Issuu on Google+

EricJohnson|news editor eric@themetrospirit.com

GabrielVega|lead designer gabe@themetrospirit.com

BrendaCarter|senior account executive brenda@themetrospirit.com

AmyChristian|arts editor/production director amy@themetrospirit.com

JoeWhite|publisher joe@themetrospirit.com

JohnnyBeckworth|circulation manager johnny@themetrospirit.com

Michael-RKQVRQ_VLJKWLQJV‡Valerie(PHULFN_ZULWHU‡Amy3HUNLQV_HGLWRULDOLQWHUQ‡Laura3HUU\_YROXQWHHU‡KristinHawkins|editorial intern

WHINELINE I just want to commend the Police Department. Lately it seems they have been going above and beyond what I am used to getting from public servants. Two weeks ago my husband was at work and he received a call from the Sheriff’s office telling his they had found his stolen vehicle. WHAT!?

He didn’t even know it had been stolen. Then yesterday, a friend of mine left his car (that has a broken window) downtown overnight. The police saw it and since my friend had some motorcycle gear in the seat they took it and put it somewhere safe for him. Thank you, thank you, thank you Richmond County Sheriff’s Office! I want you to know that

your efforts are not going National folks? unnoticed or unappreciated. Here’s to hoping that next I’m thinking of starting a year’s Rock Fore Dough Bass Fishing tournament lineup is stronger like years up at the lake this time next past. Many people who year when they are also wanted to go just couldn’t holding that famous golf justify spending $35 on tournament in Augusta. names they haven’t heard of I think I will call my Bass in this year’s lineup. tournament the Master Baiters. Ya think I would get It is time to revisit the Mercy any grief from The Augusta Ministries controversy.

o r t e m IRIT SP Years ago Fran Olliver, Mercy Ministries director , who resides far West of downtown Augusta said, “We have no where else to go but Harrisburg”...but, Mercy Ministries has been given the old Castleberry building/compound, which is a perfect location for Mercy Ministries. Why haven’t they moved there?

(continued on page 38)

04 06 07

METRONEWS AUGUSTA TEK CROSSWORD FEATURE

08 12 13 16

EVENTS CALENDAR SIGHTINGS JENNY IS WRIGHT

23 28 31

SLAB THE8 MATT’S MUSIC ART 45

32 35 36 37

16 08 10 14

38

Contributors Greg Baker|Sam Eifling |Kristin Hawkins |Rhonda Jones nes |Austin Rhodes|Josh Ruffin|M Ruffin|Mat Ruffin|Matt Stone|Adam Wadding|Jenny Wrig Wright

o r t e m IR P S

INSIDER RUFFIN’ IT AUSTIN RHODES

WHINE LINE

Metro Spirit is a freee newspaper published publis weekly on Thursday, 52 weeks eks a year. Editorial coverage includes local ocal al issues and news, arts, arts entertainment, entert people, places and pectrum. The he views do not necessarily represent present the views of the th publisher. publish Visit us at metrospirit.com. m.© events. In our paperr appear views from across the political and social spectrum. ner/Publisher: Joe White. Legal: Phillip Scott Hibbard. Reproduction or use without permissio p person, perso please. 15 House, LLC. Owner/Publisher: permission is prohibited. One copy per

CONTENTS

Bridging the Future: Dramatic canal bridges top list of new, exciting changes for Augusta’s most identifiable resource An Incredible Little Storefront: Program uses history and archeology to help veterans transition to the workplace Progressive Paddling: Kayaking’s popularity expanding activity in the canal and the Savannah River Mudfest: Decision to race leaves mountain bike trails rutted and in need of repairs

COVER DESIGN: KRUHU Want to advertise in the Metro Spirit? 706.496.2535 or 706.373.3636

IN

V24|NO16

INSIDER@THEMETROSPIRIT.COM Insider is an anonymous, opinion-based examination of the hidden details of Augusta politics and personalities.

SIDER

Safe Harbor? Though it might seem as if all the momentum has gone out of the move to kick Sentinel Offender Services out of the local probation business — and resolve the issues regarding the constitutionality of private probation and answer the question about why some judges seem to go out of their way to match offenders with the electronic monitoring they can’t afford — those close to the courts insist the momentum is gathering. Quietly and constantly the cases against Sentinel keep coming, and the offenses they document are getting more and more egregious in their disregard for personal freedom and more brazen in their use of the courts as a means to collect a debt. In fact, if not for a family emergency involving one of Sentinel’s legal team, that momentum might be on display right now. A Tuesday hearing had to be postponed, but when it’s rescheduled, expect some interesting maneuvering, though if history has taught us anything, it’s that Judge Danny Craig is going to move at his own pace and cover only the ground he wants to cover. Kind of the way a tugboat works, gently but steadily moving something very large into a secure and captive berth.

Needle (and Stethoscope) Interesting that the Grovetown City Council came down with such unity regarding the need to have a tattoo ordinance that allows only licensed physicians to give tattoos. Interesting because, at present, there is only one tattoo shop in town, and that one is grandfathered in, which means that he can continue operating his business by one set of rules, while anyone else coming into town has to be, you know, a doctor. Given the number of physicians struggling to come to terms with the structure of current healthcare regulations, however, that scenario might not be all that outlandish. And who knows — maybe the doctor’s scrawl will become all the rage

4

METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Can You Hear Me Now? The best line from Tuesday’s mostly uneventful commission meeting came from Commissioner Marion Williams in response to General Council Andrew MacKenzie’s very lawyerly explanation of the “Call the Question” rules: “I heard a lot of words, but I didn’t hear any clarity.”

Retreating Before the Retreat With the April 24 commission retreat on the horizon, a motion at Tuesday’s meeting by Commissioner Donnie Smith managed to postpone what might have been a complicating factor — a commission discussion regarding changing the ordinance dealing with conflicts of interest and ethics violations. Such a discussion has been looming since it was shuffled out of the Administrative Services Committee meeting on March 25. In truth, it’s been simmering since the censure of Commissioners Grady Smith, Wayne Guilfoyle and Joe Jackson, who all admitted to doing some form of business with the city, which is a clear violation of city code. Since then, commissioners have made quite a show out of how they might put some teeth into the ordinance. The kind of teeth that can take a pound of flesh. They’ve talked about talking about it, but so far they’ve steered clear of it. Of course, there’s no way to discuss that kind of thing without getting everybody’s defenses up, so the motion to task the attorney and Commissioners Johnson, Davis, Smith and Mason to review the ordinances of other municipalities in order to compare ethics policies and come back with possible revision was an elegant way to both postpone and diffuse. Nothing has gone away and nothing has changed, but the move paves the way for commissioners to start the retreat without the ticklish issue of self policing, which can’t be a bad thing, considering.

2nd Annual

!

AUGUSTA LIVING GREEN DAY AUGUSTA COMMONS

April 20th 10:00 am - 4:00 pm 836 Reynolds Street, Augusta, GA

Free event celebrating “Green” living in the CSRA Family Fun, Food Vendors, and Live Music Augusta Environmental Services Department will be on hand to recycle: Tires (Limit 4) | Home Electronics | Batteries

WWW.AUGUSTAGA.GOV/GREEN 18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT

5

V24|NO16

Fictional Reenactment

What we can learn from a novelist about emphathy Over the past two weeks or so, I’ve been reading Nick Flynn’s new memoir “The Reenactments.” It’s his third, and at this point — about 200 pages in — I can’t decide whether it’s his best or his most mediocre (I’d be hard-pressed to characterize any of his writing as “bad”), but it definitely has my attention. Not that my decision to finish it has anything to do with that; once I start a book, movie or any undertaking, I have a hard time justifying the termination or suspension of completing it. The only exception is the occasional video game — I’m still trying to figure out how to KO Mike Tyson from the original “Punch-Out!” and have spent the last six months just staring down Electro through the shrink-wrap on the Wii Spider-man box art. To the point, Flynn’s fame yanks any writer honest with him- or herself in two different existential directions, neither of them particularly pleasant. On the one hand, he is infuriatingly successful. The near-simultaneous clapping-over of his first memoir (“Another Bullshit Night in Suck City”) and his first volume of poetry (“Some Ether”) immediately established him as both a truly legitimate author and a darling of the literary community. Those two categorizations don’t always go hand in hand, and it’s exponentially frustrating to anyone on the outside when they do. To his credit, Flynn hasn’t squandered his notoriety. Since then, he’s used it to pursue a couple of pet projects that likely wouldn’t have seen the light of day if no one knew his name: “Blind Huber,” his sophomore poetry collection, for example, is a series of short, ephemeral poems centered around an eponymous beekeeper. On the other hand, success has not come easy, though it seemed to occur all at once for him. “… Suck City” wasn’t published until Flynn was in his forties, an age at which debut working authors are still referred to as “young,” and he had to live through hell — the failing mental health and suicide of his mother, his own drug and alcohol dependency, and the crux of the book, his father’s homelessness and their reconnection through Flynn’s work at a Boston homeless shelter — described in the book, to attain it. It’s a book and a personal history that begs the question: Must we suffer — or rather, should we seek suffering — in order to obtain success and/or self-fulfillment?

6

METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Certain religious orders would agree, to an extent. While only the most extreme actively seek to suffer — think self-flagellation, life-endangering fasting — they do live apart from the world, and lead lives characterized by prayer, labor and scholarship. Some of them get to drink beer, a meager pittance. And that’s me saying that. I bring up this question because of, in a roundabout way, “The Reenactments.” See, a few years ago it was made into a film called “Being Flynn,” (a title which did nothing to downplay Flynn’s celebrity, but whatever) and starring the like of Julianne Moore and Robert de Niro as his mother and father. Paul Dano (“There Will be Blood,” “Little Miss Sunshine”) played Flynn, evidently as a hipster. The film did reasonably well, and de Niro earned particular acclaim for his portrayal of the father. “The Reenactments” is an account and meditation of that process from Flynn’s perspective, sometimes a mere chronicle of production, at other times a more insular discussion of what it means when life takes on a layer of the meta. Stylistically, Flynn responds by dappling the book with numerous selfreferences, repurposing lines from old poems and more of his own writings. In this way, Flynn would seem to resoundingly answer “yes” to the question about suffering, as he willfully — or at least sees this as the only way to deal with the book’s goingson — recalls earlier painful bits of his life in order to place into context the current, though on-thesurface-haute, painful bits. The book is good, and the contemporary stylistic flourishes — a single sentence on a page, for example — that seem at first to do little more than pad the page length are in fact timed and measured to ensure maximum rhetorical and emotional impact. For that matter, we don’t think — or even do — in fully fleshed-out paragraphs. The self, not to mention its view, perception and processing of the world, is a fractured one. When I started writing this, I swear I had a point in mind, and I think it’s this: Flynn’s book, while a notable one, doesn’t describe an experience that all of us have not or will not go through if we simply allow ourselves a single modicum of self-awareness. Be still a moment — listen, see, feel — and the world truly seems to playact. It’s almost absurd.

Be still a moment longer, however, and something else begins to happen. That iota of self-awareness you allowed yourself begins to expand, to encompass and enfold the daily, the populace’ minutiae, that teeming yet ephemeral mass of firing synapses that keeps the world electrified. It’s called empathy. After a tragedy, it’s the easiest thing in the world to feel, or to pretend you feel. And if we would wake up and make the effort to harness that sentiment, that knee-jerk care-ofour-fellow-man, oh, what we could accomplish. How we would lessen the dire need of it, even as it proliferates. How we would reshape the legacy of our species, before something final scatters us throughout the vacuum.

JOSHRUFFIN, a Metro Spirit alum, is a published

journalist and poet who just received his MFA from Georgia College & State University. He was once the most un-intimidating bouncer at Soul Bar.

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Modern Terror Demands Modern Justice So here we sit. Again. The death toll from the Boston Marathon attack does not resonate around the world quite the way the devastation of 9/11 did, but to the survivors and eyewitnesses of this nation’s latest battle with terrorists, the pain and scars will remain in much the same way. As all the amazing stories of courage were told, as the unspeakable injuries were cataloged and as investigators sift through mountains of evidence looking for answers, we are left with a criminal justice system that is completely and totally ill-equipped and too seriously restrained by the Constitution to be an effective final solution once those responsible are brought forth. None but the most naive will refer to Monday’s bombings as anything but terrorism. Thank God the feds are officially handling everything, because if the triple murder (at this time) and mass assault of dozens and dozens of innocents is not enough to turn your stomach, perhaps the fact that the State of Massachusetts does not have a death penalty will send you heaving to the can. Like I said, praise the Lord Massachusetts authorities will be watching the eventual prosecution of this case from the cheap seats because the last thing the criminally insane, terror-obsessed zealots of the world need to see is one of their own doing cushy time in the Barney Frank/Ted Kennedy state prison system. Legal scholars have been hesitant to push for much serious reform when it comes to fighting terror or, for that matter, mass murder because, quite frankly, they are making way too much money off of it. I saw this firsthand when (so-called) Republican Georgia State Senator Preston Smith not once, but twice personally

torpedoed in committee State House approved legislation that would have made our state’s death penalty far more prosecutor friendly, particularly in cases where the guilt of the criminals in question was beyond a shadow of a doubt. (Think Richard Starrett, Renaldo Rivera, Willie Palmer.) He reportedly did this with the full support (tacit, if not expressed) of the Georgia Bar Association. When Smith ran for Attorney General he was soundly defeated in the GOP primary by Sam Olens, a far lesser known and under-financed candidate, primarily under the weight of his Casper Milquetoast approach to death penalty reform. And goody-goody for that! One less pantywaist to deal with within the ranks of the conservative party is always a good thing. But back to the situation at hand, and that is a federal criminal justice system that needs far swifter and better-delivered results than the current rules and customs of constitutional law will allow. What we need are a set of constitutional amendments that will allow for direct federal prosecution not only in cases of enemy sponsored terrorism, but also for mass murders that are premeditated and plotted on citizens in this country, by anyone. I am not talking about cases involving loonbirds who snap and kill their entire family on Thanksgiving night because Grandma forgot to make cranberry sauce; I am talking about premeditated criminal plots aimed at killing and maiming multiple human beings, for any purpose contrived by the sick animals who do such things. The new courts would allow previously verboten evidence, like that obtained by waterboarding, or under drugged interrogation, to play a part in a trial, as long as a simple majority of an elected panel of judges deemed the techniques

wholly necessary to capture or identify the truly guilty. There would be no citizen juries in these very specialized and limited cases, only a panel of elected judges. Oh, and they would serve one five-year term, and retire with no set pension. Also, there would be no mental illness limitation for delivering said death penalty upon conviction. Adam Lanza? The needle. (Had he survived his suicide attempt.) Seung-Hui Cho? The needle. (Ditto.) James Holmes? The needle. Jared Laughner? The needle. Why keep the criminally insane around? We put crazy animals down; we should do the same for dangerous, crazy criminals. And if you were incompetent in your mass killing attempt (David Hinkley and the Shoe Bomber come to mind), you will not be rewarded for your unintentional mistakes. You will be prosecuted for every human you attempted to kill in a premeditated fashion in the same way as if you had succeeded. If convicted, the needle. Again, all of this will now be allowed, because our new constitutional amendments say it will be allowed. I guarantee if such reform were put to a popular vote in this country it would win with 75 percent of the people supporting it. The terrorists and mass murderers don’t play by the rules. To stop them, it is way past time to change ours.

AUSTINRHODES

The views expressed are the opinions of Austin Rhodes and do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher.

t Eliminates the need for hot water in your laundry

NEVER

t Provides up to 10 years of service

BUYDETERGENT Davis Appliance & Furniture 3273 Deams Bridge Rd. Augusta, GA 30906

706.796.0500

18APRIL2013

t Installs to your existing washing machine t Environmentally friendly laundry appliance that produces sparkling clean, dazzling fresh laundry with little or no detergent, bleach or fabric softener. t Health Benefits include the reduction or elimination of skin irritations and allergic reactions caused by residual chemicals in fabric from detergent, bleach and fabric softener. t pureWash changes water by adding enhanced oxygen and photo-catalytic oxidizers to the cold water supply. It eliminates the use of harmful chemicals, using the strength of oxygen to turn your wather into the most powerful and efficient agent possible. t Hospitals have been using the technology for over 20 years because of its disinfecting and cleaning properties. AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT

7

V24|NO16

ERICJOHNSON

An Incredible Little Storefront

Program uses history and archeology to help veterans transition to the workplace

It’s easy to overlook the Veterans Curation Program office in Martinez, nestled as it is next to an H&R Block office in the West Town Shopping Center, but once you find it, it’s hard not to be impressed. Inside the sparse office, veterans learn job skills while sorting through historic and prehistoric objects under the direction of Caroline Bradford and Patrick Rivera, two young researchers from, to hear them talk, vastly different worlds. Bradford is a historian, Rivera is an archeologist and, there at the VCP office, they are the scientific version of the Odd Couple. “Patrick showed us this pigment stone and said that if you rub it, the pigment will come off on your fingers,” Bradford says. “I told him that I wasn’t going to touch it because I want to preserve it, where his thinking is — he wants to develop theories and get his hands on things.” The Veterans Curation Program was created by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2009 as a way to serve the job training needs of veterans while at the same time helping the corps catalog its backlog of archeological collections. One of three VCP offices across the nation, the Augusta office is processing artifacts from the Millers Ferry collection — 150 boxes of artifacts from Wilcox 8

METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

County, Alabama, where in the 1960s a hydroelectric dam was built on the Alabama River. “Right now, the collection is in pretty bad condition,” Bradford says. “Some of it is loose in the boxes and some of the boxes are torn up, so we’re going to put it in archival plastic. Eventually, it will go in archival cartons and the data will be presented in a spreadsheet and we’ll send it back to the University of Alabama Office of Archeological Research.” The project should take two years. According to Bradford, the Millers Ferry Dam is similar to the Strom Thurmond Dam that forms Clarks Hill Lake. While it’s considerably smaller, the same methods apply. “Whenever you fill a reservoir, you have to think about all the area that’s going to be underwater,” she says. “That’s where you start looking for archeological sites, and after WWII, the corps got really big in doing this kind of thing, and that created a huge amount of collections that got done pretty fast and have been languishing on shelves for the last 50 years.” The last scene of the first Indiana Jones movie? She says it’s more accurate than you might think. Labs like the one in Martinez, which is owned by New South Associates, a cultural resource management company, methodically process those collections, and while to some it might sound boring, Bradford insists it is a plumb job. “Someone goes out in the field, and they dig for

days or months on end and this is the product of what they’ve done,” she says. “But there were a lot of days where they were just digging up dirt and throwing it into a pile.” Here, Rivera agrees. “This is definitely one of the coolest things you can do as an archeologist,” Rivera says. “I just get to sit here all day and work with the cool things other people have dug up.” And that’s rewarding? “You have no idea,” he says. “Just today, I found something that made me so excited that I took pictures and sent them out to my boss. I get to find stuff like 18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

that every day.� Eventually, everything from the artifacts Rivera is sorting through to the documents Bradford will be reviewing, will be photographed and put into an online database run by Arizona State University, something that will revolutionize the way such things are studied. Instead of getting permission to see one or two individual artifacts, everything will be viewable online. Which is where the veterans come in. Without their labor, most of the backlog of collections would never get processed because professors are seldom interested in investing time and money in digs that aren’t their own. “Since no one knows what’s in these boxes, no one can be sure it’s going to help them out,� Rivera says. “They might find something, but they’re not going to be sure enough to want to go back through all the collections themselves.� Picking things up on the fly, the vets learn a broad range of transferable office skills. “We’re not requiring people to become experts,� Rivera says. “For artifacts, it’s mostly sorting between very basic things, like figuring out if this is prehistoric pottery or historic pottery.� The fact that they’re not using a highly specialized database further enables the veterans to broaden their job skills while making the research available to the widest possible audience. The program, which will employ approximately six veterans, is designed to last about six months before the next group comes in. “It’ll take them two months to get good at artifacts and two months to get good at archives,� Bradford says. “Then, between the photography and the scanning and the job building, that will kind of round it out.� The end result will bring job training to the vets and help whittle away the corps’ collection of artifacts. “It’s a really great opportunity,� Rivera says. “You don’t have to have any experience in archeology and you don’t have to have any experience in history — we’ll train you on what you need to know for this, and at the end of six months, we’ll go out of our way to help make sure you’ve got a good resume and start setting you up for interviews.� Though neither have Bradford nor Rivera has a background in job training, the benefits are obvious and rewarding. “I came out here for an open house, and that was my first introduction to the program,� Bradford says. “I looked at the outside of the office and thought, ‘This is the VCP?’ But then I walked inside and started talking to veterans and hearing how fulfilling they found it, I thought, ‘Man — this is an incredible little storefront.’� 18APRIL2013

PRESENTED BY FORT GORDON & UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX

(4''#FOKUUKQPVQVJG'XGPV*ĹžOPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Fort Gordon’s Barton Field

April 18-21, 2013 #EVKXKVKGU'PVGTVCKPOGPV** Carnival Pricing

Saturday, April 20

Friday & Saturday All You Can Ride: Under 48� 48� & Over Single Tickets:

$10.00 $20.00 $1.00 each

Thursday & Sunday All You Can Ride Single Tickets:

$10.00 $1.00 each

Thursday, April 18 4 p.m.-10 p.m.

Carnival (Family Night)

9 a.m.-2 p.m. Flea Market 9 a.m.-3 p.m. BOSS Car, Truck & Bike Show Registration 9:00-11:00 a.m. Judging 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Award Ceremony 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.-Dark Pony Rides 10 a.m.-Midnight Carnival

The John King Band

5CVWTFC[.KXG'PVGTVCKPOGPV 5-5:30 p.m. DJ Music with Games/ Contests 5:30-6:30 p.m. Doug and the Henry’s 7:30-10:30 p.m. The John King Band

Friday, April 19 4-11 p.m. 5 p.m.-Dark 5:30-6:30 p.m. 7:30-10:30 p.m.

Carnival Pony Rides Signal Corps Band Rock Band Playback “The Band� (featuring Tutu D’Vyne)

Sunday, April 21 Noon-6 p.m.

Carnival (Service Member Appreciation) *Excludes carnival and concessions.

6KOGUUWDLGEVVQEJCPIG

ĹžYYYHQTVIQTFQPEQO

Doug and the Henrys

Playback “The Band�

(Americana/Bluegrass)

(featuring Tutu D’Vyne)

Carnival

Flea Market

Signal Corps Band Rock Band

Pony Rides

BOSS Car, Truck & Bike Show

And More ...

Sponsors Advertising and Sponsorship do not constitute endorsement by the DoD, the U.S. Army or Fort Gordon MWR.

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT

9

V24|NO16

KRISTINHAWKINS

Progressive Paddling

Kayaking’s popularity expanding activity in the canal and the Savannah River

The sport of kayaking has increased in popularity so much locally that kayak rentals and sales are growing along with new business opportunities to capitalize on the interest.

A FIRST CLASS STEAKHOUSE WITH 152 ROOMS. We age our own steaks for 28 days, grow our own herbs and make our own sauces. Experience our table side salads Washington Road at I-20 | 1069 Stevens Creek Road | Augusta 10 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Barry Smith, the community and leisure services division director for Columbia County, said that after the remodel and expansion of the Savannah Rapids Pavilion area, more and more people have started using the canal to kayak. The increase in use of Savannah Rapids as a place to drop in kayaks has also led to people wanting the ability to rent at the location. “What we did — we did a request for proposal to secure a provider of canoe and kayak rentals,” Smith said. “Escape Outdoors was basically the provider that was selected. Escape Outdoors has since sold its rental business to Steve and Leslie Wright, who now own Savannah Rapids Kayak Rentals. Steve Wright said it was the love of the water and outdoors that drew him to the business. “My wife taught with the man who owns Escape Outdoors,” Wright said. “They were interested in starting up a kayaking rental business and we just discussed it with them and they started it. I think the owner of Escape Outdoors wanted to get rid of it and we wanted it so it was perfect for us. We could enjoy it and we could spend time outside instead of in a classroom.” Wright said one of the things he has noticed about kayaking is that it does not matter what time of year the warm weather hits, that kayakers will utilize any nice day to get out on the water. “The warmer it gets the more people that come out,” Wright said. “I think it was the second weekend in January where we had that real warm spell and people just came out. It was incredible.” Matt Patrick, the manager at Escape Outdoors, said that the sport of kayaking is simple enough for anyone to learn, thus leaving people coming back for more. “I have to tell people all the time, ‘If you can ride a bike then you can kayak in your sleep,’” he said. “It usually takes about a 30 second buffer zone before you figure out what you are doing and then usually everyone has a good time from there.” Not only is kayaking a good way for people to get in better shape, but Patrick added that it is also a way for members of the community to utilize the resources around them. “A lot of people are starting to realize that not only is kayaking cheap, it does get you in good shape,” Patrick said. “It’s easy to get out there, and with all the necessary equipment you can kind of just pick up and go.” Word of mouth has been one of the biggest influences on the popularity of the sport, according to Patrick. Taylor Haddon, a student at Georgia Regents University and a frequent kayaker, said all it took was one trip with a group of friends to get him hooked. “The first time I went was about two years ago and it was my first time ever being in a kayak,” Haddon said. “I got invited to go on a trip to Tybee Island with four of my friends and we didn’t plan any practice trips or anything beforehand. I pretty much just got in and we set off from downtown at the marina and it was pretty easy, I guess, because the trip was over 200 miles and I made it with no prior experience.” Since his trip two years ago, Haddon said he goes kayaking every chance he gets. Both Haddon and Patrick agreed that the simplicity of the sport as well as their draw to the outdoors has heavily affected their love of the sport. “Kayaking is just one thing that’s easy to do and it’s fun and kind of gets you in direct contact with the water,” Patrick said. “It’s a nice, serene, quiet thing to do if you are out on the river or lake. It’s a good thing to do to get out there and enjoy nature.” 18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

GREGORY A. BAKER, PH.D

Fighting Terror with Tech

23(1+286( 7KXUVGD\0D\_SPSP 811 Telfair Street · 706.722.9964 · ICAUGUSTA.ORG Immaculate Conception Catholic School PreK (3&4) through 8th Grade 6PDOO&ODVV6L]HVo&DWKROLF&KULVWLDQ(QYLURQPHQWo$IIRUGDEOH7XLWLRQ )XOO\$FFUHGLWHGo&HUWLILHG7HDFKHUVo%HIRUHDQG$IWHU6FKRRO&DUH &ODVVURRP7HFKQRORJ\o6SRUWV3URJUDPo$UWDQG0XVLF

WELCOMING STUDENTS OF ALL BACKGROUNDS AND FAITH

Social media helps in the aftermath of the bombings in Boston The big news of the week is the terrorist attack in Boston. Our thoughts and prayers are with those whose lives were lost or otherwise forever changed. And our emotions burn at those who dare bring violence into our lives. This time it was on Patriots Day in Boston. Next time, it could be Sunday in Augusta. Fortunately, social media always helps us come together in times of crisis, and Monday was no exception. Within seconds, Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites quickly spread news of the blast, and within minutes photos and videos were posted. A local event immediately became international, with an outpouring of support from those across the world. In the aftermath, race organizers used online services to communicate with stranded racers and help them get reunited with their families. Google relaunched its Person Finder, first used during the Haitian earthquake, to help loved ones find each other. And in the days to come, no doubt the cell phone video from all the citizen journalists will help track down the bastards that did this. It’s sad to think that this is the world in which my daughters have to grow up. But it’s of some comfort to see how social media seems keeps us connected and, hopefully, helps us stay vigilant in protecting ourselves. The Time Is Near — A couple of different rumors in the smart watch department. First, the CNET is jumping on comments made by Apple board member Bill Campbell at an internal Intuit event this week. Campbell referred to application of technology to “really intimate things,â€? specifically items like glasses and watches. Second, Microsoft reportedly requested Asian suppliers to ship components for a touch-enabled watch device. Too soon to say how committed Microsoft is, but it seems they are interested. Of course, we are all still trying to figure out why someone might need a smart watch. For the time being, having the latest tech status gadget seems to be enough. Are You Sure About That? — We’ve all been there on Facebook, having spent the last 15 minutes creating a great post. Just before hitting the Post button, you have a second thought. Next thing you know, it’s a ctrl-a followed by delete. It’s called self-censorship, and according to Sauvik Dak and Adam Kramer, about 71 percent of Facebook users do it. Dak and Kramer recently published a paper titled‌ ready for this‌ “SelfCensorship on Facebook.â€? The eight-page treatise is riveting, but for the sake of brevity, I’ll boil it down for you (with some added literary license)‌ ‡,I\RXGRQ¡WNQRZ\RXUDXGLHQFH\RX¡OOFHQVRU\RXUVHOIRXWRIIHDURIPDNLQJD fool of yourself. ‡,I\RXDUHWDONLQJWRDVSHFLILFDXGLHQFH\RX¡OOFHQVRU\RXUVHOIRXWRIIHDURIQRW being relevant. ‡,I\RXDUHSDUWRIDVRFLDOJURXSZLWKVWULFWVRFLDOQRUPV\RX¡OOFHQVRU\RXUVHOIWR conform. ‡,I\RXZULWHDFROXPQIRUWKH0HWUR6SLULW\RX¡OOQHYHUFHQVRU\RXUVHOIEHFDXVH you have no problem with being foolish, pointless and deviant. And, also, you’d really hate to see a good whine go to waste! Until next week, I’m off the grid @gregory_a_baker. GREGORY A. BAKER, PH.D, is vice president and chief rocket scientist for CMA, which provides information technology services to CSRA businesses and nonprofits.

12 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

FITTING REARRANGEMENTS By Matt Ginsberg / Edited by Will Shortz

96 97 98 99

Beat it Name on a museum plaque Memphis-to-Nashville dir. Opera character who sings “Largo al factotum” 101 “The ___ Show” (best-selling album of 2002) 103 “Great” 1666 conflagration 109 Birthday suit enthusiast 112 Passage 113 Video store penalty 115 Medical suffix 116 Apt anagram for 24-Across 119 Designer Picasso, daughter of Pablo 120 Coastal niche 121 They’re on the left in Britain 122 “South Pacific” protagonist and namesakes 123 Former Israeli president Weizman 124 Dustup 125 Baffled 126 1978 Peace Prize recipient Down 1 Cuba, por ejemplo 2 Coupe’s couple 3 Apt anagram for 31-Across 4 Places to hole up after holdups 5 Unvarying 6 Grant, e.g. 7 How things are generally stir-fried 8 Backs, anatomically 9 Munitions supplier 10 Black shade 11 Lover of Psyche 12 To be in Paris? 13 Buckingham Palace resident 14 Alters to allow development, maybe 15 Scotland’s “Granite City” 16 English poet who co-founded the Pre-Raphaelites 17 Begins, as a journey 19 Scratch the surface of, maybe 21 Per ___ 27 Galena and cerussite 30 Apt anagram for 55-Across 32 Egyptian sun deity 33 Reggae precursor 37 Georgia neighbor

38 Not much, as of paint 40 Fleetwood or Eldorado, informally 41 Checked out 43 Ask for change 44 “How can ___ sure?” 45 Hometown of TV’s McCloud 46 PC insert 49 Alternative to “com” 51 Banker’s concern 54 Apt anagram for 79-Across 56 Hot tar, e.g. 57 Mata ___ 59 Good protein source 60 1984 title role for Emilio Estevez 63 Apt anagram for 103-Across 64 Offshore installation 67 Sun 68 Multiple-choice choices 70 Order during an M.R.I. 72 Croatian leader? 74 Municipal facility: Abbr. 76 U.S.A. part: Abbr. 78 Alternative to white 80 “Hurlyburly” writer David 81 Tomorrow’s is tonight 82 Like Mars 85 Was congenial 86 Completely 87 Like the word “curiae” in “amicus curiae” 90 Melodic phrase 91 Legendary queen of the Britons immortalized by Shakespeare 93 Teetotaler 95 Cool, in slang 96 Small chickens 100 Lose it 102 Heart 104 Short pastoral piece 105 Not built up 106 Prefix with car 107 Some Siouans 108 Where Hercules slew the lion 110 Minuteman’s location 111 Stepped 114 Big ___ (sports conference) 117 Moses Malone, on the 76ers 118 N.M. setting

1

2

3

4

5

6

18

19

7

8

9

20

23

10

26

27 31

13

14

29

42

43

44

45

55

59

65

66 74

86

87

67

68

88

77 82

89

97

103 110

115

116

120

121

123

124

D E A L S

U R B A N

E R A T O

C A B I N

A W A R E

G A T O R

C I T E

A N E W

G L U M

R O L E

C H E W B A C C A

L O S T W E E K E N D T O N A I K E N

S L E E V O E K S E M A O N D C E U S T C O O R R E N M E R S

111

64 72

78 83

84

90

91 96

99

102

109

63 71

95

98

101

52 57

70

76 81

94

51

62 69

80

93

39 47

61

75

79

92

38

56

60

73

37

50

54

58

17

34

46

49

53

16

30

33 36

41

15

22

28 32

48

85

12

25

35 40

11

21

24

PREVIOUSPUZZLEANSWERS

Across 1 Postal ID 6 Memphis belle? 10 Raspberry 14 Kind of form 18 Cobbler’s job 20 So that one might 22 Black shade 23 Stevedore, at times 24 College student’s place 25 Dial competitor 26 British soccer powerhouse 28 “Got it” 29 Fish with a long neck 31 Procrastinators’ enablers 34 Shark, maybe 35 Beat at a Nathan’s hot dog contest, say 36 Snake in “The Jungle Book” 39 Salad bar items 40 “Le ___ de Monte-Cristo” 42 Visa offering 47 Of ___ (servicing) 48 Mayo containers? 49 Turned 50 “China Beach” actress Helgenberger 52 Novelist who had two spouses simultaneously 53 Abbr. on car sellers’ license plates 54 N. African land 55 “Decision Points” author 58 Repeats 61 Vague response to “When?” 62 Marsh of detective fiction 65 ___ City, Miss. 66 Gecko’s gripper 69 Turbulence 71 Local bird life 73 “Bye Bye Bye” band 75 Onetime sunblock agent 77 BB shooter 79 Galileo, for one 83 Electric ___ 84 Mishandle something, say 85 One of the M’s of 3M: Abbr. 88 Electric car 89 Football misdirection 91 Hipster’s pad 92 Charioteer’s place 94 Apt anagram for 42-Across

104

105

106

100

107

108

112

113

117

118

114 119 122

125

A S S A Y

T E T R A

T E N S E R

I M F

A E O N

N A N O

B E D M I M M E

F L H A R E G O N G E R Y N G I E R O R E N C D B R O R A W E N A N D M Y A R E N S T E E N D T A

126

J A K E A D E S W A R S S N E A S U P M C N I N T H I P O S V E R S A T U R A C N A Y N A N O F T H A S I A M E N T S A E G A L G R A G E R E G G L I U S E P

D E A T H M E T A L

C R O W E

C A R O L K R A E N F E

A S T R

B E A K

A I D S

I N S T

L U S T A S H E D E A C I R R E S P D S E N I U P I N T O G D E T H I N S T A N

H A D I N S O N G S

FROM BEETHOVEN TO THE BEASTIE BOYS Elliott Sons Funeral Homes ELLIOTTFUNERALHOME.COM

18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 13

V24|NO16

ERICJOHNSON

Mudfest

Decision to race leaves mountain bike trails rutted and in need of repairs

By all accounts, the XTERRA Hickory Knob Triathlon held on the weekend of March 23 and 24 was a wet one, and while the rain might have made the swimming and running portion of the event miserable, it made the bike portion of the event positively destructive. “This isn’t just minor damage,” says Dave Kozlowski, president of the CSRA chapter of the Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association (SORBA). “The initial estimate is that it’s going to be at least 400 man hours to repair.” While the average person on the street might think that riding mountain bikes on the trail in the rain and the mud is sort of what you’re supposed to do, it’s really the opposite. With the clay here in the southeast, riding in the rain actually destroys the trails, which is why SORBA-CSRA, as an advocacy group, strongly discourages people from riding or using trails when they’re wet. However, despite the work they do to keep up (and in some cases build) the trails for different land managers across the area, SORBA-CSRA does not have the power to stop a rider from riding a trail in the rain, let alone cancel or postpone an organized race. “We can’t tell any one land manager what to do, but certainly we hope that in return for our maintaining their trails, they are considerate enough to consult us when we are able to offer advice.” In the case of the XTERRA Hickory Knob Triathlon, several local SORBA-CSRA members were at a board of

directors meeting when the event occurred, so they were not in attendance, though they’ve pieced together reports from those who were at the race, many of whom have commented on forum section on SORBA-CSRA’s website, including video from one rider’s chest-mounted camera. “We returned that Sunday night, and the following week we found out that it was just a mudfest out there on the trails,” Kozlowski says. “As bad as we thought the conditions were, it’s even worse than we imagined. There was running water in some sections for as far as you could see. In fact, the guy who was wearing the camera who also had audio made several comments to himself as he’s slogging through the mess about this being a mud run instead of a bike race.” As it dries, the ruts created by the race will become hard, complicating repairs. “We’re talking to a local trail builder right now and we’re also talking to another SORBA chapter that many years ago had a very similar catastrophe happen with a race on one of their trails,” Kozlowski says. “We’re getting information about the best way to approach such extensive damage.” As an organization, though, he says it’s going to be tough to muster much enthusiasm for repairing the trail without more information from the land manager. “While we don’t mind doing the repair on this, if Hickory Knob is going to host this event again and not enforce a rain policy, then it’s going to be hard for us to get members to go out there and fix the trail when potentially, it’ll get damaged next year,” he says. And this is where it gets tricky. While Kozlowski and many of his SORBA-CSRA members agree a rain policy should exist to prevent something like this from happening again,

that’s not something SORBA-CSRA has pressed for in the past. “My feeling is that we probably should have done it, and we will do it now in the future with all our land managers when we know about events occurring,” he says. Though the destruction is obvious and the reason is clear, assigning blame has not been as straightforward as you might think. While it was an XTERRA-sanctioned event, XTERRA is simply a large organization that gives its name to an event. The race itself was put on by Multisport Fitness, a company out of Hilton Head. And as land manager, Hickory Knob officials could have insisted on moving the bike portion to a paved road, but apparently that didn’t happen, either. According to Kozlowski, his initial contact with Race Director Andy Kennedy was brief but cordial, though Kennedy did not apologize for the condition of the course or for the debris many reported was left behind after the race. “I wasn’t very optimistic after the first conversation, but coincidentally, after some of our members contacted XTERRA, the big organization, the race promoter sent the officers of SORBA-CSRA an email offering an olive branch of sorts,” Kozlowski says. The email admitted the trails were wet and sloppy on race morning, but Kennedy sidestepped responsibility for allowing the race to continue. “I was not, as race director, in any position to cancel the XTERRA Hickory Knob race,” he wrote. “I do, though, understand the desire to do some maintenance of the trails after the race. As such, I have sent an e-mail out to all who registered for the race, whether they raced or not, letting them know that SORBA-CSRA will be holding a work day on the trails on a date in the not too distant future and asking that they come do a bit of work if they are able.” In the email, he also directed race participants to the SORBA-CSRA website and encouraged donations to help trail repair. In addition, he himself said he joined the SORBA-CSRA chapter and said that XTERRA would be providing pizza and beer for those who attend the trail work session. Kozlowski says he’s attempting to contact the proper people at Hickory Knob State Park to find out what part they played in allowing the race to continue. “We’re past blame,” he says. “We just want to sort of fix it and make sure it doesn’t happen again to either them or any of the other trails with our other land managers.”

Are you so frustrated with your computer you’ve considered tossing it out the window? Is it so slow you can barely use it? Are you having trouble getting to your favorite web page... or facebood? Are you even tempted to teake it to one of those Big Box Stores for service? Think again! Do you really want the place that sells you envelopes or flat screen TVs working on your computer? Bring it to ComputerOne today... and our real computer guys will make it all better at a price you can afford. We’re the opposite of a Big Box Store. We’re the little store in Fairway Square and although we have our own of computer experts, we dont really call them geeks (at least to their faces). They’re just competent, skilled computer technicians with the know-how to clean up your computer at a reasonable price and get you back on the internet fast. And although we’re not keeping score, given the fact we’re celebrating our 25th anniversary this year, it is very likely we’ve sold and repaired more computers than any other company in Augusta... and we have thousands of satisfied customers to prove it.

THINK. NOT A BIG BOX... NOT EVEN CLOSE

14 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

NOTABIGBOX.COM

Professional Virus & Spyware Removal Services $69.95 Call us today at 706.667.9009

About Us | Services | Virus and Spyware Removal | Custom Built Computers | Point of Sale Systems | Driving Directions | Contact Us Copyright 2011 ComputerOne Technology, Inc., All Rights Reserved - Website developed, hosted and maintained by Southfire, Inc. 2825 Washington Rd., Fairway Square Shopping Center, Augusta, GA 30909 - 706.667.9009

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Coming Soon to Evans! Opening May 2013

4349 Washington Road Across from Mellow Mushroom in front of Kroger

Phyllis Salazar Vice President & Office Manager 706-650-2265

www.firstbankofga.com 18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 15

V24|NO16

ERICJOHNSON

Bridging the Future

Dramatic canal bridges top list of new, exciting changes for Augusta’s most identifiable resource

The view along Riverwatch Parkway is about to change dramatically with the addition of a small but impressive stretch of the Augusta Canal Trail. “It’s going to be very popular, I feel,” says Dayton Sherrouse, executive director of the Augusta Canal Authority. Construction has already begun for the $1.5 million section of the trail, called the River Levee Trail, which will cross the tailraces of Sibley and King mills. “The current trail comes off the existing trail by Lake Olmsted right by the bulkhead gates and it loops around underneath Riverwatch Parkway by Raes Creek and it stops at Sibley Mill,” Sherrouse says. “What this will do is bring it across the tailrace at Sibley and in between going over to the King Mill tailrace and across it and then back up to the top of the levee.” From there, he says, the trail will connect into downtown Augusta. “There’s a short section in there we will want to improve with a paved trail, but at least it will be workable once we get back on top of the levee,” he says. Those things don’t happen overnight, however, and for 16 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

now the hardhat area only includes the bridges and the land in between, which according to Tom Dunaway, senior project manager for W.R. Toole Engineers, looks deceptively small on paper. “From a length standpoint, this section is really short,” he says. “It’s only about 1,500 feet. The meat and potatoes of the project are the two bridge crossings. Those are the big cost components.” Dunaway, who is also designing the newest section of Columbia County’s Euchee Creek Greenway Trail, says one of the two bridges is a prefabricated steel bridge similar to the one planned to cross Euchee Creek. It will be installed in two pieces before the end of the month, but to do that, the contractors are constructing a temporary bridge to help them build the final bridge. “They’re actually building a bridge to build a bridge,” Dunaway says. Getting to the Sibley tailrace, while time consuming because of the thick growth, has been a pretty straightforward affair. “We generally knew the alignment,” he says. “We did make some changes to help save as many of the larger growth trees, but where they’re working now across the Sibley Mill tailrace — that was generally set based on previous phases.”

The 1,500 feet between the Sibley Mill tailrace and the King Mill tailrace, though, required a field layout similar to what he did near Euchee Creek, where he walked off the proposed course, marking individual trees to save. Once completed, both Dunaway and Sherrouse expect this section to be a destination point. “The bridge over King Mill tailrace will be a cable-stayed bridge, which is almost a miniature suspension bridge,” Dunaway says. “That will be a really unique crossing there.” It will be one of the only cable-stayed bridges in the area. “Those are going to be real highlights for the city of Augusta and the canal trail,” he says. “It’s truly a quality of life issue. Those bridges will draw a lot of folks down.” The money for this phase of the project comes from a grant administered by the Department of Transportation. The Canal Authority can be a direct recipient of the money because it’s a state-created authority, but that doesn’t mean Sherrouse can simply take the money and start construction. Before he can do anything, he needs approvals from the Corps of Engineers, the Historic Preservation Division, the Department of Natural Resources and various city departments. “There are a lot of hoops you’ve got to jump through,” Sherrouse says, chuckling. Some of those hoops involve the use of Special Purpose 18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) funds, which are allocated by the city. Sherrouse uses those funds to match federal and state grants for canal improvement projects. “The federal money — the most you can get is 80 percent,” he says. “Then, you have to match at least 20 percent, and we historically overmatch. They like to see that.” Starting out, the federal grant for this phase of the overall trail project was $825,000, but Sherrouse says he’s in the process of getting the paperwork done to receive another $150,000, which would push the federal portion to $975,000. “I got a call a few weeks ago from (former commissioner) Don Grantham, who serves on the DOT board representing our area,” Sherrouse says. “He said there was another $150,000 available, so we’re in the process of adding it to this project.” Sherrouse went before the commission Tuesday to finalize the SPLOST agreement, in which the county agrees to appropriate the sum of $4.17 million to the authority for the Augusta Canal Improvement Project. The initial trigger of $925,000 has been raised and will be immediately allocated to the Canal Authority. The balance of the money will be dispersed in three additional installments, with the Canal Authority receiving $625,000 more before the end of the year, $725,000 before the end of 2014 and roughly $1.9 million before the end of 2015. Because of the requirements of SPLOST funds, the money cannot be used for maintenance and operations, and thanks to these voter-approved funds, Sherrouse is looking at looking at several additional projects. At a Wednesday announcement, Sherrouse unveiled several new changes to the canal, including a renaming of the Interpretive Center to the Augusta Canal Discovery Center. Also in the works, a Confederate Powder Works interpretive plaza and a comprehensive new signage plan for the entire canal. Project Manager Russell Foster finds a series of mountain bike trails proposed to be 18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 17

V24|NO16

constructed between the canal and the river particularly exciting. “We had a trail development management plan done for us, and they’re recommending eight to 10 miles of mountain bike/nature trails,” Foster says. “That’s going to make us a destination if we have sort of a mini FATS in an urban setting.” Another project is an upgraded entrance near Lake Olmsted. “We’re working on another project right now on the other side of the canal at the back end of Lake Olmsted by where the Humane Society is,” he says. “We’re going to add some additional parking there, because there’s really no place to park.” There is also a new gateway at Riverlook Drive that will provide public access at the end of the Riverlook Drive culde-sac. This $165,000 project will replace the Eisenhower Park

access point. It includes a parking area for approximately 43 vehicles and it will look similar to the Goodrich Street/Levee Road entrance at the east side of the pumping station. Also, Sherrouse plans for another section of trail heading inland along the third level of the canal running by the judicial center. “We’ve got that under design now and we’re hoping to get that out for bid later this summer,” he says. “We’ve already got a grant approved for it, so we’re just getting the design done on it. Hopefully, we can get that out for bid toward the end of the summer.” In addition to the new trail sections, Sherrouse also says existing sections of trail will receive improvements. “Basically, from the pumping station all the way back up to the headgates in Columbia County will stay natural,” he says. “It’s been a historic trail there, and folks don’t want it paved. But the in-town portions of it will be gradually paved, even

the ones that are there now.” The section currently under construction will be built out of concrete rather than asphalt because of the durability factor and the fact that, due to its remoteness, getting repair equipment back in there promises to be difficult. “It’s more expensive on the front end to do it in concrete, but you can cut down on your long-term maintenance,” Sherrouse says. Eventually, the trail will be a uniting factor for several communities. “The nice thing about this — we’re kind of the middle, but you can actually then go across 13th Street and get to the greeneway system in North Augusta, and up in Columbia County, they’re extending the trail out Evans to Locks Road toward Evans Town Center.”

Get Associated with a 2.69% pre-owned auto loan. APR

csraonline.org

18 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Arts

Undercover Artists Show will be held at Julian Smith Casino, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Benefits Camp To Be Independent, Walton Foundation’s annual camp for children and young adults ages 8-21 with an acquired brain injury. $50. Call 706-826-5809 or email HYPERLINK “mailto:alsalley@wrh.org”alsalley@wrh.org. Cavestone Pottery Making will be held at Mistletoe State Park, Saturday, April 20. Register by April 18. Class $2; parking $5. Call 706-541-0321 or visit gastateparks.org/mistletoe.

Exhibitions

Reception for religious Easter art exhibit featuring Malaika Favorite and Ronald Bonar will be held at the Kroc Center, 4-5 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Email allyson.campbell@uss.salvationarmy.org or call 706-364-4064. Mortal Coil: Photographs by Jennifer Onofrio Fornes will open at the Morris Museum, 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Reception follows. Free. Call 706-7247501 or visit themorris.org. “Tiny Worlds: Big Problem” will show at OddFellows Gallery as part of a World Voice Day celebration, through April 30. Features GRU’s patient art projects. After that, it will be moved to GRU Medical Center. Call 706-4464802 or visit gru.edu. The Drawings of Rebecca Clark will be on exhibit at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art through May 17. Her subject matter is the interconnected nature of the insects, animals and plants of her environment. Members free; non-members $5. Call 706-722-5495 or visit ghia.org. “Restoration,” an exhibit of work by GRU adjunct instructor Mahera Khaleque, will be on display through May 17. Members, free; nonmembers, $5. Call 706-722-5495 or visit ghia.org. Georgia Artists With Disabilities touring exhibit will be on display at Walton Rehabilitation Hospital through April 30. Call 706-823-8584 or visit whr.org. First Lady Ellen Axson Wilson and Her Circle exhibit will be shown at the Morris Museum until May 5. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School Senior Exhibition will be held at the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art through April 25. Call 706-722-5495 or visit ghia.org. “Alterations: Fashioning a Black Identity” exhibit will be presented by Nancy Wellington Bookhart at the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History through April 30. Call 706-724-3576 or visit lucycraftlaneymuseum.com. Millie Gosch art exhibit is on display at Sacred Heart Cultural Center through April 30. Call 706-826-4700 or visit sacredheartaugusta.org. “Romantic Spirits” exhibit, featuring paintings of the South from the Johnson collection, will be on display through May 26. Call 706-828-3825 or visit themorris.org. “Tying the Knot,” a display of wedding dresses and accessories from the late 1800s to the 1960s, will be on exhibit at the Augusta Museum of History until May. Call 706-722-8454 or visit augustamuseum.org.

Music

Think all rabbis are serious? Not Rabbi Bob Alper, a stand-up comic who has been called a “Jewish Bill Cosby.” Rabbi Alper will perform at Congregation Children of Israel at 7 p.m., Sunday, April 21, in a show best suited for those 11 and over. $18, advance; $22, door. Call 706-736-3140.

Midday Music will be held at First Presbyterian Church in Aiken, noon, Thursday, April 18. Free. Reservations required. Call 803-648-2662 or visit aikenpresbyterian.org. Jazz Ensemble will play at the GRU Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre, 7:309 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Call 706-667-4100 or visit gru.edu. Classical guitarist James Manuele of the Portland Duo will perform at the Nancy Carson Library in North Augusta, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Call 803-642-7575 or visit abbe-lib.org. The Millennium Brass Quintet will play at the GRU Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Friday, April 19. Call 706-667-4100 or visit gru.edu. Drum 4 Your Life classes are being held at the Odell Weeks Center in Aiken. Next session is noon, Saturday, April 20. Registration required. Call 803-642-7630. Masterworks VI: Evening at the Opera, featuring area vocalists and the Columbia County Orchestra will be held at the Jabez Hardin Theatre in Evans, 6 p.m., Saturday, April 20 as part of the Columbia County Orchestra’s Masterworks Series. Free. Donations accepted. Visit columbiacco.org. Jazz Lives will be presented at the Julian Smith Casino, 7 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Live music, art and movement featuring CollectiveCulture, and SoulCelebration with Snarky Puppy. Call 706-495-6238 or visit gardencityjazz.com. 18APRIL2013

ENTERTAIN

ME AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 23

V24|NO16

Music of the 19th and 20th Centuries will be performed by GRU faculty and colleagues as part of the Music at the Morris series, at the Morris Museum, 2 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Free. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org.

instructor Sherwood Belangia as part of the Art at Lunch series at the Morris Museum, noon, Friday, April 19. Members $10; non-members $14. Lunch by Shane’s Rib Shack. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org.

USCA Chamber Music Concert will be performed at the Etherredge Center, 7 p.m., Monday, April 22. Free. Call 803-648-6851 or visit usca.edu.

Open Mic Variety Show will be held in celebration of National Poetry Month, at Headquarters Library, 7-9 p.m., Friday, April 19. Free. Call 706-8212600 or visit ecgrl.org.

Conservatory Jazz Band Concert (high school) will be held at the GRU Maxwell Performing Arts Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 706731-7971 or visit gru.edu.

Poetry Slam and Open Mic Night will be held at Headquarters Library for ages 18 and up, 6:30 p.m., Friday, April 19. Free. Light refreshments. Registration required. Call 706-821-2604 or visit ecgrl.org.

Augusta Children’s Chorale spring concert will be held at First Baptist Church in Augusta, 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. $5. Visit fbcaugusta.org.

Author Kim Boykin, “The Wisdom of Hair,” will appear at the Aiken Library, 3 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Call 803-642-7575 or visit abbe-lib.org.

USCA student recital will be performed at the USCA Etherredge Center, 3:45 p.m., Wednesday, April 24. Free. Call 803-648-6851 or visit usca.edu.

Dance

Irish music benefit concert featuring Pat Broaders, Liz Knowles and Kieran O’Hare will be given at the Enterprise Mill Event Center, 7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 25. $15 advance; $20 door. Benefits Press On, cure for childhood cancer fund. Call 706-267-5416. Amateur Series Sign-up will be held at the Columbia County Amphitheatre through April 27. Free to sign up. Performances will take place Fridays in June, with finale on July 12. Visit ccamateurseries.com. Augusta Canal Moonlight Music Cruises board at the Augusta Canal Interpretive Center, 6:30 p.m., each Friday in April. Participants are invited to bring aboard snacks and beverages and enjoy live music for an hour and a half along the scenic canal. $25; reservations required. Visit augustacanal.com.

Literary

Harlem Book Club at Euchee Creek Library in Grovetown will cover “Bless Your Heart, Tramp” by Celia Rivenbark, 4 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org. It’s Your Book Club! will discuss “Our Kind of People,” by Lawrence Otis Graham at Headquarters Library, 6:30-8:45 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Call 706-821-2600 or visit ecgrl.org. Flannery O’Connor and the Artist’s Vocation talk will be given by GRU

24 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Contra Dance will be held at the Arsenal Hill Park Building, Columbia, S.C., 7-10:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20. No experience or partner necessary. Live music by Corner House. $8 general admission; $5 with valid student I.D. Bring clean, soft-soled, non-marking shoes. Call 803-760-5881, email info@contracola.org or visit contracola.org.

Theater

“Quickies,” Le Chat Noir Theatre’s short play festival, continue through Thursday through Saturday, April 18-20. Email info@lcnaugusta.com or visit lcnaugusta.com. “Chanticleer” will be performed at the USCA Etherredge Center, 8 p.m., Friday, April 19. General $4; students $7 day of. Call 803-648-6851 or visit usca.edu. “Give It to God” stage play will be presented by M&M Productions at the Imperial Theatre, 7 p.m., Saturday, April 20. $15-$28. Discounts for seniors, military, students and groups of 10 or more. Call 706-722-8341 or visit imperialtheatre.com. Hinton Battle’s “Love Lies” will be performed at the Bell Auditorium, 4 p.m., April 21. $47.50. Comedy about three women, unaware of each other’s existence, who show up at their fiancé’s funeral. Call 706-2624573 or visit augustaentertainmentcomplex.com. Auditions for the Missoula Children’s Theatre’s production of “Blackbeard the Pirate,” open to kids in kindergarten-12th grade, will be held Monday,

April 22, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at Fort Gordon’s Youth Services Gym, Building 45410. Auditioners should stay for the entire time and rehearsals will be held every day from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. (for some performers) in preparation for the show, which will be held Saturday, April 27, at 1:30 p.m. in Alexander Hall. Free. Email steven.r.walpert.naf@mail.mil.

Special Events

Holocaust Memorial Day will be honored at the Augusta Jewish Community Center with a Yom Hashoah program, 6:45 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Attendees are asked to wear white shirts or blouses. Visit augustajcc.org. Luncheon and Workshop with Stefan Mumaw will be presented by the American Advertising Association at Center at A Conference Venue at Edgar’s, 11 a.m., Thursday, April 18. Luncheon $25; workshop $15. Call 706-854-4728. Actor Danny Glover will speak at Paine College, 7 p.m., Friday, April 19. He is the guest speaker for a scholarship foundation banquet to be held at Paine’s HEAL Complex. Black-tie event. $100. Call 706-432-0024 or 706-733-0923. Artisans’ Fair will be held at the Living History Park in North Augusta, noon-7 p.m., Friday, April 19; until 5 p.m., Saturday, April 20; until 4 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Arts, crafts, music, food and wine. Call 803-279-2323. Earth Day Celebration will take place at the GRU Health Sciences Campus Student Center, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Friday, April 19. This year’s theme is “Think Green, Live Green, Work Green.” Vendors, music, free tree seedlings. Call for carpooling information. Call 706-721-0695 or visit gru.edu. Plant sale and exchange will be held at the Aiken Farmers Market, starting 8 a.m., Saturday, April 20. Free. Call 803-649-6297, ext. 122. Earth Day Celebration will be held at Phinizy Swamp, Saturday, April 20. There will be exploration, education and vendors. Visit naturalsciencesacademy.org. Got Tires? Richmond County recycling event will be held at Pendleton King Park, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Richmond County private residents may recycle up to five scrap tires and home electronics at no charge. No businesses. Call 1-855-468-8473 or visit augustasolidwaste.com. “Lessons from the Garden,” a Garden Festival tea, will be held in the private gardens of Mr. and Mrs. R. Daniel Blanton, 5 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Features a blue-and-white theme, based on the Carolyne Roehm book,

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

“A Passion for Blue and White.” Reservations required. Call 706-826-4700 or visit sacredheartaugusta.org. Rabbi Bob Alper, stand-up comic, will perform at Congregation Children of Israel at 7 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Best for those 11 and over. $18, advance; $22, door. Call 706-736-3140. Phil Schaefer, former NBC and CBS radio sports broadcaster, will appear at the Nancy Carson Library in North Augusta, 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 803-642-7575 or visit abbe-lib.org. Pinterest Party for adults will be held at the Aiken Library, 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Reduce, reuse and recycle the Pinterest way with an evening of crafting. Bring craft materials, tin cans, containers or T-shirts to repurpose. Call 803-642-7585 or visit abbe-lib.org. Successful Superwoman’s Brunch will be held at Legend’s Club in honor of Administrative Professionals Day, 11 a.m., Wednesday, April 24. Networking begins at noon. Men welcome. Members $35; nonmembers $40. Registration requested. Call 706-651-0018 or visit columbiacountychamber.com. Take Back the Night Rally against sexual violence will begin at the GRU Summerville campus Thursday, April 25. Call 706-721-2201 or visit gru.edu. Sacred Heart Garden Festival Preview Party will be held at the Sacred Heart Cultural Center, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 25. Call 706-826-4700 or visit sacredheartgardenfestival.com. Evans Towne Farmers Market is held on the grounds of the Columbia County Public Library each Thursday through June from 4:30-7 p.m. All meats, eggs, dairy and produce will be from local and sustainable farms. There will also be cooking demos and education, local artisans with handcrafted goods, live music, local food vendors and weekly events. Visit evanstownefarmersmarket.com.

Breastfeeding class will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Registration required. Call 706-651-2229 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

only at the Woodside Country Club by Carson Kight, DMD, 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Free, light dinner. This is a WE member-only event. Call 803-6415000 or visit aikenregional.com.

Breastfeeding Class for expectant mothers will be held at Babies R Us in Evans 7-9 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Free. Registration required. Call 706774-2825 or visit universityhealth.org.

Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention Class will be held in the University Hospital Heart & Vascular Institute, 2 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Free. Registration required. Call 706-774-5548 or visit universityhealth.org.

Free Oral Cancer Screenings at Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, 8 a.m.-noon, Thursday, April 18. Oral, head and neck cancers are more prevalent in the South than in other areas of the country because of higher rates of tobacco and alcohol use. Free. Reservations required. Call 706-721-6744 or gru.edu.

Total Joint Replacement educational talk will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 706-651-4343 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Powerful Tools for Caregivers class will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 2-3:30 p.m., Thursdays, April 18-May 23. Provides tools for caregivers to assist and support an elderly or chronically ill loved one. For more information, call 706-651-2490 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Babies, Bumps and Bruises will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 7 p.m., Thursday, April 25. Call 706-651-4343 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Weekend Childbirth Education class will meet in the University Hospital Education Center, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Friday, April 19 and 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Registration required. Free. Call 706-774-2825 or visit universityhealth.org. Lamaze Childbirth Education will be offered at Trinity Hospital 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Registration required. Bring two pillows. Call 706-481-7727 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Mobile Mammography Screenings will be held 8 a.m.-3 p.m. the following dates and locations: Women’s Wellness Expo, Tee Center, Saturday, April 20; SRS, F Area, Monday, April 22; Internal Medicine Partners, Peach Orchard Rd., Wednesday, April 24; Belle Terrace Health & Wellness, Thursday, April 25. Free through Medicare. Appointment required. Call 706-774-4149 or toll-free 866-774-4141.

Saturday Market at the River is each Saturday through Nov. 23 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the 8th Street Bulkhead downtown and features vendors, food, drinks, entertainment and a group run that begins at 8 a.m. Visit theaugustamarket.com.

Short and Sweet childbirth class will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20 and 7-9:30 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Covers labor and delivery, comfort techniques, medication/epidurals and relaxation and breathing techniques. Registration required. Call 706-6512229 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Health

Dental Health Effects on Overall Health lecture will be presented for women

18APRIL2013

Ready and Able (first of five sessions) will be offered at Doctors Hospital, 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 706-651-4343 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Introduction to Infant CPR class will meet in the University Hospital lobby, 7-8:30 p.m., Thursday, April 25. Registration required. Call 706-774-2825 or visit universityhealth.org. Diabetes and Your Feet will be offered by University Hospital, at Savannah Rapids Pavilion, 6-7:30 p.m., Thursday, April 25. Free. Light refreshments. Reservations required. Call 706-722-9011 or visit universityhealth.org. Yoga Class is offered by the Kroc Center every Saturday at The Augusta Market downtown, 10-11 a.m. Free. Bring your own mat. Call 706-3645762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Support

LaLeche League, a support group for mothers-to-be, and nursing moms and their babies, will meet at Trinity Hospital, 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 706-231-0022 or 706-364-1768, or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets at St. Johns Towers 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Call 706-863-6355 or visit universityhealth.org. Insulin Pumpers diabetes support group will meet in the University Hospital Cafeteria, 6-7 p.m., Thursday, April 25. Free. No registration. Call 706-868-3027 or visit universityhealth.org. Overeaters Anonymous meets at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 7:30

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 25

V24|NO16

Education

Computer Bootcamp Part 1 will be held at Evans Library, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Must attend both sessions. Call 706-863-1946 or visit ecgrl.org. Intro to Facebook will be held at Euchee Creek Library, 10:30 a.m., Thursday, April 18. Registration required. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org. The Augusta Archaeological Society will meet 8 p.m., Thursday, April 18, at T-Bones Steakhouse. Savannah River Archaeological Research Program archaeologist Christopher Thornock will present a program called “The Hollywood Mound Site: A Middle Mississippian Community on the Savannah River.” Dinner on your own 6:30 p.m. Call 706-863-7964. AARP Driver Safety Program will be offered at Trinity Hospital for drivers age 50 and older, Thursday and Friday, April 18-19. Graduates can apply for discount on insurance. $14; $2 discount for AARP members. Call 706-481-7000 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Voices of the Past: The Other Tubmans will show at Augusta Museum of History at noon, 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Free with museum admission. Call 706-722-8454 or visit augustamuseum.org. Transition Resource Fair will be held at Evans High School, 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday, April 20, for students K-12 with disabilities, parents, guardians and teachers. Speak with representatives about work options, tech school, college and financial aid. Learn how to prep your students from early childhood and beyond. Call 706-650-5638 or 706-826-1128. Civil War Landmark Tour will be offered by historian Dr. Thomas J. Brown and communications professor Dr. Debra Van Tuyll, 2 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Free. Email spcoll@gru.edu, visit guides.aug.edu/augustaviewpoint or call 706-667-4912. The Steampunk Civil War lecture will be given by Civil War historian, Dr. Thomas J. Brown at the GRU Summerville campus, 2 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Presented in conjunction with the Augusta’s Viewpoint: Understanding the Civil War reading and lecture series. Call 706-721-2201 or visit gru.edu. Professional Development Series will be held at the GRU Jaguar Student Activities Center, 3-5 p.m., Wednesday, April 24. Registration required. Call 706-737-1604 or visit gru.edu.

Sports-Outdoors

Augusta GreenJackets home games are held at the Lake Olmstead Stadium, 2-7 7 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday, April 18; Friday, April 19; Saturday, April 20. They will play 9 a.m.-2:05 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Call 706-738-7889 or visit milb.com. G.A.M.E.S. Awards Banquet is now accepting nominations for outstanding coaches and athletes. Due April 19. Visit augustasportscouncil.com. Aiken Polo 6 Goal Tournament will be held at the Aiken Polo Club, starting 3 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Tournament held daily through April 28. Call 803-6433611 or visit aikenpoloclub.org. Take Back the Day 5K run/walk to prevent sexual violence will be held Saturday, April 20. Registration is 7:30-8:30 a.m. Runners and walkers $30; students $5; $10 individual; $15 family. Race begins at the amphitheater at the GRU Summerville campus. Pre-registration available at active.com/running/ augusta-ga/take-back-the-day-5k-run-walk-2013. Call 706-737-1444 or visit gru.edu. Swamp Stomp 5K will be held at Phinizy Swamp, 8 a.m., Saturday, April 20. $23 with T-shirt; $17 without T-shirt. Registration required and closes Thursday, April 18. Visit naturalsciencesacademy.org. 18APRIL2013

Bass Fishing Tournament will be held for two-person teams at Gravatt Camp and Conference Center, 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Sunday, April 21. Call 803-648-1817 or visit bishopgravatt.org. Golf Classic will be held by Symphony Orchestra Augusta at Augusta Country Club, 5:30 p.m., Monday, April 22. Non-players $60. Cocktails, hors D’oeuvres and live bluegrass. Call 706-826-4719. Triple 8 Group Run meets at 8th and Reynolds, 8 a.m., every Saturday through Oct. 26. Choose your distance: 3, 6 or 8 miles. Open to everyone. Visit theaugustamarket.com. Wheelchair Tennis Clinic, presented by the Walton Foundation for Independence, meets each Monday at 6 p.m. (weather permitting) at The Club at Rae’s Creek. Free and open to the public. Call 706-826-5809 or email alsalley@wrh.org. Weekly Group Runs include the Monday Metro Run meeting at Metro Coffeehouse at 6 p.m.; Monday Intervals meeting at the Family Y track on Wheeler Road at 7 p.m.; the Tuesday Nacho Mama’s Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesday’s Blanchard Woods Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesday Stay in Shape Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesday’s Post Office Hill Training Run at 7 p.m.; Thursday’s Homer Hustle at 6 p.m.; and Saturday’s Stay in Shape Run at 8 a.m. Visit augustastriders.com. The Augusta Furies Women’s Rugby Football Club practices 6-8 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays at Julian Smith Casino for players 18 and up. Email augusta.furies@gmail.com or visit augustafuries.org. The Augusta Rugby Club holds weekly practice sessions at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Larry Bray Memorial Pitch in Augusta. Experienced players and newbies ages 18 and up are welcome. Bring a pair of cleats or cross trainers, a mouthguard, gym shorts and a T-shirt. Visit augustarugby.org or Facebook under the Augusta Rugby Club heading. Hott Shott Disc Golf is held each Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Killer B Disc Golf in downtown Augusta, and features games and prizes for all ages and skill levels. $2. Call 706-8147514 or visit killerbdiscgolf.blogspot.com/p/hott-shott. Thursday Night Chain Reaction Ride begins at 6 p.m. each Thursday at Patriots Park in Grovetown. For intermediate to fast-paced cyclists, who average 25-32 miles. Participants should bring their own water and helmet. Call 706-855-2024 or visit chainreactionbicycles.net. Riverview Disc Golf League meets each Thursday at 6 p.m. at Riverview Park in North Augusta. Entry fee, $5; ace pool, $1. Call 803-215-8181 or visit augustadiscgolf.com. Road Bike Ride meets each Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Andy Jordan’s Bicycle Warehouse downtown for an approximately 25-mile ride at a moderate to fast pace. Front and rear lights, as well as a helmet, are required.

DECLASSIFIED

p.m., Tuesdays and at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 1:30 p.m., Saturdays. Call 907-854-1509.

ANNUAL CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE Unitarian Universalist Church 3501 Walton Way Extension

Call 706-724-6777 or visit andyjordans.com. The Augusta Fencers Club is open five nights a week from 5:30-9 p.m. and most Saturday mornings from 10 a.m.noon. Visitors always welcome. Call 706-722- 8878. BlazeSports Swim Team, for all ages of physically challenged swimmers who want to train for competition, meets at the Wilson Family Y. Members, $35 a month; non-members, $50 a month. Pre-registration required. Visit thefamilyy.org.

Kids-Teens

Children’s Earth Day Program for all ages will be offered at the Aiken Library, 4 p.m., Friday, April 19. Stories, games and a recyclable craft. No registration required. Call 803-642-7575 or visit abbe-lib.org. Trash to TREEsure, a Kids’ Club Earth Day event, will be held for all ages at 211 Robert C. Daniel, Jr. Parkway, 1011:30 a.m., Saturday, April 20. $2. Call 706-738-9330. Aiken Kite Festival will be held for all ages at Citizens Park, Field No. 3, 10 a.m., Saturday, April 20. Kite flying demos, inflatables, Aiken Horsepower Car Club cruise in, SPCA book donations, music, ultimate frisbee for teens. Bring chairs or blankets. Call 803-642-7634. Children’s Festival will be held at the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Museum tours, face-painting, a fire engine and more! Call 706-724-3576 or visit lucycraftlaneymuseum.com. Family Earth and Sky Night will be held at USCA, 6:3010 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Hands-on activities and outdoor observation, free. Planetarium show, “Worlds in Motion” will be presented on a first-come, first-served basis at 7 p.m., 8 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. Planetarium show prices are $4.50 general admission, $3.50 seniors, $2.50 4K-grade 12, $1 USCA students and staff with proper I.D. Call 803-641-3313 or visit rpsec.usca.edu. Explore Reed Creek 4:30-5:30 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Wear rubber boots or old sneakers – nothing opentoed or open-heeled. Children must be accompanied. Registration required. Members free; non-members $2 per child. Call 706-210-4027 or visit reedcreekpark.com. National Library Week Reading Raffle will be held at Friedman Library, through Saturday, April 20. Fill out a Reading Raffle ticket and tell what you’ve been reading. Winner drawn on Monday, April 22 for adult, teen and child category. Winners notified by phone. Call 706-736-6758 or visit ecgrl.org. All About Frogs will be offered at Reed Creek Park, 8-9 p.m., Monday, April 22, for ages 5 and up. Children must be accompanied. Registration required. Members free; non-members $2 per child. Call 706-210-4027 or visit reedcreekpark.com. Teen Earth Day Magazine Art for grades 6-12 will be offered at the Aiken Library, 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. They will be using old magazines to create art for

Have you Aerated your yard?

their rooms. No registration required. Call 803-6427575 or visit abbe-lib.org. “To the Moon and Beyond” will be shown at DuPont Planetarium, 8-9 p.m., Saturdays through April 27. Features info about Apollo astronauts experiences on the moon, and NASA’s plans for space travel in the future. Call 803-641-3654. On Being a Girl will be offered at Trinity Hospital for girls ages 9-12, accompanied by a female relative or friend, 6-9 p.m., Tuesday, April 23. Deals with physical and emotional changes that happen at puberty. $10 per person. Registration required. Call 706-481-7000 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Georgia Regents Health System is taking applications for the summer Volunteen Program. High school students between 15 and 18 years of age are eligible to apply for this six-week program that provides an educational, hands-on volunteer experience in the academic health center environment. Call 706-7213596 or visit grhealth.org/volunteer.

Hobbies

Wine Tasting will be held at Wine World in North Augusta, 5-8 p.m., Thursday, April 18. Call 803-279-9522 or visit wineworldsc.com. Weekly Wine Tastings at Vineyard Wine Market in Evans are held 4:30-6:30 p.m. Fridays, and 1-6 p.m. Saturdays. Call 706-922-9463 or visit vine11.com.

Spiritual

Bible Teaching Seminars at the Friedman Library will cover When Life Has No Hope, noon-1 p.m., Saturday, April 20. Bring your Bible. Call 706-691-4023 or visit donaldsao.com

Elsewhere

The Georgia Renaissance Festival is held in Fairburn, Ga., just outside Atlanta, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays, plus Memorial Day, through June 2. General admission $16.95, seniors 60 and over $15.95, kids 6-12 $6.95. Medieval and fantasy costuming, folk and filk music, food, beer, shows, lots of stuff for kids of all ages. Call 770-964-8575 or visit garenfest.com. “Impressionism from Monet to Matisse” exhibit will be on display at the Columbia Museum of Art through April 21. Adults, $15; seniors and military, $12; students, $5; kids 5 and under, free; members, free. Call 803-799-2810 or visit columbiamuseum.org. Thursday Nights at the High, a special event at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, offers half-price tickets from 4-8 p.m. each Thursday. A guided tour is offered at 6:30 p.m. Call 404-733-4200 or visit high.org.

If you would like to see your organization’s events listed in our calendar, please email Amy Christian at amy@themetrospirit.com. The deadline for each Thursday’s issue is the previous Friday at noon.

All Yard Work 35 Years Experience

Mow, Trim, Fertilize, Tree Work, Hauling, etc.

(Next door to Fire Station)

Great References and Prices.

Saturday, April 6 8 am - 12 Noon

Call for a free quote today!

(Items priced to sell) -Rain or Shine-

FREE ESTIMATES!

706.832.4672

ALL DECLASSIFIED ADS ARE CASH IN ADVANCE (CREDIT CARD PAYMENT REQUIRED) AND ARE $40 PER WEEK. VISIT METROSPIRIT.COM TO PLACE YOUR AD IN MINUTES.

Andrew Jones 706.833.3060

KRIS FISHER '- (YHQW+RVW 2YHU\HDUVRI'-LQJ UDGLR H[SHULHQFH5HIHUHQFHVDYDLODEOH

:HGGLQJV‡%LUWKGD\V‡3DUWLHV‡$QQLYHUVDULHV‡(WF

$Q\*HQUHRI0XVLF 706.399.4209 | kfish@rocketmail.com

DJKFISH.COM

1.5” X 1.9” (ACTUAL SIZE) $40 PER WEEK AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 27

V24|NO16

Michael Johnson

mejphoto.photoreflect.com

Tyler James, Beth Bargeron, Karen Purvis and Andrew Blood at Whiskey Bar (Kitchen).

SIGHTINGS

Shelby Hamilton, Caroline Eaker and Marta Nixon at Augusta National.

Rebecca Miles, Jacqueline Tucker and Sandra Rhodes at Augusta National.

SIGHTINGS

Brittany Cannon with Lindsey and Sam Hartley at Surrey Tavern.

Jan, honoree Craig Stadler and Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver at the Mayor’s Masters Reception at the Augusta Common.

Brittany Dukes, Meagan Brittingham and Brandi Brannen at the Columbia County Championship Festival with the Chris Young Band.

SIGHTINGS

Gwen Greenwood, Laveda Tutt, Margaret Wilson and Denise Watson at the Mayor’s Masters Reception at the Augusta Common.

28 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Craig and Nancy Hannan with Congressman John Barrow at the Mayor’s Masters Reception at the Augusta Common.

Roberto, Trent, Chase and Stephanie Lainez at the Mayor’s Masters Reception at the Augusta Common.

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

SIGHTINGS

Allison Griffin, Lexi Bollinger, Anna Patton and Katie Blanchard at the First Tee of Augusta’s Drive for Show, Rock Fore! Dough IX at Evans Towne Center Park.

Cherith Ohly, Carey Murdock, Cristal Tullis and Malia Ohly at the First Tee of Augusta’s Drive for Show, Rock Fore! Dough IX at Evans Towne Center Park.

Kathryn Crew, Jenna Ansley and Kathleen Walden at Wild Wing.

SIGHTINGS

Cody Howard, Ashley Wesse, Katie Rhoden and Sarah Dorman at Wild Wing.

Joey Hadden, Denise Pendarvis and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani at Fund the Boom at the Evans Towne Center Park.

SIGHTINGS

Ben Hill, Kristen Henry, Caroline Kenrick and Chris Hall at the Locals Party at the Country Club.

18APRIL2013

Seren Jacobs, Ethan Nichols, Benai Clements and Jessica Conner at Rehab’s show at Surreal at Surrey.

Morgan Groothand, Alex Cohen and Haley Cohen Brannen at the Columbia County Championship Festival with Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Michael Johnson

mejphoto.photoreflect.com

Suzanne Moore, Rehab’s Danny Boone and Melissa Phillips at Surreal at Surrey.

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 29

V24|NO16

15 in 5

Because I love a list. Especially a random list. ‡5HHQWU\LVURXJK7KH%R\DVNHGLIZHJHWDYDFDWLRQDIWHURXUYDFDWLRQ:H needed one more day. ‡,HQMR\HGWKHIDFWWKDWVRPDQ\RI\RXEHFDPHJROIIDVKLRQSROLFHODVWZHHN7KH YLRODWLRQXSGDWHVZHUHQXPHURXVDQGDSSUHFLDWHG7KHWZRPRVWQRWDEOHRXWILWV ZHUHWKHGDLV\GXNHFXWRIIMHDQVKRUWVDQGWKHJHQWOHPHQLQWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI Florida orange and blue pants/shorts. ‡:KRORVWDEHW"7KHRQO\RWKHUH[SODQDWLRQIRUWKRVHDWURFLRXVSDQWVLVWKDWRQHRI \RXUZLYHVIRXQGWKHSDWWHUQRQ3LQWHUHVWDQGWKRXJKWLW·GEHFXWHIRU\·DOODOOWR PDWFK6KHKDGWRKDYHVHZQWKHP1RRWKHUZRPDQZRXOG·YHOHW\·DOORXWRIWKH house dressed like that. ‡'RHVDQ\RQHHOVHILQGLWLURQLFWKDWWKHGXGHDUUHVWHGIRUKHFNOLQJSHRSOHEHFDXVH RIWKHLUDWWLUHDWWKHJROIFRXUVHZDVDUUHVWHG LQVLGHWKHFRXUVH ZHDULQJD7VKLUW" 7DONDERXWOLYLQJLQDJODVVKRXVH3UREDEO\VKRXOGQ·WWKURZVWRQHV ‡1RPDWWHUZKDW\RXWKLQNDERXWDOOWKRVHYLVLWRUVRXUWRZQORRNVSUHWW\LQFUHGLEOH WKLVWLPHRI\HDU7KHUHDUHVRPHLGLRWVLQFOXGLQJWKRVHZKRVWLOO\HOO´JHWLQWKH KROHµZKHQ7LJHUKLWV7KHELJJHULGLRWZDVWKHRQHZKR\HOOHG´UHGRQNXORXVµ HYHU\WLPH-DVRQ'D\ZDVRQWKHWHHER[,·PQRWDZDUHRIDQ\ RIILFLDOFRQWHVWEXWKHZLQV,·GORYHWREHDIO\RQWKHZDOOZKHQ KHJRHVEDFNWRKLVKRXUVRI'95·GJROIDQGVKRZVKLVIULHQGVWKDW VRPHKRZKH·VHYHQPRUHRIDIRROWKDQWKH\$FWXDOO\,ZRXOGQ·W 7KH\FDQKDYHWKDWPRPHQW

marathon. Two, it was scary. Three, utter chaos ensued. Um, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m no expert, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m certainly not a scientist, but all three of those lend to a little motion I like to call running. Â&#x2021;:HKDGWRH[SODLQ\HWDQRWKHUWHUULEOHVRPHWKLQJWRRXUFKLOGUHQ7KHLUIULHQGV were talking about it. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind being up front with them. I do mind that these WKLQJVDUHKDSSHQLQJ:KHQZHZHUHOLWWOHZHZRUULHGDERXWWRUQDGRGULOOVDQG taking candy from strangers. Â&#x2021;$Q\HDUROGZDVNLOOHG$VPLQHKDYHZDLWHGIRUWKHLUVDIWHUGR]HQVRIUDFHVKH was waiting for his daddy at the finish line. The Kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know that part. Â&#x2021;6RPDQ\KDYHWDONHGDERXW´WKLVQH[WJHQHUDWLRQµDQG´NLGVWRGD\µZLWK IUXVWUDWLRQ<RXNQRZZKDW"7KH%R\DQG7KH*LUOJLYHPHKRSH,KRSHWKH things they see now will cause them to act. I hope these shootings and bombings ZLOOUHPLQGWKHPWKDWOLIHLVSUHFLRXV,KRSHWKH\GRQ·WOLYHLQIHDUEHFDXVHRIWKH things they know. I hope theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll learn from the mistakes and actions of others. I hope they know compassion. Â&#x2021;,FKRRVHKRSH&KHHUVDQG*RGEOHVV\·DOO

Â&#x2021;7KHUHZDVJUHDWGHEDWHDERXWWKHSLPHQWRFKHHVHDQGFKLFNHQ sandwich. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t typically eat either, but from what I saw, the pimento cheese was not the same, and the chicken was no more WKDQDSUHYLRXVO\IUR]HQFKLFNHQSDWW\,·OOVWLFNZLWKHJJVDODG2K and beer. Â&#x2021;,·OODGPLWWRWKURZLQJDZD\DIHZSODVWLFFXSVRXWWKHUH$WDOO VWDFNLVQRWKLQJPRUHWKDQHYLGHQFH Â&#x2021;)ROORZLQJVXFKDZRQGHUIXOZHHNZLWKP\IULHQGVDQGIDPLO\WKH VLWXDWLRQLQ%RVWRQZDVMDUULQJ Â&#x2021;2QFHDJDLQZHILQGRXUVHOYHVLQWKHZDNHRIDWHUULEOHWUDJHG\ 7KHGHDWKVDQGLQMXULHVDUHDZIXODQGVKRXOGQ·WEHPLQLPL]HG Â&#x2021;8QIRUWXQDWHO\WKHIDFHRIWKHPDUDWKRQKDVFKDQJHGIRUHYHU $WKOHWHVZKRRQFHUDQZLWKRSWLPLVPDQGSULGHZLOODOZD\VKDYHIHDU7KHUDFH ZKLFKKDVDGHHSKLVWRU\FRQWLQXLQJWKURXJKWZR:RUOG:DUVZLOOQRZEHD PHPRULDO3DWULRWV'D\DJUHDWGD\RIFHOHEUDWLRQLQ%RVWRQZLOOEHDVDGGD\RI remembrance. Â&#x2021;,·PVRUU\IRUWKH6DXGLVWXGHQWZKRZDVTXHVWLRQHGDIWHUVKRZLQJXSLQMXUHGDW WKHKRVSLWDO$XWKRULWLHVVD\KHZDVVHHQUXQQLQJIURPWKHVFHQH2QH,WZDVD

We W e specialize in tree cutting and a nd limbing, landscaping, lot clearing, clearing, stump grinding, and much more!

Ask A sk to see our License and Insurance.

Michael M ichael Murray : 706.691.8832 Thomas T homas Prince : 912.531.7079

AUGUSTA A UGUSTA TREE PROFESSIONALS

30 METROSPIRITAUGUSTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

JENNYWRIGHT lives in Summerville with her husband, who she calls The Man, and two kids, who she affectionately calls The Boy and The Girl. She enjoys taking photos, cooking and playing tennis.

MONEY

DOESNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T

GROW ON TREES (Although some local tree services must beli be liliev evee it doe ev ddoes oess ac oe acco cord co rdin rd ingg to tthe in heir he ir eest stim st imat im ates at ess!) believe according their estimates!)

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 31

V24|NO16

&DOO8VRU*R2QOLQHIRU<RXUFREE (VWLPDWH SEE WHAT FISH HAS TO OFFER: » ([SHUW:LQGRZ&OHDQLQJ,QFOXGLQJ6LOOV 6FUHHQV » *XWWHUV&KDQGHOLHUV6N\OLJKWV0LUURUV 0RUH » 8QLIRUPHG%RQGHG,QVXUHG3URIHVVLRQDO&OHDQHUV » &RPPHUFLDO 5HVLGHQWLDO6HUYLFH » 6DWLVIDFWLRQ*XDUDQWHHG

(706) 305-3900

Ã&#x20AC;VKZLQGRZFOHDQLQJFRP Locally Owned & Operated 32 METROSPIRITAUGUSTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 33

V24|NO16

FEATURED

April 18 18Thursday, Live Music

French Market Grille West - Doc Easton Smooth Jazz Malibu Jack’s - Marilyn Adcock Mellow Mushroom (Downtown and Evans) - Live and Local Metro Coffeehouse - Jacob Johnson Rose Hill Estate - Preston Weston & Sandra Sky City - Easter Island, Man Ray and Cloud Formations Tavern at the Bean - Irish Music The Willcox - Jazz Wild Wing - Storm Branch Band

Karen Gordon and Garden City Jazz have a busy weekend coming up. Not only are they playing at the PI Bar & Grille Friday, April 19, they’re also hosting #JazzLives: CollectiveCulture +SoulCelebration on Sunday, April 21, at the Julian Smith Casino. The live music, art and movement event features band Snarky Puppy. Call 706-495-6238 or visit gardencityjazz.com.

What’s Tonight?

Chevy’s Nite Club - Karaoke, wine tasting Cocktails Lounge - Karaoke Fishbowl Lounge - Karaoke Fox’s Lair - Trivia, Soup and Suds Helga’s Pub & Grille - Trivia The Highlander - Butt Naked Trivia Joe’s Underground - Trivia w/ Jacob & Wendell The Loft - Karaoke MAD Studios - Open Mic w/ Derrick Standifer Malibu Jack’s - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Evans) - Karaoke The Playground - Open Mic with Brandy Polo Tavern - DJ Nick Hurshman Shannon’s - Karaoke Surreal at Surrey - College and F&B Night Villa Europa - Karaoke Wooden Barrel - ’80s Night Karaoke

April 19 19Friday, Live Music

100 Laurens - Keith Gregory Augusta Canal Moonlight Music Cruise - Double D Country Club - Outshyne Coyote’s - Dave Firmin, Rhes Reeves & the Coyote Band Doubletree - Classic Jazz First Round - John Berret’s LaRoxes Fox’s Lair - She N She French Market Grille West - Doc Easton James Brown Arena - Carrie Underwood, Hunter Hayes Joe’s Underground - Candice Hurst Malibu Jacks - David Heath Perfect Picture PI Bar & Grill - Karen Gordon and Garden City Jazz Playoffs Sports Bar & Grille - The Southern Meltdown Band Polo Tavern - Atomic Road Stillwater Taproom - The Welfare Liners Surrey Tavern - Stereotype Tavern at the Bean - Musicians Hangout Wild Wing - Chick Flix

What’s Tonight?

Armando’s - Karaoke w/ Rockin Rob Club Argos - Friday Night House Party Cocktails Lounge - Grown-Up Fridays with DJ Cork and Bull Pub - Karaoke Eagle’s Nest - Free Salsa Lessons; Latin Dance Party Fishbowl Lounge - Karaoke Iron Horse Bar & Grill - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Karaoke with Ryan Moseley Mi Rancho (Washington Road) - Karaoke with Jeff Barnes Mi Rancho (Clearwater) - Three J’s Karaoke Ms. Carolyn’s - Karaoke 34 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Palmetto Tavern - DJ Tim The Playground - DJ Rebeck’s Hideaway - Open Mic Roadrunner Cafe - Karaoke with Steve Chappel Sector 7G - TFS Rave: Nightmare in Pixieland w/ DJs Number5, LinearNorth and Polyphase Sky City - Mr. and Ms. Augusta Pride Pageant 2013 Soul Bar - Disco Hell Wooden Barrel - Karaoke Contest

20

Saturday, April 20 Live Music

100 Laurens - John Kolbeck The Acoustic Coffeehouse - Open Acoustic Jam Session with Eryn Eubanks and the Family Fold Chevy’s Nite Club - Live Music Country Club - Richie Scholl Coyote’s - Jawga Boyz The First Round - Hybrid Mind Joe’s Underground - TX Clergy MAD Studios - Hunger Strike Feed the Homeless Benefit w/ Dusty are the Nomads, Chad James, Leslie Raezer, Stoney Cannon, Dale Lewis Jr. Malibu Jacks - South Atlantic Express P.I. Bar and Grill - Not Gaddy Jazz with Pam Bowman Polo Tavern - The Hollerers Sky City - Funk You Surrey Tavern - Foxstreet Allstars Wild Wing - Cover Story

What’s Tonight?

Club Argos - Saturday Night Dance Party and Show Cocktails Lounge - Latin Night Fishbowl Lounge - Karaoke Helga’s Pub & Grille - Trivia The Loft - DJ Richie Rich Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Clearwater) - Karaoke with Danny Haywood Mi Rancho (Washington Road) - Karaoke Ms. Carolyn’s - Karaoke The Playground - DJ Rana Robbie’s - Saturday Night Dance Party Soul Bar - DJ Ender Tavern at the Bean - Karaoke Wooden Barrel - Kamikaze Karaoke

April 21 21Sunday, Live Music 5 O’Clock Bistro - Mike & Dave

Cotton Patch - Keith Gregory (brunch) Julian Smith Casino - #JazzLives: CollectiveCulture +SoulCelebration w/ Snarky Puppy, Funk You Malibu Jack’s - Playback The Band w/ Tutu Dy’Vine Patridge Inn - Sunday Evening Jazz w/ the Not Gaddy Jazz Trio Wild Wing - Keith Gregory The Willcox - Jon Vaughn, brunch; Preston & Weston, night

What’s Tonight?

Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Washington Road) - Karaoke, Salsa Dancing Polo Tavern - Bingo Night Shannon’s - Karaoke with Peggy Gardner

April 22 22Monday, Live Music Shannon’s - Open Mic Night

What’s Tonight?

Applebee’s (Evans) - Trivia Club Argos - Karaoke Joe’s Underground - Poker Malibu Jack’s - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Trivia The Playground - DJ Rana Robolli’s - Trivia with Mike Thomas Somewhere in Augusta - Poker Wild Wing - Trivia

April 23 23Tuesday, Live Music

The Highlander - Open Mic Night Shannon’s - Karaoke Contest Somewhere In Augusta - Jacob Beltz The Willcox - Piano jazz

What’s Tonight?

Chevy’s Nite Club - Shag Night Club Argos - Karaoke Fishbowl Lounge - Dart League Laura’s Backyard Tavern - Karaoke w/ David Doane Limelight Cafe - Bottom’s Up Karaoke Malibu Jack’s - Poker Mellow Mushroom (Downtown and Evans) - Trivia The Playground - Truly Twisted Trivia with Big Troy Polo Tavern - Karaoke Shannon’s - Karaoke with Mike Johnson

Somewhere In Augusta - Big Prize Trivia Surrey Tavern - Tubeday Tuesday Movie Night

April 24 24Wednesday, Live Music Joe’s Underground - Live Music Malibu Jack’s - Marilyn Adcock

What’s Tonight?

Armando’s - Karaoke w/ Rockin Rob Cocktails Lounge - Augusta’s Got Talent Cotton Patch - Trivia and Tunes Hotel Aiken - Karaoke w/ Tom Mitchell Laura’s Backyard Tavern - Karaoke w/ David Doane The Loft - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Downtown) - Karaoke Mi Rancho (Washington Road) - Karaoke The Playground - Krazy Karaoke with Big Troy Polo Tavern - Karaoke w/ Tom Mitchell Somewhere in Augusta - The Comedy Zone w/ Frankie Paul and John Crist Surrey Tavern - Trivia with Christian and Mickey

Upcoming

Jennifer Daniels (A benefit for Leukemia & Lymphoma Society) - Sky City April 25 Tiki Barflys - Wild Wing April 25 Anthony Orio - Country Club April 26 Kicks 99’s Hooked on Country w/ Justin Moore Bell Auditorium April 26 Faming Hanley, Super Bob, Shotgun Opera - Sky City April 26 AcostA - Joe’s Underground April 26 Amanda Daughtry - Wild Wing April 26 Artist Showcase w/ Cameras, Guns & Radios Tavern at the Bean April 26 Amanda Daughtry - Country Club April 27 Vintage Trouble - Sky City April 27 Free Ride - Wild Wing April 27 Rhonda Vincent and the Rage - USC-Aiken Convocation Center April 27 The Henry’s - 5 O’Clock Bistro April 28 Kolbeck - Wild Wing April 28 Alice in Chains - Bell Auditorium May 1 Pop Evil - Sky City May 4 Little Big Town - Bell Auditorium May 8 Beware of Darkness - Sky City May 8 Black Francis, Reid Paley - Sky City May 9 Derelict String Band - Stillwater Tap Room May 10 Jubee, The Morning After, the Mason Jars - Sky City May 10 18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

THE

BOX TOPS

Jackie Robinson hits it out of the park!

EIGHT

RANK

TITLE

WEEKEND GROSS

TOTAL GROSS

WEEK #

LAST WEEK

1

42

$27,487,144

$27,487,144

1

-

2

SCARY MOVIE 5

$14,157,367

$14,157,367

1

-

3

THE CROODS

$13,115,074

$142,439,144

4

3

4

G.I. JOE: RETALIATION

$10,894,415

$102,520,113

3

2

5

EVIL DEAD

$9,488,302

$41,530,084

2

1

SAMEIFLING

“Trance”

Heist film turned “Inception” doesn’t hold up to its opening scenes The bravado opening to “Trance,” the seductive but ultimately eye-roll-worthy heist film from Danny Boyle, unfolds at an art auction house. The gently dashing Simon (James McAvoy) breaks the fourth wall to explain, through his Scottish lilt, that in the event of an attempted robbery during an auction his task is to spirit the most valuable thing in the room — the painting — backstage, zip it into a canvas case and rush it to a deposit slot that feeds into a time-locked vault. Now segue directly into this very thing happening. A 200-year-old Goya called “Witches in the Air” is fetching 20-something million pounds at auction. Then: gas canisters, panic, chaos. Simon gets as far as the deposit slot, tries to play hero as the thief opens the case and catches the stock of a shotgun to his forehead. Boyle’s touch with motion, light and music — all hallmarks of his 1996 masterwork “Trainspotting” and his direction of the 2010 London Olympics opening ceremony — are on full display here, and throughout “Trance.” But true panache owes a debt also to logic, and quickly Boyle asks his audience to follow him onto brittle ice. As Simon is undergoing emergency brain surgery we learn that the four men who ripped off the painting are carrying only the frame. The canvas is missing, and when Simon comes out of his coma they’re expecting him (their inside man, it happens) to produce it. But he genuinely cannot recall its whereabouts. Rather than kill him, the leader of this gang, Franck (Vincent Cassel) prods him into hypnotherapy. London apparently is well-stocked in this department, and out of the listings Simon plucks the likeable name Elizabeth Lamb. Thus it falls to Doctor (?) Lamb (Rosario Dawson) to extract this delicate detail out of Simon’s muddled mind. What follows feels, at best, like “Inception” crossed with “Snatch.” Boyle traipses through reality, real memories, ersatz memories and hypno-hallucinations with a surprising deftness, and it all looks great, with lots of eerily glowing walls and neonlit venues and drunken-angled shots. For as convoluted as this knot becomes, it

amazingly holds together as a narrative. This is one of those movies that sends you looking up the editor’s name: Jon Harris (who, lo, edited “Snatch” and was Oscarnominated for “127 Hours”). But just because you can follow it doesn’t mean you’ll want to. What neither the editor nor the cast can overcome is the general disjoint between the events of the film and all the other stuff you know about life. Turns out that grafting a film about a Big Job Gone Wrong onto a film about Hypnotic Memory Recovery and Maybe a Love Triangle requires you to wade through a bog of dippy explanations as to why and how Simon is guarding his memories from himself, and then watch as McAvoy and Dawson and Cassel all try to treat the material with straight faces. Not even fun-nasty gangster shenanigans and a couple of late twists can rescue this listing ship. The heist genre has been done in enough ways over enough years that, inevitably, a plot has to reach to come up with even vaguely original take. But once you sit through “Trance” you may soon look forward to repressing large swaths of it in turn.

APRIL 19

HORROR SCI-FI

“Oblivion,” rated PG-13, starring Tom Cruise, Morgan Freeman. Tom Cruise saves the world… again. 18APRIL2013

“The Lords of Salem,” rated R, starring Sheri Moon Zombie, Bruce Davison, Jeff Daniel Phillips, Meg Foster. A Rob Zombie film about a radio DJ, a mysterious package and a town’s violent past. Let’s face it: You either already knew about this one or quit reading after “Rob Zombie.”

DRAMA

“Filly Brown,” rated R, starring Gina Rodriguez, Jenni Rivera, Lou Diamond Phillips, Edward James Olmos. A street poet gets a shot at hip-hop stardom… but at what cost? AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 35

V24|NO16

No More Plaid Pants

But live band action is plentiful in the next few weeks

‘Stache Your Cash! )LWQHVVLVSK\VLFDO ¿QDQFLDO IPATING C I T R A P H OUT TEENS & Y -BASED GAMES BY ISE IN EXCERC CERTIFIED ! ’S T I F S S O CR RUCTORS T S N I S S E CHILD FITN

  4*0-



1 PLACE Who: –ʼÊÈɶ¢ºÉÇÄ›˜ª{˜¨§–˜ÇÄÈÈIJÉ $ 00 GIFT CARD 1 PLACE What: Youth Week CrossFit Kick-Off 2 $ 0 Putt-Putt 5 When: ¨Êù¶Î–ÅǾÁ‡†ù‡ÅÂÉĉŠGIFT CARD Where: 205 Davis Road, Augusta, Georgia st

ND

For more information call: 706-854-6140 www.YOURamfcu.org

Federally insured by the NCUA

Suddenly the number of boat shoes, polo shirts and middleaged married men hitting on Hooter’s waitresses has gone down. Another year of the Masters has come and gone and, I have to say, this year was a blast. The annual events, like Rock FORE! Dough and the Par 3 Party, were a huge success. And even though I wish the band’s music had died in the plane crash, Friday night’s show with Lynyrd Skynyrd had a good crowd. The big concerts were a highlight for locals and guests in Augusta, but I thought it was great to see local talent performing each day of the week. The streets of downtown Augusta were not only packed with golf fans, the bars were packed with talent. It was nice to go out on a Wednesday and watch some live music while enjoying a few beers in the middle of the busiest week of the year in Augusta. If only we could have 26 weeks like that a year, I think a lot of people would trying to stay in Augusta besides hitting the road. I’m not sure “old Augusta” would be okay with that, though. Holy schnikes, do we have some awesome concerts coming up. Just when you thought there weren’t too many shows on the horizon, promoters are killing it. Let’s first start with the band Vintage Trouble. This band performed on the Late Show with David Letterman a few months back and on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno just last week. Picture this: James Brown and Otis Redding meets Led Zeppelin. I predict this to be the best show in Augusta this year, especially for the price. $12 advance tickets can be had right now at skycityaugusta.com. It seems that Sky City is taking a lot of the shows; with brand new LED lights and an awesome sound system, it’s kind of hard to beat. Four days after Vintage Trouble, on May 1, Augusta welcomes one of the biggest rock acts to ever come to town, Alice in Chains. Alice is out touring to promote their new studio album, “The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here,” which will hit store shelves on May 28. Tickets are still available for this show at the Bell Auditorium. Three days after Alice in Chains, on May 4, the band Pop Evil returns to Augusta, this time hitting the stage at Sky City. $12 gets you in the door. This is another Saturday night show in Augusta, I’m starting to like this trend. Four days after Pop Evil, May 8, the band Beware of Darkness is in Augusta, again at Sky City. The phrase “low dough show” comes to mind, since advance tickets are only $6! The band is a loud three-piece out of Los Angeles, guaranteed not to disappoint. In a two-week time frame, Augusta will have all the entertainment for rock fans that they can handle. The only question is: can Augusta handle it? With that many options, do you now pick and choose which shows you want to see or, with the ticket prices, can you see them all? I hope for the latter but, as usual, I live in a dream world. Special thanks to all the promoters and venues for giving Augusta a shot to show that they want to see live music. Can rock and charity go together? I believe so. Coming up on Friday, April 26, it’s the Third Annual Rock Now For Autism Speaks, featuring Framing Hanley, Super Bob and Shotgun Opera. Again, Sky City is the place to be; $12 advance tickets are available now. Last, I have to support my own. Before you head to see Vintage Trouble, venture to the Savannah Rapids Pavilion for the Second Annual Chicken River Bluegrass Festival on Saturday, April 27. Craft beer, bluegrass and chicken… you had me at beer. Music is from noon until 7 p.m. and provided by my favorite watering hole, Stillwater Taproom. Sky City sure did get a lot of plugs this week. What’s going on at your bar? Where is your band playing? Did you get hit on by John Daly? Email me at matt@ themetrospirit.com.

MATTSTONE can be heard weekdays from 2-6 p.m. on 95 Rock.

36 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

Whodunit?

LAURAPERRY

Undercover Artists paint smiles for children to attend Camp TBI For the first time in its seven-year history, Undercover Artists, a Walton Foundation fundraiser, won’t be held on the grounds of Walton Rehab but at Julian Smith Casino. Walton Foundation Associate Development Officer Alice Salley says that with the April 1 sale of Walton Rehab to Health South, they felt it was a good idea to secure another location for the April 18 event. “We may bring it back to the hospital grounds, but we [at the foundation] are excited about the change,” Salley says. “We won’t worry about weather issues, and with this being our seventh year, it will be a nice refresh.” As always, 100 percent of the funds raised will benefit the Walton Foundation’s Camp TBI (Camp To Be Independent), a summer camp offering horseback riding, sporting activities, arts and crafts and social activities to children ages 8-21 with traumatic brain injuries. The Undercover Artists fundraiser was originally launched on April 12, 2007, as a way to highlight the traveling Georgia Artists with Disabilities Juried Art Show on display at Walton Rehab. The relocation has made highlighting this year’s show difficult, but according to Salley, the Walton Foundation plans to use a TV monitor at the Julian Smith Casino to show photographs Who painted this piece? Attendees at the Seventh of the Georgia Artists with Annual Undercover Artists auction will have to wait Disabilities artwork on display and see. at Walton, inviting patrons to make plans to come by and see it. The Artists with Disabilities show will be on display until April 30. The Walton Foundation expects to have the most canvases they’ve ever had for the Undercover Artists auction, about 118 this year. On each 12x16 canvas, the artist’s signature will be covered with masking tape when bidding starts. Participants in the show range from well-known artists to local political figures and celebrities. And this is not your quiet art museum show — the cocktail party begins with music by The Henry’s, followed by Daddy Grace. Salley says the energy continues to build until the final 30 minutes, when each painting’s artist is finally revealed and the bid sheets really fill up. “There is definitely a rush when the tape comes off,” says Vicki Greene, Walton Foundation’s vice president. “People will have been circling and eyeing the paintings that they like all night, planning the perfect spot for it. When the names are uncovered, there’s a whole new look at the paintings. It gets really frenzied and fun.”

WHERE GREAT FOOD ROCKS.

THURSDAY STORM BRANCH BAND FRIDAY NIGHT ROCKS CHICK FLIX SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE COVER STORY SUNDAY KEITH GREGORY MONDAY KIDS NIGHT: $1 KIDS MEALS PLUS TRIVIA NIGHT 2FER TUESDAY BUY 8 WINGS. GET 8 FREE!

Undercover Artists Julian Smith Casino Thursday, April 18 7 p.m. $50 706-826-5809 wrh.org AUGUSTA 706-364-WILD 18APRIL2013

|

|

3035 WASHINGTON ROAD

W W W. W I L D W I N G C A F E . C O M AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 37

LINE

Mexican Restaurant in S.C.: Cashier Jackey refused to correct my bill, confirmed by waitress as her mistake, saying she didn’t give discounts. Hope taking my barely eaten leftovers made you feel better for the $5 discount / over charge to someone who loves to blog. Thanks again Augusta for proving you suck and showing artists why no one should come play here!! Grace Potter was phenomenal yet not many people showed and the ones that did sat in lawn chairs 100 yards back from the stage. Congrats to Rick Pitino and the Louisville Cardinal basketball team. Wait a minute, is that the very same Rick Pitino that was involved in that “sexual relations / abortion / extortion” melodrama fiasco circa 2009? Why yes it is - nevermind! I am one Augustan who is always happy to see Masters Week over. Excuse me if I don’t get excited about a bunch of obnoxious poorly dressed Yankees invading our town, clogging our roads, and pushing us locals out of our favorite restaurants. Not to mention the price of everything nearly doubles during this week.

38 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

WHINELINE@THEMETROSPIRIT.COM

Have something you want to get off your chest? Send your whines to whineline@themetrospirit. com. If you do so by noon on Friday, you might just see it in the next Thursday’s issue. Oh, and whines may be edited for content but will pretty much be printed exactly as you type them.

Maybe if Deke had not squandered the first six years as mayor on that foolish ballpark, He would already have something substantial and long lasting to build a his legacy on. This plan to give a way the mills to Azziz looks desperate from someone who has not had any real accomplishments as mayor. Petersburg Station, which is a quiet neighborhood where people frequently walk and children play between Baston Road and The Pass, is not a racetrack. Well looks like the US gov’t is at it again, let’s start something big & important get it about a third or so done and then pull the plug... MOX Plant at SRS - $4 bil spent and soon to join the likes of Yucca Mtn - $9 bil spent and what do we have to show for it? a hole, granted a very safe hole, in the side of a mountain... then there was the Supper Conducting Super Collider - $2 bil spent and what do we have to show for it? a very large hole in the ground in Texas... sigh... my tax dollars at work... What’s the deal with the Augusta National strangling local businesses? How much is enough?

up

THUMBS

WHINE

V24|NO16

The quick thinking and heroic responses of almost everyone on the scene at Monday’s Boston Marathon.

down

The anonymous commenters to the online news stories about the Boston Marathon tragedy. If the bombings weren’t enough to make you fear for humanity, some of the comments cer tainly sealed the deal.

18APRIL2013

V24|NO16

18APRIL2013

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 39

V24|NO16

40 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

18APRIL2013


Metro Spirit 04.18.2013