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Celebrating the

LOYOLA SCIENCE CENTER as a Human Endeavor

THE UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

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THE UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

PRESIDENT’S LETTER

The Loyola Science Center is the most significant building in our history. As the academic heart of our campus, it is fitting that it bears the name of Saint Ignatius. Saint Ignatius and his companions were instilled with a desire “to seek God in all things.” This altogether Jesuit way of proceeding has led to many great accomplishments in the sciences. From Matteo Ricci, S.J., to Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, S.J., Jesuits have found themselves at home on the edges of knowledge. The Loyola Science Center is a place of research, scholarship, teaching and discovery, a place for faculty and students to find God in all. As we celebrate the conclusion of this magnificent undertaking, we are filled with pride, but also deep gratitude for the vision, sacrifice, generosity and hard work that empowered us to realize our dream. Sincerely,

Loyola Science Center

Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., President

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“It will be a place of research, scholarship, teaching and discovery, a place to find God in all things.” Kevin P. Quinn, S.J. University President

Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D.

~Associate Provost for Academic Affairs When Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D., began his career as a college instructor more than 30 years ago, he knew he wanted a place that emphasized teaching and put a priority on research at the undergraduate level. He found that at The University of Scranton. Those core values remain very important to the University, and they have manifested themselves in the new science center. “This building was developed over 15 years,” said Dr. Dreisbach, who started working at the University in 1978 as an assistant chemistry professor. Today he serves as the associate provost for academic affairs. “It captures what The University of Scranton deems to be important – faculty-student interactions.”

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THE VISION

A PLACE THAT EDUCATES ALL WHO ENTER

Imagine a place that educates everyone. Imagine lounges and study areas that create an atmosphere where students and faculty gather and interact. A building filled with flexible, high-tech classrooms that encourage discussion and group learning. Imagine a building that serves as a showcase for modern science teaching, a building that reaches beyond The University of Scranton and provides a valuable resource to the community. A building dedicated to the belief of St. Ignatius Loyola that God can be found in every human endeavor and every field of study. Imagine a visitor confusing the science center for the student center. That place is the new Loyola Science Center. For 15 years, those planning the building envisioned a center that would serve as a place of learning for all who enter. The planners, with a goal of fostering a culture of science, envisioned a center that would bring all sciences under one roof, instead of those disciplines being spread out over different buildings on campus. The planners also believed the center should be more than just a classroom or laboratory building. “It will be the academic heart of campus,” University President Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., said. “It will be a place of research, scholarship, teaching and discovery, a place to find God in all things.” Loyola Science Center

Built on the ideas of Project Kaleidoscope, a program spearheaded by the National Science Foundation whose goal is to boost the quality of teaching and learning in the sciences, the nearly 200,000-square-foot center features formal and informal learning spaces for students and faculty.

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CENTERED

STUDENT DESIGN Architect Charles Kirby of Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture and Engineering (EYP) remembers his early visits to Scranton and how he was struck by the University’s core values. ‘ One of the things we came away with was the strength of community in nurturing the student,” he said, “how the faculty supported the students and how they stressed the need for small class sizes.” “Frankly,” Kirby said, “that was a concern because small class sizes translate into a bigger price tag.” Kirby recalled he was so worried that he approached then-president Scott R. Pilarz, S.J., who quickly reassured the architect that “small was the way to go.”

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“We centered the building on the students,” said George Gomez, Ph.D., associate professor of biology, who served as the “project shepherd” for the center. In that role, he coordinated the effort from design to implementation to the opening. “And we kept the students involved

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‘ One of the things we came away with was the strength of community in nurturing the student.”

Charles Kirby

Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture & Engineering

in the whole process. They gave us their impressions of successful workspaces and helped design many of the spaces. We even had them select the chairs that they would eventually use every day.” “When one says the word ‘church,’ you can either think of the building itself, or the congregation that inhabits it,” Dr. Gomez said. “When we define ‘science center,’ it also defines a community of people who use it.” And that idea was fused into the building.

Jeremy Sepinsky, Ph.D.

~ Assistant Professor of Physics/Electrical Engineering For a physicist using complicated math formulas to unlock some of the secrets of the universe, the success of the science curriculum at the University is quite simple to understand: It’s the atmosphere.

Science Center pushes that mission forward. “Teaching is a big part of what my life is,” he said. “One of the biggest strengths of teaching is to be able to watch students through the years, to help them shape their own journeys.”

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Scranton, said Dr. Sepinsky, strives to put the student first, and the new Loyola

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Maria Squire, Ph.D. ’00 Associate Professor of Biology

In her research into bone biomechanics, Maria Squire, Ph.D., has become somewhat of an expert on strength. “What makes a place great is the people,” said Dr. Squire, associate professor of biology, who graduated from Scranton in 2000. Dr. Squire, who joined the faculty in 2005, said her educators at Scranton really shaped who she became, and she now hopes to do the same for her students. The Loyola Science Center will help her achieve her goal, she said. “I think it’s an indication of what this building can bring to Scranton,” she explained. “The building can bring an even bigger greatness to the University. It speaks volumes to what we can be.”

Stephanie Yazinski ‘05 Before she ever walked into a classroom at The University of Scranton, Stephanie Yazinski wanted to be a doctor, and she knew Scranton was the place that would help her reach her goals. But something happened while she was there. “Having the opportunity to work in a lab and perform research with George Gomez, Ph.D., completely altered the trajectory of my career path, which was previously focused on medical school,” she said. “I was able to experience the challenge, excitement and satisfaction that come with performing research, and that motivated my decision to pursue a career in academic science.” Yazinski - who graduated from the University in 2005

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with a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry and biomathematics - is now a research scientist studying breast cancer biology at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical College.

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STRENGTHS IN THE SCIENCES The University also believes the new $85 million center, with its state-of-the-art design, will serve as a vital recruiting tool and will boost the success of its science programs. In its pre-medical program alone, the University since 1980 has placed an average of more than 45 students per year into American schools of medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatry and veterinary medicine, often in the most prestigious institutions in the country. Since 1999, the acceptance rate of University of Scranton applicants to medical, dental and other health professions schools has averaged 79 percent, with acceptance rates for individual years ranging from 65 to 100 percent. The history of science education at Scranton through the 1960s was inextricably linked to preparation of students for careers in medicine. Beyond this core, however, lies a story of rich collaboration between students and faculty. More than 50 percent of students in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) participate in research; 45 percent of these students wrote a formal thesis; 38 percent authored or co-authored a publication and/or conference paper. The willingness of faculty to collaborate with students on research projects has had a measurable impact on its graduates. While the construction of the building is clearly seen as an institutional commitment to continuing a tradition of excellence in science education, it is also viewed as a challenge for the faculty, students, alumni and administrators. It is a challenge to transform science education. It is a challenge for Scranton to become more than what it is and to grow and evolve as a community of scholars who learn together by living together. The creation of the Loyola Science Center is a truly transformational step along this journey. Loyola Science Center

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CONSTRUCTION & FINANCING TIMELINE Without funding, the University’s most ambitious project ever would have remained a dream. The compelling vision of the project would spark generous gifts and grants to the Pride, Passion, Promise Campaign, but that was only half of the story. The challenge would demand a financial plan of unprecedented complexity, executed during one of the nation’s worst economic crises in generations. “The scale of the science center was unlike anything we had ever done before, and so too was our approach to its funding,” said Edward J. Steinmetz Jr., senior vice president for finance and administration. “The support of our donors was essential, but we needed more.” Architectural rendering of front entrance

FALL 2000

2007 - 2008

MAY 2008

Early Construction

MAY 14, 2009

FALL 2009

, ES TE D US VE R S O F T GIN PR O BE AP RD N CT OA IO JE B CT O E U PR TH STR BY N CO G N KI EA BR D Y UN N O MO ED GR RE IR CE H D AN ED T CT C LE ITE SE CH P R EY A G IN AS M AM GR O PR G IN S D G IL IN T BU E E ED M ET PL M CO R PE PA N O SI VI N IO ED AT AT UC RE ED E C CE TE N IT IE M SC OM C

Loyola Science Center

FALL 1998

May 14, 2009 ground-breaking ceremony

Phase One – The Loyola Science Center includes a 150-seat lecture hall, a rooftop greenhouse and observation deck, laboratories, offices and study areas. **Phase Two – The 50,000-square-foot renovation of the Harper McGinnis Wing of St. Thomas Hall includes a new entrance to the Loyola Science Center from the Commons. *

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Years of careful budgeting and sacrifice provided a base of funding, while not compromising other essential needs, and the University’s successful past and promising future persuaded the investor community to purchase bonds. Along the way to completion, tough economic times would raise questions. “We remained committed to sticking to the vision for the building and not cutting corners,” he said. “Our timeline was ambitious, but working closely with excellent partners, we completed the project on time and under budget.” Loyola Science Center dedicated on Sept. 28, 2012 June 2010 , AMDG purple beam placed

JUNE 2010

SEPT. 2010

AUG. 2011

Fr. Quinn speaking at naming ceremony

NOV. 2011

MARCH 2012

JULY 2012

AUG. 2012

SEPT. 28, 2012

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CE D N TE IE CA SC DI E ED LA D AT YO ER IC LO NT E, ED D ET CE L PL AL M H CO ER II) ED N E U EH AS ISS KU PH IT (** M N ER O P TI CY VA N ED O A N UP AT IC RE C C ED O D L ED AL T AT IH N IC , ME AN D E IL ED CE D M L ET N PL OU AL H M NN D CO A AL I) G N O SE IN M A CD H A M T (*P R N N TE EN IO N M CT CE ST VE RU CE IN ST N R N IE C FO CO S A AM ” ED EW L BE IAM N YO AS LE R LE LO RP GLO RE S PU I D E DE N AC M ) BO PL E D CT S OR GO JE ER AJ F O RK M O PR O D RY W “A O N N GL IO IO R CT IPT TE RU CR REA ST S N IN E G CO TH TH I W OR (F

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LEED INITIATIVES

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council that gives a framework for designing, constructing and using buildings in an environmentally responsible manner. LEED certification provides independent verification that our building was designed to help ensure the health of both our environment and the people who occupy the building. We implemented LEED recommendations on several fronts. Some of them are highlighted on this page.

WATER Water use reduction – the use of efficient water fixtures to reduce the total amount of water used in the building Water efficient landscaping – reduction in the water use for irrigation

ENERGY Energy utilization – energy recovery wheels act as exchangers that take energy in the exhaust air and recycle it to pre-condition intake air prior to entering the ventilation systems

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Occupancy sensors in lighting and ventilation systems – only rooms that are occupied have lighting and environmental control Microclimate control – light and temperature controls for each individual space allow for lower energy use

RESOURCE STEWARDSHIP

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Use of certified wood – this is wood that is certified by Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), harvested from sustainable sources and processed in environmentally friendly ways. This wood is tracked from start to finish to ensure FSC compliance. Use of regional materials (extracted, processed and manufactured locally) – includes building stone Use of “low emitting materials” (carpets, adhesives, sealants) – these are materials that emit low volatile organic compounds

Storage and collection of recyclable materials

RECYCLING

Construction waste management: divert 75 percent of the material from disposal Use of materials with recycled content – this includes several materials, including student chairs in the classrooms

OBTAIN MORE LEED CREDITS Purchase green power

the building Commit to using green cleaning products

Loyola Science Center

Design a LEED educational component for

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Total number of drops and cabling: more than 4,425 cable drops consisting of more than 1,000,000 feet of Category 6E plenum cable (roughly 190 miles), approximately a five-fold increase.

NEW EQUIPMENT Olympus FV1000 Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope Designed for high-resolution, confocal observation of different types of cells and tissues, these microscopes use lasers to illuminate specially marked molecules, allowing the visualization of cellular details on different types of tissue.

TECHNOLOGY FACTS Newport Laser Tables Heavy-duty steel tables supported by a cushion of air that allows them to be vibration resistant. Extremely sensitive equipment, such as lasers, is mounted on these tables, and any vibrations

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in the environment are eliminated.

Optical Telescope The 14 Meade LX200 telescope with Ritchey-ChrĂŠtien-like optics is equipped with technology that allows automatic alignment of the instrument and acquires digital images of stellar objects.

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The Loyola Science Center is supported by a state-ofthe-art, 650-square-foot DR data center that features a redundant cooling system and an emergency generator service, assuring 99 percent equipment availability.

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FEATURES The LSC133 lecture hall is the most advanced space on campus, with three projection screens, high-definition audio and video with a Blu-ray player, motorized blackboards and an annotative monitor at the presenter’s dais. This is one of two rooms equipped with lecture capture capabilities.

A 103-inch digital display screen sits at the focal point of the Loyola Science Center. The monitor features about two million pixels, resulting in super clear, high resolution images.

Many of the rooms use a new technology that digitizes analogue audio and video signals to a processor that is completely digital. Via the University’s network, our instructional technology equipment has the capability of reporting such things as projector lamp hours, power status and usage metrics. The equipment is accessible remotely, allowing automated, scheduled power shutdowns designed to extend lamp hours and conserve energy. Seven new digital signage displays grace the halls of the Loyola Science Center, offering the ability for department-specific content at each location.

new standard for Scranton classrooms. Future classroom designs and

One hundred and thirty-two, representing approximately

implementation will build upon the new standard technology implemented

18 percent of total access points across campus.

in this building.

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Instructional technology in the Loyola Science Center established a

Wireless Access Points

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SEVEN REASONS YOU’LL

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NATURAL LIGHT ... IN SCRANTON! As you can see, there is glass all around

the building. If you stand at the end of any

hallway in the building, you can actually get a view of the outside from three different

directions. So even on a rare cloudy Scranton

day, we will get ample natural light flooding in.

REASONS

YOU’LL

LOVE

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THE NEW SCIENCE CENTER

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SCIENCE ON DISPLAY

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To highlight the idea of science as a human

endeavor, we wanted all of our research and teaching laboratories to be highly visible to

everyone. Therefore, teaching and research

spaces are designed with large glass windows and walls. This makes science very visible as

the openness creates energy and palpable excitement.

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A NEIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT

In the building, faculty offices and students are not only arranged by department, sometimes they are centered around common interests and research approaches. For example, on the second floor, the neuroscience neighborhood will house faculty from

14 6 LOVE THE NEW SCIENCE CENTER

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By Dr. George Gomez

three different departments. This design promotes interdisciplinary learning

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and collaboration.

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COFFEE, COFFEE, EVERYWHERE The coffee shop and atrium seem to be a central design element for all modern buildings. While a coffee shop and social

STUDENT SPACES

space may seem very “non-scientific,” this

The building was constructed with

is not done in the laboratory; rather, it is

multiple non-reserved spaces designed

done while discussing ideas, theories or

to be open and available to all types of

concepts over a meal or a cup of joe.

is quite the contrary. The best science

7 3 5 student use. Outside the faculty offices, we built “tutorial spaces” where small

groups of students can work with faculty members, or can wait for faculty in a comfortable environment.

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IT’S ACTUALLY DESIGNED FOR SCIENCE

The buildings that our science departments have been occupying to date

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COLLISIONS ... OF A PRODUCTIVE TYPE

were not designed to accommodate

When you walk through the building,

to the plumbing, to the water, to the room

there are multiple ways to get from point

layouts, both faculty and the architects

A to point B. So a daily trip from office

influenced all aspects of the design.

today’s approach to science teaching

and research. From the ventilation system,

to classroom to laboratory can take

different forms every day. This flow of traffic allows one to encounter different people every day, which could lead to new and productive collaborations that will shape science education tomorrow.

George Gomez, Ph.D. ~Associate Professor of Biology and Neuroscience

As a scientist and a teacher, George Gomez, Ph.D., can see how the new Loyola Science Center aims to move faculty away from what some would consider traditional roles.

Even the staircases, he said, are designed to create several ways to get through the building, almost forcing professors and students to bump into one another in an effort to share and create new ideas. “I think about science happening everywhere,” said Dr. Gomez, associate professor of biology and neuroscience at the University and project shepherd for the science center. “Much of what we do involves coming up with ideas.” That, said Dr. Gomez, is a driving force behind the building. “Science is really about collaboration,’’ he said, and the center puts a priority on bringing students together.

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EFFECTIVE

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IDEAS

COLLISION

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COLLISION OF IDEAS “Collaboration. That’s the most important part of science,” said Stephanie Yazinski ’05. Even today, she explained, part of her training requires that she spend at least an hour a week collaborating with other researchers on their projects. A cancer researcher working at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical College, Yazinski believes one of the goals of the Loyola Science Center is a direct hit. The new center’s glass walls and meeting spaces encourage interaction and the exchange of ideas, which is crucial to promoting good science, she said. In creating the spaces inside the building, the planners stressed the need for areas where people could come into casual contact with each other and start a conversation that could lead to more in-depth collaboration. As one faculty member put it, these spaces would promote “effective intellectual collisions.” “The idea is to engage the casual passer-by into the process we call science,” Dr. Gomez said. Because some of the spaces are not formal laboratories, faculty and students from other disciplines can come in and engage with the students who are doing research, creating an interdisciplinary environment, he said. Part and parcel of the building’s design is a transparency of activity that occurs within each learning and research space. More than 50 percent of the University’s students in sciences, engineering, technology and mathematics participate in research. This clear view of student and faculty science activity is designed to engage everyone who enters the building into the process and to highlight the work.

at Oxford University, said Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D., associate provost for academic affairs. “Rooms that are designed to foster collaboration,” he said. “When you look at those tea rooms,

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Some of this inspiration for the design came from the tea rooms

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they are where scientists were talking about coming up with ideas. This is where Nobel Prize research was born.” The University also recognizes that the best work does not take place on the “traditional benchtop.” Rather, it takes place in spaces where people share ideas, when people discuss concepts and debate theories. Much of the space in this facility is dedicated to student study and collaboration. “Collaboration gives us diversity of thought, which allows us to look at old problems in new and innovative ways, and this is how science advances and evolves,” Dr. Gomez said. Bradley Wierbowski ’13, a double major in biochemistry/cell molecular biology and English literature, said the new building is “phenomenal.” The glass walls, on which students and professors are encouraged to write, the layout of the classrooms and the amount of student study spaces all foster an environment that encourages learning. “To see people writing on the glass walls, to see the formulas they’re studying, it really keeps people motivated,” Wierbowski reasoned. The building’s transparency also reinforces the notion that science is truly a human endeavor – an idea crucial to the University’s mission. While the center includes traditional classrooms and teaching laboratories, the spaces that are most transformational to the institutional culture are the social spaces. Jeremy Sepinsky, Ph.D., an assistant professor of physics, noticed that the new building does indeed inject energy into the students. “I love it, it’s great,” Dr. Sepinsky said. “Everyone can see what you’re doing. Those big windows provide extra motivation.”

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“It’s certainly not what we’re used to.” The new center replaces Loyola Hall, which was built in 1956 and renovated in 1987. Most recently, Loyola Hall allowed only enough space for the Biology and Chemistry departments.

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IDEAS

COLLISION

OF

EFFECTIVE

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INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO THE SCIENCES

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“There are many disciplines, but there is only one science.”

Marc Seid, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology and Neuroscience

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INTERDISCIPLINARY

APPROACH TO THE SCIENCES

Getting people to “think outside the box” presents a challenge in any environment. In a sense, the design of the new Loyola Science Center encourages students and faculty to think beyond the lab. Moving student spaces closer to the hallways and away from the traditional bench gives students a comfortable place to work and relocates the energy of that work closer to main hallways. Those design elements help emphasize interdisciplinary learning. The interdisciplinary approach involves the combining of two or more academic disciplines into one activity. It is about creating something new by crossing boundaries and thinking across them. The power of interdisciplinary learning lies in the ability of students to solve problems by taking information and processes from several disciplines and integrating them into a unique solution for the problem at hand. This is why interdisciplinary teaching and research is one of the fastest growing trends in science education. Interdisciplinary approaches teach students how to “think outside the box” and how to operate and solve problems in real-world scenarios.

Marc Seid, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology and Neuroscience Throughout the study of science – whether it’s chemistry, biology or computers – one thing has become constant: Important breakthroughs require ideas and techniques rooted in many disciplines. “There is only one science,” said Marc Seid, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology. “There are many disciplines, but there is only one science.”

study of ants, said the same rules of chemistry and physics apply to his work. In fact, Dr. Seid stated, it was the research of ants that led to quicker computer networks, and the work of evolutionary biologists has been key in the fight against AIDS.

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Dr. Seid, a neuroscientist and evolutionary biologist who specializes in the

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Part of the challenge for the new science center was to create learning environments that foster thinking that crosses those traditional disciplinary boundaries. Faced with this formidable task, the center’s architects, Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture and Engineering, sought to preserve the sense of community that is central to the University’s mission. The firm did so by developing smaller “neighborhoods” of faculty offices, student learning spaces, laboratories and classrooms. The application of the concept is evident from the exterior elevations that show the center not as a single massive form, but rather reduced to three smaller, more intimate appearing substructures. These neighborhoods are populated by traditional departments, or by faculty who wish to “live” near others with whom they will collaborate in interdisciplinary teaching and research projects. These neighborhoods are filled with a variety of student learning spaces that serve as places for all students who seek to engage in academic work and conversations. In the field of neuroscience, for example, the traditional approach viewed the study of the nervous system as being part of biology. Current thinking has evolved to relabel neuroscience as an interdisciplinary field that works with chemistry, computing science, physics, psychology, mathematics and physics. The center also reinforces the notion that science is largely a human endeavor – an effort done by humans in the company of humans. In a university such as Scranton with a strong liberal arts core, the intersection between the sciences and humanities is critical to the educational philosophy. The design of the center provides a physical space that encourages integration among traditional science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, as well as the humanities, to drive the development of new teaching methods and engage the

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students in practices that prepare them to face challenges in their future.

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Kevin Berry ‘09 Three years after leaving The University of Scranton, Kevin Berry remains inspired by an Ignatian ideal. Berry, a biology/philosophy graduate, has taken his interdisciplinary approach to learning to a new level as a fourth-year student concentrating on physical medicine and rehabilitation at Penn State/Hershey Medical College. The goal of neurological rehabilitation is to assist patients in attaining their maximum level of functioning and quality of life in the most normalized and least restrictive environment. This is accomplished by an individualized assessment of the patient’s current condition. “Cura personalis,” he said of his work. “We don’t just focus on one part; I have to focus on the whole person.” Berry, a native of Archbald, attributes his career path to his time at the University. “Everything I am I owe to Scranton,” he said.

Bradley Weirbowski ‘13 Bradley Wierbowski has crossed a line, an educational line. The Scranton senior is a double major in biochemistry/cell molecular biology and English literature and is just one of 282 students to be awarded a Goldwater Scholarship for the 2012-2013 academic year. The Owego, N.Y., native, who maintains a 4.0 GPA going into his final year at Scranton, said he thrives on the creative and analytical ways of thinking his unique combination of majors inspires. Those different modes keep him fresh as he confronts his daily course work. “In science it’s tempting to focus on an interpretation that’s established,” he said. In English literature, he explained, the goal is to try to find a

That way of thinking, he reasoned, helps his approach to science. By coming at science from many different perspectives, the student can see the result for what it really is and not get trapped by a preconceived notion, he said.

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different way of looking at things.

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THE HALLS OF

THE LOYOLA SCIENCE CENTER The Design of the Building Creates Four Halls

DR. H. MCDONALD HALL Dedicated on Nov.11, 2011, the Dr. Herbert M. and Mary E. McDonald Hall is named in honor of Herbert, M.D. ’35, H’01 and Mary H’01 McDonald in recognition of their longstanding leadership and support of The University of Scranton. McDonald Hall was dedicated to the memory of Joseph T. McDonald, Esq. ’27, Frank M. McDonald, Esq. ’34 and George B. McDonald ’35, siblings of Mary E. McDonald H’01

Dr. McDonald. Dr. McDonald served as president of the staff and chairman of the department of surgery at Hahnemann Hospital, now Geisinger-Community Medical Center of Scranton. Mary McDonald served on the University’s Board of Trustees from 1986-1992 and held the position of vice chair from 1989-1992.

Herbert M. McDonald, M.D.’35

HARPER-MCGINNIS HALL The University of Scranton dedicated the Harper-McGinnis Wing of St. Thomas Hall in 1987 under 22nd President J.A. Panuska, S.J., in recognition of two longtime physics professors, Joseph P. Harper, Ph.D., and Eugene A. McGinnis, Ph.D. ’48. The original two-story addition to St. Thomas Hall, built in 1987, housed the Physics and Electrical Engineering departments. The late Dr. Harper earned Joseph P. Harper, Ph.D.

his doctoral degree from the University of Texas. Prior to beginning his career at The University of Scranton in 1936, Dr. Harper taught at the University of Texas and St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas. The late Dr. McGinnis, a World War

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II veteran, attended The University of Scranton and was a former student of Dr. Harper. Dr. McGinnis earned his doctorate from Fordham University. He began teaching in the University’s Physics and Electrical Engineering department shortly after earning his degree from the University in 1948. Together, Drs. Harper and Eugene A. McGinnis, Ph.D. ‘48

McGinnis contributed more than 70 years of teaching service to The University of Scranton.

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KUEHNER HALL Recently dedicated on Aug. 5, 2012, Kuehner Hall is named in honor of longtime friends and supporters of the University, Carl J. ’62, H’11 and JoAnne M. H’01 Kuehner. Carl served on the Board of Trustees from 2003-2009 and served as chairman of the board from 2007-2009. He is currently the president of Real Estate Technology Corporation, a successful Florida-based Carl J. Kuehner ‘62, H’11

real estate development and investment firm. JoAnne is the founder and chair of Hope for Haiti, Inc., an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for the Haitian people through education, nutrition and healthcare.

JoAnne M. Kuehner H’01

MILANI HALL Milani Hall was dedicated on March 24, 2012, in recognition of Frank ’55 and Doris Milani, along with their children, Natalie, Frank and Elizabeth. This hall is named in recognition of Dr. Milani’s long-standing support of the University, and honors the memory of several of his and his wife’s siblings. Dr. Milani earned his Bachelor of Science in biology from The University of Scranton in 1955 and his Frank Milani, M.D. ’55

Doctor of Medicine from St. Thomas University in 1959. He presently practices internal medicine for the Lackawanna Medical Group and is a clinical faculty member at the Commonwealth Medical College.

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Doris Milani

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ARCHITECTURAL FIRM: EINHORN YAFFEE AND PRESCOTT ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING

CONSTRUCTION MANAGER: QUANDEL ENTERPRISES, INC.

PROJECT RECOGNITION

STEERING COMMITTEE: • Harold Baillie, Ph.D., Provost & Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Loyola Science Center

• Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D., Associate Provost for Academic Affairs • James Devers, Assistant Vice President of Facilities Operations • George Gomez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology & Neuroscience (Project Shepherd) • Edward Steinmetz Jr., Senior Vice President of Finance & Administration • David Wilson, University Architect

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SCIENCE CENTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE: • Yaodong Bi, Ph.D., Computing Sciences • Timothy Cannon, Ph.D., Psychology/Neuroscience • Christie Pugh Karpiak, Ph.D., Psychology/Neuroscience • David Rusak, Ph.D., Chemistry • James Devers, Assistant Vice President of Facilities Operations • Joseph Dreisbach, Ph.D., Chemistry/Associate Provost for Academic Affairs • Paul Fahey, Ph.D., Physics • Anthony Ferzola, Ph.D., Mathematics • Timothy Foley, Ph.D., Chemistry/BCMB/Neuroscience • George Gomez, Ph.D., Biology/BCMB/Neuroscience (Project Shepherd) • Michael Hardisky, Ph.D., Biology • David Marx, Ph.D., Chemistry • Ronald Skutnick, Director, Network Infrastructure • Janice Voltzow, Ph.D., Biology • Robert Waldeck, Ph.D., Biology/Neuroscience • David Wilson, University Architect • Christine Zakzewski, Ph.D., Physics

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• Edward Steinmetz Jr., Senior Vice President of Finance & Administration

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES Former Trustees 2008-2012 Carl Kuehner ‘62, H ‘11, Chair George Aschenbrenner, S.J. Most Reverend Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L. J.P. Bannon, M.D. Paula Barrett, C.P.A ‘81 James Caccavo ‘84 Ellen Casey H‘88 Margaret Condron, Ph.D. Theresa DeBarbrie Lisa DeNaples, D.M.D. Louis DeNaples, M.D. Michele Finn Edward Glynn, S.J., H‘90 Carl Lisman George Lynett, J.D. ‘71 Arthur Madigan, S.J. Ryan Maher, S.J. Margaret Q. Mariotti, Au.D. Msgr. Andrew Martin H‘11 Karen Pennington, Ph.D. ‘76 Scott R. Pilarz, S.J. Robert Reiser, S.J. Harry Rose ‘65 Matthew Ruhl, S.J. Don Sherwood Thomas Sullivan Fred Zagone, S.J.

President’s Cabinet Harold W. Baillie, Ph.D. Provost & Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Edward J. Steinmetz Jr., C.P.A. Senior Vice President for Finance & Administration

Vincent Carilli, Ph.D. Vice President for Student Affairs

Patricia A. Day, J.D. Vice President for Human Resources

Jerome P. DeSanto, Ed.D. Vice President for Planning & Chief Information Officer

Richard G. Malloy, S.J., Ph.D.

Loyola Science Center

Vice President of Mission and Ministry

Gerald C. Zaboski Vice President for External Affairs

Robert B. Farrell, J.D. General Counsel

Ryan J. Maher, S.J., Ed.D. Executive Director, The Jesuit Center

Robert W. Davis Jr. Chief of Staff & Interim Vice President for Development & Alumni Relations

CURRENT TRUSTEES Christopher M. “Kip” Condron ‘70, H ‘03, Chair Francis J. Pearn ‘83, Vice Chair William J. Brady ‘83 Vincent Cooke, S.J. Thomas J. Davis, C.P.A.‘69 Jacquelyn Dionne ‘89 Donna M. Doherty James Duffy, S.J., M.D. ‘88 Mary Beth Farrell, C.P.A.‘79, H ‘10 Matthew Geiger ‘81 Marie A. George, Ph.D., G ‘78 Michael P. Glinsky ‘66 Otto Hentz, S.J. Joseph J. Kadow, J.D. ‘78 James J. Knipper ‘81 Lawrence Lynch, C.P.A. ‘81 George V. Lynett, Jr. Dennis J. McGonigle ‘82 James F. Mullery, Jr. ‘86 Justin B. Murphy ‘76 Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., President Vincent F. Reilly, J.D.‘80 Thomas Roach, S.J. Kathleen C. Santora, J.D.‘80 Teresa M. Schafer ‘81 Joseph Sebastianelli, Esq. ‘68 Patrick W. Shea, J.D.‘78 Joseph L. Sorbera, Jr. John A. Walsh ‘66

Trustees Emeriti Arthur J. Kania, J.D. ’53 Hon. Joseph M. McDade

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INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS BCMB (Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology) Biomathematics Biophysics Environmental Sciences Neuroscience

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SCIENCE DEPARTMENTS

BIOLOGY

CHEMISTRY

COMPUTING SCIENCES

MATHEMATICS

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PHYSICS/EE

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