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DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY DISORDER & CLIMATE CHANGE Jonathan PAUL Marshall EDITor

Featuring:

Anne Di Lauro · Anne Noonan & Julie Macken Craig San Roque · David Tacey · Glenda Cloughley Max Harrison & Susan Murphy · Jacinta Frawley Jonathan Marshall · Lenore Kulakauskas · Lucy Davey Marie TuliP · Pam Stavropoulos · Peter Dicker Peter White · Robert Bosnak · Sally Gillespie Terence McBride

JUNG DOWNUNDER BOOKS

Published by Jung Downunder Books. Acknowledgements: Cover image:“Depth Psychology, Disorder & Climate Change”, photograph by Nahomie “State of Mind” with stock by night-fate-stock and Rain Storm 2 by ShutterBugs-stock on DeviantART. Images reworked and typography by Tim Hartridge. Book design and production by Tim Hartridge, www.timhartridge.com.au.tt Typeface: Life BT, Myriad Pro Light, Roman. Sally Gillespie “An Elemental Imbalance” and Jacinta Frawley “Musing on the Council Pick up”, both previously published in JungDownunder: newsletter of the C.G. Jung Society of Sydney. David Tacey’s “The Sacred from Below” and “Entering the Dream of Nature” are reprinted here with the permission of Daimon Verlag, Switzerland. Readers who are interested in a fuller exploration of depth psychology and environmental concern are invited to consult David Tacey’s new book: Edge of the Sacred: Jung, Psyche, Earth (Daimon, 2009) which can be ordered from good bookshops or from the website: http://www.daimon.ch Marie Tulip “Hut Poems” previously published in Hut Poems, Cerberus Press 1999. Reprinted by permission of the Author. Dr. Jonathan Paul Marshall is the recipient of an Australian Research Council Federation Fellowship DP0880853 “Chaos, Information Technology, Global Administration and Daily Life”. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and are not necessarily those of the Australian Research Council. Jung Downunder Books are a publication of The CG Jung Society of Sydney GPO Box 2796 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia www.jungdownunder.com BOOK COPYRIGHT © 2009 BY C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF SYDNEY ISBSN: 978-0-9806752-0-7 Copyright © 2009 in all pieces belongs to the authors, who have given JungDownunder Books permission to print the works, in this format, for at least 10 years. Requests for permissions to republish should be addressed to the authors care of JungDownunder Books. All rights reserved. Apart from any fair dealings for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no copy of this book nor any part of it issued by the publisher shall by way of trade or otherwise be resold or hired out, copied and/or circulated without the prior written permission of the copyright owner and publisher.

The facts of nature cannot in the long run be violated. Penetrating and seeping through everything like water, they will undermine any system that fails to take account of them, and sooner or later they will bring about its downfall. But an authority wise enough in its statesmanship to give sufficient free play to nature – of which spirit is a part – need fear no premature decline. Carl Jung (CW 16: §227)

We are human beings thinking in moral terms, and we give the name of disorder to any order in which we cannot recognise the visible essences to which we are accustomed. Chaos is a name for any order that produces confusion in our minds. Hence we may say paradoxically that a fresh recognition of chaos at the heart of nature may mark an advance in science. It will mark, at the least, a closer view of the facts, rendering our preconceptions more consciously human. George Santayana Dominions and Powers, 33

A dream may let us deeper into the secret of nature than a hundred concerted experiments. Emerson “Nature: Chapter 8 Prospects”, Works I: 32 V

National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry Title: Depth psychology, disorder and climate change / Robert Bosnak ... [et al.]. ; editor, Jonathan Paul Marshall. Edition: 1st ed. ISBN: 9780980675207 (pbk.) Notes: Includes index. Bibliography. Subjects: Clinical psychology. Social psychology. Jungian psychology. Other Authors/Contributors: Bosnak, Robert. Lucy Davey Peter Dicker Anne di Lauro Glenda Cloughley Jacinta Frawley Sally Gillespie Bronwyn Goss Max Harrison Lenore Kulakauskas Julie Macken Jonathan Marshall Terence McBride Susan Murphy Anne Noonan Craig San Roque Pam Stavropoulos David Tacey Marie Tulip Peter White Dewey Number: 150.1954

{CONTENTS}

Acknowledgements

IX

Jonathan Marshall Depth Psychology and Climate Change

XI

1 Craig San Roque

Sea Level

2 Robert Bosnak

From Time Immemorial to Days Unforeseeable

1 27

3 Jonathan Marshall Climate Change is a Symbolic Event

33

4 Peter Dicker

The Earth’s Subtle Body

43

5 Anne di Lauro

A Dream of Water

71

6 Lenore Kulakauskas Climate Change and Western Consciousness

81

7 Interlude I

Some Tales of Solomon and Sheba

8 Susan Murphy

Conversation with Dulumnmun, Uncle Max Harrison 113

107

9 Jonathan Marshall Oedipus and Ecology: with a Note on the Holy Grail 125 10 Bronwyn Goss

The Gift of the Furies Experience: March 2009

137

11 Glenda Cloughley

Climate Change and The Great Chance for Poetry

145

12 Interlude 2

From the Chang Tzu

177

13 Sally Gillespie

An Elemental Imbalance

187

14 Jonathan Marshall Depth Psychology and Social Innovation

197

15 Anne Noonan

and Julie Macken

16 Interlude 3

Stardust

219

Goethe ‘Aphorisms on Nature’

237

17 Pam Stavropoulos Unconscious Responses to Climate Change

241

18 David Tacey

The Sacred from Below

265

19 Interlude 4

From ‘Hut Poems’ by Marie Tulip

277

20 Terence McBride

Earth Protector or Earth Destroyer

283

21 Peter White

Coping with a Climate of Change

301

22 Jacinta Frawley

Musing on the Council Pickup

333

23 Jonathan Marshall On Oppositions or Differences

341

24 Lucy Davey

Can these bones live?

355

25 David Tacey

Entering the Dream of Nature

365

26 Sally Gillespie

Descent in the Time of Climate Change

395

27 Jonathan Marshall Conclusion: Climate Change and Disorder

415

Bibliography

451

Authors

461

Index

471 VII

SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLY

{ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS}

huge thank you to all the contributors who gave so much of their time and effort to help this project come to fruition; without you all and your persistence there would be no book. Thank you to Peter Dicker and Sally Gillespie for supplementary editing and advice. A warm thank you also to Tim Hartridge for his patience and labour in creating a wonderful design for both the book’s layout and cover. To see more of Tim’s work go to: www.timhartridge.com.au.tt Sally Gillespie volunteered to proof read – which was a pretty monu­ ment­al job. Without the Committee of the Jung Society of Sydney, and their vision and enthusiasm the moment would have passed. I hope this is the start of a continuing and productive series of ventures which celebr­ate Jungian thought in Australia. Finally the greatest thanks to my editor, spouse and dearest love Sally Gillespie, who alone knows what it is really like to work and live with me, and without whose encouragement nothing would ever happen. IX

SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLY

{INTRODUCTION}

Depth Psychology and Climate Change Jonathan Marshall

I

Why Psychology? n general, there has been a mutual disinterest, or even a closed borderline, between people interested in issues of cli­ mate change and those interested in psychology, the nature

of being, or the nature of social interaction1 . This is despite the

existence of a climate change politics which involves people inter­ acting to­geth­er. Considering psychology and climate change to­ gether, explicit­ly puts people back into the ecology, and allows us 1 This is not to deny the existence of ecopsychology as a rather splintered movement. Its foundational texts would have to be Roszak (1992, 2nd Edition 2002) or Roszak, Gomes & Kanner (1995). Hibbard concludes his review of the history and theory of eco-psychology (2003) with the comment: after nearly a decade of observation and work… Roszak discovered that few psy­ chologists are interested in the human-nature interrelationship and environmental­ ists generally are not interested in what psychologists have to offer them. We can still hope this will change. See also the references to Peter White’s essay in this collection. XI

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

to think of human life and mind as a complex ecology. Mind, or psyche, is no longer just seen as confined within the human skull, neither does the psyche have to be seen as unified. Such an ap­ proach can, with care, add to our understanding of the complexity of the issues involved, rather than letting us simplify to the levels of ‘we are good or practical’ and ‘they are evil and driven by de­ structive ideology’. We could see fear, depression, judgement, dif­ ferent concerns about survival and our own easy condemnations as part of the debate and as open to question, rather than as either marginal to the discussion, or as independent factors brought to it. We can also expand our ideas of disorder and disruption, so that these processes are understood as part of life, and perhaps even as necessary to life, rather than taken as events we can speedily pass over, dismiss as temporary glitches, brand as failures, or cure as quickly as possible. Bringing psychology forward causes us to look at our own vul­ nerabilities, not just in the external world but also in the intern­al world. A degree of introspection helps us to be more suspicious of our motives, and more sensitive to the feedback arising from the de­cisions we make – and when we are interacting with complex systems, we need to be maximally sensitive and experimental in our attitude. We cannot know if our plans will be successful in ad­vance. Our well-intended actions could actually produce desta­ bilising, or harmful results. Humanly imposed order may always be subverted by reality, or produce disruption. In fact, it may be that many ‘psychological disorders’ are actually the result of too much order; they are states in which the person has little room to move, XII

INTRODUCTION

makes automatic associations, and repeats actions and interpreta­ tions with little respect for the variety of the world and its hap­ penings. The same may be true of social orders and orderings. By cultivating an experimental attitude around our preferred orders, and with an understanding of psychology, we may be able to inter­ rupt our tendency to keep proceeding simply because we believe something will, or should, work, as it fits in with our psychological state and its complexes or fragilities. Our reactions to apparent facts, especially complex and threat­ ening facts, are as important as those facts themselves. If, we ac­ cept, as Jung writes: It is becoming ever more obvious that it is not famine, not earthquakes, not microbes, not cancer but man him­ self who is man’s greatest danger to man

(CW 18: §1358).

then we may also conclude that some significant danger comes from our own behaviour, the working of our own psychologies and the way we act within our societies, rather than from the world itself. The threat arises from what we do and think. Therefore it seems likely that we cannot change the world without simultane­ ously changing ourselves. If we don’t, then we simply head to­ wards a new disaster with new leaders.

Common Responses If we attempt to classify some of the main attitudinal responses to our current situations we might see them as involving denial, new age hope, religious or other dogmatism, fear, hope in the powers of rational argument, or some combination of these. Many people XIII

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so classified might see themselves differently. People who seem to me to be engaged in denial might see themselves as optimist­ic. They are convinced in their imaginings that if there are any prob­ lems they can be solved in time, or that they will personally survive any catastrophe. They may also see themselves as realists with a sensible ‘wait and see’ approach, or as people who are concerned about the survival of a way of life which they value highly. They might also see a greater threat coming from activism than from human effects on the world. Similarly people engaged in ‘new age hope’ might agree that a change in consciousness is necessary but feel and imagine that this can only be reached by spiritual disci­ pline, the merging of consciousnesses, performance of magic, or some kind of mass breakthrough that will happen spontaneously when the time, or the stars, are right. They may hope that a crisis will precipitate a healing spiritual change (cf Tolle 2005 among many others). Religious dogmatists may believe or imagine they are getting back in touch with the one true force of the universe and behaving morally, and thus that they will be saved irrespective of what happens to the world around them. It is all in the will of God. They may have no idea of the dangers around the feelings of validity that they experience, or how unconscious realms can lead them astray, as is shown by the vast numbers of failed millenar­ ian movements over the years2. Other dogmatists might imagine and insist that there is no hope unless we abandon all technology and become ‘natural’ again; which is a demand for such a highly 2 For interesting accounts of, and interpretations of, millenarian movements see Fest­ inger (1964), Lawrence (1964), Cohn (1970) and Wilson (1973). XIV

INTRODUCTION

improbable change that it is doomed in advance – people have always used some technology. People whose primary response is fear and imaginings of destruction, might feel that a sense of doom and helplessness is appropriate and that there is nothing they can do except enjoy themselves, or prepare for the worst. Their pri­ mary feeling might be that everything is in the hands of others and they can do nothing. This feeling of fear and hopeless­ness may even have been brought on by green activists relentlessly, and counter-productively, presenting the current situation as desper­ ate (Milton 2008). Changing these feelings requires psychologic­al understanding and action. Finally those who think that solutions will come from rational argument may feel frustrated that people seem uninterested or sceptical of what they say, even coming to see their inability to have success persuading others as proof of general stupidity, or as evidence of a conspiracy against them or against humanity: thus entering quite dangerous psychological ter­ ritory. Such people have unreal psychological expectations of the powers of reason and persuasion, forgetting that, as Jung says, “human nature does not yield to a well meaning hint or to ideal­ istic advice”

(CW 18: §1452).

We are always contending with depths

and hidden forces, which also affect the rational arguments we are presenting. In general, none of these attitudes really considers the ways that symbols and fantasies can have their own compell­ing truth and possibly mislead us, or proposes a myth which might be helpful. Rational, or accounting, methods of dealing with climate change and disorder fail because the essential problem with catastrophe XV

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

is that it is a danger which has not yet happened, or has had little effect as yet, and can therefore be ignored. People have been warn­ ing about the effects of humans on the environment for well over fifty years, and during that period we have managed to cope. It may thus seem reasonable that we might continue to cope without drastic change. Similarly because a recognised catastrophe has not happened it is hard to evaluate its effects. We can only guess. The same complexity, which makes it dangerous to assume that we un­ derstand natural systems, also undermines our ability to make pre­ dictions about them. The history of environmental doom-saying has been full of incorrect predictions, so it can seem rational to keep ignoring those predict­ions. Visions of ecological crisis have been normalised, so we can pay as little attention to them as to all the other dangers we are constantly warned about – it can be said that we live in a ‘scare culture’ and just shrug our shoulders as a result. Things may have gradually become worse, but again we cope. Refusal to get excited about the coming end of the world is as much a mythical or archetypal process as getting caught up in it is. Approaches which warn of future dangers, by definition, warn people of dangers which may not occur, asking them to cut back on their activities to prevent something which may not happen anyway. If these predictions are successful in making other people change their behaviours, and the events they predict do not occur, there is little to no proof that these changes were responsible for the failure of the predictions. Success discredits the predictors. If this seems implausible, think of the ways that people have re­ XVI

INTRODUCTION

acted to the so called Y2K bug, which was supposed to send the whole computerised world into chaos when the dating systems no longer worked with the change of the century. Predictions were made of planes falling out of the sky, food inventories collapsing and so on (Brooker & North 2007: 162-3). Massive amounts of work was undertaken to fix the bugs, and almost nothing bad hap­ pened. Since then, some people have accused the predictors of being alarmist. There is no easy victory for prophecy. If psychology is considered, the common attitudes and positions described above seem quite closed. They are, perhaps, over-or­ dered. They seem to be failing and yet, despite the failure, people continue pursuing them. The authors of this book attempt to pro­ vide a new direction by thinking about climate change, disruption, ecology and depth psychology together. We accept the majority scientific view that global warming and other ecological problems are occurring and that humans have a part in creating these prob­ lems and must have a part in solving them. Therefore we will not provide more evidence about the various crises we face; there are plenty of other books which do that. We also accept that some kind of change of consciousness is required, and that fear is debilitat­ ing, and so we try not to arouse fear alone and hope to provide some antidote to, or understanding of, fear. We also write about the reasons for the failure of so called ‘rational argument’ and the importance of the ‘irrational’. We look at myths in the hope of pro­ viding metaphors which can help people’s energies become more focused. We even suggest basic ways of trying to reconnect to the natural world so that it becomes real and enlivening for us. XVII

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

Jungian Theory An important feature of depth psychology, particularly of the Jun­ gian variety, is the insistence that our psyches are grounded in forces, images and symbols which have their own dynamics be­ yond our willed control. Our psyche is populated by ‘others’. Our mental ecology is complicated, and is never dictated by the ego, or our consciousness, even though that ego-consciousness has an effect and is absolutely necessary for steering our way through life. One consequence of this is that even if we had all the right inform­ at­­­ion and intentions that might not be enough. An essential idea which arises from this framework, is the import­ ance of relating to, and learning from, the non-ego. Tradition­ally this has involved paying attention to our dreams, to myths, to fairytales, to images, to symbols, to alchemy and so on. But over the years this list has been extended to include our landscapes, room­ scapes, bodies, animals, technology and environment generally. All of these processes have been seen usefully as part of our psyches, or as part of the anima mundi, the ‘world-soul’, with something to say to us. The ultimate idea is that if we do not listen to them, and engage with them on their own terms, then the ‘repressed’ will return with vengeance. If we do listen, then our lives may become richer and perhaps less miserable and timid, although no one will promise life cannot be tragic. This interaction with the non-ego, or the unconscious, is not always comfortable, it is not always sweetness and light: darkness, chaos, and turbulence can easily be met with. Panic, pain and bad XVIII

INTRODUCTION

feeling will be encountered – part of the reason we repress such contacts is that it is often hard to continue to live in quite the same way if you are open to these things. Being open threatens the sta­ bility established by the ego and, as a result, it often seems prefer­ able to remain in ignorance. Sometimes it is possible for people to succeed in living what appear to be successful lives in complete ig­ norance – at least until a crisis arises. For others it is not so easy. This focus on the non-egoic aims to take us out of the individ­ual, or out of the analytic pair, into the wider culture and its dynam­ ics, and even into nature, without losing the sense that at least some power resides in the person themselves, and in their wider Self. Such an approach allows us to see disorder in the world, not so much as something which is always a threat, but as something which is always present, particularly whenever something changes, and as sometimes useful. We can begin to wonder about the com­ plex effects of our responses. Are we simply moving one type of disorder to another place, or simply exchanging one disorder for another? If we are not prepared and practised at listening to ‘the other’ then, when faced with a perception of overwhelming danger, it is easy for our efforts to be unconsciously directed at maintain­ing our own purity, our virtue and our group boundaries; and in find­ ing scapegoats we can exile and sacrifice to the gods. Caution at this point does not deny the need for political action, and indeed for social change. It should merely remind us that, after the 20th century with its often disastrous communist, fascist, anti-colonial and corporate revolutions, we should bear some awareness of the XIX

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

fraught nature of any social change and the consequences of de­ mands for purity and the positing of an ‘evil other’ who needs to be sacrificed. The faults that have lead to catastrophe, and the interpret­a­t­ions of those faults are collective and shared by us, even if we are appar­ ently uninvolved, and especially if we claim to be above them. We may be troubled by guilt over our participation in self-destruct­ive processes, and try to lessen this guilt by seeking evil elsewhere. In therapeutic terms, we need to encounter, and if possible, integrate our own ‘shadow’ (the darkness thrown forward by our own ego) rather than project it outwards. This increases our freedom as we become less trapped in our compensations and guilt. Without this care, it is also possible to blame something that is so big (say the transition from hunter-gatherer life to agriculture {cf Zerzan 1994}) that we cannot produce change at all, or change has to involve massive violence and condemnation of others as evil. In this situation, any action which might promote ecological well being could be defined as ‘sane’ no matter how many people it kills. Such a position may well be an escape from the problem into apocalyptic myth; and myths have their own demands. Likewise we can blame ‘science’, the ‘mechanistic world view’, Descartes or even perspective drawing (cf Romanyshyn 1989). Yet it is only by science, and often at personal cost to individual scien­ tists, that we know there is a global ecological crisis, that we have some inkling of the possible causes and trends of it, or can guess at the possible effectiveness of the remedies. Science, whatever its problems, has always insisted that we need to go to nature and lis­ XX

INTRODUCTION

ten and question. We cannot ignore this movement towards listen­ ing to the others (nature and human) and think everything can be solved by pure thought, ‘great tradition’ or return to a mythic past, alone. If we are going to blame the mechanistic world view or Des­ cartes, then we need to be able to explain what sustains this view now and its actual relevance when we are surrounded by interest in non-mechanistic world views and a general lack of interest in the mathematics which are the basis of Cartesian mechanism. By complicating the idea that ‘we’ on our side are virtuous, and ‘they’ on the other side are not, depth psychology points to the processes by which we undermine our attempts at virtue, and re­ minds us that virtue can be as devastating as vice. Living is com­ plex and not subject to will. We have to learn to relate to those things we do not know, and know that most of our knowledge of such events rises in symbols which have their own lives and their own dynamics, which may not be the same as our conscious egoic inclinations. Several of the authors in this book, point to the collective uncon­ scious as including the world, including the social world, and the ways it works. Such an approach leads to us proposing some kind of self-work and optimism, that is related to the state of the world, but with an awareness of the dangers of blind hope, dogma and ungrounded fantasy. We also hope that considering these issues will add something to depth psychology itself. Essentially if we don’t explore how humans go about imagining global warming, the environment and catastrophe generally, then we will not have much hope of producing the psychological and XXI

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

behaviour足al changes which are necessary for us to adapt to and mitigate ecological problems. Without this understanding we may try to produce change in people by strategies which are counter足 productive or leave them feeling overwhelmed and inclined to re足 treat from the problem, and thus make things worse. We need new, useful and meaningful myths to live by.

XXII

{CHAPTER ONE}

Sea Level Craig San Roque

“Dense clouds, no rain from our western region” I Ching, 9 ‘The taming power of the small’

Part 1 November 16, 2008: Fires in Los Angeles. Windstorm in Brisbane “Water on the mountain.”

I Ching 39 Chien

I

live, not on the mountain, am not one among those who see a long way, have no security, no certainty. The place where I live is three metres above sea level. The house rests on a sand bar

near the mouth of a broad river flowing east. Today, on the nar­ row sand, children play in the salt tidal river water, among them, are three children of a family from the Torres Strait islands. Their mother has died suddenly, tragically. They are playing between worlds. Between grief and lives going on, as the tides go on. 1

SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLY

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460

Authors

Robert Bosnak is a Zurich trained Analyst. His interests include inter‑cultural dream work, the effects of embodied imagery on the immune system, and dream incubation techniques. He is past president of the International Association for the Study of Dreams, was a visiting professor in clinical psychology at Kyoto University and has been a consultant to the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-on-Avon. He founded the internet site cyberdreamwork. com in 1997, to introduce a new, global, real-time, method of doing group dreamwork over the Internet. He has pioneered a form of dreamwork known as ‘embodied imagination’, which is described in a number of books, notably Embodiment: Creative Imagination in Medicine, Art and Travel, Routledge, London/ New York, 2007. His first book, A Little Course in Dreams has been translated into twelve languages. 461

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Lucy Davey, over the last ten years, has lectured and tutored at the University of Sydney. Her major academic interest lies in Ugaritic texts, particularly those relating to the role of the god­ dess figures. She is interested in Jung’s ideas because they offer a rich approach to the developments of life and encourage a variety of responses to changes which occur to the individual. Peter Dicker lives in the Illawarra, a beautiful coastal region of New South Wales, Australia, where he works as a psychologist in a public health clinic. He is a former president of the Illawarra Jung Society and is regarded as a passionate and articulate ex­ ponent of James Hillman’s work, with a particular interest in its relevance to the Australian scene. Over the past two decades Peter has explored and developed his interest in Jungian and Archetypal Psychology through numerous creative projects – lectures, essays, poetry and musical compositions – and he continues to maintain an ongoing passion for ideas, especially in relation to matters of clinical and cultural concern. Dr Glenda Cloughley is a Jungian analyst, singer and composer. Her confidence in the usefulness of depth psychology, mythol­ ogy and the arts in addressing urgent public issues has led to numer­ous imaginative projects, of which The Gifts of the Furies is the most recent. Glenda initiated the first song of A Chorus of Women –– when 150 Canberra women gathered quietly in Par­ liament House and sang a lament for the people of Iraq (words by Glenda, music by Judith Clingan AM) on 18 March 2003, 462

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the day that Prime Minister Howard announced that Australia was going to war. Since that national media event, A Chorus of Women has continued to comment on events and re-sound the ancient voice of the citizens’ chorus in over 120 public perfor­ mances of original music. Glenda’s PhD thesis, The Axiom of Becoming, links individual and cultural psychology, and she has contributed papers to international symposia in the interdisci­ plinary field of archaeomythology. She is also a Visiting Fellow in the College of Physical Sciences at the Australian National University. Anne Di Lauro was born in Sydney and educated in Brisbane, obtaining a B.A. in English and French Literature from the Uni­ versity of Queensland and later a post-graduate Diploma of Li­ brarianship at the University of New South Wales. Inclined to Romantic Idealism by education and temperament, she set sail, at the tender age of 23, for the Other Side of the World, where she worked for governmental and international organisations in­ volved in Third World development in France, England, Swit­ zerland, Italy, the United States and Canada. She eventually re­ turned to Australia with a passion for the work of C.G. Jung and undertook a Masters of Counselling at Queensland University of Technology. She has also studied Embodied Imagination with Robert Bosnak and is a certified Embodied Dream Imagery Psy­ chotherapist. She currently practises psychotherapy from a Jun­ gian perspective in Brisbane and is president of the C.G. Jung Society of Queensland. 463

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Jacinta Frawley is a Jungian Analyst trained in Zurich, Switzer­ land. She has an analytic practice in southern Sydney and enjoys writing and thinking about the small things in life. Sally Gillespie Sally is a Jungian psychotherapist and current President of the CG Jung Society of Sydney. She is the author of Living the Dream and The Book of Dreaming and co-author of The Knot of Time: Astrology and Female Experience. She is engaged in ongoing research into the emerging myths and dreams of climate change. In her free time she knits, gardens and edits the non-stop harvest of Jonathan Marshall’s writing. Bronwyn Goss is an artist who writes about art and the creative process. She is a lover of the Earth. Bronwyn is a West Australian who lived in Canberra from 1998 to 2004 and during that time participated in many performances by A Chorus of Women. She is the designer of the poster for The Gifts of the Furies. Since late 2004 she has lived in Perth and remains engaged with Cho­ rus endeavours, joining them in performance when she can. She was delighted to be in the audience for The Gifts of the Furies on March 29, 2009. Max Dulumnmun Harrison is a fully initiated Yuin elder from Wallaga Lake and Bawley Point, on the south coast New South Wales. He has become widely recognised for his skill in commu­ nicating traditional ‘lore’ of care for country and the sacredness of the natural world, in many cultural contexts. A visually stunning 464

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book of his teaching, My Peoples’ Dreaming, edited and photo­ graphed by Peter McConchie, will be published by Finch Publish­ ing in October 2009. Lenore Kulakauskas Born in Sydney in 1944 and educated at Sydney Girls High School and Sydney and Western Sydney Uni­ versities, Lenore’s career has spanned accounting, small business ownership, farming, writing, graphic design and counselling. She has an avid curiosity and still remembers, at age 18, the thrill of reading about Jung’s description of a collective unconscious at the State Library of NSW. Her enthusiasm for investigating the human condition has never waned, and from the 1970’s on she has studied nutrition, exercise physiology and management, ayurveda, meditation techniques, western astrology, cognitive behavioural therapy and typology based counselling and Jungian and post-Jungian based analytical psychology. Although always Sydney based, Lenore has lived and worked in Auckland New Zealand, Kurrajong NSW, San Francisco USA, Tasmania, North Coast NSW, Canberra, Hong Kong, Byron Bay and Perth. She has 2 daughters and has recently given up her nomadic lifestyle to return to her beloved ocean and sandstone cliffs at Bondi Beach. Jonathan Paul Marshall is a research academic at the University of Technology Sydney, currently specialising in studying the disrup­ tive effects of technology and computer software. He is author of articles about internet life, the ‘information economy’ and ghosts, and the books Jung, Alchemy and History (Hermetic Research 465

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Press) and Living on Cybermind (Peter Lang). He also edited the Cybermind Gender Project in the Transforming Cultures E-journal (to be found online). In his fantasy life he would like to be a novelist and musician – but even better than that he is married to Sally Gillespie. Julie Macken is a former journalist with The Australian Financial Review. She has written extensively on business ethics, sustain­ ability, climate change and human rights. She now works for the LHMU National Office as journalist and strategy consultant. Terence McBride has a background in philosophical and theologic­­al studies. He then trained at the C.G. Jung Institute Zurich Switzer­ land for over six years, obtaining the post-graduate diploma in Analytical Psychology in July 1979. On returning to Sydney he set up in private practice as a Jungian analyst, which continues to this day. He served as the third president of the C.G. Jung Society of Sydney, from 1981 to 1993. He is married with two children and a growing number of grandchildren. His delight is to discover the workings of the inner life of the human being. Dr Susan Murphy, Roshi, is a writer, filmmaker and broadcaster, a former academic who moonlights as a Zen teacher, leading re­ treats for Zen Open Circle in Sydney and Melbourne Zen Group. She has published widely in the fields of film, cultural studies, social ecology and Zen (most recent book, Upside Down Zen, Ha­ chette-Livre Australia, 2004; Wisdom Publications USA, 2006), 466

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and has a special interest in exploring the affinities between Zen and indigenous spirituality, in the process of Zen becoming native to Australia. Her next title, to be published by Pictador, investi­ gates how Zen and indigenous ways of seeing can cut through to fresh ground in forming a sane and coherent human response to planetary emergency. Anne Noonan is a psychiatrist and Jungian analyst, trained in Rome, a former president of the Sydney Jung Society who works in Sydney and remote Central Australian communities. She is a member of the Medical Association for the Prevention of War and currently work­ing on a project looking at the interrelationships of war and climate change. Craig San Roque is Jungian Analyst and community psycholo­ gist. His Ph D on ‘Intoxication’ was awarded by the University of Western Sydney, 1999, and supported by the innovative Social Ecology section – at the time an insurgent base for community oriented eco-psychological projects. At the time of writing he was working in inner Sydney and lived on the lower Hawkesbury Riv­ er, the setting for the chapter – ‘Sea Level’. Since then he has, unexpectedly, returned to central Australia where his partner is actively engaged in an environmental protection project, manag­ ing the arid lands and the feral camel population explosion. Pam Stavropoulos was initially trained as a political scientist. After completing her doctoral research and holding a Fulbright fellow­ 467

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ship and lectureships at the University of New England and Mac足 quarie University, she re-trained as a counsellor and is currently engaged in private practice counselling and program direction at a Sydney counselling college. Her most recent book is Living Under Liberalism: The Politics of Depression in Western Democracies, Universal Publishing. Dr David Tacey is Reader in literature and depth psychology at La Trobe University, Melbourne. He was born in Melbourne but raised in Alice Springs, central Australia. It was here that he was influenced by Aboriginal cultures and their religious cosmology. From Alice Springs, he moved to Adelaide to attend universities, reading philosophy, psychology and literature. After completing a PhD in literature and analytical psychology, he moved to the Unit足 ed States, where he conducted studies in archetypal psychology, with a focus on the psychology of religious experience. He was a Harkness Postdoctoral Fellow of the Commonwealth Fund, New York, and his studies were supervised by James Hillman. David is the author of nine books, including The Spirituality Revolution: The Emergence of Contemporary Spirituality, London: Routledge, 2004; and ReEnchantment: The New Australian Spirituality, Syd足 ney: Harper Collins, 2000. Recent books include: How to Read Jung, London: Granta, 2006, and The Idea of the Numinous, ed足 ited with Ann Casement, London: Routledge, 2006. In 2009, his book Edge of the Sacred: Jung, Psyche, Earth was published in Zurich by Daimon Verlag. In addition, David has published over a hundred essays and articles on cultural studies, religion and depth 468

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psychology. David regularly gives short courses at the summer school of the C. G. Jung Institute in Zurich and he is on the edi­ torial boards of several international journals of Jungian studies, analytical psychology and religious studies. Marie Tulip. Growing up in North Queensland, Marie Tulip went on to do her Masters degree in French literature in Chicago, 1958. Since then Marie has been a teacher, activist and writer, mainly in the areas of feminist theology and women’s spirituality. These poems were written in her sandstone hut in the Blue Mountains. Peter White has diverse professional experience in the environment­ al fields of planning, impact assessment, natural resource manage­ ment and sustainability. He has science degrees in ecology and sustain­ability. He has been involved in local community activism since the mid 1990s in fighting overdevelopment, promoting bio­ diversity conservation and bushland restoration and improved planning and manage­ment of natural landscapes. He has been a member of numerous advisory committees in local government including currently a sustainability and climate change committee. Peter became interested in climate change in the mid 1980s and has had an on-going interest in this issue ever since. He com­ pleted his PhD in 2009 in which he explored the phenomenon of ecological consciousness and its individual and collective develop­ ment. He developed exercises and understanding in which this ex­ panded form of consciousness can be used as a coping mechanism to deal with affective and spiritual challenges posed by the global 469

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ecological crisis. Peter lives in Sydney, Australia with his family and is planning to develop an interactional website, a self-help book and journal articles on eco-consciousness development.

470

Index

A

Aboriginal 41, 365, 435 acupuncture 65 Adam 111, 223 Addiction 114 Adler 197, 202 Aeschylus 140, 149, 164, 228 Aesopian 181 Aizenstat, Stephen 78 alchemy XVIII, 57, 86, 159, 240, 421, 440, 443 alchemists 294 anima 288 anima loci 376 anima mundi XVIII, 294, 375, 377, 436 apocalyptic 31, 429 Apuleius 438 Ariadne 45 Artaud 443

B

Babylon 357 Bachelard 37 Bass, Tom 140, 150 Bateson 319

Bateson, Gregory 40, 430 Behrendt, Larissa 227 Beijing 14 Bion 223 biophilia 397 Birnbach 209 Bosnak, Robert 38, 423, 429

C

Callimachus 285 Canberra 162 chakra 64 Chang Tzu 177 Chinese 40, 45, 64 Chorus of Women 139 Christian 87 Christianity 91, 265, 392, 431 Clark, Giles 11, 13 Cloughley 137 Cloughley, Glenda 439, 442, 443 Coal 119 collective unconscious XXI, 356 Colosseum 53 community feeling 210, 216, 448 computer 92 471

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

Confucius 178 Conservation Medicine 23 context 37 Corbin 391 Cormac McArthy 18 Creon 132 Cyclops 232

D

Dalai Lama 298 Danu 290 death 209 Demeter 232, 284, 404, 436 depression 250 Descartes XX, 29, 46, 343, 373 destructive instinct 209 Devall 323 Dicker, Peter 426, 431, 432, 433, 437 di Lauro, Anne 426, 431 Dionysos 232 Dionysus 227, 231 Di Vinci, Leonardo 205 Dora 127 Douglas, Mary 259 downsizing 243

E

Earth Mother 286, 404 Ecclesiastes 111 Ecological Self 79 ecology 47 eco-therapy 315 Einstein, Albert 316 Elements Air 191 Earth 192 Fire 17, 190 Eliot, T.S. 325 Emerson, Ralph Waldo 76 enantiodromia 342 Enki 407 Enlightenment 245, 291, 372 Epimetheus 227 Erishkegal 405 Eros 54 Erysichthon 283, 436, 442 Ethos 140 Eve 223 Ezekiel 355, 439 472

F

Fates 232 Fire 17 Fisher King 133 five levels of consciousness 289 Flannery 22 Frazer, Sir James 423 Fredericksen 355 Freud 84, 126, 127, 197, 296, 355

G

Gadu 118, 124 Gaia 268, 428 Garden of Eden 111 Gardner, Robert 72 Geb 433 Gemeinschaftsgefuhl 210 Genesis 38, 219, 222 Giegerich 431 Giegerich, Wolfgang 82 Gifts of the Furies, The 138, 145 Gillespie, Sally 415, 439 Goethe 75, 237, 356 Golden Orb Dreaming 118 Gomorrah 362 Google Earth 95 Gore, Al 312, 319, 330 Goss, Bronwyn 442 Grail 134 Great Mother 268

H

Hades 232, 404 Hall, Rodney 388 Hamilton, Clive 79 Harding, Esther 215 Heaney, Seamus 162, 166 Hekate 335, 439 Queen of Witches 336 Helios 233 Henry More 344 Heraclitus 269, 415 Hermes 421 Hesiod 39, 228, 427 Hillman, James 46, 53, 57, 76, 183, 273, 365, 372, 391, 435 Hinkson, John 93, 100 Hitler, Adolf 215 Hopkins, Gerard Manley 77

INDEX

horizontally 83 Hun-Tun 180, 184 Huxley, Julian 413

Long Walk 8, 15 Lopez-Pedraza, Rafeal 227 Lovelock, James 268, 407

I

M

Ibsen, Henrik 149 Icarus 193 I-Ching 343 Inanna 405, 441 individuation 212 Islam 265

Kant, Emmanuel 402 Katz, Louise 438 Kerenyi, Carl 164 Kronos 228, 427 Kulakauskas, Lenore 431, 432 Kyoto Protocol 71

Mabo 2 MacCracken, Miles 221 Macken, Julie 427 Macy, Joanna 78 Maha Pralaya 23 Mammon 101 Manna 335 Mars 90, 98 Martin 199 Marx, Carl 215 Mathews, Freya 12 McBride, Terrence 436, 445 McLuhan 359 Meher Baba 23 Mellor, Doreen 137 Mencius 184, 186 Michelangelo 205 Military 19 Minotaur 45 Monbiot, George 150, 152, 188 mother 434 mother complex 54, 58 Mother Earth 52, 55, 268 Mount Keira 51 Mowaljarli, David 165 Muningee 235 Murphy, Susan 428 Murray, Les 381, 385 myth 202, 219

L

N

J

Jacobi, Jolande 356 Jacoby, Mario 76 Jain logic 349 jen 185 Jocasta 126 Judaism 265 Judeo-Christian 368 Jung, Carl Gustuv XIII, 34, 36, 43, 56, 73, 84, 129, 135, 139, 162, 188, 190, 197, 267, 269, 272, 289, 328, 342, 352, 374, 391, 396, 420, 430, 439, 445 Jungian Theory XVIII

K

Laius 126 Lao Tse 185 Lawrence, D. H. 370 Lear, Jonathan 20 Legge, James 181 Lessing, Doris 412 Leunig, Michael 380 Levy-Bruhl 370 li 184 liberalism 242 libido 202, 342 Lindenmayer 5 logic 86, 101

Neilson 382 Neilson, Shaw 382 Net of Indra 19 Noonan, Anne 427, 433 Noonuccal, Oodgeroo 369 Norgaard 308, 309

O

Oedipus 125, 439 Oedipus the King 130 Olofsson & Ohman 309 Omerta 428 Oppian 415 473

D E P T H P S Y C H O L O G Y, D I S O R D E R A N D C L I M AT E C H A N G E

Orange Tree, The 382 Oresteia 138 Orpheus 60, 69, 439 Ortiz Hill, Michael 397, 400 Ovid 39, 283, 427

P

paganism 273 Pam Stavropoulos 436 Persephone 404 Plato 294, 427 Pleiades 235 Plenty Coup 20 Poet 266 poetic 50 poetry 164, 442 polarities 352 Pope 131 Poseidon 232 Positivism 294 private 242, 246 Prometheus 227, 427 psychological types 207 public 242, 246

Q

quasi-physical 30

R

real 293, 436 Reich, Wilhelm 209 Religion 205 re-sacralisation 436 resacralisation 266 resacralization 258 revitalisation 37 Rigby, Kate 153 Robert Anton Wilson 351 Robert Bosnak 353 Romano, Riccardo 224 Romantic 272 Romantics 435 Roszak XI

S

Samuels, Andrew 253, 254, 257, 259 San Roque, Craig 429 scapegoat 423 scapegoating 343, 435, 448 474

Schelling, F.W. von 75 science XX Second Bridegroom, The 389 Self XIX, 47, 206 Sequoia Trueblood 72 Seven Sisters 220, 235 shadow XX, 249 Sharp, Geoff 99 Sheba, Queen of 108 Siegfried 56 sign 34, 200 social interest 210, 448 Solomon 107 Solzhenitsyn, Aleksandr 157 soul 83, 84, 365, 433, 437 Speth, James Gustave 59, 60 Sphinx 128 St Augustine 92 Stavropoulos, Pam 428, 436 Stein, Murray 357 Stevens, Wallace 161 subtle 45 Sword of Damocles 43 symbol XV, XVIII, 34, 200 symbolic 54

T

Tacey, David 433 Tao 178, 182 Taoists 443 technology 97, 431 Terra Nullius 2 Thebes 126 Themis 232 therapy 204 Theseus 45 Thomashow 314 Thoreau, Henry David 76, 321, 324, 325 Thornton, James 298 thread 44 Tillich, Paul 34 Titans 219 Tjukurpa 163, 290 Tjukurrpa 141 trimurti 22 Trojan War 146 Trueblood, Sequoia 72 Tu Bish’vat 108 types 207

INDEX

U

Unaipon, David 235 Uncle Max 41, 443, 445 unconscious XVIII, 198, 438 unus mundus 374 uroboros 86

V

Van Deurzen, Emmy 260 vertically 83

W

Watson, Grant 379 Weber, Max 291 Weil, Simone 161 Wentworth 2 White, Patrick 379 White, Peter XI, 444 wicca 273 Wilson, Edward O. 410 wirklich 293 Wordsworth, William 75 Wotan 216 Wowolla Boyle, Josie 141 Wright, Judith 154, 157, 161, 366, 381 Wright, Ronald 401, 411

X Y

Y2K XVII yang 182 Yang 343 Yeats, W B 162 Yeats, W.B. 391 yi 185 yin 182 Yin 343

Z

Zeus 230, 427, 439, 442 Zi Gong 177 Zinkin, Louis 223 zoe 164

475

SAMPLE CHAPTER ONLY

Jung Downunder Books hopes the dialogue begun in this book can continue. So, if any of the contributors or readers feel that they have a response to the essays in this book, whether critical or not, or if people feel they have something new to say, then please send those responses to: cgjung@jungdownunder.com If you do not receive an acknowledgement within 2 weeks, please assume that we have not received it, or it has been devoured by the spam filters, and send it again. Should we receive enough interesting responses and new essays, then we intend to publish a small booklet of those responses in 2010-11.


Depth Psychology, Disorder and Climate Change