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SPRING 2010

www.CMLF.com Something for Everyone at Delaware Seashore State Parks North America’s Greatest Bird-Watching Destination—Cape May, NJ

Check out the new online version of the Traveller Magazine! A quick click from the Cape May–Lewes Ferry website.

www.SchellBrothers.com

SPRING 2010

TA B L E O F

CONTENTS We reveal some hidden gems on the Delaware shores that will delight your family! See page 6.

F E AT U R E SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE AT DELAWARE SEASHORE STATE PARKS by Necia Beck....................................................6

SHORE SCENE NORTH AMERICA’S GREATEST BIRDWATCHING DESTINATION—CAPE MAY, NJ by Peter Dunne...............................................14

Get out the binoculars, it’s time for bird-watching. Spot more than 100 bird species in both New Jersey and Delaware. Check out page 14.

D E PA RT M E N T S ALL ABOARD

A letter from the director....................................2

FERRY INFORMATION Fares .................................... 20 Schedules ..............................21 Area Maps ..............................24 Driving Directions....................26

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Be sure and check out the new Ferry rates along with our maps to help guide you around the Twin Capes. See page 20.

ALL ABOARD

Welcome aboard the Cape May–Lewes Ferry

While in Cape May, stop into the Cape May Bird Observatory to celebrate spring and explore one of North America’s world-famous bird-watching destinations. From the novice to the seasoned naturalist, the Observatory has something for everyone. Check out the programs and special events for this spring at www.birdcapemay.org/spring.shtml

SPRINGTIME GREETINGS FROM THE TWIN CAPES REGION!

April, May and June bring both new growth and new visitors to the area. The days get longer, the sun shines brighter and the temperature rises. After the winter and mountains of snow we had in the Northeast this year, it’s safe to say that we are all ready to shed the heavy coats and boots, put on the shorts and t-shirts and get outside to enjoy the springtime.

Have a pleasant journey across the Delaware Bay between Cape May, NJ, and Lewes, DE. Sit back, relax and enjoy your trip, and thank you for including the Cape May–Lewes Ferry in your travel plans.

Spring is a great time to visit a State Park in Delaware and take in the natural beauty they offer. Whether just five minutes from the Lewes Ferry terminal or a half hour’s drive south on Coastal Highway, the Delaware State Parks offer much to see and do. For more information, visit their website at www.destateparks.com/

Jim Johnson Executive Director Delaware River & Bay Authority

Check out these events: NASCAR packages, Garden State Wine Growers Association, Wine Festival at Cape May Ferry Terminal, Sunset & Wine Lovers Cruises, Wildwood Fabulous ‘50s Weekend , Cape May Jazz Festival, Rehoboth Film Festival, Ocean City SUNFEST.

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A D V E RT I S E R S

LISTING

S TA F F

Atlantic Sands Hotel....................................IBC Best Western Gold Leaf..................................4 Blue Sea Cafe............................................... .28 Boardwalk Plaza Hotel................................... 5 The Breakers Hotel & Suites.......................IBC

Heather

Brian

James

Pam

Bobbi

EDITOR Heather Skelly traved@travmag.com

The Depot Travel Park...................................13 ART DIRECTOR Hampton Inn–Rehoboth Beach......................4

Brian Tharan

Inn at Canal Square.......................................13 Jerry’s Seafood............................................. 28

PRODUCTION ARTIST Brian Tharan

Kids’ Ketch.....................................................13 Lewes Chamber of Commerce..................... 12

COPY EDITOR James Kassees

Lewes Mercantile Antiques..........................13 Schell Brothers..............................................IFC

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Necia Beck, Peter Dunne

Sleep Inn & Suites...........................................4 Stepping Stone..............................................13

PRODUCTION MANAGER Pam Stevenson

TAC..................................................................12 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Bobbi Engel

The Twin Capes Traveller is an editorial magazine published three times a year (spring, summer and fall editions) by Bi-Coastal Publications. The publication is distributed at the Cape May–Lewes Ferry and at numerous other destinations in New Jersey and Delaware. Printed in the USA. The Cape May–Lewes Ferry is operated by the Delaware River & Bay Authority. If you would like your organization to be considered for editorial coverage, or you have a story idea, request a copy of next issue’s editorial lineup and direct all editorial queries, submissions or press kits to Bobbi Engel at BEngel@travmag.com or fax (302) 227-4761. Advertising in Twin Capes Traveller does not guarantee editorial inclusion.

©2010 Bi-Coastal Publications

SALES MANAGER Lana O’Hollaren • Lana@travmag.com

A D S A L E S C O O R D I N AT O R Bobbi Engel • BEngel@travmag.com

C A P E M AY – L E W E S F E R R Y Jim Salmon • Public Information Officer, DRBA

SALES OFFICE (302) 249-6759 P.O. Box 1033 • Wilmington, DE 19899

EDITORIAL OFFICE (302) 655-1552 819 N. Washington St. • Wilmington, DE 19801

Save Money and Time–Book Online! www.CMLF.com • 800.643.3779 3

S TAY & P L AY I N R E H O B OT H B E A C H , D E L AWA R E

www.rehobothhamptoninn.com

www.RehobothSleepInn.com

1400 Coastal Hwy.

www.bestwesterngoldleaf.com

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R E H O B OT H B E A C H A C C O M M O D AT I O N S

pampering at every turn.

The pink hotel on the boardwalk. Oceanfront at Olive Avenue ! Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971 Reservations: (800) 33 BEACH ! (302) 227-7169 www.boardwalkplaza.com 5

By Necia Beck Delaware State Parks

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Delaware’s State Parks are unique in their diverse settings, features and history. From former military sites to millponds to urban oases, our state parks have something to offer all Delawareans and visitors, regardless of age and interests. And the parks that make up the Delaware Seashore State Park Region are a perfect microcosm of the larger state park system. Tucked away between the beach resort towns of Rehoboth Beach and Bethany Beach in Delaware, and Ocean City in Maryland, these parks and attractions are rich in history, nature and recreation. The Delaware Seashore State Park Region includes Fenwick Island, Holts Landing and Delaware Seashore State Parks, as well as the Indian River Life-Saving Station, the Indian River Marina, vacation cottages and natural areas.

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MUSEUM, GIFT SHOP AND WEDDINGS—Traveling south along Route 1 from Rehoboth, the first of these attractions that the explorer will happen upon is the Indian River Life-Saving Station. The station was completed in 1876 by the U.S. Life-Saving Service, which was established to address an alarming number of shipwrecks along U.S. coastlines and waterways in the late 19th century. The service merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to form the U.S. Coast Guard. The Indian River Life-Saving Station has been restored to its 1905 appearance and now houses a museum and gift shop. It also provides an exquisite backdrop for one-of-a-kind beach weddings and living history programs. It is currently one of the few remaining lifesaving stations in the country, and one of even fewer that recreates the Breeches Buoy lifesaving drill practiced by the surfmen who lived at the station at the turn of the last century.

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STATE-OF-THE-ART MARINA AND VACATION COTTAGES—Further south on Route 1, a little more than a mile

north of the Indian River Inlet Bridge, lies the Indian River Marina and its 12 fully furnished, year-round vacation cottages. Here, visitors can tie up their boats and take a relaxing vacation close to beaches, shopping and some of the best fishing grounds on the East Coast. Recent far-reaching improvements to the Indian River Marina make it a must-stop destination for the recreational boater or fisherman. A new 274-slip floating dock system has space available for transient, seasonal or year-round boaters. And that’s not all; the marina complex boasts a two-lane boat ramp, fuel dock, indoor dry storage facility with haul-out, slipholder shower and laundry facilities, fish cleaning, seafood sales, bait and tackle shop, ship’s store, repair and service vendors, pump-out and recycling, large conference room with kitchen, and more, all within walking distance to beaches and a short drive to tax-free shopping. And, speaking of shopping, each winter Delaware State Parks partners with Tanger Outlets to offer a special Shop-All-Day, Sleep-All-Night package. Holiday shoppers can spend their weekend days taking advantage of the great deals at the tax-free shopping outlets, and

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then relax each night in a fully furnished cottage that sleeps six. The year-round Cottages at the Indian River Marina feature heat, air-conditioning, gas fireplace, kitchenette, screened porch and a breath-taking view of the Indian River Inlet.

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FISHERMEN’S PARADISE—Shopping and boating aren’t the only activities you’ll enjoy here. The Marina’s head boats and charter boats are ideal for recreational fishermen, all year. For visitors with the appropriate permit, Delaware Seashore and Fenwick Island State Parks offer dune crossings to allow surf fishermen to drive their vehicles on the beach to fish in designated areas. And, a special access pier at the Indian River Inlet makes fishing fun and easy for visitors of all abilities.* If fishing isn’t your cup of tea, perhaps you’d like to try your hand at crabbing. Holts Landing State Park is home to Delaware’s only pier built exclusively for crabbing. The sturdy pier overhangs the shallow bay water, allowing crabbers to lure blue crabs and other mid-Atlantic delicacies. The pier is open daily from 8 a.m. until sunset. *A valid Delaware Fishing Permit is required to fish in all Delaware tidal and non-tidal waters.

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SSSH! A BEACH RESORT MINUS THE CROWDS!

Continuing our journey south, we come upon one of Delaware State Parks’ best-kept secrets. Fenwick Island State Park, three miles of barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and Little Assawoman Bay, is a hidden treasure featuring sun, sand, surf and everything you could want from a beach resort, except the crowds. In the summer, lifeguards patrol the white sand beaches and broad swimming area. Enhancements such as the modern bathhouse with showers that also includes a gift shop and snack foods, as well as chair, umbrella and kayak rentals, ensure days filled with relaxation and recreation. Surfers will enjoy one of the few beaches in Delaware with an area designated solely for surfing.

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WAIT, THERE’S MORE! Because the parks and attractions of the Delaware Seashore State Park Region are situated on the ocean and bay beaches, it’s natural to imagine all the water-based recreational opportunities and to forget all the other things there are to see and do here. Delaware Seashore State Park’s campground has sites that can accommodate camping units from tents to large recreational vehicles. Many sites feature three-point hook-ups, and showers, vending machines and a laundry facility are added campground conveniences from April through November. Some sites are available for year-round camping. The region’s parks also offer picnicking, pavilions, horseshoe pits, playgrounds and grassy fields where the careful observer can spot hawks, osprey, herons and songbirds. Deer, possum, raccoons and foxes are often seen along trails through the trees and shrubs. Feel like taking a hike? The Thompson Island Trail takes you on an easy three-mile hike through a mature hardwood forest and a small glade where hikers can catch a glimpse of the tidal marsh. The Burton Island Trail is a loop with boardwalks that provide views of the Indian River Bay, Rehoboth Bay and the Salt Marsh. At Holts Landing State Park, the Sea Hawk trail guides hikers through a mixed hardwood and conifer forest, through grassy meadow and along the Indian River shoreline. This trail is perfect for bird-watching and sneaking a peek at the wildlife found in the coastal bay environments along the way. At certain times of year, horseback riding is welcome in designated areas of the beaches.

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WE’RE SAVING A PLACE FOR YOU—Delaware State Parks

has the important responsibility of preserving and protecting some of the most unique natural and cultural resources anywhere. Many of those resources are found right within the Delaware Seashore State Park Region. So, whether it’s April or August, whether you’re looking to relax or learn, whether you’re young or young at heart, won’t you join us in one of the special places we’ve saved just for you? www.destateparks.com

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Visit Lewes

Photo of the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal by Kevin Moore

A Historic Year-Round Destination Great shopping, dining, and fun throughout the Spring & Summer 2010 April 2

Great Delaware Kite Festival 10 a.m. Cape Henlopen State Park

April 23 & 24

Lewes Tulip Festival 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Zwaanendael Park & other locations

April 30–May 2 Lewes Merchants' Spring Sidewalk Sale 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Lewes Commercial District around Second Street

May 1

British Motorcar Show 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Lewes Historical Society Complex

June 19

Lewes Garden Tour 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Private & Public Gardens throughout Lewes

July 4

Old Fashioned 4th of July Children's activities on Second Street Boat Parade on Canal 2 p.m.

Stop in or call for a Visitor’s Guide or a Historic Lewes Map

Contact the Lewes Chamber of Commerce for additional information—Located in the Fisher–Martin House, 120 Kings Highway www.leweschamber.com, email: inquiry@leweschamber.com, toll-free 877-465-3937 • 302-645-8073

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www.lewes-antiques.com

www.theinnatcanalsquare.com

• Pottery • Jewelry • Pillows • Wooden Bowls • Handblown glass balls

www.SteppingStoneLewes.com

www.thedepottravelpark.com

www.kidsketch.com

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by Peter Dunne

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Do you like birds? Silly question. Everybody enjoys watching birds. The shore would sure be an empty place without them. Did you know that Cape May is one of the planet’s most famous bird-watching locations? Equal in acclaim to such celebrated ecotourist destinations as Costa Rica, East Africa, the Amazon Basin, Antarctica? It’s true. With a bird list exceeding 420 species (more than half the species found in North America) and concentrations of migrating birds that have earned Cape May the nickname “The Migration Mainline,” Cape May draws thousands of birders from around the world (and millions of birds!). Want to add an exciting new facet to your Cape May experience and discover why birdwatching is America’s second-largest and fastest-growing outdoor activity? Stop by the Cape May Bird Observatory’s Northwood Center in Cape May Point and pick up your free checklist and birding map and let the treasure hunt begin.

Bird-watching? Sure. It’s easy. It’s fun. It’s cheap! Right around New Jersey Audubon’s Northwood Center just off Lighthouse Avenue you can see the rakishly crested Northern Cardinal, the sassy Carolina Wren, the acrobatic Carolina Chickadee— and these are just the minimum ante for visitors—the yearround residents. In summer these resident species are joined by breeding specialties such as the Prothonotary Warbler (a bird the color of honey set ablaze), the Indigo Bunting, and the Yellow-breasted Chat—a feathered buffoon among songbirds.

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All these species and dozens more can be found south of the Cape May canal at locations plotted on your free birding map. If you are interested in larger birds, Cape May’s hawk flights are world-famous. Tens of thousands of migrating hawks pass over Cape May and resident birds include the Cooper’s Hawk, the Red-tailed Hawk, the Osprey—even the Bald Eagle. Last year 450 Bald Eagles were counted in migration between September and November (along with nearly 1,000 Peregrine Falcons). The hawk-watch platform at Cape May Point State Park is a great location for viewing migrating and resident hawks, and the nearby bunker pond is a magnet for migrating shorebirds, whose southbound migration begins in June and extends into autumn proper. Speaking of shorebirds, the Nature Conservancy’s South Cape May Meadows is one of the best places to study 16

numbers of herons, egrets, gulls, and terns, as well as shorebird species, and you can purchase passes to visit this private preserve at the Northwood Center. I’ll bet you thought gulls and terns were shorebirds. Nope. Not technically. Shorebirds include sandpipers and plovers—like the rare, in fact endangered, Piping Plover that nests locally. But most of the shorebirds found in Cape May breed in the Arctic and are just passing through. Are you familiar with the small sandpiper that runs up and down the beach and seems to play tag with the waves. They’re called Sanderlings. They breed in the high Arctic even though you can find them every month of the year in Cape May except late June and early July. That’s when Sanderlings go north to breed. By mid-July, they and dozens of other shorebird species will carpet the beaches and marshes of Cape May. All summer, the burble and chirps of Purple Martins fill the air over Cape May. Starting in July, hundreds and thousands of migrating Swallows gather in the skies along with migrating butterflies and dragonflies. Dragonflies migrate? Absolutely. You can discover all this and more once you get your eyes calibrated and find out how much natural wonder is packed into Cape May.

What’s the Catch? There is a catch or perhaps a challenge. The challenge in birding is pinning the name to the bird. It’s the avocational equivalent of sinking a putt, scoring a run, or finding a rare stamp or coin. You’ll need a field guide—an illustrated book that shows birds and their “field marks.” It helps to have binoculars, instruments that give you supernatural intimacy with some of the earth’s most beautiful creatures. 17

But you don’t need the guide or binoculars if you go on one of the many twohour birding field trips offered by the Cape May Bird Observatory, or attend the “Bird Walk for All People” program orchestrated by Don Freiday, Director of Birding Programs for CMBO. OK, I lied. There is a fee for the walks. But the schedule of events is free (you can pick that up when you stop by for the checklist and map), and going on a walk will save you the cost of buying binoculars and a field guide. High-quality loaner binoculars come with the walk and the experts who lead them don’t need field guides (in fact, some leaders write them).

The One Thing Not to Do Whatever you do, do not miss an opportunity to savor Cape May’s birds because you don’t know anything about birds or finding them. Of course you don’t! That’s why CMBO has daily bird walks. Like I said, bird-watching is fun and easy. The difference between a beginning birder and an experienced birder is that thus far beginning birders have misidentified few birds and experienced birders have misidentified thousands.

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The Reward Think about going home and telling your friends that through binoculars you stood eyeball to eyeball with a Snowy Egret, a Royal Tern, or a Least Bittern. Think of all the fun you’ll have when you return home with newfound powers and skill—able to pick out highflying birds of prey or pin names to the birds that share your backyard. Of course, few places on earth offer the birding opportunity of Cape May. That’s why it’s famous. That’s why people come from all over the world to savor our wealth of birds. If you went the Grand Canyon, wouldn’t you step up to the rim to take in the view? Well, going to Cape May and not going birding is like going to the Grand Canyon and just sitting in the visitor parking lot. Come by yourself or bring the family and friends. Birdwatching is enjoyed by people of all ages, incomes, walks of life and belt size. This is your chance to find out why. NJ Audubon Cape May Bird Observatory 701 East Lake Drive, Cape May Point, NJ 08212. 609-884-2736 www.BirdCapeMay.org

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FARES

Save up to $12 per vehicle with purchase of return-trip value fare! All fares are one-way unless noted.

SPECIAL DISCOUNT FARES FRIENDS AND FAMILY: All passengers greater than 4 in the vehicle travel FREE! First 4 passengers (including driver) must pay full fare. Higher fares pay first. Not valid with any other discounts. Other restrictions may apply. GROUP RATES: Available for parties of 25 or more.

www.CMLF.com

• Check out the Ferry Schedules on the next page. • Explore Delaware and New Jersey with our Maps, starting on page 24.

CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN—NEW FOR 2010: For a 33% savings on vehicle fares, discount books are now available—only $24 per crossing. Some restrictions may apply. Ask for details. Nov.– April– Peak† VEHICLE & DRIVER March Oct. Car, SUV, Van, Pickup Truck, one-way (vehicles less than 20’ length) $30 $36 $44 Return-Trip Value Fare $26 $32 $32 Motorcycle or Motorbike, one-way $25 $31 $36 Return-Trip Value Fare $22 $27 $27 6-Pack*, valid for 2 customers (all vehicles less than 20’ length) $153 $153 $153 6-Pack* (commercial vehicles) 15% off scheduled fare 12-Pack*, valid for 2 customers (all vehicles less than 20’ length) $288 $288 $288 *Discount books of six (6) or twelve (12) tickets. Not valid Saturdays, Sundays or Holidays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. from Memorial Day to Labor Day. VEHICLE & FOOT PASSENGERS Children, ages 5 and under FREE FREE FREE Children, age 6–13, one-way $4 $5 $5 Return-Trip Value Fare $3 $4 $4 14 years of age and older, one-way $8 $10 $10 Return-Trip Value Fare $6 $8 $8 6-Pack Adult Tickets, valid for 2 customers $45 $45 Please note that all return-trip value fares must be purchased with initial sailing. CHARTER BUS PASSENGERS Children, age 5 and under Children, age 6–13 14 years of age and older

FREE $2 $3

FREE $3 $5

FREE $3 $5

FERRY TERMINAL SHUTTLE FARES Children, age 5 and under FREE 6 years of age and older $4

FREE $4

FREE $4

OTHER DISCOUNTS & FEES Internet Reservation Discount Non-Refundable Reservation Cancellation Fee

-$2 $5

-$2 $5

-$2 $5

OTHER VEHICLES & DRIVER 20’ to under 25’ 25’ to under 35’ 35’ to under 45’ 45’ to under 60’ More than 60’

$34 $43 $50 $62 $85

$42 $50 $57 $70 $93

$50 $61 $69 $85 $113

PEAK FARES valid from Memorial Day to Labor Day— Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays.

TICKET EXPIRATION: Purchased ferry tickets expire two years following purchase date.

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2010 Ferry

Vehicle discounts available when you book online! Please reserve! We reserve up to 100% of our Vehicle Space. Go to www.CMLF.com.

DEPARTURE TIMES

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PLEASE NOTE: A fuel surcharge may apply. For details, please go to www.CMLF.com.

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NOTE: • Schedule subject to change without notice. Check www.CMLF.com for additional departures and changes. • Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. • Pets are permitted on all boats, with some on-board restrictions, but are NOT permitted on shuttles. • Photo ID required for driver and all foot passengers. • Reservations are required for buses and other groups. • Reserved customers may forfeit their reserved status and a $5 cancellation fee if they have not completed check-in 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure time. • Have your vehicle size, passenger count, and a credit card number handy when you call. • Discounts are available when booking online.

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Crossing 17 miles 80 minutes

Numbers in parentheses indicate mileage from ferry terminal.

NEW & IMPROVED!

www.CMLF.com 800.643.3779 22

FUNFUNFUN

for the whole family

Visit www.CMLF.com or call 800.643.3779 for information and reservations.

Lucky 7 Atlantic City Tours Adults: $12; Available every Wed. & Thurs., 6/16–8/26. Departing from Lewes at 9:15 a.m.

Cape May County Zoo Trip Every Tues. and Thurs., 6/22–8/26. Adults: $26; Children 6–13: $18; Children under 6: Free. Departing from Lewes at 9:15 a.m. and returning from Cape May at 4:30 p.m. Space is limited. Reservations are required.

Cape May Guided Trolley Tour Weekends, 5/1–6/13 and 10/2–10/31; Daily 6/14–10/1. Adults: $25; Children 6–13: $18; Children under 6: Free.

Historic Lewes Guided Trolley Tour Available on the 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. departures from Cape May, Tues.–Thurs., 6/15–9/16. Adults: $25; Children 6–13: $16; Children under 6: Free.

Historic Lewes Tour (Self-Guided) Mon.–Sat., 6/14–9/18; Open 7 Days 7/11–8/15. Adults: $25; Children 6–13: $18; Children under 6: Free.

Rock the Boat

Lighthouse Pete’s Family Fun Cruise

Every Friday, 7/9–8/27; FREE with price of ferry passage. Cruise departs Cape May at 6:00 p.m. and Lewes at 6:15 p.m.

Wed. (CM) & Thurs. (LW), 7/7–8/26; FREE with price of ferry passage. The cruise departs Cape May every Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. and Lewes at 4:15 p.m. every Thursday.

Cash, travelers checks and credit cards accepted. For tour information, comments or questions, please contact us at: 800.643.3779 or

customerservice@drba.net Vessels’ salon decks are accessible via terminal elevators. Advise tollbooth/ticket agents upon arrival of your needs. Groups are requested to call in advance at 800.643.3779. For information on these and other exciting activities and events including NASCAR® packages and the Cape May Wine Festival at the Ferry, go to www.CMLF.com.

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Tourism Information

DART First State Resort Transit

Downtown Lewes–Rehoboth Shuttle

Cape May–Lewes Ferry Shuttle Stops

Biking to Cape Henlopen State Park: Take a left as you leave the Lewes terminal and go straight to the park on Cape Henlopen Drive, approx. 1 mile.

Biking to Downtown Lewes: Turn right as you leave the terminal onto Cape Henlopen Drive to Savannah Road (Dairy Queen) intersection. Go left on Savannah Road and proceed across the drawbridge to downtown Lewes, approx. 1.2 miles.

Biking across the bay?

Reservations: 800.643.3779 or www.CMLF.com

Delaware

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Accessing Bike Path to Historic Cold Spring Village: Turn right as you leave the terminal and proceed on Route 9 through the third traffic light (Seashore Road intersection) for a few hundred yards to the railroad. Go left on the path at the tracks, which takes you to Historic Cold Spring Village and beyond.

on Route 9 to the third traffic light at Seashore Road (school on left). Go right on Seashore Road, over the canal bridge and proceed to Beach Drive in Cape May, approx. 7 miles.

Biking to Downtown Cape May: Turn right as you leave the terminal and proceed

Biking across the bay?

Step back in time on a Cape May Guided Trolley Tour. The 45-minute trolley tour gives you a beautiful view of the Victorian town.

Destination New Jersey

Reservations: 800.643.3779 or www.CMLF.com

New Jersey

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Cape May Ferry Shuttle

Cape May–Lewes Ferry Shuttle Stops

Directions to Popular Destinations

from the Lewes Terminal Tanger Outlets; Rehoboth Beach, Delaware/Ocean City, Maryland. Take Rte. 9 West to Rte. 1 South. Outlets border Rte. 1. Continue South on Rte. 1 past Tanger Outlets about a mile and follow signs to the town of Rehoboth Beach, approx. 7 miles, 10 minutes. For Ocean City, continue on Rte. 1 South. Approx. 34 miles, 45 minutes. Dover, Delaware. Take Rte. 9 West to Rte. 1 North. Approx. 32 miles, 45 minutes. Easton/St. Michaels, Maryland. Take Rte. 9 West to Rte. 1 North (right). Turn left onto Rte. 9 West to Georgetown, DE. Turn onto Rte. 18 West to Rte. 318 West (Federalsburg area). Rte. 318 and Rte. 331 will merge. Stay on Rte. 331 North to Easton, approx. 56 miles, 70 minutes. For St. Michaels, take Rte. 33 West out of Easton. Approx. 68 miles, 1-1/4 hours. Annapolis/Baltimore, Maryland/Washington, D.C. Take Rte. 9 W to Rte. 1 North (right). Turn left onto Rte. 9 West to Georgetown, DE. Turn onto Rte. 18 West to Rte. 404 West. In the Wye Mills, MD, area, take Rte. 50 West over the William Preston Lake, Jr. Memorial Bridge. Annapolis, approx. 89 miles, 1-1/2 hours. For Baltimore, continue on Rte. 50 to Rte. 97 North. Approx. 116 miles, 2 hours. For Washington, continue on Rte. 50 West directly into Washington, D.C., or you can get on the Beltway, Rte. 495, North or South, around Washington. Approx. 122 miles, 2-1/4 hours. For All Points South. Take Rte. 9 W to Rte. 1 North (right). Turn left onto Rte. 9 West to Georgetown, DE. Turn left onto Rte. 113 South to Pokomoke City, MD. This merges and becomes Rte. 13 South. Continue on Rte. 13 to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel.

Chincoteague, Virginia. Follow “Points South” directions and then take Rte. 175 East. Approx. 77 miles, 1-1/2 hours.

Norfolk/Virginia Beach/Williamsburg, Virginia. Follow “Points South” directions and then cross the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (toll). Short portion of Rte. 13 remains after the bridge. Norfolk/Virginia Beach, approx. 160 miles, 3 hours. For Williamsburg, take 64 West. Approx. 206 miles, 4 hours.

95 South/Emporia, Virginia. Follow “Points South” directions and then cross the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (toll). Rte. 13 turns into Rte. 64 East. Take 64 East around the Norfolk area to 58 West. Continue on 58 West to Emporia, Virginia, to pick up 95 South. Approx. 240 miles, 4-1/2 hours. Outer Banks, North Carolina. Follow “Points South” directions and then cross the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (toll). Rte. 13 turns into Rte. 64 East. Exit onto Rte. 168 South. Take 168 to 158 East. Continue to Rte. 12 in the Outer Banks. Approx. 210 miles, 4-1/4 hours.

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Follow “Points South” directions and then cross the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (toll). Rte. 13 turns into Rte. 64 East. Exit onto Rte. 17 South and continue to Myrtle Beach. Approx. 534 miles, 11 hours.

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Directions to Popular Destinations

from the Cape May Terminal Cape May, New Jersey. Exiting the Cape May terminal area, bear to the right. At the third traffic light on Sandman Blvd., turn right. This is Seashore Road, which turns into Broadway in Cape May. Road dead-ends at the beach; turn left to go downtown or park to go to the beach.

For All Southern New Jersey Shore Points. Exit the ferry terminal onto Sandman Blvd. (also known as Lincoln Blvd. and Rte. 9). Follow the signs located at every intersection to local communities or the southern beginning (Exit Zero) of the Garden State Parkway, 3 miles east of the terminal.

Cape May County Park and Zoo. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points.” At the third traffic light on the Garden State Parkway (at the Chamber of Commerce building), make a left. At the next stop sign, which is Rte. 9, simply cross over and enter the park. Approx. 15 miles, 25 minutes.

Wildwood, NJ. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points” to exit 4B (12 miles). Stone Harbor, NJ. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points” to exit 10A (14 miles).

Avalon, NJ. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points” to exit 13 (17 miles). Ocean City, NJ. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points” to exit 25 or 29 (36 miles).

Atlantic City, NJ. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points” until you reach exit 38A. This is the Atlantic City Expressway. Approx. 45 miles, 1 hour.

Delaware Memorial Bridge. Take Rte. 9 North to Rte. 47 North. In the city of Millville, Rte. 47 and Rte. 49 intersect. Take Rte. 49 West. Continue on Rte. 49 West to 295 South. Approx. 87 miles, 1-1/2 hours.

Trenton. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points.” Exit the Garden State Parkway onto the Atlantic City Expressway at 38B (Philadelphia). Take the Expressway West to Rte. 54 North (exit 28). Take Rte. 54 North to Rte. 206 North. Continue on Rte. 206 North to Trenton. Approx. 123 miles, 2-1/4 hours. New York City. Follow “Southern New Jersey Shore Points.” At exit 129 (Woodbridge), exit the Parkway and get onto the New Jersey Turnpike heading north. Take the New Jersey Turnpike to exit 16E (Rte. 495 North) to New York City via the Lincoln Tunnel. The Lincoln Tunnel takes you into Manhattan. Approx. 160 miles, 3 hours.

27

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Twin Capes Traveller Spring 2010