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Presented by Tennessee Arts Commission in Partnership with Knox County Schools

Create2014: Creativity in Education Institute is moving Full STEAM Ahead in education. STEAM – Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math + the Arts – supports an integrated curriculum in which subjects are not taught in isolation. As a renowned arts integration conference, Create2014 recognizes the significance of the arts in building 21st century learning skills while shaping whole school reform through projectbased learning. Sessions are offered for PK-12 classroom teachers, arts specialists, teaching artists, special education and resource teachers as well as principals and superintendents. Educators come together to understand how subjects like science and engineering connect with arts and design. Let’s move education forward with enthusiasm and determination to provide students with the tools they need for realworld application. Full STEAM Ahead! Professional Development Bringing Together Arts Specialists, Classroom Teachers, and Community Arts Providers to Move Education Forward.

SPECIAL THANKS TO

Knox County Schools, L & N STEM Academy, Becky Ashe, Dr. Roy Miller, Brandi Self, Knoxville Arts & Culture Alliance, Liza Zenni, Knoxville Museum of Art, Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, Tennessee Children’s Dance Ensemble, Knoxville Opera, Joy of Music School, Jerry’s ArtaRama, Cheryl Sheridan, Hatch Show Print, and all of the presenting artists and teachers.

CREATE2014: CREATIVITY IN EDUCATION INSTITUTE FULL STEAM AHEAD

MONDAY, JUNE 23

BEST PRACTICES IN ARTS INTEGRATION BY ARTS360 & VALUE PLUS SCHOOLS

11:00-1:00 Check-in 1:00-2:00 Workshops/Lesson Demos 2:15-3:15 Repeat Workshops/Lesson Demos 3:15-3:45 Break 3:45-5:15 Tutorials 5:15-5:30 Walk to Knoxville Museum of Art 5:30-7:30 Welcome, Reception, Music & Art Tour 7:30 Dinner on your own

TUESDAY, JUNE 24 STEAM EDUCATION

8:30-9:00 9:00-9:20 9:30-11:00 11:00-11:30 11:30-12:15 12:00-1:00 12:15-1:30 1:30-1:45 1:45-2:45 3:00-4:00 4:15-5:45 5:45-6:15 6:15-7:15 7:15

Networking & Breakfast Performance by Tennessee Children’s Dance Ensemble Keynote by Dr. David Sousa Book Signing Lunch Dr. David Sousa Breakout Session MindBenders Presentation by Dr. Lodge McCammon Walk to L & N STEM Academy Workshops/Lesson Demos Repeat Workshops/Lesson Demos Tutorials Board Shuttles to Emporium Networking, Reception, & KACA Introduction Dinner on your own with informal gathering

L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy

Knoxville Museum of Art

The Foundry The Foundry The Foundry The Foundry The Foundry L & N STEM Academy Commons The Foundry L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy Emporium Barley’s Pizza in Old Town

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 BRAIN & CREATIVITY/STEAM EDUCATION

8:00-9:00 Networking & Coffee with Music by William Coleman L & N STEM Academy 9:00-10:00 Workshops/Lesson Demos L & N STEM Academy 10:15-11:15 Repeat Workshops/Lessons Demos L & N STEM Academy 11:15-11:30 Walk to The Foundry 11:30-1:30 Lunch with MindBenders Presentation by Creativity Infusion Team The Foundry 1:30-1:45 Walk to L & N STEM Academy 1:45-3:15 Arts Experiences L & N STEM Academy 3:30-5:00 Tutorials L & N STEM Academy 5:00-5:30 Board Shuttles to Vine Middle School 5:30-7:00 Performance by Carpetbag Theatre Vine Middle School 7:00 Dinner on your own

THURSDAY, JUNE 26 COMMUNITY ARTS EDUCATION

8:00-9:00 Networking & Coffee with Teaching Artists 9:00-10:30 Arts Experiences 10:45-11:45 Workshops/Lesson Demos 11:45-12:15 Load Shuttles to Café 4 12:15-2:00 Lunch & Teaching Artist Showcase 2:00-2:30 Load Shuttles to Community Arts Partners 2:30-4:30 Arts Experiences at Community Arts Partners 4:30 Shuttles depart back to L & N STEM Academy & Hotel

L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy L & N STEM Academy Café 4 Square Room Various 1

MONDAY

Monday, June 23rd 1:00-2:00 - Workshops/Lesson Demos

ARTS INTEGRATION 101 PART I OF II BRANDI SELF

What is arts integration? What exactly does it take to create an arts integrated lesson? How do you incorporate state standards for both arts and non- arts content in an integrated lesson? This lesson will provide answers to these questions as well as focus on strategies for writing lessons, teaching the standards and assessing learning. Part II immediately follows this session. YOU MUST ALSO ATTEND PART II. Commons Area

THE ART IN ELA KARLA BANKS

The Art of ELA will allow teachers the opportunity to participate in three ELA lessons that integrate visual arts. The topics covered will include Action Verbs with Keith Haring, Main Idea with Norman Rockwell, and Cartooning with Quotes (focus on Dr. Seuss). Participants will leave with three lesson plans and Smartboard files. Room 202

GETTING “INTO” THE MASTERS ELLEN GILCH/WHITNEY HOVATER

Have you ever been the subject of a famous masterpiece? In this creative writing lesson demo participants will first use perspective to transport (sketch) themselves into a masterpiece by Rembrandt, Renoir, Van Gogh, Raphael, or Homer. Then, as we write descriptive paragraphs we will become the focal point and action of the painting. In order to publish our piece we will recreate our actions on the “Green Screen” app using iPads. Lesson plan, paintings, art materials, and examples will be provided, as well as iPads for publishing. Participants will leave having the opportunity to be the muse of a famous masterpiece. Room 216

MULTI-MODAL PHONICS: THE WAY IT SHOULD BE! TARYN ANDERSON/ASHLEY JONES

Learning is enhanced when phonics and phonemic awareness are taught the CORRECT way. Learning phonics is most successfully achieved using a “phono” (hearing), “oral” (speaking), “visual” (seeing), “kinesthetic” (moving), and “tactile” (touching) whole brain approach. We want to model effective ways to make your learners successful lifelong readers. In this course we will be using arts integration to present fun, helpful, creative ways of teaching phonics. Room 203

5 ARTS-INTEGRATED LESSONS CLASSROOM TEACHERS LIKED BEST DAVID GRANT

As a K-5 art teacher at an Arts360 school, David has narrowed down the top 5 lessons that teachers reported to have helped with their class curriculum. These projects can be simplified for a regular classroom teacher to implement or elaborated on by an art teacher. Room 214

WEB 2.0: THE ENDLESS ARTS INTEGRATION RESOURCE CHERYL SHERIDAN/AMY CHURCHWELL

2

As the benefit of arts integration continues to become evident, more and more Web 2.0 resources are becoming available to aid with the integration. This workshop will provide participants with information on several of these resources. Time will be spent exploring, making connections, and discussing ways to incorporate the information into the classroom. Technology that is shared will help educators more easily incorporate the arts into their curriculum. Room 208

ROCKIN’ CLOSE READING: CLOSE READING WITH LYRICS LIBBY DAWSON/RACHEL HUTSON

Close reading can sometimes be difficult for students to stay engaged and enthusiastic about learning. Most students love music, so why not dive into close reading with song lyrics? This lesson demo will focus on how to implement close reading strategies using song lyrics that students enjoy. Close reading allows students to think deeply about what they are reading by reading the text multiple times with different purposes. Students will learn how to analyze text, ask questions, and further their understanding by dissecting songs. Come join us for a rockin’ good time! Room 207

MEASURING MONDRIAN: MATH AND NON-REPRESENTATIONAL ABSTRACTION ETHAN PIGNATARO

This lesson is a great way to teach students not only about non-objective abstract art, but also ruler use, measurement, and geometry skills. Students will learn how Piet Mondrian developed his art into abstraction while learning or reviewing angle types, units of measurement, geometry terms, and shapes. Through following pre-determined guidelines set by you, students will plan, measure, draw, and paint a completely non-objective abstract artwork. Participants will leave with a copy of the lesson plan and an ActivInspire Flipchart Lesson after starting a working example. Room 222

COLOR MIXING AND STATES OF MATTER HOLLY BRIGGS

Using colored ice cubes, we will walk through a lesson on color mixing and states of matter. What happens to ice when it sits on a table for an hour? What happens when you mix two primary colors? Together, we will make predictions, test theories, and paint our observations. This is a simple lesson for early learners that equally balances Art and Science. Originally written as a 2nd grade lesson, this activity can be adapted to fit intermediate learners as well. Art classroom

SEE A CHARACTER IN COLOR! CHARACTERIZATION THROUGH COLOR AND ADJECTIVES LINDSEY COHN

Do you want another way to help your kids jump into a character? Let’s use color to describe a character. This session will use Olivia by Ian Falcouner and Mondrian. You will receive a lesson, character map, art gallery walk, and an art experience for your children to better understand a character through color. Room D113

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION KELLY FARR

This lesson demo will provide participants with an opportunity to take part in an arts integrated lesson focusing on using an actor’s tool to create skits demonstrating the meaning of students’ vocabulary words. Room 205

ARTS INTEGRATION MEETS TECHNOLOGY AMBER SAWYER

Whether it be creating photo collages, writing music, recording dramas, or making visual art come to life, technology takes the production of the arts to the next level. Technology allows students to create high quality productions that demonstrate their learning as a result of an arts integrated lesson. This session will focus on how the iPad can be used as a tool to create student-centered productions demonstrating each individual’s understanding based on his or her learning style. Room M052 3

HOOK ‘EM: CAPTURING STUDENTS THROUGH THE ARTS HAYES/LOUDERBACK/SMALL

In a world with several things vying for our student’s attention, they need an entry point for engagement into learning. The arts can be fully integrated or they can be a hook into the lesson. The presenters will explain several practical hooks for all content areas. These strategies have been used in an intermediate classroom, but can be adapted for other classrooms as well. Room D119

MUSIC CENTER GAMES FOR THE MUSIC CLASSROOM MEGAN SIMMONS

This session will focus on creating games, which combine Music with Math skills. These can be used as center games while having students participate in Recorder Karate. You will leave this session having 2-3 games ready for student use. Room G012

CURRICULUM BEYOND THE COVER HEATHER HUGHES

Struggling to get EVERYTHING in?? Using Author Studies across the curriculum can multiply your time. Participants focus will be on how to create multi-disciplinary units centered around an author. This workshop will provide an opportunity to explore ways to integrate technology and the arts into your students’ learning experiences and presentations. The activities will address the various multiple intelligences. The agenda for the workshop will include organizing and planning the unit, interacting with a model unit as a student, and options and resources for planning your own lesson. Room D112 2:15-3:15 – Repeat Workshops/Lesson Demos

ARTS INTEGRATION 101 PART II OF II - BRANDI SELF

What is arts integration? What exactly does it take to create an arts integrated lesson? How do you incorporate state standards for both arts and non-arts content in an integrated lesson? This lesson will provide answers to these questions as well as focus on strategies for writing lessons, teaching the standards and assessing learning. YOU MUST ALSO ATTEND PART I. Commons Area

THE ART IN ELA KARLA BANKS

The Art of ELA will allow teachers the opportunity to participate in three ELA lessons that integrate visual arts. The topics covered will include Action Verbs with Keith Haring, Main Idea with Norman Rockwell, and Cartooning with Quotes (focus on Dr. Seuss). Participants will leave with three lesson plans and Smartboard files. Room 202

GETTING “INTO” THE MASTERS ELLEN GILCH/WHITNEY HOVATER

Have you ever been the subject of a famous masterpiece? In this creative writing lesson demo participants will first use perspective to transport (sketch) themselves into a masterpiece by Rembrandt, Renoir, Van Gogh, Raphael, or Homer. Then, as we write descriptive paragraphs we will become the focal point and action of the painting. In order to publish our piece we will recreate our actions on the “Green Screen” app using iPads. Lesson plan, paintings, art materials, and examples will be provided, as well as iPads for publishing. Participants will leave having the opportunity to be the muse of a famous masterpiece. Room 216

4

MULTI-MODAL PHONICS: THE WAY IT SHOULD BE! TARYN ANDERSON/ASHLEY JONES

Learning is enhanced when phonics and phonemic awareness are taught the CORRECT way. Learning phonics is most successfully achieved using a “phono” (hearing), “oral” (speaking), “visual” (seeing), “kinesthetic” (moving), and “tactile” (touching) whole brain approach. We want to model effective ways to make your learners successful lifelong readers. In this course we will be using arts integration to present fun, helpful, creative ways of teaching phonics. Room 203

5 ARTS-INTEGRATED LESSONS CLASSROOM TEACHERS LIKED BEST DAVID GRANT

As a K-5 art teacher at an Arts360 school, David has narrowed down the top 5 lessons that teachers reported to have helped with their class curriculum. These projects can be simplified for a regular classroom teacher to implement or elaborated on by an art teacher. Room 214

WEB 2.0: THE ENDLESS ARTS INTEGRATION RESOURCE CHERYL SHERIDAN/AMY CHURCHWELL

As the benefit of arts integration continues to become evident, more and more Web 2.0 resources are becoming available to aid with the integration. This workshop will provide participants with information on several of these resources. Time will be spent exploring, making connections, and discussing ways to incorporate the information into the classroom. Technology that is shared will help educators more easily incorporate the arts into their curriculum. Room 208

ROCKIN’ CLOSE READING: CLOSE READING WITH LYRICS LIBBY DAWSON/RACHEL HUTSON

Close reading can sometimes be difficult for students to stay engaged and enthusiastic about learning. Most students love music, so why not dive into close reading with song lyrics? This lesson demo will focus on how to implement close reading strategies using song lyrics that students enjoy. Close reading allows students to think deeply about what they are reading by reading the text multiple times with different purposes. Students will learn how to analyze text, ask questions, and further their understanding by dissecting songs. Come join us for a rockin’ good time! Room 207

MEASURING MONDRIAN: MATH AND NON-REPRESENTATIONAL ABSTRACTION ETHAN PIGNATARO

This lesson is a great way to teach students not only about non-objective abstract art, but also ruler use, measurement, and geometry skills. Students will learn how Piet Mondrian developed his art into abstraction while learning or reviewing angle types, units of measurement, geometry terms, and shapes. Through following pre-determined guidelines set by you, students will plan, measure, draw, and paint a completely non-objective abstract artwork. Participants will leave with a copy of the lesson plan and an ActivInspire Flipchart Lesson after starting a working example. Room 222

COLOR MIXING AND STATES OF MATTER HOLLY BRIGGS

Using colored ice cubes, we will walk through a lesson on color mixing and states of matter. What happens to ice when it sits on a table for an hour? What happens when you mix two primary colors? Together, we will make predictions, test theories, and paint 5

our observations. This is a simple lesson for early learners that equally balance Art and Science. Originally written as a 2nd grade lesson, this activity can be adapted to fit intermediate learners as well. Art classroom

SEE A CHARACTER IN COLOR! CHARACTERIZATION THROUGH COLOR AND ADJECTIVES LINDSEY COHN

Do you want another way to help your kids jump into a character? Let’s use color to describe a character. This session will use Olivia by Ian Falcouner and Mondrian. You will receive a lesson, character map, art gallery walk, and an art experience for your children to better understand a character through color. Room D113

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION KELLY FARR

This lesson demo will provide participants with an opportunity to take part in an arts integrated lesson focusing on using an actor’s tool to create skits demonstrating the meaning of students’ vocabulary words. Room 205

ARTS INTEGRATION MEETS TECHNOLOGY AMBER SAWYER

Whether it be creating photo collages, writing music, recording dramas, or making visual art come to life, technology takes the production of the arts to the next level. Technology allows students to create high quality productions that demonstrate their learning as a result of an arts integrated lesson. This session will focus on how the iPad can be used as a tool to create student-centered productions demonstrating each individual’s understanding based on his or her learning style. Room M052

HOOK ‘EM: CAPTURING STUDENTS THROUGH THE ARTS HAYES/LOUDERBACK/SMALL

In a world with several things vying for our student’s attention, they need an entry point for engagement into learning. The arts can be fully integrated or they can be a hook into the lesson. The presenters will explain several practical hooks for all content areas. These strategies have been used in an intermediate classroom, but can be adapted for other classrooms as well. Room D119

MUSIC CENTER GAMES FOR THE MUSIC CLASSROOM MEGAN SIMMONS

This session will focus on creating games, which combine Music with Math skills. These can be used as center games while having students participate in Recorder Karate. You will leave this session having 2-3 games ready for student use. Room G012

CURRICULUM BEYOND THE COVER HEATHER HUGHES

Struggling to get EVERYTHING in?? Using Author Studies across the curriculum can multiply your time. Participants focus will be on how to create multi-disciplinary units centered around an author. This workshop will provide an opportunity to explore ways to integrate technology and the arts into your students’ learning experiences and presentations. The activities will address the various multiple intelligences. The agenda for the workshop will include organizing and planning the unit, interacting with a model unit as a student, and options and resources for planning your own. Room D112 3:15-3:45 - Break 6

3:45-5:15 - Tutorials/Arts Experiences

IPADS AND THE ARTS: THE EARLY PRIMARY CLASSROOM BRITINEY FIFE/TRUDY PICKETT/JULIE FARMER

In this session, participants will work through three early primary lessons (ELA, Math & Science) using the iPad app “Feltboard”. These lessons will integrate writing, technology, and other content areas.  Participants don’t have to have access to an iPad for each student to benefit from this class.  Strategies for how to utilize “Feltboard” with a varied number of devices will be demonstrated. Room M052

READING THE ARTS BRANDI SELF/LIBBY DAWSON

The adoption of Common Core demands that we expand our understanding of text to include products of the arts.  When using visual art and music as text, teachers can help students make deeper connections to the key reading skills being taught within the classroom.  Utilizing arts integration when examining different types of text results in a higher level of critical thinking and text analysis.  This tutorial will focus on applying key reading skills to all forms of text including paintings, songs, poetry, and movement patterns.  Participants will learn a variety of ways to expand text beyond the written word, so that students have a deeper, more thorough understanding of the reading skills outlined within the Common Core Standards. Room 202

CEREAL BOX BOOK BAILEY EARITH

Learn to recycle cereal boxes to create easy, clever journals. Participants will learn how to build a signature, create a cover using recycled materials, and bind them together to create a simple journal. These versatile journals can be used in the classroom for creative writing, research, and journaling projects. Participants will also learn to make a simpler variation of this technique using greeting cards or wallpaper. This project helps develop dexterity, attention to detail, concentration, & following directions. It addresses the Common Core Standards of creativity and communication and works well as an adjunct to writing assignments. Room 216

PLACING THE MEDIA CENTER AT THE CENTER OF COMMON CORE SHERRY NORFOLK Storytelling can teach by inviting students to think for themselves and to create their own truths. This interactive upper elementary lesson plan will demonstrate an effective and engaging storytelling strategy that encourages kids to make their own interpretations of stories, defend them with evidence, and describe how events in a story look from different characters’ perspectives. In the process, students collaborate, communicate, think critically, and respond creatively – a 21st Century Grand Slam! Room 203

ARCHITECTURE IN THE SCHOOL NANCY CAMPBELL

Architecture integrates visual arts across the curriculum. This introduction to the built environment provides an overview of proven architecture projects for teachers and art specialists. Many teachers are reluctant to include architecture in the classroom, even though their students love it. Projects will include programs for early grades through high school. The interdisciplinary nature of architecture provides real world applications of STEAM, social studies, and visual arts learning, with plenty of inquiry, problem-solving, and creative thinking thrown in. This tutorial will introduce built environment concepts, provide examples of integrated lessons for different grades, and include a design experience using readily available materials. Room 214 7

THE ARTS IN SERVICE: SERVICE LEARNING AND ARTS INTEGRATION CHERRI COLEMAN

Explore form, function, design, and geometry with the hands-on experience of weaving your own folk art creation. We will explore how basket making can help students understand and retain applied math principles through visual art, and leave with at least one basket that connects multiple subjects and standards in the curriculum. Appropriate adjustments for grade level will be discussed. This program was designed by a husband and wife team; a mathematician and a teaching artist. Room 207

MARBLING ON FABRIC: MONOTYPE PRINTING OLIVE DURANT

Marbling is the means of transferring color surface design from bath to cloth or paper. Marbling frees up the drawer to new possibilities and to be spontaneous with line. The craft of marbling promotes active participation, collaboration, and production. The participants will explore the math, science and engineering of monotype printing through surface tension, soap resistance, and color relationships. Art Classroom

START WITH THE ARTS TINA RADTKE

Learn how to engage your students by introducing new ideas and concepts through Arts Explorations in any subject (Science, English, Math, History). Using this method, your students will begin making logical inferences about the upcoming topic and defending them by either writing or orally citing specific information from the text (art). Using Arts Explorations at the beginning of a concept allows students to explore their problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication and connections skills. They can also identify the author’s (artist’s) point of view based on aspects of the text (art). Room 222

CONNECT THE DOTS IN MIDDLE GRADES: ARTS INTEGRATION IN CONNECTIONS DANA HARRELL

This session will explore the many ways the arts can be integrated into various middle school subjects, including connections classes. We will look at technology, arts activities and games that can teach the standards through the various learning styles. Specifically, we will look at some creative storytelling apps, visual arts, technology, games and dance activities to teach music and photography. This is a crash course on how to take a worn out, standard lesson plan, and give it a new life through technology and the arts. There will be student examples as well as some examples that have been created for this class. There will also be a hand-out, with lots of great ideas for participants. Room D113

LEARNING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE THROUGH ART DEE KIMBRELL

Social Emotional Skills are essential for success in the classroom and more importantly for the success of our communities. A child cannot focus on their ABCs and 123s if they are concerned about their safety and how to relate to others. Learn how to teach these important skills through various art forms. Participants will experience how to use the arts as an emotional tool for themselves and how to share these tools in the classroom. Room D119

CREATING A CULTURE OF ARTS INTEGRATION IN YOUR CLASSROOM AND SCHOOL KELLY FARR 8

This workshop will focus on how to create a culture of arts integration in a classroom and school. It will provide multiple ideas and strategies, as well as some lesson ideas. This session is perfect for schools that are new to arts integration and also offers fresh ideas for those with more experience. Room 205

IDEA BUILD ADVENTURE LINDSEY BAILEY

In Idea Build Adventure, participants will learn how large-scale building projects can combine geometry, architecture, process, and collaboration to learn about art making, all while creating a safe space for the students. Participants will work together to research ideas, sift through materials, and build a community structure that will be experienced by CREATE 2014 attendees. Participants attending this tutorial will receive a copy of “Deliciously Happy: Go Make Fun!” and a collection of lesson plans featuring easy-to-manage large scale projects on a low-scale budget. Room 208 5:15-5:30 – Walk to Knoxville Museum of Art 5:30-7:30 – Welcome, Reception, Music & Art Tour Please join us for music and an art tour at the Knoxville Museum of Art located next door to the L & N STEM Academy. Heavy hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar will be available. Guest speakers: - Mayor Tim Burchett, Knox County - David Butler, Executive Director of Knoxville Museum of Art - Senator Becky Duncan Massey, Sixth District - Dr. Jim McIntyre, Superintendent of Knox County Schools - Senator Doug Overbey, Second District - Jamie Woodson, President of SCORE 7:30 – Dinner on your own

8:30-9:00 Networking & Breakfast 9:00-9:20 Performance by Tennessee Children’s Dance Ensemble 9:30-11:00 Keynote by Dr. David Sousa

FROM STEM TO STEAM: USING BRAIN-COMPATIBLE STRATEGIES TO INTEGRATE THE ARTS

The STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) initiative does not seem to be doing as well as anticipated in raising student achievement in these subject areas. What can be done? This keynote offers one answer to that question by examining the cognitive and social neuroscience findings showing how the arts enhance creativity, problem solving, memory systems, and analytical skills --- all critical attributes to achieving success in the STEM subjects. Using classroom-tested lesson plans, we will explore how easily teachers and teaching artists, at all grade levels, have successfully integrated the arts into STEM lessons, turning them into STEAM lessons that are much more fun, interesting, and engaging to students. There will be some surprises! 11:00-11:30 – Book Signing All Create2014 participants will receive a free copy of Dr. Sousa’s latest book, From STEM to STEAM: Using Brain-Compatible Strategies to Integrate the Arts. 11:30-12:15 – Lunch Guest speaker: Dr. Roy Miller, Principal of Mooreland Heights Elementary School

TUESDAY

Tuesday, June 24th

12:00-1:00 – Dr. David Sousa Breakout Session at L & N STEM Academy Commons 9

12:15-1:30 – MindBenders Presentation by Dr. Lodge McCammon

FLIPPING THE STEAM CLASSROOM

Flipping the classroom is an instructional method that has the power to make teachers more efficient, highly reflective, and give them an unprecedented ability to build relationships. Teachers using this method deliver their lecture or direct-instruction-content through concise videos, which opens class time for rigorous and engaging STEAM learning activities. Using simple tools, every teacher can start making this change tomorrow. 1:45-2:45 – Workshops/Lesson Demos

SHOWCASING YOUR ARTS INTEGRATION PROGRAM KELLY FARR

This session will provide participants with ideas to showcase their arts integration programs to the community. It will include a video created by Knox County Schools that provides examples of the Arts360 schools presenting their arts integration programs to their communities through Evening with the Arts programs. Room 202

FINE ARTS SUMMER CAMP: AN ON-SITE VISIT TO FUN, FASCINATION AND FINE ARTS! JEAN HEISE

Participants will travel to the Fine Arts Summer Camp, in session in Knox County Schools at a local elementary school. Observe how the Fine Arts Summer Camp has had a significant impact on regular summer school attendance. Fine Arts Camp information including documents, communication strategies, and data collected will be shared. You will visit an Art, Music, Dance, and PE class to observe teacher instruction and student participation. Location: Green Magnet Math and Science Academy

FROM SEUSS TO STRAUSS: MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY READING CLASSROOM ERIC BRANSCOME

Educators consistently seek ways to integrate content across the curriculum and incorporate music to enhance learning. This presentation will be a hands-on time of learning strategies using music to teach reading skills to preschool and elementary children. The presentation will include an extensive list of songs that have become published books, books that have become songs, and lessons that use these resources in music and reading activities. Room 216

EXPERIENCING NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION THROUGH DANCE DEBORAH WHELAN

We will explore Newton’s first and second laws of motion through the kinesthetic experience of movement and dance, and analyze how they affect the moving or still body in space. These concepts will be applied: on-balance and off-balance, symmetrical and asymmetrical, motion and stillness, strong and light force, and active and passive force. Room 203

THE WORLD WIDE WEB OF LITERATURE STEPHANIE PRUITT

The internet and other technological platforms and applications have transformed the way we can engage with literature. This workshop will look at ways creative writers, teachers, students, and engaged readers use technology for planning tools, collaborations, research, interactive discussions, publication, and much more. This goes far 10

beyond Googlebooks and Nook readers. Participants will see how mind-mapping software, video chats, QR codes, digital storytelling, and free resource sites can enlarge our literary worlds. Room M052

MAPPING AND DESIGNING IN A STEAM CURRICULUM OF URBAN PLANNING SUZANNE WEDEKIND

Scale drawing requires math skills of ratio and proportion and the application to real world problems of architecture and urban planning. The design process is the tool to communicate practical solutions to problems in the local community. Each participant will have access to the online curriculum guide on urban planning and will also receive a copy of a lesson plan for scale drawing. The curriculum guide, Go to 2033, will be referenced on the website: www.aiaetn.org/community/architecture-in-schools. Room 214

SCULPTING CIRCUITS GERI FORKNER

Teach simple electrical circuits to children as young as kindergarten. Use conductive and non-conductive clays in combination to light up LEDs. You can teach sculpture and electricity all at the same time. Perfect for STEAM education for the younger grades. Art Classroom

KING TERRIBLE AND THE GOLDEN COINS: AN ORIGINAL MATHEMATICAL FAIRY TALE KATHLEEN LYNAM

This original fairy tale allows children to work in groups collaboratively. The students will take on an assigned role as a villager, along with the appropriate prop. They will each be given a precise amount of gold coins. This fairy tale is about a terrible king (King Terrible) who is greedy. He sends his tax collector to the village and demands a specific number of gold coins from a group of students. They will have to work together to come up with the correct amount due the tax collector. This story has 4 chapters so each student can participate. Room 208

INNER PLANET MONOLOGUES: SCIENCE AND THEATRE INTEGRATION SEAN GLAZEBROOK

In this model science-theatre integrated lesson, classroom teachers, teaching artists, and administrators will have the opportunity to see arts integration in action. Acting as students, participants will learn about the inner planets of the solar system and their identifying characteristics through tableaux. Following this initial exploration, student-participants will be asked to demonstrate their understanding through the writing and performing of “planet monologues” – written using the voices of the planets themselves! This model lesson will demonstrate the key relationship between art form and curriculum that suffuses quality arts integration, and provide a roadmap for teachers, artists, and administrators to integrate the arts in their own schools. Room 207

CONNECTING KIDS TO SCI-FI CINDY PRIDE/BRENDA STUTTS

In this session, we will focus on A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle. In planning this lesson, we incorporated every aspect of a student schedule (Reading, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Math, Library, Visual Art, Music, Drama, Dance, and Lunch). By having teachers and staff teach “mini” lessons in all subjects the students were better able to understand the concepts presented. We also worked with the local children’s theater to give our students a chance to view the work on stage. Room 202 11

STORYTELLING AND SCIENCE: THE DEEPENING SPIRAL (LOWER ELEMENTARY) SHERRY NORFOLK

When we first discover something in nature—like a rainbow—we look at it with awe. Awe leads to curiosity (to know more about it, where it came from, how it is formed, etc.); curiosity leads to research (science). Research leads to deeper understanding, which leads to celebration (story, art, music). Celebration leads to awe...which leads to curiosity...which leads to more discovery…the deepening spiral. In this interactive session, we will discover the magic of creating the deepening spiral of story plus science through a variety of storytelling and story writing strategies. Room 205

LITERACY, THE ARTS, AND THE COMMON CORE: UNDERSTANDING DRAMA AND VISUAL ART AS INFORMATIONAL TEXT LAURIE MELNIK/JOEL BAXLEY

This workshop will guide participants in the alignment of arts education and literacy-based Common Core standards through an examination of informational text.  Informational text emphasizes essential literacy skills for STEAM-based education including investigating ideas, claims, reasoning, and evidence. Participants will actively explore relationships between the parallel processes of examining informational text and the artistic process as seen in drama and visual art. This workshop is aimed at middle school teachers, arts specialists, and teaching artists. Participants will acquire strategies for developing arts integrated units of study that purposefully align with the common core. Room D113

RIGOROUS STEAM INSTRUCTION USING MUSIC, VIDEO & MOVEMENT DR. LODGE MCCAMMON

Experience a flipped STEAM classroom where we will use the power of music, video, and movement to engage students by addressing multiple learning styles. Dr. Lodge’s teaching method is a new, innovative, and efficient approach to instruction that encourages teachers to allow their students to get up and move while learning. Get ready for active STEAM learning! Room D119 3:00-4:00 - Repeat Workshops/LessonDemos

SHOWCASING YOUR ARTS INTEGRATION PROGRAM KELLY FARR

This session will provide participants with ideas to showcase their arts integration programs to the community. It will include a video created by Knox County Schools that provides examples of the Arts360 schools presenting their arts integration programs to their communities through Evening with the Arts programs. Room 202

FROM SEUSS TO STRAUSS: MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY READING CLASSROOM ERIC BRANSCOME

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Educators consistently seek ways to integrate content across the curriculum and incorporate music to enhance learning. This presentation will be a hands-on time of learning strategies using music to teaching reading skills to preschool and elementary children. The presentation will include an extensive list of songs that have become published books, books that have become songs, and lessons that use these resources in music and reading activities. Room 216

EXPERIENCING NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION THROUGH DANCE DEBORAH WHELAN

We will explore Newton’s first and second laws of motion through the kinesthetic experience of movement and dance, and analyze how they affect the moving or still body in space. These concepts will be applied: on-balance and off-balance, symmetrical and asymmetrical, motion and stillness, strong and light force, and active and passive force. Room 203

THE WORLD WIDE WEB OF LITERATURE STEPHANIE PRUITT

The internet and other technological platforms and applications have transformed the way we can engage with literature. This workshop will look at ways creative writers, teachers, students, and engaged readers use technology for planning tools, collaborations, research, interactive discussions, publication, and much more. This goes far beyond Googlebooks and Nook readers. Participants will see how mind-mapping software, video chats, QR codes, digital storytelling, and free resource sites can enlarge our literary worlds. Room M052

MAPPING AND DESIGNING IN A STEAM CURRICULUM OF URBAN PLANNING SUZANNE WEDEKIND

Scale drawing requires math skills of ratio and proportion and the application to real world problems of architecture and urban planning. The design process is the tool to communicate practical solutions to problems in the local community. Each participant will have access to the online curriculum guide on urban planning and will also receive a copy of a lesson plan for scale drawing. The curriculum guide, Go to 2033, will be referenced on the website: www.aiaetn.org/community/architecture-in-schools. Room 214

SCULPTING CIRCUITS GERI FORKNER

Teach simple electrical circuits to children as young as kindergarten. Use conductive and non-conductive clays in combination to light up LEDs. You can teach sculpture and electricity all at the same time. Perfect for STEAM education for the younger grades. Art Classroom

KING TERRIBLE AND THE GOLDEN COINS: AN ORIGINAL MATHEMATICAL FAIRY TALE KATHLEEN LYNAM

This original fairy tale allows children to work in groups collaboratively. The students will take on an assigned role as a villager, along with the appropriate prop. They will each be given a precise amount of gold coins. This fairy tale is about a terrible king (King Terrible) who is greedy. He sends his tax collector to the village and demands a specific number of gold coins from a group of students. They will have to work together to come up with the correct amount due the tax collector. This story has 4 chapters so each student can participate. Room 208

INNER PLANET MONOLOGUES: SCIENCE AND THEATRE INTEGRATION SEAN GLAZEBROOK

In this model science-theatre integrated lesson, classroom teachers, teaching artists, and administrators will have the opportunity to see arts integration in action. Acting as students, participants will learn about the inner planets of the solar system and their identifying characteristics through tableaux. Following this initial

13

exploration, student-participants will be asked to demonstrate their understanding through the writing and performing of “planet monologues” – written using the voices of the planets themselves! This model lesson will demonstrate the key relationship between art form and curriculum that suffuses quality arts integration, and provide a roadmap for teachers, artists, and administrators to integrate the arts in their own schools. Room 207

CONNECTING KIDS TO SCI-FI CINDY PRIDE/BRENDA STUTTS

In this session, we will focus on A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle. In planning this lesson, we incorporated every aspect of a student schedule (Reading, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Math, Library, Visual Art, Music, Drama, Dance, and Lunch). By having teachers and staff teach “mini” lessons in all subjects the students were better able to understand the concepts presented. We also worked with the local children’s theater to give our students a chance to view the work on stage. Room 202

STORYTELLING AND SCIENCE: THE DEEPENING SPIRAL (LOWER ELEMENTARY) SHERRY NORFOLK

When we first discover something in nature -- like a rainbow -- we look at it with awe. Awe leads to curiosity (to know more about it, where it came from, how it is formed, etc.); curiosity leads to research (science). Research leads to deeper understanding, which leads to celebration (story, art, music). Celebration leads to awe... which leads to curiosity...which leads to more discovery…the deepening spiral. In this interactive session, we will discover the magic of creating the deepening spiral of story plus science through a variety of storytelling and story writing strategies. Room 205

LITERACY, THE ARTS, AND THE COMMON CORE: UNDERSTANDING DRAMA AND VISUAL ART AS INFORMATIONAL TEXT LAURIE MELNIK/JOEL BAXLEY

This workshop will guide participants in the alignment of arts education and literacy-based common core standards through an examination of informational text.  Informational text emphasizes essential literacy skills for STEAM-based education including investigating ideas, claims, reasoning, and evidence. Participants will actively explore relationships between the parallel processes of examining informational text and the artistic process as seen in drama and visual art. This workshop is aimed at middle school teachers, arts specialists, and teaching artists. Participants will acquire strategies for developing arts integrated units of study that purposefully align with the common core. Room D113

RIGOROUS STEAM INSTRUCTION USING MUSIC, VIDEO & MOVEMENT DR. LODGE MCCAMMON

Experience a flipped STEAM classroom where we will use the power of music, video, and movement to engage students by addressing multiple learning styles. Dr. Lodge’s teaching method is a new, innovative, and efficient approach to instruction that encourages teachers to allow their students to get up and move while learning. Get ready for active STEAM learning! Room D119

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4:15-5:45 - Tutorials

STEM LEARNING THROUGH THE ARTS RESEARCH LISA MUCI

STEM Learning through the Arts Research is a project funded by Young Audiences Arts for Learning, private corporations, and individual donors to assess student and teacher attitudes toward using the arts to teach STEM subjects and concepts. If you are searching for ideas on how to develop a research project using STEM and the arts, this session will offer insights on where to look for funding, what key elements to include in grant proposals, and how to carry out a plan once you’ve received funding. Room 202

ARTREPRENEURSHIP: DEVELOPING BUSINESS SKILLS THROUGH ARTS-RICH PROJECT BASED LEARNING STEPHANIE PRUITT

Let’s debunk the starving artist image! Many contemporary artists are minding their creative business and using innovative tools combined with solid business principals to make a living through their art. We’ll look at several case studies of successful artrepreneurs and discuss methods and classroom projects that help develop the necessary communication, business, and organizational skills to forge a professional path out of creative passions. This session will help educators use art to teach economics, entrepreneurship, and market research. It will help practicing artists exercise their business muscles. Room M052

SHADOW PUPPETS IN THE 21ST CENTURY CLASSROOM KATHLEEN LYNAM

Students are mesmerized by shadows on a screen. This ancient art form directly supports any topic of study—dinosaurs, fractions, shapes, letters, etc., and engages all types of learners. The shadow puppets are easy to make, inexpensive, and silhouettes are available from numerous sources. In this tutorial, teachers will learn how to make and use shadow puppets, receive a free portable shadow screen, and explore immediate ways to use them in the classroom. Shadow puppetry is a way to provide your students with tangible 21st Century Skills: Communication, Collaboration, and Critical Thinking supported by the Common Core Standards. Room 205

MINECRAFT MOSIACS HOLLY BRIGGS

How can you use fractions, decimals, and percentages to make mosaics? Channeling the popularity of the pixelated building game Minecraft, we will create mathematical mosaics using paper tiles. This fun lesson for upper elementary and middle school students will capture imaginations as it uses simple math techniques to create a 100 tile mosaic. We will use a planning guide to determine the fractions and percentages of colors, while also teaching place value and decimals! Come build with us! Room 216

STASH THE TRASH - A LESSON IN ART, RECYCLING, AND SERVICE RAQUEL ROY What about those bottlecaps? The average American generates 600 times their adult weight in garbage during their lifetime. This arts-based service-learning project will teach you a few facts/myths about plastic bottle caps. Inspired by artists like Peter Max, we will then collaboratively design and create a mural with a motivational message out of bottlecaps. Room 203

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USING ANDY GOLDSWORTHY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM ALIGNED WITH CCSS ROBYNE BATSON/KARYNE BATSON

Writing is a means for making thinking visible, therefore, graffiti, arts integration, and writing strategies will be explored in this class. Participants will apply close reading strategies to a recent article about Banksy while developing text dependent questions. We will incorporate what we write into a graffiti art journal page that we create through inspiration from Banksy. The journal page will be made with markers, water colors, and ink. Room 214

BOTTLE CAPS, BRAINS, AND BEAUTY: A STEAM PROJECT FOR A K-9 AFTERCARE PROGRAM FOR AT-RISK STUDENTS DEE KIMBRELL In February of 2014, the students of Children Are People, Inc. undertook a school-wide project to celebrate the spirit of their unique after school program. Dee Kimbrell will share how she integrated the art of pointillism with STEM subjects to create a STEAM project and ignited the passion for learning in these at-risk students. Class includes outcome data forms, lesson plans, photos of the progression of the project, and a hands-on experience for the participants of the class. Room 208

SCIENCE FOR KEEPS: FROM STEM TO STEAM THROUGH THEATRE SEAN GLAZEBROOK Enhance your students’ ability to comprehend and retain key science concepts using theatre! K-3 teachers will be introduced to two key theatre strategies - tableau and scripting - and how they can be used for effective teaching and performance-based assessment. Teachers will be guided through each step of the theatre-science integration process as practiced by KID smART, a New Orleans-based education nonprofit, and have the chance to review and discuss the latest research in emotionally-resonant curriculum. Room 207

ENGAGING THE COMMUNITY LINDSEY BAILEY

In Engaging the Community, participants will learn strategies and integration techniques for community collaborations. A survey of successful civic, youth, and neighborhood development projects will be examined; and participants will learn how elementary, middle, and high school age students and their artwork can help communities articulate their history, culture, and needs--and how that community in turn can inspire the creative expression of the elementary, middle and high school age students. Participants attending this tutorial will receive a copy of Deliciously Happy: Go Make Fun! and a variety of contemporary articles on community projects. Participants will also receive a collection of lesson plans for arts-based specialists interested in engaging community. Room 222

MARBLING ON FABRIC: MONOTYPE PRINTING OLIVE DURANT

Marbling is the means of transferring color surface design from bath to cloth or paper. Marbling frees up the drawer to new possibilities and to be spontaneous with line. The craft of marbling promotes active participation, collaboration and production. The participants will explore the math, science and engineering of monotype printing through surface tension, soap resistance and color relationships. Art Classroom 5:45 – 6:15 – Board Shuttles to Emporium 16

6:15 – 7:15 – Networking & Reception at Knoxville Arts and Culture Alliance Guest speaker: Liza Zenni, Executive Director of Knoxville Museum of Art 7:15 – Informal gathering at Barley’s Pizza or Dinner on your own

8:00-9:00 - Networking & Coffee with Music by William Coleman 9:00-10:00 - Workshops/Lesson Demos

ENCOURAGING SCIENCE INQUIRY THROUGH TECHNOLOGY LIBBY DAWSON

Most students today have never known a time without technology. They intuitively pick up technology quickly. How can we use this resource to help push our students to inquiry and deeper thinking? SCIENCE AND THE ARTS! Science inquiry, the arts, and technology are all ways to push students to think more creatively, critically, and with more depth. This lesson will walk you through an integrated unit incorporating science (recycling, human impact on the environment, and inventions), writing research, visual art, and technology. Learn about how students research, design, and create an invention to reduce pollution through this project-based learning unit. Room 205

DESIGN AND MAXIMIZE YOUR STEAM PROGRAMS: WHAT EVERY TEACHING ARTIST NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT STEM LISA MUCI

If you are a teaching artist and you want to integrate or enhance the STEM curriculum in your programs, this session is for you! Led by the program director of a successful arts integration organization in Kansas, this session will offer participants the ingredients for creating and presenting successful STEAM programs. With a focus on divergent thinking, the session will engage participants as hands-on learners in a STEM subject! Participants will brainstorm how their art forms guide and enhance learning in STEM subjects and concepts, resulting in the knowledge to develop their programs with intentionality. An emphasis on how to integrate technology into programs, how to define the core of the CCSS, and how to effectively instill awareness of the 21st century learning skills, rounds out the session. Participants will receive a STEM learning/CCSS take-home tool. Room 202

WHY ART MATTERS TONY HENSON

WEDNESDAY

Wednesday, June 25th

By using something personal, connect the significance of art to your photograph of a loved one. We all know art is important to the artists that create it. Do you know why art matters specifically to you? Each person will bring in a 4x6” photo of a loved one. A slide of Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait is shown and a lecture examens the fact that the historical significance of art is often explored; however, why art is important to YOU is not. Room 203

ALL STEAMED UP: MUSIC IN A STEM-CENTERED CURRICULUM ERIC BRANSCOME As STEM objectives become commonplace, music teachers may feel increasing pressure to emphasize science over music. However, a quick analysis of the STEM curriculum reveals that musicians may have already been STEMming all along. Specifically, the art of improvisation and composition involve the same process of

17

creative problem solving, purposeful trial and error, and experimentation that are central to the engineering process of the STEM curriculum. This session will present sample lessons and activities by which music teachers can incorporate STEM objectives into the music classroom through musical improvisation and composition, while maintaining a central focus on the music content. Room 216

THE COLLISION OF MATH, SCIENCE, AND DANCE IN THE MAKING OF A HUMAN SNOWFLAKE DEBORAH WHELAN

We will explore how Science, Math and Dance collide in the making of a human snowflake that meets the criteria of nature’s snowflakes. We will explore gas, liquids, and solids; 6-point radial symmetry, and positive-negative space through movement explortion, culminating in cooperative group choreography that shows the development of a snow crystal. Room G012

SCULPTING CIRCUITS GERI FORKNER

Teach simple electrical circuits to children as young as kindergarten. Use conductive and non-conductive clays in combination to light up LEDs. You can teach sculpture and electricity all at the same time. Perfect for STEAM education for the younger grades. Art Classroom

EXPLORE THE ANIMAL KINGDOM: MYTH, FABLE, AND FACTS THROUGH PUPPETRY AND PROPS KATHLEEN LYNAM

What is the difference between a myth and a fable? Why were they written? Explore their purpose and learn about their differences through a common or unfamiliar animal. Bring the myth to life through dramatic play with props and/or puppets. Then, set the record straight with factual information about that same animal. This in-depth look at the animal kingdom will engage your student’s interest in the realm of scientific exploration. Room 222

INNER PLANET MONOLOGUES: SCIENCE AND THEATRE INTEGRATION SEAN GLAZEBROOK In this model science-theatre integrated lesson, classroom teachers, teaching artists, and administrators will have the opportunity to see arts integration in action. Acting as students, participants will learn about the inner planets of the solar system and their identifying characteristics through tableaux. Following this initial exploration, student-participants will be asked to demonstrate their understanding through the writing and performing of “planet monologues” – written using the voices of the planets themselves! This model lesson will demonstrate the key relationship between art form and curriculum that suffuses quality arts integration, and provide a roadmap for teachers, artists, and administrators to integrate the arts in their own schools. Room 214

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE THROUGH THE ARTS SOPHIE LUCIDO JOHNSON

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Artistic integration offers a gateway to accessing important skills that are severely lacking for children with emotional and behavioral challenges. This session will provide tools for using visual arts and theater disciplines to access social emotional skills -such as teamwork, emotional expression, emotional vocabulary, and tools for conflict resolution. Teachers will be given strategies to encourage their students to take ownership of their learning through active engagement, and can learn skills to break patterns of behavioral disruptions and effectively begin to deal with trauma. Room 207

STORYTELLING AND SCIENCE: THE DEEPENING SPIRAL (UPPER ELEMENTARY) SHERRY NORFOLK

Engaging the imagination engages curiosity, which, in turn, engages the intellect… which leads to deeper understanding, which leads to creativity and imagination and curiosity: the deepening spiral. In this interactive session, we’ll explore various storytelling strategies that engage upper elementary students in scientific inquiry and creative design strategies. Room D113

MOVEMENT, LANGUAGE, AND LEARNING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES PAMELA A. VANGILDER

This workshop will explore the learning and movement connection through a variety of participatory experiences that will lead to a greater understanding of the importance of kinesthetic learning for students with disabilities.  Participants will learn strategies for teaching self-regulation and personal social skills and explore the relationship between developmental movement patterns, cognition, and functional movement skills. They will learn how to incorporate movement and learning experiences into their daily classroom routine while aligning with the 21st Century Skills for learning. Room D112 10:15-11:15 - Repeat Workshops/Lesson Demos

ENCOURAGING SCIENCE INQUIRY THROUGH TECHNOLOGY LIBBY DAWSON Most students today have never known a time without technology. They intuitively pick up technology quickly. How can we use this resource to help push our students to inquiry and deeper thinking? SCIENCE AND THE ARTS! Science inquiry, the arts, and technology are all ways to push students to think more creatively, critically, and with more depth. This lesson will walk you through an integrated unit incorporating science (recycling, human impact on the environment, and inventions), writing research, visual art, and technology. Learn about how students research, design, and create an invention to reduce pollution through this project-based learning unit. Room 205

DESIGN AND MAXIMIZE YOUR STEAM PROGRAMS: WHAT EVERY TEACHING ARTIST NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT STEM LISA MUCI

If you are a teaching artist and you want to integrate or enhance the STEM curriculum in your programs, this session is for you! Led by the program director of a successful arts integration organization in Kansas, this session will offer participants the ingredients for creating and presenting successful STEAM programs. With a focus on divergent thinking, the session will engage participants as hands-on learners in a STEM subject! Participants will brainstorm how their art forms guide and enhance learning in STEM subjects and concepts, resulting in the knowledge to develop their programs with intentionality. An emphasis on how to integrate technology into programs, how to define the core of the CCSS, and how to effectively instill awareness of the 21st century learning skills, rounds out the session. Participants will receive a STEM learning/ CCSS take-home tool. Room 202

WHY ART MATTERS TONY HENSON

By using something personal, connect the significance of art to your photograph of a loved one. We all know art is important to the artists that create it. Do you know why

19

art matters specifically to you? Each person will bring in a 4x6” photo of a loved one. A slide of Rembrandt’s Self-Portrait is shown and a lecture examens the fact that the historical significance of art is often explored; however, why art is important to YOU is not. Room 203

ALL STEAMED UP: MUSIC IN A STEM-CENTERED CURRICULUM ERIC BRANSCOME

As STEM objectives become commonplace, music teachers may feel increasing pressure to emphasize science over music. However, a quick analysis of the STEM curriculum reveals that musicians may have already been STEMming all along. Specifically, the art of improvisation and composition involve the same process of creative problem solving, purposeful trial and error, and experimentation that are central to the engineering process of the STEM curriculum. This session will present sample lessons and activities by which music teachers can incorporate STEM objectives into the music classroom through musical improvisation and composition, while maintaining a central focus on the music content. Room 216

THE COLLISION OF MATH, SCIENCE, AND DANCE IN THE MAKING OF A HUMAN SNOWFLAKE DEBORAH WHELAN

We will explore how Science, Math and Dance collide in the making of a human snowflake that meets the criteria of nature’s snowflakes. We will explore gas, liquids and solids, 6-point radial symmetry, and positive-negative space through movement exploration, culminating in cooperative group choreography that shows the development of a snow crystal. Room G012

SCULPTING CIRCUITS GERI FORKNER

Teach simple electrical circuits to children as young as kindergarten. Use conductive and non-conductive clays in combination to light up LEDs. You can teach sculpture and electricity all at the same time. Perfect for STEAM education for the younger grades. Art Classroom

EXPLORE THE ANIMAL KINGDOM: MYTH, FABLE, AND FACTS THROUGH PUPPETRY AND PROPS KATHLEEN LYNAM

What is the difference between a myth and a fable? Why were they written? Explore their purpose and learn about their differences through a common or unfamiliar animal. Bring the myth to life through dramatic play with props and or puppets. Then set the record straight with factual information about that same animal. This in-depth look at the animal kingdom will engage your student’s interest in the realm of scientific exploration. Room 222

INNER PLANET MONOLOGUES: SCIENCE AND THEATRE INTEGRATION SEAN GLAZEBROOK

In this model science-theatre integrated lesson, classroom teachers, teaching artists, and administrators will have the opportunity to see arts integration in action. Acting as students, participants will learn about the inner planets of the solar system and their identifying characteristics through tableaux. Following this initial exploration, student-participants will be asked to demonstrate their understanding through the writing and performing of “planet monologues” – written using the 20

voices of the planets themselves! This model lesson will demonstrate the key relationship between art form and curriculum that suffuses quality arts integration, and provide a roadmap for teachers, artists, and administrators to integrate the arts in their own schools. Room 214

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE THROUGH THE ARTS SOPHIE LUCIDO JOHNSON

Artistic integration offers a gateway to accessing important skills that are severely lacking for children with emotional and behavioral challenges. This session will provide tools for using visual arts and theater disciplines to access social-emotional skills -such as teamwork, emotional expression, emotional vocabulary, and tools for conflict resolution. Teachers will be given strategies to encourage their students to take ownership of their learning through active engagement, and can learn skills to break patterns of behavioral disruptions and effectively begin to deal with trauma. Room 207

STORYTELLING AND SCIENCE: THE DEEPENING SPIRAL (UPPER ELEMENTARY) SHERRY NORFOLK

Engaging the imagination engages curiosity, which, in turn, engages the intellect… which leads to deeper understanding, which leads to creativity and imagination and curiosity: the deepening spiral. In this interactive session, we’ll explore various storytelling strategies that engage upper elementary students in scientific inquiry and creative design strategies. Room D113

MOVEMENT, LANGUAGE, AND LEARNING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES PAMELA A. VANGILDER

This workshop will explore the learning and movement connection through a variety of participatory experiences that will lead to a greater understanding of the importance of kinesthetic learning for students with disabilities.  Participants will learn strategies for teaching self-regulation and personal social skills and explore the relationship between developmental movement patterns, cognition, and functional movement skills. They will learn how to incorporate movement and learning experiences into their daily classroom routine while aligning with the 21st Century Skills for learning. Room D112 11:15-11:30 - Walk to The Foundry 11:30-1:30 - Lunch with MindBenders Presentation

CREATIVITY INFUSION: A FRAMEWORK FOR TRANSFORMING TEACHING AND LEARNING CREATIVITY INFUSION TEAM Studies show a steady decrease in student creativity even as the need for arts and creativity in classrooms has grown. Now creativity is a national socio-economic priority. But how can we teach for creativity in an over-crowded curricular day? What cognitive skills, experiences and instructional practices are most effective? How can we change school culture across grade levels? What about accountability? Having piloted our framework in the Atlanta Schools and in university teacher preparation, we offer answers and a comprehensive approach for planning curriculum, instruction, and assessment. 1:30-1:45 - Walk to L & N STEM Academy 21

1:45-3:15 - Arts Experiences

MATH AND THE ART OF BASKETRY CHERRI COLEMAN

Explore form, function, design, and geometry with the hands-on experience of weaving your own folk art creation. We will explore how basket making can help students understand and retain applied math principals through visual art, and leave with at least one basket that connects multiple subjects and standards in the curriculum. Appropriate adjustments for grade level will be discussed. Room 221

ABSTRACT PAINTING TONY HENSON

Gerhard Richter is one of the most successful living artists today. Born in Germany, Richter has been painting using mainly a squeegee since 1980, and his works can fetch up to $35 million. I will show a few of Richter’s abstract paintings and explain the process. Each person will produce a painting that “copies” that of Richter’s style. The goal is to experience the process and application of paint used by contemporary artists to provide a better understanding of art and relate to it. Art Classroom

QUILTED POEMS: A CLASSROOM CULTURE OF EMPATHY, CRITICAL LISTENING, AND PARTICIPATION THROUGH CREATIVE WRITING STEPHANIE PRUITT

Nurturing a classroom culture that is conducive to engaged learning and collaboration is a top priority of educators. In this arts experience, participants will move through a series of accessible and fun creative writing activities that encourage strong communication and collaboration. Like a quilting bee, each person will work on an independent portion that strengthens the whole. Room 202

LIGHT UP SCULPTURES GERI FORKNER

In this hands-on class we’ll make action sculptures using inexpensive and accessible materials then light them up with LEDs. No soldering needed. We’ll learn a simple electrical circuit easy enough for all levels of students. Room 203

DRAWING WITH PAPER AND SCISSORS & THE ART OF HENRI MATISSE ANNAMARIA GUNDLACH

Get wild and create with colorful paper, glue, and scissors. Be inspired by the art of Fauvist artist Henri Matisse, who created wonderful works of art with paper. Drawing is not always necessary to create art, nor is staying in the lines! A picture can be worth a thousand words. This fun and easy way of cutting and pasting gives participants the opportunity to experience how an idea can be expressed visually without words. This activity offers insight into how students manipulate materials and how they solve the problem of using paper to communicate a vision and idea. It’s also a great way to integrate this activity into core subjects as the art activity serves as an impetus to communicate verbally or in writing. No experience necessary, just bring your imagination and willingness to play! Room 216

STORYTELLING THROUGH CAVE PAINTING BAILEY EARITH 22

Students will learn how to create cave paintings as a way to tell visual and oral stories. This project removes the fear and pressure to draw well and frees students to concen-

trate on telling a story. This lesson can be easily expanded to include a history lesson on the peoples who actually created cave paintings. This lesson has been very successful with autistic students. Room 214

CONTACT IMPROVISATION AND CHOREOGRAPHY DEBORAH WHELAN

This will be a community building movement session centered around the concept of “Contact Improvisation,” which is dancing/moving while connected to another person/body in space. We will explore force: pushing and pulling, weight: strong and light, contact: connected to another body while cooperatively making progress toward a goal, improvisation: movement exploration in this moment in time, and choreography: a set series of movements performed the same way each time. Movement experiences will occur in partners and small groups. Cooperative choreography utilizing the concepts explored will culminate in a group performance at the end of the session. Room D112

MATHEMATICS AND THE HUMAN FACE KAREN BROWN

Participants will learn about basic facial proportions and use this knowledge to create a portrait or self-portrait. Participants will gain the knowledge of how facial proportions relate to math by dividing ovals into fractional segments and shapes to constitute approximate facial proportions. Liz successfully taught this lesson to 4th and 5th graders on a regular basis with exciting results. Room 207

TRADITIONAL MUSIC OF GHANA WEST AFRICA KOFI MAWUKO

An introduction to the music and songs of Ghana provides students with the means to create polyrhythmic patterns using musical instruments, their voices, and their bodies. Students will practice basic hand patterns (tone, slap, bass) on the drums to produce simple rhythms. Body language and stage etiquette are emphasized. Listening and retention skills are highly stressed with call and response techniques. Discussions on traditional customs and the migration of Africa’s music and instruments into today’s society, how the instruments are created, and the types of events for which they are used. Participants can bring percussive instruments. Room G012

APPALACHIAN PARTY GAMES AND FOLK DANCES SEAN MCCOLLOUGH

In this workshop we will dance! Dances will include Appalachian play party games, square dances, circle dances, and contra dances. We will also learn how to teach these dances to students while also exploring musical concepts such as meter and form. In addition, we will learn a little about the history of the dances and the music associated with them. The majority of the dances will be geared toward 3rd grade and above, but some can be done with younger children. Room 222

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE THROUGH THE ARTS: HANDS ON! SOPHIE LUCIDO JOHNSON

Participants will create visual arts works that allow them to demonstrate their emotions through abstract composition. They will create a Feelings Flag using the technique of collage, a multimedia emotions line in wax and water colors, and more. These projects are appropriate for all grade levels, and are meant to help students explore emotional vocabulary in order to deepen their social/ emotional literacy. Room 205

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3:30-5:00 - Tutorials

MINECRAFT MOSIACS HOLLY BRIGGS

How can you use fractions, decimals, and percentages to make mosaics? Channeling the popularity of the pixelated building game Minecraft, we will create mathematical mosaics using paper tiles. This fun lesson for upper elementary and middle school students will capture imaginations as it uses simple math techniques to create a 100 tile mosaic. We will use a planning guide to determine the fractions and percentages of colors, while also teaching place value and decimals! Come build with us! Room 205

ARTREPRENEURSHIP: DEVELOPING BUSINESS SKILLS THROUGH ARTS-RICH PROJECT BASED LEARNING STEPHANIE PRUITT

Let’s debunk the starving artist image! Many contemporary artists are minding their creative business and using innovative tools combined with solid business principals to make a living through their art. We’ll look at several case studies of successful artrepreneurs and discuss methods and classroom projects that help develop the necessary communication, business, and organizational skills to forge a professional path out of creative passions. This session will help educators use art to teach economics, entrepreneurship, and market research. It will help practicing artists exercise their business muscles. Room 221

AFRICAN AMERICAN FACE JUGS WITH COMMON CORE STANDARDS OLIVE DURANT

Participants will have an opportunity to pull, pinch, and manipulate a soft, natural element, earthenware clay, to form a face on a can constructed cylinder. The clay construction may be bisque fired and painted with a bisque stain to retain permanence. Essential questions about “Face Jugs” will be raised in connection to authentic learning of hand/eye skills, reading a face, and knowing facial proportions. Art Classroom

NUMBER STORIES: MAKING MATH ENGAGING THROUGH THEATRE SEAN GLAZEBROOK

This experiential workshop will help transform your K-2 curriculum from STEM to STEAM learning using theatre! Explore how to use the theatrical strategies of characterization and guided improv to make your math standards approachable, engaging, and, most importantly, FUN for your students. As part of this workshop, create a guided improv story geared to your own classroom so you will be ready to begin integrating math and theatre immediately. Room 203

FILM AS LITERATURE: DISCUSSING AND WRITING ABOUT MOVIES ANALYTICALLY IN THE CLASSROOM ANDREW M. COOMES

This session is designed to showcase a Film as Literature course that Coomes created and currently teaches in a high school. Students begin to view film not only as entertainment, but as literature collaboratively created with a purpose. Students think, discuss, and write analytically about characters, point of view, setting, themes, symbolism, actors, soundtracks, and technical aspects of film. With a focus on the Common Core standards, the course utilizes a medium that has not only been around for over 100 years but is one with which students are familiar and willingly embrace. Room 216 24

TEACHING CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH ARCHITECTURE SUZANNE WEDEKIND

Participants will explore the use of video and related materials about the design process from the architect’s point of view. The project was funded through a national grant process and is sponsored by the East Tennessee Chapter of the AIA. It is available from a new website: aiathink.org. Architects will be workshop facilitators along with Suzanne Wedekind, an art teacher who frequently collaborates with architects in the classroom. Room 214

STEM LEARNING THROUGH THE ARTS RESEARCH LISA MUCI

STEM Learning through the Arts Research is a project funded by Young Audiences Arts for Learning, private corporations, and individual donors to assess student and teacher attitudes toward using the arts to teach STEM subjects and concepts. If you are searching for ideas on how to develop a research project using STEM and the arts, this session will offer insight on where to look for funding, what key elements to include in grant proposals, and how to carry out a plan once you’ve received funding. Room M052

INTEGRATING THE ARTS AND COMMON CORE INTO LESSON PLANNING ROBYNE BATSON/KARYNE BATSON

This Learning Forward workshop will showcase lessons at various grade levels that are well designed and meet Common Core objectives. Lesson plans can be designed to engage and impact challenging and meaningful learning. The thinking process to integrate Common Core and the arts into lessons will be examined. Strategies will be explored to simply revise your current lessons to effectively meet Common Core standards, along with ways to integrate the arts and evidence based questioning. Room 207

SHADOW PUPPETS IN THE 21ST CENTURY CLASSROOM KATHLEEN LYNAM

Students are mesmerized by shadows on a screen. This ancient art form directly supports any topic of study—dinosaurs, fractions, shapes, letters, etc. and engage all types of learners. The shadow puppets are easy to make, inexpensive, and silhouettes are available from numerous sources. In this tutorial, teachers will learn how to make and use shadow puppets, receive a free portable shadow screen, and explore immediate ways to use them in the classroom. Shadow puppetry is a way to provide your students with tangible 21st Century Skills: Communication, Collaboration, Critical Thinking, and Communication, and is supported by the Common Core Standards. Room 208

IDEA BUILD ADVENTURE LINDSEY BAILEY

In Idea Build Adventure, participants will learn how large-scale building projects can combine geometry, architecture, process, and collaboration to learn about art making, all while creating a safe-space for the students. Participants will work together to research ideas, sift through materials, and build a community structure that will be experienced by CREATE 2014 attendees. Participants attending this tutorial will receive a copy of “Deliciously Happy: Go Make Fun!” and a collection of lesson plans featuring easy-to-manage large scale projects on a low-scale budget. Room 222

CREATIVITY INFUSION TRAINING: A CLOSER LOOK AT TECHNIQUES AND STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING CREATIVITY ARTSAPS Join us in taking a closer look at Creativity Infusion through a variety of hands-on ex-

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periences, approaches, and perspectives. We provide an introduction to the cognitive science behind learning and creativity; provide a K-12 instructional matrix for developing a creative mindset in each art form (Dance, Music, Theatre and Art) and across subjects; look in-depth at specific creativity objectives; and share specific strategies and techniques for use in classrooms. We also offer ways that schools and districts can approach developing creativity. Come prepared to move, engage, and share! Room 202 5:00pm-5:30pm

Board Shuttles to Vine Middle School

THURSDAY

5:30pm-7:00pm Performance: Carpetbag Theatre Carpetbag Theatre’s mission is to give artistic voice to the issues and dreams of people who have been silenced by racism, classism, sexism, ageism, homophobia and other forms of oppression. CBT serves communities by returning their stories to them with honesty, dignity, and concern for the aesthetic of that particular community, helping culturally specific communities to re-define how they organize. 7:00pm Dinner on your own

Thursday, June 26th 8:00am-9:00am

Networking & Coffee with Roster Teaching Artists

9:00am-10:30 am

Arts Experiences

SIMPLICITY AND THE ART OF ASIAN INK PAINTING AND JAPANESE HAIKU ANNAMARIA GUNDLACH

Asian brush painting is a painting method that is simple and elegant and requires no art experience. Participants will use a sumi brush and ink to create simple ink paintings inspired by nature. Additionally, learn to compose Japanese Haiku poetry that is minimalistic, visual, and reflective of nature. This art experience brings out the artist and helps participants gain confidence in applying these activities in lesson plans that develop our understanding of other cultures. Relax, take a breath, and let the creative juices flow! Room 205

CLOTHING MEETS ELECTRICITY GERI FORKNER

If you are more interested in clothing than robots, this STEAM class will introduce you to the new world of electronic textiles. In this hands-on class, you will stitch an LED into a textile using conductive thread. You will be introduced to what’s possible in this rapidly expanding industry and learn a basic electric circuit, all without needing an engineering degree. However, you might inspire some students in that direction. Interested in programming? We will also discuss what is possible with arduino, lily pad, and raspberry pi—and see working examples. Room 202

STORYTELLING THROUGH CAVE PAINTING BAILEY EARITH

Students will learn how to create cave paintings as a way to tell visual and oral stories. This project removes the fear and pressure to draw well and frees students to concentrate on telling a story. This lesson can be easily expanded to include a history lesson on the peoples who actually created cave paintings. This lesson has been very successful with autistic students. Room 203 26

MARBLING ON FABRIC: MONOTYPE PRINTING OLIVE DURANT

Marbling is the means of transferring color surface design from bath to cloth or paper. Marbling frees up the drawer to new possibilities and to be spontaneous with line. The craft of marbling promotes active participation, collaboration and production. The participants will explore the math, science and engineering of monotype printing through surface tension, soap resistance and color relationships. Art Classroom

HABITATS: OUTSIDE THE BOX JOANN GUSTA

Are you stuck in a habitat box? If you use the standard box diorama every year, then this workshop is for you! We will explore other great habitat ideas you can use in the art class, as well as the regular classroom. You will have an opportunity to make and take a variety of habitats. Room 216

ART JOURNALING THROUGH BANKSY ALIGNED WITH CCSS ROBYNE BATSON/KAREN BATSON

Participants will experience an interactive arts integrated lesson in this session with hands-on activities and collaboration. Pieces from nature will be used to create your own work of art in the style of Andy Goldsworthy. CCSS reading skills will be applied to Goldsworthy’s masterpieces. Participants will practice the teaching methods of arts integration, close reading, thinking routines, and text-dependent questioning. Room 214

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE THROUGH THE ARTS: HANDS ON! SOPHIE LUCIDO JOHNSON

Participants will create visual arts works that allow them to demonstrate their emotions through abstract composition. They will create a Feelings Flag using the technique of collage, a multimedia emotions line in wax and water colors, and more. These projects are appropriate for all grade levels, and are meant to help students explore emotional vocabulary in order to deepen their social/ emotional literacy. Room 207

DANCE FOR LEARNING’S SAKE! ASHLEY MUSHAMBA

Kick it up a notch with your teaching! Teach your students to dance for learning’s sake! During this session participants use dance to explore, teach, measure, and assess student understanding of Tennessee Literature standards. We will use Verna Aardema’s, “Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears,” to make literature connections and create a mini-showcase which can be used as a performance assessment in your classroom. Come learn to dance, and dance to learn! Room D112

“STORY IN A MAGAZINE” GRAMMAR AND INTERACTIVE STORY THEATRE CHERRI COLEMAN

Who says grammar is boring? Not in this classroom! Inspired by magazine covers illustrated by Norman Rockwell, we will explore the technique of interactive story theatre. We will learn ways to bring adjectives, verbs, and adverbs to life with pantomime, interpret the artist’s work while using plot structure and create a three-dimensional, improvisational story theatre performance based on the artwork. Always a blast but seldom predictable, this method was originally devised for the Frist Center for the Visual Arts’ Artful Tales program and engages all styles of learning. Lesson plans, connections to curriculum, and expansions to the program are included with the workshop. Come dressed to move and prepared to have fun. Room D113 27

TRADITIONAL DANCE OF GHANA, WEST AFRICA REBEKAH AND KOFI MAWUKO

We will use our voices and bodies to make accompanying rhythms as we learn the language of the drums. This session provides an intriguing and mesmerizing way to develop mental and physical skills. The historical context of the dance and its implications on today’s society are examined. Participants should dress appropriately for exercise. Room G012

TENNESSEE’S MUSICAL LEGACY SEAN MCCOLLOUGH

Rock ‘n Roll was born out of the south. It was born out of a mixture of black and white musical styles. Rock music has a lot to teach us about our history and culture. Tennessee plays prominently into the story of rock, as does the Civil Rights Movement. In this session you will learn some of rock’s history along with ways to connect it to both state curriculum standards, and to contemporary issues that kids care about. Room 222

TAPPING INTO INTERNATIONAL TEACHING LINDSEY BAILEY

Teaching overseas is about sharing information: both with the students and teachers who Lindsey works with in Singapore and with the students and teachers Lindsey works with in the States. In Tapping Into International Teaching, Lindsey gives a brief overview of her experience working at Stamford American International School and engages the participants in two art making projects from lessons she created for her students based on local customs and traditions of various neighborhoods in Singapore. Participants attending this tutorial will receive a copy of “Deliciously Happy: Go Make Fun!” and a collection of lesson plans from her first year teaching at Stamford American International School. Room 208 10:45-11:45 - Workshops/Lesson Demos

PHUNKY PHONEMIC PHONIC AWARENESS KIMBERLY MATIBAG

Learn an arts integration of dance and theater with phonemic awareness and phonics instruction through a vocal and movement warm-up that can be personalized for the teacher’s teaching style. This covers short and long vowels with vowel teams, digraphs, and blends. Have fun making sounds with your body! Room D112

CRAFTING LIGHT GERI FORKNER

Add electricity to art and craft paper projects you are already doing in your classroom. Using copper foil tape, create a simple electrical circuit to light up a greeting card or picture with LEDs. No soldering or engineering experience required. Room 202

DEVELOPING STORY IDEAS BY USING CRITICAL RESPONSE PROTOCOL BAILEY EARITH

Critical Response Protocol is a wonderful method for helping students write creative stories based on a character. Students will learn to analyze a character (picture or sculpture) using critical response protocol statements to develop story ideas. This process has been very successful in the special education classroom. Room 203 28

BREAKING DOWN “WE DIDN’T START THE FIRE” BOB ADAMCIK

This session will help teachers plan a curriculum for breaking down and explaining Billy Joel’s, “We Didn’t Start the Fire.” This session includes demonstrating helpful websites for research, using technology through powerpoint or keynote presentations with a smart board, integrating research and writing skills, and helping students to prepare for public speaking. This fits in with literacy and social studies goals. Room 216

MUSIC IN THE PRIMARY GRADES’ CLASSROOM AND MUSIC ROOM BRITINEY FIFE/CARLY EGAN

Are you an elementary music educator who would love some ideas for your youngest students? Are you an early childhood educator who would love to do more than just sing calendar songs for music time? Then this session is for you! Come hear some ideas from a music teacher and a kindergarten teacher on how young children can grow and thrive in a music rich classroom. Participants will leave with at least two complete lesson plans and several lesson starters to use in their instruction. Room 222

GET INTO CHARACTER WITH SCULPTURE WHITNEY HOVATER

Get into Character with sculpture! In this lesson demo you will be working in small groups to look, with great detail, at well-known children’s book characters. With your groups you will discuss and create character webs of a particular character’s traits and how their traits changed throughout the story (RL.2.3). Then, you will create a sculpture using Crayola’s Model Magic. Your sculpture will be done in small detailed increments using sculpting methods to create color, texture, and layering—ending with remarkable likeness to the character you are sculpting, and the traits that describe them. Each participant will leave with a sculpture as the center of his or her character traits web. Crayola Model Magic will be provided, as well as tools and coloring technics. Come and enjoy looking deep into physicality and personality character traits with sculpting! Room 207

BIOMEDICAL MUSIC STRATEGIES MARTHA SUMMA-CHADWICK

Biomedical music techniques (developed at Colorado State University’s Center for Biomedical Research in Music) can be utilized very effectively in the classroom or at home for persons with special needs. This didactic session will present an overview of how music is perceived in the brain, followed by an explanation of techniques that can be used to help persons with Autism, ADHD, Cerebral Palsy, or other afflictions resulting in motor, speech, or cognition problems. Therapists, educators, musicians, and parents will benefit from seeing video examples of work with children and experiencing interactive exercises throughout the presentation. Room G012

WHEN HISTORY AND ART COLLIDE ROBIN GARNER/ROBYNE BATSON

When history and the arts collide, students are challenged to learn. Students will focus on the literature piece called, “What Are Presidents Make Of” while making connections to visual arts and history. Participants will use trinkets and supplies provided to create a president while citing evidence from the written text. Students will evaluate their work and collaborate together while using thinking routines. Room 214

GRAPHIC STORYTELLING WITH MR. OLLIE TIM OLIPHANT

This program demonstrates how artwork can fit with the stories your students write to form the basics of a graphic novel. The formats may be a storybook illustration or something more complex by adding panels, word balloons, and sequential storytelling

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in the form of drawings. We’ll explore the techniques of thumbnail sketches,  rough drafts, page layout, and to finished illustrations. These will be professional methods as used by big-time comic book and graphic novel artists and writers. Room 208

COMPOUND WORDS “LITERALLY” KAREN BROWN

In this lesson students will explore compound words and then illustrate a chosen word’s “literal” meaning. For example: butterfly – this would possibly be a picture of a stick of butter flying. The class will also discuss how this “literal” definition differs from the actual definition. Room 205

STORYTELLING: TEACHING CRITICAL INFERENCE THROUGH CHARACTER MOTIVATION SHERRY NORFOLK

Storytelling can teach by inviting students to think for themselves and to create their own truths. This interactive upper elementary lesson plan will demonstrate an effective and engaging storytelling strategy that encourages kids to make their own interpretations of stories, defend them with evidence, and describe how events in a story look from different characters’ perspectives. In the process, students collaborate, communicate, think critically, and respond creatively – a 21st Century Grand Slam! Room D113

COMMUNITY ARTS: A CATALYST FOR POSITIVE CHANGE CHERRI COLEMAN

For generations people of many cultures have gathered to weave, to spin, to sew and carve. With their hands busy but their minds free they conversed, sharing their history, values, and beliefs. In this workshop, we will explore how Community Arts programs can be a catalyst to unite modern communities, encourage inclusion and sensitivity, and revive the lost art of communication. We will explore the model through multiple mediums, learn to draw out communication with storytelling techniques and investigate how the arts can build lasting relationships between individuals, organizations, and the community. Room 221

ART HISTORY: FUN AND MEANING IN MIDDLE SCHOOL JAYNE HUTCHINS/FRANK JUAN

This workshop will be using mini-studio projects within a middle school Art History curriculum. A collection using images of paintings, sculptures, architecture, and monuments will serve as authentic texts of import and history. This balance of art production and historical contexts provides the student with expanded context of history, cultures, and the world via the visual arts. Room M052 11:45-12:15 - Load Shuttles to Café 4 12:15-2:00 - Lunch & Teaching Artist Showcase 2:00-2:30 - Board Shuttles to Community Arts Partners 2:30-4:30 - Arts Experiences at Community Arts Partners Knoxville Opera – Session will take place at the Emporium. Tennessee Children’s Dance Ensemble – Session will take place at the Emporium. Knoxville Symphony Orchestra – Session will take place at the Emporium. Knoxville Museum of Art – Session will take place at the Knoxville Museum of Art. Joy of Music – Session will take place at Joy of Music at 1209 Euclid Ave. NW. 30

4:30 - Shuttles depart back to L & N STEM Academy & Hotel

KEYNOTE PRESENTER DR. DAVID A. SOUSA

Dr. David A. Sousa is an international consultant in educational neuroscience and author of 16 books that suggest ways educators and parents can translate current brain research into strategies for improving learning. A member of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, he has conducted workshops in hundreds of school districts on brain research, instructional skills, and science education at the Pre-K to 12 and university levels. He has made presentations to more than 200,000 educators at national conventions of educational organizations and to regional and local school districts across the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and Asia. Dr. Sousa has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts, a Master of Arts in Teaching degree in science from Harvard University, and a doctorate from Rutgers University. His teaching experience covers all levels. He has taught senior high school science, served as a K-12 director of science, a supervisor of instruction, and a district superintendent in New Jersey schools. He was an adjunct professor of education at Seton Hall University for 10 years and a visiting lecturer at Rutgers University. Prior to his career in New Jersey, Dr. Sousa taught at the American School of Paris (France), and served for five years as a Foreign Service Officer and science advisor at the USA diplomatic missions in Geneva (Switzerland) and Vienna (Austria). Dr. Sousa has edited science books and published dozens of articles in leading journals on staff development, science education, and educational research. His most popular books for educators include: How the Brain Learns, now in its fourth edition; How the Special Needs Brain Learns, second edition; How the Gifted Brain Learns; How the Brain Learns to Read; How the Brain Influences Behavior; How the ELL Brain Learns; Differentiation and the Brain (with Carol Tomlinson) and How the Brain Learns Mathematics, which was selected by the Independent Publishers’ Association as one of the best professional development books of 2008. The Leadership Brain suggests ways for educators to lead today’s schools more effectively. His books have been published in French, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Korean, Russian, and several other languages. His latest book, Brainwork: The Neuroscience of How We Lead Others, is written for business and organizational leaders. Dr. Sousa has served as past president of the National Staff Development Council (now called Learning Forward). He has received numerous awards from professional associations, school districts, and educational foundations for his commitment to research, staff development, and science education. He received the Distinguished Alumni Award and an honorary doctorate from Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts, and an honorary doctorate in humane letters from Gratz College in Philadelphia. Dr. Sousa has been interviewed by Matt Lauer on the NBC Today Show, by other television programs, and by National Public Radio about his work with schools using brain research. He makes his home in south Florida.

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MINDBENDERS SERIES PRESENTERS DR. LODGE MCCAMMON

Dr. Lodge McCammon is an educational pioneer. His career began in 2003 at Wakefield High School where he taught Civics and AP Economics. McCammon received a Ph.D. from NC State University in 2008 and continued his work by developing innovative practices and sharing them with students, teachers, and schools across the world. McCammon is a musician who spends much of his time in the recording studio composing curriculum-based music. His songs and related materials can be found in Discovery Education Streaming. He is also an education consultant who provides professional services: keynote speeches, presentations, curriculum development, and a variety of training programs.

CREATIVITY INFUSION TEAM

The Creativity Infusion Team is comprised of: Raymond Veon, Assistant Dean for Arts Education at Utah State University; Dr. Adriana Van Rensburg, Author and Music Educator; Barry Stewart Mann, Actor and Story Teller; Tiffany Mingo, Movement and Dance Educator; and Jeff Mather, Site-Specific Sculptor and Community-Based Teaching Artist. Together, through a U.S. Department of Education Grant, they developed the Creativity Infusion Framework, a school-based, K-12 model for developing creative mindsets in our students. Each member of the team is a practicing artist and an award-winning educator with extensive experience in delivering outstanding arts education and professional development across diverse cultural and geographic settings. They help organizations, schools, and districts across the country to adopt and implement practices for nurturing, developing, and sustaining creativity in young people.

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PRESENTERS BOB ADAMCIK

Bob Adamcik teaches general music at Gresham Middle School in Knoxville, and performs as the Principal Timpanist and Co-Principal Percussionist with the Knoxville Symphony. He has performed with the Dallas and Ft. Worth Symphony Orchestras. He grew up in Texas and attended the University of North Texas, where he received a Bachelor’s of Music (Education) degree and a Master’s degree in Percussion Performance. In his spare time, Bob enjoys reading, biking, and hiking.

TARYN ANDERSON

Taryn Anderson has a bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education from The University of Memphis. She has been teaching at The Covington Integrated Arts Academy for 5 years. She taught first grade for 3 years and now has been teaching Kindergarten for two years. This year she presented at Harvard’s Project Zero Conference in Memphis, Tennessee. She believes that Arts Integration is the true way to teach a student. Let’s make them love learning and thinking!!!

LINDSEY BAILEY

Lindsey Bailey is an artist, born and raised in Texas. She graduated in 2008 from The University of Texas at Austin, receiving a B.F.A. in studio art; and graduated in 2010 with a Master of Arts in Community Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art. As an artist, she develops a dialogue with youth about issues they are facing. These conversations frequently bring up questions she is exploring in her own work, sparking new ideas. This continuing dialogue becomes the content of finished artwork. Ms. Bailey’s work has appeared in numerous exhibitions in the United States and Southeast Asia. Ms. Bailey is currently teaching art in Singapore at Stamford American International School during the fall and spring, and is working towards a second master’s degree in Studio Art from the Maryland Institute College of Art.

KARLA BANKS

Karla Banks is a special education teacher at Mooreland Heights in Knoxville, TN.  For the last 10 years, she has taught a self-contained class for students with a variety of abilities.  During that time, Karla has served as an Arts360 Mentor to four elementary schools in Knox County.  She has also earned several teaching awards, including the Value Plus Schools Molly Pratt Spirit Award in 2009.  When she isn’t teaching, she loves spending time with her husband and two daughters.​

ROBIN GARNER

Robin Garner is a mom, grandmother, and third grade teacher who loves integrating art into education! She is currently teaching third grade English Language Arts and Science at Covington Integrated Arts Academy. She has a difficult time deciding which of her passions is stronger: education, children, or the arts. That is why teaching at C.I.A.A. is such an incredible fit!

ROBYNE BATSON, ED.D

Robyne Batson, Ed.D is a professional educator holding a Doctorate in Educational Leadership and Administration with a dissertation on Autism and Arts Integration. She has been involved in education since 1983 and is presently a classroom teacher and building level mentor of curriculum, instruction, and arts integration. Robyne is a level 5 teacher and includes the Common Core and arts integration in her daily lessons. Robyne has been a guest speaker at the Tennessee Governor’s Conference as well as the featured speaker at professional development trainings. Robyne is a Learning Curve Consultant, Arts Integration Specialist, and Artist in Residency for the Tennessee Arts Commission.

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KARYNE BATSON

Karyne Batson is a professional educator with experience in the art classroom, the regular classroom, and internationally. She currently loves the new emphasis in education on research-based strategies for the teaching of language arts. She teaches first grade in Covington, Tennessee.

DR. ERIC BRANSCOME

Dr. Eric Branscome is Assistant Professor of Music and Coordinator of Music Education at Austin Peay State University. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music education, and supervises music student teachers. Dr. Branscome also directs Camp Granada, APSU’s elementary music summer day camp. He is the author of Music Career Advising: A Guide for Students, Parents, and Teachers (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers), Essential Listening Activities, Essential Rhythm Activities, and Music Board Game Workshop(Alfred Publications). His other publications and research interests include elementary curriculum development, music teacher education, and music career advising.

HOLLY BRIGGS

Holly Briggs has spent 10 years teaching Art in the classroom, with the past 8 years as the Visual Arts teacher at Mooreland Heights Elementary School, in Knoxville, Tennessee. Ms. Briggs emphasizes and highlights the importance of an integrated curriculum, combining art and the core curricular subjects. Tennessee Arts Commission presented Ms. Briggs with the Master Teacher Award through the Value Plus Program. In 2010, Ms. Briggs was recognized by the Knoxville News Sentinel Reader’s Poll as East Tennessee’s Best Artist. Ms. Briggs was featured in a 2013 Metro Pulse article as “People You Should Know, Holly Briggs: Knoxville’s Artistic Educator.” Ms. Briggs’ hobbies include, among many things, playing and teaching guitar, collecting intangible items, perusing reference materials, rock skipping, exploring, creating, debating, and the art of conversation.

KAREN BROWN

Karen Brown has received awards for her teaching and artwork. Although she is known primarily for her jewelry designs, she additionally enjoys incorporating drawing and multimedia techniques. Karen holds a BFA, a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction grades 1-8, and her Art Education Certification K-12. She was a classroom teacher for over 11 years; however, since 2003 she has taught Art for Knox County. Additionally, she teaches adult non-credit and children’s art classes at Pellissippi State Community College. Her artwork has been displayed in various local galleries and shows. She has also created various works on commission for individuals and companies.

NANCY S. CAMPBELL

Teaching Artist, Nancy S. Campbell, works successfully with schools and community organizations across Tennessee. She adeptly designs programs for students of all ages and abilities in a wide variety of visual arts media. Recent school programs include introductory painting, portrait painting, printmaking, and architecture. She conducts teacher workshops (including all Create arts integration conferences and the Tennessee Art Education Association) and frequently serves as a juror and peer reviewer. A museum educator for the Knoxville Museum of Art, Campbell is on the Teaching Artist Roster of the Tennessee Arts Commission. She is trained in arts integration and Common Core.

LINDSEY COHN

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Lindsey Cohn just got married in November to a wonderful Knoxville native. She is originally from Roanoke, VA and came to Knoxville to attend Johnson Bible College where she got her degree in Early Childhood Education. Lindsey has been teaching 1st grade at Mooreland Heights for 6 years.

CHERRI COLEMAN

Cherri Coleman is a Teaching Artist of dance, theatre, storytelling, and heritage arts. Graduates of her student-led performing arts programs have gone on to Broadway, international tours, careers in stagecraft and graphic arts, video, music and film. A native Tennessean, Cherri also keeps alive local traditions of storytelling, white oak and cane basketry, training the next generation of heritage art enthusiasts. Her current endeavor, “Celebrating Our Roots©” partners with the National Storytelling Network and local historic sites to train high school and middle school students in leadership, community building and historic preservation.

ANDREW COOMES

Andrew Coomes received his B.A. in English and Allied Language Arts at Western Kentucky University (2002). He earned his M.A. in English at Middle Tennessee State University (2004), where he wrote his thesis on the films of Kevin Smith. His work has been published in The Pop Culture Zone: Writing Critically about Popular Culture (Cengage Learning, 2014), Movies, Music, and More: Advancing Popular Culture in the Writing Classroom (Fountainhead Press, 2010), and COMPbiblio: Leaders and Influences in Composition Theory and Practice (Fountainhead Press, 2007). He currently teaches English IV AP and Film as Literature at Riverdale High School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

LIBBY DAWSON

Libby Dawson is a 5th grade teacher at Mooreland Heights Elementary in Knoxville, TN. After working in marketing research, she earned a Masters of Education from the University of Tennessee. She has been a classroom teacher at Mooreland Heights for six years. Her strong interest in art integration leads her to teach at Mooreland Heights, a Value Plus School. From 2010 - present, she has served as an Arts360° mentor to other elementary schools in Knox County. Libby was certified as an Arts Integration Specialist in 2011. She continues to grow as an art integration teacher, and strives to continue to find new ways to bring creativity and incorporate technology into the classroom using the arts.

RACHEL HUTSON

Rachel Hutson is a 5th grade teacher at Mooreland Heights Elementary in Knoxville, TN. Rachel graduated with a Master’s degree in Holistic Education from Johnson University. She has been teaching at Mooreland Heights for 6 years. She was voted as Mooreland Heights’ Teacher of the Year for 2012-2013, and was instrumental in writing a grant for the school’s technology grant in 2013-2014. Through her time there she has enjoyed the opportunities that she has been given to learn and watch her students grow through the school’s emphasis on art and technology integration.

OLIVE BALLARD DURANT

Olive Ballard Durant, better known as “Lolly” is an East Tennessean Folk Artisan who juggles her responsibilities as a professional teaching artist with her creative time in her “Down & Under Studios” on Signal Mountain, Tennessee. Lolly received her B.A. degree in Studio Art/ Education from Converse College for Women in Spartanburg, South Carolina and her M.A. degree in Studio Art/ Education from New York University in New York City, New York. She received special training in magnet school curriculum and instruction as a full-time art educator and instructor in the Hamilton County School System.

BAILEY EARITH

Bailey Earith is a mixed media fiber artist and teaching artist in Knoxville, TN. Using her Occupational Therapy skills, she specializes in teaching academics through art to children with disabilities.  She has art work in collections around the world. She has been published extensively in magazines and books for her innovative work in the studio and as an artist-in-residence.  She is proud to be a VSA and TAC artist roster

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member and is associated with the Renaissance Center and the Knoxville Arts & Culture Alliance. Most recently, she has been invited to help improve the special education program in Russia. 

KELLY FARR

Kelly Farr is a 5th grade teacher at Mt. Olive Elementary School in Knoxville, TN. He is a lead teacher and our Arts360 coordinator. Mt. Olive Elementary School has been an arts integrated school for four years and has seen outstanding results from the program. This will be Kelly’s fourth year presenting at Create.

CARLY EGAN

Carly Egan has been the music teacher at Mooreland Heights Elementary School in Knoxville, TN for the past five years. She earned her bachelor’s in music education from Carson-Newman College and her Masters in Music Education from The University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Ms. Egan has most recently been a mentor teacher in the Arts360 initiative in Knoxville.

BRITINEY FIFE

Britiney Fife is a kindergarten teacher at Mooreland Heights Elementary School in Knoxville, TN. She has enjoyed teaching with the arts for the past seven years in the Value Plus program. Britiney has a master’s degree in Holistic Education from Johnson University. She enjoys finding new and innovative ways to teach the arts in an early childhood setting.

GERI FORKNER

Geri Forkner creates felted and woven works of art from her studio in East Tennessee. She teaches fiber arts internationally to both children and adults. Her award winning art works have been displayed internationally and are in museum collections in New York, Atlanta, GA, and at the West Point Military Academy. Geri is a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild. She uses her knowledge of the traditional crafts to push their boundaries in new and innovative ways. Find out more at: www.weavingschool.wordpress.com

SEAN GLAZEBROOK

Sean Glazebrook, an Arts Coach for KID smART, facilitates arts integration workshops for classroom teachers in New Orleans, the Gulf South region, and nationally. He coaches and supports KID smART teaching artists and serves as artist-in-residence at McDonough City Park Academy. He coordinates the KID smART-directed ICI Initiative statewide. Sean is also Education Director for The NOLA Project, a New Orleans-based theatre company focused on producing original work and engaging new audiences. He holds a BFA in Theatre and History from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and a certificate in Shakespeare in Performance from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He has completed the Kennedy Center’s Artists as Educators track.

SOPHIE LUCIDO JOHNSON 

Sophie Lucido Johnson worked for five years as a special education teacher in New Orleans public schools, with an emphasis on students with emotional and behavioral challenges. Sophie is the editor-in-chief of the literary magazine Neutrons Protons, and is a frequently published writer with an emphasis in creative nonfiction. She is also a touring comedian and producer, and performs at The New Movement Comedy Theater in New Orleans. Sophie is working with KID smART to develop an arts integrated Emotional Literacy Curriculum in a residency at Andrew Wilson and an AXIS Small Learning Group. She majored in English at Whitman College with a minor in Book Arts.  36

DAVID GRANT

David Grant has been teaching for 10 years. Two of those years have been at an Arts360 school in Knoxville, Tennessee.  He’s had other teaching experiences in the beautiful artistic city of Asheville, NC and in Fremont, Ohio.  David has always made it a goal to integrate other subject areas into art. 

ANNAMARIA GUNDLACH

Annamaria Gundlach is a professional clay sculptor, an outreach artist with the Knoxville Museum of Art, and an instructor at the Knoxville Fine Arts & Crafts Center. She teaches clay sculpture and art to adults and children. She is an arts integration teaching artist and believes art facilitates learning because it engages all the senses through creative hands-on activities that encourage self-expression, confidence, and a meaningful understanding of core subjects. She tailors lesson plans to achieve the teacher’s objectives while encouraging everyone to find their inner artist. She has received numerous Tennessee Arts Commission Artist Residency grants. She also received Professional Development grants to study in the United States and Italy. Thousands of students have experienced the joy of creating and learning with her.

JOANN GUSTA

JoAnn Gusta is currently a teacher at Green Magnet Academy in Knoxville, Tennessee. Green is a STEAM school and JoAnn is the Arts Integration coordinator, as well as the Art Teacher, for K – 5th grades. JoAnn has over 18 years of teaching experience in PK-12 Art Education in four states. She holds a BS in Art Education from the University of Dayton and a MS in Education was completed at SUNY Cortland.  JoAnn has taught using Arts Integration as goal since 1996, with her master’s thesis on integrating reading and art.  She received the Green Magnet Teacher of the Year Award.

DANA HARRELL

Dana Harrell is in her 13th year of teaching chorus. She is currently the chorus teacher at West Jackson Middle School in Jefferson, GA. She previously taught chorus and drama in both middle and high school. Dana also teaches private piano and guitar at The Georgia School of Music in Jefferson. She is the mother of four adult children, and the grandmother of three perfect grandchildren! Dana’s undergraduate degree is in Music Education and Music Therapy from Ohio University. She also holds a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction, Integrating the Arts across the Curriculum, from Lesley University.

HANNAH LOUDERBACK, AMANDA SMALL, AND MONICA HAYES Hannah Louderback, Amanda Small, and Monica Hayes are all 4th grade teachers at Mooreland Heights Elementary. They have been working with arts integrated schools for a collective total of 7 years at various schools in Knox County in both primary and intermediate grade levels. Their aim is to intentionally reach urban and rural students. They have found that using an integrated approach of technology and the arts more effectively engages students.

DR. JEAN HEISE

Dr. Jean Heise is in her third year as the Humanities Supervisor for Knox County Schools.  She is also the K-12 PE, Health and Wellness Specialist for the district.  She received her undergraduate education at Ball State University, master’s degrees from University of Central Oklahoma and from East Tennessee State University and her Doctorate in Educational Administration from Oklahoma State University.  Dr. Heise was an elementary teacher in Oklahoma City Schools for eight years and a student teaching coordinator at Chicago State University for two years.  She has been an assistant principal for 4 years and a principal for 9 years.  She was also the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship and taught in England for one year.   37

TONY HENSON

Tony Henson grew up north of Nashville, TN. Tony obtained his B.A. from Western Kentucky University and M.F.A. in painting. Art has been the only constant in his life and he found a positive way to escape and create a world with his emotions. While pursuing a full time career as a painter, he also teaches at Walters State and VA Highlands. His colorful and expressive abstract work provides a sense of immersion for the viewer. Tony’s inspiration and influence can be found in nature, music, and his love for color. www.tonyhensonart.com

WHITNEY HOVATER

Whitney Hovater has been teaching for four years through arts integration. Whitney has taught second grade for three years at Mooreland Heights Elementary an arts integrated, Value Plus, and more recently a 1:1 technology school in Knoxville, TN. She serves as an Arts 360 mentor to four elementary schools in Knox County, as well as training new teachers to implement the arts. She believes in creatively integrating the arts to help students of a lower demographic embrace art and connect it to their learning.    ​

HEATHER HUGHES

Heather Hughes is a TPaCK (Technology, Pedagogy, and Content Knowledge) Instructional Coach at Mooreland Heights Elementary, a Tech 1:1 school in Knoxville. She has been an Instructional Coach for 4 years and spent 12 years teaching with Hamilton County Schools in Chattanooga. She earned her Bachelor of Science and Master of Education from East Tennessee State University. Heather has over 15 years of theatre experience involving acting, set construction, and backstage work. Some of her previous workshops or professional developments include Elementary Centers, Small Group Reading Instruction, Classroom Management, Differentiation, Student Creations with Technology, and Drama with Young Children.

JAYNE HUTCHINS

Jayne Hutchins has a background in painting, and an eclectic appreciation for many different types of artworks. She has been teaching middle school art in Knox County since 2005, and has served as a Knox County Professional Development Specialist for Secondary Art Education this year. Jayne has spent the last few years searching out and developing new ways to incorporate career readiness and connections to “real world” relevancy into the every day middle school art experience, and is very excited with the results of these ventures within the culture of her diverse classes.

FRANK JUAN

Frank Juan received his BFA degree from the University of Tampa, 1972. Completed certification and additional graduate level work at USF, 1974. He served as a high school teacher in the Florida schools for 3 years then worked in the Federal Government for 30 years for Social Security Administration and Department of Energy, retiring in 2003. He then served as PR Manager for Tellico Village for 3 years. Mr. Juan has taught art in Knox County since 2008. According to Juan, “I’ve done a lot of different things in my past. However, I could never stray too far from teaching art. It is my passion. Now, it seems I’ve come full circle again.”

DEE KIMBRELL

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A member of the National Storytelling Association since 1999, Dee has been a story teller and workshop facilitator for over 25 years. She has been on the Tennessee Artist Roster since 2004 performing in libraries and schools across the state. Dee is also a certified Processology Practitioner, which means she specializes in the process of thoughts and feelings, learning strategies and the fine points of learning in all age categories. Dee is the founder of Creative Genius In YOU, an educational consulting and professional development company for those who desire to bring more collaboration, creativity and play into the learning process.

KATHLEEN LYNAM

Kathleen Lynam is a national and international puppeteer and teaching artist. Her national affiliations include, Wolf Trap Early Learning Through the Arts and the John F. Kennedy Center’s Professional Development for Teachers program. Workshops for teachers and librarians are available that include exploration of character, voice, movement, and easy-to-make, unique puppets that will help your students to focus and learn. As an approved artist with the TN Arts Commission, classroom residencies are offered to students K-6 based upon literacy and STEM connections and aligned with educational standards. She was awarded the Outstanding Artist-Residence in 2008 by the TN Arts Commission.

KIMBERLY MATIBAG

Kimberly Matibag is a theatrical dance choreographer and educator who loves words, movement, and the combination of arts and academics. In Knoxville, Tennessee, she founded Circle Modern Dance with Mark Lamb. This company explored mixed-ability dance, educational outreach, and choreography with diverse populations. She has been an educator in the public school system with elementary, middle, and high school as well as a master teacher for adults. Her workshop will leave you dancing and sounding out vowel teams with immediate tools to liven up your phonological and orthographical processors!

KOFI AND REBEKAH MAWUKO

Kofi and Rebekah Mawuko deliver the Culture of Ghana in a high energy, educational show of music, singing, dancing, and storytelling that is appropriate for all people. The Mawukos’ Keep the Heritage Alive motto has granted them the opportunity to perform together and individually before audiences around the East and Southeast USA, specializing in educational entertainment for K-12 schools and colleges. www. africandancechattanooga.com

SEAN MCCOLLOUGH

Sean McCollough is a multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter. He is also a teacher, a bandleader, a record producer, a sound engineer, a radio host for Kidstuff on WDVX, and a national Parents’ Choice award winner. His musical endeavors take him in many directions. He performs for young audiences both solo and with his Kidstuff Band. He plays regularly with Americana acts The Lonetones and Kevin Abernathy. He also presents workshops and does residencies in schools, gives lectures at museums and conferences, and teaches musicology at the University of Tennessee. 

JOEL BAXLEY

Joel Baxley, Director of Visual Art Education at the Southeast Center for Education in the Arts at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, has worked as an artist and a teacher in a variety of settings. He has created commercial art and design for print and electronic media, designs for stage productions, and works of fine art for show and commission. He has taught children and adults, including experiences as an art specialist, a college instructor, and a teaching administrator. He has presented on visual art and arts integration nationally, including the Annenberg Connecting with the Arts workshop series.

LAURIE MELNIK

Laurie Melnik, Interim Executive Director and Director of Theatre Education at the Southeast Center for Education in the Arts at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, cultivates multi-organizational collaborations for the purpose of strengthening arts teaching and learning in a variety of school and community settings. She is a member of the American Alliance for Theatre and Education where she also serves on their Board of Directors. She has an M.F.A in Theatre with a concentration in Theatre for Young Audiences from the University of Central Florida and an M.P.A. in Nonprofit Management from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

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LISA MUCI

Lisa Muci is a specialist in integrating the arts with STEM and the Common Core.  She is a member of the Young Audiences National Arts in Education Leadership Institute, Regional Director of Kansas Wolf Trap and Program Director of Arts Partners, Inc.  Her experiences with arts integration began in the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, where her string quartet presented programs integrating music with social studies, language arts, history, and math.  A participant in the Tennessee Arts Commission’s Arts360/Artful Teaching & Learning initiative based on Harvard University’s Project Zero, Muci has presented numerous workshops guiding teachers and teaching artists to gain confidence in integrating STEM and the arts.

ASHLEY MUSHAMBA

Ashley Mushamba is the founder/executive director of “Dancing Through the Curriculum,” which is a non-profit organization that uses dance to teach “Common Core” state standards. In addition, she works as a “Project-Based Learning” coach at Park Avenue Elementary, located in Nashville, Tennessee. Prior to the previously mentioned positions, she worked as an elementary classroom teacher, dance instructor, and performance director for over 5 years. Ashley has always had a love for dance and teaching children. She began taking technique classes at the age of five, and continued to dance throughout high school and college at Fisk University. Afterwards, she obtained her MAT in Elementary Education from Trevecca Nazarene University.  Ashley feels as if her dance experience has contributed to her academic, emotional, and physical well-being. 

SHERRY NORFOLK

Sherry Norfolk is an award-winning, internationally acclaimed storyteller, author, and teaching artist. Co-author of The Virginia Giant: The True Story of Peter Francisco, Literacy Development in the Storytelling Classroom, The Storytelling Classroom: Applications Across the Curriculum, and Social Studies in the Storytelling Classroom, she is a leading authority on integrating learning through storytelling. She also co-authored The Moral of the Story: Folktales for Character Development and six picture books. Sherry received the National Storytelling Network Oracle Award for Distinguished National Service, and is Adjunct Professor at Lesley University.

TIM OLIPHANT

Award winning cartoonist/illustrator/teaching artist, Mr. Ollie has worked professionally since 1983 having been published in many national magazines, advertising agencies, greeting card companies, and other media. His graphic storytelling illustration work has appeared in educational magazines such as Odyssey, Appleseeds, and Calliope. Mr. Ollie became a teaching artist in 1987 through the Tennessee Arts Commission and has since worked in all the states surrounding Tennessee facilitating workshops and artist residencies. Mr. Ollie is a recipient of the School Bell Award from the Tenn. Education Association and Outstanding Artist in Residence from the Tennessee Arts Commission. He lives in Lewisburg, TN.

ETHAN PIGNATARO

Ethan Pignataro teaches art at New Hopewell Elementary School, an Arts 360 school in Knoxville. He graduated with his master’s degree in Teacher Education from UTK in spring of 2012 and earned a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from Georgia Southern University in 2005, concentrating in printmaking and photography. He has taken part in a number of solo and group shows and has had a variety of professional experiences as a graphic designer, commercial screen printer, gallery manager, and educator. With his background comes a knowledge, understanding and appreciation of art techniques both traditional and modern.

CINDY PRIDE 40

Cindy Pride is the Kids on Stage Coordinator at Mt. Pleasant Middle School of the Visual and Performing Arts. Mrs. Pride received her Bachelor of Music degree from

Tennessee Tech University and Master of Education from Tennessee State University. She has seventeen years of experience in Fine Arts education and currently leads a successful school wide Arts Integration Program. Mrs. Pride specializes in connecting student learning in Reading and the Arts to the student’s environment. She and Reading teacher, Brenda Stutts, have developed multiple lessons covering fiction, non-fiction and science fiction utilizing Drama, Visual Art, Dance, and Music.

STEPHANIE PRUITT

Stephanie Pruitt is a poet and aha moment maker. She has taught creative writing and arts education at Vanderbilt University along with workshops and residencies in over one hundred K-12 and community settings. Curricular connections between poetry and economics, history, math, engineering, and science rock her world! Stephanie specializes in professional development for educators, artrepreneurship, and project based learning. In addition to publishing work in numerous magazines, journals, and anthologies, the Nashville native collaborates with visual artists and creative organizations to publish poetry as public art installations and community experiences. She curates a popular reading series called Poems & Pancakes. More information at www. StephaniePruitt.com

TINA RADTKE

Tina Radtke is the Arts Education Director for KingsportARTS in Kingsport, TN. Tina holds a B.S. in theatre and fine arts and M. Ed. from Milligan College. In addition to creating arts education workshops and summer camps for ages 18 months to 18 years, she created and currently teaches a Kindergarten Readiness Program (through the arts) and inservices on Arts and the Common Core for local school systems. She has several years of grant writing experience and has served on Tennessee Arts Commission’s grant panel.

RAQUEL ROY

Raquel Roy has taught at Art at Maryville High School for 8 years and Art Methods at Carson-Newman University for 7 years. She grew up in Puebla, Mexico, where her parents we missionaries for 32 years, and attended an The American School of Puebla with students from all around the world. This upbringing has greatly influenced her passion for teaching multicultural art in her classroom and including her students in service learning projects yearly. She has a BA in Painting from Carson Newman and an MS in Art Education from Florida State University. 

AMBER SAWYER

Amber Sawyer earned her undergraduate degree in Interdisciplinary Studies and her master’s degree in Holistic Education from Johnson University. She has taught first grade at Mooreland Heights Elementary in Knox County Schools for 5 years.  She was named Teacher of the Year for her school in 2014.  In addition to integrating the arts, Amber also routinely incorporates technology into her one to one classroom. Amber is part of the team leading and supporting the staff through our recent technology deployment. 

BRANDI SELF

Brandi Self earned her undergraduate degree in elementary education from Maryville College and her EA&S in Educational Administration from Lincoln Memorial University.  She was an intermediate teacher with Knox Co. Schools for 12 years, earning several teaching excellence awards.  During that time she also served as Value Plus Leader at Mooreland Heights Elementary and helped lead the arts integration program.  Brandi has been involved in curriculum planning on the school, district, and state level.  She has also conducted several staff developments on curriculum development, effective teaching practices, common core, technology, and arts integration.  She is currently the Knox County District Coordinator for the Arts360 Arts Integration Program.​​ 41

CHERYL SHERIDAN

Cheryl has been in the Knox County School System for the past 25 years. She is currently a technology trainer serving all schools within the district. She has presented at several local and state conferences on a variety of instructional technology topics. Her favorite part of her job is when she sees the “I got it!” look in teachers’ eyes when they truly understand the technology being taught.

AMY CHURCHWELL

Amy Churchwell has been an elementary music teacher for Knox County Schools for 9 years. She enjoys teaching the love of music to children of all ages. Mrs. Churchwell has been a presenter for the Create Conference for 4 years. She has a love of technology as well as music.

MEGAN SIMMONS

Megan Simmons has been teaching elementary music for 14 years and has spent the majority of her career in the inner city. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Freed-Hardeman University and a master’s degree from Western Governors University. 

DR. MARTHA SUMMA-CHADWICK

Dr. Martha Summa-Chadwick is a nationally recognized piano soloist, teacher, lecturer, and neuroscience enthusiast. She holds a DMA from the University of Kansas where she maintained dual focus in both piano and music therapy. In addition, she has completed Fellowship level training at Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy at Colorado State University. She is the Executive Director of the non-profit Music Therapy Gateway In Communications, Inc. (www.mtgic.org) in the Chattanooga, TN area. Martha is a frequent guest speaker at conferences and workshops, and her organization has also initiated a concert series to advocate for the power of music in therapy.

PAMELA VANGILDER

Pamela VanGilder has been a teacher of movement and dance for individuals of all ages and abilities for over thirty years.  She has experience in designing and presenting dance education training for classroom teachers and teaching artists through local and national programs. She is the movement and dance specialist at Madonna Learning Center, a school for children and young adults with disabilities. She was on the NDEO committee for writing the 2005 National Dance Standards and has been a consultant in the area of special education and dance for writing team of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards. 

SUZANNE WEDEKIND

Suzanne Wedekind, art teacher at West Valley Middle School, consults with the East Tennessee Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in the development of educational resources such as the new video: Teaching Critical Thinking Through Architecture. In 2010, she collaborated with architect Gene Burr and senior planners to write Go to 2033: A Teaching Manual of the General Plan of Knoxville-Knox County. Her goal is to create a network of architects and teachers who desire the cross-curricular connections for creative problem-solving in the classroom.

DEBORAH WHELAN

Deborah Whelan received her MA degree in Dance from American University. She was founder of the Dance Department and Dance Company at Meredith College in Raleigh, NC. After moving with her family to Pennsylvania, she was a faculty member in the Dance Program at Penn State University and Co-Director of the Contemporary Dance Company. She is the architect of the first elementary school dance program and dance company in the State of Tennessee at Beaumont Magnet Academy, where she is the Artistic Director of “Beaumont Dance Works.” For the Tennessee Department of Education, she co-authored the State’s current K-5 dance curriculum. 42

SPECIAL GUEST ARTISTS CARPETBAG THEATRE

Carpetbag Theatre’s mission is to give artistic voice to the issues and dreams of people who have been silenced by racism, classism, sexism, ageism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression. CBT serves communities by returning their stories to them with honesty, dignity, and concern for the aesthetic of that particular community, helping culturally specific communities to re-define how they organize.

KNOXVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Rachel Loseke, violin Sara Matayoshi, violin Eunsoon Corliss, viola Stacy Miller, cello

TENNESSEE CHILDREN’S DANCE ENSEMBLE

The Tennessee Children’s Dance Ensemble continues to prove a child’s capacity to match a professional level of artistry. It is the Ensembles mission to provide opportunities for children to excel in dance and to teach children that only through hard work, dedication, and a heightened sense of discipline is this excellence possible. The results have been over 30 years of children performing modern dance masterpieces on stage and creating their own masterpieces in life beyond TCDE.

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TENNESSEE ARTS COMMISSION STAFF ANN BROWN

Ann Talbott Brown, Director of Arts Education, joined the Tennessee Arts Commission in 2009. In this capacity, she oversees all aspects of the Arts Education program including six grant programs; the USDOE AEMDD-funded arts integration programs Arts360 and Value Plus Schools; Create Conference; Poetry Out Loud; and the Teaching Artist Roster. She has served as a reviewer or panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts, National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards, and Kentucky Arts Council. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Southern Illinois University and a Master’s degree in Arts Administration with a certification in Nonprofit Management from the University of Oregon. Before joining the Commission, Ann worked with and/or performed in the Whatcom Symphony Orchestra, Southern Illinois Symphony Orchestra, Willamette Valley Music Festival, Southern Illinois Music Festival, and university arts programs in Oregon and Illinois. Before that, she served as a licensed K-8 public school music teacher and oboe instructor.

JAMES WELLS

James Wells, Arts Education Special Projects Coordinator, joined the Tennessee Arts Commission in January 2014. He oversees arts education grants to schools and nonprofits, provides technical assistance to educators, artists and nonprofit staff, and manages training and other arts education events and projects. Before moving to Nashville, James was the Education Programs Manager for the Culture and Heritage Museums in Rock Hill, SC. He also served as a board member for the Arts Council of York County and Keep York County Beautiful. Before entering the nonprofit field, he served as a licensed K-12 visual art educator in both Tennessee and South Carolina. James holds a Bachelor’s degree in Art Education from University of Memphis and a Master’s degree in Arts Administration from Winthrop University.

LEE BAIRD

Lee Baird has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from a large state university and was somehow made Director of Literary Arts for the Tennessee Arts Commission, despite his ardent love of Nicholas Sparks novels. He enjoys Shark Week, mustards of all stripes, and a good Thermos. He considers himself to be a bon-vivant, raconteur, and man-about-town. Everyone else considers him to be about half as funny as he thinks he is. He dedicates tonight’s performance to his parents who (quite presciently) predicted he would never amount to anything.

WILLIAM COLEMAN

William Coleman currently serves as the Director of Arts Access for the Tennessee Arts Commission. The Arts Access program is designed to support underserved constituents and organizations across the state, and identify barriers to Commission programs and funding for these groups. William is also the accessibility coordinator for the agency. He helps ensure that the arts are accessible to people with disabilities. William has over 15 years of teaching, performing, arts administration, and directing experience. He holds degrees and post graduate studies from Purdue University, University of Oklahoma, Middle Tennessee State University, and the University of Tennessee.

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CLARE FERNANDEZ

Clare Fernandez, Executive Administrative Assistant, provides administrative support to the Executive Director and the 15-member Commission, as well as marketing, editing, copywriting, and special events assistance. She comes to the Tennessee Arts Commission from The Ingram Commons at Vanderbilt University. In this role, she provided administrative, editorial and programmatic support to staff, faculty, and students. Clare is a native Nashvillian with a background in and passion for theatre arts. She graduated from Vanderbilt University with a B.A. in Spanish and Theatre. Clare enjoys acting, swimming, reading, sketching, and exploring Nashville’s vibrant arts and foodie scene with family and friends.

SUZANNE LYNCH

Suzanne Lynch, Director of Communications and Development, joined the Tennessee Arts Commission in November of 2013. Her position includes agency brand development, Specialty License Plate Program promotions, and agency communications. Prior to joining the Tennessee Arts Commission, Suzanne was the Creative Manager for Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee. Before moving to Nashville in 2011, Suzanne was the creative director for her own business, Message Brand Advertising, in Ithaca, New York. During those early start-up years, she was also an assistant professor in the Integrated Marketing Communications Degree Program at the Park School of Communications, Ithaca College. Previously, Suzanne was an art director for several advertising agencies in New York City and worked on national accounts such as Verizon Wireless and Duncan Hines. Suzanne has a B.F.A. in Graphic Design from Ball State University and a M.A. in Advertising Design from Syracuse University.

JARED MORRISON

Jared Morrison began his tenure as Performing Arts Director at the Tennessee Arts Commission in January 2014. For the past 15 years, he has held marketing, development and artistic administration positions at many respected arts institutions, including the Nashville and Chicago symphony orchestras, Spivey Hall, Sarasota Opera and Lyric Opera of Chicago. Jared holds a B.M. in Vocal Performance from Shorter College, a M.M. in Arts Administration from Florida State University, and is a former OPERA America Fellow. In addition to his work with the Commission, he is an active vocal soloist and choral musician.

GRACIE ROBINSON

Nashville native, lover of language, and a little on the ‘crafty’ side, Gracie Robinson is a senior at Middle Tennessee State University. Having not inherited the Nashville music gene, she puts her creative energies into writing. As a Public Relations major, she has been very privileged to spend the past two months as the communications intern with the Tennessee Arts Commission. When not working, you can find her on Pinterest researching the latest DIYs in home improvement.

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ACCESSIBILITY

The Tennessee Arts Commission provides assistance through its accessibility programs to artists with disabilities and statewide arts organizations. “Imagine a Tennessee where everyone can participate in and experience the arts.� The goal of the Tennessee Arts Commission can become a reality through the cooperation of the artists, arts organizations, arts educators, volunteers, and supporters who compromise the Tennessee arts industry. The goal of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is to insure that people with disabilities have the same opportunity to participate in everyday activities and programs. Therefore the Tennessee Arts Commission adopts the following accessibility statement: No person on the basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age, religion, or sex shall be excluded from participation in, or be denied benefits of, or otherwise be subject to discrimination of services, programs, and employment provided by the TAC and its contracting agencies.

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TENNESSEE ARTS COMMISSION MEMBERS Rhea Condra, Gallatin – Chair

Lanis “Lanny” Cope, Knoxville – Vice Chair Patsy White Camp, Jackson – Secretary Lisa Bobango, Germantown Ritche Bowden, Memphis Donna Chase, Knoxville

Stephanie Barger Conner, Nashville Ed Gerace, Johnson City

Waymon L. Hickman Sr., Columbia Chancellor Carol L. McCoy, Nashville Dr. Leo McGee, Cookeville Jan Ramsey, Chattanooga Ann Smith, Johnson City Connie S. Weathers, Chattanooga Lee D. Yeiser, Savannah

CREATE2014 Executive Director Anne B. Pope

Coordinators

Ann Brown, Director of Arts Education James Wells, Arts Education Special Projects Coordinator Accessibility

William Coleman, Director of Arts Access Graphic Designer Suzanne Lynch, Director of Communications and Development Technical Director Jared Morrison, Director of Performing Arts Staff Lee Baird, Director of Literary Arts Clare Fernandez, Executive Administrative Assistant Gracie Robinson, Intern 47

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TENNESSEE ARTS COMMISSION 401 CHARLOTTE AVENUE NASHVILLE, TN 37243 PUBLICATION AUTHORIZATION NUMBER: 316645 JUNE 2014


Create2014 Conference Program