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© 2012

February 17, 2012 SOUTHERN EDITION

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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“Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet”

P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXVI ❖ No. IV 80 pages, 2 sections, plus supplement

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COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File Calendar Readers’ Retreat Pet Talk The Bookworm Sez New column Table Talk The Outdoors The Land Funpage Marketing Milker’s Message Mielke Market Weekly Advertiser Listing Auctions/Classifieds Note location in this issue Back Roads

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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STAFF Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.25; $22 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.25. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

Dark history revisited State University this spring with a degree in America is a great place to live. Living agronomy; and the sons are farming and in the Midwest makes that even better. raising cattle near Milford. Our history as a country and state is She enjoys writing, photography, playing relatively short compared to the birththe guitar, teasing little kids, and knowing places of our ancestors. Even that short that laughter truly is the best medicine. history has not always been a proud one. (She says she despises mending blue This issue of The Land has a number of jeans.) stories focusing on one of the dark times We hope you enjoy “Table Talk.” of U.S. and Minnesota history. The U.S.Schwaller came up with the name of her Dakota War started 150 years ago this LAND MINDS column “because it brings thoughts of the year, making pioneer life even more By Kevin Schulz kitchen table, where almost all important adventurous. conversations take place in the farm I am not a great historian, thus you home.” won’t see me trying to explain the rea“Table Talk” is taking the place of sons and fault that led to the start of “The Yield,” the this conflict between white settlers and the original settlers of this area. long-time column written by Sue I have lived through enough wars in my own short Peterson since history to know that there is no one reason nor one 1978. Sue has person entirely at fault for starting a war. decided that it is Not to get all kumbaya on you, but wounds can be time to hang up her healed if everyone seeks peace and understanding of pen and retire from the events that blew up that summer of 1862, endher writing, as seen Karen Schwaller Sue Peterson ing in Mankato the day after Christmas that year in the Jan. 20 issue. with the hanging of 38 Dakota Indians. Karen and “Table Talk” will not replace Sue and It’s too late for resolution and proper restitution, “The Yield.” That’s like asking Aaron Rogers to but we should all learn as much as we can about our replace Brett Favre at quarterback. It seems to be past to improve the future. working out OK in Green Bay. Log on to www.mnhs.org/library/tips/history_ Sue and “The Yield” had developed quite a followtopics/94dakota.html for information from the Min- ing in the past 30-plus years. I’m certain Karen and nesota Historical Society. There are also other links “Table Talk” will also gain a following. within the stories on Pages 8A-22A. So, please turn to Page 34A, pull up a chair and As you will also learn on Page 15A, history has a join Karen Schwaller in the debut of “Table Talk.” way of reinventing itself. I would also like to thank Sue Peterson for her Speaking of the future many years of sharing “The Yield” with The Land’s This issue of The Land debuts “Table Talk,” a new readers. She started writing her column in 1978 column by Karen Schwaller. from her farm south of Amboy in Blue Earth County. The last few years she has been writing from her Schwaller comes to us from Milford, Iowa. The home in Blue Earth in Faribault County. mother of three (one daughter and twin sons) grew up on a grain-livestock farm near Remsen, Iowa. As my mail pile indicates since Sue announced her retirement, her writing will be missed. After obtaining a degree in journalism, she moved to Milford, Iowa, to write for the local newspaper, and it Kevin Schulz is the editor of The Land. He may be was there that she met one of the locals, Dave Schwaller. reached at editor@TheLandOnline.com. ❖ The couple’s daughter will graduate from South Dakota

OPINION

Schwaller came up with the name of her column ‘because it brings thoughts of the kitchen table, where almost all important conversations take place in the farm home.’

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 24A — The Agricultural Research Service is devloping a new way to map drought areas worldwide.

7B-11B — The Central Minnesota Farm Show in St. Cloud is set for Feb. 28-March 1. 12B — The Fleckvieh cattle breed is catching the eye of dairy and beef producers.

Frolicking on ‘snow days’ of childhood years past

OPINION

If my father sent hired men Jackie and Charlie to straw the big loafing shed, off we’d go with them to open gates, load the wagon and, later, toss the bales to them to spread. They loved the help; we loved helping. Most times, however, the snow that brought so much pleasure in the morning usually melted by mid-afternoon. Since mud ruined the fun, we traded it for games of euchre at the kitchen table. If my mother thought us wasting time she often drafted us for kitchen work or sent us to the basement to crack pecans.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Whatever we did those afternoons certainly beat the memory work and bus rides that had threatened us just hours before. Only once or twice during all my school days on the farm did snow or ice keep us more than one day from learning and Luther. But the memories of all those special days still quicken the pace of a slow, muddy day a half century later. Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com.❖ << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

A dash of sugar-like snow is almost lost Then, finally, we climbed to the levee’s in the brown grass and gray sky out my flat top where we could see the farm’s back door. Winter’s dullness seems to have fields, barns and cows in one glorious finally caught February and the weight sweep. But that grand sight quickly gave has slowed it to a cold crawl. way to sledding and down we’d scream on the levee’s river side because near its botFifty years ago a tablespoon more snow tom another, smaller shoulder gave us or a teaspoon more ice would have another short-and-fast ride. Wow. changed a plow horse day like this into a runaway stallion. Reading, writing and But that ecstasy always brought agony religion would have been ditched for sled- FARM & FOOD FILE — a slick, steep trek back to the top. A ding, skating and tagging along with Dad dozen or so screaming trips down, folBy Alan Guebert and the hired men on the farm of my lowed by a dozen or so wheezing trips youth. back up, wiped us out. Back we then went, through the fences, pastures and Each of those rare days began the still-staring Holsteins, to Mom’s warm same way: listening to the stern voice of kitchen. an announcer on “the 50,000 red-hot Recovery was quick — it came with hot chocolate watts of KMOX Radio, St. Louis” as he slowly read a long list of school closings. If he called our school, we — and off we traipsed with Dad or the hired men as they did chores or hid out in the heated dairy barn. five siblings — my sister, three brothers and me — cheered happily. Our mother, however, sighed quietly. In many ways that part of the snow day was better The fickleness of southern Illinois weather dictated than sledding because my brothers and I were with the day’s schedule. Since a good snow was as rare as people who talked like we wanted to talk, looked like thick pond ice — and neither survived long — quick we wanted to look and did the things we wanted to do. They were men and we, well, we weren’t. action was required to either sled the mountainous levee that surrounded the farm or skate what 364 other days a year was just a four-acre watering hole for dry cows. First, we pulled on two pairs of just about everything we owned — blue jeans, socks, T-shirts, flannel shirts, sweatshirts and cloth gloves. The all-cotton outfits were crowned with itchy woolen hats and shod in thin rubber boots. Next, to actually sled, we crawled, slid or climbed under, through or over barbed-wire, woven-wire and wooden fences that held the pastures between our house and the levee. As we did the cows always stood in a stiff stare. You know you’re a sight when you’ve frozen a cow’s curiosity.

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Letter: Rastetter responds to Tanzania project accusations To the Editor: Editor’s note: Nationally syndicated “Farm and Food File” columnist Alan Guebert wrote two columns that appeared in The Land in January regarding the involvement of a number of parties — including Bruce Rastetter — in an African agricultural project. Recently there has been discussion about a project in Tanzania involving AgriSol Energy. As a native Iowan, lifelong farmer and a partner in AgriSol, I want to assure you that our business venture in Tanzania is meant to improve the lives of Tanzanians — by increasing both food and economic security. You may be surprised to learn that total agricultural production in western Tanzania is very low. Our project aims to increase yields, provide access to quality storage facilities and foster transparent markets. Working with local farmers we will help to increase agricultural production, in turn improving their overall standard of living and health. Our current project, centered in Lugufu, consists of about 34,000 acres that con-

tain no refugees. I want to assure you that under no circumstances will AgriSol facilitate or advocate the removal of any refugee. This land will be cultivated to produce corn, soybeans, animal feed, meats and cooking oils. The project will be developed over 10 years and require an investment of approximately $100 million. Early on, AgriSol engaged Iowa State University to provide important advice based on their experience with this type of work. However, due to my appointment to the Iowa Board of Regents, Iowa State has decided to step back from direct involvement in the project. Working with other advisers, AgriSol hopes to develop a new agricultural model that can be duplicated to benefit other underdeveloped global markets — combining a modern agricultural operation with self-supported farmer and community extension programs. In the words of Norman Borlaug, a great humanitarian and native Iowan, “Food is the moral right of all who are born into this world.” Bruce Rastetter Summit Group CEO

OPINION

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The advice we provided to AgriSol was grounded in the lessons learned — and the partnerships forged — in rural Uganda.

The impact our Center for Sustainable Rural Livelihoods has had in transforming lives of rural Ugandans This week I notified AgriSol Energy has been extraordinary. that the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences would no longer serve in We cannot be prouder of the efforts an advisory capacity to its planning of our faculty, students and Ugandan for its proposed project in Tanzania. partners. Our students themselves have been transformed as they’ve I ended the college’s advising role because much of our time and energy experienced the world through the has been directed at countering mis- eyes of others and taken classroom representations about why and how information into a practical global we were involved. setting. It has not been directed at what Thank you for sharing comments originally compelled us to explore proand questions to me. Also, thanks to gram development in Tanzania — the those who expressed support and role agricultural education can play in helping small farmers and families encouragement for the College’s goals and mission. I have appreciated your struggling against poverty and feedback and thoughts. ❖ hunger.

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Commentary: Will seaweed be the biofuel solution? supply 1 percent of its annual gasoline “The form of sugar inside the seaweed is very needs by growing the brown seaweed for exotic,” said Yashuo Yoshikuni, one of the developharvest on less than 1 percent of its ter- ers. “There is no industrial microbe to break down ritorial waters. the alginate (in the seaweed) and convert The world already grows it into fuels and chemiand harvests more than 15 The form of sugar inside the seacal compounds.” million metric tons of weed is very exotic. There is no kombu and other seaweeds How badly does the industrial microbe to break down for direct human consumpenvironmental movethe alginate and convert it into tion. There seems no reason ment want to get rid of fuels and chemical compounds. why large additional fossil fuels? Enough to amounts of the seaweed accept the biotech — Yashuo Yoshikuni ethanol solution? At could not be harvested for ethanol without driving up the this moment, the costs of other foods. Corn ethanol competes directly world’s acceptance of other renewable fuels is plumfor land with food and feed, thereby increasing food meting, due to their high costs compared to coal and costs to consumers, especially for meat, milk and natural gas. Meanwhile, the new horizontal drilling eggs. and fracking processes have suddenly made longThe seaweed catch? The new ethanol depends on known and abundant shale petroleum reserves far genetically engineered bacteria. The process has more cost-effective. The claims that fracking will been developed by BioArchitecture Lab. Inc. and the pollute drinking water are not holding up, since the University of Washington in Seattle. They modified petroleum drilling is thousands of feet further down the common E. coli bacterium to turn the sugars in in the soil profile than the well-drilling. edible kelp into ethanol. The research has just been reported in the Jan. 20 issue of the journal Science. See SEAWEED, pg. 6A

OPINION

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Researchers may have broken the biofuel barrier. A new biotech discovery enables ethanol to be made from a common variety of brown seaweed. This would bypass the biggest problem with corn ethanol and biodiesel — the world’s shortage of cropland. The new ethanol process uses the familiar E. coli bacterium working on kombu, a variety of edible brown kelp, which is common in the world’s seas and oceans. It has been grown and harvested commercially by such countries as China, Japan and Korea for hundreds of years. If you like sushi, it is the brown wrapping on your favorites. The new process can turn a mixture of kombu and water, with the E. coli added, into a solution of about 5 percent ethanol in two days. Distill the ethanol from the water; put the water back into the ocean and “Voila”! Better yet, this happens at low temperatures, between 25 and 30 degrees Celsius. Thus the ethanol can be produced without the use of additional costly energy — a big advantage over the current efforts to produce cost-effective ethanol from algae. An analysis by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory suggests that the United States could

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BUTTERFIELD, MN 56120

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Letter: Let private sector, not government, produce jobs To the Editor: I’ve been listening to the Republican candidates debate about their opponents’ weaknesses, such as how many wives or traveling companions they have. These certainly attest to the morals of some

running for public office and should come out before the election. But these really aren’t dealing with the problems our country is facing at the present time. It’s hard to find a perfect candidate. I only know of

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two perfect people. When Mitt Romney released his tax records, they related to the biggest problem that we have in the United States today: unemployment. He is a candidate who had given jobs to over 100,000 people. He did it without asking for a taxpayer subsidy. Venture capitalists like him include Warren Buffett, the second-richest man in the United States. They buy failing businesses and get them going again. Contrast this with President Obama, who doled out more than $500 million in our tax dollars to Solyndra. They employed about 1,000 people for a year and then went bankrupt. That is $500,000 per job invested. Or the charade when they rescued General Motors by giving them a big loan so they could close several plants in the United States and build four new ones; three of them in China. You and I, the taxpayers, are going to pay the bill, while someone else receives the benefits. Can government produce jobs on taxpayers’ borrowed money? My vote will go to letting the private sector produce the jobs. Under the free enterprise system, we should have the right to start any business we wish. If we are successful we should keep the profit, and if we are not successful we have the duty to absorb the loss. The taxpayers should not have to pay the losses. Al Schumann Eyota, Minn.

OPINION

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‘Natural’ demands

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SEAWEED, from pg. 5A The eco-movement has long demanded “natural” food production. Bio-tech food production has been successfully banned in many Third World countries because of the pressure from First World activists. But would that apply to kelp ethanol vats? The kelp for biofuel can be grown in Puget Sound, but kelp farms have been rejected by landowners and fishermen. On the other hand, if kombu ethanol can be produced so readily, other nations have at least as much seawater in their surroundings as the “rich” in North America and Europe. Meaning all countries having access to seawater could make energy and support their own populations while expanding their economies into the 21st century. Remember, of course, none of this will much reduce our dependency on oil. One percent of our territorial waters for 1 percent of our fuel means it will only be useful in fulfilling the congressional mandate and perhaps rescue us from corn ethanol. This commentary was submitted by Dennis Avery, a senior fellow for the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C., and the director for the Center for Global Food Issues. He was formerly a senior analyst for the Department of State. Readers may write him at P.O. Box 202, Churchville, VA 24421 or e-mail to cgfi@hughes.net. ❖

Letter: Who is actually representing American values? sion. Money borrowed to the banks and automobile companies has been almost completely repaid. Republican opposition has prevented President Obama from completely getting America out of the recession, but progress is being made. All of the problems President Obama faced were caused by the conservative policies and mismanagement of eight years of George Bush. It will take more than four years to repair the damage. What do the Republicans have to offer? They have two candidates. The first is Mitt Romney, a multimillionaire who pays a tax rate lower than the average American,

OPINION

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced a package of technology enhancements from the Farm Service Agency that include web access for handheld and smartphone users, as well as a more efficient and timely option for receiving news and critical program information. The FSA site is accessible through any device that connects to the internet. The mobile site organizes the information on the website in a way that makes for easy reading on a small, hand-held screen. It does not require screen adjustments or constant scrolling and panning across the information. In addition to the mobile website, FSA is now offering farmers and ranchers a more efficient and timely option for receiving critical program information. Such things as eligibility requirements, deadlines and related information can be accessed through an electronic news service hosted by GovDelivery. By signing up for free online communications through GovDelivery, farmers and ranchers can receive news, via e-mail, directly to their home or farm office or to their mobile devices — allowing them to receive immediate notification of farm program news that is pertinent to their agricultural operation. Through GovDelivery, producers can establish subscriber preferences by choosing to receive federal farm program and farm loan information by topic, by state and/or by county. Producers can also select as many subscriber options as they want, which allows producers in multiple counties or across state lines to receive updates from each county in which they opeate or have an interest. To access FSA’s mobile website log on to www.fsa.usda.gov/mobile. To sign up for FSA’s GovDelivery electronic news service, log on to www.fsa.usda.gov/subscribe. ❖

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has a substantial part of his wealth in overseas accounts, and made his money by dismantling companies in distress, selling off the pieces for profit, and firing American workers. The second is Newt Gingrich, the former Speaker of the House who was kicked out of his own party, fined $300,000 for ethics violations, made millions lobbying, been married three times, and was having an affair with a staffer while he was impeaching President Clinton for having an affair. Is this the best the Republicans have? What a joke. Marv Jensen Kensington, Minn.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

To the Editor: People on the right criticize Alan Guebert on his “liberal bias.” I am sure these same fair, open-minded individuals also criticize Rush Limbaugh, Glen Beck and others of that ilk for their “conservative bias.” Guebert apparently does not represent American values — being a Missouri Synod Lutheran, good family man, and lives in a rural Illinois area close to his place of birth. Rush Limbaugh, on the other hand, does represent conservative values, living in a Florida penthouse, is fat, smokes cigars, has been divorced many times, and has been convicted of buying and using illegal drugs. Why are conservative leaders always such hypocrites? Why are they always forgiven by the people who blindly follow them? President Obama got us out of one war, Iraq; is close to getting us out of another war, Afghanistan; and prevented us from getting into another war, Libya. He killed Osama bin Laden and has almost completely destroyed al-Qaida. His foreign policy has been extremely successful and is not being challenged by Republican presidential candidates. Domestically, President Obama saved the American car industry, saved the American banking system, and prevented the recession from turning into a depres-

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U.S.-Dakota War anniversary

Summer’s events ‘commemorating’ those who died The Defenders Monument on the boulevard of New Ulm, Minn.’s, Center Street was dedicated Aug. 22, 1891, “to honor the memory of the defenders who aided” New Ulm during the U.S.-Dakota War.

Richard Siemers

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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By RICHARD SIEMERS The Land Correspondent One hundred and fifty years ago the United States was involved in its great Civil War. Many Minnesota men were off fighting in Virginia and Tennessee. But all was not quiet back home. Minnesotans were involved in their own kind of civil war, a fight between settlers, U.S. army soldiers and the Dakota Indians. We are commemorating the It is known as the U.S.-Dakota War of people who 1862. This summer died in that Brown County, scene war. Many relof much of the fightatives of those ing, is recognizing the people are still 150th anniversary of the conflict with around. numerous events. — Bob Burgess “We are commemorating the people who died in that war,” said Bob Burgess, director of the Brown County Historical Society, which has offices at the Society’s museum in New Ulm. “Many relatives of those people are still around.” The reasons for the conflict are complex. The Dakota had grievances about broken promises by the U.S. government, shortages of food, dishonest agents and a callous trader who remarked that if they were hungry, they could “eat grass.” That remark coupled with a delay in goods and cash due to the Dakota may have been the most immediate cause. Whatever specific causes might See ANNIVERSARY, pg. 9A

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“We’re finding out that many of the settlers left and never came back,” Burgess said. The government had told people it was OK to settle here, without providing protection. “Some came because they had relatives. But they were just caught in the middle.” The BCHS is part of a large group of individuals and organizations who are planning or participating in some way. It includes county commissioners, representatives from towns, townships, and county libraries, German-Bohemian Heritage Society, Junior Pioneers of New Ulm and Vicinity (who are direct descendants of the founders of New Ulm), Hermann Monument Society, Turner Hall, New Ulm Battery, veterans groups, among others.

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A pocket guide designed by Purdue Extension to be an in-field reference for corn and soybean producers is now available. The 2012 Corn and Soybean Field Guide allows farmers to quickly analyze trouble spots in their fields. The guide is updated annually and is full of information and photographs to help diagnose and manage problems such as weeds, diseases and insects. Its 320 pages cover crop development, nutrient deficiencies, planting decisions, soil fertility and herbicide injuries. The information can be used throughout the growing season — from planting to harvest. The 2012 updates include new nitrogen fertilizer recommendations. The guides also can now be purchased in single or bulk quantities through Purdue Extension’s “The Education Store” at www.the-education-store.com Producers who use the guide to help manage pest problems and apply appropriate amounts of fertilizer for deficiencies cannot only produce top yields but also save money, said Corey Gerber, director of Purdue’s Crop Diagnostic Training and Research Center. The Corn and Soybean Field Guide has been in production since 1988. According to Gerber, the guide is applicable to all regions of the United States and around the world. Individual copies are $7, or a box of 25 copies is $157.50. They can be ordered online at the web address above or by telephone at 888-EXT-INFO (398-4636). They usually ship within two business days. ❖

The BCHS is confining its remembrance to the war as it was fought in Brown County. They are compiling narratives and oral histories of about 1,200 people. They actually have files on about 5,700 families who lived in the area in 1862.

The New Ulm Public Library started a speaker series last year, and is joined by the BCHS in sponsoring symposiums and round table discussions this year. They are working with Native American consultants so a balanced view is presented. There will be reunions of families whose relatives were residents at the time of the war. Monuments erected shortly after the war at New Ulm and Milford are being refurbished and rededicated. A new monument located at a strategic point in the battle at New Ulm is being erected by the BCHS, GermanBohemian Heritage Society and Junior Pioneers of New Ulm and Vicinity. The Brown County Museum has a permanent exhibit related to the U.S.-Dakota War that is being redone and will reopen in August. A total of 1,200 photos of people who lived in the area at the time will be part of an interactive database people can access. This is only a taste of all that is being planned to remember the war and commemorate those who died during the fighting in Brown County’s early history. For more information and a calendar of events, log on to their website at www.browncountydakotawarcommemoration.com. ❖

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off attacks on Aug. 19 and Aug. 23, with the loss of 34 lives. On Aug. 25 they evacuated and went to Mankato. The war ended Sept. 26 with the Dakota releasing the hostages they had taken.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

ANNIVERSARY, from pg. 8A have sparked the uprising by the Dakota, an underlying factor, Burgess said, was the clash of two cultures — the dominant U.S. culture that was pressing against the native Dakota culture. The Dakota themselves were divided. Only a small number Bob Burgess chose to take up arms, thinking the U.S. army was busy elsewhere and this was an opportunity to take back their land. Others refused to fight and even helped to warn and protect settlers. Brown and Renville counties, where loss of life was greatest, were largely German settlers who had lived on friendly terms with the Dakota. Milford Township, in northern Brown County along the Cottonwood River, was on the eastern edge of the Lower Sioux Reservation. Surprise attacks on Aug. 18 at the beginning of the five-week war killed over 50 settlers, the highest death rate of any township. New Ulm had less than 1,000 residents, but swelled to 2,000 as refugees streamed into town. While many buildings were destroyed, people fought

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Describing the conflict a daunting task for historians By TIM KROHN Mankato Free Press

U.S.-Dakota War

NEW ULM, Minn. — As Bob Burgess and his staff began preparing an exhibit on the 150th anniversary of the Dakota-U.S. War, they realized their reach was going to exceed their grasp. “As you delve into this, it’s so complex. We had to throttle back our appetite for presentation of the war because of the scope. It was so massive,” said Burgess, director of the Brown County Historical Society in New Ulm. As the anniversary approaches — it began Aug. 17, 1862, when four young Dakota killed five settlers — historians, the public and the Dakota struggle with how to portray and mark the events, which resulted in the mass execution of 38 Dakota in Mankato in December of that year. In Brown County, which was at the heart of the battles, including a siege at New Ulm, Burgess said they are focusing on the settlers who died and fought as well as the stories of the Dakota who were involved. In the end, he said, the goal is to gather and display as much information as possible about the complex war’s effects on Brown County. “It’s important that all the sides be included. I could

list 12, maybe 14 reasons for how the war started. I don’t think you try to spoon feed anything. People have to learn the information and decide for themselves why the war started,” Burgess said. He said as interest grows, more families have come forward with stories and mementos of their ancestors who fought or died. For example, the museum has been loaned a cartridge box from a soldier from a Minnesota militia group involved in the war with the Dakota. “We also have buildings in town from that time. We have the Forster Building, where there’s still the place where a bullet tore through the wall. The Kiesling House also is still here,” Burgess said. The two structures were outside the barricaded downtown where women and children had taken cover and were used as positions to keep the attacking Dakota from overrunning the barricade. Burgess said they’ve also strived to learn all they can about Dakota who were in the county at the time. They’ve identified 14 Dakota who were in the county, although many more would have been involved. The exhibit will include a touch screen with more than 1,000 faces on it, allowing people to touch it to see their biographies.

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There are also stories being gathered from Dakota at Sisseton, S.D., about Dakota scouts who scouted for the U.S. Army during the war.There are stories of other Dakota who warned and protected settlers and stories of those who fought. “There are (Dakota) family members reviewing what we’re doing. They have direct lineage to those Dakota scouts who worked for Sibley and they have family members who fought. You have this very complex situation and you stir it up, and it gets complicated,” Burgess said. Darla Gebhard is a research archivist at the museum whose great-grandfather defended New Ulm. She said the battles there were important. “There was a lot of concern. If they passed New Ulm, (the fight) would go to Nicollet and Blue Earth counties.” The society’s website — log on to www.browncountyhistorymn.org — has more information and a downloadable booklet about the events. The Blue Earth County Historical Society has chosen not to create a special exhibit to mark the 150th anniversary. (A portion of their permanent museum display describes the war.) “We’re not doing a physical exhibit. It’s not like, ‘Let’s have a party over this,’” said Jessica Potter, director of the Historical Society. The society has started monthly events bringing in Dakota speakers to talk about various aspects of the Dakota culture. “We are focusing on the culture. My goal is to raise the understanding,” Potter said. “We can maybe have a civil discussion.” The society also is planning to install a plaque in Reconciliation Park, located near the library in Mankato and the site of the hanging. It will list the names of the 38 Dakota executed. Potter said the society wants to form a larger group to look at possibly adding other monuments or memorials in the area. The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012 << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack made the following statement regarding data released Feb. 10 showing U.S. farm exports reached a record $136.3 billion in calendar year 2011. “The data released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture represents a record-breaking calendar year for farm exports, demonstrating — once again — that American agriculture remains a bright spot in our nation’s economy. We saw a rise in both the value and volume of U.S. agricultural exports worldwide in 2011, as international sales rose $20.5 billion over the previous record set in calendar year 2010. Total agricultural exports for calendar year 2011 U.S. agriculture is were a robust $136.3 the second-most billion. productive sector “These figures indiof our economy cate how demand for in the past few the American brand decades ... of agriculture continues to soar worldwide, sup— Tom Vilsack porting good jobs for Americans across a variety of industries such as transportation, renewable energy, manufacturing, food services and on-farm employment. During the past three years, the U.S. farm sector has continued to support and create jobs on a consistent basis, strengthening an American economy that’s built to last. Every $1 billion in agricultural exports supports 8,400 American jobs, meaning that U.S. farm exports helped support more than 1 million U.S. jobs in 2011. “And that gets to the innovation of our American farmers, ranchers and growers. American agriculture continues to apply the latest in technology and achieve a nearly unparalleled level of productivity. In fact, U.S. agriculture is the second-most productive sector of our economy in the past few decades outside of information technology. “Exports of almost all major U.S. commodities rose in calendar year 201l, helping us to reach President Obama’s goal of doubling all U.S. exports by the end of 2014. Grains were the biggest contributor to the overall record, reaching an all-time high of $37.7 billion, a $9.2 billion increase over 2010. Cotton experienced the biggest year-to-year increase, up 44 percent from 2010, reaching a record $8.5 billion. Dairy and pork exports also set records in 2011, reaching $4.8 billion and $6 billion respectively. “Another success story is U.S. beef exports. Last year, the United States exported an all-time high of $5.4 billion worth of beef and beef products, surpassing the previous record by more than $1.6 billion. The volume of shipments also surpassed the 2003 levels, the last year before a detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Washington state disrupted U.S. trade. The return to pre-2003 levels marks an important milestone in the USDA’s steadfast efforts to open and expand international markets. Despite this progress, restrictions continue to constrain exports to many of our key markets and we remain fully committed to breaking down those trade barriers. “There was more good news for U.S. beef exporters

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Museum offers glimpse of the old world, inside and out

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The spiral staircase from the post office is still at home in the Brown County Historical Society. The post office was housed in the building until 1976. The current museum opened in 1984.

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

lands and Belgium that border Germany. By RICHARD SIEMERS The Land Correspondent Adding to the architecture is the striking Of all of the displays of materials used. Quoting from the Society’s county history that the website, “the exterior of the structure has Brown County Historical alternating courses of variegated deep red Society has in its New Ulm, rough brick and gray-white terra cotta Minn., museum, one of the stone (a manufactured concrete stone).” most striking is the building The building served as New Ulm’s post itself. Deb Gebhard Bob Burgess office from 1910 to 1976. When the post office The exterior makes you moved to a new location, the city of New Ulm and think you are back in Europe. Brown County purchased the building. The BCHS “They wanted a German look,” said Research became a third partner to renovate the building for a Librarian Darla Gebhard. “It is not a replica of any museum. When the renovation was complete, the city building in Germany, but was inspired by buildings gave its interest to the county. The BCHS rents the space for its museum, which opened in 1984. from the German lowlands.” The post office had a high ceiling with an attic The steep roof and stepped gables are similar to buildings seen in the German state of Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), and in the lowland countries of the Nether- See MUSEUM, pg. 14A

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Century Farms display among featured exhibits

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Far left: The steep roof and stepped gables of the museum are similar to buildings seen in the German state of Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), and in the lowland countries of the Netherlands and Belgium that border Germany.

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Left: The New Ulm room houses furniture that was brought from New Ulm’s sister city of Ulm, Germany.

MUSEUM, from pg. 13A above. The renovation included adding a mezzanine, an open space which provides a second floor for exhibits, and transforming the attic into a third floor exhibit area. While the interior has greatly changed, there are remnants that keep its former use alive. Gebhard told how a postal inspector would arrive unannounced, enter by a back door, and take an iron spiral staircase to the attic where there were several

peep windows through which an inspector could watch the employees. Staff members can point visitors to a segment of the spiral staircase that was preserved, and to one of the peep windows that was salvaged and installed in a wall overlooking the entry. The light fixtures are also original. While not open to public viewing, Director Bob Burgess pointed out remnants of a terrazzo floor in the basement, and a shower drain. Early in the 20th century mail delivery was dirty and muddy. This was a place for the carriers to shower and clean up.

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When you are done being fascinated by the building, you can look at the exhibits. The first floor is a display of Century Farms of Brown County and of the changes in farming through the decades. The mezzanine has artifacts of children’s writer and illustrator Wanda Gag, a New Ulm native; a display of historic quilts and sewing machines, with one contemporary quilt; and the Ulm Room, filled with historic furniture brought from New Ulm’s sister city of Ulm, Germany. The third floor is an exhibit on the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862. That exhibit is undergoing a complete renovation in preparation for the 150th anniversary of the war and will reopen in August. The museum is located at the intersection of Broadway and Center Street. Check their website at browncountyhistorymn.org for hours and other information. There is a modest entrance fee. ❖

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U.S.-Dakota War question: Is it ... or isn’t it?

15 A THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Photos by Pat Christman/Mankato Free Press

Wood believed to be from 1862 scaffold stashed away

Scaffold timber really from bridge, historical society says

Historical society not planning to display beam

New research challenges decades of assumptions

By TIM KROHN Mankato Free Press A beam that newspapers from 1881 and 1927 describe as part of the gallows used in executing 38 Dakota Indians in Mankato has for decades been stored away. The director of the Blue Earth County Historical Society said she doesn’t intend to display it as the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War is marked this summer. “We are not trying to hide it. We just don’t have the physical capacity to display it,” said Jessica Potter.

“We have 24,000 objects and we can’t have them all on display in a 3,000-foot museum. And it’s an object that does not have interpretation with it that will be positive to everyone who sees it. We have to be sensitive to that.”

By DAN LINEHAN Mankato Free Press A timber beam held in storage by the Blue Earth County (Minn.) Historical Society is not part of the scaffold used to hang 38 Dakota Indians in 1862, Executive Director Jessica Potter said Feb. 10. That conclusion came after Potter labored the first week of February on a historical mystery: Does the beam sitting in the back of the historical society’s collection room match the description in a 1927 newspaper story? By Feb. 10, her answer was clear: No. There is no smoking gun. But there are enough differences — in dimensions, spacing of notches and perhaps type of wood — that Potter is questioning decades of assumptions about the timber. “As long as I’ve been here, the legend was that this was the scaffold timber,” she said.

Instead, she believes it may be part of an 1856 bridge built by the military and donated sometime after 1931, when it was replaced with concrete. A short description of such a timber is just two places away from the scaffold in a log book of donations from the 1930s. The hanging, which remains the largest mass execution in American history, looms especially large this year, the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War. Not the t imber After a Free Press story ran Feb. 5 about the beam not being displayed, Potter took a tape measure to the weathered piece of wood. (That story can be found at the left.) First, it is about 19 feet long, not 24 feet as it’s described in a 1927 story in which a reporter viewed the timber as it was kept in the basement of the Ben Pay Hotel. While it could have been cut since then, Potter said the ends show that any cut, if made, was not done recently. That story and others describe the timber as about a foot square, though it is somewhat smaller. It is about 7.5 inches tall and about 9 or 10 inches See CHALLENGE, pg. 17A

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She said they also don’t have a “solid research base to have it on display,” and said the object would bring strong emotions.

Potter said the authenticity of the timber hasn’t been verified. But there are newspaper articles that describe the whereabouts of the timber soon after the war. (See story at right with new information about authenticity of the beam.) The timber came from prominent Mankato businessman and Civil War Home Guard Cmdr. John F. Meagher. He reportedly bought the timber in an auction held by the Army soon after the hangings and used it as a beam in his hardware store. After a later fire in the building, Meagher shipped the beam by train to the University of Minnesota. In the Nov. 24, 1881, issue of the University of Minnesota newspaper, the Ariel, a story told of Meagher giving the timber to the university’s museum. Meagher sent a letter to the university that said in part: “It is a rather hard looking relic and you may be disappointed when you see it, but I can assure you it did the business and completely civilized the Sioux Indians ... “The notches around one side of this were to accommodate the ropes ...” Meagher’s letter said. See BEAM, pg. 16A

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Left: Blue Earth County (Minn.) Historical Society Executive Director Jessica Potter discusses the history of a beam in the society’s collection. Potter believes the beam, initially labeled as a beam from the gallows used to hang 38 Native Americans in 1862, is actually a timber from a military bridge built in 1856 and washed away three years later. Right: The “park book” that chronicled artifacts kept in storage by the historical society in the Sibley Park pavilion prior to 1934 shows entries for a “timber” from a military bridge that was donated to the society followed two entries later by an entry for the “scaffold timber” from the infamous gallows.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Exhibition of objects becomes controversial topic BEAM, from pg. 15A The timber was held by the university until 1927 when it was turned over to the Blue Earth County Historical Society as described in a Dec. 24, 1927, Free Press story. (See related story on Page 18A.) The controversy over which historic objects to display has come to the forefront with sensitive nature of the war and the nation’s largest mass execution in Mankato. The state Historical Society has the noose used to hang Chief Chaska in storage and said it does not plan to put it on public view when it opens an exhibit on the war, saying they don’t want it to become “the noose exhibit.”

For Darla Gebhard, a research archivist and librarian at the Brown County Historical Society, keeping compelling history out of reach of the public goes against the very nature of historical societies’ obligations. “Personally, I know that any artifact here, that anyone could come in and view it. Even if it’s not on display, we certainly take it out,” Gebhard said. “That’s just freedom of information. You hold artifacts in trust for the public and the public should be able to view them — not just some people can see them and some cannot.” Gebhard, whose great-grandfather defended New Ulm from Dakota attacks in August 1862, said objects

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such as the noose or remnants of the gallows may be painful for some but are part of the historical story. “I’d certainly like to see Chaska’s noose on exhibit because I think it would be a very personal, powerful experience to see it. While it’s painful for some, history is sometimes powerful and painful.” She said it is similar to people seeing the shoes or other personal items of Holocaust victims that are on display in the national Holocaust Museum. Potter said some people are allowed to view objects in storage, if they have a reason to. “You have to give us a reason why you want to see an object in our closed collection — people who are doing research on a topic. Then it goes before a collections committee to decide if it has merit,” Potter said. She said the process is needed because of the time it can take to locate and show someone objects that are in storage. The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

The Blue Earth County (Minn.) Historical Society has no plans to display the beam, regardless of its authenticity.

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Potter: Actual beam may have been lost in flooding

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remain visible on the ticket. Potter believes this is the same ticket that originally held the name of John F. Meagher, the Mankato hardware dealer who bought the timber in early 1863. How would that get attached to a bridge timber? She does not know, but believes someone, knowingly or not, attached the ticket to the wrong piece of timber. “When is that moment where the stories got crossed and one object got kept and the other wasn’t?” she asked. If it is truly gone, the timber is the second artifact related to the hangings that has been lost. An 8,500-pound granite monument, created in 1912 with the inscription, “Here were hanged 38 Sioux Indians,” was in a city storage yard but has not been seen publicly since the mid-’90s. The timber is likely to stay in the collection, along with about 85 percent of the historical society’s 24,000 artifacts. “We can start to dig a little more to at least figure out where this bridge was,” she said. The digging will be the first time in decades this piece will be subjected to scrutiny, she said. “We ask a lot of questions about a lot of things. Why we didn’t ask questions about this one I don’t know.” The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

To get a better guess, he’d have to sand it smooth CHALLENGE, from pg. 15A and inspect it further. wide depending on where you measure. That seems unlikely to happen, because Potter It is the notches, though, that supposedly held the said she probably won’t do any more research to rope for nine nooses, that may have been investigate whether or not it’s the the most identifiable part of a gallows scaffold “because I really don’t feel timber. And those notches are neither as that it is.” wide nor spaced in the manner described None of it Dinsmore agrees. in the story. matches the “None of it matches the descripThe story describes nine notches “about description (in tion (in newspaper accounts). ... I three inches wide.” There are none of that newspaper suspect this is a different beam.” width. The smaller, slanted notches are accounts). ... either 1 or 2 inches wide and the larger A half-century hole ones about 8 inches. I suspect this is Potter does not doubt that the a different timber donated to the historical Potter also said they’re not equally society in 1927 was authentic. On spaced, as they’re described in the 1927 beam. May 12, 1932, it was removed from story. the hotel basement and put on dis— Randy The story also describes “four bolt play at a Sibley Park pavilion, Dinsmore holes” in the middle of the wood, though according to a Free Press story. Potter said there is only one hole. Sometime between 1932 and “Needless to say, this is not the object described in 1987, when the historical society moved into its curthe 1927 article,” she said. rent location, Potter believes the real scaffold piece The larger cuts would not have immediately was lost. thrown off previous caretakers of the beam because It may have been lost in a flood, considering the newspaper accounts said the timber was used in a hardware store after it was sold in early 1863. It was park pavilion was on the river side of the park and was torn down or swept away. presumably re-cut for that purpose. There is a clue, perhaps, in a small ticket that is A final piece of evidence, though it is more tentative, is the nature of the wood, frequently described framed and nailed to the timber with rusted flathead screws. Only small word fragments (which as freshly cut white oak in news accounts. appear to include “Mankato” and “Minnesota”) Randy Dinsmore, a project coordinator at Goodrich Construction, was donating his time for an unrelated project at the historical society and was asked to take a look at the timber. His guess is that it’s either hickory or red elm, though “pretty much all wood looks the same when it’s grayed out and leathered.”

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From 1927: ‘Scaffold timber relic of Indian hanging prized’ The Free Press Dec. 24, 1927 There are walking sticks owned by Mankato people made from some of the timber which formed the scaffold on which the thirtyeight Indians were hanged here in 1862 but ever since the wood was prized as relics has the city possessed so large a piece of it as turned up here this week when W.H. Pay, president of the Blue Earth County Historical Society, obtained a twenty-four foot tim-

ber from the University of Minnesota. The University was about to destroy it after having preserved it for many years in the geological survey rooms there, but Pay wrote and asked for it. The timber still has on it the little square address ticket which the sender, John F. Meagher, a Mankato hardware dealer tacked on it when he shipped it. The bit of cardboard is yellow with age.

The timber is not by any means sound as an inspection of it in the basement of the Ben Pay hotel where Pay had it stored will show. The scaffold is supposed to have been constructed of new oak, but the relic is much decomposed and the surface of it looks like an old railroad tie taken out of the track. It is about a foot square. Four bolt holes appear just in the middle of the twenty-four foot piece. These were apparently used to attach one of the several uprights of the foursquare scaffold. The timber is believed to have been either a top or a bottom section of the gallows. There are nine notches cut in one edge of its length, each about three inches wide and equal distance apart. They were made roughly by making two cuts with a saw and knocking out the wood between the cuts. The ropes used to hang the Indi-

ans are believed to have run in these notches. The scaffold was made to hang forty, and with nine notches on each side there would only be thirty-six. The other sides may have had more notches. But it is impossible to tell. The notches show no evidence of being worn by ropes, although they probably would not in any case, since the scaffold was used only once. The gallows was built by soldiers and the wood of it was auctioned off about six months after the hanging when Meagher obtained it, using it for a building which afterward burned. Various fixtures of metal used on the gallows were collected by the soldiers and placed among the Army stores as were probably the hanging ropes. All this material has no doubt long since disappeared. ❖

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Outstanding U.S. sheep industry members were honored for their contributions to the industry at an awards luncheon held Jan. 27, at the American Sheep Industry Association/National Lamb Feeders Association Convention in Scottsdale, Ariz. The Camptender Award was presented to G. F. Kennedy, DVM, of Pipestone, Minn., for his mentoring of a countless number of veterinary students over the past 50 years. He has a passion for working with young people and developing them professionally. Kennedy has taken the lead role in many issues related to sheep health, including vitamin E levels, baby lamb health, nutrition and scrapie. He has developed many nutritional products

that have not only saved many a lamb, but also helped producers become successful with their flocks. He is known for making his advice practical and straight forward, always with the producer in mind. Through his years of work, he developed one of the first sheep supply catalogs with Pipestone Veterinary Clinic. “I am appreciative and humbled by the award,” Kennedy said when he accepted the award. “Sheep are a very important part of my life commitment to service. My initial ownership of sheep enabled me to cope with veterinary practices and allowed me to acquire the expertise to further help the industry.” ❖

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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150 years later, war’s wounds still cut deep Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services A 150-year-old loop of rope, knotted into a hangman’s noose, sits in a climate-controlled case in the underground archives of the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. Some say it should be burned, buried or returned to the hands of the Dakota people. Others argue it should be displayed, like piles of shoes at Holocaust museums, as a powerful artifact to help people confront the grim story of the U.S.-Dakota War, which erupted in Minnesota in 1862 and ended with the largest mass execution in U.S. history. The noose, and just what to make of it, is one sign of the historical reckoning looming this year as Minnesotans wrestle with how to mark the 150th anniversary of one its ugliest, yet often overlooked, episodes. “This will be a very challenging year — the wounds are still deep,” said Republican state Rep. Dean Urdahl, a longtime history teacher whose Grove City home is three miles from where the war broke out. His great-great-grandfather buried some of its first victims. “It was our state’s greatest tragedy.” Dozens of commemorative events are planned, from a major exhibit at the Minnesota History Center to programs in classrooms across the state and cellphone tours along the Minnesota River, where the war raged for six weeks. Yet, in the shadow of it all are deep rifts over how to best observe the war’s sesquicentennial. Some Dakota believe artifacts should be returned to them, and that Historic Fort Snelling should be razed or portrayed as a concentration camp used to punish hundreds of their ancestors after the war. Meanwhile, some descendants of the more than 400 settlers and soldiers killed in the conflict complained when early brochures about commemorative cell-phone tours of the area hinted that only Dakota elders’ voices would be featured. The concerns reflect debates evident across the country over how to provide a more complete rendition of the past at historic sites, even if that means confronting deeply disturbing events long written out of the historical narrative. “You can’t turn your head from what is not pretty in history and, whatever we do, it’s not going to somehow heal things or settle it,” said Stephen Elliott, who became the director of the Minnesota Historical Society last May after 28 years at Colonial Williamsburg. He was among those who decided to give the role of African-Americans and slavery greater prominence at Williamsburg. Five years ago, a similar effort led to reconstruction of a slave cabin at Mount Vernon, the historic home of George Washington. The U.S.-Dakota War was largely overshadowed by the Civil War raging to the south. But the bloody clash left a profound legacy on the then 4-year-old state of Minnesota. “I would hope that average, mainstream MinSee WOUNDS, pg. 21A

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WOUNDS, from pg. 20A nesotans would take this moment to pause and wake up a little bit to the truth that this country came out of Indian country,” said Guy Lopez, a Dakota from Crow Creek, S.D., who now lives in Washington. “What happened 150 years ago wasn’t out of the blue and was not without provocation.” The year 1862 started with broken promises and starvation for the Dakota, who had been pushed into a narrow strip of reservation land along the Minnesota River. It exploded when their despair and anger turned into deadly attacks on settlers in August and September. It ended with the December hanging of 38 Dakota warriors in Mankato. An act of Congress then banished thousands of Dakota from Minnesota. The law, though now unobserved, remains on the books. “In a situation where it’s so contentious, part of what we’re trying to address through this observance is how we can be a better institution in terms of our relationship with the Dakota,” said Dan Spock, director of the history center museum. But, he added, “we know there will be people for whom we have to be a thing to be against.” For the first time, the history center is using a “truth recovery project” model developed in Northern Ireland, which Spock said features outreach to gather a fuller sense of what happened, “rather than assuming all we have to do is sit down, do some research and cook it up ourselves.” Emotions high in the valley The Minnesota River valley, where the war unfolded, is dotted with living descendants of settlers whose family trees wind back to 1862. In that area, and among the Dakota, interest in the war is intense. But many Minnesotans remain largely unaware of the tragic story. “You can get through the Minnesota school system and never hear about the Dakota conflict, and at a national level people are completely clueless,” said Jessica Potter, the director of the Blue Earth County Historical Society in Mankato, where the hangings took place after President Abraham Lincoln signed the orders. “Even in this community, we have major community leaders who say: ‘Lincoln was involved, really?’” Blue Earth County’s collection includes a wooden beam reputed to be part of the scaffolding from which the hanging ropes dangled. It remains out of view because of questions about its authenticity. John LaBatte — a New Ulm descendant of a Dakota warrior, a Dakota who opposed the war and a slain white trader — will lead battleground tours this summer and is on the state historical society’s descendants advisory panel. It surprises him how deeply the war still resonates, noting that it took only decades after World War II for the United States to develop friendly relations with Japan and Germany. But that war involved a unified America fighting an enemy on foreign soil, said Sasha Houston Brown, academic adviser for indigenous students at Minneapolis Community and Technical College and a

21 A THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

a detour. See it on Page 40B.

Many unaware of the history

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Descendants of Dakota, settlers at odds on relics WOUNDS, from pg. 21A Santee Sioux. The other was fought in occupied territory of the Dakota homeland. “All this goes against the great American myth of the land of the free and the home of the brave. That wasn’t the reality, and it makes people uncomfortable,” Brown said. Among the most outspoken Dakota critics of the Minnesota Historical Society’s practices is Waziyatawin, who lives in the Upper Sioux Community near Granite Falls and holds a doctorate degree in history. She insists the historical society “is totally callous to the concerns of Dakota people” and thinks Fort Snelling should be torn down or returned because it served as a concentration camp, imprisoning 1,600 starving and diseased Dakota nearby in the winter of 1862-63. She is angry that the historical society’s collection includes the noose, as well as dolls and other items soldiers collected during punitive raids following the war. “All these things need to be in Dakota hands; they have no right to them. It’s just another atrocity that they even have these objects taken off the killing fields. ... “The idea that they hold indigenous peoples’ things and tell us it’s for the public’s good is outrageous,” she said. Spock insists state historians are trying to be sensitive to Dakota concerns and acknowledges problems in the historical society’s past. The remains of Dakota leader Little Crow, in the collection for more than a century, were finally turned over in 1971 under pressure and buried in Flandreau, S.D. “We’re not in the habit of thinking of our activities as being anything other than virtuous, so when somebody says, ‘You shouldn’t have this, it doesn’t belong to you,’ it kind of cuts to the core or our values,” Spock said.

The history center invited Dakota and settlers’ descendants to join separate panels to respond to plans for the anniversary exhibit and events. They showed the groups the noose and other items in January, but refused a Star Tribune request to photograph or see it. They plan not to include it when the 1862 exhibit opens this summer. “Partly out of sensitivity to the Dakota people, we feel strongly that the noose would tend to overwhelm the whole story and it would just become the noose exhibit,” Spock said. “It would detract from what we really want people to understand, which is this whole chain of events that leads to this war, and if there’s culpability people can see it.” Darla Gebhard, research librarian at the Brown County Museum in New Ulm, is the great-greatgranddaughter of a man who defended New Ulm from Dakota attackers. The noose, she said, should be displayed because “it reminds us of what a horrible end there was to the war, and to deny it and not show those pieces is like you’re trying to erase the shame of what happened.” She recalls the shoes and human hair at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington — “tell me that wasn’t a riveting experience” — and thinks artifacts are vital to understanding history. The noose that killed Chaska After the war, brief trials led to more than 300 Dakota braves being sentenced to die. Lincoln cut the list to 39, writing to state leaders that he was “anxious to not act with so much clemency as to encourage another outbreak ... nor with so much severity as to be real cruelty.” A last-minute reprieve by the state left the list at 38. They were hanged the day after Christmas in Mankato. Among them was a man named Chaska, who experts now agree was mistakenly executed. The noose used to hang him is the one in the historical society’s archives.

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A doctor’s wife, Sarah Wakefield, had testified that Chaska protected her and her children when they were taken captive. But Chaska wound up on the gallows anyway. A soldier named J.K. Arnold stole the noose right after the hanging and hid it for seven years, according to his letter in the archives, violating orders to ship all the nooses to Washington. “It’s sitting in there as a trophy and we want it returned along with the other 37 nooses that are somewhere in Washington,” said Melvin Lee Houston, 59, of the Santee reservation in Lindy, Neb. His great-great-great-grandfather was among the 38 hanged and his ancestors were among thousands of Dakota forced out of Minnesota. He hopes all the nooses will be found and given to Dakota elders this year for a Wiping of the Tears ceremony. History center officials resist giving up artifacts, saying it’s their job to protect historical evidence, such as the noose, for future generations. Rep. Urdahl has introduced resolutions to pardon Chaska and to urge Congress to repeal the Dakota Exclusion Act. Even those efforts have aroused controversy. Waziyatawin and some other Dakota oppose the pardon as an attempt to “assuage white guilt” by clearing a Dakota who helped a white woman instead of the other 37 hanged warriors, who she says were patriotic Minnesotans protecting their homeland from intruders. “There’s so much division in the Dakota community,” Brown said. “It’s not about blaming or shaming or guilting. Right now, it’s about allowing the truth through history to be acknowledged and recognized.” This article was originally published in the Jan. 29 issue of the Star Tribune in Minneapolis. It was written by Curt Brown. ❖

Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com

Minnesota FFA Alumni Conference Feb. 18, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. AFSA High School, Vadnais Heights, Minn. Info: $25/person at the door, $20 in advance, $10/student; register online at http://z.umn.edu/ mnffaalumni2012, payments should be mailed to Minnesota FFA Alumni Association, P.O. Box 131298, Roseville, MN 55113; for more information, log on to www.mnffaalumni.org or contact Chicky Otte, (507) 2910197 or sddotte@frontiernet.net

Masopust — The Czech Mardi Gras Feb. 19 American Legion Hall, Montgomery, Minn. Info: Call Colleen or Renee, (507) 364-5577 Central Minnesota Dairy Producer Panel: Robotic Milking Systems — What Makes Them Work? Feb. 21, 12:30-3 p.m. Credit Union, Melrose, Minn. Info: Call Craig Roerick, (320) 255-6169 Southern Minnesota Wheat Workshop Feb. 21, 1:30-4 p.m. Meeker Cooperative Light & Power Association, Litchfield, Minn. Info: Call Nathan, (800) 5870770, or Doug, (320) 589-1711

Quality Assurance Training Feb. 22 Southern Research and Outreach Center, Waseca, Minn. Info: Pork Quality Assurance, 10 a.m.-Noon; Transport Quality Assurance, 1-3:30 p.m.; registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 or log on to www.mnpork.com

Home Builder 101 Seminar Feb. 23, 6-8 p.m. Community Center, Windom, Minn. Info: Free; call (866) 577-1831 to register; hosted by AgStar Agricultural Outlook Forum Feb. 23-24 Arlington, Va. Info: U.S. Department of Agriculture commemorates its 150th anniversary; log on to www.usda.gov/oce/forum Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service Organic Farming Conference Feb. 23-25 LaCrosse, Wis. Info: Call (715) 778-5775 or log on to www.mosesorganic.org Cold Climate Conference Feb. 23-25 Crowne Plaza Riverfront, St. Paul Info: Log on to http://goo.gl/AJAJZ

Southern Minnesota Wheat Workshop Feb. 22, 11:45 a.m.-4 p.m. LeSueur County Fairgrounds 4-H Building, Le Center, Minn. Minnesota Master Info: Call Diane, (507) 3578230, or Doug, (320) 589-1711 Naturalist Volunteer Training Feb. 23-May 3, 6:30-9 p.m. Dry Manure Applicator Mid-Central Research and OutCertification Workshop reach Center, Willmar, Minn. Feb. 22, 1 p.m. Info: $200/person, scholarships Sioux County Extension are available; held Thursday Office, Orange City, Iowa nights, plus fields trips on Info: Call (712) 737-4230 to register

March 24 and April 21; register at www.MinnesotaMaster Naturalist.org or call Julie or Amy, (888) 241-4532 or info@ minnesotamasternaturalist.org

Info: Second in a series of Third Crop Producer meetings; there is a session from 10 a.m.-Noon, and another 14 p.m.; no cost, lunch on your own; contact Jill Sackett, (507) 238-5449 or sacke032@umn.edu; log on to www.ruraladvantage.org

Southern Minnesota Wheat Workshop Feb. 24, 1-4 p.m. McKinney’s (Country Inn & Suites), Benson, Minn. Rice and Steele County Info: Call Scott, (320) 760Crop Day 6129, or Doug, (320) 589-1711 Feb. 28 Steele County Community GroundBreakers Center, Owatonna, Minn. Conference Info: Registration begins at Feb. 24-25 8:30 a.m.; no cost to attend; Minneapolis Marriott South- direct questions to Rice west, Minnetonka, Minn. County Extension Office, Info: Free to AgStar clients, (507) 332-6109 $100/prospective client with lodging, $50 without; for New Tools for New Rules more information or to regis- Ag Symposium ter, call (866) 577-1831; log on Feb. 28, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. to www.AgStar.com South Central College John Votca Conference Center, Gardening Knowledge for North Mankato, Minn. Free Info: $119/person, proceeds go Feb. 25, 8-11:30 a.m. toward agribusiness scholarships Whitney Senior Center, St. and program advancement, as Cloud, Minn. well as general support for the Info: No charge, but advanced SCC non-profit Foundation; registration required by con- Edmond J. Seifried, Christopher tacting the Stearns County W. Hesse and David Kohl are Extension Office, (320) 255scheduled to speak; contact Tami 6169 or (800) 450-6171 Reuter, (507) 389-7342; log on to http://goo.gl/C5YfO for tickets Local Foods and Third Crops Forest Pest First Detector Feb. 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Training Session Knights of Columbus, FairFeb. 28, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. mont, Minn. Whitewater State Park Visi-

tor Center-Park Office, Altura, Minn. Info:Log on to http://goo.gl/cyfQE Swine Ventilation Workshop: Managing Your Unseen Employee Feb. 28, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. NIACC Farm Shop, Mason City, Iowa Info: Limited to 30; contact Russ Euken, (641) 923-2856 or reuken@iastate.edu Your Money, Your Future Feb. 28, 5:30-8 p.m. Cerro Gordo County Extension Office, Mason City, Iowa Info: Free supper provided; presented by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance Specialist Brenda Schmitt; call (641) 424-0909 Swine Ventilation Workshop: Managing Your Unseen Employee Feb. 29, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Hamilton County Fairgrounds Van Deist Building, Webster City, Iowa Info: Limited to 30; contact Russ Euken, (641) 923-2856 or reuken@iastate.edu Beekeeping School March Spencer, Iowa Info: Contact Larry or Marlene Boernsen, (712) 735-4205, for details

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Draft Horse Owners Workshop Feb. 18, 10 a.m. University of Minnesota Leatherdale Equine Center, St. Paul Info: Search online for “Minnesota Extension Horse” or call (800) 876-8636

Seed Treatment Continuing Instructional Course for Commercial Pesticide Applicators Feb. 22, 9-11 a.m. Floyd County Extension Office, Charles City, Iowa Info: Registration starts at 8:30 a.m.; $35/person; call (641) 228-1453 for more information or to register; call your local county Extension office for other classes held across Iowa

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Small Farm Planning 101 Feb. 18, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. North Iowa Fairgrounds 4-H Learning Center, Mason City, Iowa Info: Contact Cerro Gordo County Extension Office, (641) 423-0844

Log on to http://bit.ly/theland-calendar 23 for our full events calendar A

Dry Manure Applicator Certification Workshop Feb. 23, 9 a.m. Buena Vista County Extension Office, Storm Lake, Iowa Info: Call (712) 732-5056 to register Drainage and Wetland Conference Feb. 23 River’s Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud, Minn. Info: $95/person; sponsored by Rinke Noonan; log on to www.rinkenoonan.com or contact Jennifer Carlson, (320) 656-3537 or jcarlson@rinkenoonan.com, to register or for questions “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Home Builder 101 Seminar Feb. 21, 6-8 p.m. Southern Minnesota AgStar, Worthington, Minn. Info: Free; call (866) 577-1831 Wheat Workshop to register; hosted by AgStar Feb. 22, 1-4 p.m. Pizza Ranch, Slayton, Minn. Forest Pest First Detector Info: Call Liz, (507) 372-3912, Mike, (507) 825-6715, or Training Session Doug, (320) 589-1711; this is Feb. 22, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. University of Minnesota Land- part of the Winter Crops Day scape Arboretum Snyder Audi- program, which will start in the morning; $15/person torium, Chaska, Minn. Info: Log on to http://goo.gl/cyfQE

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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A new way to map drought, water use worldwide Every month, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Center for Climate Prediction has a drought briefing by teleconference to identify the latest drought areas in North America. Agricultural Research Service scientists Martha Anderson and Bill Kustas are hoping that in a year or so, data from their computer model/satellite package will give evapotranspiration — known as ET — maps a seat at that briefing. With funding from NOAA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, they have developed a modeling system that NOAA will use to generate ET estimates over the continental United States. NOAA will evaluate these ET products to see how well they work for operational hydrologic and meteorological modeling. One application of the remotely sensed ET maps will be to monitor drought over the United States from a satellite’s perspective. Anderson is a physical scientist and Kustas is a hydrologist; both are at the ARS Hydrology and Remote Sensing Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. Next year, North America; Someday, the world Anderson and Kustas, along with NOAA colleagues Chris Hain and Xiwu Zhan, are also mapping ET over the entire globe at a coarser spatial resolution, working toward a day when the maps can be used worldwide for drought monitoring. The group has developed a website showing their drought-monitoring maps; the site will soon go public and be linked to the U.S. Drought Portal at www.drought.gov. The work has advanced enough that the team wants to expand its drought monitoring to Mexico, Canada and Central and South America. They are

ARS/USDA

Artist’s rendition of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission satellite, scheduled for launch in January 2013. This satellite provides thermal infrared images at the high spatial resolutions critical for many agricultural applications. mapping parts of Africa — including the Horn of Africa region, where drought has caused famine in Somalia — with data from European Union meteorological satellites. Anderson recently attended a conference in Ethiopia on soil moisture and drought monitoring to help subsistence farmers cope with increased weather variability. Scientists, Ethiopian government officials and disaster-aid groups participated in the conference and showed great interest in the new water-use and droughtearly-warning information that can be provided by satellite systems. Use of ET for drought mapping ET consists of the water evaporated from soil and plant surfaces and the

water vapor that escapes, or transpires, through plant leaf pores (stomata) as the plants absorb carbon dioxide through photosynthesis. Anderson and Kustas and colleagues have simplified the estimation of ET by using measurements of land-surface temperature obtained from weather and research satellites. With this data, they can infer soil moisture without needing data on precipitation, soil characteristics or anything else below the Earth’s surface. Anderson said that, “generally speaking, a cooler land surface is an indicator that ET is higher. Evaporation cools surfaces, so lower surface temperatures are typically associated with wetter soil and greater ET rates. In contrast, stressed vegetation exhibits elevated

leaf temperatures, which can also be detected from space.” Their ET maps can discriminate rivers, lakes, irrigated cropland and wetlands based on the cooler surface temperatures. These maps are remarkably similar to those created by more complex hydrologic computer models requiring significantly more input data — which is often not readily available. ALEXI infers soil moisture Anderson and Kustas feed the remotely sensed temperature data into their computer model, ALEXI (Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse), and it mathematically partitions the composite measurements into soil and plant temperatures. In turn, the equations use these component temperatures to make separate estimates of soil evaporation and plant transpiration. Soil evaporation estimates allow inferences about soil moisture in the first several inches of topsoil. Plant transpiration estimates do the same for soil moisture in the root zone, which can extend down to three feet or more, depending on plant type. Information about root-zone soil moisture is critical to farmers because it helps them decide how much and when to irrigate or how drought is likely to affect yields in dryland agricultural areas. These soilmoisture estimates can also be integrated into hydrological models to estimate total water losses and gains, accounting for factors such as runoff, drainage and ground-water recharge. Since 2000, ALEXI has been running daily, estimating ET over the continental United States. ALEXI’s accuracy has been shown to be within about 10 percent of measurements by surfaceand tower-based instruments. See DROUGHT, pg. 25A

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Drought defined by deviation from normal dryness enhanced ET in irrigated and wetland areas that hydrologic models miss. The ALEXI model mainly uses data from meteorological satellites, but it also receives data on vegetation cover from NASA’s Aqua and Terra satellites. ALEXI is coupled with a model that simulates the interactions of the lowest part of the atmosphere with Earth’s surface. These interactions affect soil evaporation and plant transpiration. For example, if the lower atmosphere is dry and the land surface wet, ET will increase. Two sources are better than one Anderson was a researcher at the University of

Wisconsin-Madison in the 1990s, working with John Norman, a professor with expertise in soilplant-atmosphere computer modeling and agricultural remote sensing. Anderson joined Norman in working with Kustas on developing ALEXI. Kustas said that “at a time when the ability to estimate ET using remotely sensed surface temperature was being discredited, Norman came up with a new approach, a unique two-source modeling framework, that converted many skeptics.” The twosource model estimates contributions of water, See DROUGHT, pg. 26A

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DROUGHT, from pg. 24A Dry is normal in the west Anderson explains that drought is monitored by detecting anomalies, so she and colleagues want to add ET anomalies to the monitoring process. “It is dry in the American West, so that’s their normal, while greater moisture is the norm in the East,” Anderson said. “We’re looking for what is abnormal for a region, either drier or wetter than usual.” To do this, they created an Evaporative Stress Index by computing anomalies in the ratio of the “actual ET” estimated by ALEXI to the “potential ET,” which is the maximum ET that could be expected for a given region. This ratio gives a value from 0 to 1, with 0 indicating very dry conditions and 1 indicating wet or ample moisture for soil and plants. In a typical year, the ratio will be smaller in the West than in the East, but significant deviations from the typical ESI values in various regions provide a measure for detecting drought conditions. “Drought detection is always in terms of percentage deviation from the norm in dryness or wetness for a region. In other words, will there be more or less rainfall than usual,” Kustas said. “This index tells us whether there is more or less ET than usual.” Cross-checking their methods The scientists use coarse-resolution data from geostationary satellites to screen for drought stress and then take a closer look at stressed areas with highresolution data from other satellites. Geostationary satellites appear motionless because they orbit at 22,000 miles above Earth’s equator. These satellites take snapshots of land-surface temperature conditions every five to 15 minutes. Scientists at ARS, NASA and Johns Hopkins University are testing the drought-mapping software side by side with traditional hydrologic mapping to see if the best parts of each method could be combined to improve regional water-budget estimates. Currently, they are comparing the two techniques to see how well each one estimates water usage along the full length of the Nile River. “We want to see how closely the results from those two methods match, as a cross check,” Anderson said. So far, maps drawn from the two methods look similar, but the remote-sensing approach gives better spatial detail, and it highlights regions of

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Soil moisture detected via microwave emissions DROUGHT, from pg. 25A energy, and temperatures from both the soil and vegetation components of the land surface. ALEXI is built on this two-source framework, but extends its application to a regional scale. Norman, Kustas and colleagues worked for more than two decades to develop the surface temperature-based techniques for estimating ET. But, Kustas said, it is Anderson “who has carried ALEXI from a research tool to an operational system that can serve as a practical tool for ET and drought monitoring.” Evaluating ALEXI model formulations Since 1987, there have been studies evaluating different modeling components used in ALEXI as part of large-scale remote-sensing field experiments throughout North America. These studies have yielded a vast reservoir of data across various landscapes, from desert to tall-grass prairie to crop fields, forests and bare land. Many of these campaigns focused on testing microwave sensors that detect Earth’s natural microwave emissions from land for direct measurements of soil moisture. Wade Crow, an ARS physical scientist at Beltsville, is researching ways to blend microwave with thermal data currently used by Anderson and Kustas, looking to take advantage of the best features of each method. In more recent field studies, they tested their thermal technique over cotton fields in the Texas Panhandle. They have also applied it in the Everglades of southern Florida, working with the South

Florida Water Management District. Both regions are examples of areas where water managers and farmers urgently need the type of daily high-resolution ET and soil moisture availability estimates the ALEXI-satellite package promises to deliver. For the Texas remote-sensing campaign, Kustas and Anderson worked with Paul Colaizzi, Prasanna Gowda and Steve Evett to evaluate and refine major remote-sensing-based ET models for arid and semiarid regions. Colaizzi and Gowda are agricultural engineers, and Evett is a soil scientist in the ARS Soil and Water Management Research Unit in Bushland, Texas. The experiment, led by Evett and Kustas, involved four ARS labs and several universities. Weighing lysimeters at Bushland measure crop water use through changes in the weight of 100-square-foot blocks of soil perched on underground scales. These measurements provide “ground truth” data for testing ET estimates from ALEXI and other models. “The ALEXI model allowed us to scale these point measurements up to regional water-use estimates,” Kustas said. Typically, regional ground-based networks of ET weather stations are too sparse to support operational decision making. Consequently, satellite imagery is likely to be the only viable source for routine ET estimates. Evett sees many future uses for satellite remote sensing of ET, particularly for water-district management and policy-making on water issues. See DROUGHT, pg. 27A Peggy Greb/Agricultural Research Service

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At the OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs and Environmental Enhancement) study area in Beltsville, Md., hydrologist Bill Kustas checks the position of a water vapor/CO2 sensor on a micrometeorological tower. In combination with the adjacent sonic anemometer, which measures horizontal and vertical wind, these instruments measure the turbulent exchange of water, energy and CO2 between the soil-plant system and the lower atmosphere and are used to evaluate the ALEXI computer model over different landscapes.

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Satellite technology aids forecast of crop yield, weather This article was published in the February issue of Agricultural Research magazine. It was written by former ARS information staff member Don Comis. This research supports the USDA

priorities of responding to climate change and promoting international food security and is part of Water Availability and Watershed Management and Climate Change, Soils, and Emissions, two ARS national programs described at www.nps.ars.usda.gov. ❖

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Peggy Greb/Agricultural Research Service

Physical scientist Martha Anderson and research leader Bill Kustas view a global scale map of evapotranspiration generated with the ALEXI model. Anderson and Kustas are collaborating with U.S. and international researchers from all the major continents in evaluating ALEXI output.

other vegetation that regulate water and carbon exchange across the landscape.

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readings from the geostationary satellites, we can monitor the changes in land and air temperatures as the sun rises. Since heat transfer from the land surface is largest around noon, late morning to early afternoon is when there is the greatest potential for turbulence caused by the temperature difference between land and air,” Anderson said. In addition, remotely sensed ET and soil moisture maps can also be assimilated into meteorological models, potentially improving short-range weather forecasts. John Mecikalski, with the Atmospheric Science Department of the University of Alabama at Huntsville, is using ALEXI heat-flux estimates to eventually forecast where thunderstorms may develop one to six hours in advance. This is likely to improve flood forecasts and the prediction of severe weather outbreaks, as well as have benefits for air travel. Previously with UW-M, Mecikalski was responsible for developing the prototype data infrastructure to implement ALEXI at continental scales. Link to carbon cycle Anderson said the next generation of ALEXI may also predict carbon fluxes, since there is a close link between Earth’s carbon and water cycles. Both canopy transpiration and CO2 uptake are jointly controlled by leaf stomata, and therefore carbon assimilation and water use by plants can be tightly coupled. By modeling both cycles together, rather than separately, Anderson thinks we can do better at monitoring the nation’s carbon and water budgets. Satellite measurements of land-surface temperature will be a crucial model input, providing valuable spatial information on the health of the crops and

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

DROUGHT, from pg. 26A Irrigation scheduling from space In the long run, Anderson and Kustas hope to provide local ET data for use in irrigation scheduling, just as is currently done from field weather stations. But the data from satellites would be for individual farm fields, rather than from the nearest field station, so it would more accurately reflect local conditions. This will be especially helpful in places where there are no extensive networks of field weather stations, such as Africa. Still, getting routine ET estimates for individual fields from satellites is laborious at this point, Anderson said. She and Kustas hope to streamline the process for operational use. They’re counting on new satellites with highresolution thermal sensors to improve the timeliness of satellite imagery. The Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, scheduled for launch by NASA in January 2013, will be critical to moving toward routine mapping of ET at field scale. More and more uses Besides drought monitoring, water management and irrigation scheduling, uses of the ALEXI/satellite package include crop yield prediction. “If crops suddenly show stress, we can ask whether that will affect yield, which will depend on the crop and whether it’s in a critical growth stage when drought occurs,” Anderson said. Another use is in weather forecasting. Differences between land and air temperatures have major effects on weather, including spawning convection and thunderstorms. “With five- to 15-minute

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‘North For the Harvest’ tells a current labor tale the children of the land owner. That last phrase, about children under 14 needing to be children of the landowner, probably originated from Mabel Costigan, Norris points out. She was married to U.S. Sen. Edward B. Costigan. The Costigan family was involved in the Colorado sugar beet industry and Mabel had campaigned to get children out of the beet fields in Colorado. At the time, American Crystal was the third largest sugar producer in the country and was a major force in the sugar industry in both Colorado and the Red River Valley. By the time of the Jones-Costigan Act, sugar beet production and processing was already well-established in the Valley of the Red River of the North. Norris shows how sugar joined wheat and potatoes to become a major crop in the big flat rich fields between Minnesota and North Dakota during the first two decades of the 20th century. He shows that tens of thousands of refugees fled the killing fields of the Mexican Revolution for Texas during in the second decade of the 20th century. He

Necessity turned farmers in the Red River Valley to sugar beet growing. Necessity brought the sugar beet industry to the valley. And necessity linked Mexican migrant workers to those farmers and the industry.

Education award to Minnesota FFA Foundation The Minnesota FFA Foundation was recently recognized by the Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council Education Committee at its annual meeting with the 2012 Education Award. This award recognizes efforts to promote agriculture. The Minnesota FFA Foundation and Minnesota FFA Association encourage its members to promote agriculture in their local communities and identify outreach efforts. “FFA has a rich tradition of educating all ages about agriculture. In 2010, the state FFA officers developed the Agriculture Literacy Challenge to recognize outstanding efforts by chapters,” said

Jim Ertl, Minnesota FFA Association executive secretary. “Chapters will again be recognized for the Agriculture Literacy Challenge at the upcoming State FFA Convention, April 22-24.” The Minnesota FFA Foundation partners with individuals and businesses to provide resources that promote and enhance premier leadership, personal growth and career success for Minnesota youth in Agricultural Education. For more information about the Minnesota FFA Foundation, contact executive director Val Aarsvold at (507) 534-0188 or log on to www.mnffafoundation.org. ❖

Clean Cities coalitions promote biodiesel USB funding will assist Clean Cities across the United States in communicating the benefits of soy biodiesel and Bioheat through radio public service announcements, outdoor advertising, informational workshops for energy users and distributors, promotional events and many other activities. Among the Clean Cities Coalitions selected by USB farmer-directors to participate in the 2012 reimbursement program include: Iowa Clean Cities, partnering with Iowa Soybean Association; and Twin Cities Clean Cities Coalition, partnering with Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council. ❖

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Why should urban Americans join you in using soy biodiesel? That’s the question the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff will answer as part of its biodiesel and Bioheat communications program. It will help improve availability and use of soy biodiesel — the only commercially available advanced biofuel — in major U.S. cities across the United States. This year, USB farmer-leaders committed nearly $200,000 to assist nine U.S. Department of Energy-affiliated “Clean Cities” coalitions to increase the availability and use of soy biodiesel and heating-oil-alternative Bioheat through promotion and education activities.

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See NORTH, pg. 30A

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

By TIM KING The Land Correspondent A well-written history book can explain to us how, and why, we got where we are today. “North For the Harvest: Mexican Workers, Growers and the Sugar Beet Industry,” by Jim Norris, does that job nicely. In recent months, the U.S. Department of Labor has been in the process of writing rules to limit young people’s work on farms. The rule making process has caused quite a stir in farm country. What are the feds doing sticking their nose in long-cherished agricultural ways, many of us have asked? Norris points out that the federal government’s long nose has been sniffing around agriculture, and agricultural labor, for a long time now. The Jones-Costigan Act of 1934 established a production quota for sugar producers, created a system of price supports, established a minimum wage for sugar beet field workers, and forbade the employment of anyone under 14 years old unless they were

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Market, government, weather molded labor pool NORTH, from pg. 29A also shows how many of those refugees went to work in the growing agriculture industry of Texas. And he shows why those refugees became the mainstays of a growing sugar industry far to the north. “Necessity turned farmers in the Red River Valley to sugar beet growing. Necessity brought the sugar beet industry to the valley. And necessity linked Mexican migrant workers to those farmers and the industry,” he writes. Because labor was so critical, the sugar company often helped farmers find workers. They tried German immigrants, college students, Japanese immigrants and Native Americans. But always, sometimes reluctantly, they returned to the Mexican workers. Often times the company was in competition with other beet growing regions and Texas farmers in the so-called Winter Garden of Crystal City. “In 1920, Crystal City had a population of about 800 residents with 520 irrigated acres of vegetables cultivated in the area. Ten years later the population had grown to over 6,600, of which 5,100 were Mexicans; growers cultivated over 11,000 acres of spinach and onions.” The sugar industry in the Red River Valley was expanding rapidly at the same time. The sugar company brought workers north by the trainload. The competition for labor was fierce. Occasionally the government stepped in. During World Wars I and II guest worker programs were instituted. But during the Great Depression of the 1930s there were mass deportations of those same workers. Non-citizens and citi-

zens with brown skin were indiscriminately deported. By 1941, at the dawn of WWII, 27,000 workers were needed in the Valley’s sugar beet fields. Seventy-five percent of those were Mexican. White people were abandoning the area by the thousands in search of jobs in the growing war industries of California. The companies and farmers struggled through fieldwork with the help of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Bad, and worsening, weather delayed the harvest and drove many workers away. The industry’s intense need for labor brought on the first strike. Workers who had been pulling beets from frozen ground in blizzard conditions demanded more. “One evening, with the harvest running perilously late in the season, a delegation of about 20 workers appeared at the East Grand Forks sugar plant and threatened to organize a strike if harvest wages were not increased. American Crystal had no choice but to agree quickly; the company increased wages from $0.90 per ton to $1.10. Only by them doing so was the 1941 harvest completed.” Norris continues to follow the relationship between workers, farmers and American Crystal Sugar until the farmers bought the company in the early 1970s. With that purchase, he points out; the farmers changed their relationship with the workers. No longer would the company recruit workers for the farmers. They were on their own. Although Norris takes us no farther than the ’70s, it is easy to imagine the connection between decisions made 40 years ago and the labor-management struggles playing out in the Valley’s sugar industry today.

“North For the Harvest: Mexican Workers, Growers and the Sugar Beet Industry” is published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press and is available from them at www.mhspress.org, from local bookstores or from your local library. ❖

Iowa Soybean award winners The Iowa Soybean Association announced the winners of new awards it established this year to recognize those who have demonstrated commitment and leadership in the field of agriculture. The Friend of the Iowa Soybean Farmer Award was presented to Iowa Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds, recognizing her support of Iowa soybean farmers through her actions and efforts. The Legacy of Leadership Award was presented to the family of the late Curt Raasch, of Odeboldt. Raasch demonstrated a passionate and relentless commitment to growing the state’s soybean industry. The New Leader Award was presented to Lindsay Greiner, a soybean farmer from Keota. Greiner, who has been involved in his ISA district advisory council, has shown outstanding involvement and commitment to promoting the soybean industry and agriculture as a whole. The Rising Star Award was presented to Kendra Wuthrich, daughter of Roger and DeAnn Wuthrich of Bloomfield. This award recognizes an ISA member’s son or daughter who is actively involved in promoting agriculture through involvement in local, state and national activities and organizations, and who is preparing to continue ag studies in college. The Environmental Stewardship Award was presented to ISA member Robert Ballou of Monticello, who has demonstrated a commitment to installing and maintaining practices that improve environmental sustainability. ❖

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Pet Talk: Ringworm is quite contagious in pets, humans It may be surprising for some to learn that the skin infection known as ringworm, or dermatophytosis, is not actually a worm or parasite at all, but a fungus. The lesion will not always be in the shape of a ring, but it will appear scaly in the center with a red irritated color on the periphery. “Household pets generally pick up the disease from other animals. Where the infection occurs on the skin there will be a bald patch, but sometimes they may just have a few broken hairs,” said Leon Russell, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. Ringworm is highly contagious and can pass from person to person either through direct contact, through contact with an infected object, contact with an infected pet or infected soil. Humans can contract ringworm from animals easily by touching the infected area directly or through contact with objects which have been exposed contaminated with the fungus or its spores. Animal ringworm types, usually from a dog, cat or rodent are more likely to be transmitted to young children. With children it is often found in the scalp region. “Fungi that mostly live in human skin are called ‘anthropophilic’, those that live on animals are

called ‘zoophilic’, and those that prefer to live in soil are called ‘geophilic’ fungi,” Russell said. The anthropophilic ringworm is mostly seen in developing countries such as Africa, or parts of Asia by human-tohuman transmission. Many times this occurs from sharing hairbrushes or combs, and unless someone’s immune system is highly compromised then the disease is not life threatening. “Tinea pedis, or athlete’s foot, is the most common form of ringworm found in humans and the most difficult to treat. The rash most often appears in the moist areas between the toes, though the rest of the foot can be infected as well. Itching and burning are typical symptoms,” Russell said. Community swimming pools, used towels, health clubs, steam rooms and showers are common areas where athlete’s foot can be contracted. “Rarely humans can transmit the disease to animals. An example of this might be if a person with athlete’s foot comes home, takes their shoes off, and scratches or rubs ol’ Fido with their bare foot,” Russell said. Livestock such as cattle or horses are more likely to have ringworm when they are kept inside their stalls in the winter because of the rubbing up against wood and other stall materials.

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“These cases are seen more in the northern parts of the United States where the weather is colder. Generally, when the weather becomes warmer again and the animals are turned outside into the sunshine of pastures, the disease begins to clear up,” Russell said. In horses ringworm is seen usually in places where rubbing may occur, such as where a saddle or bridle might touch. Adults are more likely to contract ringworm from a horse rather than children, due to occupational exposure and handling. The effects of ringworm tend to be superficial ones of appearance, though, if not treated in animals it can easily spread and cause scar tissue. Some people, mostly children, who contract ringworm from a pet can sometimes have a reaction with their skin tissue resulting in bulgy lesion-looking patches on the skin called Kerions. “The treatment for ringworm in humans or animals is usually going to involve a topical medication. Oral medication may be needed if the ringworm is chronic. It is certainly not a reason to get rid of a dog or cat because it can be treated,” Russell said. If a pet is diagnosed with ringworm it is best to take steps to disinfect objects that the animal has been in contact with, using chemicals like chlorine diluted in water. It is important to bring your pet, especially young pets, in for their vaccinations and checkups to ensure that diseases such as ringworm are not causing any problems. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. More information is available at http://tamunews.tamu.edu. This column is distributed by CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company to The Land. ❖

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Efforts to eliminate scrapie in the sheep and goat populations in the United States are succeeding. To ensure complete and successful eradication of this fatal degenerative brain disease it is necessary to address identification requirements for both sheep and goats. The “Goat Identification: Visual & Electronic” presentation and the “Identification Requirements of the National Scrapie Eradication Program for Sheep” presentation have been combined into one compact disk by the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Scrapie Education Program with support from the National Institute for Animal Agriculture. The presentations cover basic information regarding which goats/sheep are required to be identified. The main focus of the presentation explores approved ear tags and tattoos and their proper placement. The presentations also have sections about the use of registry tattoos and other identification methods and record keeping. Log on to www.eradicatescrapie.org to access the presentation in PDF format for downloading to a CD or as a printed version. An order form to request your free copy of the presentation is also available at this web address. ❖

‘Building with Secondhand Stuff’ worth a second look Not much of a do-it-yourselfer? That’s going to change, once you get “Building with Secondhand Stuff” in your hands. Using lots of gorgeous full-color pictures, easy-to-follow steps, a unique perspective, and tons of encouragement, Peterson offers a huge range of ideas for giving your home a new look for little-to-no money. I liked this book for the possibilities Peterson shares, and for the way it got me to thinking about other uses for materials. The other thing I liked to see is that Peterson hammers home reminders of safety. In an eagerness to get started, it’s easy to forget gloves and goggles but safety sidebars are helpful and plentiful here.

Homeowners know that a house is never done, so if you’re looking for something old to lend a new look, then look here first. “Building with Secondhand Stuff” is a book you wood love. ■ Look for the reviewed book at a bookstore or a library near you. You may also find the book at online book retailers.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and never goes anywhere without a book. She lives in Wisconsin with three dogs and 10,000 books. ❖

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First, though, Nobody needs to you’ll need to ask remind you that permission before money’s tight. Building with (if it’s a Still, you’ve Secondhand Stuff taking construction site) been dreaming of By Chris Peterson or find a regular a new look c.2011, Creative source, such as a around your salvage or demoliPublishing home, an addition tion company or International or a total look at flea marremodel, and $19.99 kets. Then do THE BOOKWORM SEZ that’s dangerous 144 pages your homework. territory. You By Terri Schlichenmeyer Old wood can be know from expea treasure or it rience that one can be a mess, and idea leads to another, neither situawhich leads to another tion can be and pretty soon, you’re determined by a deep in sawdust and cursory glance. debt. Carefully assess So how can you get a wood and all new look — or a new materials, Peterson shed, garage, outsays. Know what building or playyou need, but keep house for the kids an open mind — for cheap or for because, once you’re free? Start with bitten by the reclaimthe ideas in ing bug, you might find “Building with all sorts of uses for your Secondhand finds. Stuff” by Chris Not just for outdoors, old Peterson. stone and ceramic materiEven in a down economy, als can be used in many difconstruction of new buildings continferent ways, and in conjuncues to happen while old buildings are tion with the wood you’ve demolished and carted off to a landfill. saved. Peterson advocates using mateThat’s a lot of waste, Peterson says, which can be “a fantastic opportunity” rials for projects they weren’t meant for, a mere “matter of looking beyond for homeowners. the rugged nature of the material.” It doesn’t take much imagination to Reclaiming old metals is “not quite as realize that reclaiming and repurposing old or cast-off building materials is obvious” a notion, but Peterson urges readers to use their imaginations. Old sustainable and environmentally ceilings can become backsplashes (and friendly. The bonus to reusing is that vice versa). Antique hardware would materials you find may be of higher look great with reclaimed doors or quality than what’s in stores. Plus, learning to deconstruct and reuse can newly-built cabinets. You can even reuse old plumbing, with a few caveats. be a fun challenge.

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Grandpa’s tractor ends an emotional ride back home This is the debut of Karen Schwaller’s It was the day of my parents’ farm sale. column “Table Talk.” Farm sale day is a day unlike any other Schwaller grew up on a grain-livestock in the life of a farmer and his family. A farm near Remsen, Iowa. rite of passage, painful as it may be. My family traveled to the Remsen-Kingsley After obtaining a degree in journalism, (Iowa) area to be part of this day, which she moved to Milford, Iowa, to write for held the possibility of great things for our the local newspaper, and it was there that two (then) 14-year-old boys, who wanted she met one of the locals, who became her nothing more than to get one of grandpa’s farmer-husband, Dave Schwaller. tractors, for which they had saved all The Schwallers grow grain and liveTABLE TALK summer. stock near Milford, and they also have By Karen Schwaller For my dad, going to farm sales was three grown children — a daughter, who something he had done often in his 74 will graduate from South Dakota State years. But this one was his own, and his University this spring with a degree in agronomy; sorrow showed the night before the sale, as our famand twin sons who are farming and raising cattle ily gathered to look around the farm and share memnear Milford. ories, laughter and tears. ■ It’s amazing how a farmer can become one with the It was a familiar place; more familiar to some land and the work it takes, and that letting go of than to others. those things used each day could be so hard. It was I lived there for my first 18 years, but my parents once a thriving farm with lots of kids and lots of work to be done. had lived there for more than 50 years. On that night, a lifetime of sweat and grit was On this day, pickup trucks lined the gravel road. I could smell the aroma from the lunch wagon. There lined up and ready to be sold to the highest bidder. were people in bib overalls and greasy jeans milling Before the crowd arrived and the hum of the aucaround. I could hear the hiss of a John Deere Model tioneer began, my dad and I walked around the A being started and the rumble of other tractors items that were lined up all around the yard. Me, that were lined up in the yard and being started.

wondering how he ever used all that stuff, and him, gazing at it all through misty, nostalgic eyes, remembering, and wondering how 50 years of farming could have possibly gone by so quickly. He bent over to show me an item, and when he did, one of his tears splashed onto it. I felt a lump in my throat, and when the auctioneer began, I knew it was all really happening. It was quite a feeling at first, seeing three of my four brothers on the hay racks with the auctioneer, holding up part of their own farm memories for bidders to see, then handing things over to their new owners. They had worked hard with our dad and with all of it, and they had also worked very hard at getting it ready to sell. Finally it was time to sell the farm equipment. Our sons had stomach aches, nervous that there were plenty of other bidders out there who had more money than they. But none had more pure desire to have one of grandpa’s tractors than those two on that day. The first tractor sold, a John Deere A, and it went to my oldest brother. After it sold, I told him, “It’s really cool you got that tractor.” He replied, “Well, it’s been here 50 years,” as he began to choke up. It used to amaze me as a kid, watching Dad and my brothers start that tractor. I thought it was positively mystifySee TABLE TALK, pg. 35A

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New crop of Master Gardeners joins volunteer force munity and they are interested in horticulture,” she said. “They also value lifelong learning and want to have a meaningful connection to the University of Minnesota.” The core course is required for these aspiring Master Gardeners — and it’s also intense. In addition to background on Extension and the program, they learn about the most up-to-date University research in 14 topics ranging from soils and botany to lawn care, and from plant diseases to insects. The classes are taught by Extension educators, scientists and University professors. They are offered both face-to-face and online, and many people choose to take them as a hybrid of the two models. After completing the core course, volunteers spend one year and at least 50 hours as Master Gardener interns. After the internship year, they must contribute a minimum of 25 hours of volunteer work

Flowing tears of sorrow and laughter band said, “Why don’t you tell the rest of the story, guys?” Looking sheepishly at me, one of them said, “We broke the headlight out on the motorcycle.” “How did that happen already?” I inquired. After a pause, he replied, “I hit the 1750. We’re not used to the throttle yet.” It felt really good to laugh. Karen Schwaller brings “Table Talk” to The Land from her home near Milford, Iowa. She can be reached at kschwaller@evertek.net. ❖

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TABLE TALK, from pg. 34A ing as they worked to turn that flywheel. Other tractors and equipment sold, including an older Honda motorcycle that one of our sons purchased with some money that was apparently burning a hole in his pocket. Soon it was time to sell the tractor that our boys had wanted, an Oliver 1750, the only tractor that my father had ever bought brand new. They set a top price and stood nervously by their dad as he did the bidding for them. As the bidding went on, they soon neared their top-end price. They bid as few more times, and soon their dad whispered that was too far over their price, and shook his head as he looked at them, albeit rather reluctantly, knowing how much they wanted that tractor. I felt their disappointment, and it showed on their faces, and probably on my own. The end of the bidding came, and as if a miracle occurred, the man who was bidding against our sons had somehow figured out that our boys were bidding on the tractor, and he backed out. After the auctioneer cried “Sold!” as he had so many times that day, the auctioneer went over and shook the hands of our two young sons, congratulating them on becoming the very proud new owners of one of Grandpa Art’s most beloved tractors. They were overcome with joy, as were many there in that moment. Tears flowed by family members and friends of all ages. The auctioneer later told me he had to look away from them because he was afraid he was going to be crying, too. Hands clapped, sharing in our boys’ happiness and relief, and cheers went out for a tractor that went to two young farmers who had fallen in love with it, simply because it was one of grandpa’s tractors. Grandpa Art’s farm was the only home that tractor had ever known. The tractor was loaded up on a trailer, and taken to its new home. The next night the boys and I sat down to e-mail my youngest brother in Arkansas to let him know that they had purchased grandpa’s tractor. My hus-

each year. There is also an annual continuing education requirement for volunteers. Some choose to help children plant school gardens, teach neighbors how to grow healthy foods or assist with university research. “Master Gardeners will always involve others in the community with the decision-making, and strive to educate others through the experience,” Weisenhorn said. “That impact is so important.” What else should the graduating Master Gardener class of 2012 expect from its first years in the program? Volunteers should expect to work hard. “Even in a community garden, somebody is going to have to shovel the compost,” Weisenhorn said. But Master Gardeners aren’t bothered by a little work. “They can teach people about the benefits and practices of composting at the same time they are shoveling it,” she said. “The passion to dig in and make a difference — that’s what keeps them going.” For more information on Extension’s Master Gardener program, including how to become a Master Gardener volunteer, log on to www.extension.umn.edu/master-gardener. University of Minnesota Extension is a 100-yearold partnership between the university and federal, state and county governments to provide scientific knowledge and expertise to the public. Through Extension, the University of Minnesota “extends” its resources to address critical public issues in priority areas, including food and agriculture, communities, environment, youth and families. For more information, log on to www.extension.umn.edu. ❖

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

When the course wraps up in mid-February, the University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardener class of 2012 will be the 35th in the volunteer program’s history. This year’s cohort includes 178 people from 42 counties plus the Fond du Lac tribal nation. This class will join a force of more than 2,200 Minnesotans who volunteer 131,000-plus hours and give $2.8 million worth of their time per year to benefit schools, community gardens, youth programs, the environment and more through a broad array of horticulture education activities. Most stay in the program for at least 10 years, but at least three “charter members” from the first class in 1977 remain active. Julie Weisenhorn, state director for Extension’s Master Gardener program and a retired Master Gardener, knows firsthand why they do it. “Master Gardeners want to give back to their com-

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36 A

A danger to dogs, some traps have no business in nature introduce legislation that Twenty years ago, while would require that some hunting for pheasants on powerful body-gripping some Conservation Reserve ... at least I was allowed the chance to rescue my dog. traps be set at least five feet Program land, my springer Had the trap been a Conibear, a body-gripping trap, above the ground or subspaniel vanished. even if he survived the initial blow from its powerful merged in water. Moments earlier, he had jaws, by the time I found him, it likely would have Trappers already are been casting about in front been too late. restricted in the way they of me, the rustling grass set the largest body-gripping telegraphing his location. unable to locate him. same love and appreciation of the outtraps and the legislation would extend But then he was gone. THE OUTDOORS doors and the bounty it offers. to the mid-sized traps that presently But at least I was allowed I blew my whistle. Nothare allowed as ground sets in most of By John Cross the chance to rescue my Trappers and hunters traditionally ing. After a few minutes of Minnesota. dog. have been comrades in arms when it waiting, listening, watching — and comes to beating back the threats to Authors of the bill say the proposed Had the trap been a Conibear, a bodywith growing concern — I began to our outdoor pursuits. bill is not intended to ban the use of gripping trap, even if he survived the search for the missing canine. Conibear-style traps, only to lessen the That hunting dogs sometimes wind Eventually, I worked my way over to initial blow from its powerful jaws, by chances of dogs being caught in the the time I found him, it likely would up in traps during a trip afield is notha drainage ditch that cut through the particularly deadly devices. have been too late. ing new. But in the case of leg-hold middle of the grassy expanse and traps, a hunter can still free his dog The change would not be welcomed At least six dog owners in Minnesota looked over the edge. with minimal damage. As illustrated by trappers said a spokesman for the last fall did not have second chances. Below me, the terrified dog was by my experience, ditto for snares. MTA, explaining that such requirethrashing. Unable even to whimper or One dog owner, unable to free his sufments would make the traps which fering canine companion caught in a But Conibears, by their very design, yelp, the dog had a trapper’s snare typically are used to capture raccoons are designed to kill quickly and effiwrapped tightly around his nose, cut- Conibear, had to shoot it to end its and bobcats ineffective. agony. ciently. ting deeper and tighter as he strugAt the certain risk of incurring the Except for a brief stint as a youngster In recent years, a paid advertisement gled. wrath of the trapping fraternity, it seeking a little pocket change in from the Minnesota Trappers AssociaI dropped my shotgun and after a seems Minnesota trappers might be exchange for pocket gophers, I’ve never tion printed in the annual Minnesota few anxious moments, managed to well served by embracing the proposed Hunting and Trapping Handbook has loosen the device and set the dog free. been a trapper. outlined how to release a domestic ani- changes that would minimize the However, like most hunters, I view deadly threat to our canine hunting I remain haunted by the close call mal caught in a Conibear. partners. and my canine buddy’s fate had I been trappers as cut mostly from the same cloth as us — folks imbued with the It is complicated and confusing proceAfter all, when it comes to our dogs, dure, even when studied in leisurely we hunters can be an irrational lot. We circumstances. But in the stressful chaos of having a struggling, dying dog invest a lot of time, money and emotion Visit at one’s feet, following the instructions in them. We love ’em as members of the family. at th us would be nearly impossible. e Cen About 7,000 Minnesota trapping And the instructions imply that the Farmtral MN licenses are sold annually compared to dog wasn’t killed at the moment the S Febr h 300,000 small game licenses. uary ow jaws snapped around its neck. 28Mar Best they keep us on their side. Recent news reports of dogs being Boo ch 1 th # killed in the traps have prompted Rep. John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free 507 John Ward, DFL-Brainerd, and Sen. Press staff writer. Contact him at (507) 344Chuck Wiger, DFL-Maplewood, to 6376 or jcross@mankatofreepress.com. ❖

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Caregivers need to keep an eye on their own wellness affect concentration and task performance, impair judgment to the point of danger (driving, using machinery and administering medications), and impact job performance. Sleep deprivation can lead to mental distress, memory loss and depression. The physical consequences of sleep deprivation can include changes in appetite (weight gain or loss), frequent infections, addictions to alcohol or prescription drugs, problems with focusing, droopy eyelids and increased sensitivity to pain. In addition, lack of sleep can interfere with the body’s ability to regulate insulin production and the metabolism of sugar, putting care-

givers at a higher risk of developing diabetes. There are several ways that caregivers can take steps to fight fatigue and improve their physical and mental health. • Recognize that fatigue is present and that it is negatively affecting daily life. • Seek solutions to alleviate fatigue and sleep loss. • Carry out these solutions with the help of family, friends or hired services. See CAREGIVER, pg. 38A

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Calvin’s day begins before 5 a.m. He knows another exhausting day lies ahead. He allows himself only enough time to have a cup of coffee and read the paper before lying back down by his wife’s side until 6 a.m. when the daily routine begins again — toileting, showering, dressing, wheelchair transfers, laundry, meal preparation, housekeeping, correspondence, paperwork, yard work, personal care. Soon it’s time for a doctor appointment; more wheelchair transfers, a trip to the pharmacy, grocery shopping, and then, finally, a return home to continue the care routine. No time to rest during the day. Bedtime planning takes an hour so he begins by 9 p.m. Calvin is physically and emotionally exhausted by 10 p.m. and falls asleep quickly. But he is awakened and out of bed at least three times during the night, tending to his wife’s needs, taking her to the toilet, or changing wet sheets. He attempts to return to bed and finds he cannot fall asleep. His mind is active, he feels anxious and has relentless thoughts that swirl in his mind. Daybreak seems to come too quickly and the schedule begins once again. Caregiving consumes 24 hours of the day and sleep deprivation and fatigue are the common denominators. Caregiver fatigue cannot be understated. According to Webster’s dictionary, fatigue means “physical or mental exhaustion; weariness.” Spouses, adult children and family members alike are susceptible to caregiver fatigue whether they are providing care 24 hours a day or caregiving from a distance. The sandwich generation faces particular challenges as they attempt to provide care to elderly parents while juggling the demands of young families and full-time careers. Whether caregivers are losing actual sleep or simply wearing down from the constant worry and obligations, help is needed before feelings of resentment and guilt set in or the caregiver’s health is compromised. Sleep is absolutely necessary to live. However, it is often a low priority in the whole caregiver scenario. As an adult, our bodies need six to nine hours of sleep and after age 65, we need six to eight hours per night. The American Association of Retired Persons likens the need for caregivers to take care of themselves to performing regular maintenance on a car. Without regular attention, even the finest cars and caregivers will soon deteriorate. Rest must be a priority. The brain’s frontal lobe especially relies on sleep to effectively function. Without adequate rest, the brain’s ability to access memory, control speech and resolve problems, is greatly hampered. Family caregivers truly are at risk of physical and emotional problems of their own while they are providing care to a loved one. Fatigue contributes to an increased vulnerability to illness and it is prevalent in nearly all caregivers, yet unseen by most. The results of fatigue creep in over time, robbing the energy and focus of a caregiver. They often become so immersed in their role that they are unable to see their own health decline “right before their eyes.” By the time many care providers realize they have become caregivers, they are already suffering from the symptoms of caregiver fatigue and are headed for burnout. Lack of sleep can affect emotional as well as physical health. It can produce anxiety, anger, irritability,

37 A

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

38 A

Caregivers must take time for themselves to recharge CAREGIVER, from pg. 37A An important consideration is for caregivers to step back, set personal limits and encourage the care receiver to perform some of their own self-care activities. As time goes on, it can be easy to over-help and invite greater dependence by the care receiver. When the caregiver finally accepts outside help, they usually experience a strong sense of relief. Most care-

givers wished they had taken the help much sooner. In some cases, when 24-hour care is no longer achievable, moving a loved one to an assisted living facility or to a nursing home is the best solution. Caregivers, as well as care receivers, need a well-balanced diet and adequate hydration during the day to stave off fatigue and vulnerability to illness. Try to avoid large meals, high-fat foods and the drinking of fluids before bedtime. Taking vitamins, eating proteins, grains

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and fresh produce and decreasing sugar, caffeine and alcohol can also promote wellness. Caffeine is a mild stimulant and consuming it before bedtime can affect sleep. It is also a diuretic and will result in an increased need to urinate during the night.Alcohol is a depressant by classification; however, it does cause a person to sleep lighter and awaken more frequently. Fortunately, there are many things that can help to decrease weariness and promote a good night’s sleep. • Regular exercise can have a positive effect on improving sleeping habits as well as decreasing stress, depression and anxiety. • Try to maintain a daily routine for naps and sleep so that the body can adjust to a rhythmic pattern. • Listen to positive sounds to promote relaxation before sleep. Music or nature sounds, such as waves, can be soothing to the soul.Avoid watching stimulating television shows right before bed as this may bring alarming news that unsettles our mood and disrupts our ability to rest. • Meditation, prayer and deep breathing exercises are also options to use for calming our minds and bodies so that we can sleep. These can also be done if one awakens during the night. • Try drinking warm milk, taking a relaxing bath, reading something pleasant and perhaps journal some thoughts prior to bedtime. • If insomnia is prevalent, discuss medication options with a physician. Caregivers must take time for themselves and focus on their own needs (both physical and emotional) to avoid depleting their strength and energy. Keeping a daily log of sleeping habits can be a “wake-up call” to caregivers and a helpful tool for the doctor to determine recommended solutions. Record the quality of sleep as well as the frequency. Record also the foods eaten and the use of medication, caffeine and alcohol. Note the activities engaged in during the day as well as the emotions. After several weeks, trends may appear that offer great insight into the toll of caregiving and the decisions that need to be made to decrease fatigue and increase energy. After years of sleep deprivation, fatigue can become a chronic state. The body’s biological clocks are disrupted and symptoms of aging seem to accelerate. It can clearly be seen that fatigue and sleep deprivation strongly impact the caregiver’s ability to provide the best possible care to their loved one. Family caregivers are at risk and must open their eyes to their own needs and solutions that may be available to them. Asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness. When someone else takes over the caregiving responsibilities, even for a short time, caregivers can step back, focus on themselves, rest and get recharged. Information adapted from an article written by Kristine Dwyer for the Fearless Caregiver Newsletter, Feb. 24, 2011. This article was submitted by Gail Gilman Waldner, Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging program developer and University of Minnesota professor emeritus. She may be contacted at ggwaldner@rndc.org or (507) 389-8869. ❖

39 A THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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THE LAND

S E C T I O N

B

February 17, 2012.

Cash Grain Markets corn/change* Dover Edgerton Jackson Janesville Cannon Falls Sleepy Eye Average: Year Ago Average:

soybeans/change*

$15

average soybeans average soybeans year prior

$6.14

$12.01

$12 $ 9 $ 6 $ $ 3

$6.42

$13.34

$ 0

$6.12 $6.19 $6.21 $6.14 $6.03 $6.17

+.16 +.10 +.07 -.04 +.06 +.05

$12.20 $11.99 $12.01 $12.02 $11.84 $11.97

+.82 +.62 +.68 +.64 +.68 +.67

average corn

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

1 B

average corn year prior Feb'11 Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan'12

Grain prices are effective cash close on Feb. 13. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Angles Battle for acres will be intense

The following market analysis is for the week ending Feb. 10. CORN — Corn opened the week ahead of the Feb. 9 U.S. Department of Agriculture crop production report with strong gains, as the trade was looking for a bullish USDA report. Without a clear bullish picture from the USDA, corn retreated from early gains into negative territory. The USDA report made only two changes to the balance sheet, increasing exports 50 million bushels to 1.7 billion bushels and increasing imports by 5 million bushels. This fit with the weekly export PHYLLIS NYSTROM sales that are running 7 percent Country Hedging St. Paul behind last year since the new export forecast calls for 7 percent less than last year. This put the carryout at 801 million bushels versus 846 million last month and expectations for 797 million bushels. The ending stocks-to-use ratio dropped from 6.7 percent to 6.3 percent. The world balance sheet was supportive as the USDA lowered Argentine corn production as expected from 26 million metric tons to 22 mmt. The Brazilian production number was left unchanged at 61 mmt when a slight reduction was anticipated. World ending stocks fell 2.8 mmt to 125.4 mmt and compared to last year’s carryout of 128.8 mmt. Corn export values were strong as spreads on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange narrowed, trying to entice bushels to the market. Egypt bought 240,000

February has started out as a struggle for livestock prices. Despite all of the bullishness talked about around the cattle and hog markets over the past few weeks, the actual cash markets are struggling against resistance at higher prices. Over the past several weeks the cash cattle market has seen lower prices as packers have been stingy in their bids trying to recover some of their lost margin. The futures market in turn has failed to move into new highs, showing the overhead resistance that continues near the all-time highs. JOE TEALE Broker The futures market has been Great Plains Commodity setting the price discovery on a Afton, Minn. weekly basis for the past several months. However, it now looks as if the packers are gaining more control over the price discovery as they hold their bids to the end of the week. It is becoming more evident that the demand for beef product is more dominating than the supply of cattle. This is most evident in the boxed beef movement. Every time the beef cutout moves higher the volume in the boxed beef trade diminishes. When the beef cutout comes down, then the volume in the boxed beef trade begins to increase which solidifies the thought of good resistance at higher prices. It is also apparent that cattle are being held back as weights have increased each week for the last month. With the futures continuing to show premi-

The 2012 “battle for acres” will be as intense as we have seen in years. With near-record-tight stocks and strong demand, the stakes could not be greater. It will be the market’s job to determine the acreage mix of grain to be planted this spring. When using “benchmark” cost of production numbers, I find corn to be nearly $150 per acre more profitable than soybeans at current prices. I grant that everyone’s numbers will be different and I encourage each of you run your own numbers and compare. With soybeans at nearly a breakeven proposition, why would anyTOM NEHER one plant them? AgStar VP & Team This is the question that I Leader — Grain Industry Rochester, Minn. asked my friend the other night, after watching a local high school basketball game. He made the point about the agronomic benefit of crop rotation and diversification. He also said that he was concerned about the drought that we were experiencing and that soybeans were much more drought-resistant than corn. He pointed out that I am always talking about risk management and that it was good to be diversified. Silently acknowledging his points, I could not help but play the “devil’s advocate.” I countered by suggesting that the new plant genetics in corn would laugh at the dry growing conditions. Furthermore, I pointed out that from a margin management perspective, it made no sense to lock-in a break-even in

See NYSTROM, pg. 2B

See TEALE, pg. 2B

See NEHER, pg. 2B

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.

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Livestock Angles Cash markets struggling

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Grain Outlook Plant in dust, bins will bust?

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2 B

Soybean exports running 30 percent behind last year NYSTROM, from pg. 1B mt of U.S. corn as we headed into the weekend. Farmers were somewhat disengaged, with old crop price levels nothing they haven’t seen before. Feed wheat from the United Kingdom is supposedly headed to the East Coast of the United States for feeding. Maybe this is an old contract being executed because Spain is buying U.S. feed wheat. Basis levels were steady to firm to encourage corn into the pipeline, but values were slightly weaker later in the week. Ethanol margins are either in the red or close to it and ethanol stocks continue to climb. Weekly ethanol production was down 16,000 barrels per day. Ethanol stocks are at a record 884 million gallons. This supports reports of plants cutting rates or closing, but in general they continue to compete

for corn. The fourth largest ethanol producer announced plans to cut ethanol production by 30 percent at two of its nine plants. Rumors circulated that a major producer had plans to curb production 10 percent at some plants. Outside markets lent a modicum of influence this week with the debt and financial bailout situation in Greece still unsettled. The European finance leaders would like to see the new austerity measures for Greece passed into law to avoid any games when Greek elections roll around. OUTLOOK: Our $5.80 to $6.60 trading range in March corn has held, but I would move up the near-term support to $6.27 1/2 per bushel. We did punch through $6.50 on report day, but were unable to follow-through to the upside. Turning to new crop corn, while there is some concern over the dry con-

MARKETING

Economies hurting all meat demand TEALE, from pg. 1B ums in the deferred months, it appears that producers are holding back inventories looking for better prices. Because of this situation, producers should remain current and use these premiums to their advantage and protect their inventories. Since mid-December after making a low in prices, the hog market has been on an ever so slow recovery. Demand for pork product has been good and has helped stabilize and improve the packer’s need to accumulate live inventory. The supply of hogs has been adequate which has kept the rally in prices from being more impressive.

Considering that the pork cutout is less than half of that of the beef cutout, domestic retail demand seems to be shifting toward the featuring of pork. Couple this with a good export market and the hog market should be able to continue to improve in the weeks ahead. The only caveat to this scenario would be the continued economic conditions here in the United States and abroad which would definitely hurt demand for all meats. Producers should continue to monitor the market, but take advantage of locking inventories on good rallies that produce good premiums in the deferred marketings. ❖

ditions for this spring, if planters roll without interruption there is a tendency for more acres to go to corn. The old adage “plant in the dust and the bins will bust” may be trotted out. Illinois is experiencing their sixth warmest winter in 117 years. The USDA Outlook meeting will be held Feb. 23-24. Their February acreage estimate has been close to the March 31 Planting Intentions report the last two years. March corn was down 12 3/4 cents for the week to close at $6.31 3/4; December corn collapsed to $5.59 3/4, down 21 3/4 cents. SOYBEANS — The February USDA report showed no changes to the U.S. balance sheet, leaving the carryout at 275 million bushels versus pre-report estimates for 273 million bushels. The stocks-to-use ratio was steady at 9.1 percent. They did lower Argentina’s bean production estimate from 50.5 mmt to 48.0 mmt and Brazil from 74 mmt to 72 mmt. World carryout was reduced from 63.4 mmt to 60.3 mmt and compared to 68.9 mmt last year. March soybeans were unable to pierce the psychological $12.50 level, keeping our range from $11.50 to $12.50 short term and $13 longer term range. The USDA report CONAB (ag ministry) lowered their production estimate for Brazil to 69.2 mmt from their earlier estimate of 71.7 mmt. If

CONAB is correct, this could further tighten U.S. balance sheets for 201213. This is one of, if not the lowest, estimate for Brazil. China reappeared to buy 120,000 mt of U.S. beans late in the week. China’s January soybean imports dropped 10 percent year on year. China released some disappointing economic news this week, January imports were down 15 percent and their exports were down 0.5 percent, the first drop in exports in over two years. Soybean exports continue to be poor, running 30 percent behind last year when total sales are forecast to only be down 15 percent. This week’s sales were 22 million bushels. South American weather has improved in Argentina, but southern Brazil is not showing significant improvement as their beans flower. OUTLOOK: We’ll tighten the shortterm trading range to $11.50 to $12.50/$13 until there is more clarity concerning South American production. In the interim, we’ll look for more range-bound trade and outside influences. If southern Brazil does not get some timely rain, another run to the upside would be expected. March soybeans were down 3 1/2 cents at $12.29 per bushel when the closing bell rang; November soybeans were up 2 1/4 cents at $12.39 1/2 per bushel. ❖

Keep a sharpened pencil NEHER, from pg. 1B soybeans, when a tidy profit could be captured with corn. My friend noticed the sly grin on my face and he knew that I was just “yanking his chain.” We laughed and agreed that the market had a job to do, in determining the crop acreage mix this spring. He asked if corn was going to go down or would soybeans go up in price to attract more acres. As always, I him told that I didn’t know the answer to that question. This caused him to roll his eyes and shake his head in disbelief. I told my friend that this was the time of year that I really start to watch the spreads between futures contracts. In corn, I like to watch the July versus the December contract to see the market’s opinion on the relationship between old crop and new crop. In the soybean market, I look to the July contract versus the November for a similar opinion. Finally, I watch the

December corn contract versus the November soybean contract to see the market’s opinion about the acreage mix to be planted. Currently my spread charts look like the market is favoring corn to go down in price and soybeans to rise in price. Yet we all know that many things can change between now and planting time in the spring. These charts may even look different by the time you read this column. The volatility that we are experiencing in a globalized market creates risk and opportunity in the futures markets. The volatility that we are seeing in the basis creates risk and opportunity in the local markets. If we will keep an eye on the spreads, we may have a grain angle that will help us in planning our marketing strategy. Keep your pencil sharp and your focus on the goal of capturing profitable margins. ❖

Three business models drive small-farm growth MARKETING

Dollar cost averaging reduces risk Dollar cost averaging is a technique designed to reduce market risk by purchasing securities at predetermined intervals and set amounts. This system tends to reduce market risk and eliminate some of the guesswork of deciding when to invest, explained Brenda Schmitt, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Family Finance field specialist. Instead of waiting to invest a single lump sum when you feel prices are at a low, you consistently invest smaller amounts over a longer period of time — for example, $100 every month. You first need to decide how much you can invest each month or quarter. Consistency is the key with dollar cost averaging, so make certain you are financially able to invest the selected amount. Choose an investment that you want to hold for five to 10 years or longer. The key to dollar cost averaging is to keep to your schedule regardless of the price of the security. If you are investing a regular amount in a 401(k) or other employer retirement plan via payroll deduction, you are already using dollar cost averaging. With other investing, you can also take advantage of

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automatic deductions by regularly having contributions deducted from your bank account. This method of investing has a few cautions. The cost of commissions to routinely purchase individual stocks may not make this approach feasible. This means no-load mutual funds that charge no sales fees can be a good choice for dollar cost averaging. Also, most mutual funds allow you to purchase fractions of shares. With dollar cost averaging you still need to monitor your investments, re-examining the stocks or mutual funds to see if they are still a wise investment. For more information contact Brenda Schmitt at (641) 512-0650 or schmitt@iastate.edu. ••• This article was submitted by the Floyd County office of Iowa State University Extension in Charles City, Iowa. ❖

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Extension has a Small Farms program, a network of educators who support people new to agriculture, those moving from hobby to career farming and those building on generations of experience. For more information, log on to www.extension.umn.edu/smallfarms. This article was submitted by Nathan Winter, University of Minnesota Extension agricultural productions systems educator for McLeod and Meeker (Minn.) counties. ❖

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The face of the small farms is changing with new farmers, urban farming and recent immigrants. Often, many of these new farms have another primary occupation. These new farmers are seeking education that will help to make them successful in their new professions. The University of Minnesota Center for Farm Financial Management offers a website called AgPlan (www.agplan.umn.edu), developed to help rural businesses to develop a business plan.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

The agricultural economy in Minnesota is strong, and some of that strength is coming from the growth of small farms. Increased interest in local foods and products is driving that growth. The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines small farms as farms with $250,000 or less in sales of agricultural commodities. The 2007 Census of Agriculture indicates that’s 91 percent of U.S. farms and over half of the land. Most of the growth is in the area of small farms that have sales less than $10,000. Three types of business opportunity have helped create a positive environment for both farmers and people interested in local, healthy foods — farmers markets, other merchandising options and farm-toschool programs. Farmers markets can be a great option for finding locally produced food, as well as adding vitality to a community. They are popping up in rural Minnesota as well as in cities and suburbs. Many farmers markets now accept Farmers Market Nutrition Program food assistance coupons and other assistance vouchers. Other merchandising options include roadside stands, on-farm stores and Community Supported Agriculture programs, in which families purchase a regular share of the foods produced. Farm-to-school programs are also becoming another option for small farm production, and Minnesota is a leader in this area. Farmers are able to work directly with local schools to sell healthy and locally grown produce to the school districts, and can get help through University of Minnesota Extension’s Farm to School resources (www.extension.umn.edu/farm-to-school).

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Record 2011 farm profits could stumble in 2012 Against a backdrop of economic uncertainty, U.S. agriculture last year stood as a shining example of growth. 2011 set records, with net farm income topping $100 billion for the first time ever. “Prices are up across the board for all the major crops, and while we’ve seen cost of production increases overall, they haven’t increased as rapidly as the prices of crops people are selling,” said Pat Westhoff, director of the University of Missouri Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute. “Even corrected for inflation, farm profits are at or near the highest levels since the 1970s. That is indeed a very good outcome overall.” U.S. farm income rose 28 percent in 2011 compared to the previous year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture reports. Record agricultural exports topped $137 billion, while crop receipts rose 16 percent and livestock sales receipts averaged 17 percent more than in 2010. For livestock producers, this year offers welcome relief from some tough times. When the economic recession hit, prices dropped sharply as demand for meat slumped, and high feed

prices meant many livestock producers lost money. In response, some producers stopped raising livestock and others scaled back expansion plans. Westhoff said we’re seeing a turnaround. “We’ve seen higher prices for both hogs and cattle this year in a pretty sharp way after really tough years in 2008-09,” he said. “Now we’re seeing a bit stronger demand for our meat overseas and at the same time we’ve got less supply. “Events like the drought in Texas have reduced cattle numbers, so there will be less beef to be sold in 2012. That will help keep cattle prices high ahead of us for the next several years.” In 2012, chicken producers won’t be as lucky. Demand for chicken has not kept pace with the appetite for red meat, and there is an expectation that chicken production will consolidate soon. “That’s causing talk of lower chicken production in 2012, and that’s something that doesn’t happen very often,” Westhoff said. Crop exports likely will fall short of last year. With less droughts and

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floods affecting foreign yields, competition will ramp up once again. “Less soybeans, less corn, less wheat almost certainly will be exported in the current marketing year than last year,” Westhoff said. “It’s not that demand is necessarily weak, it’s just lots of other countries are supplying those foreign markets.” It’s hard to guess whether 2012 will bring another round of high prices, but higher yields, weaker exports and even the European debt crisis could hinder a repeat.

MARKETING

“There are lots of things that could go wrong in front of us, and instead of $5 to $6 corn, $3 to $4 corn could return,” Westhoff said. “We’re very much in a volatile situation, and what people think about the markets today will be different than six months or a year from now.” MU FAPRI provides economic analysis about agriculture issues and proposed legislation. It is funded in part by the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. This article was submitted by the University of Missouri Cooperative Media Group. ❖

Independent foreclosure review Did you face foreclosure in 2009 or 2010? “If so, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency says you may be eligible for a free independent review of your case,” said Brenda Schmitt, Iowa State University Extension Family Finance field specialist. Independent foreclosure reviews let borrowers who faced foreclosure on their primary residences between Jan. 1, 2009, and Dec. 31, 2010, request reviews of their cases if they believe they suffered financial injury as a result of errors in the foreclosure processes of the following servicers. America’s Servicing Co., Aurora Loan Services, Bank of America, Beneficial, Chase, Citibank, CitiFinancial, Citi Mortgage, Country-Wide, EMC, EverBank/Everhome, Freedom Financial, GMAC Mortgage, HFC, HSBC, IndyMac Mortgage Services, MetLife Bank, National City, PNC Mortgage, Sovereign Bank, Sun-Trust Mortgage, U.S. Bank, Wachovia, Washington Mutual, and Wells Fargo. The reviews will determine whether individuals suffered financial injury and should receive compensation or other remedies due to errors or other problems during their home foreclosure process. The reviews were ordered by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve in April 2011 after the federal regulators found unsafe and unsound mortgage servicing and foreclosure practices among these large, federally regulated mortgage servicers. Situations that may have led to financial injury include, but are not limited to: • The mortgage balance at the time

of the foreclosure action was more than you actually owed. • Fees charged or mortgage payments were inaccurately calculated, processed or applied. • You were doing everything a modification agreement required but the foreclosure sale still happened. • The foreclosure action occurred while you were protected by bankruptcy. • A foreclosure proceeded on a military member in violation of Servicemembers Civil Relief Act protections. More than 4 million letters were mailed to potentially eligible borrowers with request-for-review forms and instructions on how to complete and return them. The form lets you describe what you think went wrong. Simply answer the questions to tell your story, include any additional documents you think relevant and return the form by April 30. If you believe you are eligible and have not received a form, you can request one by calling (888) 952-9105, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. (ET) and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (ET). For additional information and answers to basic questions about the review process, log on to www.Independent ForeclosureReview.com. Reviews are conducted by independent consultants working under the direction of the federal regulators and may take several months to complete. You can learn more at www.occ.gov/ independentforeclosurereview. This article was submitted by the Floyd County office of Iowa State University Extension in Charles City, Iowa. ❖

Achieve your financial goals with self-rewarding plan

When setting financial goals, set up a self-rewarding plan. If you exceed the

target savings goal amount, reward yourself by spending the extra savings on something useful or special. Pay with cash when possible. People tend to spend less in addition to avoiding interest payments on loans or credit cards. Take on a save-first attitude. Before spending your paycheck on bills or groceries, or buying items on credit, put a portion of your paycheck into a savings

account or investment. Consider making the habit automatic by having a percentage of your paycheck automatically deducted and invested into a savings bond, CDs, mutual funds or other savings plans. You can also have your bank set up an automatic transfer on a periodic basis.

Different strategies may work for meeting different financial goals. An account that is FDIC insured will provide safety. Think about how liquid an account is. Can the funds be converted to cash quickly and easily? What will be the return on your investment, or the interest rate your investment earns over a ing and support from AgStar, we can certain time period. Is this an account help minority individuals become successful producers.” Additionally, the AgStar Fund for Rural America has allocated a budget in which Prices received by Minnesota farmers borrowers will be eligible for vouchers of for corn for January averaged $5.70 per up to $500 for computer purchases or bushel, an increase of $0.18 from the technical and financial training. December price. Soybeans were up $0.30 “AgStar is committed to giving back to a January price of $11.50/bu. The allto rural America and this program is a milk price for January, at $20.40 per great example of our desire to aid those cwt., was down $0.60 from December. who most need it,” said John Monson, Preliminary January 2012 prices senior vice president of the Fund for received in Iowa for corn were $5.80. This Rural America. “We are honored to ful- is a 14 percent increase from January fill that commitment in a tangible way.” 2011. Oat prices are $0.11 lower than in For more information on this new pro- January 2011, and soybean prices are gram, log on to AgStar.com/Minority $0.50 lower than they were in January Lending or contact Agustin Arzeno at 2011. Compared to January 2011, all-hay (952) 997-1257. For partnerships and questions from organizations, contact David Krueger at (507) 344-5129. ❖

AgStar announces minority lending program

This article was submitted by the Cerro Gordo County office of Iowa State University Extension in Mason City, Iowa. ❖

Corn, bean prices increase

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prices increased $39 to $144 and alfalfa hay prices increased $35 to $152. The preliminary U.S. All Farm Products Index of Prices Received by Farmers in January, at 186 percent, based on 1990-92 equals 100, increased 7 points (3.9 percent) from December. The Crop Index increased 10 points, but the Livestock Index was down 1 point (0.6 percent) from December. This article was submitted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service field offices of Minnesota and Iowa. ❖

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AgStar Financial Services ACA, a value-added financial services company owned by its client-stockholders, announced that it is now offering a Minority Lending Program. The Minority Lending Program was created for minority agricultural producers within AgStar’s local service area in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Small producers and organic farmers are encouraged to apply for financing. The program is designed to provide established, as well as new producers, ongoing access to credit, related financial services and outreach programs. “Minority farming continues to be a growing segment and this program is designed to help support those individuals,” said David Krueger, director of minority lending at AgStar. “It can be challenging to manage or start a new operation, but with the proper financ-

that will be simple to use and requires no minimum balance. Are there special services, such as 24-hour banking online or at ATMs, or investment management services? What are the tax considerations of different savings vehicles, or how, when and how much of your investment is affected by taxes. If you’re not comfortable comparing savings strategies yourself, or you would like advice on establishing savings or investments, speak with a financial adviser or counselor.

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Financial stability and reaching financial goals involves hard work and discipline. “While it’s easy to earn money, it’s oftentimes more difficult to save consistently,” said Brenda Schmitt, Iowa State University Extension Family Finance field specialist. Making smart choices and setting goals is important.

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Bonds, bills, stocks — Investing to reach your goals There are many considerations to help you reach your investment goals. Mutual funds Mutual funds are managed by investment companies. The investment company uses a pool of money (from investors) to buy a combination of stocks, bonds and other securities. Funds are purchased by a group of investors, rather than by individuals, so that the fees and risk is spread out among the group. Mutual funds may be used as retirement accounts, and oftentimes, income earned on these investments

FARM • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

(also known as dividends) is reinvested into the mutual fund account rather than paid out to investors, thereby earning interest on the reinvested amount. One aspect of mutual funds to keep in mind is that dividends not reinvested into a tax-advantaged account will be taxed as if you received them directly. Bonds Bonds are similar to CDs in that they are not liquid for a period of time, but the difference is that they can be purchased through companies, banks, or local, state and federal governments. When purchasing a bond, you are lending money to a company in return for interest payments from the company until the bond matures, or reaches face-value. Maturity dates vary, so bonds can be used as shortor long-term investments. Bonds are also more stable than stocks, but still carry risks such as being subject to default or prepayment if they are “callable,” meaning the bond issuer has the right to redeem the bond prior to the maturity date (and prior to reaching the full face-value). Overall, you are guaranteed to get your money back with bonds, but keep in mind they also pay lower interest than stocks. Treasury bills Treasury bills are the shortest-term investment vehicles offered by the government, and cannot exceed one year to reach maturity. The most common treasury bills have three- and six-month maturities, and the minimum face-value is $10,000. Treasury bills are sold at a discount, meaning they are sold for less than their face value. Once the bill matures, you will receive the full value of the bill. Due to their short-term nature, treasury bills are highly liquid, but it is important to note both the minimum facevalue requirement, as well as the fact that if they are sold before the maturity date, you could incur a loss. Stocks

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Stocks are issued by companies in order to expand or raise capital. Purchasers are called “shareholders,” meaning that when they buy stock, they own a portion of that company. As the value of the company changes, the value of its stock changes. If the company performs well financially, shareholders may be periodically paid dividends or have those dividends reinvested in the company. Companies are not required to repay money if you sell your shares of stock or repurchase shares of stock from a shareholder at a later date. Stocks are riskier investments than bonds, as the value of stocks can fluctuate or even become worthless if a business fails. However, the potential rewards from stocks are greater than from bonds, as the value of shares of stock aren’t limited to a face value. In addition, the value of shares of stock can increase indefinitely, depending on the company’s performance. Advisers While this overview may be useful, it is also beneficial to utilize the assistance and knowledge offered by a financial professional, especially if you have any questions or concerns about managing your money. You don’t have to have financial troubles to utilize counseling or advising resources. A financial counselor can be helpful to gain professional insight into your financial behaviors, to ask a few questions or to compare financial products. For more information contact your Iowa State University Extension office and ask for PM 1462 Saving and Investing — Money Mechanics. This article was submitted by the Franklin County office of Iowa State University Extension in Hampton, Iowa. It was written by Brenda Schmitt, Iowa State University Extension family resource management program specialist at Nashua, Iowa. She may be reached at (641) 512-0650 or schmitt@iastate.edu. ❖

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Do You Want to Achieve HIGHER YIELDS?

What: Central Minnesota Farm Show (Sponsored by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce) Where: River’s Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud, Minn. When: Feb. 28-March 1 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: Admission is free to the general public Parking: $5 at the Convention Center. Prices vary in other locations. been a popular community event for central Minnesota. Serving over a 100-mile radius, the show gives area farmers an opportunity to check out the season’s newest products, as well as socialize with other members of the agriculture industry. It also allows vendors a rare chance to meet their customers in person. Chad Carlson of Carlson Wholesale in St. Cloud, said the farm show is their main pipeline to the customer. “Most visitors just come to see what’s new,” Carlson said. Customers visit Carlson’s five-booth display to chat with the sales team, pick up new catalogs and comparison shop. Carlson points out that the farm

Keeping the ‘farm’ in farm show available in a standard retail outlet. Year after year the farm show strives to deliver an event that is both relevant and useful to the central Minnesota agriculture industry. The show provides farmers with a rare opportunity to view multiple products firsthand. It’s this one-stop convenience that keeps visitors coming back. Ultimately, keeping the farm in farm show requires careful consideration of industry changes, logistics and consumer interests. The Farm Show Committee has proven that it’s possible to make adjustments without sacrificing quality, and that’s one thing that will never change. The Central Minnesota Farm Show is organized by the St. Cloud (Minn.) Area Chamber of Commerce. ❖

tives on hand at one time, the farm show clearly illustrates the many components successfully at work. Once again all the pieces are in place for a 2012 show that promises to bring the same level of quality vendors, customers and information that make the farm show a central Minnesota tradition. ❖

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Imagine visiting a home and garden show and finding fishing poles on sale. Sure, it might provide a convenient distraction for bored spouses, but it has little to do with the home or the garden. Each year the Central Minnesota Farm Show planning committee faces the same dilemma. Approached by vendors that sell non-industry related merchandise, the group must decide which merchants are genuinely appropriate for the event. “Farmers aren’t interested in knickknacks,” said Greg Theis, Greg E. Theis Remodeling and chairman of the 2012 Central Minnesota Farm Show. “We work very hard to keep the quality of vendors high.” For a farmer, there’s little incentive to use a workday looking at products that are

show kicks off the start of the prime time agribusiness season. Farmers browse now and buy later. Come early spring sales start to take off and continue non-stop into fall. Necessary components Much like the machines on display, the agriculture industry depends on a complex network of parts to keep it running smoothly. With so many industry representa-

<< CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW >>

After 45 years the Central Minnesota Farm Show, organized by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is still delivering the goods. The formula is simple: Assemble hundreds of vendors from every corner of the agriculture industry and let both the farming and nonfarming communities know about it. The combination results in an average of more than 4,000 visitors for the three-day event. This year’s Farm Show is scheduled for Feb. 28-March 1 at the River’s Edge Convention Center. Admission to the event is free. The show is coordinated and arranged by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Farm Show Committee. Greg Theis, Greg E. Theis Remodeling, chairman for the 2012 show, said the event offers something for anyone with an interest in the agriculture industry. “Visitors can look for special product offers, entertainment and educational opportunities from a variety of professional vendors,” Theis said. Agricultural meeting grounds Since opening its doors four decades ago, the farm show has

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Farm show rooted in central Minnesota

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Central Minnesota Farm Show exhibitor guide Be sure to stop by the booths of these exhibitors as you browse through the Central Minnesota Farm Show Feb. 28-March 1. 21st Century Ag Agro-culture liquid fertilizers 206 Abba Roofing Roofing, windows, siding, gutters, insulation

207 ABC Seamless of St. Cloud Siding, windows, gutters, steel and asphalt roofing 803

Accelerated Genetics Dairy and beef genetics 513 Advanced Comfort Technology Inc. Dual Chamber Cow Waterbeds 805

ABS Global Inc. Table top display, literature on artificial Advanced Ag Construction insemination and udder care products Graindyers, grain bins and grain handling equipment 925

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924

Advantage 1 Insurance Agency Insurance 400

Arnold’s of Kimball Case IH tractors, skid loaders, hay equipment 901-903-905-1000-1002-1004

Agri-King Inc. Silo-King, livestock nutrution 926 Agri-News Newspaper 5

Arnold’s Equipment Melroe skid loader with attachements 821-823

Arnzen Construction Inc. Berg equipment, J&D Equipment, Macro Air Fan, straw choppers, Agri-Systems Inc. Grain storage and handling systems - feed carts design, sales and construction, Brock 201-203-205-300-302-304 bins, DMC, Schlagel Arvig Communication Systems 1018 Security solutions, selling Honeywell home security products AgStar Financial Services 811 Marketing materials promoting AgStar products and service Avon Ag Lime 801-900 Ag Lime display 2 Albers Dairy Equipment Inc. Headlocks, free stalls, water troughs Barn Restoration Specialists Corp. 829 Pictures and information 219 All America Pressure Washers Pressure washers and parts 112 Battery Wholesale Batteries Allied Distribution Inc. 101 - Glenn Carlson Hall Infloor heating product 409 Benton County Ag Society Display booth Ameribuilt Buildings 1022-1024 Post frame building display 608 Best Footing Concrete Grooving Concrete grooving American Family Insurance 417 Insurance 515 BOE Custom Services Inc. Custom baling, wrapping and American Pressure Inc. land rolling. Net wrap - farmers Alkota, Landa & Karcher portable brand, twines, Farmers brand and pressure washers, accessories for Bravo brand, plastic wrap pressure washers 410 320 Bongards Creameries American Shelters Bongards cheese Hoop building 1020 606 - Glenn Carlson Hall Buckey’s Sales & Service AMPI Doda manure pumps Display booth, cheese 800-802 606 - Glenn Carlson Hall Byron Seeds Amps Inc. Seed corn Winpower and Honda PTO, 606 portable generators 818 Carlson Wholesale Ritchie livestock fountains, Loyal API Garage Door Store farm equipment, CalfTel small Overhead garage doors and operators animal housing, Tos-O-Wik - Midland, Liftmaster, Genie

livestock pest control 311-313-410-412 Glenn Carlson Hall Catholic United Financial Fraternal life Insurance 1017 Central McGowan Inc. Welding supplies and equipment 206 - Glenn Carlson Hall Central Minnesota Corn Growers Corn growers association 807 Central Minnesota Credit Union Display booth 908 Central MN Ethanol Co-op Display booth 809 CentraSota Co-op Agronomy - seed - fertilizer - crop production products 301-303-305 -Glenn Carlson Hall Champion Ag Electric Long day lighting 500 Champion Milking Systems LLC Dairymaster milking equipment, Oxyblast Water treatment system, Impulse 502-504 Channel Bio LLC Seed, corn and soybean display booth 922 Cleary Building Corp. Table top display, post frame buildings with literature 831 Complete Grain Systems Grain dryer and grain handling equipment 804-806-808 Country Financial Financial products 404 Courtland Waste Handling GEA Houle manure handling equipment 910 C.S. Arvola Inc. Agricultural livestock, shop and storage buildings 1019

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Culbac Products Animal health product, feed additive, healthy start 9 Cutco Cutco-sporting, hunting, fishing, pocket, super shears - kitchen cutlery 12

Dairy Star Newspaper 7 Dairyland Pest Control Display booth - pest control

Dairyland Seed Inc. Seed (corn, alfalfa soybeans) display 202 - Glenn Carlson Hall Dairyland Supply Vandale Waste Handler, Houle Equipment, Penta TMR Mixers, Feed Carts, Polydome products, hydra-spreads 601-603-605-607-609-611621-700-702-704-706-708 Deatons Nutrition Inc. Multi-sill II Inoculant 506 Diamond Industrial Cleaning Equipment Pressure washers, Karcher,

Hydrotek, MITM 602 - Glenn Carlson Hall Dick Meyer Co. Inc. Barn floor grooving information 914 Donabauer Environmental LLC Wetland consulting 514 Dust Busters Furnace & Duct Cleaning Furnace and duct cleaning, chimney cleaning 1013

Farm equipment - Teagle bale processors, rakes 810-812-814

Falls Silo Service Table top display 833

European Energy Connections Consulting services for ag products 315

Feed Stuff Bagging Siloflex silage bags, MCT Plus Inoculant, Buchneri Inoculant, silage bagger 815

Exclusive Home Products Westbend Waterless Cookware 406-408 Feed Co. Inc. Retail livestock feed, organic livestock feeds 813

Edward Jones Investments Financial information about investing Form A Feed Form A Feed animal feed 1011 319 Erickson Marketing

Finken Water Water Treatment, softeners, spas, (Vita spas, Hellenbrand, Watercare) plumbing, heating, cooling, Bryant 600 - Glenn Carlson Hall First District Association Fieldgate cheese 321 G3 Power Systems LLC

Power generators 106 Genex Cooperative Genex Cooperative is an AI organization and we will have photos of our bulls 817 Genex Farm Systems Conveyor, roller mill, store tank, unloader, calf feeder 1025-1027-1029 Gilman Co-op Creamery Farm and feed store display 916 Gold Country Seed Farm seed 911

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Farm and Family Meetâ&#x20AC;?

Dairy Farmers of America Dairy Marketing company, dairy products to be displayed 400 - Glenn Carlson Hall

204 - Glenn Carlson Hall

Granite Electronics

Growers nutritional solutions - fer- blower 401-403-405-407 Mobile, AT&T wireless phones 612 819 Hotsy Equipment of MN H&S Mfg. Co. Inc. Hot pressure washers Grassland Solutions Forage box, manure spreader, rake 711 High tensile fencing for cattle, and bale wrapper sheep, horses; fencing display 927-929-931-933-935-1026Hubbard Feeds with literature 1028-1030-1032-1034 Hubbard feed and animal prod11 ucts Hanson Silo Co. 709 Green Energy Products Hanson valmetal products Sunpower solar Panels, renew207-209-211-213-306-308Innovative Power Systems able energy 310-312 - Glenn Carlson Hall Solar energy, wind energy 404 - Glenn Carlson Hall 518 Healthy Calves Direct Greg E. Theis Remodeling Urban automatic feeders and milk Joes Supplies Inc. Replacement windows, remodel- shuttles Shop supplies ing 510 717 705 Hitchdoc Jung Seed Genetics Growers Mineral Solutions Travis seed cart, Hitchdoc snow Jung Seed Genetics, seed corn,

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

10 B Motorola 2-way radios, Nextel, T- tilizer and animal mineral

alfalfa, soybeans 104 K&S Millwrights Neco grain dryer and material handling equipment; Conrad American and GSC grain bins, Lambton conveyor grain legs 108-Glenn Carlson Hall KASM/KDDG Radio Booth for live broadcasting 1 Kleen Test Products/Milk Check Milk Check brand of milk filters 713

Kramer Financial Financial services 918

MidCentral Heating & Air Conditioning Portage and main outdoor wood boilers 913

Kruger Seeds Seeds, soybean and corn 402 - Glenn Carlson Hall

Midsota Manufacturing Inc. Trailers and skidsteer attachments 412-414-416-418-420

Kuhn North America TMR mixers and manure spreaders, Kuhn - disc mowers and conditioners and rakes 300-302-304-306-308

Midstate Genetics Farm seed and chemicals, Kleenacres herbicides 505

1009

KYES Radio station 1015

Knife River Aggregates, asphalt and ready mix concrete, pre fab booth backwall L&L Sales and Service and counter Pasture Mat mattresses and Artex Stalls 1006

<< CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW >>

Lange Ag Systems Display booth - dairy feeding housing and ventilation equipment 1007 Legend Seeds Display of corn, beans, alfalfa products 3-4 Lumber One, Avon Farm buildings display booth 1005 Malecha Sales Bergman Speed Hitch, grease guns 1010 Mark J. Traut Wells Inc. Water treatment equipment, well equipment, B&B band, grundfos, aeromotor 816

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Master Builders of Avon Building products, contractor, construction 1012

Mike’s Knives Cutlery, kitchen knives 217 Minnesota Dairy Beef Council Education display, dairy beef products samples 200 - Glenn Carlson Hall Midwest Machinery Co. John Deere ag equipment 519-521 Mies Outland Road baler 101 Miller Auto Plaza GMC truck 1021-1023 Mimbach Fleet Supply Ritchie Fountains, Spanier Welding Product, Calf-tel products, Husqvarna mowers and saws, Behlen livestock equipment 120-122 Minnesota Assoc. of Farm Mutual Insurance Co. Insurance services 917 Minnesota Farm Guide Newspaper display booth 100 Minnesota Farm Insurance Farm insurance products 512

MEDA Inc. Dairy sanitation products, health products 825-827

Minnesota Farmers Union Livestock program display, tabletop 402

Messer Repair & Fabricating Rock bucket and pallet forks, pop-up hitch display 103-105-Glenn Carlson Hall

Minnesota Home Improvements Roofing, siding, windows, doors, leaf guard gutters 114-116

The Minnesota Project Meyer Manufacturing Corp. Educational materials Meyer farm equipment, Forage box and wagon, manure spreader, 503 mineral feeder 820-822-824-826-828-830

Patz Corp. Feeding and manure handling equipment 107-109-111-208-210-212 Glenn Carlson Hall

Redwood Metal Works Artex manure spreaders and silage trailers 613-615-617-619

Select Sires Information on sires with semen available. Also information on animal care products available 606-608 Silver Stream Shelters Hoop structure/fabric cover shelter 212 Slipka Trading Display booth 516

Stuart A. Olson Inc. Ag Concepts - soil - biostimulants, Schaeffers Mfg. - oil/lubricants 907-909 Sunrise Ag Co-op Hubbard feeds, animal, health products 205

Steffes Auctioneers Auctioneer 210 Stine Seed Co. Stine hybrid corn, soybeans 208 Strategic Farm Marketing Crop insurance 517

Western Products Renewal by Anderson, Seamless siding, replacement windows, Leaf Away gutter protection system, roofing 201

Terra-Therm Geothermal heating and cooling in farm shops 215

Whitcomb Bros. Crane Service Grain handling equipment, MFS, Neco, Grain Handler 507

The Land Magazine 10

Wieser Concrete Products Manure storage, bunker silos, feed bunk 608

Spee Dee Delivery Regional delivery service, package Titan Pro SCI Inc. Seed, chemical, crop insurance, and LTL service offerings fertilizer 200 211 Stearns County Farm Bureau Townsquare Media Display booth Radio station 906 6 Stearns Electric Association Electric demand side management Tri-County Foam Insulation LLC Display conservation programs 109 501 Stearns Vet Outlet Animal health products, Westfalia Surge Equipment, large animal equipment 921-923

Life on the Farm board games 105

Uncle Sam’s Flag & Pole Titan telescoping flag poles/flag accessories 102 Van’s Flags & Flagpoles Flags and flagpoles 620 VQ Orthocare Bonicare knee treatment 311 Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota N.A. Financial products, brochures 600 We R Fun Games

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Wilson Trailer Sales of MN Inc. Wilson trailer sales, literature for Wilson livestock, grain hopper, flatbed and gooseneck trailers 509 Wingert Sales & Service Roll stand, videos 314-316 Woller Equipment Tractors, skidloaders 310-312 WVAL Radio 800 AM Radio station 8 Your Home Improvement Co. Windows, cabinets, countertops, siding, preservation, doors 511

<< CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW >>

Ziegler Ag Equipment Caterpillar compact construction equipment, Challenger tractors 100-102-104-106 - Glenn Carlson Hall

Stop by booths 613 - 619 at the St. Cloud Farm Show February 29-March 2

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Retro Door Co. Door Company Seal System Pedogenesis Fertility management with sample 317 of products RetroGreen Energy 602-604 Modern Farm Equipment Retrofoam display booth Farm equipment, JCB Fastrac tractor 920 Peterson Farms Seed 405-407-409-411-413-504Corn and soybean seed 506-508-510-512 Robo Mfg. LLC 309 Rotary rock picker, skid steer Morton Buildings attachment, tractor attachment Pioneer Hi-Bred Display booth 508 Pioneer brand products including 614 corn hybrids and soybean varieties Rodney Knutson 616 Mulching Mania Crop and farm insurance Table display showing clearing of land 1008 Pluto Legal LLC 209 Table top display of attorney Roers Whitewashing & Cleaning information National Farmers Service Marketing of major ag commodities, 305 Whitewashing, powerwashing and fans grain, livestock, dairy 202 Prairie Brand Seeds 113 Prairie Brand seed (corn, soybean Roto-Mix LLC and alfalfa) Nextire Inc. Feed mixers 118 Skid steer tires and tracks and 712-714-716-718 other related items Prairie Lakes Co-op 307-309 - Glenn Carlson Hall Royalton Lumber & Hardware Farmer owned co-op Agriculture building materials 107 Northern Tool & Equipment 715 Honda and North Star generators, pressure washers, power eqipment Principal Financial Group S.I. Feeders Estate and retirement planning 411 Steel cattle feeders 204 930-932-934 Northland Farm Systems Producers Hybrids Doda solid manure separator St. Cloud Overhead Door Co. Seed corn, alfalfa, soybeans 915 Garage door and accessories 313 835 Norwex Cleaning supplies and organic skin care Quality Sales and Service St. Cloud State University Alladin pressure washers and 520 Education and training in farm safety parts for washers 835 707 NuTech Seed Seed information Sam’s Club R&S Tire Service 419 Retail exhibit Agriculture tires and rims 301 (Firestone, Titan) OK Tire Store - Motley 610 Michelin ag and end products (tires), Firestone ag and end tires Rasmussen College 1016 College information 919 Osakis Silo Repair Co. Silo unloader equipment RDO Equipment 406-408 - Glenn Carlson Hall John Deere Loader 115-117-119-121-214-216Outpost Builders Inc. 218-220 Fabric structures by Span Tech 902 Real-Tuff Inc. Squeeze chute, HTC, Stardolone, Paul Mueller Company Mueller milk coolers, accu-therm windbreak, Circular Mat Pen 1031-1033 plate heat exchanger 608-610-612 - Glenn Carlson Hall Redfield LLC General contractor - specializing Paul’s Welding & Repair,Inc. in concrete Jamesway feeding equipment 103 111 Mobile Washer Pressure washers 1014

Schaefer Ventilation Equipment Schaefer exhauxt fan 203

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Minnesota Spray Foam Insulation Spray foam insulation and retro seal insulation 307

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Milker's Message from

THE LAND

Fleckvieh breed catching eye of dairy, beef farmers By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer A dairy breed from Bavaria, Germany, called Fleckvieh seems to be gaining attention for both beef and dairy production in Canada and the United States. “It’s a dual-purpose breed with the aim of improving longevity, health, fertility and strength,” said John Popp, president of Big Bear Genetics Ltd. in Erickson, Manitoba. With nearly 10 years working with Fleckvieh genetics in several Canadian and U.S. cow herds, Popp said, “we can John Popp confidently say we are adding 1.5 lactations to herd average. We’re also adding to the milk’s component value with a 0.2 percent improvement in protein and measurably higher butter fat. Those component improvements offset the 2 to 5 percent reduction in milk production.” Popp said there is also a predictable reduction in somatic cell count which too can be added bonuses to the milk check. Cooperators are also reporting improvements in fertility which directly impacts dairy margins. With Fleckvieh, producers have the option of choosing different types of genetics. Within the breed you can select to add or reduce frame size. A 1,400- to 1,500-pound cow is the generally accepted mature weight. If used in a Holstein herd, Popp said the Fleckvieh genetics would reduce the hip height of cows about two inches, producing a rounder, more muscular animal. “Dairymen think this rounder, shorter cow won’t milk. But the cow functions differently in terms of her metabolism,” Popp said. As such she has a slower onset of lactation, a flatter more persistent lactation, but still capable of producing 65 to 70 pounds of milk daily with a 4 percent BF, a

Submitted by Big Bear Genetics Ltd.

A fourth-lactation Fleckvieh Holstein cross. 3.6 percent protein along with cell count numbers of 80,000 to 100,000, and breeding rates of 1.8 inseminations per pregnancy. Climate adjustment may be another point in favor of the Fleckvieh breed. Popp said that with increased heat stress it takes longer for a cow with more muscle mass to become heated up. “So we’re experiencing less heat stress on our Fleckviehs versus thinner, more ‘dairy style’ cows. Also the Fleckvieh breed has a thicker hide so she is more able to maintain herself in temperature extremes of both heat and cold. “We’ve got some herds in Canada where guys are wintering their Fleckvieh cows straight out on a straw pack.” Access to semen is best made by contacting Big Bear Genetics directly at email bigbeargenetics@inetlink.ca or log on to www.bigbeargenetics.com or call (204) 636-2387. An Iowa source is Hawkeye Breeders in Adel, Iowa. Semen is shipped directly to farms; Popp and other members of Big Bear

Genetics welcome the opportunity to visit with herd owners. Costs at $20 to $30 for any sires selected should be comparable with other sources. “We

only import the top 10 percent of the sires that we feel are suitable for North American genetics for cross breeding. With the experience we have gained and the cows milking from our sire line up our results are now very predictable,” Popp said. He said there are now several dairy herds in Minnesota that have gotten into cross breeding with Fleckvieh cross-bred cows now milking. For about 12 years, he has been working with a German dairy genetics firm — Bayern Genetik — that specializes in the Fleckvieh breed. Popp’s doctorate is in ruminant nutrition from the University of Saskatchewan. This helps him understand and work with dairies on management and nutrition. A pure Fleckvieh cow is red and white. Fleckvieh genetics are recognized for their ability to contribute to meat yield, growth performance and maternal traits. Popp sees the breed working its way into both dairy and beef cow operations in Canada and the United States. Popp and Big Bear Genetics were exhibiting at the Midwest Dairy Expo, St. Cloud, Minn., in December. ❖

Residue risk assessment tool for dairy Dairy producers can assess their risk for a violative antibiotic residue in milk and meat by using an online tool from Pfizer Animal Health. The short, 10-question self-assessment takes only a few minutes to complete and is at www.AvoidResidues.com/Assessment. “This assessment is designed to help producers evaluate their management practices that could lead to a higher risk of a residue violation,” said Mike Lormore, director of Dairy Technical Services for Pfizer Animal Health. The assessment tool — created using data from actual Federal Drug Administration investigations into residue violations — asks question about a producer’s on-farm animal health practices. A weighted scoring system

assigns points to practices based on their likelihood of contributing to a higher risk of a residue violation. Once completed, the assessment rates the farm’s residue risk level as low, moderate or high. Results can be printed or e-mailed to the herd veterinarian. This tool is another part of Pfizer Animal Health’s continued commitment to responsible antibiotic use as well as milk and meat drug residue avoidance. To take the evaluation, log on to www.AvoidResidues.com, where visitors will also find thought-provoking, action-oriented videos about the causes of violative drug residues and tips for getting started on a drug residue prevention plan. ❖

Still looking for silver lining on dairy’s cloud

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

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See MIELKE, pg. 14B

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

This column was written for the marketing week ending Feb. 10. Dairy prices saw more weakness the first full week of February. The cash block cheese price closed that Friday at $1.4750 per pound, down a penny on MIELKE MARKET the week and 44 cents below a WEEKLY year ago when they jumped 10.5 cents. The barrels saw By Lee Mielke some gains but still lost a penny on the week, closing at $1.4850, 41.5 cents below a year ago when they gained 12.5 cents, They’re a penny above the blocks despite a fair amount of product being sold. Nine cars of block and 29 of barrel traded hands. The National Agricultural Statistics Service-surveyed U.S. average block price fell to $1.5587, down 2.5 cents. The barrels averaged $1.5409, down 3.7 cents. Cash butter saw its fourth consecutive week of loss, losing another 6 cents and closing at $1.4325, 65.75 cents below a year ago. Four cars traded hands on the week. NASS butter averaged $1.5470, down 4.3 cents. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $1.3350, down 2.25 cents on the week, while Extra Grade held all week at $1.2975. NASS powder averaged $1.3853, down 0.8 cent, and dry whey averaged 66.48 cents, down a penny. ■ Commercial disappearance and the production of dairy products finished 2011 strong and rounded out a big year of output and usage, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data reported by Jerry Dryer in his Feb. 3 Dairy and Food Market Analyst. Cheese production was up 1.7 percent (173 million pounds) to a record high 10.609 billion pounds and commercial disappearance grew by 3 percent (317 million pounds). American cheese disappearance grew 1.2 percent (49 million pounds) and other cheese, by 4.2 percent (268 million pounds). Dry whey output fell about 1 percent (10 million pounds to 950.6 million) and commercial disappearance was down 0.9 percent (8 million pounds to 952 million pounds). Butter production increased 15.4 percent (241 million pounds) and commercial disappearance was up 10 percent (163 million pounds). Milk powder — nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder — output neared the two-billion-pound threshold at 1.964 billion; up 8 percent (147 million pounds). Commercial disappearance was up even more, wrote Dryer, plus 8.8 percent (159 million pounds). Dryer also touched on the growing milk supply and, based on plant operators he has talked with,

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Mild weather across U.S. helping raise milk production

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

MIELKE, from pg. 13B warned that “the traditional spring peak in daily milk production is one to four months early across most of the U.S.” He speculated whether there would be even more to come “as warmer weather and longer days push their way north to the milk-sheds across the upper tier of states” and posed the question: “Will there be enough plant capacity for all of the milk by March, April and May.” Sev-

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

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■ Meanwhile, Oceania skim milk powder prices have held mostly steady since October. “Traders and handlers indicate that powder stocks are sufficient to fulfill commitments with minimal volumes remaining as uncommitted,” according to the Dairy Market News. Mild winter weather across much of the country is helping to increase milk production and thus more milk is finding its way to cheese vats, according to the DMN. Inventories are building as sales are reported as slow since the start of the new year. In most regions, the winter season has been much less stressful on the herd and increasing milk receipts at processing plants are being reported. Except for Florida, milk volumes coastto-coast are building to the point that milk is not moving from one region to another to supplement shortages. Milk volumes are increasing, but processing capacity is generally sufficient within close proximity of production at this time, according to the USDA. Cream markets are weak and pricing multiples are easing. Cream volumes are heavy and often clearing from one region to another to find processing. Producers of higher-class cream product items are seeing declines in orders after a recent boost from footballrelated interest, thus more cream is available to churns coast to coast. The Oceania milk production season continues to trend lower. New Zealand weather patterns are favorable for production at this time of the annual cycle and handlers continue to project a 3 to 4 percent annual increase over last season, with some handlers adjusting their estimates to a 4 percent-plus increase. Fluctuating weather in Australia is not having an overall negative impact on milk output. Producers and handlers indicate volumes are lower but maintaining levels that are often higher than projected. Producers project a 2- to 3-percent annual increase when the current fiscal year ends in June. ■ Back on the home front, the USDA raised its 2012 milk production forecast in this week’s World Agricultural MN TRUCK & TRACTOR Supply and Demand Estimates Report Mankato, MN • 507-388-4599 after lowering it slightly a month ago. LODERMEIER’S CENTRAL MN EQUIP. Look for output to hit 199 billion Goodhue, MN • 651-923-4441 Lake Henry, MN • 370-243-7411 pounds, up 500 million pounds from last month’s projection. NORTHLAND FARM SYSTEMS SE SKID LOADER Milk cow numbers were raised for Owatonna, MN • 507-451-3131 St. Charles, MN • 507-932-4560 much of the year as the USDA’s Cattle eral people he spoke with are concerned, he reported. Zeroing in on nonfat dry milk, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange’s Daily Dairy Report says U.S. NFDM prices have dropped steadily the last seven months, falling 25 to 30 cents from the July 2011 peak. Buyers are often waiting for prices to stabilize before ordering too far out, according to the DDR, and inventories are building.

Report indicated 1 percent more dairy cows on Jan. 1. However, producers are holding 1 percent fewer heifers for addition to the dairy herd, which is expected to push cow numbers lower later in the year. Milk per cow forecasts were raised as data for the last quarter of 2011 was higher than expected and mild weather in much of the country is supporting increased early year yields. Output for 2011 was put at 196.2 billion, up 200 million pounds from last month’s projection and compares to 2010’s 192.8 billion. With higher forecast 2012 production, cheese and butter prices were lowered. The NDM price was lowered to reflect slightly weaker early year prices. With stronger forecast demand for whey, the whey price forecast was raised. The lower cheese price is expected to more than offset the higher whey price, resulting in a reduced forecast Class III price. Look for the 2012 Class III average to range $16.70 to $17.40 per hundredweight, down from the $17.10 to $17.90 expected a month ago, and compares to $18.37 in 2011 and $14.41 in 2010. Lower butter and NDM prices result in a lower Class IV price, now projected to average $16.25 to $17.05, down from $16.45 to $17.35 expected in the last report, and compares to $19.04 in 2011 and $15.09 in 2010. ■ The WASDE report was the topic of Dairy Profit Weekly editor, Dave Natzke, in his Friday DairyLine update. He reported on the weakening cheese, butter and milk powder prices and the rising futures prices for corn and soybeans. He gave as an example, Feb. 8 annual average 2012 Class III milk futures contracts traded 85 cents/cwt. below the average on Jan. 5, with prices for February through March down nearly $2/cwt. compared to a month ago. He reported that the WASDE indicates the trend could continue and cited the rising milk production data and lowered milk price projections detailed above and warned that, “if lower milk prices aren’t enough incentive for dairy farmers to reduce milk production, higher feed costs might be.” The USDA forecasts the season-average corn price to be 60 cents to $1.40 per bushel higher than the year before, and soybean prices up to $1/bu. higher. Higher beef prices might be an incentive to more culling, Natzke said. LatSee MIELKE, pg. 15B

LGM program ‘workable’ in setting revenue floor groups of dairy farmers examining changes that could be made to the LGM to make it more workable and get it out of pilot status and now is the time to do it.

Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖

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Land O’Lakes Animal Milk Products Co. announces the release of Cow’s Match ColdFront calf milk replacer, a calf milk replacer that helps provide an optimal balance of fat and carbohydrates. The key ingredients of Cow’s Match ColdFront calf milk replacer provide higher and more quickly mobilized energy sources to dairy calves, helping them better overcome challenges associated with cooler weather and environmental conditions. Colder weather presents the risk of environmental stress to calves. Temperatures below 60 degrees for calves less than 3 weeks-of-age and 42 degrees for calves greater than 21 days-of-age create cold stress effects. Calves begin to require more dietary energy just for maintaining body conditioning. During times of cold stress, energy is the limiting factor to calf performance. The primary sources of energy in milk replacer are fat and carbohydrates. Cow’s Match ColdFront calf milk replacer has been formulated to provide an optimal balance of fat and carbohydrates (lactose) to prepare calves for cold weather conditions. Based upon the same high nutrition levels of Cow’s Match calf milk replacer — which set a new industry standard

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

revenue,” according to the University of Wisconsin’s Brian Gould in Tuesday’s DairyLine, but is severely limited by a budget of just $20 million a year for all of the pilot livestock revenue programs, including the LGM. Gould said the Congressional Budget Office 10-year forecast of direct payments to agriculture is about $60 billion, with $22 billion going to corn producers and $11 billion to wheat. $443 million would go to dairy or less than 0.3 percent. He predicted continued volatility in dairy but said the LGM program works, although it may need to be removed from “pilot status,” so more funds could become available for the LGM. The LGM ran out of money after two months, Gould said, but he speculated that about 2 1/2 percent of U.S. annual milk production was insured and was equivalent to what’s sold on the Class III futures. The relative small amount of milk represented is only because of the lack of money, Gould said. Gould encouraged listeners to be involved in the hearing process as the farm bill process moves ahead and to contact lawmakers. He said there are

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

MIELKE, from pg. 14B est USDA projections raised beef prices by $6 to $14/cwt. compared to last year. ■ Cooperatives Working Together accepted 35 requests for export assistance this week to sell a total of 3.763 million pounds of Cheddar cheese and 3.411 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through June 2012. The sales raised the CWT’s 2012 cheese exports to 17 million pounds plus 14.4 million pounds of butter to 14 countries. ■ Looking “back to the futures,” the Class III milk price average for the first six months of 2012 stood at $17.60 on Jan. 6; $17.28 on Jan. 13; $16.81 on Jan. 20; $16.85 on Jan. 27; $16.35 on Feb. 3 and was hovering around $16.15 late morning Feb. 10. ■ Meanwhile, the Livestock Gross Margin insurance program has been a “very workable way for dairy producers to set some minimum floors on their

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Can a prairie teach us about agricultural water quality?

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

This provided an environment promoting denitrification that can decrease nitrate concentrations fairly rapidly — within one growing season. Upland soils were drier and had less available carbon, so nitrate loss occurred more slowly. — Mark Tomer phosphorus concentrations were found in shallow ground water along Jeff Cook/Agricultural Research Service the waterways — and if ARS researchers are studying how nitrates and phosphorus affect water quality in a crop field ground-water levels rose that has been converted to native prairie vegetation at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge enough to produce over- near Prairie City, Iowa. One place to figure out how agricultural practices affect water quality is in land flows that con- a crop field that is being converted to native prairie vegetation. tribute to streamflow, the phosphorus concentrations were high enough to threaten local water quality. “We learned that while conservation practices that plant grass along waterways and in riparian buffers can trap sediments from field runoff, the sediments contain phosphorus that can leach into the water,” Tomer said. “Under certain conditions, legacy Farm Succession and the Next Springfield nutrients in soil might still pollute Tuesday, February 28 nearby waterways, even though eroded Generation soil has been trapped.” New Ulm Legacy nutrients remain in the soil Farm Business Planning long after producers have stopped Monday, March 12 using them to fertilize crops. Treating Family Members Comfrey Tomer wants to learn more about Fairly this tradeoff between phosphorus and Monday, March 26 nitrate in shallow ground water, how often it occurs, and what controls it. Farm Transfers 1:00 P.M.–3:00 P.M. “We think studying this prairie has given us insight that can help farmers Estate Taxes better manage water quality, from their fields right down to the Gulf of Gifting Mexico.” This article was published in the February issue of Agricultural Research magazine. It was written by ARS information staff member Ann Perry. Presented by Steven J. Franta and Patrick A. Lowther This research is part of Water Availability and Watershed Management an Call (507) 354-2161 ARS national program described at to reserve your space today www.nps.ars.usda.gov. ❖

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In Iowa, natural resource managers are conducting this type of landscape restoration at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge near Prairie City. So this is where Agricultural Research Service soil scientists Mark Tomer and Cynthia Cambardella partnered with colleagues from Grinnell College, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Iowa Geological Survey Bureau (part of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources) to describe changes in water quality during prairie establishment. The ARS researchers work at the National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment in Ames. Their group studied concentrations of nitrates and phosphorus in ground water in a 17-acre field while it was being converted from corn and soybean row-cropping to a reconstructed prairie. The researchers set up groundwater monitoring wells and collected water samples from 2002 through 2009. After a final soybean harvest in 2003, the field was seeded with native grasses and forbs. As the prairie became established, nitrate concentrations declined and stabilized within five years. Initially, nitrate levels in ground-water wells higher up the slopes averaged 10.6 parts per million, levels that can fuel downstream development of the “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico. Nitrate levels along ephemeral waterways averaged only 2.5 ppm, and after 2006, nitrates disappeared from the shallow ground water near the waterways. Further upslope, ground water still had measurable nitrate levels in 2006, but levels diminished to around 2 ppm after 2007. “The rate of nitrate loss mostly came down to two things: how much available carbon was in the soil and the depth of the water table,” Tomer said. “Along the waterways, there was carbon available in the saturated soils. This provided an environment promoting denitrification that can decrease nitrate concentrations fairly rapidly — within one growing season. Upland soils were drier and had less available carbon, so nitrate loss occurred more slowly.” These results didn’t surprise the researchers. But phosphorus measurements did, because unlike nitrate, phosphorus levels did not decline. Between 2006 and 2009, phosphorus concentrations averaged 0.14 ppm along the ephemeral waterways, while average upland concentrations were only around 0.02 ppm. The higher

17 B

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

18 B

Gene helps with multiple leaf diseases in corn Corn is one of the most widely grown crops in the United States, which produces 40 percent of the world crop. But as with all crops, diseases threaten corn production. Three diseases, southern corn leaf blight, northern leaf blight and gray leaf spot, all cause lesions on corn leaves. In the U.S. Midwest Corn Belt, northern leaf blight and gray leaf spot are significant problems.

Agricultural Research Service scientists and university colleagues found a specific gene in corn that seems to confer resistance to all three of these leaf diseases. This discovery, published in 2011 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could potentially help plant breeders build disease-resistance traits into future corn plants. The researchers examined 300 corn varieties from around the world, mak-

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ing sure to have a genetically diverse confer multiple resistance,” he said. “This representation. No corn variety has gene, a GST (glutathione S-transferase), complete resistance to any of these dis- is part of a family of genes known for eases, but varieties differ in the sever- their roles in regulating oxidative stress and in detoxification. Both of these funcity of symptoms they exhibit. “We set out to look for maize lines with tions are consistent with a role in disease resistance to these three leaf diseases. resistance.” “While we know the But what we really wanted DNA sequence variato know is which genes tion of the gene in all underlie disease resistthe different lines, the ance,” said ARS plant Usually, you function of the genes geneticist Peter Balintare looking for tested is often Kurti, who is in the Plant something that unknown. But by putScience Research Unit in causes the ting together the inforRaleigh, N.C. Also on the change in one mation on which variresearch team were ARS trait. We modieties carry specific plant geneticists Jim Holsequence variations land and Matt Krakowsky fied the techand also exhibit better and scientists with the Uninique so that resistance, we could versity of Delaware, Cornell we can find identify a gene that University and Kansas gene variants appears related to mulState University. that are associtiple disease resistWhen they tested the ance,” Holland said. ated with varilines for resistance to these ation in multiThis study represents three diseases, they found a departure from the that if a corn variety was ple traits. standard process of gene resistant to one disease, — Jim Holland association mapping. chances were favorable that “Usually, you are looking it was also resistant to the other two. So the search was on for the gene or for something that causes the change in one genes responsible for that multiple dis- trait. We modified the technique so that we can find gene variants that are associated ease resistance. The researchers applied a statistical with variation in multiple traits, such as analysis technique called “association resistance to multiple diseases,” he said. This article was published in the Febmapping” to identify regions of the genome associated with variation in dis- ruary issue of Agricultural Research ease resistance. “We knew there was a magazine. It was written by ARS inforstrong correlation between resistance of mation staff member Sharon Durham. one disease and the other two. So we posThis research is part of Plant Genetic tulated that some resistance genes con- Resources, Genomics, and Genetic ferred resistance to two or more different Improvement, an ARS national prodiseases,” Balint-Kurti said. gram described at ❖ “We identified a gene that seemed to www.nps.ars.usda.gov.

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Employment

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Employment

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A g B uilde r s of So MN Inc ........14A A g Pow e r E nte r pri ses Inc ........38B A gro-C ulture L iq ui d Fert i l i zers 29A A gStar Financ ial ......................11A A nde r s on Se e ds ... ...............16A, 4B A r nold C ompanies Inc ......20B, 21B Avoc a Spr ay Se r v i ce ................32B B aye r C rop Sc ie nce ..................40A B aye r Tr uc k & E q ui pm ent Inc ..36A B ayw ood Home Care ..................4A B ig Gain ..................................17A B lue Hilltop I nc ......................22A B ob B ur ns Sale s & Serv ............35B B os s Supply I nc ........................5B B ros koff Str uc tures ..................29A C & C R oofing ..........................8A C as e I H ..................................31A C e ntr al M N Far m Show ..............7B C HS ................... .......................3A C ountr y Side Homes ..................2B C our tland Was te H andl i ng ........8B C ur ts Tr uc k & D i esel Servi ce ..38A C yr illa B e ac h Homes Inc ..........18A D ahl Far m Supply ....................26A D an Pike C le r king ....................23B D ie r s A g Supply ........................3B D unc an Tr aile r s LLC ................36B E me r s on Kalis ..........................31B E xc e ls ior Home s West Inc ........30A Fair mont A uc tion eer Al l ey ........22B Fas t D is tr ibuting ......................27A Fre ude nthal D air y & Mf g Co ....16B Ge hl C o ..................................13B Gr aff I ns ur anc e ........................8A Gre at N or th Show Provi der ......13A Gre g D e inke n ..........................25A Haas E quipme nt ......................26B Hagie Spr aye r s ... .....................19A He ns lin A uc tions ......................19B Holland A uc tion Co ..........23B, 25B I ngalls Hone y I nc ....................22A Jayc ox ............... .....................27B K&S M illw r ights Inc ................10B Ke ith B ode ......... .....................28B Ke ltge ns I nc ..............................3B Kie s te r I mpl ............................31B L & D A g Se r vic e Inc ..............23A Lager’s of Mankato ..................37A L ano E quipme nt ......................32B L ar s on B ros . I mp l ............26B, 35B L e tc he r s Far m Suppl y ................5A L ode r me ie r s ............................34B M ankato I mpl ..... .....................36B M ankato M otor Co ..................34A M ankato Spr ay Cent er Inc ......10A Massey Ferguson........................6A M as s op E le c tr ic ........................27B M ate jc e k I mpl ..........................33B M att M ar ing A uc ti on Co ..........24B M id-A me r ic an A uct i on Co 22B, 24B M idw ay Far m E qui pm ent Inc ....28B

19 B THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Milk Source, LLC Milk Source, LLC ADVERTISING NOTICE: Veterinarian Herd Manager Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make Milk Source is a growing Milk Source is a growing multi-site farming entermulti-site farming enterevery effort to avoid errors prise w/ 18,000 cows & prise w/ 18,000 cows & by checking all copy, but 14,000 heifers. We strive to 10,000 acres. We strive to sometimes errors are provide a safe work enviprovide a safe work envimissed. Therefore, we ask ronment for our employees ronment for our employees that you review your ad for and optimal stewardship to & optimal stewardship to correctness. If you find a the land. We are seeking a the land. We are seeking a mistake, please call (507) Veterinarian. This is an opHerd Manager w/ extraor345-4523 immediately so portunity for a vet to gain dinary leadership skills, that the error can be corexperience & hone their cow health & parlor manrected. We regret that we skills on multiple large agement experience. This cannot be responsible for dairies. The candidate will individual must have more than one week's inwork as a member of the proven large herd leadersertion if the error is not herd team at the dairies. ship experience. This posicalled to our attention. We Duties will also include pertion will oversee day to day cannot be liable for an forming surgeries, pregmanagement of all cow amount greater than the nancy checking, reviewing health, maternity and milkcost of the ad. THE LAND treatment protocols, & reing operations. Milk has the right to edit, reject productive protocols. Milk Source will offer a competior properly classify any ad. Source will offer a competitive salary, full benefits, & Each classified line ad is tive salary, full benefits, & exc opportunity for future separately copyrighted to exc opportunity for future advancement. To apply THE LAND. Reporduction advancement. To apply please contact or send rewithout permission is please contact or send resumes to Ryan Knorr at: strictly prohibited. sumes to Ryan Knorr at: rknorr@milksource.net rknorr@milksource.net

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TRACTORS 4WD

CIH 535 Quad, '10, 800 hrs ..........................................$299,000 CIH 535 Quad, '09 ........................................................$287,500 CIH STX530Q, '06, 2340 hrs ........................................$225,000 CIH 500 Steiger, '11, 405 hrs ........................................$265,500 CIH 485 Steiger, '08, 1560 hrs ......................................$210,000 CIH 430 Steiger, '07, 8100 hrs ......................................$125,000 CIH STX375, '01, 4230 hrs............................................$126,000 CIH STX275, '02, 2875 hrs............................................$125,000 CIH 9390, '97 ..................................................................$88,500 CIH 9380, '97 ..................................................................$79,000 CIH 9380, '97, 4600 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 9370Q, '98, 4690 hrs................................................$99,500 CIH 9270, '91, 4815 hrs ..................................................$72,900 CIH 9170, '89, 7825 hrs ..................................................$56,500 CIH 9150, '88, 6405 hrs ..................................................$45,300 Case 550H, '00, 1675 hrs ................................................$35,500 Challenger MT865B, '06, 3745 hrs ................................$199,500 JD 9400T, '01, 3765 hrs ................................................$109,000 CIH 9380, '96, 8075 hrs ..................................................$65,000 NH T9060, '08, 1440 hrs ..............................................$212,000 NH TJ330, '07................................................................$139,500 Versatile 835, '78, 11,000 hrs..........................................$15,500

TRACTORS 2WD

TRACTORS AWD/MFD Continued

CIH 245 Mag, '10, 945 hrs ............................................$138,900 CIH 245 Mag, '09, 2160 hrs ..........................................$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, '09, 2250 hrs ..........................................$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, '09, 2460 hrs ..........................................$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, '08....................................................................Call CIH 245 Mag, '07, 3145 hrs ..........................................$105,000 CIH 215 Mag, '11, 555 hrs ............................................$135,000 CIH 215 Mag, '11, 695 hrs ............................................$130,000 CIH 215 Mag, '10, 3100 hrs ..........................................$105,000 CIH 215 Mag, '09, 770 hrs ............................................$129,000 CIH 215 Mag, '09, 880 hrs ............................................$129,500 CIH 230 Puma, '11, 130 hrs ..........................................$135,000 CIH 8950, 8725 hrs ........................................................$62,500 CIH 7220, 4940 hrs ........................................................$61,500 CIH 7140, '91 ..................................................................$45,900 CIH 5130, '92, 2170 hrs ..................................................$35,500 CIH 3594, '87, 4210 hrs ..................................................$23,500 CIH 55A, '11, 4 hrs ..........................................................$28,000 Farmall 350........................................................................$3,900 Fendt 818, 4220 hrs ........................................................$79,500 Ford 8970, '95, 5600 hrs ................................................$57,500 Ford 8970, '94, 8140 hrs ................................................$57,500 Ford 8630, '91, 4385 hrs ................................................$26,500 JD 8640, '79, 9315 hrs....................................................$16,900 JD 8400, '97, 3560 hrs....................................................$79,500 JD 7800, '93, 6375 hrs....................................................$55,000 McCormick TTX230, '09, 615 hrs....................................$90,000 McCormick XTX215, '06, 870 hrs....................................$85,000 McCormick XTX165, '09, 260 hrs....................................$84,900 NH 8870, '00, 4145 hrs ..................................................$62,500 NH TC210, '06, 1795 hrs ................................................$94,900

COMPACT TRACTORS / RTV’s

CIH 7110, '91, 7645 hrs ..................................................$32,500 Case 830, '69, 4190 hrs ....................................................$5,000 Farmall H, '41 ....................................................................$1,500 Farmall H ..........................................................................$1,350 IH 986, '77, 8735 hrs ........................................................$9,950 IH 886, '79, 6195 hrs ......................................................$12,500 IH 706, '66, 3700 hrs ........................................................$7,500 IH 656, '72, 2090 hrs ......................................................$10,500 IH H, '41 ............................................................................$1,800 IH M, '49............................................................................$1,500 Allis 7060, '76, 3140 hrs ..................................................$9,900 JD 4030, '75 ......................................................................$9,900

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

TRACTORS AWD/MFD CIH 335 Mag, '11, 50 hrs ..............................................$219,000 (2) CIH 335 Mag, '10 ........................................choice $151,900 CIH 305 Mag, '11, 360 hrs ............................................$194,500 CIH 305 Mag, '11, 1300 hrs ..........................................$167,500 (2) CIH 305 Mag, '10 ........................................choice $182,500 (2) CIH 305 Mag, '10 ........................................choice $151,900 CIH 305 Mag, '09, 1595 hrs ..........................................$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, '09, 2505 hrs ..........................................$162,500 CIH 290 Mag, '11, 180 hrs ............................................$192,500 CIH MX285, '05, 2770 hrs ............................................$126,500 CIH 275 Mag, '11, 600 hrs ............................................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 600 hrs ............................................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 800 hrs ............................................$175,000 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 950 hrs ............................................$155,500 CIH 275 Mag, '09....................................................................Call CIH 275 Mag, '09, 765 hrs ............................................$169,900 CIH 275 Mag, '07, 2220 hrs ..........................................$146,900 CIH MX275, '06, 2020 hrs ............................................$129,500 CIH 245 Mag, '11, 300 hrs ............................................$153,500

CIH 40 Farmall CVT ........................................................$36,250 CIH DX25E, '04, 175 hrs..................................................$13,900 Agco ST 40, '02, 435 hrs ................................................$15,500 JD 4310, '02, 1090 hrs....................................................$21,000 Kubota B2410HSD, '04, 215 hrs......................................$10,500 Kubota BX2360T, '09 ........................................................$8,950 Kubota BX2350TV, '08, 655 hrs ........................................$7,950 Kubota BX2230, '04, 1965 hrs ..........................................$7,750 Kubota BX2200, '01 ..........................................................$8,750 Kubota BX1830, '04 ..........................................................$6,950 Kubota BX1500, '04, 1235 hrs ..........................................$6,100 Kubota L5740HSTC, '10 ..................................................$36,800 Cub Cadet 4x4D Trail, '06, 670 hrs....................................$7,975 Kawasaki Mule, '02, 2670 hrs............................................$5,500 Kubota RTV900R, '08 ........................................................$9,350 Kubota RTV900W, '06, 800 hrs ........................................$9,900 Kubota RTV900, '06, 935 hrs ............................................$7,950 Kubota RTV900W, '04, 830 hrs ........................................$8,200 Steiner Hawk, '00 ..............................................................$3,250

COMBINES Select combines eligible for 18 month waiver, or up to a $2,388 rebate CIH 9120, '11, 290 hrs ..................................................$320,000 CIH 9120T, '10, 655 hrs ................................................$329,000 CIH 9120, '09, 725 hrs ..................................................$289,000 CIH 8120, '11, 260 hrs ..................................................$319,000 CIH 8120, '11, 210 hrs ..................................................$309,000 CIH 8120, '11, 250 hrs ..................................................$309,000 CIH 8120T, '10, 970 hrs ................................................$319,000 CIH 8120, '10, 190 hrs ..................................................$315,000 CIH 8120, '09, 930 hrs ..................................................$253,400 CIH 8120, '09, 1120 hrs ................................................$265,000 CIH 8120, '09, 1265 hrs ................................................$249,500 CIH 8120, '09, 1060 hrs ................................................$260,000 CIH 8010, '07, 1100 hrs ................................................$215,000 CIH 8010, '06, 865 hrs ..................................................$175,000 CIH 8010, '06, 1410 hrs ................................................$191,500 CIH 8010, '06, 1900 hrs ................................................$164,500

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COMBINES Continued

BEAN/CORNHEADS Continued

CIH 8010, '04, 2115 hrs ................................................$139,000 CIH 8010, '04, 2440 hrs ................................................$159,000 CIH 7120, '10, 465 hrs ..................................................$245,000 CIH 7120, '09, 915 hrs ..................................................$252,500 CIH 7088, '11, 585 hrs ..................................................$249,000 CIH 7088, '11, 640 hrs ..................................................$249,000 CIH 7088, '10, 470 hrs ..................................................$245,000 CIH 7088, '10, 810 hrs ..................................................$225,000 CIH 7088, '09, 845 hrs ..................................................$215,000 CIH 7010, '07, 2875 hrs ................................................$155,000 CIH 6088, '11, 470 hrs ..................................................$239,000 CIH 6088, '11, 545 hrs ..................................................$239,000 CIH 6088, '11, 500 hrs ..................................................$239,000 CIH 6088, '10, 450 hrs ..................................................$228,500 CIH 6088, '10, 525 hrs ..................................................$235,000 CIH 6088, '10, 500 hrs ..................................................$225,000 CIH 2588, '07, 1910 hrs ................................................$178,900 CIH 2388, '06, 1440 hrs ..................................$159,500 CIH 2388, '06, 1735 hrs ..................................$157,500 CIH 2388, '05, 2320 hrs ..................................$126,900 CIH 2388, '04, 1270 hrs ..................................$125,000 CIH 2388, '04, 2350 hrs ..................................$133,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2740 hrs ..................................$135,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2415 hrs ..................................$140,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2540 hrs ..................................$117,900 CIH 2388, '03, 2550 hrs ..................................$125,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2760 hrs ..................................$119,900 CIH 2388, '02, 2975 hrs ....................................$99,000 CIH 2388, '01, 2400 hrs ....................................$99,500 CIH 2388, '01, 2580 hrs ..................................$106,500 CIH 2388, '01, 2840 hrs ....................................$99,500 CIH 2388, '01, 3250 hrs ....................................$99,900 CIH 2388, '00, 2000 hrs ..................................$115,000 CIH 2388, '00, 3295 hrs ....................................$86,500 CIH 2388, '98, 3210 hrs ....................................$77,500 CIH 2388, '98, 3250 hrs ....................................$85,700 CIH 2388, '98, 3780 hrs ....................................$82,500 CIH 2366, '02, 3125 hrs ....................................$89,500 CIH 2366, '00, 2810 hrs ....................................$89,500 CIH 2366, '00, 3135 hrs ....................................$89,500 CIH 2366, '99, 3845 hrs ....................................$79,500 CIH 2188, '97, 3800 hrs ..................................................$69,500 CIH 2188, '97, 2365 hrs ..................................................$79,000 CIH 2188, '96, 2950 hrs ..................................................$72,500 CIH 2188, '96, 3045 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 2166, '97, 4150 hrs ..................................................$62,500 CIH 2166, '96, 3250 hrs ..................................................$59,500 CIH 2166, '96, 3430 hrs ..................................................$63,500 CIH 1688, '94, 3305 hrs ..................................................$49,500 CIH 1688, '94, 4160 hrs ..................................................$39,500 CIH 1688, '94, 4325 hrs ..................................................$39,500 CIH 1688, '93, 4560 hrs ..................................................$47,500 CIH 1666, '93, 3180 hrs ..................................................$49,500 CIH 1660, '91, 3255 hrs ..................................................$35,000 CIH 1660, '91, 3650 hrs ..................................................$27,000 CIH 1660, '90, 4360 hrs ..................................................$29,500 CIH 1660, '87, 4605 hrs ..................................................$27,500 CIH 1440............................................................................$5,900 Gleaner R62, '98, 3265 hrs..............................................$57,900 JD 9870STS, '09, 830 hrs ............................................$275,000 JD 9870, '09, 1100 hrs..................................................$256,000 JD 9770S, '08, 890 hrs..................................................$217,000 JD 9660, '07, 1805 hrs..................................................$169,500 JD 9660STS, '04, 2115 hrs ..........................................$149,000 JD 9610, '96, 3265 hrs....................................................$62,500 JD 9500, '89, 4520 hrs....................................................$37,950 JD 9400, '97, 3250 hrs....................................................$44,500 JD 9400, '91, 4720 hrs....................................................$35,950 MF 8570, '95 ..................................................................$41,900 MF 750, '77 ......................................................................$3,500 NH TR97, '95, 3955 hrs ..................................................$29,500 NH TR86, '89, 3860 hrs ..................................................$18,500 NH TR86, '85, 3245 hrs ....................................................$9,900 NH 970, '03, 2020 hrs ..................................................$139,000

Macdon 974, 35' Beanhead ............................................$45,000 Macdon 30' Beanhead ....................................................$41,500 MF 9750, 25' Beanhead ....................................................$7,000 NH 960 Beanhead ..............................................................$1,400 (3) CIH 2612 Cornhead..................................$77,000 & $82,300 (3) CIH 2608 Cornhead ..................................$52,900 - $65,000 CIH 2606 Cornhead ........................................................$44,500 (9) CIH 2208 Cornhead ..................................$26,500 - $35,500 (2) CIH 2206 Cornhead..................................$24,500 & $30,000 (2) CIH 1222 Cornhead..................................$12,500 & $16,900 (12) CIH 1083 Cornhead ..................................starting at $9,500 (5) CIH 1063 Cornhead ....................................starting at $9,500 CIH 1000, 1R222 Cornhead ............................................$15,750 CIH 9R22 Cornhead ........................................................$15,000 IH 12R22 Cornhead ........................................................$15,500 IH 983, 9R22 Cornhead ..................................................$10,500 IH 963, 6R30 Cornhead ....................................................$7,950 IH 883 Cornhead................................................................$3,500 (3) IH 863 Cornhead ..........................................$2,750 - $4,500 Cat 1622 Cornhead ..........................................................$29,500 Cressoni 6R30 Cornhead ................................................$21,500 Drago 18R22 Cornhead ................................................$135,000 (6) Drago 12R22 Cornhead............................$49,500 & $85,000 (2) Drago 12R20 Cornhead ............................................$84,500 Drago 10R30 Cornhead ..................................................$65,500 (3) Drago 10R22 Cornhead ............................$39,500 - $65,500 (15) Drago 8R30 Cornhead ............................$29,500 - $57,500 (2) Drago 8R22 Cornhead..............................$33,000 & $44,900 (3) Drago 6R30 Cornhead ..............................$41,500 - $50,000 Geringhoff 1222 Cornhead ..............................................$69,500 Geringhoff 8R30 Cornhead ..............................................$29,900 (4) Geringhoff Roto Disc ................................$29,900 - $46,000 Gleaner 3000, 6R30 Cornhead ........................................$16,000 Harvestec 4306C Cornhead ............................................$34,000 (4) Harvestec 8R30 Cornhead ........................$25,000 - $39,500 Harvestec 6R30 Cornhead ..............................................$15,900 JD 1293, 12R30 Cornhead ..............................................$45,500 JD 10R22 Cornhead ..........................................................$8,500 (5) JD 893, 8R30 Cornhead ............................$14,500 - $33,000 JD 843 10R22 Cornhead ................................................$12,500 JD 843, 8R30 Cornhead ....................................................$7,500 JD 843, 8R22 Cornhead ..................................................$10,000 (2) JD 643, 6R30 Cornhead ..............................$5,500 & $6,500 Lexion C512R30 Cornhead ..............................................$38,000 NH 962 Cornhead ..............................................................$1,400 IH 810 Platform ................................................................$1,500 JD Platform........................................................................$1,500 Homemade 30' Head Transport ............................................$900 Homemade 4 Wheel Head Transport ................................$1,000 P & K 30' Head Transport..................................................$3,995 Walco CHC30, 30' Head Transport ....................................$2,500

BEAN/CORNHEADS CIH 2162, 35' Beanhead ..................................................$59,900 (2) CIH 2062, 36' Beanhead ..........................$45,000 & $48,000 CIH 2062, 30' Beanhead ..................................................$39,500 (4) CIH 2020, 35' Beanhead............................$27,900 - $32,500 (6) CIH 2020, 30' Beanhead............................$19,500 - $33,500 (3) CIH 2020, 25' Beanhead..........................$$18,900 - $23,000 CIH 2020, 20' Beanhead ..................................................$24,000 (29) CIH 1020, 30' Beanhead ..........................Starting at $2,000 (21) CIH 1020, 25' Beanhead ..........................Starting at $5,500 (3) CIH 1020, 22.5' Beanhead ............................$4,950 - $9,700 (4) CIH 1020, 20' Beanhead............................$10,500 - $15,500 CIH 1020, 15' Cornhead ....................................................$8,500 CIH 920 Beanhead ............................................................$3,500 Gleaner 800, 25' Beanhead..............................................$16,000 (4) JD 930F, 30' Beanhead ................................$9,550 - $11,900 (2) JD 920, 20' Beanhead ..................................$5,500 & $5,900 (3) JD 635F, 35' Beanhead ..............................$32,000 - $34,500 JD 630F Beanhead ..........................................................$36,900

FALL TILLAGE (7) CIH 870, 22' Subsoiler ..............................$59,000 - $75,000 (4) CIH 870, 18' Subsoiler ..............................$43,500 - $57,500 (4) CIH MRX690 Suboiler ..............................$20,900 - $28,500 (5) CIH 9300, 22.5' Subsoiler ........................$24,500 - $45,000 (2) CIH 9300, 9 Shank Subsoiler ..................$36,000 & $36,500 (7) CIH 730B Subsoiler ..................................$17,500 - $26,000 (3) CIH 730C, 17.5' Subsoiler ........................$35,000 - $41,500 (4) CIH 730C, 7 Shank Subsoiler ....................$34,900 - $39,900 (2) CIH 730B, 7 Shank Subsoiler ..................$22,500 & $24,000 IH 11, 9 Shank Subsoiler ..................................................$1,950 DMI 9300, 22' Subsoiler..................................................$29,500 DMI 2500, 4 Shank Subsoiler............................................$6,950 DMI 730B Subsoiler ........................................................$17,500 (4) DMI 730B, 17.5' Subsoiler ........................$15,000 - $19,500 (3) DMI 730B, 7 Shank Suboiler ....................$17,000 - $19,500 (3) DMI 730, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......................$7,500 - $12,900 DMI 530B, 12.5' Subsoiler ..............................................$16,900 DMI 530, 12.5' Subsoiler ................................................$15,500 DMI 530, 5 Shank Subsoiler............................................$13,500 (2) DMI CCII, 11.5' Subsoiler ............................$5,250 & $7,750 (2) DMI Tiger II Subsoiler..................................$2,400 & $7,950 Bourgault 2200, 30' Subsoiler ........................................$92,400 (14) JD 2700 Subsoiler ..................................$21,500 - $38,000 JD 960 Subsoiler ..............................................................$6,500 (2) JD 512, 22.5' Subsoiler ..................................choice $49,500 (3) JD 512, 22' Subsoiler................................$40,000 - $46,500 (2) JD 512, 17.5' Subsoiler ..........................$17,000 & $25,500 (3) JD 512, 9 Shank Subsoiler ........................$23,900 - $27,750 JD 510, 7 Shank Subsoiler ..............................................$10,500 Krause 4850, 18' Subsoiler ............................................$43,500 Landoll 2320, 5 Shank Subsoiler ....................................$15,950 M & W 2900 Subsoiler ....................................................$14,900 M & W 2200 Subsoiler ....................................................$14,900 M & W 1875, 17.5' Subsoiler ..........................................$12,900 M & W 1860, 9 Shank Subsoiler ......................................$9,300 M & W 1465, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......................................$6,500 NH ST770, 17.5' Subsoiler ..............................................$22,500 Sunflower 4412, 7 Shank Subsoiler ................................$29,500 (6) Wilrich V957DDR Subsoiler ......................$23,500 - $33,900 Wilrich 6600 Subsoiler ......................................................$8,500 IH 4700, 30' Chisel Plow ..................................................$3,950

FALL TILLAGE Continue

White 423 Chisel Plow ......................................... CIH 800, 9x18 MB Plow ....................................... CIH 710 MB Plow ................................................. IH 710 MB Plow ................................................... IH 700, 7x18 MB Plow ......................................... JD 3710, 9 Bottom MB Plow ............................... JD 3600, 6x18 MB Plow ....................................... JD 726, 34' Combo Mulch ................................... Sunflower 6432, 30' Combo Mulch ..................... DMI 40' Crumbler ................................................. Flexicoil 75, 45' Crumbler..................................... NH SG110, 45' Crumbler ..................................... Summers 44' Coil Crumbler ................................. Unverferth 1225, 33' Crumbler.............................

SELF PROP. FORAGE HARVE

Chase Groskreutz, East - (320) 2 Randy Olmscheid, West - (320) 5

Claas 980, '10, 645 hrs......................................... Claas 980, '10....................................................... Claas 980, '09, 1135 hrs....................................... Claas 980, '08....................................................... Claas 980, '08, 1495 hrs....................................... Claas 970, '08, 1040 hrs....................................... Claas 900, '09, 1625 hrs....................................... Claas 900, '07, 1935 hrs....................................... Claas 900, '07, 2430 hrs....................................... Claas 900, '03, 2275 hrs....................................... Claas 890, '04, 2865 hrs....................................... Claas 890, '02....................................................... Claas 890, '02, 2555 hrs....................................... Claas 870 GE, '06, 1585 hrs ................................. Claas 870 GE, '06, 2590 hrs ................................. Claas 870, '03, 2790 hrs....................................... Claas 860, '98, 5205 hrs....................................... JD 7550, '08 ......................................................... JD 6850, '01, 2360 hrs......................................... JD 6810, '96, 4590 hrs......................................... JD 5400, 2660 hrs ............................................... NH FX60, '03, 1970 hrs ....................................... NH FX58, '02, 1410 hrs .......................................

FORAGE

Gehl CB1285 PT Forg Harv................................... Gehl CB1275 PT Forg Harv................................... Gehl CB1265 PT Forg Harv................................... Gehl 1075 PT Forg Harv ....................................... NH FP240 Forg Harv............................................. IH 830 PT Forg Harv............................................. (8) Claas PU380HD Hayhead ..........................$13 (3) Claas PU380 Pro Hayhead ........................$23 (8) Claas PU380 Hayhead ..............................$12 Claas PU300 Hayhead........................................... (4) Gehl HA1210 7' Hayhead................................. Gehl HA1110, '95 Hayhead .................................. Gehl 7' Hayhead.................................................... JD 640B Hayhead ................................................. JD 630A Hayhead ................................................. JD 630 Hayhead ................................................... JD 10' Hayhead..................................................... JD 7' Hayhead ...................................................... JD 5HP, 5.5' Hayhead .......................................... NH 3500 Hayhead................................................. NH 355W Hayhead ............................................... NH 340W Hayhead ............................................... NH 29P Hayhead................................................... (3) Claas Orbis 900 Cornhead ....................$110,0 (3) Claas Orbis 750 Cornhead ........................$76 (4) Claas Orbis 600 Cornhead ........................$65 (10) Claas RU600, 8R30 Cornhead ................$24 (3) Claas RU450XTRA Cornhead ....................$42 (10) Claas RU450 Cornhead............................$28 (3) Gehl TR330 Cornhead ..................................$ (2) JD 688 Cornhead ....................................$28, JD 686 Cornhead ................................................. JD 676 Cornhead ................................................. JD 666, 6R30 Cornhead ....................................... JD 3R30 Cornhead ............................................... Kemper 4500 Cornhead ....................................... Kemper 3000 Cornhead ....................................... NH 3PN Cornhead................................................. (2) NH R1600 Cornhead ................................$39,

HAY EQUIPMENT

CIH 8830, '96, 1430 hrs ....................................... Versatile 400, '76 ................................................. CIH DHX181 Windrower Head ............................. CIH DC515, 15' Mow Cond................................... (2) CIH 8360, 12' MowCond..............................$4 CIH 8340, 9' MowCond ....................................... (2) CIH 8312, 12' MowCond ..........................$9,5 CIH DCX161 MowCond.........................................

WILLMAR, MN • 320-235-4898

ettengel

515

ST. MARTIN, MN • 320-548-3285 Sales: • Dan Hoffman • Joe Mehr • Erik Mueller • Randy Olmscheid • Jamie Pelzer

www.arnoldsinc.com

ALDEN, MN • 507-874-3400

for more used equipment listings

Sales: • Brad Wermedal • Tim Wiersma • Tim Engebretson

d ...........$1,500 .........$10,500 ...........$1,500 ...........$1,300 ...........$7,000 .........$22,000 ...........$5,000 .........$29,500 .........$18,800 .........$10,900 .........$10,900 .........$16,900 .........$16,500 .........$15,900

STERS

48-3733 583-6014

.........$15,900 ...........$2,800 .........$20,000 ...........$9,500 900 & $6,900 ...........$7,950 00 & $ 11,500 .........$20,500

SKID LDR’s / EXC Continued Gehl 4825SX, '98, 5640 hrs ..............................................$8,500 Gehl 4640E, '06, 2705 hrs ..............................................$15,000 Gehl 3825 ..........................................................................$9,500 Gehl SL3410, '90 ..............................................................$5,000 JD 328, '05, 5180 hrs......................................................$19,500 JD 320, 2210 hrs ............................................................$19,900 NH LS170, '02, 2765 hrs ................................................$16,900 Kubota U35SS, '05, 140 hrs ............................................$28,000

SPRAYERS - SELF-PROPELLED Rudy Lusk - (507) 227-4119 CIH 4420, '09, 1320 hrs ................................................$175,000 CIH 4420, '09, 1560 hrs ................................................$175,000 CIH SPX4260, '99............................................................$85,000 Hagie 2100, '01, 2600 hrs ..............................................$73,000 Hagie STS-14, '10..........................................................$218,000 Rogator 854, '01..............................................................$83,500 Rogator 854, '97, 4475 hrs ............................................$44,000 Tyler Patriot XL, '94, 4360 hrs ........................................$37,900 Walker 44, '99, 2050 hrs ................................................$49,500

SPRAYERS - PULL-TYPE Ag Chem 1000 ................................................................$13,500 Ag Chem 750 ....................................................................$8,900 (2) Demco Conquest......................................$18,900 & $19,500 DMI 2800 ........................................................................$17,500 Fast 9512E, 80'................................................................$32,700 Hardi NM550, 60' ............................................................$12,500 Hardi 500, 60'....................................................................$7,900 L & D Land Pro..................................................................$8,900 Redball 690......................................................................$36,500 Redball 690, 2000 Gal ....................................................$29,500 Redball 670, 1200 Gal ....................................................$21,500 Redball 650, 400 Gal ........................................................$8,500 Redball 565......................................................................$15,500 Top Air 1600, 120' ..........................................................$52,000 Top Air 500, 45' ................................................................$3,800

SKID LOADERS / EXCAVATORS Case SR250, '12, 2 hrs....................................................$42,500 Case 1845B, '92, 5550 hrs ................................................$7,400 Case 1845C, '00 ..............................................................$14,900 Case 1845C, '96, 7080 hrs ..............................................$10,000 Case 1845C, '90, 2240 hrs ..............................................$12,500 Case 1840, '99, 5960 hrs ..................................................$9,975 Case 1840, '95, 4395 hrs ................................................$10,500 Case 1840, '91, 6355 hrs ..................................................$9,850 Case 1840, '89, 2495 hrs ................................................$10,900 Case 1840, '89, 3350 hrs ..................................................$9,900 Case 1840, 4400 hrs..........................................................$9,750 Case 1840, 4855 hrs..........................................................$9,500 Case 1830..........................................................................$3,500 Case 1825, '89, 4000 hrs ..................................................$5,500 Case 435, '07, 1050 hrs ..................................................$20,900 Case 430, '06, 2105 hrs ..................................................$17,900 Case 430, '06, 3905 hrs ..................................................$22,000 Case 430, '05, 3720 hrs ..................................................$17,900 Case 420, '06, 600 hrs ....................................................$21,000 Case 40XT, '02, 1735 hrs ................................................$15,900 Bobcat S650, '11, 275 hrs ......................................................Call Bobcat 863C, '97, 2140 hrs ............................................$13,900 Bobcat 743, '88, 3820 hrs ................................................$7,250 Cat 257B, 2705 hrs..........................................................$22,500 Gehl 7800, '01, 6395 hrs ................................................$18,500 Gehl 7810 Turbo, '04, 3350 hrs ......................................$34,500 Gehl 5640E, '07, 1915 hrs ..............................................$19,900 Gehl 5240E, '10, 380 hrs ................................................$27,500 Gehl 5420E, '08, 400 hrs ................................................$27,500

PLANTING & SEEDING

CIH 1260, 36R22 ..........................................................$185,000 (2) CIH 1250, 24R30 ................................$113,900 & $121,000 CIH 1250, 16R30 ..........................................................$105,000 (3) CIH 1200, 24R22 .................................... $39,900 - $66,900 (3) CIH 1200, 12R30 ......................................$48,500 - $52,500 CIH 1200, 12R23 ............................................................$65,300 CIH 955SRC, 8R13 ..........................................................$19,500 CIH 950, 16R22 ..............................................................$15,900 (2) CIH 900, 12R30 ................................................choice $6,500 IH 800, 16R30 ..................................................................$8,950 IH 800, 12R30 ..................................................................$3,900 (2) JD 7300, 18R22 ......................................$17,500 & $18,000 JD 7300, 12R30 ..............................................................$12,500 JD 7100, 12R30 ................................................................$6,500 JD 1770, 16R30 ..............................................................$65,500 JD 1770, 16R30 ..............................................................$46,300 JD 1760, 12R30 ..............................................................$46,500 White 8524, 24R30........................................................$109,900 White 6100, 24R22..........................................................$24,500 CIH 5400MT, 20' Drill ........................................................$6,950 IH 510 Drill ........................................................................$1,500 (3) Great Plains 20' Drill ....................................$4,500 - $5,500 JD 750NT, 15' Drill ..........................................................$15,000 JD 520, 20' Drill ................................................................$4,500 JD 455, 30' Drill ..............................................................$21,900 CIH SDX40, 40' Seeder..................................................$129,500

SPRING TILLAGE (3) CIH TM 200, 60.5' Fld Cult ............................choice $67,500 CIH TM 200, 50.5' Fld Cult ..............................................$57,900 (2) CIH TM 200, 48.5' Fld Cult ......................$41,250 & $55,000 CIH TM 200, 40.5' ACS Fld Cult ......................................$58,950 CIH TMII, 60.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$57,500 (2) CIH TMII, 50.5' Fld Cult ..........................$46,750 & $57,500 CIH TMII, 48.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$39,500 (2) CIH TMII, 44.5' Fld Cult ..........................$34,500 & $39,500 CIH TMII, 36' Fld Cult ......................................................$34,500 CIH TMII, 30.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$26,500 CIH 4900, 40' Fld Cult ......................................................$7,000 CIH 4300, 37.5' Fld Cult ....................................................$7,500 IH 4600, 31' Fld Cult..........................................................$4,500 DMI TMII, 36.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$26,900 DMI TMII, 32.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$22,900 (2) DMI TM, 44.5' Fld Cult ............................$11,500 & $12,500 Brent 28.5' Fld Cult..........................................................$15,500 Brillion HFCT, 36.5' Fld Cult ..............................................$9,750 Flexcoil 820, 40' Fld Cult ................................................$11,500 (2) JD 2210, 64.5' Fld Cult ............................$49,500 & $61,500 JD 2210, 34' Fld Cult ......................................................$35,000 JD 985, 60' Fld Cult ......................................................$345,000 JD 985, 48.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$15,500 (4) JD 980, 44.5' Fld Cult................................$13,500 - $17,950 (2) JD 980, 36.5' Fld Cult ..............................$14,500 & $16,900 JD 980, 29.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$16,750 JD 960, 32.5' Fld Cult ........................................................$5,995 JD 726, 38' Fld Cult ........................................................$27,500 Sunflower 5053, 39' Fld Cult ..........................................$19,900 Wilrich 2500, 27.4' Fld Cult ..............................................$1,950 CIH RMX340, '03 ............................................................$29,500 CIH 3900, 33' Disk ..........................................................$14,900 CIH 370, 31' Disk ............................................................$52,500 CIH 330, 34' Disk ............................................................$54,500 White 271, 22' Disk ..........................................................$5,995 Wishek 862NT, 26' Disk ..................................................$29,900

TEC

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

.........$19,500 .........$16,500 ...........$7,500 ...........$9,500 .........$23,000 ...........$2,895 500 - $15,000 000 - $24,500 500 - $14,500 ...........$9,500 $500 - $1,850 ..............$500 ..............$500 .........$15,000 ...........$8,500 ...........$8,500 ...........$4,900 ..............$800 ..............$400 ...........$6,500 ...........$8,500 ...........$5,000 ...........$3,500 00 - $111,000 000 - $79,000 000 - $68,000 500 - $59,000 000 - $46,000 000 - $48,000 2,600 - $5,500 000 & $51,500 .........$27,900 .........$52,000 .........$12,500 ...........$2,600 .........$29,500 .........$22,000 ...........$8,500 00 & $42,500

HAY EQUIPMENT Continued CIH SC412 MowCond ........................................................$7,900 (2) Claas 8550C MowCond ............................$36,500 & $42,500 Claas 8400RC MowCond ................................................$55,000 Hesston 1160, 14' MowCond ............................................$5,350 JD Moco 946 MowCond ..................................................$29,500 JD 1600, 14' MowCond ....................................................$6,995 JD 945, 13' MowCond ....................................................$15,000 NH 1475 MowCond ..........................................................$7,500 NH 1441, 16' PT Windrower............................................$21,500 (2) NH 116, 14' MowCond ................................$5,900 & $6,500 Vermeer 1030, 13.5' MowCond ......................................$18,500 Fransgard 240, 8' Disc Mower ..........................................$4,200 Kuhn GMD55 Disc Mower ................................................$3,900 IH 120, 7' Sickle Mower ......................................................$795 NH 455, 7' Sickle Mower ..................................................$1,750 CIH FC60, 60" Rotary Mower ................................................$550 Landpride FDR2584 Rotary Mower ..................................$2,750 Woods RD7200D Rotary Mower ......................................$1,895 H & S TWM9 Wind Merg ................................................$26,500 H & S TWN2-P Wind Merg..............................................$22,500 (2) Millerpro 310............................................$65,000 & $67,000 (3) Millerpro 14-16 Wind Merg .................... $28,500 - $35,800 NH H5410, 9' Wind Merg ................................................$17,900 NH 166 Wind Merg............................................................$3,750 NH 144 Wind Merg............................................................$2,000 Victor 245 Wind Merg ....................................................$34,800 Kuhn GA8521 Rake..........................................................$23,500 Kuhn GA7301 Rake..........................................................$14,500

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

.......$335,000 .......$335,000 .......$275,000 .......$275,000 .......$255,000 .......$279,000 .......$242,000 .......$175,000 .......$180,000 .......$168,000 .......$154,000 .......$158,500 .......$147,000 .......$189,000 .......$184,500 .......$162,000 .........$82,000 .......$235,000 .........$92,000 .........$59,500 .........$24,000 .......$115,000 .......$108,000

Visit Our Website:

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Sales: • Bob Pfingston • Nate Scharmer • Brian Lingle • Christy Hoff • Bob Lindahl • Tim Hansen • Jeff Ruprecht

21 B

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATE-WIDE We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

1-800-828-6642

LARGE FARM ESTATE AUCTION FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2012 11:00 AM EXIT INTERSTATE 94 AT FREEPORT, MN THEN 5 MILES SOUTH ON COUNTY TAR #11 THEN 2 & 1/4 MILES WEST ON COUNTY TAR #176

EXCELLENT LINE OF CLEAN WELL MAINTAINED FARM EQUIPMENT, MOST SHEDDED ‘97 JD 7410 MFWD, QUAD, 38” RUBBER, BAND DUALS, ONLY 5325 HRS ‘92 JD 4455 MFWD, P SHIFT, 42” RUBBER, HUB DUALS, ONLY 4986 ONE OWNER HOURS ‘71 JD 3020 GAS, ROPS, 3 PT, WF, SIDE CONSOLE, SHOWS 3995 HRS JD 620 GAS, FENDERS, NF, NICE METAL ‘82 JD 6620 TURBO - HYDRO DIESEL COMIBNE, 5500 HRS, JD 643 6RN CH, JD 216 BEAN HEAD JD 450 12’ END WHEEL DRILL, GRASS, 6” SPACINGS JD 7000 6RN PLANTER, DF JD 960 24’ FIELD CULT. JD 215 16’ DURA-CUSHION DISC CASE IH 6500 9 SHANK DISC CHISEL JD 535 ROUND BALER JD #127 STALK CHOPPER, LIKE NEW WHITE 598 5 BOTTOM VARIABLE WIDTH PLOW PEERLESS 610 MILL-N-MIX ROLLER MIXER, LIKE NEW JD 3950 FORAGE HARVESTER, 2RN CH, HH PARKER 2600 GRAVITY BOX AND HD GEAR H&S 310 TANDEM AXLE MANURE SPREADER PLUS FULL LINE OF SHARP FARM EQUPMENT 8200 BUSHEL BIN WITH SUKUP GAS DRYER FAN TOOLS, COLLECTIBLES, FARM MISC.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

For complete brochure ph. 320-352-3803 or www.midamericanauctioninc.com

MRS. GILES (DICK) BARB RIELAND, OWNER FOR MORE INFO PH. BRIAN RIELAND 320-980-2037 AL WESSEL - LIC. #77-60 • PH. 320-547-2206 KEVIN WINTER - LIC. #77-18 • PH. 320-760-1593 AUCTIONEERS

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC

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EARLY SPRING CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

SAT., MARCH 3rd • 9:30 AM • RACINE, MN LOCATED: 15 miles So. of Rochester, MN on Hwy. 63

Tractors, Loaders, Field Cults., Disks, Plows, Planters, Sprayers, Hay Equipment, Mills, Spreaders, All Types Of Farm Equipment & Misc., Plus Lawn Tractors, Hay, Round Corn Stalk Bales, & Much More Open Monday - Friday from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm & also Saturday, February 25th from 9:00 am to Noon Consignments welcome sale morning View full listing, photos, & late consignments on our website at: suessauction.com OR at midwestauction.com

SUESS AUCTION & IMPLEMENT 19 FIRST STREET NE, RACINE, MN 55967

507-378-2222

www.suessauction.com

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Milk Source, LLC Crop Manager Milk Source is a growing multi-site farming enterprise w/ 18,000 cows & 10,000 acres. We strive to provide a safe work environment for our employees and optimal stewardship to the land. We are seeking a Crop Manager to oversee a 11,000 acre enterprise. This individual must have superior knowledge of large scale crop production & input purchasing. Milk Source will offer a competitive salary, full benefits, & exc opportunity for future advancement. To apply please contact or send resumes to Ryan Knorr at rknorr@milksource.net Real Estate

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Notice of Farm Sale: 105A in Blue Earth County, 91A tillable, 35A +/- in NW ¼, 70A +/- in SW ¼, Section 18 T105N, R26W, Mapleton Twp to be sold by sealed bid/private auction. Bid deadline 3:30pm Feb 17, 2012. For info contact Steve Gleason US Bank Rochester MN 507-285-7924

Real Estate

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We have extensive lists of Land Investors & farm buyers throughout MN. We always have interested buyers. For top prices, go with our proven methods over thousands of acres. Serving Minnesota Mages Land Co & Auc Serv www.magesland.com 800-803-8761 Real Estate Wanted

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New oak flatbeds, bunks, green chop boxes. Cedar lawn furniture. 715-269-5258. NH 499 haybine, good cond., $5,000. 612-247-0297 NH BB940A baler, tandem, accumulator, applicator; NH 2550 windrower, 14' head; Vermeer R23A rake; 2 Brillion SS12 drills w/grass. 320-394-2103 Eves. or 320-394-2243 Days. Material Handling

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'03 NH 195 spreader, upper beater, slop gate, 425 tires, always shedded, exc. cond., Mpls Moline corn sheller, al$12,500. 507-828-4155 ways shedded, $115, Antique Power Case Tractor magazines, mid 90's, 2009. Bins & Buildings 033 Zimmerman MN 763-856-2950 (2) 20,000 bu bins; (2) 20,000 bu bins w/ floors & Oliver 88 Super diesel, 3 pt. 8” unloads, (2) 12,000 bu hitch, good tires, runs good, bins, (1) 9,000 bu bin w/ $2,000 OBO; '77 Ford 250, floor & 8” unload, (1) 24' 4x4, restored in & out, steel bin floor, (3) 18' bin flatbed, tires like new, runs floors. All bins down & good, $2,000; Cushman golf ready to load 507-697-6133 cart, 3 whl, looks good, runs good, $500. 320-269-2903 Hanson 18' ring drive; Van Dale 16' surface drive silo Pull type Road Grader unloaders; Loyal 9" x 24" (Road Patrol), $500. feed elevator; NH 60 blow712-297-7951 er, all very good condition. (608)487-6121 Pull type Road Grader (Road Patrol), $400. 712Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 297-7951 100% financing w/no liens or red tape, call Steve at WANTED: Old gas pump. Fairfax Ag for an appoint608-884-6855 or leave message ment. 888-830-7757 Hay & Forage Equip 031

paulkrueger@edinarealty.com

FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 and 6000 series forage harvesters. Used kernel proAntiques & Collectibles 026 cessors, also, used JD 40 1979 Pontiac Trans Am. 403 knife Dura-Drums, and V8, automatic, power windrum conversions for 5400 dows, AC. 86,000 miles. and 5460. Call (507)427-3520 (715)896-1050. www.ok-enterprises.com (952)447-4700

Steffes Auction Calendar 2012 For More info Call 1-800-726-8609 or visit our website: www.steffesauctioneers.com Opening February 7 & Closing February 21: IQBID Kibble Equipment Inc., Montevideo, MN, Late Model Farm Equipment Thursday, February 16 @ 10 AM: Richland County Farmland Auction, Mooreton, ND, SW1/4 Section 2 in Danton Twp. Opening March 1 & Closing March 8: IQBID Tri-State March Consignment Event. Advertise now to sell your excess equipment! Advertising Deadline: February 15 Wednesday, March 14 @ 10 AM: AgIron 60 Consignment Event, Red River Valley Fairgrounds, West Fargo, ND. Advertising Deadline: February 15

Wednesday, April 4 @ 10 AM: CS Dubois Construction Inc., West Fargo, ND, Business Realignment

Bidding Opens Friday, February 17 @ 12:00 P.M. and Begins to Close @ 6:00 P.M. Wednesday, February 29, 2012 2003 IH 9400 Eagle semi tractor 1992 Cornhusker 42’ semi grain hopper trailer C-IH 4300, 32.5’ field cultivator Oliver Super 88 tractor w/loader JD #714, 21’ disk chisel JD 750 drill Wilrich 6600 disk ripper Fast #1000, 60’ sprayer, 3 pt. boom Top Air 1000 gal. pull between sprayer trailer Feterl 8”x71’ direct drive PTO auger w/hyd. lift JD 7100, 8R36” or 16R18” planter Parker gravity wagon w/Dakon running gear Tye 20’ 3 pt. drill Truck auger, 6”x25’ 1996 Ford F-150 XL 2WD pickup 1993 Ford F-150 4x4 pickup Bumper hitch 6”x10’ flatbed trailer Schweiss 8’ 3 pt. snowblower Tee-Jet 844 controller 1988 JD LT 166 tractor lawn mower JD 826 walk behind snowblower Agri-Fab 36’ pull behind tiller Portable hog chute Pax 4 ton bulk bin Assorted 8’ to 16’ tube cattle & hog gates Several poly livestock water tanks 250 gal. poly tank Contractor air compressor LB White heater Large amount of City Surplus Equipment & Supplies MANY additional items

For More Information Contact:

Tuesday, April 10 @ 10 AM: Ken & Ted Weshnevski, Tower City, ND, Farm Auction

Curt Bargfrede - Internet Sale Manager @ 507-841-1709 or Dan Pike #32-11-010 Jackson, MN - 507-847-3468

Thursday, April 12 @ 11 AM: Cedar Bend Farms, Warroad, MN, Farm Auction

Sale Conducted By:

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FOR SALE: '01 DMC 1700 5” FOR SALE: (2) Kansun 10- FOR SALE: HandlAir Grain FOR SALE: JD Model 500 25-215 grain dryers, 3 Air System, new 40hp 3 Grain Cart. Exc. condition. Vac, used very little, like phase, stainless steel phase motor in '09, new 715-896-1050. new cond, $5,000/OBO; Van screens, $22,000/ea. Sudenblower in '10, 6 hole distribDale 24' silo unloader, FOR SALE:Used grain bins, ga 42' 3,000 bph Grain Leg, utor, lots of pipe, elbows, $500/OBO. JD Heavy offset floors unload systems, sti8 yrs old, $8,000. Batco 1800 deadhead, & connectors. cast wheels, 38”, rators, fans & heaters, aerseries portable drive over 507-380-1947 $1,000/OBO. 651-983-4741 ation fans, buying or sellpit, hyd drive, used 1 yr, FOR SALE: '09 Brock super ing, try me first and also $13,000. air, 5” air system, 40hp, 3 320-583-8465 or 320-562-2178 call for very competitive FOR SALE: Like New phase, 600 hrs, 300' of pipe contract rates! Office Brent 472 grain cart, late & a 6 hole distributor, FOR SALE: Grain bins, 30', hours 8am-5pm Monday – model, low use, shedded. Friday Saturday 9am - 12 many elbows & deadheads. Asking $14,500. Call 24', 18'; 1500 bu. hopper noon or call 507-697-6133 $23,500/OBO. 507-215-0957 Chris at 507-383-2303 or bin; aeration fans; 10” inAsk for Gary Bruce at 507-383-2190 cline unload augers; sweep For Sale: '89 Super B Grain augers; exc. cond. Best ofWestfield Augers, New: Dryer, Model SE 1000c, fer. 507-427-2197 or 507-22710-61...... $8,199 DMC Calc-u-dri, 440 volt 3 FOR SALE: Used 80' Suden0491 phase, natural gas. 10-71...... $8,799 ga grain leg, 2500bph, used Cal 320-238-2188 All sizes available. very little, $12,500/OBO. Ask for Mark or Doug Call Mike 507-848-6268 507-215-0957

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“YOUR #1 AUCTION PROFESSIONALS”

259.17 Acres Farmland 5-Acre Building Site - Steele County Thursday, February 23 2012 • 12 Noon AUCTION LOCATION: Eagle Club, 141 Rose St. East, Owatonna, MN PROPERTY LOCATION: From Medford, MN, four miles ease on Steele Cty. 12 or 69th St. N.E. WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS! Auctioneer’s Note: I would like to thank everybody for the interest in the Parrish land auction. For many years, Lloyd and Ellouise have taken great pride in their farming operation. If you’re in the market for some of Steele County’s productive farmland or looking for that country living building site, you’ll want to be sure to attend this auction. Col. Tracy Holland

• 183.24 ACRES STEEL COUNTY’S PRODUCTIVE FARMLAND • 75.93 ACRES STEELE COUNTY’S PRODUCTIVE FARMLAND/HUNTING LAND • 5-ACRE BUILDING SITE WITH 2+ BEDROOM HOME Real Estate: Parcel 1: consisting of 75.93 acres, more or less, of Steele County’s farmland/hunting, Merton Township, Section 7. Tillable acres 47.6, crop productivity index (CPI) 79.2. There are currently approximately 13.7 acres enrolled in the CRP program on this parcel until 9-30-12 with average payment of $120 per acre. The remaining acres are mostly mature woodland with a beautiful winding river. Wildlife lovers, you’ll want to take a look at this one. Parcel 2: Consisting of 183.24 acres, more or less, of Steele County’s productive farmland, Merton Township, Section 7. Tillable acres 176.2, crop productivity index (CPI) 89. there are 22.9 acres on the west line of this parcel enrolled in a CRP contract with total payment of $3,067 per year until 2018. There will also be approximately 10 acres of CRP on this parcel, located on the north-west end with a contract to expire on 9-30-12 with an approximate average of $120 per acre payment. Parcel 3: Consisting of a 2+ bedroom home on five acres, more or less, kitchen, living & dining rooms, 11⁄2 baths, main floor utility, partial finished basement with family room, central air, vaulted ceiling in living room, patio door to large deck of the rear of house overlooking your own pond, submersible well, steel siding, attached single car garage with opener, located on a blacktop road. There are approximately three acres tillable on this parcel. FOR COLOR AERIAL, SOIL & TILE MAPS GO TO WWW.HOLLANDAUCTION.COM OR FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL HOLLAND AUCTION AT (507) 684-2955 OR (507) 456-5128 INFORMATION FROM STEELE COUNTY FSA AND SWCD OFFICES ARE THE COMBINATION OF ALL THREE PARCELS. CORN BASE 141, CORN DIRECT + CC YIELD 121, SOYBEAN BASE 8.2, SOYBEAN DIRECT + CC YIELD 31, WHEAT BASE 2.6, WHEAT DIRECT + CC YIELD 44. THERE ARE CURRENTLY 46.6 ACRES TOTAL ENROLLED IN THE STEEL COUNTY CRP PROGRAM ON PARCELS 1 & 2, WHICH WILL BE PRO-RATED TO EXACT ACRES PER PARCEL PENDING NEW BUYERS, SEE PARCELS 1 & 2 ABOVE FOR APPROXIMATE FIGURES Real Estate Terms: Successful bidder shall be required to pay $20,000 down (NON-REFUNDABLE) on Parcel 1, $40,000 down (NON-REFUNDABLE) on Parcel 2, $5,000 down (NON-REFUNDABLE) on Parcel 3 and sign a purchase agreement immediately following the conclusion of the real estate auction. The balance shall be due on or before March 23, 2012. Bruck Mikeworth, attornty for real estate and handling all earnest monies. All information is believed to be correct, but is not guaranteed. Buyers shall rely on their own information, judgement and inspection. Any verbal announcements made day of auction takes precedence over print. NO BUYERS FEE ON THIS AUCTION.

ELLOUISE M. PARRISH - ESTATE 4124 69th St. NE, Medford, MN

HOLLAND AUCTION CO. (507) 684-2955

FOR FULL COLOR PICTURES & LISTING Visit Our Website www.hollandauction.com • A Professional Full Service Auction Company • Member of State & National Auctioneer’s Association

Auctioneers:

Tracy Holland & Associates #7405002 Ellendale, MN (507) 684-2955 or (507) 456-5128 (cell)

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Wednesday, March 28 @ 10 AM: Don Seltvedt, Harvey, ND, Farm Retirement Auction. Most Equipment Has Been Stored Inside With Excellent Maintenance

PIKEBID.COM Online Timed Auction

Grain Handling Equip

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investments. If you have even thought about selling contact: Paul Krueger, Farm & Land Specialist, Edina Realty, SW Suburban Office, 14198 Commerce Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN 55372.

Hay & Forage Equip

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

BEAUTIFUL 570 acre organ- FOR SALE: '66 Ford 750N ic farm. 2 homes, 230 tilltruck, very good body, able, 138 pasture. Nice $3,000/OBO. 320-398-7112 woods, miles of new 4-wire fence. Hunting. Milking 90 FOR SALE: JD plows, modhead now, additional rented el 4D, 214 on steel, reland & could split into 2 stored, very nice; model 44 farms. (218)837-5217 or 214 hyd lift plow, recond; (218)402-0134. F145H 416, semi mount stengaard@live.com plow, good cond; 2500 518 hyd reset in very good Older Harmony mobile cond. All plows in very home, 12x68, porch 12x16, good cond complete w/ coultreated plywood skirting, to ters. 320-732-3370 be moved, $2,800 OBO. 320354-2635 or 320-295-0281 FOR SALE: VAC Case for parts. '36 B JD for parts. Sell your land or real estate Extension rims & cutoff in 30 days for 0% commiswheels for JD. 763-434-5282 sion. Call Ray 507-339-1272

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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Grain Handling Equip

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If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND Southern MNNorthern IA March 2 March 16 March 30 April 13 April 27 May 11

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Northern MN Feb 24 March 9 March 23 April 6 April 20 May 4

Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land! Website: www.TheLandOnline.com

e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

LARGE FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 2012 11:00 AM EXIT INTERSTATE 94 AT FREEPORT, MN THEN 9 MILES SOUTH ON CTY. TAR # 11, THEN 3/4 MILE EAST ON CTY. TAR # 12, THEN 4/10 MILE NORTH ON COUNTY 177 NOTE: OWNERS DISCONTINUING FARMING, NICE LINE OF EQUIPMENT, MAJOR PIECES SHEDDED

LARGE REAL ESTATE, DAIRY CATTLE & FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2012 10:00 AM LOCATED: 4 MILES EAST OF SAUK CENTRE, MN ON COUNTY TAR #17 EXCELLENT 240 ACRE DAIRY FARM SELLS IN TWO PARCELS FEATURING A BEAUTIFUL 3+ BEDROOM HOME, VERY GOOD DAIRY FACILITY WITH FLAT PARLOR, 5 BAY 6 ROW SOLAR BARN, DAIRY EQUIPMENT, LIVESTOCK ENCLOSURES AND MUCH MORE. PARCEL #1 - BUILDINGS & 120AC +/PARCEL #2 - 120 AC +/-, GREAT LOCATION, EASY ACCESS TO I94

PLUS FULL LINE OF CLEAN FARM EQUIPMENT, TOOLS AND MISC.

104 HEAD OF COMPOSITE DAIRY CATTLE VERY WELL UDDERED HERD OF HOLSTEINX JERSEY X BROWN SWISS DAIRY CATTLE. EXCLUSIVELY AI BRED, SCC AVE. 150,000. 4.59% FAT, 3.8% P, RHA APPROX 18,000#. INCLUDES 55 COWS MANY RECENTLY FRESH OR DUE SOON, 16 BRED HEIFERS AND 33 OPEN HEIFERS FROM BABIES TO BREEDING AGE. TRACTORS & FARM EQUIPMENT CASE 4490 4 WHEEL DRIVE, P SHIFT, RECENT UPDATES IH 966 DSL, CAB, 3 PT, 2000 HRS ON OH IH 656 DSL, CAB, 3 PT., WF JD 260 SERIES 2 DSL SKID LOADER, 2 SPEED, 2476 HRS. CLARK 125A WHEEL LOADER KNIGHT 3375 TRAILER TMR WITH HAY MAX KIT AND SCALE JD 235 24’ CUSHION GANG DISK JD 3970 FORAGE HARVESTER, RECENT UPDATES, JD 3RN CH (GREEN) (2) H&S 18’ REAR UNLOAD FORAGE BOXES ON HD H&S 4 WHEEL GEARS, 22.5 RUBBER PLUS OTHER FARM MACHINERY, CALF HUTS, HAY AND STRAW

For complete brochure ph. 320-352-3803 or www.midamericanauctioninc.com

For complete brochure ph. 320-352-3803 or www.midamericanauctioninc.com

CHUCK AND CHERYL SCHAFER OWNERS

DICK & BARB BORGERDING OWNERS

‘76 JD 4630, SG CAB, QUAT, GOOD 38” RUBBER, HUB DUALS, 400 HRS ON OH, NICE COND ‘73 JD 4430, SG CAB, 38” RUBBER, DUAL HYD. ‘00 JD 3950 CHOPPER, HYD. SPOUT, LIGHT KIT, NICE, JD 2RN CH, JD HH ‘94 NH 499 12’ HYDRA SWING HAYBINE NI #4845 ROUND BALER NH 166 INVERTER CIH 600 BLOWER (2) NICE H&S 7+4 16’ FRONT UNLOAD FORAGE BOXES ON KNOWLES 12T TANDEM GEARS FARMHAND 822 ALL HYD. PTO GRINDER MIXER JD 714 7 SHANK DISC CHISEL JD 7000 6X30 PLANTER, DF, X AUGER, JUST RECONDITIONED JD 1010 24’ FIELD CULT. IH 470 20’ TANDEM DISC NH 680 TANDEM AXLE MANURE SPREADER ALLIED 8’ 3 PT. SNOWBLOWER (2) GOOD 260 BU. GRAVITY BOXES & GEARS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Farm Implements

Used Delux model '65 JD 4020, dsl PS; JD 530, 30' (12 row) Loftness stalk DPX13575 grain dryer, exc. chopper, good, $3,900/trade. 3pt fenders; '39 Allis cond. Call Dave at 507-925319-296-2236 WC;'41 Allis, JD 158 ldr; 4114 JD 146A ldr; Case IH 2255 Ag Wrap 6x6 bale wrapper, ldr; Hesston 10 stacker; 3pt or loader mt, w/plastic Schweiss 3 axle 8x16 trailrolls, $9,950. 641-425-5478 er; JD 350 7' mower; NH 455 pull type 7' mower; IH 100 7' pull mower; JD 640 FOR SALE & WILL PURCHASE: NH BALE WAGhay rake; JD 851 hay rake. ONS. ROEDER IMPLEKoester Equipment MENT SENECA, KS 66538 507-399-3006 785-336-6103 2 or 3 pt blades 6', 7', 8' & 9', FOR SALE: '05 Rite-way $100 to $1250. Tractors & SS250 rock picker, all hyd., other equip. avail. 712-299always shedded, used very 6608 little, exc. cond., $6,250 OBO. 320-543-2242 3 pt Snowblowers, 7', 8', $850 to $2850. Tractor weights & FOR SALE: --USED Late chains. 712-299-6608 Model Great Plains/Kent Discovator/Finishers 48-369250 CIH 4WD, PS, 20.8x42 28-24 Ft. NEED Good Used tires; 4555 JD FWA, PS, Finishers In Trade. We 18.4x42 tires; 4430 JD, PS, Trade. Dealer 319-347-6282 18.4x38 tires, pwr beyond We Deliver Anywhere. hyd, 3pt lift assist; Demco Conquest 1100 gal sprayer, Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication x boom, foam markers & FOR SALE: 200 gal Elliptical tank w/ saddle, yellow; monitor; 955 CIH 12R VF with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier 4-710/74R42 Michelin tires planter, trash whippers & on Kirchner rims for 70 semonitor; CIH Tigermate II ** Indicates Early Deadline ries JD combines, New red field cult, 40.5', 4 bar -used only 100 hrs. drag. 507-276-4627 Ask Your 507-428-3270

REM Grain Vac 2700, new....................$19,450 Mike 507-848-6268

PH. 320-293-2599

PH. 320-352-5138

AL WESSEL - LIC. #77-60 • PH. 320-547-2206 KEVIN WINTER - LIC. #77-18 • PH. 320-760-1593

AL WESSEL - LIC. #77-60 • PH. 320-547-2206 KEVIN WINTER - LIC. #77-18 • PH. 320-760-1593

AUCTIONEERS

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC

AUCTIONEERS

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC

Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements We buy Salvage Equipment Parts Available Hammell Equip., Inc. (507)867-4910

035 Tractors

FOR SALE: AC 185 tractor, 4200 one owner hrs; AC 316s snap coupler plows; Int'l 58 8R30” plate planter; New Idea PTO manure spreader. All in real nice cond. Call 507-525-4928 036

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Ford 7700 dsl., good rubber, '94 JD 4960, MFD, 18.4x42, w/ FOR SALE: '01 Case IH FOR SALE: IH 560, G, FH, pwr adjust whls, frt wgts, duals, 4800 hrs, 3SCV, QH, NF, OH, 16.9-38 tires, MX240, MFD, 5700 hrs, new duals w/wide spacers for sharp, $69,000. Schwartz hyd ldr, $5200. fuel pump, fair tires, 30” rows, nice tractor. 320- (715)495-7543 or (715)926-5099 515-368-1358 $60,000/OBO. 507-822-0984 864-4583 or 320-779-4583

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

• Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders • Lorenz & Farm King Snowblowers • Mandako Land Rollers, 12’-60’ • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Powder River Crowding Tub & Alley • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Garfield Earth Scrapers • Peck Grain Augers, 8” - 10” - 12” • Special Price

• MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Jari Sickle Mowers • Grasshopper Lawn Mowers - Special Price Now! • “Tire” feeders & waterers • MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor for skidsteers, tractors, loaders or telehandlers • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes - MX Model In Stock • Brillion Alfalfa & Grass Seeders • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders • Enduraplas Bale Feeders, Panels & Tanks • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • Farm King Augers and Mowers • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak bunk feeders & bale racks • Walco log splitter • Goat & Sheep feeders

• We Also Buy & Sell Used GT Tox-O-Wic Dryers Or We Can Rebuild Your Dryer For You

• We Buy & Sell Used Smidley Steer Stuffers Or We Can Rebuild Your Steer Stuffer For You

Notch Equipment:

ADVANCE NOTICE AGIRON 28 LITCHFIELD LOCATION: Steffes Auctioneers, 24400 MN Hwy 22 South, Litchfield MN

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 10:00 AM This is a large event with many items already consigned.

Tractors, Combines, Heads, Trucks, Semis, Tillage, Construction Equipment, Hay & Livestock Equipment & much more! LIVE ONLINE BIDDING WITH REGISTRATION & DETAILS ONLINE: www.steffesauctioneers.com

• Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers

Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scaler

Sioux Equipment:

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~ • #206 Vermeer stump chipper, 16 hp. rebuilt engine • Aitchinson 7’ 3-pt. (grass farmer) inter-seeder • #370 GT PTO grain dryer • 6’ Green chopper • 18’ Meyers bale rack w/10-ton Meyers wagon • NH #513 spreader, VG • 81⁄2 yd. Garfield hyd. push off scraper, used only 3 days in past 2 yrs. • Grasshopper 723 w/52” deck, “Demo”

AGIRON 28 LITCHFIELD CONSIGNMENT EVENT

Brought to you by: Steffes Auctioneers Inc., 24400 MN Hwy. 22 South, Litchfield, MN 55355. (320) 693-9371 • Eric Gabrielson MN47-08, Ashley Huhn MN47-06, Randy Kath MN47-001, Scott Steffes MN14-51, Brad Olstad MN14-70 • www.steffesauctioneers.com

• Early Order Discounts Now In Effect on New GT Dryers, Grasshoppers & Zero Turn Mowers • Woods 6’ 3 pt. snowblower w/orbit motor spout • Gehl #312 Scavenger II spreader, 260 bu., VG • Brady 5600 15’ stalk shredder & windrower • Steer Stuffer & Hog Feeders • 20’ JD BWF disk w/duals, Very Good • Special Prices on new Augers & Gravity Boxes In Stock

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Bluff Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

CONSIGN EARLY! ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24TH Call Eric, Ashley, & Randy at (320) 693-9371 or e-mail at eric@steffesauctioneers.com

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

13.5 Acres Freeborn County Farmland

“YOUR #1 AUCTION PROFESSIONALS”

Thursday, March 22 • 12 Noon LOCATION: From Clarks Grove, MN, 1/2 mile north on Freeborn Co 24 (or 771st Ave), then west. First farm on south side across railroad tracks on Freeborn Co 24 (or 290th St). Auction will be held at this location. Auctioneer’s Note: Here’s your opportunity to bid at public auction on a very atttractive smaller parcel of farmland with some high productive soils including Lester Loam, Webster Clay Loam & Glencoe Clay Loam. Hope to see you on auction day. Col. Tracy Holland

13.5 Acres of Freeborn County’s Productive Farmland Bath Township, Section 34 Real Estate: Consisting of 13.5 acres, more or less, of Freeborn County’s productive farmland. Bath Township, Section 34. Tillable Acres 11.9, CPI Rating 91, CER Rating 86, Corn Base 7.7 Corn Direct & CC yield 114, Soybean Base 4.2, Soybean Direct & CC Yield 34. Taxes for 2011 were $552 (Non-Homestead).

FOR COLOR AERIAL & SOIL MAPS GO TO WWW.HOLLANDAUCTION.COM OR FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL HOLLAND AUCTION AT (507) 684-2955 OR (507) 456-5128

NH BR7090 Baler, applicator, bale command net & twine, 1200 bales, $31,000. 641-425-5478

Real Estate Terms: Successful bidder shall be required to pay $5,000 down (NON-REFUNDABLE) and sign a purchase agreement immediately following the conclusion of the real estate auction. The balance shall be due on or before April 23, 2012. Daryl Bail, attorney for real estate and handling all earnest monies. All information is believed to be correct, but is not guaranteed. Buyers shall rely on their own information, judgment and inspection. Any verbal announcements day of auction takes precedence over print.

Poly cup auger for gravity box, hydraulic motor w/ 12V on & off, $1,200; 825 JD 8R cult w/ rolling shields, $1,500. 612-282-1184 Rite Way Land Rollers, New 46'.........$35,972 62'.........$51,537 Mike 507-848-6268

KURTIS HANSON - OWNER Clarks Grove, MN HOLLAND AUCTION CO. (507) 684-2955

FOR FULL COLOR PICTURES & LISTING Visit Our Website www.hollandauction.com • A Professional Full Service Auction Company • Member of State & National Auctioneer’s Association

Auctioneers:

Tracy Holland & Associates #7405002 Ellendale, MN (507) 684-2955 or (507) 456-5128 (cell)

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

NH 185 Manure Spreader w/ new beater, $6,000; (3) 18' front & rear unload chopper boxes w/14 ton tandem running gear, 14Lx16.1 tires. (715)495-8065.

NH HW345 windrower, 437 hrs, 15.6' discbine head, cab/AC, $71,000. 641-425-5478

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FOR SALE: CIH 1063 cornhead, very good cond., $9,500; also, stainless steel Tractors nursery hog feeders, 4' & '67 4020, cab, pwr shift, dual 5', $200 & $250. 320-356-7196 hyd, 16.9x38 w/ matching FOR SALE: Hyd flat fold duals, new rubber, clean & markers for planter or toolstraight, $12,900; '71 4020, bars etc. $2,500/set. cab, dual hyd, needs eng 712-297-7951 work, $6,500. Call 612-282-1184 after 5 pm. FOR SALE: IH 490 disc, 22', exc. blades, new bearings & '79 4440 Quad, dual hyd, low tires, $5,500. 641-495-6170 hrs on OH, new clutch, FOR SALE: Olson irrigator, 20.8x38 drivers 95%, duals 1420' long, low pressure 15%, very nice paint & intedrop nozzles, good tires, rior, $21,000; '78 404 engine, knuckles, booster pump, 4900 hrs, $2,900. barricades included, no Call 612-282-1184 after 5 pm. leaks. 320-249-5934 '94 JD 7200, CAH, MFWD, FOR SALE: Used 18,000 gal. quad, 6800 hrs, 320-90-50 propane storage tank. 507tires or 20.8x38, easy on 925-4114 fuel, $30,900; '00 JD 4200 utility, MFWD, hydro, 26 Hardi 1100 Navigator hp, JD 420 ldr, $9,900. 320sprayer, 60' boom, OH 1000 543-3523 PTO pump, $21,000. 641-425-5478 FOR SALE: '06 JD 9620, 3225 Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Rehrs, 800 metrics 50%, power pair Repair-Troubleshootshift, 4 SCVs, diff lock, HID lights, Greenstar ready, ing Sales-Design Custom exc condition. 320-226-1182 hydraulic hose-making up to 2” Service calls made. STOEN'S Hydrostatic Ser- FOR SALE: '68 Oliver 1850 gas. 3spd shift. 5,200 hrs. vice 16084 State Hwy 29 N Tires 80%. Ldr w/ 7' snow Glenwood, MN 56334 320bucket. Orig paint. New 634-4360 distributor & carburetor IH 5088 tractor, 6700 hrs., 3 within 3 yrs. Heat houser. hyd., 3 pt., just checked $4,900 firm. Chatfield, MN over, 18.4x38 w/duals, (507)867-3827 or $13,750; 18.4x38 duals, 3 1/2” (507)273-0424. hubs from IH 1086, $850; FOR SALE: '81 IHC 3588 Loftness 8', 2 auger snow2+2, 150HP tractor, 3934 blower, $2,450; Hoelschler act hrs, This is a very clean 10 pack accumulator & & low hr tractor for its age fork, $4,500. 320-361-0065 & is mechanically solid. JD 4960 MFW tractor, 3 pt, 3 $14,900. 320-221-2039 hyds., 18.4x42 w/duals 90%, FOR SALE: Case IH 8920, frt wgts, recent OH, MFWD, 18.4x42 duals, 80%, $42,500; CIH 4800, 25' field went through the shop. cult., all walking tandems, $47,500; IH 656 dsl, WF, $6,500; CIH 900, 6x30 $6,500; JD 8760, 24spd, planter w/dry fert., $1,900; PTO, 18.4x42 duals, $47,500; 14.9x46 band duals, $1,350. CAT 85D, $49,500; '11 NH 320-769-2756 L225 skid steer, 10 hrs, Koyker 500 ldr for JD 4020 or loaded, cab & air, warrantractor w/ 20” frame, ty, $38,500. Trades possible. $2,650. (712)684-2613 320-250-7720 Loaders for 1940 thru 1970 tractors $250 to $3650. 712299-6608 Pomeroy Meyers VMax 3954 w/3rd auger, 3 yrs old, nice, asking $16,900/OBO. Hardi 550 gal. sprayer, hyd boom, 45', $10,900. Call 608-863-0952.

036 Tractors

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

FOR SALE: 16' Parkhurst grain box w/ 13T hoist, very good cond, $3,000/OBO 320-398-7112

Tractors

Airseeder, 40’ Horsch 1502 ............$25,000 Airseeder, CIH SDX40 w/cart, low use ......................................................$69,000 JD 7300, 12RN planter ......................$6,000 JD 7100, 20R19 planter......................$4,500 JD 7100, 16R22 planter......................$4,500 JD 7000, 12R30 planter, liq. fert.........$4,500 JD 7000, 8R30 planter........................$4,000 JD 9600 combine, new duals............$25,000 IH 460, 560, gas, WF ........................$2,000 IH M loader, new tires........................Coming JD 3010, gas, WF, 3 pt. ......................$4,500 JD 2510, gas ......................................$6,250 ‘70 JD 3020, gas, late ........................$6,500 (2) ‘72 JD 3020, syncro, diesel ..............................$10,500/$12,500 JD 2640, JD 146 loader, nice............$12,500 JD 2355, Utility, diesel, 2200 hrs. ....$11,500 (2) JD 3020, PS ..................$8,500/$17,500 JD 4010 D..........................................$5,500 JD 4010 D, F11 loader ......................$6,500 JD 4020 D, new clutch, synchro ......$6,750 (2) JD 4020, PS ....................$7,500/$8,900 (3) JD 4020, PS, SC ..........$12,500-$15,500 JD 4000, WF, 3 pt. ..............................$9,750 (2) JD 4230, Quad, PS, engine OH ..$14,500 (2) JD 4430, PS ................$13,500/$14,500 JD 4440, PS......................................$18,500 JD 4250, Quad, JD 4450, PS ..........$24,500 JD 4250, PS, FWA ............................$28,500 JD 4650, PS, duals ..........................$24,500 JD 4850, PS, FWA, duals..................$24,500 JD 4255, Quad, new engine..............$37,500

JD 4960, MFD, duals ........................$40,000 JD 2940, FWA, JD 260 loader ..........$16,500 NH BR 780A baler, net wrap ............$17,500 NH BR 780 baler, net wrap ..............$11,500 NH BR 780 baler ................................$9,500 JD 843 loader, Like New ..................$12,500 JD 840 loader, JD 8000 mts. ..............$9,500 JD 720 loader......................................$5,500 JD 740 loader, self leveling, Nice ......Coming JD 260 loader, Very Good ..................$4,500 JD 280 loader, grapple ........................$8,900 (2) JD 158, (3) JD 148 loader$2,500/$4,500 IH 2350 loader ....................................$3,250 Leon 1000 grapple, (off JD 8100) ......$5,500 (2) Dual 3100 loader, blue cyl $1,250/$2,500 Dual 310 loader ..................................$3,000 Farmhand F358 loader, IH mts. ..........$3,250 Miller PL-4 loader ..............................$3,500 (2) Miller M12........................$1,500/$2,500 New Box Scrapers, 10’/12’ ....$1,650/$1,750 New & Used Skidsteer Attachments ......Call Pallet Forks, Grapples, Rock Buckets....Call New & Used Batco & Conveyall belt conveyors..............................................Call 8”, 10”, 13” Augers, various sizes ........Call ‘75 IH 1600, new clutch, 15’ steel b ..$2,500 (4) Gravity Boxes ......................$750/$4,000 Davis Backhoe, (off Case)..................$2,500 IH 80, 7’ snowblower..........................$1,400 (5) Snowblowers ......................$500/$5,500 Bobcat T200 skidsteer ......................$13,500 Bobcat T300 skidsteer ......................$27,500 ‘08 NH C175 track skidsteer ............$22,500

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily Visa and MasterCard Accepted

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ United Farmers Cooperative 507-228-8224 or 800-642-4104 Main Office: Ag Service Center www.ufcmn.com 840 Pioneer Avenue P.O. Box 4 United Farmers Cooperative LeSueur • 800-252-5993

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• 320-598-7604 •

Madison, MN From Hwy. 75 & 212 Jct., 3.5 mi. W., 2.5 mi. S.

Lafayette, MN 56054-0004

USED DRYERS & AUGERS Good Selection of Used Dryers - Call! GSI 1226, FF 190, GSI 260 ....................CALL Feterl 10”x66’, swing ............................$2,995 Feterl 10”x60’, PTO ..............................$2,995 Hutchinson 10”x51’, PTO ....................$2,200 Hutchinson 10”x63’, swing drive ........$6,585 Sudenga 10”x61’, swing drive ............$7,200 Feterl 12”x72’, swing drive ..................$7,495 Feterl 8”x60’ w/motor ..........................$3,985

SKIDLOADERS ‘10 Bobcat T190, heat, AC ................$36,900 Bobcat T190, heat ..............................$20,600 ‘09 Bobcat S205, 2-spd. ....................$29,900 ‘11 Bobcat S205, heat/AC, 2-spd. ....$29,450 Bobcat S160, heat, 2-spd. ................$27,600 Gehl 4640 ............................................$13,900 Gehl 4240E ..........................................$15,600 Bobcat 743 w/bucket ..........................$8,950 Bobcat 742............................................$7,550 (2) Bobcat 642B ....................................$6,950 ‘09 Gehl 5640E, joystick ....................$25,600 Gehl 5640E, heat, 2-spd.....................$27,600 Gehl 5240E, heat/AC, 2-spd., 325 hrs. ............................................$26,900 (2) Gehl 3510, bucket ..........................$6,950 Gehl 4240E, heat, 2007 ......................$17,400 Case 1825B w/bucket ........................$10,650

TILLAGE Krause Dominator, 21’ ........................$61,900 (3) Wilrich 957, 7 shank ............From $22,600 Wilrich 357, 5 shank, 3 pt ....................$6,250 JD 3 pt. plow, 5 btm ............................$2,850

CIH 42’ crumbler ..................................$9,450 Brillion 40’, 4 bar ................................$12,900 Sunflower 32’ disc ..............................$12,500

SPRAYERS Fast 1000 gal., 90’ boom......................$9,900 Fast 1000 gal., 60’ boom......................$7,850 Redball 680, 110’, 1300 gal. ..............$17,650 L&D 1000 gal., 60’ boom ....................$11,900 Century 1300 gal., 90’ boom, Big Wheel ........................................$17,500 Hardi 6600 Commander, 132’ boom..$65,900 Century 750 gal., 60’ boom..................$6,650 Century 500 gal., 60’ boom..................$6,250 Demco 500 gal., 60’ boom ..................$4,350 Koyker 500 gal., 45’ ..............................$3,275

MISCELLANEOUS DMI 530, 5-shank................................$14,800 Wilrich QX2 w/basket, 53’ ..................$46,900 Krause Dominator, 18’ ........................$44,800 (2) JD 960, 31.5’ ....................................$7,450 JD 2700, 7-shank................................$27,900 J&M 875 grain cart ............................$25,900 Demco grain cart, 750 bu...................$17,500 CIH 5400 min-till drill, 20’, 3 pt. ..........$8,950 Used grain legs ........................................Call Knight 8024 side slinger ......................$8,950 NI 3739 spreader ..................................$7,950 Gehl 1410 spreader ..............................$8,250 NI 3632 spreader ..................................$5,850 NI 514 spreader ....................................$4,250 NH 514 spreader, end gate ..................$4,250 Woods Batwing mower, 15’ ................$8,475 JD 800 swather, 12’ head ....................$1,775 Used Snowblowers ..................................Call

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

HAAS EQUIP., LLC

036 Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Harvesting Equip

IH 1466. Complete restore & JD 4255, 2WD, 5,200 hrs., Specializing in most AC Q.R., 2 hyd., JD duals, very OH. New clutch, pump, used tractor parts for sharp, $34,800 OBO. 952-240brakes, paint & rebuilt sale. Now parting out 2193 front end. $16,000/OBO. WD, 190XT, #200 & D-17 608-863-1708. tractors. Rosenberg JD 4320, 8,200 hrs., 38” tires, Tractor Salvage IH 766 G, good cond, good 2 hyd., cab, 3 pt., 1,000 507-848-1701 or 507-236-8726 TA, w/GB hyd loader good RPM PTO only, good cond., cond, $7,600/OBO. $8,800. 952-240-2193 641-847-1992 WANTED: JD 4030, 4230, JD 4440 QR, cab & air, B 4240, or 4020, '69 , '70, or '71 JD 3010, dsl, WF, Hiniker range is out, $15,000. '00 JD w/ cab, w/ or w/out lder, w/ cab, good clean tractor, 7810 PQ, MFW, 8000 hrs, or w/out snowblower. 4000 hrs, $8,900/OBO. $45,000. 715-299-4430 320-748-7680 712-260-6400 JD 8210 MFWD tractor, SN: WANTED: Unrestored tracP004176, 5100 hrs, 320/90R54 tors, any make, any model, rear duals, 290/90R38 will pay cash, can be dead fronts, 4 remotes, 540-1000 or alive. PTO capable, clean, Please call 507-383-5973 $82,500. 320-894-1136

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

26 B

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large Inventory, We ship! Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage 715-673-4829

We have new completely overhauled Allis Chalmers W.D. Engine w/ all new parts. Rosenberg Tractor Salvage 507-848-1701 or 507-236-8726

037

'97 Gleaner R-52 combine w/ 520 flex BH, hugger 630 CH. Well maint, always shedded. 2,450 hrs. (651)459-8114. FOR SALE: '06 JD 635 bean head, new sickle, new drive belt & chain, can deliver. $15,900. 507-327-1903 or 507-964-5548 FOR SALE: Eaton rebuilt hydraulic pump from IH 2577, part #87338787, will fit others. 507-264-3722 FOR SALE: I'ntl 810 pickup head, 9', sund pickup, hyd drive, $1,500/OBO. 320-583-4796 FOR SALE: IH 826 cornhead, 8R22” w/ 66 Series PTO drive & Poly Snouts, $3,000. 507-430-8966 FOR SALE: JD 930F bean head, single point hookup, very good cond., $13,750; trailer available. 507-6474120

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS

‘08 1250, 24-30, bulk fill, 3500 acres-$123,500 IH 1586, Nice JD 1760, 12-30-$34,500 JD 8450, 3 pt, PTO-$25,000 ‘98 CIH 9370 Quad, 2500 hrs JD 7200, 12-30, liquid fert -$16,500 ‘89 CIH 9170 Kinze 3200, 12-30, liquid fert TILLAGE -$38,500 DMI Tigermate II, 44’, 4-bar COMBINES CIH 4300, 46’, low transport 1 ‘90 1660, 4258 hrs JD 980, 44 ⁄2’ 1 ‘87 1660, 1850 hrs JD 980, 36 ⁄2’-$4,995 ‘97 2166, 2650 hrs CIH 5400, 20’ drill-$3,850 ‘98 2388, 3400 hrs CIH 1830, 12R V.S. cult ‘09 6088, 553 hrs -$3,850 ‘10 7088, 265 hrs CIH 5700, 27’ chisel plow ‘08 7010, 428 hrs DMI 730B (Blue)-$16,500 ‘97-’05 1020, 25’ platforms DMI 730B (Red)-$19,500 CIH 9300, 9-shank-$22,500 IH 983, 8-30-$5,950 Artsway 240, 8-30 shredder CIH 1083, 8-30-$8,950 Artsway 180, 6-30 shredder CIH 2206, 6-30 CIH 2208, 8-30-$28,500 PLANTERS ‘08-’10 CIH 2608, 8-30 ‘08 1200, 16-30 Pivot, bulk chopping head fill, 2500 acres-$83,500 ‘98 Geringhoff 8-30-$24,500 ‘07 1200, 16-30 Pivot, bulk ‘97 JD 893, 8-30-$18,500 fill-$76,500

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC. 1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

Harvesting Equip

037 Planting Equip

038 Tillage Equip

039

Tillage Equip

039

Tillage Equip

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USED DRYERS

27 B THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

JD 6620 combine, w/443 corn FOR SALE: IHC 5500 mini- Case IH 4300, 24½' field FOR SALE: '11 Case IH FOR SALE: 21' Kewanee mum till grain drill, 30', tandem disk, good cond. RMX340 disk, 32', harrow head, field ready. Will sepcult., 3 bar harrow, walking markers, 7” spacing, shaft James R. Johnson 54943 loaded, only did 300 acres. arate. $12,000. 715-541-2462 tandems on main & wings, monitor, rubber press CSAH# 16 Grove City MN. $42,500; JD 960 cult, 32', or 715-357-3689. all brand new sweeps, alwheels, nice condition. Phone: 320-857-2480 harrow, no welds, $6,900. ways shedded, very good 320-226-1182 Email: jjohn@hutchtel.net Trades possible. cond., $14,750. Near MankaPlanting Equip 038 320-250-7720 to, MN. 507-380-7863 FOR SALE: JD 1760 wing FOR SALE: 42' CIH crum16 JD single disk fertilizer fold 12R back planter, LF, FOR SALE: (2) Tebben 6RN bler, exc. cond. 320-212-1410 openers off 1770NT. 651-335JD pump, Red balls, 3 bu FOR SALE: '04 JD 980 cult., cult, 1 6R liq fert applica38 ½' long, hvy springs, 1 9357 boxes, row cleaners, precitor. 400 gal saddle tanks for FOR SALE: Hiniker 1700 owner, always shedded, sion E sets, JD 250 monitor 440 or 1086. 763-434-5282 220 Friesen seed tender, no stalk chopper w/ 1000 PTO $22,000; JD 9750STS, 3300 or 20/20 monitor. trailer, good condition, shaft, 6R, very clean, eng/1981 sep hrs, 20.8x38 duFOR SALE: 16R B&H 9100 507-521-2589 $5500. 515-545-4246 $7,500. als, RWD, hopper topper, cult, all new bearings, coulGreat Plains Late Model 6-30 320-238-2269 Green Isle MN yld mon., long auger, sgl pt ters & barring off disk, 6R mounted Monosem PreciTwin Row 3 Pt No-Til hookup, $120,000 OBO; JD same as new, includes navision Planter 30" spacing, Planter w/ Markers, Moni630F bean head, full finger gator guidance & lift assist JD 960, 42' field cult., priced dry & liquid fertilizer. tor Etc For Corn & Beans, right; 2 JD 500 gal. spray auger, sgl pt hookup, wheels; 16R Orthman cult Plants vegetables, corn & Plant in Standing Stalks, pups, will split off tanks; $20,000. 320-510-0468 w/ B&H shields & NH3 clossoybeans. Purchased new Shedded, Like New Only 1500 gal. sprayer supply ing disks; 16R Orthman in '04, upgrading to 12R. 900 Acres, Half Price of FOR SALE: '08 Case IH tank; 150 bu. gravity box on row stalker. All in exc cond Call Chad at 612-845-7378. New. 319-347-6677 Can Del 6T gear. 320-864-4583 or 320527B, Ecolo-Tiger w/ hydro & stored inside. Sunflower 779-4583 disk, level'r unit, exc cond, 1434 36' disk, little use. FOR SALE: '97 JD 1760 JD 7000 mounted 8R corn $23,500. WANTED: Landoll 7431-33 planter, 12R30”, liq fert, planter, finger planter, vert till disk. 507-993-1803 320-238-2269 Green Isle MN row cleaners, 250 monitor, Dickey John mon., dual lift low acres. 320-224-7253 assist. 507-747-2749 or 507......................$103,000 (W) CIH 1200, 16/31, '04, liq fert, 828-8503 CHECK US OUT ON THE INTERNET AT: (W) (JJC0269007) FOR SALE: 16 used Martin pro600, pivot ........................$89,500 CIH 2388, '00, 1989 sep hrs, RT, FT, www.jaycoximplement.com or jaycoxpowersports.com fertilizer coulters, good JD 8300 grain drill w/grass YM (JJC0268398) ..................$95,000 (LP)Great Plains YP1625, var rat, starter seeder & 2 grain drill hitch. shape, $187.50 each or bulk, twin row......................$108,000 2388, '00, 1780 sep hrs $87,500 Tractors 4WD Skidloaders & Telehandlers (LP)CIH 320-583-2318 $3,000 for entire grouping, (LP)CIH 2388, '99, 2418 sep hrs, FT, YM, (W) IH 800 12RN, VF......................$2,950 (L*) CIH 550 Steiger, ‘11, 309 hrs, (W) Bobcat S300, '07, 1738 hrs, Cab/Ac, fits on JD planters. (W) IH 800 8RN, trailing ................$2,450 RT ..........................................$79,500 YETTER New residue manaccuguide, susp cab, 800’s A71, SJC, 2 spd ....................$31,500 (W) CIH 2388, '98, 2150 sep hrs, duals (W) JD 1780, 12-23, ‘02 ..............$35,000 507-383-9266 agers. Also, full line of Yet............................................$273,500 (W) BobcatT5600T, '05, 943 hrs,0 ..............................................$79,500 (W) JD 7200 16RN, ‘97, FF, vac, big ter Equipment available. (W) (3) CIH 550 Steiger, '11, 233 hrs, AC ..........................................$26,500 (LP)COJ 2388. ‘06, 935 sep hrs, FOR SALE: 6R36” White hoppers ............................Coming In 507-236-1934 C accuguide, lux cab, 800R38's (L) Boccat 773, ‘98, 2600 hrs ....$14,000 planter, always shedded, (W) Kinze 3700 24RN, '02, 2020 Prec. 30.5x32, FT, RT, YM (HAJ295865) 507-235-9593 H ............................................$279,500 (W) Gehl 3510, '89 ........................$4,950 used on 160 acres, asking mon/meters, liq fert, TW ......$79,500 ..............................................JUST IN 8:00am to 5:00pm. (L) CIH 430 Stieger, ‘07, 680x42, (W) Gehl CT7-23 telehandler, 400 hrs, $1,000; also, JD 1100 moni(W) Kinze 3600 16/31, KPMIII, '06, (W) CIH 2377, '06, 1135 sep hrs., 2000 hrs ..............................$159,000 ‘07, 80” bucket......................$52,500 tor25F field cult, asking set up as twin rows ..............$84,950 30.5X32, FT, RT, YM............$149,500 (W) CIH STX500, ‘05, 2300hrs, (W) CAT TH360B, 2923 hrs, forks, Tillage Equip 039 $500. 507-425-2077 (W) Kinze 3600 12/23,'02, KPMIII, 800R38’s ..............................$189,500 7000lbs, 44', Cab, nice ........$42,500 (L) CIH 2366, ‘04, 1800 eng, 1250 sep, TW (616026) ..........................$57,500 YM, SP, Ft, bin ext ..............$111,000 FOR SALE: 7300 12R22” JD 2 JD 630 discs, 26', both very (W) CIH STX375, '01, 5600 hrs, lux cab, (LP)Case 465, 05 ..................COMING IN (W) CIH 2366, '03, 1254 sep hrs, (W) White 5100 12RN, '91, VF, trailing, 520/85R46 ..........................$109,500 (W) Case 85XT, '02, 1988 hrs, cab, good cond. $12,500/ea; JD air planter w/ 2.6 bu boxes liq fert. ..................................$10,900 30.5x32, FT, YM, RT, CH ....$116,500 no door, bucket ....................$23,500 724 soil finisher, 24', new (W) CIH STX325, ‘04, 3315 hrs, 18.4x46, w/ extensions, 250 JD moni(LP)Flexi-coil 2320 & 6000, 10” spacing, (W) CIH 2366, '98, 30.5x32, YM, RT 3 pt, autopilot ready, PTO, lux cab (LP)Case75XT, ‘03, 1943 HRS, discs 100 acres ago, $12,500 32.5’, markers ......................$21,000 tor w/ corn & soybean me..............................................$86,500 ............................................$139,500 (JAF0379919) ........................$21,500 OBO. (715)455-1485 or (LP)CIH Insecticide boxes, 800, 900, 950 ters, exc cond, shedded. (L) CIH 2166, ‘97, 2790 sep hrs, (W) CIH 9370, ‘97, 4900 hrs, 24 spd, (LP)Case75XT, ‘99, 2418 HRS, (715)948-2175. planters ..............................$200/row $9,800. 320-843-2774 (JJC0182033) ........................$57,500 710R42’s, new engine ..........$89,500 (JAF0296887) ........................$17,900 (L*) CIH 2166, ‘97, 3500 sep hrs, RT, FT, 28 Ft Kent/Great Plains Se- (W) CIH 9370, ‘96, 3606 hrs, 12 spd Sprayers (LP)Case 420, '06, 1900 hrs, FOR SALE: Electric drive YM, mudhog (JJC0183001) ..$59,500 (LP)Hardi Commander 1200+, 80’ boom, ries 7 Finisher, Very Good. man, new 20.8x42’s ..............$89,500 (N5M411704) ..........................Just In clutches for most brands of (LP)CIH 1660, '92, 4280 hrs, 24.5x32, Farm King 13x36 Truck (W) CIH 9280, ‘91, 4025 hrs, PS, 20.8x42 (LP)Case side windows, fits 410-465 triples, 2500 cont. ................$25,750 planters. 507-521-2589 CH, RT ..................................$25,500 (LP)Hardi Com 4400, ‘07, 90’ boom, Auger PTO. 5 Ft Heavy triples, OH 2 yrs ago skidloaders ................................$600 (LP)CIH 1660, ‘90, 24.5x32, 4100 hrs triples, 5500 controller, steer Duty Rock Picker w/ Reel ..............................................$73,500 (LP)GEHL 4240, ‘07, 1975 hrs, 60” bkt, FOR SALE: Gravity flow (JJC0040223) ........................$15,000 ..............................................$39,500 forks, aux hyd ......................$14,950 All Hydraulic (Built Heav- (W) CIH 9270, '91, PS, 8095 hrs, 24.5x32 wagon w/ Christiansen seed (LP)CIH 1660, ‘88, 4420 hrs, RT, FT, CH (LP)Hardi 3 pt 40’ boom ..................$675 tiger style ..............................$59,500 (W) Kubota KX91R1AS2 mini excavator, ier Than Most) Almost vac, used very little. (JJC0036903) ........................$25,500 (LP)Hardi Com 1500, ‘09, 80’ boom, (L) CIH 9250, PS, 4900 hrs ........$56,000 ‘08, 24” bkt ............................$32,950 New. 319-347-2349 Can Del 320-365-3663 triples, 5500 ..........................$35,900 (W) JD 9630T, '08, 709 hrs ........$279,500 (W) Bobcat 90" skidloader mount finish (LP)CIH 1660, ‘90, 4438 HRS, RT, CH, 30.5X32 (JJC0041615) ..........$25,500 (W) Demco 850 big wheel, ‘09, 60’ mower, '06 ..............................$3,950 Tractors MFD boom, Raven 450..................$22,895 MFS 3250 BUSHEL (W) Bobcat 96" v-plow ..................$3,950 (W) IH 1460, '81, RT, CH, 24.5x32, (LP)CIH 290 Magnum, ‘11 ......Coming In (W) Westendorf 96” snow bkt, skidsteer bin ext, axle ext ......................$9,950 (W) Demco 1000 gallon big wheel, ‘04, (LP)CIH MX225 CVT, ‘10, lux cab, (W) JD 9510, ‘99, 1834 SEP HRS, 60’, MT3405 ..........................$17,950 DELUX 3015, 300 BPH mount ......................................$1,000 4 remotes, wgts ..................$147,900 (L) Case 40XT, ‘01, 3100 hrs ......$18,000 30.5X32..................................$79,500 (W) Summers 1500 gallon, 120’ boom, (W) CIH MX335, ‘08, lux cab, high flow, (L) Bobcat 773, ‘98, 2600 hrs ....$14,000 (W) NH TR88, '96 ........................$59,500 DELUX 6030, 600 BPH 12”X71’ MAYRATH ‘07 ..........................................$35,950 accuguide, 1570 hrs ..........$172,500 (W) Top Aire 750 gallon, tandem axle, (2) 380 BEHLEN, 1 Ph., SWINGAWAY Field Cultivators Combines (W) CIH MX270, ‘02, 3010 hrs, lux cab, Raven 440, 60’ x-fold..............$3,500 (W) CIH TMII 60.5’, ‘09, ACS round 18 month interest Waiver 18.4x46, front duals ..............$89,500 LP 10”X61’ MAYRATH all Used Combines/heads ..............................................$62,500 Used ATV’s & Utility Vehicles (W) CIH MX180, '00, 5865 hrs, lux cab, 700 BEHLEN, 3 Ph., autopilot ready, 12.5x54 ......$65,000 (W) CIH 8120, ‘10, 20.8x42, 412 sep hrs, (W) CIH TMII 60.5’, ‘08, 4-bar ....$51,500 (W) Can Am Outlander 650XT, ‘08, 1893 SWINGAWAY Accuguide rdy, YM, FT (W) CIH TMII 60.5’, ‘07, 4-bar ....$49,500 mi, tracks ................................$9,250 (LP)IH 3588, 2+2, '79, 4944 hrs ..$10,500 DOUBLE BURNER 10”X71’ MAYRATH ............................................$259,500 (LP)CIH TM200, 42.5’, ‘09, ACS round (W) Can Am Outlander 650XT, ‘08, red, (W) Kubota M110XDTC, ‘11, 250 hrs, (LP)CIH 8010, '07, 20.8x42, YM, FT, ..............................................$49,500 5726 mi ....................................$4,650 LA1953 loadr ........................$53,500 SWINGAWAY CH........................................$195,500 (LP)CIH 4900 37', 3-bar ................$6,500 (LP)Can Amn Outlander Max 800 XT, (W) New Holland TG230, ‘06, 1500 hrs, 8”X57’ KEWANEE PTO (W) CIH 8010, '07, 20.8x42, 926 s hrs, (W) DMI TMII 50.5’, ‘06, 4-bar ‘08, yellow, 650 mi ..................$7,250 supersteer ............................$97,500 BEHLEN 1600 BUSHEL YM, FT, CH, mudhog ..........$205,500 ..........................................Coming In (W) Can Am Outlander Max 800 LTD, (W) New Holland TC33D, ‘99, loader, ‘08, blue, 431 mi......................$8,950 BEHLEN 2800 BUSHEL belly mower ..........................$13,950 (W) CIH 8010, ;07, 20.8x42, 780 sep hrs, (W) IH 4900, 41’, 3-bar mulcher ....$5,950 YM, FT, Ch ..........................$195,500 (W) IH 4700, 48', 3-bar mulcher....$4,250 (W) Can Am DS90, ‘08, yellow, new (W) New Holland TN75S, '04, 2863 hrs, (W) CIH 8010, '06, 20.8x42 duals, (W) JD 2310 39’ soil finisher, ‘08, 5-bar engine ......................................$1,250 turf tires ................................$26,500 We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; 1661 s hrs, YM, FT..............$169,500 mulcher..............................Coming In (W) Honda MUV700A Big Red, ‘10, 706 (L) CIH MX120, MFD, cab, L300 loader, Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. (W) JD 2210 58.5', 4-bar ............$39,500 mi, green canopy ....................$9,950 6900 hrs ................................$48,000 (LP)CIH 8010, '06, 871 hrs, mudhog ............................................$215,000 (W) JD 985 48' ............................$18,950 (W) Honda TRX450, ‘07 ................$3,950 (L) XIH JZ94, ROPS, MFD, 500 hrs Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, (W) CIH 8010, ‘05, 1696 sep hrs, duals, (W) Polaris Ranger XP, ‘10, green, pwr (W) Wilrich 2500 28', 3-bar mulcher ..............................................$28,000 bearings, chain & pulleys. YM, FT, (HAJ106135) ..........$149,500 steering, cab/htr, 2750 mi ....$12,995 ................................................$2,950 Tractors 2WD (LP)CIH 8010, '04, FT, YM, Pro600 (W) Polaris Ranger XP SE, ‘08, Blue, Planters & Drills See us for your Fall Farm needs (W) CIH 8920, ‘98, very clean, ............................................$189,000 cab/htr, 6500 mi. ....................$9,450 3025 hrs ................................$62,500 (W) CIH 7120, ‘10, 20.8x42, 237 sep hrs, (LP)CIH 955, 8R36, trailing, '98, er, tw ............................................$9,700 (W) Yamaha Grizzly 700, ‘09, black, 2900 (LP)IH 5288, '83, 18.4x42, 9900 hrs YM, FT, CH ..........................$255,500 (W) CIH 1250 24RN, pro 600, bulk, mi ............................................$6,595 ..............................................$17,000 (W) CIH 7010, '08, 20.8x42, 826 sep hrs, '10 (2) ..................................$129,500 (W) Yamaha Grizzly 660, ‘04, camo, (W) IH 5288, '81, 18.4x42, 8771 hrs mudhog, YM, FT, CH ..........$215,500 1100 mi ....................................$4,950 ..............................................$16,900 (WP)CIH 7010, ‘08, 20.8x42, 750 sep hrs, (W) CIH 1250 16RN, pro 600, accurow, (W) Yamaha Raptor 70, ‘05 ..........$1,650 '09 ........................................$109,500 (W) IH 5088, '82, 18.4x38, 7714 hrs, mudhog, YM, FT, CH ..........$205,500 (LP)CIH 1200, 16R30, pivot, universal (LP)Cub Cadet Volunteer, ‘11, top, turn fresh OH ................................$22,500 (W) CIH 6088, '11, 20.8x38, mudhog, signals, diesel, 25 hrs ............$9,750 display ..................................$65,000 (W) IH 826 ......................................$9,950 YM, FT, CH ..........................$245,000 (LP)IH 806, gas, MF loader, WF ....$5,950 (W) CIH 5088, '11, 225 s hrs, 20.8x38, (W) JD 3010 gas, ‘63, 46A loader, YM, FT, CH ..........................$205,500 WF............................................$7,950 (LP)CIH 2388, '06, 1161 s hrs ..$156,000 (W) Case 1370 ..............................Just In (LP)CIH 2388, ‘06, 931 sep hrs, Lake Park • 712-832-3151 Worthington • 507-376-3147 (W) Ford 8n, '51, restored ............$4,950 (HAJ295215)....................COMING IN (LP)Farmall B, belly mower ..........$1,950 (W) CIH 2388, ‘05, 18.4 duals, 1567 sep Luverne • 507-283-2319 (LP)Farmall H, loader ....................$1,950 hrs, YM, FT, 4WD ................$149,500 (W) Farmall H, belly mower ..........$2,150 (LP)CIH 2388, '02, 18.4x38 duals, 1350 Case IH and Case Credit are registered trademarks of Case Corporation (L) IH 966, cab, 7000 hrs..............$9,500 sep hrs, YM, RT (JJC0271006) Visit Case’s Web Site at http://www.casecorp.com (L) JD 2840, 1900 hrs ................$12,900 ............................................$112,000 Check us out on the internet at www.jaycoximplement.com (LP)CIH 2388, '01, RT, FT, 2026 s hrs,

USED AUGERS

HOPPER TANKS

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

JAYCOX IMPLEMENT

Tillage Equip

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

28 B

USED TRACTORS Challenger MT525B, ‘04, 800 hrs. ........$54,500 Challenger MT645 w/ldr, 1900 hrs ........$79,500 AGCO RT155A w/ldr, 2200 hrs. ............$99,500 ‘White 6175, 2WD, 5100 hrs ................$39,500 AGCO Allis 9650, 2 WD, 5000 hrs ........$32,500

‘79 AC 7020, PD......................................$8,950 AC 7000 w/duals ....................................$8,950 AC WD, WF, repainted ............................$2,795 JD 2030 w/JD 48 ldr. ..............................$8,950 IH 300 utility w/loader ............................$3,950

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Tillage Equip

Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

Sunflower 4511-11................................$37,900 Versatile 305........................................$145,000 Versatile 305, frt. duals ......................$150,000 Krause 4850-18 Dominator ..................$54,900 Wilrich 657-13 ......................................$29,900

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

We Rent and Sell Wishek Discs

507-427-3414 or 800-657-3249 www.midwayfarmequip.com

AGCO WHITE GLEANER Hesston

‘05 NH TG285, 4WD w/18-spd. PS, Super Steer, set of 4 new rear 18.4xR46 Firestone tires, new 380/85R34 front tires, rear whl wgts, 13⁄4” 1000 PTO - S.N.: JAW135103 - $118,900

New ‘11 Rite-Way RR250ST rock picker w/2-bat reel, 1.75 cu. yd. cap., 125LX15 tires, 2” min. rock dia., 14” max. rock dia., 50” picking width, hyd. swing tongue - Stock # 60502 - $13,350

New ‘12 Rite-Way F3-46 46’ land roller, forward fold, light kit, safety tow chain, 13’6’ transport width, set of 8 11L15 8- ply factory wheels/tires, weighs 22,910 lbs. - Stock # 60583 - $36,430

New ‘12 Wilrich 13QX2 34.5’ field cult. w/floating hitch, spring cushion edge-formed C-shanks, set of 12-31x15 12-ply tires, sgl. pt. depth control w/depth indicator gauge - Stock # 60555 - $42,925

New ‘12 Rite-Way F3-42 42’ forward-fold land roller, light kit, safety tow chain, set of 8 11L15 factory wheels/tires. We also have F3-46 & F5-62 models in stock. - Stock # 60582 - $33,890

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AC 7045, PS ............................................$9,950 White 6145, FWA, 2300 hrs ..................$49,500 MF 1533 w/loader, hydro, 450 hrs ........$15,900 ‘02 AGCO DT180, 6900 hrs ..................$49,500 ‘97 Gleaner 515 flex ................................$8,950 ‘05 Wilrich V957, 7x30..........................$17,900 Rawson dual hyd drive, 2 yrs old............$2,950 (12) Yetter residue manaagers ............Ea. $200 (15) used Flexheads ....................................Call

We Rent Brandt Grain Vacs

Midway Farm Equipment

‘12 Riteway F3-52, 52’ forward fold land roller, 11LX15 12-ply tires, 8-bolt rims, road light kit, safety tow chain, transport width 13’6”, complete w/freight & setup - Stock # 60413 - $40,850

Unit is ready for the field

JUST IN AC 8050, PW, FWD, duals ....................$27,500 Wilrich Excel, 32’ ..................................$21,500 ‘08 Gleaner R65, 600 hrs ....................$189,500 ‘09 Gleaner R66, 397 hrs ....................$219,500 JD 230, 20’ disc ......................................$2,950 IH 490, 24’ disc ......................................$2,950 ‘02 White 8500, 12R30, 2 bu. ..............$34,500 JD 1770, 16R30 ....................................Coming ‘08 Wilrich Quad X2, 47’, baskets ........$49,500 Challenger MT 465B w/loader ..............$54,900

JD 2200, 321/2’ field cultivator w/floating hitch & 4 front caster whls., Accu Depth control syst., 3bar coil tine harrow, 500 gal. tank w/hyd. pump, ball valves, incorp. kit - Stock # 60133 - $32,750

inc $4 List lud 9, s a 4 t & ing 50, se fre tup ig ht

‘08 NH AT8010, w/SuperSteer, 12-bolt frt axle, (10)100 kg frt wgts, rear wgts, 3 PTO’s, 18.4R46 rear tires w/duals, 380/ 85R34 frt tires, 19 spd trans., 930 hrs. - Stock # 60310 - $124,750

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<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Keith Bode

NEW RENTAL RETURNS Brandt 5200 EX grain vac......................$17,900 MF 7495, FWD ....................................$134,500 MF 7495, 100 hrs................................$129,900 MF 7490, FWD ....................................$129,500 MF 8670, all options............................$187,000 Sunflower 1435, 30’ disc ......................$39,900

Tillage Equip

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘99 MF 8780, Smart track, 1800 hrs. ....$79,500 ‘97 MF 8780, 25’ , 863, 2400 hrs..........$79,500 ‘03 MF 8000, 25’ w/Crary air reel..........$24,900 ‘10 Gleaner 8200, 25’ flex w/air reel......$32,500 ‘96 Gleaner 525 flex w/Crary air reel ....$13,900 (5) Gleaner 8R30 huggers ......$11,900-$39,900 (6) Gleaner 6R30 huggers ........$9,950-$15,900 ‘93 Gleaner 8R36 hugger ......................$11,900 ‘90 Gleaner, 4R36 hugger........................$4,950 ‘80 Gleaner N803A cornhead ..................$2,950 Harvest Tech cornhead, 8R30 ..............$22,900 JD 843 cornhead, 10R22, Gleaner or JD $7,950 JD 843 cornhead, 8R30, Gleaner or MF ..$9,950 ‘99 Gleaner 830C, SCH..........................$15,900 ‘78 Gleaner L2 hydro ..............................$4,950 Gleaner N630A, ‘82 & up ........................$1,500 Fieldstar II yield monitor for GL, MF, CH $3,950

‘03 CIH LBX331, 3x3, big square ..........$39,500 Hesston 550, 4x6 baler ..........................$4,950 ‘05 Balzer 2000 shredder, new knives ....$8,950 ‘06 Balzer 2000 shredder ......................$16,900 Balzer 2000 shredder, semi-mounted......$5,950 ‘02 Parker 737 grain cart, duals ............$18,900 NEW 16’ harrow for Wishek disc ............$3,500 Killbros 490 grain cart ............................$8,950 Parker 510 grain cart ..............................$9,950 Hiniker 1325, 15’ chisel plow ..................$3,950 Feterl 10x60 w/GH hopper ......................$1,995 Feterl 10x60 HF w/hopper ......................$2,950 Westgo 10x71 w/hopper ........................$1,950 Feterl 8x46 PTO auger ............................$2,950 Fterl 8x60 PTO auger ..............................$1,995 Feterl 10x76 HF auger w/hopper ............$1,975 ‘81 Gleaner N5 ........................................$5,950 ‘09 Gleaner 8200, 35’ flex, air reel, new$39,900 ‘07 Gleaner 8200, 30’ flex, “A” mtg.......$26,500 ‘95 Gleaner 530 flex ................................$8,900 Schweiss 6’ snowblower, 2 auger ..........$1,995 Loftness 8’ snowblower, single auger ....$2,995 ‘10 Farm King Y840, 84” snowblower ....$2,950

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‘02 NH TV140, bi-directional tractor w/7614 loader & grapple, 18.4R34 tires, PTO & rockshaft for 3 pt. hitch on cab end only, missing 3 pt. hitch arms & drawbar on cab end, has weights & drawbar on engine end, radiator is leaking, also has a few oil leaks, runs & drive good, as is ............................................$32,000 ‘00 JD 8410, MFWD, 420/80R46 duals, weights, 4 remotes, 10,400 hrs ............$58,500 ‘01 CIH MX240, MFWD, 18.4R46 duals, 5050 hrs.. ..............................................$59,500 ‘09 NH BB9060, big square baler, tandem axle, Phiber 3 bale accumulator, no cutter, includes roller chute, 11,300 bales ......$61,500 ‘08 JCB 940, rough terrain forklift, 4WD, 8000 lb. lift, 2750 hrs. ..........................$31,500 ‘08 CIH 2020, 35’ flexible platform ........$19,500 ‘10 CIH 2020, 30’ flexible platform ........$19,500

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT ‘03 White 8186, 16R30, 3 bu. ..............$52,500 White 6100, 10R30 ................................$8,950 JD 7200, 16R30 vac, 250, LF................$21,500 Deutz Allis 385, 8R30, 300 monitor ........$2,495 WilRich Quad 5, 48’ ..............................$12,900 ‘00 Wilrich 6600, 7x30 disc ripper ........$10,000 JD 980, 38’ w/3 bar ..............................$16,500 CIH 4300, 28’ ........................................$11,900 CIH 4800, 32’ ..........................................$9,950 M&W 1875, 7x3 disc ripper ....................$9,950 Bush Hog 12R30 cult. ................................$795 Wishek 962NT, 22’ disc ........................$47,500 Tebben 7x30 deep-til disc leveler ............$6,950 ‘05 Sunflower 4510-13 disc chisel ........$19,900 ‘06 New Idea 5512 disc mower cond. ..$18,900 ‘06 NH 616 disc mower ..........................$5,950 ‘08 Hesston 3008 disc mower ................$6,950 ‘11 Wishek 862 NT, 26’ ........................$62,500 ‘09 Wishek 8623NT, 30’ ........................$49,500 Wishek 862NT, 26’ disc ........................$44,500 ‘06 WilRich V957, 5x30 ........................$24,900 WilRich V957, 7x30 ..............................$24,900 Artsway G72, 6’ finishing mower ..............$795 Wilrich V957, 7x30................................$34,900

Tillage Equip

FOR SALE: Flexi-coil 75 FOR SALE: JD field cultiva- FOR SALE: Precision plant- FOR SALE: Summers 25' heavy duty coil tine harrow packer, 46', heavy coils, tor, 24' w/ leveler, pull type, ing parts, trash whippers, attachment, $950. $8,500. 320-226-5144 $600. 515-827-5162 new & used. 507-521-2589 507-357-4994 or 507-327-3932

USED COMBINES & HEADS ‘07 Gleaner A65, 300 hrs. ..................$189,500 ‘03 Gleaner R-75’s, 1100 hrs. ............$139,500 ‘02 Gleaner R-72, duals, 1100 hrs. ....$129,500 ‘93 Gleaner R72, 2800 hrs ....................$59,500 ‘89 Gleaner R70 duals, 2700 hrs ..........$24,900 ‘05 Gleaner R65, duals, 460 hrs..........$159,500 ‘01 Gleaner R62, duals, 1300 hrs........$109,500 ‘01 Gleaner R62, duals, 900 hrs..........$109,500 ‘01 Gleaner R62, duals, 1500 hrs..........$99,500 ‘95 Gleaner R-62, 2000 hrs., RWA........$59,500 ‘92 Gleaner R-62, 2300 hrs. ..................$39,500 ‘98 Gleaner R52, duals, 1700 hrs..........$69,500 ‘08 Gleaner 8200, 25’ R series ..............$24,900 ‘05 Gleaner 8000, 30’ flex w/air reel......$27,900 ‘04 NH CR970, 1000 hrs. ....................$149,500 ‘02 Gleaner R62, 1500 hrs ....................$89,500 ‘05 Gleaner R75, 1000 hrs ..................$159,500

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Unit is ready for the field

'12 Rite-Way F5-62 62’ land roller, forward fold, light kit, safety tow chain, 13’6” transport width, set of 8 125LX15 12-ply fact. whls./tires, weighs 30,250 lbs. - Stock # 60531 - $56,670

Werner Implement Company, Inc. Vermillion, MN 55085 • www.wernerimplement.com Call Mel, Randy or Charlie

(651) 437-4435 • (800) 770-4634

Tillage Equip

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Machinery Wanted

040

Spraying Equip

041

Farm Services

TILLAGE M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ............................$14,500 Salford 24’ RTS ....................................................CALL ‘07 JD 3710, 10-bottom........................................CALL JD 2800, 7 btm, onland ........................................CALL Wilrich 10-bottom plow ........................................CALL Wilrich 3400, 50.5’ w/4 bar ............................COMING

SKIDSTEERS

CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

NEW EQUIPMENT

FOR SALE: 2-NH stack wagons, 1033 & 1034, each pickup & stack 105 bales; also, 15 bale grapple. 507-383-7396

COMBINES

‘94 Gleaner R72 w/new engine ............................CALL ‘00 Gleaner R72 w/CDF........................................CALL ‘02 Gleaner R62 w/’04 8-30 CH, ‘03 825 flex w/Crary..............................................................CALL ‘03 Gleaner R65 ....................................................CALL Gleaner R60 ......................................................$25,000 ‘08 Fantini 12-30 chopping cornhead..............$68,000 NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ........................CALL

HAY TOOLS New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand Hesston 1150, 12’ ..............................................$1,800

MISCELLANEOUS NEW Salford RT units ..........................................CALL NEW Unverferth seed tenders......................ON HAND NEW Salford RT units ..........................................CALL NEW Westfield augers................................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac..............................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers....................CALL NEW Riteway rollers ............................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..................................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ........................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ........................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ................................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks........................ CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ............................................CALL REM 2700, Rental ................................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..............................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ..........................................$48,500 (DMI Parts Available)

510 Bu. - On Hand ..Starting at $10,995 GRAVITY WAGONS 600 Agrimaster, On Hand ..........$13,500 500 E-Z Trail, On Hand ....$7,995-$9,020 400 E-Z Trail......................$6,895-$7,250 HARVEST INTERNATIONAL/AUGERS T10-32 PTO Truck Auger ..............$3,500 T10-42 Truck Auger ......................$4,250 T10-52 Truck Auger ......................$4,950 H10-62 Swing Hopper ..................$8,500 H10-72 Swing Hopper ..................$9,300 H10-82 Swing Hopper ..................$9,750 H13-62 Swing Hopper ................$13,500 H13-72 Swing Hopper ................$14,500 H13-82 Swing Hopper ................$15,500 H13-92 Swing Hopper ................$18,500 18-44 Belt Conveyor, 7.5 hp ........$9,950 12 Volt Auger Mover ....................$1,995 Hyd. Auger Mover ........................$1,350 HITCH DOC SEED TENDERS 2 Box Tandem, On Hand ..............$9,850

4 Box Tandem, On Hand ............$15,950 6 Box Gooseneck ......................$25,000 NEW KOYKER LOADERS Call For Other Sizes 510 Loader, On Hand....................$5,750 COMBINE HEAD MOVERS E-Z Trail 4-wheel 21’......................................$2,550-$2,750 26’......................................$2,890-$3,909 30’......................................$3,120-$3,320 Koyker Stor-Mor Grain Baggers & Bag Unloaders ........................In Stock NEW ROUND BALE RACKS 10’x23’, On Hand ..........................$1,995 NEW WHEEL RAKES 14 Wheel, high capacity ..............$3,995 12 Wheel, high capacity ..............$5,495 10 Wheel, V Rake, On Hand ........$3,750 5 Wheel, 3 pt. Rake, On Hand......$1,325 Land Levelers, 10’ & 12’ ........On Hand Land Roller..............................On Hand Walco Ground Pounder, 45’ ..$31,500

USED EQUIPMENT TRACTORS ‘05 JD 9320, 3 pt., 3200 hrs. ....$139,900 ‘01 JD 9400T, 3 pt., 5400 hrs., 30” tracks ................................$93,900 ‘01 JD 9200, 3 pt., 8500 hrs. ......$66,500 ‘90 Ford 946, 6100 hrs. ..............$44,500 ‘90 Ford 876, 6200 hrs. ..............$42,500 GRAIN CARTS ‘10 E-Z Trail 510 ..........................$10,500 Unverferth 4500, Nice! ..................$8,000 Parker 450 ....................................$5,250 MISCELLANEOUS ‘96 Chevy 1500 EXT 4x4 ..............$3,995 ‘96 Towmaster 18’ trailer ..............$1,500 ‘97 JD mower conditioner, 16’......$5,750 ‘07 Mandako 50’ Land Roller ....$27,500 ‘10 Tebben 45’ Land Roller ........$30,500 AJAX self loading round bale mover ....................................................$4,500

JD 1000, 34’ field cultivator..........$1,250 WAGONS ‘10 E-Z Trail 3400 w/brakes..........$6,900 (2) Parker 4000, 450 bu ................$3,750 (2) Parker 2500 ..............................$1,750 Demco 325 ....................................$2,450 ‘11 Agrimaster A600, tarp ..........$12,000 AUGERS Westfield 10x61 ............................$2,000 Hutchinson 10x72 hyd. swing hopper ....................................................$1,750 Westfield 10x71 w/right angle drive, hyd. swing hopper ....................$4,500 Koyker 10x71 hyd. swing hopper $1,850 GRAIN BAGGER AND BAG UNLOADER RENTALS GRAIN VAC RENTAL SKID LOADER RENTALS

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT

Woodford Ag

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649

507-430-5144

Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon

37666 300th St. • Redwood Falls, MN

Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

WWW.WOODFORDAG.COM

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..............................CALL ‘05 NH LS185B, cab/heat ................................$21,500 Westendorf WL40 w/IH mts ..............................$2,600

29 B

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PLANTERS NEW White planters ............................................CALL White 5100, 12-30 ..............................................$5,500 Hiniker 30’ seeder ............................................$19,500

050

ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks

NOW HIRING SERVICE TECHS USED TRACTORS

Feed Seed Hay

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED

Please send resume to: 63065 206th St., Attn: Mike Janesville, MN 56024 NEW Versatile 435, 4WD ......................................CALL NEW Versatile 250, FWA ......................................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ......................................CALL NEW NH TD5050, FWA, w/cab ............................CALL NEW Massey HD2680, FWA, w/cab ....................CALL NEW Massey 8670, FWA......................................CALL ‘98 NH 8870, FWA, 4900 hrs. ........................COMING White 2-105 ......................................................$13,500 ‘60 IH 560, WF ....................................................$5,200 IH 460 ..................................................................$3,960 IH 806, gas, w/Allied loader ..............................$7,850 IH 706 w/cab & loader ........................................$7,500 JD 4010 gas, w/cab ............................................$7,500 ‘79 Allis 185, nice ................................................$6,800 ‘66 Allis 190 gas..................................................$6,500

045

Need Your Sheep Shorn? 1ST CROP HAY, lg. rounds Contact Dylan Weaver & sm. squares, 9 mi. N of Professional Sheep Shearer Cadott. 715-703-0542. (608)582-1144 or FOR SALE: 3rd crop bale(608)386-4408 age. 50% moisture, 20% Silo demolition. We pay cash protein.RFV-140. for Harvestors, & charge 715-418-0426. for take-down of stave FOR SALE: 525 3x3 square silos. Dennis 507-995-2331 wheat straw, asking $23/bale; 300 3x3 square Feed Seed Hay 050 grass, $25/bale. 218-201-0218 4x5 net wrapped soybean Certified orstubble, raked w/ leaves & FOR SALE: ganic Grass Hay 680# rd some beans, $35/ea. Corn bales, 615# sq. bales, stored stalks, $25 (Dry!). Some inside. 715-965-7046 grass hay. Can deliver. 320-905-6195 FOR SALE: Grass hay, no rain, no weeds, small 4x5 Round Bales, mixed squares, 48 lbs, near New grass, alfalfa. No rain, Ulm, $2.70/bale. 507-359-2790 baled dry. $35/bale, 200 avail., will load. Call weekFOR SALE: Western Hay & days 8am-5pm, 715-962-3277, Straw In small squares or in Colfax, WI. large squares by the semi Dairy Quality Alfalfa load. Protein 18-26%, RFV Tested big squares & round up to-200. Smikrud bales, delivered from South Galesville, WI 800-588-2143 Dakota John Haensel (605) 608-484-0916 cell (Over 23 351-5760 years in the Hay Business) Dairy quality western alfalfa, big squares or small squares, delivered in semi loads. Clint Haensel E-TRAIL GRAIN CARTS (605) 310-6653 710 Bu. - On Hand ......................$18,795

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

JD 3pt 1 & 2 bottom plows. WANTED: 8 disk style row FOR SALE: Schweiss Easy 2R, 3pt corn planter. Weeder, 3 wheel, 3 seat, cleaners, used on JD 7000 (715)257-1617. 11HP Briggs & Stratton, hyplanters, tin adjust. 507-278drostatic drive & power 3872 Evenings JD 922 30' soil finisher, very steering, 25 gal spraying good cond, $10,000. WANTED: Laforge or Zuidtank. $500/OBO. 320-583-4796 952-240-2193 berg front 3 pt. & PTO for JD 985 49.5' cultivator, 7” 7810 or 7930 tractor. 507-276- FOR SALE: Top Aire 1100 sweeps, 5 folds, $12,900. sprayer, 60' x-fold hyd 4760 507-327-1903 or 507-964-5548 boom, Raven 440 monitor, WANTED: Log splitter, adj axle. 320-815-1925 Wil-Rich 3400 38' double fold Morehouse or similar style, field cult, new harrow must be in working order. Hardi HC 950, 950 gal, 60' teeth, $11,000/OBO. Call 320-587-4544, leave boom, foam rinse tank in952-240-2193 message. duction, good cond, Hardi Controller, $7,500. Machinery Wanted 040 507-330-3690 Spraying Equip 041 Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, White 6106, 6R30 corn Glencoe 7400; Field Cults FOR SALE: '05 Hardi Complanter, trash whips, liq. mander Plus, 1200 gal, 120' under 30': JD 980, small fert., Keatons, PTO pump, force boom, Chem Eductor, grain carts & gravity boxes $8,500. 612-490-0507 dual wheels, Titan tires, 300-400 bu. Finishers under Norac boom level, 3500 con20', clean 4 & 6R stalk chop042 troller. $29,100. 320-420-2272 Wanted pers; Nice JD 215 & 216 flex heads; JD 643 cornWANTED: 1175 Case tractor heads Must be clean; JD FOR SALE: Chem Farm in good cond; Gleaner F stainless steel saddle tanks, corn planters, 4-6-8 row. combine, 15' beanhead. like new, 500 gal, CIH 715-299-4338 507-583-7193 or 507-438-8075 mounts, CIH row crop 4WD Used Skid loaders in any & JD mounts w/ pump. WANTED: Used outdoor condition, any make or $2,500/OBO. 507-215-0957 wood boiler in good condimodel. tion. 320-444-4436 FOR SALE: Hardi NavigaStoens Hydrostatic Service tor 1100, 90' booms, 5 sec320-634-4360 045 tion, diaphragm pump, 2500 Farm Services WANTED: 2-Wheel Dolly controller, foam, ChemTrailer to haul self-proFill, flush & rinse, triple Barn roofing Hip or round pelled haybine. nozzles, 46” tires, axle susroof barns & other build(715)682-2110. pension, DH box, premium ings. Also barn & quanset Wanted: 48” pallet forks to low acres, $28,000/OBO. straightening. Kelling Silo fit JD 542 ldr. 715-415-0316 320-587-7332 1-800-355-2598

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

30 B

Feed Seed Hay

050 Fertilizer & Chem

051

FOR SALE: Organic & Non- FOR SALE: (2) 300 gal sadorganic winter rye straw, dle tanks to fit JD 30-40-503x3x6 square bales. 507-38360 series tractors, 7396 $750/OBO. 320-587-9319 Hay for Sale. LeRoy Ose, Poultry 053 Thief River Falls, MN cell 218-689-6675 30 poultry brooder stoves, South Dakota Western Alfalgood cond. $30 each OBO. fa 3 x 3 x 8. Various RFB's 507-227-6645 KNS Hay & Transport 605-999-1118. Livestock 054 WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available.Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554

Black Angus Yearling bulls: Hamp, Duroc & Yorkshire Boars & Gilts Alfred Kemen 320-598-3790

(1) = GLENCOE 320-864-5571 800-558-3759

4561 HWY 212 GLENCOE, MN 55336

(2) = HOWARD LAKE 320-543-2170 866-875-5093

5845 KEATS AVE. SW HOWARD LAKE, MN 55349

(3) = STEWART 320-562-2630 800-827-7933

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78412 CO, RD 20 STEWART, MN 55385

FEBRUARY VALUES NEW EQUIPMENT SPECIALS Kubota 1140 RTV, 4 passenger, 4WD, dsl., Camo, w/canopy............................................................................$14,000 Ramrod # 500, stand-on skid loader, 36” QA bucket ............$13,500 Pequea 80 bu. spreader, poly floor, T-rod apron, new warranty........................................................................$3,800 Pequea 50 bu. spreader, poly floor, T-rod apron, new warranty........................................................................$3,500 Artsway 10”x34’ drive truck auger, PTO ................................$4,500 Horst 8-ton, running gear 11Lx15 8-ply tires ..........................$1,735 12-Wheel V-rake w/cart, high clearance design ......................$6,400 20.8R38 Goodyear 2-star radials mounted on New Holland 10 hole dual rims..................................................................$2,000

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

USED EQUIPMENT Oliver 1600 GPS, Schwart 2 loader., near new 15.5x38 tires ..$5,500 Oliver 1650 GPS, cab w/new heater, Oliver 1610 loader w/snow bucket ....................................................................$6,500 Ford 8N, 1950 Model, side dist., new starter, 12-volt conv., new draw bar ......................................................................$2,500 Ford NAA, 12-volt conv., electric ignition, good winter restoration project ................................................................$1,800 ‘06 Honda ATV, 350 Rancher, 4WD, good rubber ....................$3,000 Ford 1200 hyd. loader w/snow bucket, all purpose tr. mts. ........$475 Dearborn pipe frame loader, fits 9N, 2N, 8N Fords, needs bucket ..........................................................................$200 ExMark Lazer, ‘08 Model, 25 hp. Kubota dsl., 860 hrs., 72” deck ............................................................................$10,000 Ford 4000 All Purpose tractor, (66) gas, 10-spd., pwr. str. ......$4,000 6’ 3-point mounted field cult. ......................................................$60 Running gear w/wooden bale rack ............................................$375 Dearborn 3-point blade..............................................................$175

New Ulm Tractor & Equipment Inc. 13144 Co. Rd. #25 New Ulm, MN

507-354-3612 Kubota, Land Pride, Vicon, Artsway, AgriPac Silage Bags

(4) = ST. CLOUD 320-252-2010 800-645-5531

1035 35TH AVE. NE SAUK RAPIDS, MN 56379

(5) = GLENWOOD 320-634-5151 888-799-1495

1710 N. FRANKLIN GLENWOOD, MN 55334

(6) = SAUK CENTRE 320-352-6511 888-320-2936

1140 CENTRE ST. SAUK CENTRE, MN 56378

(7) = ALEXANDRIA 320-763-4220 888-799-1490

5005 STATE HWY 27 E ALEXANDRIA, MN 56308

(8) = PAYNESVILLE 320-243-7474 866-784-5535

725 LAKE AVE. S PAYNESVILLE, MN 56362

(9) = PRINCETON 763-389-3453 800-570-3453

3708 BAPTIST CHURCH RD PRINCETON, MN 55371

Dairy

055

Dairy

055

MACHINERY SPECIALS

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

507-294-3387 www.midwestfarmsales.com

Midwest Ag Equip

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CIH MX270, 8000 hrs. ..........................$69,900 CIH 1140, compact w/60” deck ............$7,995 Cub Cadet 7235, compact w/72” deck $8,995 NH TC29, MFD ......................................$7,995 JD 5403, MFD ......................................$19,900 ‘79 JD 8440, Loaded, 50 Series Eng. ..$17,900 JD 4650, PS ..........................................$29,900 ‘77 JD 4630, PS....................................$15,900 JD 4620, w/cab, air ..............................$11,900 JD 4440, PS ..........................................$18,900 JD 4430, Quad, open station ..............$14,900 JD 4240, PS ..........................................$18,900 JD 4230, Quad......................................$14,900 (2) JD 4020, dls., PS ............................$12,900 ‘67 JD 4020 D, Syncro ........................$12,900 IH 856, Custom ......................................$8,900 IH 1026, Hydro ............................Coming Soon IH 460 & 560, gas ..........................from $3,000 JD Sound Guard Cabs................................Call Gehl 4635 Skid Steer, 6’ bucket ............$7,995

31 B THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Expanding Family Dairy in FOR SALE: Calf Star continneed of Dairy Herds. 10-400 uous flow mini flash pasturcows, small or big herd. izer. Also, 45 gal. stainless Stanchion side stall or free steel transportation tank. stall herds. Please leave a (715)495-1984. message. (608)482-3335 Nice, smaller herd of Holstein cows. Good udders, FOR SALE: 1 load of fancy low SCC. Monthly herd Holstein Springers, 6 - 7 1/2 health program, priced reamonths bred. Shots, vet sonable. Please leave a checked. 712-269-0874. message. 608-214-1617.

Farm Equipment For Sale

Financing Available

Emerson Kalis Easton, MN 56025 • 507-381-9675

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘08 Cat 965B, 800 hrs ....................$199,500 ‘04 Cat 855, 3000 hrs. ....................$185,000 ‘07 JD 9860STS, 800 hrs., loaded w/all options....................................$175,000 ‘07 Cat MT755B, 2100 hrs. ............$150,000 ‘07 CIH MX305, 200 hrs. on new motor, warranty ..........................................$112,500 ‘07 CIH MX275, 1750 hrs., loaded w/all options....................................$137,500 ‘89 Versatile 846, 4000 hrs., (So. MN tractor) ................................$42,500 ‘08 Lexion 595, 650 hrs. ................$265,000 ‘08 Krause Dominator, 18’ ..............$38,000 ‘04 DMI Tiger Mate II, (50.5’) ..........$37,500 ‘96 Terragator 1844, 1800 gal., 3900 hrs. ............................................$45,000 ‘95 Loral, 1600 hrs. ............................$40,000 ‘09 Hagie STS14, 120’ boom, loaded ........................................................$190,000 ‘03 Wilrich 957 VDR, nice shape ....$16,000

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

32 B

USED EQUIPMENT FROM A NAME YOU CAN TRUST! (2) ‘05 T-250, glass cab & heater, 1875 hrs. ..............................................................$29,500 ‘06 T-140, 450 hrs.....................................$22,000 ‘07 S-330, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 4000 hrs.................................................$29,500 (2) ‘09 S-300, glass cab w/AC Starting at $25,900 ‘04 S-250, glass cab & heater, hi flow aux., 2100 hrs.................................................$23,500 ‘94 853........................................................$7,900 ‘08 S-185, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 1200 hrs.................................................$24,900 ‘09 S160, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 1000 hrs.................................................$24,900 ‘04 S-130, glass cab & heater, 3200 hrs. ..$14,900 ‘98 763, glass cab & heater, 1750 hrs. ......$12,950 ‘99 751, glass cab & heater, 5700 hrs. ........$8,900

743 ..............................................................$7,500 ‘05 NH LS185.B, glass cab w/AC, 1000 hrs. ..............................................................$26,500 ‘08 NH L-175, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 2400 hrs.................................................$22,450 ‘09 NH L-170, glass cab & heater..............$13,000 ‘06 NH LS-170, glass cab & heater, 900 hrs. ..............................................................$17,950 ‘03 NH LS-160, glass cab & heater ..........$13,900 ‘78 NH L-425 ..............................................$4,950 ‘08 JD 328, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 3500 hrs.................................................$21,750 ‘87 Gehl 3510 ............................................$4,500 ‘09 Case 420 Series 3, glass cab & heater, 106 hrs...................................................$26,000 Silage Defacer ............................................$3,000

www.bobcat.com

Norwood Young America 952-467-2181

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A family business since 1946 with the Lanos: Jack, Paul, Bob and Andy

USED TRACTORS

USED PLANTERS

‘07 NH TG-245, MFD, 2100 hrs. ................$108,900 ‘01 NH TM-115A, MFD, cab, loader, 350 hrs. ................................................................$55,900 ‘92 NH 7740SL, cab, loader, 5100 hrs. ........$22,000 ‘07 NH TL-100A, MFD, cab, loader, 178 hrs. ............................................................Coming In ‘04 NH TL-90A, MFD, loader, 3200 hrs. ......$27,500 ‘07 NH TL-80A, cab, creeper gears, 2800 hrs. ................................................................$21,750 ‘02 NH TN75, MFD, cab, loader, 3500 hrs. ..$25,500 ‘04 NH TT75, loader, 675 hrs. ......................$16,500 ‘11 NH Workmaster 55, 20 hrs. ..................$15,900 ‘03 NH TC-30, MFD, loader, 700 hrs. ..........$11,950 Ford 9N, loader, Nice Shape ..........................$2,950 Oliver 1600, diesel ........................................$4,000 ‘69 AC 180, diesel ........................................$4,950 AC WD-45, gas ..............................................$2,400 ‘95 C-IH 5250, MFD, cab, 4300 hrs. ............$35,900 ‘86 C-IH 1896, 9300 hrs. ............................$12,000 ‘42 Farmall H ................................................$1,250 ‘86 JD 1250, MFD, loader, 3250 hrs. ............$8,250 Zetor 8540, cab ..........................................$10,500 ‘99 Cub Cadet 7205, MFD, 60” mower deck, 843 hrs. ....................................................$7,500

‘96 White 6100, 12x30 ................................$19,500 White 6700, 12x30, 3 pt., lift assist ............$13,500 ‘90 White 5100, 8x36, dry fert., vertical fold ..$5,950 ‘00 Kinze 3700, 24 row, 20” spacings ........$56,000 Concord 1100 air seeder ..............................$5,500

USED COMBINES ‘89 Gleaner R-60, 2400 hrs. ........................$28,500 ‘80 NH TR-75, 4x30 cornhead ......................$7,250 ‘08 Gleaner 8200, 30’ flex header ..............$26,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

USED TILLAGE ‘09 Wilrich XL2, 60’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ......................................................$58,500 Wilrich 10FC, 27’, 3 bar harrow ....................$4,000 JD 985, 49’, 3 bar harrow ..........................$21,000 ‘94 JD 980, 36.5’, 3 bar harrow ..................$14,900 Glencoe FC3500, 40’ harrow ........................$7,000 ‘07 C-IH Tigermate 2, 32.5’, 2 bar harrow w/rolling basket........................................$30,500 DMI 40’ crumbler ..........................................$5,250 ‘11 Wilrich 513 Soil Pro, 9-shanks, 24” spacing, harrow ....................................................$44,000 ‘07 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper, harrow ......$26,500 ‘03 DMI 730B, 7-shank disc ripper ..............$19,900 DMI Coulter Champ, 5-shanks, disc levelers $11,500 Wilrich chisel, 17-shanks ..............................$2,650 Kovar 30’ multi weeder, 400 gal. tank ..........$2,500

Dairy

055

Cattle

40+ Used Sprayers On Hand We are dealers for Top Air, Sprayer Specialties, Gregson Sprayers, new & used on hand Wheathart, Westfield, FarmKing, Brandt Vacs & Balzer Equipment • We have NEW Balzer stalk choppers on hand • Truckload prices on NEW Westfield augers, Brandt grain vacs, Batco belts Financing Available

NEW SPRAYERS Silverwing Broyhill 1250 gal., 60-120 adj. axle, 90’ boom, 20” spacing, Raven 450, hyd. pump, rinse tank, galvanized booms..........................................$34,890 Gregson 1000 gal., 60-120 adj. axle, 60’ boom, Raven 440, hyd. pump, 12.4x38 tires ..............................................$26,100

USED SPRAYERS Top Air 2400 gal, 132’ boom, Raven 450, rinse tank, adj axle, 380x90x54 duals ....................................................$61,000 Top Air 1600 gal, 90’ boom, tracks, Raven 450, hyd pump, adj axle $59,500 Top Air 1600 gal, 120’ boom, duals, Command Center........................$56,000 Top Air 1600 gal, 90’ new boom, hyd pump, Raven 450, adj axle, 14.9x46 tires ..............................................$38,000 Top Air 1200 gal, 90’ boom, hyd pump, rinse tank, 320x90x46 tires ........$34,400 Top Air 1600 gal, 90’ boom, hyd pump, rinse tank, Raven 450, 320x90x46 tires ....................................................$30,000 Top Air 1600 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 450, 380x90x46 tires ..........................$30,000 Schaben 1600 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 450, rinse tank, inductor ............$29,000 Brandt 1600 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 450, adj axle, 46” tires ........................$29,000 Sprayer Specialties 1500 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 450, hyd pump, rinse tank ....................................................$27,000 Redball 670, 1200 gal, 90’ boom, 120” axle, 320x90x38 tires, Raven 440 ..............................................$24,000 Redball 680, 1000 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 450, rinse tank, foamer, 320x90x42 tires ..............................................$23,000 Top Air 1100 gal, 80’ boom, hyd pump, Raven 440, adj axle 60-120 ........$19,000 Gregson 1000 gal, 90’ boom, 20” no-drip plbg, hyd pump, Raven 440, rinse tank, 72-120 axle, 14.9x46 tires ..........$16,000 Demco Conquest 1100 gal, 90’ boom, adj axle, hyd. pump, foamer, elec. over hyd, 844 Teejet control ..............$16,000 Spraymaster 1000 gal, 80’ boom, hyd pump, rinse tank, Raven 440, 88-120 axle, 13.6x38 tires ......................$14,000 Redball 680, 90’ boom, Raven 440, hyd pump, 380x90x46 tires, elect. over hyd control ........................................$13,000 SOLD Great Plains 1000 gal, 80’ Top Air X-fold boom, Tee Jet control, hyd pump, 120”

✔ Check us out at: www.lanoequipofnorwood.com

056

AVOCA SPRAY SERVICE

USED HAY EQUIPMENT

‘05 NH 195 spreader ....................................$9,950 ‘06 NH 185 spreader ....................................$9,000 ‘04 H&S 270 spreader ..................................$7,250 ‘96 H&S 235 spreader ..................................$2,850 NI 3639 spreader ..........................................$5,500 ‘11 Meyers 190A spreader ............................$6,750 ‘05 NH 3110 spreader ..................................$4,750 ‘03 Gehl MS1329 spreader..........................$11,500

056 Cattle

888 210 Ave. • Avoca, MN 56114 • Ph. 800-653-2676 or 507-335-7830 • Fax: 507-335-7808 • Mobile: 507-227-6728

‘88 Hesston 8200, high contact rolls ..........$20,750 ‘99 C-IH DC-515, 15’ discbine ....................$12,500 ‘07 NH 1441, 15’ discbine ..........................$22,600 ‘98 JD 1600A, 14’ MoCo ..............................$7,500 Gehl 2170, 9’ haybine ..................................$2,250 ‘84 Versatile 4814, 14’ haybine for 276/9030$3,500 ‘09 NH BB-9060 large square baler, 30,000 bales ................................................................$59,900 ‘97 JD 100, large square baler ....................$17,900 ‘08 NH BR-7080 round baler, netwrap & twine........................................................$21,900 ‘07 NH BR-780A round baler ......................$20,000 ‘05 NH BR-780 round baler ........................$16,500 ‘03 NH BR-780 round baler, netwrap ..........$20,900 ‘06 NH BR-750A round baler, netwrap ........$17,500 ‘83 NH 849 round baler ................................$2,500 ‘79 NH 846 round baler ................................$2,250 ‘04 Gehl 2850 round baler, twine ................$10,500 ‘78 NH 315 square baler w/75 kicker............$3,950 ‘78 NH 310 square baler w/70 thrower ........$2,950 ‘09 NH FP-240, 29P hay head, chopped hay only ..................................................$38,900 ‘88 NH 900, 900 W hay head, 824 cornhead ................................................................$12,500 NH 790 chopper, 2 row cornhead, hay head ..$7,500 NH B62B forage blower ................................$2,950 NH 30 forage blower ........................................$500 JD 65 forage blower ........................................$350 ‘09 H&S X13 rake..........................................$8,900

USED MISCELLANEOUS

056 Cattle

WANTED TO BUY: Dairy 5 yr. old Angus Bull for sale. FOR SALE: P.B. Polled Red & Black Angus Bulls, heifers and cows. 320-235Black Salers bulls, great Call mornings most AI sired. weaning 2664 E.P.D.s, most rank in the (715)985-3830. weights 700-850 lbs., Care is top 10 of the breed, top including through May 15th WANTED: Holstein heifer Bred Corriente heifers, exbloodlines, easy calving, in price, 1/3 down, balance calves from AI breeding to cellent sport cattle. $600 some 2 yr olds. when picked up. build a small private herd. each. 715-262-3898 Oak Hills Farms 507-642-8028 Meado-West Farms 715-651-4133. (715)664-8854. FOR SALE: 50 years in the FOR SALE: Reg. Black AnCattle 056 Charolais seed stock busigus bulls w/ great growth & Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, disposition, breeding out of ness, performance tested heifers or roping stock, top Schiefelbein Genetics., Charolais bulls for sale, FOR SALE OR LEASE blood lines. 507-235-3467 320-597-2747 polled, easy calving w/ exc REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & dispositions. Put more profyearlings; bred heifers, it in your pocket w/ a FOR SALE: Reg. Shorthorn Simmental bulls, black yearlings & 2 yr olds, , Polled, cows, bred heifers & open calving ease, club calves & Charolais bull. Wakefield exc quality, disposition, heifers. 218-924-2337 balance performance. Al Farms 507-402-4640 rate of gain & feed conversired. In herd improvement sion, 5 spring-summer calvprogram. J.W. Riverview FOR SALE: 7 black Angus- LIMOUSIN BULLS for sale. ing cows. 40 yrs Simmental Angus Farm Glencoe, MN & Reds, Blacks, yearling bred heifers, May/June 55336 Conklin Dealer 320two year olds. Performance breeding. Polzin RiverSide calving. $1300/ea. Call 864-4625 tested. Mill Road Limousin Simmentals, Cokato MN 507-595-3773 or 507-339-1302 715-665-2605 320-286-5805

axle, 13.6x38 tires ......................$12,500 Top Air 1000 gal, 60’ boom, Raven 440, hyd pump, rinse tank, adj axle, 13.6x38 tires ..............................................$12,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 90’ boom, Big Wheel, PTO pump, 203 controller ......................................................$8,500 NYB tandem, 1000 gal, 90’ boom, hyd pump, Raven 440 ..................$7,800 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 440, radar, foamer ........................$6,800 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 72’ boom, tandem, hyd pump, 203 controller ............$6,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 90’ boom, tandem, hyd pump, Raven 440 ..................$6,500 Blumhardt 750 gal, 90’ boom, tandem, Raven 440 ....................................$6,000 Flex-i-coil 1600 gal, 120’ boom, Tee Jet control ..........................................$5,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 60’ boom, hyd tip & center lift, hyd. pump, Spray System plbg, no control ............................$5,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal, 60’ boom, hyd fold, hyd center lift & fold, hyd pump, rinse tank, foamer, Micro Trak.......... Choice of three $5,500 Top Air 750 gal, 60’ boom, vertical fold, 203 control, hyd pump ................$5,500 Ag Chem 400 gal, 60’ hyd fold boom ......................................................$5,100 Pleasure Products 1200 gal, 90’ boom, Raven 440, Honda gas w/pump, tandem ..........................................$4,500 Bestway 750 gal, 60’ Top Air boom, vertical fold....................................$4,500 Blumhardt 500 gal, Raven 440, foamer, hyd pump, tandem, 120”..............$4,500 Top Air 800 gal, Blumhardt boom, foamer, 203 controller, hyd pump..............$4,500 Broyhill 750 gal, 60’ boom, 203 control ......................................................$4,200 Big John 500 gal, 60’ X-fold boom, Raven 440, hyd pump ..................$3,500 Broyhill 1000 gal, 60’ hyd X-fold boom, Raven 440, tandem ......................$3,500 Homemade 750 gal, Big Wheel, AgChem boom, Raven 440, PTO ................$3,500 Homemade 500 gal. RD tank, 60’ Demco boom, tandem, foamer ................$3,500 Ag Chem 500 gal, 50’ boom, hyd pump, no control ......................................$2,000 AgChem 500 gal, 60’ boom, Raven 440, hyd pump, tandem........................$3,500 AgChem 500 gal., 60’ boom, Raven 440, hyd pump, tandem........................$3,500

AgChem 500 gal, 50’ boom, hyd pump, no control ......................................$2,000 Bestway 500 gal, 60’ boom, hyd pump, 203 control, tandem......................$3,000 Demco single wheel, 203 control, hyd pump ............................................$2,500 Horvick 500 gal pull between, hyd pump, 203 control, 60’ NYB boom ............................................$2,500 JD 500 gal, 45’ boom, Raven 440 ................................................$2,500 Hardi 500 gal, 50’ boom, Hardi control, Hardi PTO pump ..........................$2,500 Rodman 300 gal, 50’ hydra-fold, foamer, PTO pump, 203 control ..........................................$2,300 Blumhardt 560 gal, 60’ boom, foamer, hyd pump, 203 control ..........................................$2,400 Demco pull between, 60’ hyd tip lift boom, no pump ............................$2,000 Demco 500 gal, 3-wheel, 45’ boom, 203 SOLD controller ......................................$2,000 Kuker 500 gal, 45’ boom, single wheel, 203 controller ................................$1,500 Pony Cart 500 gal., hyd pump, boomless nozzle ............................................$1,200 500 gal. pasture sprayer w/water tank ..........................................................$600 NEW WATER & FERTILIZER TANKS ON HAND! CALL FOR PRICES

SELF PROPELLED SPRAY Willmar 4WD, 750 gal, Raven 440, hyd adj axle ........................................$24,000 (3) Spray Coupes 220, 3-wheel, foamer, air, Raven 440 ..................Choice $7,000 Hahn 670 ........................................$3,000

3 PT. SPRAYERS (3) Top Air 500 gal, 80’ X-fold boom, hyd pump, 4 section ..............Choice $9,500 NYB 500 gal, 90’ boom, pump & control ......................................................$7,500 Top Air 500 gal, 60’ X-fold boom, hyd pump, no controller ......................$5,700 NYB 500 gal, 90’ boom, hyd pump, hyd tilt, ball valves, 203 controller ......$5,500 Blumhardt 500 gal, 90’ boom ........$3,500 500 gal, 45’ boom ..........................$3,500 Demco 500 gal, 60’ Blumhardt boom, Raven 440, no pump ....................$2,500 Sprayer Specialties 500 gal ..........$2,000 300 gal, 45’ boom ..........................$1,800

33 B

‘02 CIH STX375Q, 5700 hrs. $124,000

‘11 CIH Steiger 500Q ............$325,000

‘11 CIH Steiger 550Q ............$335,000

‘08 Magnum 215, 835 hrs., 360 HID lgts., 320R54 tires & duals ....$122,900

‘11 Magnum 215, Lux. cab, auto guide ready, 360 HID lgts., 233 hrs. $138,900

‘06 CIH MX285, 2084 hrs. ....$124,900

‘10 Magnum 335, 1465 hrs. $189,000

‘92 CIH 7120, 5870 hrs., read duals ..................................................$45,000

‘95 CIH 7240, 5026 hrs. ..........$59,500

‘11 CIH Magnum 275, 570 hrs., susp. axle, Lux. cab ................$177,800

‘11 CIH 9120, 290 eng./248 sep. hrs. ................................................$359,000

‘04 CIH 2388, 1550 eng. hrs. ................................................$129,500

‘11 CIH 7120, 205 eng./170 sep. hrs. ................................................$257,000

‘03 Bobcat 5600 Toolcat, 1982 hrs. ......................................................CALL

‘06 Bobcat S250 ....................$29,800

Bobcat 5600 Toolcat ..............$26,900 60” SB200 snowblower ..............$4,500

Bobcat 5600 Toolcat, 578 hrs. ..................................................$33,900

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

‘11 CIH 535Q, 1306 hrs., big pump, Lux. cab ..................................$289,000

USED COMBINES Interest Waiver or Low Rate Financing Available ••• Call For Details

DMI Tiger II, 50’ field cult. ......$20,000

USED 4WD TRACTORS Up To One Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘11 CIH Steiger 500Q, scraper tractor, 30” tracks, Lux. cab, big pump, HID lights, 92 hrs. ....................................................................................................................................$325,000 ‘11 CIH Steiger 550Q, scraper tractor, Lux. cab, big pump, HID lights, 732 hrs. ............$335,000 ‘11 CIH Steiger 535Q, Lux. cab, HID lights, full auto guide steering, 1306 hrs. ..............$279,900 ‘11 CIH Steiger 435, Lux. cab, HID lights, 1000 PTO, 710/70R42 tires, 450 hrs. ............$228,900 ‘02 CIH STS375Q, Quad Trac, big pump, HID lights, diff. lock, 5700 hrs., Very Nice ......$124,000 STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

USED 2WD TRACTORS Up To One Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘10 CIH Magnum 335, 1419 hrs., Lux. cab, 360 HID lights, dual PTO ..............................$189,000 ‘11 CIH Magnum 275, 567 hrs., Lux. cab, 360 HID lights, susp. axle, 480/85R64 tires, full auto guide........................................................................................................................$177,800 ‘11 CIH Magnum 215, 223 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights, auto guide ready ..........................$138,900 ‘08 CIH Magnum 215, 835 hrs., 320R54 tires & duals, Lux. cab, 360 HID lights ..............$122,900 ‘06 CIH MX285, 2086 hrs., HD drawbar, HID lights, auto guide ready ..............................$124,900 ‘95 CIH 7240, 5026 hrs., 20.8x42 tires & duals ......................................................................$59,500 ‘89 CIH 7120, MFD, 8016 hrs., 18.4x42 tires & duals ..........................................................$42,500 ‘92 CIH 7120, 5870 hrs. ..........................................................................................................$45,000 ‘06 CIH DX45, w/LX116 loader ....................................................................................................CALL

9120, track drive, RWA, 290 eng./248 sep. hrs., leather, loaded ..........................$359,000 7120, 205 eng./170 sep. hrs. ..................................................................................$257,000 5088, 290 eng./230 sep. hrs., 30.5x32 tires, hyd. folding covers..........................$189,900 2388, 1550 eng./1350 sep. hrs., duals, chopper, topper ......................................$129,500 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..............................................................................$59,800 1083, 8R30” cornhead ..............................................................................................$13,900 2162, 40’ draper head ....................................................................................................CALL 2020, 35’ platform, Crary air reel ..............................................................................$39,900 2020, 35’ platform, 11⁄2”, rock guard ..........................................................................$32,900 2020, 35’ platform, Crary air reel, 3” knife ................................................................$39,900 2020, 35’ platform, 3” knife, rock guard ..................................................................$39,900 1020, 30’ platform, 11⁄2” knife, tracker ......................................................................$14,900 1020, 20’ platform, 3” knife..........................................................................................$6,500

MACHINES LISTED BELOW TO BE SOLD AT RITCHIE BROS. AUCTION: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 ‘10 CIH Steiger 535Q, 2061hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights ‘10 CIH Steiger 535Q, 2355 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights, Full Pro 600 steering ‘07 CIH Steiger 480, 2185 hrs., 710/70R42 tires ‘05 JD 9620T, 2170 hrs., new tracks ‘99 CIH 9380Q, 6500 hrs. ‘09 CIH 8120, 873 eng./646 sep. hrs. ‘09 CIH 7120, 852 eng./712 sep. hrs. ‘08 CIH 7010, 1628 eng./1252 sep. hrs., 520x42 duals, 4WD ‘06 CIH 8010, 1762 eng./1329 sep. hrs. ‘10 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ‘06 CIH 2208, 8R30” ‘06 CIH 2208/2408, 8R30” ‘11 CIH 3020, 35’ flex head ‘10 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head, Crary air reel ‘10 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head, Crary air reel ‘08 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head.

Call For Details

Paul I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233 CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2011 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

www.matejcek.com

Herb

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

‘11 870, 18’ Ecolo-Tiger, Demo ....CALL

‘11 ‘11 ‘09 ‘04 ‘11 ‘95 ‘11 ‘10 ‘10 ‘10 ‘10 ‘03 ‘92

Cattle

34 B

056 Horse

057 Horse

057 Swine

065

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

WANT TO BUY: Butcher 8 & 9 YR. OLD Black WANTED TO BUY: Reg. Compart's total program Percheron Geldings. Arabian horse, broke to features superior boars & cows, bulls, fats & walkable 17.2HH, 1850 lbs. Safe on all ride, mare preferred. open gilts documented by cripples; also horses, farm machinery. $4,800 for 715-556-0678 or 715-828-2779 BLUP technology. Duroc, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 both. (715)505-2026. York, Landrace & F1 lines. Sheep 060 Terminal boars offer leanHorse 057 Buggy Shop Inventory. Bugness, muscle, growth. Magies, Wheel Machines, Bug- FOR SALE: 600 Bred Ewes. ternal gilts & boars are 6 & 7 yr. old Perch Geldings Lambing now. Will keep ungy & Sleigh Parts. productive, lean, durable. full brothers 7 yr old perch til Feb. 25-Mar- 25. Much More! (608)462-8311 All are stress free & PRRS mare, 7 yr old spotted draft (608)331-7125. free. Semen also available gelding, 4 yr old black reg through Elite Genes A.I. Sydell style Lambing pens. Morgan stud. Make 'em Grow! Comparts Make 8 pens, w/hay basBontrager, E21600 Brunzil Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: kets, water bucket holders. Rd, Augusta, WI. 54722 877-441-2627 $1,600. 715-790-7221

WHITE Goodhue, MN 55027

(651) 923-4441

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Lodermeiers.net

TRACTORS • • • • • • • •

(New) MF 5460, 95 PTO hp., MFD, cab (‘07) MF 3645, 73 PTO hp., MFD, cab, loader (New) MF 2680, 83 PTO hp., MFD (New) MF 1529 Compact, 29 hp., hydro, MFD (‘05) MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 350 hrs. (‘93) Agco 5680, 73 PTO hp., loader, 4250 hrs. IH 70 Hydro w/loader MF 8690, MFD, 290 PTO hp., cab, cut

COMBINES 18-24 Months Interest Free MF 9790, duals, 322 hrs. MF 9790, duals, 1034 hrs. MF 9720, 3292 hrs. MF 8570, duals Gleaner R62, 2643 hrs.

• • • • •

‘08 ‘07 ‘85 ‘90 ‘92

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

White 708N • CIH 822, steel ‘07 Geringhoff 1822, RD • CIH 822, GVL, Poly ‘08 Geringhoff 1222, RD ‘03 Geringhoff 1222, RD ‘07 Geringhoff 1220, RD ‘05 Geringhoff 1220, RD ‘04 Geringhoff 1220, RD ‘08 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘06 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘04 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘03 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘01 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘00 Geringhoff 830, RD ‘92 Geringhoff 830, PC ‘07 Geringhoff 820, RD ‘08 Geringhoff 630, RD ‘07 Geringhoff 630, RD ‘01 Geringhoff 630, RD ‘99 NH 996, 12R20” ‘05 NH 98C, 12R20” ‘04 JD 1290, KR JD 1022 ‘98 JD 893 JD 822 CIH 1083

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

CORNHEADS

GRAIN HANDLING • • • • • • • • • • • • •

NEW Brandt 7500 grain vac NEW Brandt 5200 EX grain vac ‘05 Brandt 1070 auger w/swing hopper Brandt 1070, 1080, 1390 augers w/swing hopper Brandt 1515 LP, 1535, 1545, 1575, 1585 belt conveyors Brandt GBU-10 unloader Brandt 10x35 auger Brandt GBL-10 loader Parker 1348 grain cart, 1300 bu., PTO drive Parker 605 gravity box, 625 bu. Parker 505 gravity box, 550 bu., brakes Hutchinson 10x61 auger Wheatheart transfer auger, 8”

• • • • • • • • • •

NEW MF 1328 & 1329 3 pt. disc mowers ‘11 MF 1372 disc mower cond. Sitrex DM7 disc mower Sitrex RP5 3 pt. wheel rake Sitrex 10 & 12 wheel rakes on cart Rouse 16 wheel V-rake Gehl WR520, 12 wheel rake MF 828 round baler MF 200 SP windrower Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear

HAY & LIVESTOCK

MISCELLANEOUS • Sunflower 5055, 62’ field cultivator • White 6186 planter, 16R30 • ‘08 JD 520 stalk chopper • ‘07 Balzer 20’ stalk chopper • Loftness 30’ stalk chopper, SM • Maurer 28’-42’ header trailer • WRS 30’ header trailer • ‘11 Degelman LR7645 land roller • ‘11 Degelman 7200 rock picker • ‘11 Degelman 6000 HD rock picker • Lucke 8’ snowblower • NEW SB Select 8’ & 9’ snowblowers Call for availability of Sunflower Field Cultivators

TRACTORS JOHN DEERE 620 GAS, NEW TIRES, GOOD PAINT, 1958 ALLIS CHALMERS C WOODS 5' BELLY MOWER JOHN DEERE 2750 W/245 LOADER, JOYSTICK, BUCKET, FORKS, 2WD COMBINES & HEADS GLEANER S77 COMBINE 2011, DUALS, 255 SEP, 355 ENG GLEANER R75 COMBINE 2005, DUALS, TURRET, 1400 SEP, 1700 ENG GLEANER R75 COMBINE 2003, DUALS, 1490 SEP, 1950 ENG GLEANER 8000 FLEX HEAD 30' GLEANER 320 FLEX R MTS HYD DRIVE REEL, OLD STYLE CRESSONI 8 ROW 30" CHOPPING CORN HEAD, JD MOUNTS HARVESTEC 4308C CUTTER CORN HEAD 8 ROW 30", JD MOUNT HARVESTEC 4308C CUTTER CORN HEAD 8 ROW 30" HARVESTEC 4312C 12 ROW 30" CUTTER CORN HEAD SKID STEERS MUSTANG 2060, 4200 HRS MUSTANG 2070, HEATER, CAB, 1900 HRS, 2001 MUSTANG 2070, HEATER, CAB, T BAR, 1998 TILLAGE/FIELD CULTIVATORS LANDOLL 850 SOIL FINISHER, 19.5” BAR SPIKE HARROW ALLIS CHALMERS 1500 MIN-TIL 7-SHANK CHISEL PLOW WILRICH 657 DCR 11-SHANK 5 DEEP TILL 6 CHISEL SUNFLOWER 5332 FIELD CULTIVATOR, 3 BAR COIL TINE HARROW, 27.5' JOHN DEERE 726 SOIL FINISHER, 27' JOHN DEERE 2700 MULCH RIPPER 7-SHANK SOIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSH HOG 1445 DISC, 21' MILLER PRO 6 ROW 30" CULTIVATOR DANISH TINE KORVAIR 42' DRAG FLEX SPIKE TOOTH HAY & FORAGE, STALK CHOPPERS NEW IDEA 5212 DISCBINE ARTS WAY 180C 15' STALK CHOPPER 2011 MASSEY 2150 3X3 BALER 24000 BALES w/preservative KNIGHT REEL AUGGIE 2300 TMR H&S 860 BLOWER H&S 12 WHEEL HI-CAP RAKE HESSTON 7500 FORAGE HARVESTER W/HAY & CORN HEAD HESSTON 6610 SELF PROPELLED HAYBINE NEW IDEA 406 SIDE RAKE WITH DOLLY WHEEL

NEW IDEA 5212 DISCBINE NEW HOLLAND 144 HAY INVERTOR NEW HOLLAND 499 HAYBINE ROUND BALE WAGON 8 BALE ROW CROP, DRILLS & SPRAYERS HARDI TR 500 45' BOOM TANDEM AXLE HARDI COMMANDER 750, 60' BOOM GRAIN CARTS & WAGONS EZ TRAIL 510 GRAIN CART 2011 WITH LIGHT KIT EZ TRAIL 3400 SEED WAGON, DIVIDER, TARP, 1074 GEAR DEMCO 325 GRAVITY BOX W/12 TON GEAR (Fert auger avail.) BADGER 14' FORAGE BOX W/BADGER 10 TON GEAR H&S 7+4 TWIN AUGER 16' FORAGE BOX 12TON TANDEM GEAR GEHL FX1620 FORAGE BOX W/12TON BADGER GEAR GEHL 920 14' FORAGE BOX W/12TON GEAR MANURE SPREADERS NEW IDEA 3626 SPREADER GEHL 1329 SPREADER NEW HOLLAND 795 SPREADER, TOP BEATER, 16.5X16.1 TIRES KNIGHT 8014 PRO TWIN SLINGER, SINGLE AXLE GRAIN EQUIPMENT HUTCH 8X57 PTO HUTCH 8X51 EMD WESTFIELD WR8X29 EMD, LESS MOTOR WESTFIELD MK10X71 GLP WESTFIELD WR8X56 EMD, LESS MOTOR WESTFIELD WR6X61 EMD 3 PHASE MOTOR WESTFIELD MK13X71GLP WESTFIELD MK10X61GLP, NEW CONDITION MISCELLANEOUS ROAD WARRIOR 20’ TILT BED TRAILER, 2011, 6TON, LIKE NEW REDIHAUL 16’ CAR TRAILER, GOOD RUBBER, WOOD DECK, 1992 ROAD BOSS PINTLE HITCH TRAILER, 25’ WOOD DECK, 1995 CHEV KODIAK TRUCK W/23’ ROLLBACK BED, 1990, GOOD RUBBER FEATHERLITE CATTLE TRAILER, LIKE NEW 2007, ALUMINUM 24X7 14' FERTILIZER AUGER IH 2600 TRUCK LT CUMMINS 300HP 24' GRAIN BOX 2 TAGS BUSH HOG 84" 3PT OFFSET MOWER WESTENDORF TA26 BUCKET & SPEAR JD 4020 MOUNTS McKEE 7' SNOW BLOWER, MANUAL CHUTE REM 2100 GRAIN VAC

Swine

065 Livestock Equip

075

4WD & TRACK TRACTORS

ROW CROP TRACTORS

35 B

FOR SALE: 22 farrowing, 42 gestation crates, stainless steel feet & solid steel fencing. Good shape, little rust. Call 507-835-7821 FOR SALE: Lorenz 100 grinder/mixer, fair cond, $1,100/OBO. WANTED TO BUY: Hold down wheel for Chief or Olson barn cleaner. 320-485-3929 For Sale: New steer feeders, calf & finisher sizes 3/4 to 8 ton cap. 920-948-3516 www.steerfeeder.com

‘07 NH TG275, MFWD, 2295 hrs., super steer, 5 hyd., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO megaflow hyd., 380x50 tires & duals ....$110,000

COMBINES ‘05 JD 9660, 1147 sep. hrs., 1633 eng. hrs., hi-cap unload, Contour Master, 20.8x38 duals, touchset, chopper ..............$125,000 ‘06 JD 8010, 1325 eng./1050 sep. hrs., 20.8x42 duals, tracker, chopper, rock trap, auto header, Sharp! ......................$145,000 ‘06 JD 9760, 1445 eng./1037 sep. hrs., bullet rotor, Contour Master, 20.8x42 duals, chopper, touch set, Y/M monitor ..$140,000 ‘05 JD 9760STS, 1462 eng./1086 sep. hrs., Contour Master, 20.8x38 duals, chopper, header controls ..............$129,000 ‘06 JD 9660STS, 1282 sep./1777 eng. hrs, Contour Master, bullet rotor, chopper, 20.8x38 duals ..............................$129,000 ‘04 JD 9760STS, 2358 eng./1612 sep. hrs., hi-capacity unload, Contour Master, chopper, Greenstar yield & moisture monitor, 800x32 tires ....................$119,000 ‘04 JD 9660STS, 1761 eng./1289 sep. hrs., 18.4x42 duals, Green Star yield & moisture monitor, touch set ........................$118,000 ‘09 CIH 7088, 910 sep./1235 eng. hrs., 20.8x42 duals, tracker, rock trap, Pro 600 monitor w/yield moisture ......$169,000 ‘06 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., rock trap, chopper, auto header, thru shop ....$34,500 ‘88 CIH 1680, 3426 hrs., rock trap, chopper, 30.5x32 tires, Bison rotor ..............$24,000

COMBINE HEADS ‘06 & 07 JD 635 flex heads, nice ....................................$24,000 & $25,000 JD 693, 6R30” cornhead ..................$12,500

LOADER TRACTORS ‘10 JD 6330 Premium, MFWD, 1200 hrs., cab, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, JD 673 self leveling loader w/joystick ................$65,000 ‘89 JD 4755, 2WD, cab, 3 pt., PS, 3 hyd., 1000 PTO w/Westendorf TA46 loader w/8’ quick tach bucket & joystick, loader Like New..........................................$39,000

GRAIN CARTS ‘07 Parker 938, 1000 bu. cart, scale & tarp ..............................................$26,500 Check Out Our Website For Pictures & More Listings @ www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95 763-689-1179 Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

www.larsonimplements.com

BALZER BUILDS THE BEST LIQUID MANURE HANDLING EQUUPMENT

Balzer Express Tank • 1/4” Uni-body Construction • 5” and 6” Solid Steel Spindles in Sleeves • Long Tongue and PTO • 5,000, 6,000 and 6,750 gallon sizes available

Grain Carts • New 900 x 32 flotation tires, under 10psi • 24” Unload Auger “Fastest in the industry!” • Auto-Trail Steerable Axle System • New independent horizontal “feeder” & vertical “unload” auger operation

New Tanks & Pumps: Any Size Available Used Tanks:

- Balzer 10,000 gal. 5th wheel slurry - Nuhn 5000 gal. slurry w/5 unit disk injector - Balzer 4800 slurry w/5 unit disk injector - Balzer 4200 slurry - Balzer 4200 gal. vacuum w/3-tank injector - Calumet 3750 gal. vacuum manure tank w/3-unit disc injector - Better Bilt 3400 gal. vacuum tank - Balzer 3350 vacuum tank - Balzer 3350 vacuum tank w/4 unit sweep - Better Bilt 2600 tandem axle vac tank - Van Dale 2250 gal. vacuum tank Express - Better Bilt 2100 gal. vacuum tank Lagoon - Better Bilt 1650 vac tank 1500 gal. vacuum tank Pump -- Badger VanDale 1500 vac tank - Hawkbilt 1500 gal. vacuum tank - Better Bilt 1500 vacuum tank - Better Bilt 1300 single axle vacuum tank - Dietrich 5 unit sweep injector

Misc.Equipment:

- Spray Specialites XLRD 1500 gal., 80’ boom sprayer - Redball 570, 1200 gal., 90’ boom w/Raven 450 monitor - Top Air 1100 gal., 88’ boom, Raven 450 monitor - Top Air 1100 gal., 60’ boom - Top Air 1000 gal., 60’ boom, MT 3000 monitor - L & D 1000 gal., 90’ boom - L & D 1000 gal., 88’ boom, no monitor - Blumhardt tandem axles, 1000 gal., 90’ boom w/foamer - Top Air 1000 gal., 60’ X-fold boom w/Raven 440 monitor, tandem axle V-Pump - Century HD 1000 gal., 60’ boom - Demco Conquest 1000 gal, 60’ boom, Raven • Up to 4000 440 gallons - AgChem 750 gal., 60’ X-fold boom, per minute The most durable and tandem axle dependable high capacity - Walsh 500 gal., 45’ boom pump available. - (2) Brent 600 GREEN gravity wagons Other: - Parker 505 RED gravity wagon - Clay 12’ vertical pump - Nuhn 540, 8’ vertical pump - Brent 1080 grain cart - Brent 774 grain cart - N Tech vari width vertical - Balzer 314 agitator - Brent 674 grain cart manure pump - Hydro Engineering, 16- ‘09 Doda 10’ vertical pump shank, 30’, 3 pt, direct injec- - Brent 472 grain cart - Brent 420 grain cart - Balzer Doda 6’ Super 150 tor tool bar - JD 1210A, 400 bu. grain cart vertical pump - 8”x30’ wheeled load stand - Fork type rock picker - Balzer 38’ lagoon pump - Reel type Degelman rock picker - PFM hydraulic rock picker - Mobility 6.5 ton fertilizer spreader - Mobility 4-ton spreader, full hyd. drive - Dempster 4-ton pull-type fert. spreader - Miller 12 silage dump box - New Lee Mfg. 975 trailer dsl. fuel tank - Krause Model 8200, 36’ disk - IH 706, gas, WF - CIH 30’ flat fold rotary hoe - JD 1530, 3 pt. drill w/JD cart - ‘99 Freisen Model 220 brush auger - JD model 2700, 7 shank chisel plow - DMI 730B, 7 shank chisel plow - ‘94 NH 9680, 4WD, 3580 hrs. - ‘97 NH 9282, 4WD, 3890 hrs. -‘91 JD 4455, PS transmission, 1907 hrs. ‘98 JD 8100, MFWD, 4035 hrs

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘10 CIH Magnum 275, MFWD, 750 hrs., 3 pt., 4 hyd., front wgts., 540/1000 PTO, 380x50 tires & duals, 380x34 front duals ......................................................$144,000 ‘03 JD 8320, MFWD, 4838 hrs., 3 pt., 5 hyd., 1000 PTO, 20.8x42 tires & duals, 20 front wgts., front fenders ..............$100,000 ‘03 JD 8420, 4486 hrs., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, P.S. trans., 380x50 tires & duals, front wgts...............................................$108,000 ‘08 JD 7230 Premium, MFWD, 450 hrs., cab, air, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 3 hyd., 18.4x38 tires....................................$78,000 ‘08 JD 7130 Premium, MFWD, 95 hrs., 18.4x38 tires, 3 valves, 16-spd., power quad, Like New ..............................$78,000 ‘93 JD 4960, MFWD, 9060 hrs., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, front wgts., 14.9x46 tires & duals ............................................$48,000 ‘88 JD 4650, 2WD, 7450 hrs., PS, 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 28.8x38 tires & duals ....$29,500 ‘10 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 800 hrs., 4 hyd., 540/1000 PTO, 380x46 tires & duals..............................................$130,000 ‘09 CIH Magnum 275, MFWD, 1001 hrs., 380x50 duals, 380x34 front duals, 4 hyd., 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., front wgts. ..$135,000 ‘03 CIH MX210, MFWD, 5635 hrs., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, front wgts., 380x46” tires & duals ............................................$65,000 Case 2096, cab/air, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 18.4x38 singles, 6300 hrs. ..............$16,500 ‘08 NH T8020, MFWD, Super Steer, 540/1000 PTO, 685 hrs., 4 hyds., 380x54 tires & duals ....................$118,000

075

FOR SALE: (4) bulk feed bins 4.8 ton capacity, excellent condition. 320-226-5384

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

‘11 JD 9630T, 582 hrs., 36” tracks, wgts., Well Equipped................................$284,000 ‘11 JD 8360RT, 502 hrs., 30” tracks, wgts., 3 pt., 1000 PTO ............................$250,000 ‘10 CIH MX275, MFWD, 708 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd. valves, 18.4x46 tires & duals, front tires & duals ..........$146,000 ‘10 CIH MX145, MFWD, 580 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 18.4x46 tires & duals, front wgts., Like New ....................$135,000 ‘97 JD 9300, 5568 hrs., 24-spd., 20.8x42 duals................................................$78,000 ‘95 JD 8970, 6443 hrs., 12-spd., 20.8x42 tires & duals, 4 hyds., EZee Steer auto steer ................................................$65,000

Livestock Equip

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

FOR SALE: Duroc, Hamp- 30 – 250 watt HBS lights, $150 shire, Yorkshire, & per light OBO. 507-227-6645 Hamp/Duroc boars. Also Hamp/York gilts. 4-H pigs 30 poultry range feeders on also available. Genetics skids, can also be used for from top AI sires, many sheep, 1200 lb. capacity, winners over the years. nice cond. $250 each OBO. Exc herd health. No PRSS. 507-227-6645 Delivery Available. Stan Adelman. 320-568-2225 FOR SALE: (14) farrowing crates w/ flooring, exc cond, asking $50/ea. OBO. Pets & Supplies 070 Luverne, MN 507-290-0683 or 507-283-9157 FOR SALE: Purebred bluetick coon hounds, 14 weeks FOR SALE: (2) 32x70 hoop old, exc bloodlines, barns, (1) 12T & (1) 10T $150/each. bulk bin. 507-766-0928 320-327-2852 Silver Lake MN

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

36 B

Livestock Equip

075

Trucks & Trailers

084

Trucks & Trailers

084

Miscellaneous

090

Miscellaneous

090

Fully enclosed 12' trailer, FOR SALE: Flitter tile lift FOR SALE: Tractor driven Winpower generator, pump, 10hp, 10” pump, 2500 drop down ramp door, near 25KW, trailer & PTO shaft GPM, never used, $4,900. new tires, $2,500. included. $1,600. 507-317-6782 712-297-7951 507-823-4642 IF YOU IRRIGATE, RANGER PUMP CO. it will pay big money to talk Recreational Vehicles 085 to us. We have a product is a Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps for field that can increase your FOR SALE: '92 16' LT Baydrainage & lagoon agitation yields w/ minimum investliner Capri, 70HP outboard, pumps. 1907 E. Main. Albert Lea, MN 56007 ment & labor. (715)220-3648 new seats. $2,100. Sales & Service www.westrumtruck.com Call 507-381-4089 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 ONAN ENGINES 25 hp rewww.rangerpumpco.com built engine for skid loader; rebuilt Onan engines 16 to Miscellaneous 090 WANT MORE READERS ‘05 IH 9200 ....................................................CALL 20 hp for JD garden tracTO SEE YOUR AD?? tors and others. Prices ‘04 Columbia, auto shift ................................CALL Expand your coverage area! FOR SALE: Snow Crete start at $1095.00 exchange. ‘90 Volvo FA, single axle w/26’ The Land has teamed up snow blowers, sizes to BCM, Inc 763-755-0034 with Farm News, and The match HP, on hand 6,8,9,& AL hopper ..............................................$12,500 Country Today so you can 10' long. Dave Schwartz One call does it all! ‘00 Century, Big Power..............................$21,000 do just that! Place a classiSlayton MN 507-920-8181 With one phone call, you can fied ad in The Land and ‘96 Jet 34’ steel trailer ..................................CALL place your classified ad in have the option of placing it The Land, Farm News, GENERATORS: 15kW‘06 IH 9200I ....................................................CALL in these papers as well. 500kW PTO & automatic AND The Country Today. ‘00 Mack auto shift........................................CALL More readers = better regen sets, new & used. Low Call The Land for more sults! Call The Land for time hospital take-outs. info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-657more information. 507-345Standby Power-Windom 4665 or place your ad online 4523 • 800-657-4665 Serving farmers since 1975 @ www.thelandonoline.com 800-419-9806 9-5 Mon-Sat Winpower Sales & Service PARMA DRAINAGE Reliable Power Solutions PUMPS New pumps & Since 1925 PTO & automatparts on hand. Call Minic Emergency Electric nesota's largest distributor Generators. New & Used HJ Olson & Company 320Rich Opsata-Distributor (M) ‘11 JD 8360RT, 440 hrs, IVT, 30” tracks, leather, ‘11 JD 4730, 215 hrs, 90’, high clear kit, L/ing....$220,000 4WD/TRACKS 974-3202 Cell – 320-894-6276 800-343-9376 Extended Warranty ..............................................$280,000 ‘06 JD 4930, 2500 hrs, 120’, boom trac ..............$197,500 (M) ‘91 JD 8960, 24-spd, d/lock, 20.8x42, 6687 hrs ....$62,500 (M) ‘03 Ford TG230, 3486 hrs, 3 SCV, 380/54” ............$85,000 (M) ‘11 JD 4730, 125 hrs, 90’, 380/90R46, B/Trac ....$215,000 ‘94 JD 8970, 24-spd., 20.8-42, 4 SCV, 6000 hrs ....$79,500 (M) ‘09 JD 4930, 800 hrs, 120’, 480/80R50, B/TMC ..$249,000 ‘04 JD 9220, PS, 710/70R38, d/lock, 3162 hrs ....$152,500 2WD TRACTORS ‘92 CIH 9230, 5200 hrs., 3 pt., PTO, 15.4-38 ..........$59,500 (2) JD 4020, dsl, WF, SRT ............................Choice $8,900 PLANTERS ‘07 JD 9330, 1870 hrs, PS, d/lock, 620/70R46 ....$185,000 ‘73 JD 4030, cab, QRT, 2 SCVs, 16.9-38 ................$15,000 ‘11 JD DB120, 48R30, CCs w/ref., r/clnrs, r/cmnd, 6000 .... ‘00 JD 9300T, 4117 hrs, 24 spd, 30” trks, 4 SCV $109,500 ‘75 JD 4430, 6030 hrs, PS, 18.4-38, JD 725 ldf ....$28,500 acres ......................................................................$309,500 ‘97 Wilson 48/102, All ‘00 JD 9400T, 4561 hrs, 24 spd, 4 SCVs, 36” trks$107,500 ‘11 JD 6430, 425 hrs, std cab, PQ, 18.4-34............$52,500 HOPPERS ‘03 JD 1790, 16/31, LF, Pneu. DP ..........................$82,500 ‘08 JD 9530, PS, 800/70R38, D/lock, 1688 hrs. ..$230,000 ‘92 CIH 7120, 7620 hrs, 18.4-42 w/dls, w/ldr ........$37,500 (M) ‘92 Great Plains drill, 45’, 7.5” spacing, Aluminum, Spread Axle, AR ‘87 Cornhusker, 42’, 20” ‘07 JD 9530T, 2600 hrs., 36” tracks, 26 wts........$229,500 markers ..................................................................$22,000 COMPACT/SKID STEERS ..................................$11,500 hopper height, new ‘08 JD 9530T, 36” tracks, Xenon, ins., ’03 JD 2210, 928 hrs, hydro, 62” deck ....................$9,750 (M) ‘08 JD 455 drill, 35’, 10”, Yetter markers, ‘74 Fontaine, 40’............$4,750 1486 hrs ..............................................................$245,000 brakes/tarp, 80% tires harrow ....................................................................$45,000 ‘01 JD 240, skid, hand cntrls, 72” bucket ..............$14,500 ‘11 JD 9530T, 398 hrs, 36” trks, fact. warr. ........$315,000 ..................................$13,750 Custom Haysides ‘98 Case 85XT, 2575 hrs, Grouser tracks, 72” bkt..$15,900 (M) ‘08 White 8524, 24R22”, CCS, var. rate, mon ........$89,000 ‘06 JD 9620, PS, 800/70R38, Xenon, 1530 hrs.....$205,000 ‘03 Mustang MTL25, 1300 hrs, cab, tracks ..........$29,500 2’-6’ Custom Extensions to fit MISCELLANEOUS ‘90 Timpte, Elec. Tarp, ‘09 JD 9630, 1500 hrs, PS, 800/70R38, wgt kit ..$239,500 ‘07 JD CT332, 1574 hrs, cab/air, 84: bkt ................$35,000 (M) ‘08 JD 9630, act. seat, 800/70R38, wts, ‘09 JD 630, MoCo, 9’9”, Imr cond ..........................$17,900

-Day Cab-

507-383-8976 Cell 507-373-4218 • 507-448-3306

FOR SALE: Bodco Model 43 '98 East 26' tandem end gas-powered feed cart. dump, roll tarp, fresh 715-418-0426. DOT'd, good cond., $19,500 OBO. 952-240-2193 WANTED TO BUY! USED BULK MILK COOLER FOR SALE: '81 Alum ChamALL SIZES. 920-867-3048 berlain flat floor livestock trailer, 96”x50', left load, Cars & Pickups 080 good tires & brakes, fresh DOT, farmer owned '05 Ford Crown Vic, had exc. 320-760-4210 or 320-424-0246 maintenance, service records avail., low cost transportation, $2,975. 320- FOR SALE: '94 & '95 Freightliner, FLD120, 864-4583 or 320-779-4583 10spd, N14, Cummins, '98 FOR SALE: HD Luverne Strongbox live bottom trailgrill guard, front bumper, er. grille assembly, off of '08 320-583-5951 or 320-848-2306 Ford Super Duty pickup, '08-'09 truck. Call 507-370-2149 for details. FOR SALE: '99 F250, 81K miles, 4x4, gooseneck & ag hitch, 5 spd, 80% tires, very Industrial & Const. 083 nice; also Gehl 325 manure spreader. 507-276-7466 FOR SALE: '72 Case 450D bulldozer w/ 6 way blade, under carriage very good, 90% plus, nice tight machine, $10,000. No Sunday calls please. 320-630-8247

— 6 convenient locations —

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

HANCOCK, MN

950 hrs ................................................................$250,000 HARVEST EQUIPMENT ‘10 JD 9630T, 1032 hrs, 36” trks, Xenon, wts......$259,500 ‘97 JD 9400, 2226/1330, 24.5-32, DAM, DAS, TPR $59,900 ‘04 JD 9620T, 6500 hrs, 30” tracks 80%, 4 SCV ‘01 JD 9450, 2477/1720, 30.5-32, 17’ auger, TPR..$79,500 ..............................................................................$147,500 ‘00 JD 9550, 2819/2018, LL, 18.4-38,TPR, (M) ‘11 JD 9630T, 36” tracks, leather, Xenon, 785 hrs, spreader..................................................................$82,500 factory warranty ..................................................$295,000 ‘11 JD 9570, 145/94, CM, 18.4-42 DLS ................$239,500 (M) ‘11 JD 9630T, 36” tracks, radar, leather, 716 hrs $298,500 ‘02 JD 9650STS, 3827/2557, 18.4-42 DSL, TPR ....$98,500 ‘10 Cat MT875C, 568 hrs, 16/4 PS, 4 SCVs, 36” trks, ........ (M) ‘08 JD 9670, 1410/1150, CM, 800/70R38 sgls.....$169,000 leather trim, Cat Auto Track System ....................$340,000 ‘11 JD 9770, 439/335, CM, SLS, PRWD, 650’s......$295,000 (M) ‘09 JD 9870, 961/620, CM, 800/70R38, PRWD ....$230,000 MFWD TRACTORS ‘10 JD 635F, F/F, Crary wind system, 1500 acres................$39,500 (M) ‘05 Challenger MT295B, 800 hrs, cab, 2 SCVs......$22,500 (10) ‘08-’11 JD 608, 8R30 Stalkmaster ....................From $57,000 CIH 5240, 10,700 hrs, PQ, 18.4-38, IH 520 ldr ........$24,500 (M) ‘06 Clark, 16R20, C/Head, fits 60/70 Series ..........................$35,000 ‘10 JD 5105M, 300 hrs, O/S, JD 563 lrd ................$46,500 (14) ‘08-11 JD 612, 12R30, Stalkmaster....................From $59,000 ‘11 JD 5101E, 80 hrs, cab, JD 563 ldr, warr..........$49,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘96 JD 6400, MFWD, open station, JD 640 ldr., TILLAGE 3750 hrs. ..................................................................$35,900 (M) ‘08 JD 637, disk, 45’ ..............................................$68,000 ‘11 JD 6430, MFWD, Prem. cab, 360 hrs., 18.4-38, JD ...... JD 856, 12R30, RC cult, triple rig, R/slds ................$4,900 673 ldr ......................................................................$82,500 ‘02 JD 2700, FC, 55.5’, 3 bar harrow......................$35,000 ‘05 JD 7520, MFWD, 3350 hrs, IVT, ILS, 3 SCV ......$89,500 ‘11 JD 2210, 45.5’, L/lift, R/basker, 1500 acres ....$57,500 ‘11 JD 7330, MFWD, std cab, PQ, JD 740 ldr, JD 724, m/finisher, 30’9”, 5 bar spike harrow ........$14,500 85” bkt ....................................................................$89,500 ‘95 JD 724, m/finisher, 38’, 5 bar coil tine NH3......$34,500 ‘95 JD 7800, 2622 hrs, 18.4-42, 3 SCVs ................$72,500 ‘06 JD 724, m/finisher, 39’9”, 5 bar coil tine..........$35,000 ‘01 JD 8410T, 6015 hrs, narrow stande, 24” trks ..$89,500 SPRAYERS ‘10 JD 8320R, 1188 hrs, PS, ILS, 480R50 ............$215,000 ‘11 JD 8335R, 485 hrs, IVT, ILS, 480/80R50, warr$249,500 (M) ‘11 New Fast 9518, 1850 gal, 120’, Norac ............$79,500 ‘06 JD 8430T, 2680 hrs, 120”, 25” tracks, Xenon $159,500 ‘97 Willmar 7200, 3305 hrs, 80’ boom, 12.4-42` ..$37,500 ‘10 JD 8320T, 1180 hrs., PS, 25” tracks, 5 SCV ..$223,500 ‘98 JD 4700, 2168 hrs, 90’, hyd tread, 385/85R34 $92,500 ‘11 JD 8335RT, 400 hrs, PS, 24” trks, warr..........$235,000 ‘09 JD 4730, 650 hrs, 1000’, 20” spg, Xenon ......$190,000 ‘11 JD 8630R, 385 HS, IVT, ILS, 480/80R50, ‘05 JD 4720, 2148 hrs, 80’, poly tank ................$145,000 4 SCV ....................................................................$272,000 (M) ‘06 JD 4720, 1057 hrs, 90’, A/track, L/inj ............$167,500

‘07 JD 568, rnd baler, surface wrap, high moist kit..................................................................$25,500 ‘10 JD CX20, r/mower, hyd fold, 1000 PTO ............$26,000

USED GRAIN CARTS Kinze 800, cart, 800 bu, 30.5-32` ..........................$17,500 ‘04 Brent 1084, 900’s singles, scale, tarp..............$32,500 ‘07 Brent 1084, cart, 100 bu, 18.4-42 w/tandem, tarp ........................................................................$42,500 ‘07 Parker 938, 36” tracks, 1000 bu......................$55,000

MANAGER’S SPECIALS ‘10 JD 2210, DEMO, F/C, 50’, r/basket..................$67,500

THINGS YOU NEED (NEW) Agribusiness 120’ boom ext to fit 4730 ....$16,500 (4) 250 gal. tanks to fit JD 8000T-1000 gal. ............$6,500

John Deere Crop Insurance Available at Our Locations

Contact: Kory Bundy (507) 327-1084 kory.bunde@mycropsolutons.com

Check Out Our New Website

www.mankatoimplement.com

Mankato Implement Potter Implement

Hwy. 22 South • Mankato, MN • www.mankatoimplement.com

1426 S. Broadway • New Ulm, MN

(507) 387-8201 • (800) 624-8983

(507) 354-6818

Zins Implement

Clean..........................$15,500 (2) ‘92 Wilson, 41’ AL, Hopper, Roll Tarp ....................$16,000 Hopper short term rentals also now available

BELTED TRAILERS ‘97 Trinity, 42’, 36” Belt, Tarp w/Wet Kit ..................$24,500

DAY CAB TRUCKS ‘90 Int’l 9400, 196” WB, AR ..................................$11,500

FLATBEDS ‘00 MANAC 45/96 Spread Axle, AR, Pintle Hitch, Sandblasted, New Paint ....................$8,500 Fruehauf 45/96, Closed Tandem ...................... $5,000 ‘97 Transcraft, 48/102 AL Combo, New 5th Wheel, CTS, AR, SB w/new paint ................$9,250 ‘95 Stoughton, 48’ Winch Rail w/Winch, Sliding Tandem. Good Paint ..................$7,500 ‘02 Transcraft 48/96, AL Combo, Rail w/Winch, Tie Downs, Storage Box ................$9,000

any trailer back ..............$350 Standard ......................$1,250 NEW Tip-In Tip-Out ......$1,750

DROP-DECKS Engineered Beavertail for Drop Deck ....Installed $5,500 ..............Unassembled $3,500

VAN TRAILERS Good Selection (over 30) of Van Trailers ‘95-’01, 48/10253/102, great for water storage or over the road hauling ............$3,500-$8,250 ‘95 GD AI Reefer, 48/102, Clean............................$4,750 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers to rent. $135.00 per month plus tax. $1.50/mile for pickup & delivery

MISCELLANEOUS AR/SR Axles & Suspensions For Trailers ..............$1,000 Air Ride/Axle, ............$500 Spring Ride/Axle 1/4” Plastic Liner, 10’ Wide ................$27.50/Ft. Rims - 22.5 & 24.5 ............$60 Single Wheel Dolly ........$1,350

• All Trailers DOTable •

Hwy. 11 No. • Nicollet, MN

Will Consider Trades!

(507) 225-3464

Call 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

Erlandson Implement

Minnesota Lake Implement

Erlandson Implement

214 East State St. • Kiester, MN

Hwy. 22 South • Minnesota Lake, MN

35W & Int. 90 • Albert Lea, MN

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com

(507) 294-3244

(507) 462-3828

(507) 373-6418

Delivery Available!

TRACTORS-4WD ‘09 ‘97 ‘89 ‘87 ‘81

JD 9630T, 1303 HRS., 36” TRACKS, HID LIGHTS ..............................................$278,500 CIH 9390, 4394 HRS., REMAN, 24-SPD.................................................................$95,000 CIH 9170, 4682 HRS, 12-SPD., PS, 20.8X42 ..................................................COMING IN CIH 9150, 5500 HRS., PS........................................................................................$45,500 IH 6588, 5295 HRS., 18.4X38 DUALS ....................................................................$16,900

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‘09 ‘96 ‘96 ‘98 ‘01

CIH MAGNUM 215, 1503 HRS., LEATHER, PRO ................................................$125,000 CIH 7240, 7300 HRS., 18.4X42 70% ......................................................................$56,500 AG 6175, 4601 HRS., PS ........................................................................................$53,900 CIH MX135, 4601 HRS., 520/85R38 SINGLES 90% ..............................................$47,850 CIH C-70, 1487 HRS., LOADER, VERY NICE ........................................................$27,900

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‘04 ‘78 ‘79 ‘69 ‘53

JX85, 400 HRS., LOADER W/JOYSTICK................................................................$26,500 JD 4440, 6069 HRS., 18.4X38 ................................................................................$23,900 JD 4440, 7268 HRS., 18.4X38, DUAL PTO ............................................................$21,900 IH 856, 4800 HRS., MILLER LOADER ....................................................................$11,500 OLIVER 77, BELLY MOWER ....................................................................................$2,500

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‘07 JD 2210, 47.5’, 4-BAR HARROW, 7” SWEEPS ......................................................$53,500 ‘08 JD 2210, 45.5’, 4-BAR HARROW, 7” SWEEPS ......................................................$47,200 ‘02 JD 2200, 56.5’, 200 LB. SHANK, 3-BAR ................................................................$38,900 ‘01, DMI, 44.5’, TIGERMATE II, PIVOT GAUGE WHEELS, 4-BI ..................................$36,500 WILRICH QUAD X, 45’, 4-BAR HARROW ....................................................................$34,500 ‘98 DMI, 50.5’, TIGERMATE II, 7” SWEEPS, 3-BAR HARROW ..................................$29,000 ‘96 WILRICH, QUAD 5, 52', 4-BAR HARROW ............................................................$19,975 ‘98 JD, 38’, SINGLE POINT DEPTH CONTROL ..........................................................$14,250 ‘95 DMI TIGERMATE, 47.5’, 3-BAR HARROW ............................................................$12,750 ‘98 CIH 4300, 31.5’, 4-BAR HARROW..........................................................................$12,750 CIH 4300, 28.5’, 3-BAR HARROW ................................................................................$11,900 ‘90 CIH 4900, 47.5', 7" SWEEPS, 3-BAR HARROW ....................................................$10,500 CIH 4300, 46’, 3-BAR ADJ. HARROW ..........................................................................$10,750 CIH 4900, 52.5’ ................................................................................................................$8,500 CIH 4900, 52.5’ ................................................................................................................$8,450 CIH 4900, 52.5’ ................................................................................................................$8,500 ‘94 CIH 4900, 41', 3-BAR HARROW ..............................................................................$7,900 JD 960, 37’, 3-BAR HARROW ........................................................................................$4,950

37 B THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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TRACTORS-MFD

TRACTORS-2WD

FIELD CULTIVATORS

SPRAYERS SE BLUMHARDT, 1000 GAL., 88’-90’ BOOM, RAVEN ......................................................$8,500 SE ‘95 FLEX-COIL 650, 3-SECTION BOOM ........................................................................$5,850

SKID-LOADERS ‘10 ‘10 ‘07 ‘06 ‘07 ‘07 ‘05

CASE CASE CASE CASE CASE CASE CASE

450, S3, 1062 HRS., LOADED, HEAT/AIR....................................................$35,000 420, S3, 750 HRS., 2-SPD. ..........................................................................$27,900 420CT, 907 HRS. ..........................................................................................$26,500 410, 2345 HRS., NEW REMAN ENGINE ......................................................$22,500 430, 2005 HRS. ............................................................................................$21,750 420, 1825 HRS. ............................................................................................$18,850 420, 3846 HRS., CAB & HEAT ......................................................................$17,650

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‘09 ‘09 ‘10 ‘08 ‘08 ‘07 ‘07 ‘04 ‘81

CIH 9120, 840 ENG. HRS., TRACKS, RWA, LOADED ........................................$319,900 CIH 9120, 1100 ENG. HRS., TRACKS, RWA, LOADED ......................................$289,500 CIH 7088, 455 ENG. HRS., RWA, LOADED..........................................................$269,900 CIH 7010, 808 ENG HRS., 20.8X42 DUALS ........................................................$217,500 CIH 8010, 1200 ENG. HRS., 20.8X42 DUALS ......................................................$212,900 CIH 8010, 1668 ENG. HRS., 20.8X42 DUALS, RWA ............................................$206,500 CIH 7010, 1593 ENG. HRS., 20.8X42 DUALS, AFX ROTOR................................$199,850 CIH 8010, 2451 ENG. HRS., 20.8X42 DUALS, HID LIGHTS ................................$179,950 IH 1440, 3881 ENG. HRS., CHOPPER......................................................................$9,950

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‘10 ‘07 ‘02 ‘96 ‘92 ‘91 ‘90

22 GPM PTO PUMPS, TAKE OFFS – CALL CIH 1260, 36R20”, STEERABLE REAR AXLE ......................................................$205,950 CIH 1250, 24X30, ON ROW HOPPERS, PRO 600 ................................................$81,995 KINZE, 16X31, INTERPLANT ..................................................................................$64,850 CIH 950, 12X30”, LIQUID FERT., EARLY RISER MONITOR ..................................$18,500 CIH 900, 12X30, PULL TYPE ..................................................................................$13,900 CIH 900, 12X30, TRASH W, EARLY RISER MONITOR ..........................................$12,000 CIH 900, 12X30..........................................................................................................$8,989

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CALL FOR CHANGING INVENTORY!!! ‘09 JD 2700, 9-SHANK, 24” SPACING ........................................................................$38,850 ‘07 JD 2700, 5-SHANK ..................................................................................................$27,500 ‘03 JD 2700, 9-SHANK, CUSHION BLADES, COVING BOARDS ................................$27,900 ‘04 JD 2700, 7-SHANK, 30” SPACING ........................................................................$24,500 ‘99 CIH 730B, INDIVIDUAL CUSHION GANG, (NO LEADS) ........................................$23,795 ‘01 WILRICH 957, 7-SHANK, BIG COIL TINE LEVER ..................................................$22,950 ‘00 DMI 730B, BLUE, LEADS AND MAINS ..................................................................$21,500 ‘97 DMI 730B, BLUE, 10” MAINS, 2” LEADS ..............................................................$18,750 JD 510, 7-SHANK, DISC RIPPER ................................................................................$13,900 ‘05 WILRICH 357, 7-SHANK 3-PT MOUNTED RIPPER ................................................$7,900 DMI COULTER CHAMP, 11-SHANK, 4” TWISTED SHOVELS ......................................$4,950 TEBBEN 7-SHANK MOUNT RIPPER..............................................................................$3,500

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COMBINES

PLANTERS

FALL TILLAGE

CORN HEADS & BEAN HEADS ‘09 ‘07 ‘07 ‘05 ‘05 ‘05 ‘04 ‘04 ‘03 ‘06 ‘04 ‘98 ‘99 ‘91 ‘91

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NEW PRO 600 TAKE OFF ................................................................................................CALL NEW PRO 600 TAKE OFF ................................................................................................CALL NEW PRO 600 DEMO UNIT ..............................................................................................CALL WIRING HARNESS FOR PRO 600 FOR 1250 PLANTER ..............................................CALL

‘89 ‘02 ‘90 ‘97 ‘97

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

2608, 8R30”, FT & AHHC, HYD. DECK ..........................................................$66,550 2412, 12R30”, FT, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..................................................$58,500 2208, 8R30” ......................................................................................................$38,000 2208, 8R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$35,500 2208, 8R30", HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$32,900 2208, 8R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$32,850 2208, 8R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$33,900 2208, 8R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$33,900 2208, 8R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES, AHHC ..............................................$29,975 2206, 6R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$28,500 2206, 6R30”, HYD. STRIPPER PLATES ..........................................................$25,500 1083, 8R30”, POLY, TALL CORN SHIELD ......................................................$14,900 1083, 8R30”, POLY, TALL CORN SHIELD ................................................COMING IN 1083 ..................................................................................................................$11,500 1083 ....................................................................................................................$9,950 1083 ....................................................................................................................$8,950 1063, STRAIGHT TIN, TALL CORN SHIELDS, PAINTED..................................$8,250 1020, 30', 1.5" SICKLE, FT ..............................................................................$14,900 1020, 25’, 3” SICKLE, ROCK GUARD ............................................................$11,950 1020, 30', FIELD TRACKER ..............................................................................$9,950 1020, 30’, 3” SICKLE, ROCK GUARD ..............................................................$9,000

AUTO GUIDE EQUIPMENT

Miller Sellner Implement MN Hwy. 60 West • Bingham Lake, MN (507) 831-1106

MN Hwy. 4 South • Sleepy Eye, MN (507) 794-2131

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

38 B

‘11 JD 9530, 207 hrs., Lease Return ................$264,900

‘11 JD 4730, 353 hrs., 800 gal., 90’ boom ......................$208,500

‘09 JD 4930, 2213 hrs., 1200 gal., 120’ boom ..$199,750

‘98 JD 1760, 12R30”, liquid fert. ........................................$38,900

“Contact Paul Gohlke for your John Deere crop insurance needs. 612-756-0001”

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4WD TRACTORS (W)’11 JD 9630, Lease Return ..............................................$279,000 (O)’11 JD 9630, Lease Return ..............................................$279,900 (O)’11 JD 9630, Lease Return ..............................................$279,900 (B)’11 JD 9630, 285 hrs., Lease Return ................................$279,900 (O)’11 JD 9530, 207 hrs., Lease Return................................$264,900 (O)’10 JD 9630, 810 hrs., Extended Warranty ......................$255,900 (H)’09 JD 9630, 1060 hrs., Extended Warranty ....................$244,900 (B)’77 JD 8630, 8500 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ....................................$11,900

TRACK TRACTORS (H)’10 JD 8345RT, 250 hrs. ..................................................$257,900 (H)’08 JD 9630T, 2245 hrs., auto trac ready ........................$238,500 (O)’11 JD 8310T, 300 hrs., 25” tracks ..................................$233,900 (O)’11 JD 8310T, 400 hrs., 18” tracks ..................................$226,900 (B)’07 JD 9620T, 2283 hrs. ..................................................$209,900 (O)’00 JD 9400T, 6150 hrs., 36” tracks ................................$109,000

ROW CROP TRACTORS (B)’89 JD 4755, 9781 hrs. ......................................................$49,900 (H)’80 JD 4640, 7306 hrs., PS ................................................$24,500 (H)’80 JD 4240, 7666 hrs., Quad ............................................$22,500 (H)JD 2630, 148 loader ..........................................................$16,500 (B)’88 JD 2755, 2WD ..............................................................$14,900 (B)’70 JD 3020, diesel, Syncro, 2 SCV ....................................$12,900 (H)’73 IH 1466, cab ................................................................$11,500 (B)’59 IH 560, gas, wide front ..................................................$5,950

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

COMBINES (O)’11 JD 9870, 1467 sep. hrs. ............................................$314,900 (O)’11 JD 9870, 261 sep. hrs. ..............................................$297,500 (O)’11 JD 9770, 256 sep. hrs. ..............................................$268,900 (H)’10 JD 9870, 559 sep. hrs. ..............................................$259,900 (H)’09 JD 9870, 490 sep. hrs. ..............................................$257,900 (H)’10 JD 9770, 405 sep. hrs. ..............................................$239,900 (H)’10 JD 9770, 552 sep. hrs. ..............................................$233,500 (O)’08 JD 9770, 759 sep. hrs., PRWD ..................................$219,500 (O)’10 JD 9570, 419 sep. hrs., duals ....................................$206,000 (O)’09 JD 9670, 990 sep. hrs., auto trac ready ....................$199,000 (H)’08 JD 9570, 475 sep. hrs., duals ....................................$198,900 (O)’08 JD 9570, 418 sep. hrs. ..............................................$196,000 (B)’08 JD 9770, 1011 sep. hrs. ............................................$188,000 (O)’07 JD 9660, 1032 sep. hrs. ............................................$179,900 (B)’05 JD 9860, 1235 sep. hrs...............................................$169,900 (O)’07 JD 9660, 1185 sep. hrs., duals ..................................$164,900 (H)’04 JD 9560, 1200 sep. hrs., duals ..................................$153,900 (H)’04 JD 9760, 1237 hrs. ....................................................$149,500 (B)’04 JD 9560SH, walker, 1525 sep. hrs. ............................$139,900 (H)’04 JD 9860, 2121 sep. hrs. ............................................$136,900 (H)’01 JD 9650, 1777 sep. hrs. ............................................$109,900 (H)’98 JD 9510, 2284 sep. hrs., PRWD ..................................$79,900 (H)’95 JD 9500, 1851 sep. hrs., duals ....................................$53,900 (B)’91 JD 9500, 2057 sep. hrs., PRWD ..................................$49,900

(W)’97 JD 9500, 3021 sep. hrs. ..............................................$49,900 (B)’83 JD 6620SH, sidehill, 3700 hrs. ....................................$15,900 (B)’80 JD 6620, 4384 hrs. ......................................................$14,900 (B)’87 JD 4425, 2443 hrs. ......................................................$12,900 (H)’80 JD 7220, 4365 hrs. ......................................................$11,900 (B)’81 JD 7720, 4590 hrs. ........................................................$9,900

SPRING TILLAGE

(O)’10 JD 4730, 610 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$181,800 (O)’10 JD 4730, 90’ boom ....................................................$181,700 (O)’09 JD 4730, 735 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$179,850 (O)’10 JD 4730, 894 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$179,850 (O)’09 JD 4730, 1222 hrs., 90’ boom....................................$178,900 (O)’08 JD 4730, 1282 hrs., 90’ boom....................................$176,500 (O)’06 JD 4720, 2227 hrs. ....................................................$137,250 (O)’06 Ag Chem 1074, 2505 hrs., 1000 gal., 90’ boom ........$102,500 (H)’01 JD 4710, 2421 hrs., 80’ boom......................................$99,900 (H)’00 JD 4700, 1755 hrs., 80’ boom......................................$89,900 (O)Top Air TA1600, 1600 gal., 90’/120’ boom ........................$36,900 (O)Top Air TA1100, 1100 gal., 80’ boom ................................$24,500 (O)Sprayer Specialties, 110 gal., 80’ boom ............................$21,500 (O)Spraymaster, 1100 gal., 80’ boom......................................$18,500 (O)Top Air 1100, 60’ boom, duals ............................................$8,000 (H)Top Air 1000, 60’ boom ........................................................$6,500

(B)’05 JD 2210, 58.5’ ..............................................................$42,500 (B)’05 JD 2210, 36.5’ ..............................................................$37,900 (W)’03 JD 2200, 34.5’ ............................................................$32,900 (O)’94 JD 980, 44.5’ ................................................................$18,500 (B)’94 JD 980, 39.5’ ................................................................$16,900 (W)Case 4300, 43’ ..................................................................$13,500 (H)JD 960, 36.5’ ........................................................................$4,950 (B)Glencoe 2R30” ......................................................................$2,900 (B)Hiniker 35’ cultivator ............................................................$2,900 (B)JD 1000, 32.5’ ......................................................................$2,795 (H)JD 1000, 32.5’ ........................................................................$950 (H)’10 JD 1990, 40’, 15” spacing, CCS ..................................$84,500 (B)CIH 1200, Bauer Built bar, 36R20” ....................................$79,900 (H)’00 JD 1770, 16R30”, liq. fert.............................................$54,900 (B)’11 JD 885 XUV diesel, Lease Return ................................$11,900 (O)’97 JD 1780, 24R20” ..........................................................$48,500 (B)’10 JD 850 XUV diesel, loaded, camo ................................$10,900 (H)’98 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq. fert.............................................$38,900 (O)’10 JD 620I XUV, 83 hrs., loaded........................................$10,700 (H)’04 JD 1710, 12R30” ..........................................................$26,900 (B)’10 JD 620I XUV, 117 hrs., loaded......................................$10,500 (H)’00 JD 750, 20’ no till drill ..................................................$26,900 (O)’09 JD 620I XUV, 60 hrs., loaded........................................$10,200 (B)’94 JD 455, 30’, 15” spacing ..............................................$24,900 (W)’09 JD 620I XUV, 270 hrs., loaded ......................................$9,750 (B)’02 JD 1560, 15’ no till ......................................................$24,900 (H)’10 JD 620I XUV, 1500 hrs., cab ..........................................$9,500 (B)’97 JD 455, 25’, 10” spacing ..............................................$18,900 (B)’08 JD 620I XUV, 226 hrs., loaded........................................$9,500 (H)’90 JD 7200, 12R30”, wing fold ........................................$14,800 (O)’08 JD 620I XUV, 257 hrs., loaded........................................$9,500 (O)’82 JD 7000, 12R30”, dry fert, FF ......................................$12,500 (O)’10 JD 620I XUV, 454 hrs., loaded........................................$9,350 (O)’08 JD 620I XUV, 251 hrs., loaded........................................$9,000 (W)’05 JD 6x4, 392 hrs., loaded................................................$6,950 (B)’07 JD 568, surface wrap....................................................$29,900 (B)’06 JD HPX 4x4, 682 hrs. ....................................................$6,500 (H)’08 JD 468, silage special, 6800 bales................................$25,900 (O)’08 Kawasaki Brute 750 ATV, 47 hrs. ....................................$6,250 (B)’05 JD 956, 14’6” center pivot ............................................$19,900 (O)’04 JD HPX 4x4, 800 hrs. ....................................................$5,850 (W)’02 JD 567, surface wrap ..................................................$19,900 (B)’04 Bobcat 2200 4x4, 438 hrs...............................................$5,200 (B)’08 NH BR7090, twine only ................................................$19,900 (B)Cub Cadet Big Country 4x2, 439 hrs. ..................................$4,500 (B)’05 NH 1431, 13’ ................................................................$19,900 (B)’07 Yamaha 660 ATV, 2694 mi. ............................................$4,250 (B)’03 JD 467, cover edge ......................................................$16,500 (B)’06 JD Buck 500 auto, 131 hrs. ............................................$3,500 (W)’05 CIH RBX552, twine, low bales ....................................$13,750 (W)’04 JD CX, 1025 hrs.............................................................$2,995 (B)’05 JD 525, 8’2” MoCo ......................................................$12,900 (B)’06 JD 6x4, 4044 hrs. ..........................................................$2,000 (B)NH 499, 12’ center pivot ....................................................$11,900 (B)Vermeer MC830 rotary MoCo ..............................................$8,900 (B)’98 NH 664, 2200 lb. bale ....................................................$6,995 (O)’10 JD 4930, 1330 hrs., 120’ boom..................................$228,500 (B)’92 JD 1600, center pivot, MoCo ..........................................$5,900 (O)’11 JD 4830, 341 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$227,900 (B)NH 278 square baler ............................................................$3,500 (O)’11 JD 4730, 90’ boom ....................................................$208,500 (W)’79 JD 336, ejector ..............................................................$2,950 (O)’11 JD 4730, 359 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$208,250 (B)Meyer throw wagon........................................................2@ $1,995 (O)’08 JD 4930, 1563 hrs., 120’ boom..................................$205,000 (W)H&S throw wagon ........................................................2@ $1,500 (O)’11 JD 4730, 155 hrs., 100’ boom....................................$203,500 (O)’09 JD 4930, 2213 hrs., 120’ boom..................................$199,750 (O)’10 JD 4730, 916 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$187,750 (O)’10 JD 4730, 951 hrs., 90’ boom......................................$182,500

PLANTERS & DRILLS

UTILITY VEHICLES/ATV

HAY & FORAGE

SPRAYERS

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

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This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondent Richard Siemers

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 17, 2012

Rural roots

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Original site of Breck Academy, Wilder, Minn. lasted September through June cost $110 (paid in advance). That amount included steam-heated The school, founded by a Rev. Dunn and named dorm rooms, board, laundry and tuition. It was for pioneer missionary Rev. James Lloyd Breck, Wilder, a burg along Minnesota Highway 60 south opened in 1886 on the west edge of Wilder. The only known as Breck College in those days, and served of Windom. evidence of its former existence is a large sign stat- an older student body. Pulling into this small southwest Minnesota com- ing the fact and picturing the buildings that once Breck remained in Wilder for 30 years, moving to munity of houses (pop. 60), it takes some imagina- made up the campus. its first Twin Cities location in 1916. The population to picture it as the always small but thriving tion of Wilder was already in decline and the The central administration building held the town it once was, with four passenger trains stopschool’s departure surely didn’t help. While the classrooms, dining hall and gymnasium. There was ping daily. school is long-gone, the billboard commemorating it a girls’ dormitory, a boys’ dormitory and a chapel. Wilder’s population never reached 200, which along County Highway 13 assures it has not been This being a farm college, there was a farm with may have been part of the attraction to those who forgotten. the usual buildings. The farm provided practical founded the school as an Episcopal farm college in hands-on education and produced food for the The history in this story was drawn from the two 1885. The school was advertised as a place where school. volumes of Jackson County History and supplestudents wouldn’t need much money — there was mented from the website of Breck Academy. ❖ Education was a bargain. The school year that no place to spend it — and they wouldn’t be dis-

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

reck Academy has been part of the Twin Cities B scene for so long that one would not guess it has rural roots. Yet its birthplace was the town of

tracted from their studies.

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.

February 17, 2012

“Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet”

(800) 657-4665 www.thelandonline.com theland@thelandonline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

S O U T H E R N

E D I T I O N

Copyright 2012©

CRYSTEEL’S GRAIN BODY & STINGRAY HOIST: A POWERFUL VALUE - Bodies In Stock! Crysteel Grain Tippers are built with materials and design features that offer years of performance and value: INSIDE: Crysteel Grain Tippers are designed with smooth snag-free sidewalls and steel floors to prevent bridging of loads. OUTSIDE: The smooth sidewalls improve air flow & are great for graphics. BELOW: The understructure contains no crossmembers resulting in smooth self-cleaning surfaces that are strong but without unnecessary weight.

• Unitized all-welded construction • High strength 50,000 PSI yield steel • Tubular longbeans, side rails and top rail • Swing-out 3-section rear gate w/rubber seals and large 12”x24” grain gate in center door • Rubber-mounted stop, turn and clearance light

2011 Neville 28’ tandem axle alum. single hopper trailer, 770 bu. capacity, 7700 lbs. empty wgt., ladders & catwalks, viewing windows, Shurlock roll tarp w/dbl. ridge straps & front cable return, electric roll tarp, New 11:00R22.5 Lo Pro tires, alum. outer rims, $28,200, plus taxes & registration.

2012 Neville 22’ single axle steel single hopper trailer, 650 bu. capacity, 6,300 lbs. empty wgt., ladders viewing windows, Gator hyde coating on hopper, Shurlock tarp, 11:00R22.5 new recapped tires, $15,100, plus taxes & registration.

Serving the Ag Industry since 1974

SPECIAL 24’x102”x60” in Prime Paint $9,500 Plus FET

2012 Neville 40’ tandem axle alum. twin hopper trailer, 1,150 bu. capacity, 8,900 lbs. empty wgt., ladders & catwalks, viewing windows, Shurlock tarp w/dbl. ridge straps & front cable return, New 11:00R22.5 Lo Pro tires, alum. outer rims, $29,500, plus taxes & registration.

2012 Neville 40’ tandem axle steel twin hopper w/center divider trailer, 1160 bu. capacity, 10,800 lbs. empty wgt., ladders & catwalks, viewing windows, Gator hyde coating on hoppers, Shurlock tarp w/twin ridge straps & front cable return, 11:00R22.5 new recapped tires, $24,500, plus taxes & registration.

Hwy. 60 East Lake Crystal, MN

800-722-0588 507-726-6041

Page 2 - Friday, February 24, 2012

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Buy this tractor with a new Crysteel trailer and deduct $2,000

‘89 Hendrickson VT100,Cummins NTC 315 hp., Fuller 8-spd. w/Lo/Lo, Hendrickson 40,000 lb. walking beam rear susp. w/11:00x22.5 tires on alum. rims outside, 12,000 lb. front axle w/315-80Rx22.5 tires on alum. rims, 4.65 rear end ratio - $12,500

2002 Sterling 9500 single axle tractor, 12.7L Detroit 470 hp. engine, 7-spd. trans., air ride, 11:00x22.5 tires, very clean tractor. $17,500

‘94 Ford LNT8000, 58,000 GVWR, 8.3L Cummins 275 hp, Fuller RTO1178LL 8-spd + 2 lows, 18,000 lb. front w/385/65R22 tires, 40,000 lb. Hendrickson rear w/11:00R22 tires, reburb. 20’x97” steel body w/62” sides, new tarp - $31,500

‘06 Ford F550 4x4 dsl. service truck, Demo, w/new Stellar TMAX 11’ service body & 7621 6000 lb. crane, hyd. outriggers, 40CFM hyd. comp., Miller Enpak pwr. source w/Kubota 27 hp. dsl. - $88,500 - Call for a Demo today.

Used Refurbished Kann 21’ x 96” wide x 72” high aluminum grain body, 3-pc. swingout engate, HD top rail, new roll tarp - $8,500

‘90 Ford F350 4x2, 7.3 diesel, automatic, PS, PB, 72,000 mi., Armlift AVTEL 28’ Aerial; devise, live hydraulics, hydraulic out riggers, 12’ flatbed w/new 8’ long fiberglass tool box - $12,950

‘90 Intl. 4900, 16K frt. w/385/65.22.5’s, 34K tandem, DT 466 210 hp., 10-spd., air brakes, 127K mi., Reach-all boom w/person bskt., 54’ max workng hgt., boom cap. is 1850 lbs., at 39’ & 6100 lbs. at 17’, 8000 lb. winch - $24,500

Schien 16’ x 94” wide grain body w/52” sides, w/3-pc. swingout rear doors, new steel floor & crossmembers, shotblasted & new red paint - $5,450

Used 18’x96” Marshall grain body w/steel flor, unitized const., 60” sides, new paint, new SRT Agri Cover tarp, 3-pc full swing out endgate, body is in exc. cond., twin cyl. scissors hoist mtd. under body w/pump included - $9,850

19’6”x96” Crysteel grain body w/60” sides, 3-pc. 46” rear swingout endgate, steel floor, body has been refurbished, shotblasted completely, primed, painted your choice of colors, understructure has been blasted & painted black - $6,300

Used J-Craft 20’x102” wide grain body w/58” sides, new 3-pc. swingout endgate, good condition, body & understructure is completely shotblasted & primed & painted your choice of color, body painted will cost $6,500

Schwartz Timberlock 15’6” x 94” wide grain body w/42” sides, all oak construction floor & sides, good steel crossmembers & longsills, ladder, good condition, - $1,450

Used Crysteel ST4000 twin cylinder double acting scissors hoist for up to a 20’ body, 4000 psi pump, rear hinge & controls included - $3,250.

Olympic 144 hoist, ideal for 20-21’ grain bodies, includes pump, controls, and new rear hinge assembly - $3,200

Olympic 110DA hoist, ideal for 16-17’ grain bodies, will include pump, reservoir, controls, and new rear hinge assembly - $2,150

Schwartz HP2301 single cylinder scissors hoist with pump, ideal for 14’ body on single axle truck - $750

‘08 Omaha 11’x96” bed w/steel side tool boxes, underside tool box, air compressor w/8 hp. Honda engine, air hose reel, 110 gallon fuel tank w/2 Filrite 15GPM electric fuel pumps - $4,200

‘03 Brand FX fiberglass service body w/high side front compart., steel flatbed w/hyd. tool circuit, Case D125 backhoe mtd. on rear, hyd. out riggers, hyd. pump included, Truck in pic not included, $9,800 - Ideal service truck & tile repairing body.

Used air ride/air lift tag assembly with wide stance axlw to be used with singe rims and tires, new lift controls included with suspension - $1,950

4,000 lb. Stick Boom Crane w/10’ boom that power telescopes to 16’, power rotation, elevation & winch, 12v electric power - $5,500

CEI 18’ aluminum 3-compartment bulk feed body with 24’ discharge auger, approximately 16-ton capacity, hydraulic pump and reservoir included - $5,500

‘03 Bimar 12,000 lb dump trailer w/14’ long x 80” wide dump body w/18” steel sides & barn type rear doors, 4’ removable wood sides for hauling, Twin cyl. hoist w/elec. hyd. pump, 7,000 lb. axles w/elec. brakes- $5,950

‘98 Cargomate 44’ enlosed trailer, 99” width, 10’9” height, tires size: 23.5/85R15, side door measures 47” x 671⁄2”, back door measures 8’x97” - $7,900

‘04 Towmaster T-12DD 18’ skid loader trailer, spring assist ramps, 6000 lb. axles I-beam frame, wood floor, D-rings, DOT inspected, new brakes & breakaway battery $4,500

VISIT

W W W. CRYSTEELTRUCK. C O M F O R

A DDITIONAL N E W

AND

U S E D E QUIPMENT L ISTINGS

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Page 3 - Friday, February 24, 2012

TRUCK BODIES

Western model for Construction, Farm Or Ranch Model

Gooseneck Compartment

Length

Width

Approx. Weight

C.A

Optional electrical operational kit available Order Size/TLH

Box Size Length

# of Bows

Specials

Price

W8 Yes 96” 84” 825 57 $2,111 W8 Yes 96” 96” 945 60 $2,271 W9 No 108” 96” 930 60 $2,101 W9 Yes 108” 96” 1,085 60 $2,221 W9.5 No 114” 96” 940 60 $2,131 W9.5 Yes 114” 96” 955 60 $2,251 W11 No 132” 96” 1,300 84 $2,391 W11 Yes 132” 96” 1,300 84 $2,511 W11.5 No 136” 96” 1,350 84 $2,431 W11.5 Yes 136” 96” 1,385 84 $2,551 W8 bodies include stop-tail-turn and backup lights in the rear skirt

Standard Features • 1/8” Tread Plate Floor • Structural Channel Crossmembers • Heavy Duty Tapered Header • 4” Structural Channel Long Sills • Pockets & Rub Rails-2 Sides • Sun Shield • 6-1/2” Sq. tail light holes w/exp. metal • Length - 8’ thru 13’ • Width - 84” thru 96” • Color-Black Standard, Choice of paint color at additional charge • Bulkhead mounted stop/turn/tail lights • Rear stake pockets

15% Off all Schuck hitches Model 750-RTR Cushion Hitch • 1,000 lb. Tongue Weight, 40,000 lb. Load Rating. - Swivel hitch - Fits standard 2” receiver - Includes pin and keeper - Check these dimentions! The center of the receiver tube to the top of the hitch tongue is a 5-1/2” drop - Swivel tongue extends 7” beyond to TOW position and swivels 60 degrees laterally (or 12” left to right) - Swivel tongue saves time and effort with every hook-up

Order Size/LTH

Box Size Length

Recommended number of Bows

Specials

Page 4 - Friday, February 24, 2012

• 40’ Frame Straightening Machine • Red Dot Laser Aligner • Front and Rear Suspension Repairs Cab Refurbishments • Body Repair (Dump/Grain) • U-Bolt Manufacturing * DOT Inspections

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Fully Warranted Frame lengthening, shortening, reinforcement service. Lift axle sales and installation. Expert weight distribution and bridge law consultation.

• 72’ Paint Bake Booth • 60’ Sandblasting Booth • 150 Ton Press • Sikkens Paint System • 40’ Frame Pull Cage • Brake & Spring Repair • Trailer Repair & Straightening

AG-SLIP Industrial Strength Self-Adhering Sprayed-On Liner System • Extremely smooth surface “Ag Slip applied to lawnmower decks (Dump sticky loads easier) makes for easy cleanout” • Reduce maintenance costs • Increase slideability ~ • Improves safety • Protects against material build-up under the liner compared to bolt-in liners • Repariable if damaged • Unlimited applications • Self adhering ~ • A sprayed on process • Can be applied to ANY surface (steel, wood, aluminum)


Feb. 17, 2012 :: Southern