – a world of progress and reform, industrialisation and social upheaval – was also the era of the professional woman writer – a time in which women demanded a place alongside men in the world of letters. This lecture will trace how Jewish women were part of this zeitgeist. Thurs 24 Apr | 6.45–8pm | lecture G22 Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Meet the curators – A fusion of worlds: ancient Egypt, African art and identity in modernist Britain Gemma Romain, Debbie Challis and members of the group involved in putting on the ‘A fusion of worlds’ exhibition will be on hand to talk about the reappraisal of Egyptian sculpture during the early 20th century and the artists involved, such as Jacob Epstein, Edna Manley and Harold Moody. Tue 8 Apr | 6–8pm | talk UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

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World Film Locations book launch. 5 April.

Activities Workshops Family events

Explore zoology We have rifled through drawers and cabinets to find our most amazing animals for our family hands-on, specimen-based activities. Ever wondered what the skin of a python feels like or how many spots a leopard has? Bring along your budding zoologists and ask our enthusiastic museum educators these questions and more. Sat 18 Jan | 1–4.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Life and death drawing: expression Join us to practise your drawing skills by sketching from a life model, anatomical models and other works of art in this afternoon workshop facilitated by staff from UCL Science & Technology Studies, including Dr Chiara Ambrosio, Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science, Dr Carole Reeves and Mat Paskins. Sat 25 Jan | 2–5pm Pre-booking essential UCL Art Museum m.rouleau@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540 15

Activities/Workshops/Family events

Taxonomies of bones and pots: the Petrie pops up at the Grant Museum

Hands-on: Japanese woodblock printing workshop

Find out what archaeologists owe to natural science in this hands-on event exploring Linnaean systems of classifying life forms and Flinders Petrie’s sequence of pots. Try your hand at seeing patterns that link species and pot type together in giant puzzles. Then, if you want, disrupt the systems with Foucault.

Join artist Hiroko Imada for this workshop introducing the art of Japanese woodblock printing. Taking inspiration from UCL Art Museum’s Japanese prints collection, you will learn from an experienced artist how to design, carve and print your own work.

Thurs 13 Feb | 6–7.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Valentine’s at the Grant Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it – where better to do it yourself than at the Grant Museum? Join us for a special late opening and discover the museum after dark, while also uncovering how seduction is done in the animal world with our Valentine’sthemed specimen labels. Fri 14 Feb | 6.30–9pm Tickets £5 on the door (includes a glass of wine or soft drink). UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

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Wed 26 Feb | 2–5pm Pre-booking essential. Tickets: £12 (includes material) UCL Art Museum http://japanese-woodblock.eventbrite.co.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Egypt in London: modernist sculpture walk Starting at the Carreras ‘Black Cat’ building with a discussion of the popular image of Egypt in the 1920s, we will take in some of Jacob Epstein’s outdoor public sculpture, including Rima in Hyde Park. This walk is linked to our exhibition A Fusion of Worlds: ancient Egypt, African art and identity in modernist Britain. Wed 26 Feb | 2–4pm Pre-booking essential UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Your Universe, UCL Festival of Astronomy Learn all about the lives of stars. Play God by building the universe. Hold rocks older than our own planet. Find out about life in the universe. Use our telescopes to look at the Sun, Moon and Jupiter. Talk to our young scientists who are studying newly discovered planets and the mysteries of the dark universe. Thurs 6–Sat 8 Mar | 11–6pm UCL Main Campus fd@star.ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/youruniverse

Fossil forage Get stuck in at this free, hands-on activity by sieving through our sediment that dates from a time more than 50 million years ago, when London was underwater and patrolled by sharks and rays. Any fossils you find in the sand, you get to keep. Part of National Science and Engineering Week. Sat 15 Mar | 1–4.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

The women behind Petrie: International Women’s Day event How were Hilda Urlin, Margaret Murray, Winifred Brunton, Gertrude Caton-Thompson, Olga Tufnell, Kate Bradbury and Beatrice Orme (among other women) involved with Petrie, his excavations and teaching? Find out more from our archives and contribute to this crowdsourcing event to mark International Women’s Day. Drop in. Sat 8 Mar | 2–6pm UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Japanese woodblock printing workshop, 26 February. 17

Activities/Workshops/Family events

Killer carnivores

Easter egg-laying animals

From lions to pythons and sharks to crocodiles, join us this half-term holiday as we investigate the amazing ways that meat-eaters find, catch and eat their prey. Take part in our fun specimen-based activities and get up close to our amazing skins, skulls and skeletons.

For the Easter holidays, the Grant Museum is exploring the wonderful world of eggy animals. From penguins to platypuses, sharks to snails and bullfrogs to butterflies, our fantastic specimen-based activities will investigate the best shells and spawn. Come and unscramble our games and whip up some eggcitement with our amazing animal specimens.

Mon 17–Sat 22 Feb | 1–4.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Tues 8–Wed 16 April | 1–4.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz Back by popular demand. Bring along your brainiest friends to form the ultimate team and compete for the much-coveted Golden Glittery Lion. Do you know your diptera from your lepidoptera or rock hyrax from your tree hyrax? Join us as we delve into six rounds of popular natural history. Tues 18 Mar | 6.30–9pm Pre-booking essential. Register your team on Eventbrite from14 January. UCL Grant Museum of Zoology www.grantmuseumpubquiz2.eventbrite.co.uk zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052 18

Your Universe, 6–8 March.

Lunch Hour Lectures Tuesdays and Thursdays 1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre (accessed via Malet Place) Free, no need to book. Places are on a first-come, first-served basis. Please arrive by 1pm to avoid disappointment. c.dean@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 3839 Watch live: www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl/streamed Watch online: www.youtube.com/ucllhl

Can fish count? Professor Brian Butterworth UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

Do animals possess the capacity to use numerical information? It is thought that humans inherit a numerical capacity upon which more sophisticated mathematics is built. If this is true, then we may find signs of this capacity in human infants, but we may also find that some humans are born without it. Tues 21 Jan

Studying sex comes of age: results from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles Professor Dame Anne Johnson UCL Infection & Population Health

The National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles surveys more than 15,000 men and women aged 16–74 who are resident in Britain, and is the world’s largest and most detailed study of sexual lifestyles. This lecture discusses the latest findings in the context of sexual health and wellbeing. Thurs 23 Jan 19

Lunch Hour Lectures

Oblivion and memorialisation: the legacies of Nazi persecution in Europe Professor Mary Fulbrook UCL German

Holocaust remembrance has attained an ever-greater place in the European and global consciousness. But memorialisation inevitably entails a selective focus and is accompanied by a marginalisation and even erasure of other traces of a disturbing past. This lecture explores some of the diverse and complex legacies of Nazi persecution.

Should we trust lawyers? Professor Richard Moorhead UCL Laws

Public trust in lawyers is on the decline. Some of this is inevitable: Hackgate, the financial scandal and Hillsborough have all involved lawyers at pivotal moments. An analysis of professional rules, lawyer psychology and economics suggests lawyers need to do some work to rebuild trust and behave more professionally. Tues 4 Feb

Tues 28 Jan

Why do some people become psychopaths? Professor Essi Viding UCL Psychology & Language Sciences

Although childhood behavioural problems are relatively common, not all problems develop for the same reason and only a few individuals will develop psychopathy in adulthood. This lecture will examine genetics, brain function and development, and ask why some children may be at an increased risk of psychopathy when they are older. Thurs 30 Jan 20

The end of passwords Professor Angela Sasse UCL Computer Science

Passwords have been used for about 40 years to authenticate people to computer systems, and now on smartphones and tablets. This lecture will explain why most people today struggle with them and why, contrary to received security wisdom, strong passwords do not necessarily mean good security for stakeholders and organisations. Thurs 6 Feb

Butcher, baker, candlestick-maker Professor Laura Vaughan UCL Bartlett School of Graduate Studies

Is the death of the high street inevitable? Professor Vaughan will describe her research using historical, geographical and spatial analysis of suburban centres. The results tell us how land use diversity and road connectivity have helped the high street adapt to significant social and economic change. Tues 11 Feb

A world with this much CO2: lessons from four million years ago Dr Chris Brierley UCL Geography

Last year, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations passed 400 parts per million – a level not seen since the Pliocene (3–5 million years ago). We know that the Pliocene was a warm world without glacial cycles and that the tropical Pacific’s climate was also structurally different. This lecture will discuss the causes and implications of this discrepancy. Thurs 13 Feb

Studying sex comes of age, 23 January.

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Lunch Hour Lectures

A good start in life

Dying to have a baby

Professor Yvonne Kelly UCL Epidemiology & Public Health

Dr Gwyneth Lewis UCL Institute for Women’s Health

The more advantages that a child has early in life, the better their health and their own socioeconomic circumstances in adulthood. This talk will examine what factors during pregnancy and in the early years of life set children off on better life trajectories, and what can be done to ensure that every child has a good childhood.

Dr Lewis explores the underlying political, social and medical factors contributing to continuing and inexcusable global health inequities. This lecture will explain how these factors lead to the innumerable and preventable maternal and newborn deaths that will continue to occur throughout the world in 2014.

Tues 25 Feb

Tues 4 March

Buddhas of suburbia: faith, migration and suburban change in London

Gender equality and women’s rights in Latin America

Dr Claire Dwyer UCL Geography

Professor Maxine Molyneux UCL Institute of the Americas

Suburbs are conventionally imagined as monotonous, monocultural, materialist and secular, but recent research in west London contradicts this, suggesting that suburbs are shaped by dynamic multicultural connections. Dr Dwyer will argue that creativity and modernity are important elements in the changing geographies of religious architecture in the suburbs.

Among the eight Millennium Development Goals were women’s empowerment and gender equity. This lecture, marking International Women’s Day, will focus on the Latin American region and the obstacles that women still face in achieving greater equality, justice and reproductive rights, and the measures in place to tackle violence against women.

Thurs 27 Feb

Thurs 6 March

22

Should we experiment with the climate? Dr Jack Stilgoe UCL Science & Technology Studies

Policies to tackle climate change do not seem to be working. Some scientists have begun to look into tackling climate change directly, through ‘geoengineering’, but the risks, ethics and politics look worrying. Should we be testing technologies now or keeping research indoors until we know more? Tues 11 March

Medieval languages of persuasion Dr Antonio Sennis UCL History

Divine letters, supernatural visions and apocalyptic curses were often successfully employed by medieval clerics to persuade their counterparts to do what they wanted them to do. This lecture will explore how these tools of persuasion responded to a medieval cultural logic. Thurs 13 March

Butcher, baker, candlestick-maker, 11 February.

23

Lunch Hour Lectures

How did Earth begin? Professor Lars Stixrude UCL Earth Sciences

To the founders of geology, the question of how the Earth began could not be addressed by science; answers had to await recent advances in materials physics. It appears to have begun in a completely molten state, the nature of which is remarkably rich in its implications for understanding our planet today. Tues 18 March

The impact of immigration: fact or fiction? Professor Christian Dustmann UCL Economics

New research has shown the beneficial impact that immigration has on the UK economy. However, people’s beliefs about immigration are not necessarily formed on the basis of economic considerations, but on other concerns and fears. Professor Dustmann will report on his research that quantifies the magnitude of these two channels. Thurs 20 March

24

Dying to have a baby, 4 March.

Performances Film screenings Music

UCL Chamber Music Club concert Wind instruments and voices come together “to blow the cold winter away”. The programme will include a Sonata à 7 by Johann Heinrich Schmelzer for trumpets, cornetts and sackbuts; canzonas and polychoral motets by Giovanni Gabrieli; plus seasonal chorales and fanfares guaranteed to drive off winter’s chills. Thurs 9 Jan | 5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

UCL Chamber Music Club concert A concert of music for eight wind instruments, including the neo-medieval Contrafacta Hungarica by Ferenc Farkas. Thurs 16 Jan | 5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

25

Performances/Film screenings/Music

When Worlds Collide (1951) on the big screen

Rewired: the brain, art and innovation

When a distant star is discovered to be on a collision course with Earth, the end of the world is merely eight months away. The only possible solution: build a giant spaceship to take the lucky few to the newly discovered planet of Zyra. What could possibly go wrong?

Movement for Hope and UCL Brain Repair & Rehabilitation present a dynamic event featuring connections between neuroscience, art and health. It will be an educational and entertaining evening of cutting-edge neuroscience and multimedia art with researchers from the UCL Institute of Neurology, intertwined with the art-science innovation of Movement for Hope.

Tues 21 Jan | 6.30–9pm | film screening JZ Young Lecture Theatre, Anatomy Building zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Tues 4 Feb | 6.30–8.30pm UCL Bloomsbury Theatre i.iidow@ucl.ac.uk | +44 (0)20 3448 4254

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

Science Showoff

A concert featuring several performers making their Chamber Music Club début. The programme will include works for various chamber groups, among them a baroque ensemble who will perform J. S. Bach’s Trio Sonata BW525.

Science Showoff is the cabaret night where anyone can communicate any kind of science, in any way. Join 10 of London’s brightest illuminators of science, many of them from UCL, and compere Steve Cross for a night of entertainment, enjoyment and enlightenment. Ticket money will be donated to local charities.

Thurs 30 Jan | 5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

26

Wed 5 Feb | 7.30–10pm Pre-booking essential Tickets: £10 from www.thebloomsbury.com UCL Bloomsbury Theatre e.baddeley@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1198

UCL Chamber Music Club concert A concert on the theme of places. The works featured are inspired by, or associated with, particular places and include Michael Finnissy’s arrangement of Gershwin’s A Foggy Day in London Town, John Adams’s China Gates, songs by Kurt Weill and Ernst Toch’s Geographical Fugue. Thurs 6 Feb | 1.10–1.55pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead by Tom Stoppard “Life is a gamble, at terrible odds – if it was a bet you wouldn’t take it.” UCLU Drama Society presents, in association with UCLU Stage Crew, Tom Stoppard’s iconic play. Set in the wings of Hamlet, this dark, satirical adaptation makes two minor characters the heroes of their own play. Thurs 20–Sat 22 Feb | 7.30–10pm UCL Bloomsbury Theatre emma.hardy.11@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7526 737 071

UCL Chamber Music Club concert Performers from UCLU Music Society will present this concert, in connection with UC Opera’s forthcoming production of RimskyKorsakov’s The Snow Maiden. Thurs 20 Feb | 5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

Rewired: the brain, art and innovation, 4 February. 27

Performances/Film screenings/Music

Having A Gay Old Time: voices of LGBT history Rob Eagle will present a selection of excerpts from documentaries on LGBT history. Clips will include both historic, seminal LGBT history documentaries, including Before Stonewall and Word is Out, and from recent films with older LGBT people, including Rob’s own ongoing documentary project, Having a Gay Old Time. Part of UCL Diversity Month and LGBT History month.

UCL Chamber Music Club concert A concert representing a day in a life in music. Works will include Ian Clarke’s Orange Dawn for flute and piano and Mozart’s Overture to The Marriage of Figaro, arranged for flute choir. Thurs 13 Mar | 1.10–1.55pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

25 February | 6–7.30pm | film screening J Z Young Lecture Theatre s.bharadva@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 3991

Subtext or main text? Same sex relationships in Xena and Spartacus A screening of Xena: Warrior Princess episode, ‘Amphipolis Under Siege’, featuring Athena and her girlfriend Illainus and one from Spartacus: Vengeance that shows the relationship between Agron and ex-body slave Nasir. Part of UCL Diversity Month and LGBT History month. Thurs 27 Feb | 6–9pm | film screening Pre-booking essential. Meet on the Wilkins Portico for icy drinks at 6pm. G22 Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138 18 28

UCL Chamber Music Club concert 1914 and beyond. This concert marks the centenary of the outbreak of World War I and features compositions from the same year, which opened up new paths for musical language. Works include Anton Webern’s Sonata for Cello and Piano, Charles Ives’s Violin Sonata No 4 and Manuel de Falla’s Seven Folk Songs. Tues 18 Mar | 5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room j.house@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7903 104 764

Petrie Film Club: The Collector How far do you go to make a collection? When does the search for beauty become sinister? John J. Johnston introduces this classic psychological thriller starring Terence Stamp and based on the novel of the same name by John Fowles. Film screening starts at 6.30pm. Thurs 20 Mar | 6–8.30pm | film screening Pre-booking essential UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Bright Club Bright Club is the comedy night where UCL researchers become stand-up comedians. Join 10 of them, along with three of London’s best comedians, as they channel their inner comic genius to show us that university research isn’t always as serious as you might think. Tues 29 April | 7.30–10pm Pre-booking essential Tickets: £8 from www.thebloomsbury.com UCL Bloomsbury Theatre e.baddeley@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 1198 Having A Gay Old Time, 25 February. 29 11

Exhibitions

Time-based media This exhibition looks at the way video, sound and multimedia are used in a range of ways to create a dialogue between the viewer and object, and the virtual and reality. Mon 13 Jan–Fri 28 Mar | 1–5pm UCL Art Museum m.rouleau@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Time-based media, 13 Jan–28 March.

30

Art and honour : contemporary impressions of WWI

Darwin (or) bust

This exhibition commemorates the start of World War I and has at its centre the UCL Roll of Honour. Drawing on UCL Special Collections’ Little Magazines, College Archives and the 1914–18 Collection, it also recalls the European avant-garde and more personal impressions of the Great War experienced at first hand.

UCL’s Institute of Making, together with UCL Structural & Molecular Biology, UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment and UCL Grant Museum has challenged its members to recreate the Darwin bust for the Darwin Building in any way they like. The reimagined Darwins will then be displayed in a dual-location exhibition opening on Darwin’s birthday.

Mon 3 Feb–Fri 19 Dec | 9.30am–5pm UCL Main Library k.cheney@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 6141

Wed 12 Feb–Wed 2 Apr (Mon–Sat) | 1–5pm Darwin Building Windows, Gower Street zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Art and honour, 3 February–19 December.

Darwin (or) bust, 12 February–2 April.

31 11

Exhibitions

A Fusion of Worlds: ancient Egypt, African art and identity in modernist Britain An exploration of the ways in which modernist artists – Jacob Epstein, Edna Manley and Ronald Moody – have been inspired by ancient Egypt. Funded by UCL Grand Challenges, the exhibition places these artists’ reworking of Egyptian art in the context of their political, spiritual and gendered expressions of identity. Tue 11 Mar–Sat 24 May | 1–5pm UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

A Fusion of Worlds, 11 March–24 May.

32

Events diary

Date

Time

Title

10 Jan

9am–7pm

Tintin at 85

02

13 Jan –28 Mar 16 Jan

1–5pm

Time-based media

30

1–2pm

Show ‘n’ tell

02

18 Jan

1–4.30pm

Explore zoology

15

21 Jan

1–2pm

Egypt awakened: the Petrie pops up at UCL Art Museum

21 Jan

1.15–1.55pm Can fish count?

19

21 Jan

6–8.30pm

03

21 Jan

6–7.30pm

9 Jan

16 Jan

5.30–7.30pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

5.30–6.30pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

The complexity of decision making

Page

25

25 03

Bringing the dark to light: memory of the Holocaust in post-communist Europe 6.30–9pm When Worlds Collide (1951) on the big screen 1.15–1.55pm Studying sex comes of age: results from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles 6–7.30pm Translation in history: translations and literature in ancient Mesopotamia 2–5pm Life and death drawing: expression

03

20

28 Jan

1.15–1.55pm Oblivion and memorialisation: the legacies of Nazi persecution in Europe 6.30–7.30pm Inaugural lecture: for an anthropology of history

29 Jan

6–7.30pm

04

30 Jan

1.15–1.55pm Why do some people become psychopaths?

20

30 Jan

5.30–6.30pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

26

30 Jan

5.30–7pm

04

21 Jan 23 Jan 23 Jan 25 Jan 28 Jan

Stones and symbolism: Petrie pops up in UCL’s Rock Room

Making capitalism fit for society with Colin Crouch

26 19 04 15

04

3 Feb 9.30am–5pm Art and honour: contemporary impressions of WWI –19 Dec 4 Feb 1.15–1.55pm Should we trust lawyers?

31

4 Feb

1–2pm

05

4 Feb 4 Feb

Pop-up talk: Ferguson’s Gang

6.30–7.30pm Inaugural lecture: Transporting Skies 6.30–8.30pm Rewired: the brain, art and innovation

05 26

5 Feb

7–9pm

Translation: art and word

05

5 Feb

7.30–10pm

Science Showoff

26

6 Feb

1.10–1.55pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

27

6 Feb

1.15–1.55pm The end of passwords

20

6 Feb

6–7.30pm

06

11 Feb

Translation in history lecture series: Toledo as a centre of translation in the 12th & 13th centuries 1.15–1.55pm Butcher, baker, candlestick-maker

11 Feb

6–7pm

06

Ancient plays for modern minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

20

21

33

Events diary

12 Feb

5.30–7.30pm Democracies and dictatorships in Latin America: emergence, survival and fall 6–7pm Ancient Plays for Modern Minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

06

12 Feb –2 Apr 13 Feb

1–5pm

31

1.15–1.55pm A world with this much CO2

21

13 Feb

6–7pm

07

13 Feb

07

13 Feb

6.30–7.30pm Time-based media in conversation: how to stop worrying and love (running) 6.45–8pm Jews and the making of the modern cultural industry

13 Feb

6–7.30pm

16

14 Feb

6.30–9pm

Taxonomies of bones and pots: the Petrie pops up at the Grant Museum Valentine’s at the Grant

15 Feb

2–5pm

Death by hair: from colonial south-west Africa to Nazi Germany

08

17–22 Feb 20 Feb

1–4.30pm

Killer carnivores

18

5.30–6.30

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

27

20 Feb

6–8pm

Defining desire: labels and sex in ancient and modern worlds

08

20 Feb

6–8pm

The Eleanor Roosevelt Annual Lecture

08

20–22 Feb 25 Feb

7.30–10pm

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead by Tom Stoppard

27

1.15–1.55pm A good start in life

22

25 Feb

6–7.30pm

28

25 Feb

08

26 Feb

6.30–7.30pm Growing societies: the archaeo-botany of food production and globalisation of agriculture 2–5pm Hands-on: Japanese woodblock printing workshop

26 Feb

2–4pm

Egypt in London: modernist sculpture walk

16

27 Feb

22

27 Feb

1.15–1.55pm Buddhas of suburbia: faith, migration and suburban change in London 6–9pm Subtext or main text? Same sex relationships in Xena and Spartacus 7–8.30pm Focus on the positive

27 Feb

6–7.30pm

09

4 Mar

Translation in history lecture series: 3,000 years of Chinese translation 6.45–8pm Redcliffe Salaman, President of the Jewish Historical Society of England 1.15–1.55pm Dying to have a baby

4 Mar

6.30–7.30pm Inaugural Lecture: A Godforsaken country: Assyria after 614BC

10

5 Mar

10

6 Mar

5.30–7.30pm Labour movements and democratisation in Latin America: Mexico in comparative perspective 1–2pm Show ‘n’ tell

6 Mar

1.15–1.55pm Gender equality and women’s rights in Latin America

22

12 Feb

27 Feb

27 Feb

34

Darwin (or) bust

Ancient plays for modern minds: Aristophanes’ Clouds

Having A Gay Old Time: voices of LGBT history

06

07

16

16

28 09

09 22

10

6 Mar

6.30–8.30pm China and freedom of speech: new systems for accountability of the press 6–8 Mar 11am–6pm Your Universe, UCL Festival of Astronomy

10

8 Mar

2–6pm

The women behind Petrie: International Women’s Day event

17

10 Mar

5.30���7pm

Why isn’t my professor black?

11

11 Mar

1.15–1.55pm Should we experiment with the climate?

17

23

11 Mar 1–5pm A fusion of worlds: ancient Egypt, African Art and identity –24 May in modernist Britain 13 Mar 1.10–1.55pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

32

13 Mar

1.15–1.55

Medieval languages of persuasion

23

13 Mar

6.45–8pm

The postwar quest for justice

11

15 Mar

1–4.30pm

Fossil forage

17

15 Mar

3–4pm

Edna Manley: gallery talk

11

18 Mar

1.15–1.55pm How did Earth begin?

24

18 Mar

5.30–6.30pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

28

18 Mar

6.30–9pm

Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz

18

19 Mar

6–7pm

Federalism or break-up: the UK from Parnell to Salmond

12

20 Mar

1.15–1.55

The impact of immigration: fact or fiction?

24

20 Mar

6–8pm

Housman Lecture 2014

12

20 Mar

6–8.30pm

Petrie Film Club: The Collector

29

20 Mar

6.45–8pm

What’s Jewish about Jewish folklore?

12

25 Mar

12

27 Mar

6.30–7.30pm Transnational Americas: Latin American perspectives on recent trends in pan-American migration 6.30–9pm Animal, vegetable, mineral

27 Mar

6–7.30pm

13

27 Mar

6.45–8pm

5 Apr

5–9pm

Translation in history lecture series: The translation of a saint: Santa Rosa de Lima Christobal Mendez alias David Mendez: the puzzling saga of a 17th-century converso Book launch – World Film Locations: Toronto & Vancouver

8–16 Apr 8 Apr

1–4.30pm

Easter egg-laying animals

18

6–8pm

14

24 Apr

6.45–8pm

29 April

7.30–10pm

Meet the curators – A Fusion of Worlds: Ancient Egypt, African art and identity in modernist Britain The development of the Anglo-Jewish novel by women writers in the 19th century Bright Club

28

13

13 14

14 29

35

Venues/Map

Warren Street12 UCL Grant Museum

13 Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre Second Floor, South Junction, Wilkins Building, GRAFTON WAY Gower Street WC1E 6BT 14 Haldane Room Wilkins Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT

9

15 Harrie Massey Lecture Theatre 25 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AY

9 Cruciform Lecture Theatre Cruciform Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT 10 Darwin Lecture Theatre Darwin Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT (entrance via Malet Place) 11 Garwood Lecture Theatre First floor, South Wing, UCL main campus 36

19 Roberts Building Torrington Place London WC1E 7JE

Darwin

8 Chadwick Lecture Theatre Chadwick Building, Gower Street WC1E 6BT

16

CHENIES MEWS

7 UCL Bloomsbury Theatre 15 Gordon Street WC1H 0AH

8

12

17 Pearson Building Gower Street WC1E 6BT

18 UCL Petrie Museum Malet Place WC1E 6BT Tues–Sat, 1–5pm events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138 www.ucl.ac.uk/musuems/petrie

17

Anatomy

6 Bentham House 4-8 Endsleigh Gardens WC1H 0EG

HUNTLEY STREET

5 A.V. Hill Lecture Theatre UNIVERS ITY Lecture STREET UCL Medical Sciences Building, 16 J.Z. Young Theatre Malet Place G29, Anatomy Building, WC1E 6BT Gower Street WC1E 6BT

GOWER STREET

4 UCL Art Museum South Cloisters, Wilkins Building, WC1E 6BT Mon–Fri, 1–5pm college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/uclart

P

GOWER

3 UCL Institute of Archaeology 31-34 Gordon Square WC1H 0PY

Euston Square

AM CO URT RO AD

2 UCL Institute of the Americas 51 Gordon Square, WC1H 0PN

of Zoology Mon–Sat, 1–5pm Rockefeller Building, 21 University Street WC1E 6DE +44 (0)20 3108 2052 zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/zoology

TOTTEN H

1  UCL main campus Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2000 www.ucl.ac.uk

10

20 Rock Room Room 4, 1st floor, South Wing, Gower Street WC1E 6BT 21 Senate House Malet St, London WC1E 7HU Goodge Street

UCL Maps www.ucl.ac.uk/maps

TOR

South Cloisters

Octagon Gallery

4

13 E

TAVIS TOCK S QUARE

BYNG PLACE

BEDFORD WAY

WOB URN

SQUARE

RRINGTON PLACE GORD

19 7

STREET

ENDSLEIGH STREET

TAVITON STREET

GORDON

GOWER CT

ST E T

18

GORD ON SQUARE GORDON STREET

North Cloisters

14

Bloomsbury Theatre

GOW ER

T

1 Wilkins

MALET PLACE

Euston

PLACE GARDENS

15 6

E

2

Getting to UCL BY TUBE Underground stations near to UCL’s main campus:

ACCESSIBILITY UCL aims to provide accessibility to all its events.

Euston Square (Circle, Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City lines)

If you require any information about any accessibility requirements, please contact UCL Disability Services on:

Goodge Street (Northern line) Warren Street (Northern and Victoria lines)

+44 (0)20 7679 0100 disability@ucl.ac.uk

BY RAIL Mainline train stations near to UCL’s main campus: Euston, King’s Cross and St Pancras International BY BUS Buses serving Gower Street: 10, 14, 24, 29, 73, 134, 390 BY CAR The Bloomsbury area has metered parking and visitors are strongly advised not to travel to UCL by car. University College London Gower Street London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2000 For further information about any of our events, please visit our website:

www.ucl.ac.uk/events


Brain Food, January–April 2014