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Behind the Curtain The hijacking of a venerable arts institution

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

CA$H REWARD

COMMENT | THE ARTS

I

have a sorry and regretful story to tell. It concerns the board of a nonprofit organization that I believe overstepped the boundaries of decency, honesty and fairness. A nonprofit board that didn’t understand its mission is to be the guardian, not the owner, of the organization’s future. Nonprofit organizations, no matter how worthy the cause, cannot justify cutting ethical corners. And no organization can justify treating its employees and colleagues with total disdain. The organization I’m talking about is the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, which announced in August it was shelving plans for a 2014 summer season at North Idaho College’s Schuler Auditorium. Lo and behold, two months later, we learn that there will be a 2014 season after all. But with a change in management and at a different venue.

E

ssential to this story is the gathering storm of money problems the troupe encountered over the summer of 2013. A variety of ill winds were blowing: the public was disenchanted with the show choices; ticket prices had been climbing; ticket sales were sluggish; and there were some extra big costs — Mary Poppins flew through the air at a thousand dollars a whack. The word was made public that the theater was in financial hot water. So hot that it needed $150,000 to stay alive. In two short weeks, Artistic Director Roger Welch and CST’s superstar patron Ellen Travolta raised $60,000 in a plea to patrons to help save the 46-year-old, awardwinning institution. At the fateful August board meeting, Welch presented the board a plan to raise the remainder of the necessary funds. He and Travolta weren’t given a chance to put their plan into action, say boardmembers who were there. That’s because leaders of the board had other ideas. They proceeded to stage a carefully planned coup. Without the knowledge of onethird of the board members, leaders came into the board meeting of Aug. 26 with a motion to close the theater for 2014. Period. No notice of the agenda item had been circulated. Board members uninformed of the surprise motion were caught completely off guard. Their pleas to postpone the decision to consider other options were disregarded. Staff members had been dismissed from the meeting and were totally in the dark. The board vote count to cancel the productions was nine for shutting down and five against — an ironic twist, since the final show of the season was the comedy 9 to 5. The five board members who opposed the coup have since resigned. Welch was undoubtedly the target of such a desperate, short-sighted ploy. He and Executive

Director Michelle Mendez were never officially fired, just cut from the payroll and locked out of their offices. (A caller to North Idaho College from the CST board before the August meeting suggested the locks should be changed “as there might be trouble.”) At the time of this writing, Nov. 22, neither Welch nor Mendez has received the severance pay they were subsequently promised, even after multiple requests. It’s cruel treatment of the person who had been with the organization for 27 years and as artistic director led it to awards and honors for two decades. And shabby disrespect for the hardworking Mendez, not to mention the many supporters, volunteers, former boardmembers and community members who have invested passion and dollars in the institution. Many of the donors who stepped forward with contributions in response to Travolta and Welch’s fervent urging for help to save the theater feel they have been deceived. They gave dollars to one future that will be spent on another.

I

n his 20 years as artistic director, Welch brought the North Idaho and Spokane communities the opportunity to enjoy nearly 100 amazing productions. Unforgettable moments in West Side Story and Les Misérables; great sets and acting in Chicago; the nostalgia of The Sound of Music; the diverse faces of Miss Saigon; the list of fine acting, singing and dancing goes on and on. From its earliest beginning as the Carousel Players in 1968, the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre maintained its status as a fully professional theatre. All artists were paid. Welch aimed at all times to improve the quality of the performances. He placed more importance on the well-being of his cast members than he did on romancing board or community members. That may have been his Achilles’ heel. So we have lost Roger Welch’s magic way with the world of musical stage. At 46, Welch still has a great future. What else has been lost to the future? Welch also brought us the talents of that lovable couple, Jack Bannon and Ellen Travolta, who deserve a ton of thanks for their passionate support of Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre for more than 20 years. The artistic integrity of these three fabulous people cannot be surpassed and will be greatly missed.  Mary Lou Reed served two separate terms on the board of directors of the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, last serving in 2010.

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n Nov. 10, 1620 — just a day after sighting land — Master of the Mayflower Christopher Jones had to be frazzled. He had contracted to deliver his cargo of settlers to the Hudson River country, but without a reliable map he was adrift in uncharted waters. In fact, he had just barely extricated his ship from one of the nastiest shoals on the North American coast — the Pollock Rip between Nantucket and Cape Cod. The Mayflower held 101 passengers, and they were restless. Illness had struck; two had died. The journey was long, and now winter was coming. Even worse, the settlers were divided between the Strangers and the Saints. The Strangers (so named by the self-described “Saints”) were Londoners looking for a fresh start — a species of early entrepreneurs. The Saints were separatists from the Church of England who had been living in exile in Holland and wanted to establish a home outside the reach of King James. In his book Mayflower, Nathaniel Philbrick described the Saints as having “more in common with a cult than a democratic society.” The two camps had almost nothing in common. Mutiny was in the air. Master Jones must have been thinking how much he missed his regular run between England and France, hauling wine and wool. And his heart must have been still beating fast from his near-sinking when he announced that, sorry, but they would not be going to the Hudson River; they were turning back to the shore they first sighted — Cape Cod. That day, with tempers high and the whole scheme seeming crazier than ever, the passengers did something amazing. They hammered out the Mayflower Compact — to “…covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation…” Perhaps the new world’s dark curtain of forest drove home the fact that, suddenly, they had everything in common. Once the Mayflower Compact was signed for “the general good for the colony,” there were no more Strangers and Saints — there were only Pilgrims. On Nov. 11, Jones sailed into Cape Cod Bay, and from that day on, the new lands became home to Strangers, Saints and every kind of individual in between — all, however, Americans first. So this Thanksgiving, as the steam rises from your pile of turkey, surrounded by family and friends, and as you test the heft of your fork, think for a moment on the lessons of the Pilgrims. They put aside their differences when they had to. And that was the only way — together — that they survived and planted the seeds for all that we have to be thankful for today. 

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F

rustrated separatists can agitate all they want to for a state of their own, but if we ever add a star to Old Glory, it’s more likely to represent Puerto Rico, American Samoa or Washington, D.C., than North Colorado. Earlier this month, voters in 11 sparsely populated Colorado counties got a chance to express their distaste for their state government — which is not geographically distant, but culturally a world away in Denver. On their ballots was an option to secede from Colorado. “We simply want to be left alone to live our lives without a dictatorial central government forcing itself upon us,” zealots explained on their website, 51ststate.org. Nonetheless, voters in only five of the 11 counties chose to pursue independence from the Mile High City. “Leave us alone” is the same argument I’ve been hearing for the past year while wandering the back roads of Northern California and southern Oregon. This Wild West territory has been talking about carving out its own state since 1854. They want to call it Jefferson — some say in honor of the third president; others say it’s for Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy during the Civil War. “Congress wants to control us,” grocery store clerk Ann Hanson told me, the front of her store in Klamath, Calif., festooned with the State of Jefferson seal. Rick Jones, owner of a general store in Seiad Valley, Calif., added, “All our tax money goes south [to Sacramento] and nothing comes back here.”

But that is not the case; more state money flows into Jefferson from Sacramento than the impoverished region pays California in taxes. Even so, it’s a safe bet that the 38 million citizens of the rest of California would never vote to lose their water and vacation playground to the restive few in Jefferson, and approval from the rest of a state’s voters is needed before a region can secede. Approval is also required from Congress. At this time, it’s impossible to imagine a divided Capitol Hill embracing new senators from what would be the red states of North Colorado or Jefferson. Much of rural America is needy. In Jefferson, contested water rights, endangered fisheries and land-use disputes foment frustration for residents in the midst of a job market devastated by the collapse of the timber industry. Such secession talk seems healthy. It allows those who feel aggrieved to be heard. State representatives in Salem and Sacramento should pay more attention to the people of Jefferson. At the same time, these movements offer the rest of us a metaphor for our dysfunctional national government. Without compromise, our union cannot hold. But, as Thomas Jefferson wrote in a letter to James Madison, “A little rebellion now and then is a good thing. It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government.”  University of Oregon journalism professor Peter Laufer is author of The Elusive State of Jefferson. A version of this column first appeared in High Country News (hcn.org).

DOUGLASS PROPERTIES: One almost has to look both ways when crossing a 4-way after the light turns green. A yellow light apparently means “accelerate rapidly” to a large portion of the population. Side impacts hurt at just about any speed! TIZZELY McJIZZEL: Waaaay tooo much!!! I don’t even go ANYWHERE if I don’t have to!! JENNIFER VINCENT: I worry a lot! Seven weeks ago, I was at a red light when a one-ton pickup slammed into the back of my Honda at 40 mph, and it pushed my car into the truck in front of me as well. In less than five seconds, I now have no car, four to six weeks of PT, and anxiety that I have never had before. These kinds of accidents are very preventable… Put down the phone and pay attention, please! CARA THOMPSON: When I started driving, my dad, the firefighter/EMT, told me, “Someday you will be in a wreck. It might not be your fault, you might not even be driving, but learn to expect it.” MARY K SIMMONS: I don’t drive but have had near misses more times than I can count. You wouldn’t believe how many times I almost get hit crossing in a crosswalk, with the walk sign on. … People don’t pay attention to anything. They’re too busy on their phones, doing their makeup, or eating a double cheeseburger and usually in a hurry. LUKE BISHOP: I worry a fair amount. Especially when I drive other people around such as my wife or the foster kids I care for. And I also get really nervous when certain friends drive as I tend to be on the side of the car that is about to sideswipe a semi! 

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COMMENT | SATIRE

Iran Throws Obama a Big Pity Party BY ANDY BOROWITZ

T

he Supreme Leader of Iran, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, told reporters this week that his nation agreed to a deal on its nuclear program in the hopes that it would distract attention from the trouble-plagued rollout of Obamacare. “It’s true, we’ve resisted any deal on nukes for over three decades,” the Ayatollah said. “But when we saw how much trouble Obama was having with his website, we realized it would be uncaring of us not to try to help him out.” The Ayatollah said he was not “overly optimistic” that signing a nuclear treaty with the West would be sufficient to distract attention from the President’s Obamacare woes, but added, “You never know.

Every little bit helps.” He said that he and Iran’s leaders will be putting their heads together in the days and weeks ahead to see “if there’s anything else we can do to help Obama out of this health-care mess.” “One idea we’re tossing around is to get the Iranian people to stop chanting, ‘Death to America!’ the way they have for the past 34 years,” he said. “At the very least, maybe dial it back until he gets that website straightened out.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | FOOD

GMO Fight Not Over I BY JIM HIGHTOWER

f you doubt that big money and lies can pervert elections, look at Initiative 522 in Washington State. It had been put on the ballot by a grassroots coalition of consumers, organic producers, environmentalists and others who want honesty in food labeling. The initiative would’ve required grocery manufacturers that slip genetically manipulated organisms into their products to state that fact on their food labels. But the industry ran a dishonest, multimilliondollar PR campaign, including ads to scare voters by falsely claiming that the truth-in-labeling provision would jack up each family’s annual food costs by an average of more than $450. Especially dishonest (and likely illegal) was the industry’s crude attempt to keep voters from knowing who was funding the attack ads. A front group, the Grocery Manufacturers Association, set up a dummy campaign account called “Defense of Brand,” which really was a Hidethe-Brand artifice. It let big-name food giants put some $11 million into the no-labeling campaign, without revealing their participation

and angering consumers. But the state attorney general exposed this dodge and forced the giants to fess up. Behind this hoaxwithin-a-hoax-within-another-hoax were such names as Campbell Soup, Coke, Nestlé and Pepsi. With their money and deceptions, they prevailed in the vote, but that same combo of cash and lies also infuriated millions of consumers and others across the country who seek nothing more than a basic level of corporate integrity — and a minimal level of control over the food they bring into their homes. The GMO profiteers can run, but they won’t be able to hide from the growing number of Americans who are onto them — and literally fed up with their tactics. GMO labeling laws are currently being pushed in some 20 other states. The fun is just beginning. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

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POLICE

An Inside Look SPD’s new Internal Affairs director is changing the way officer misconduct is investigated BY JACOB JONES

I

n a time when the Spokane Police Department looks to rebuild its public image and strengthen accountability, a former fraud investigator with the federal public defender’s office has taken over the investigation of officer misconduct, training priorities and technology upgrades, including the implementation of officer-worn body cameras. As director of the department’s newly created Strategic Initiatives division, Tim Schwering now oversees the vastly different, but often interconnected, operations of Internal Affairs, professional standards, information technology and officer training. He becomes the newest of multiple civilian directors joining the department amid ongoing reform efforts now reshaping the local police force. “We’ve made great progress in the last year,” Schwering says of the SPD. “Coming on, I really want to see the progress continue. … I think we’re heading in the right direction.” ...continued on next page

Spokane Police Department Director of Strategic Initiatives Tim Schwering. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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Police Chief Frank Straub says an early warning system will track behavioral red flags. JACOB JONES PHOTO

“AN INSIDE LOOK,” CONTINUED... As city officials continue to debate investigative power for the Office of Police Ombudsman, Police Chief Frank Straub says Schwering will oversee significant changes to Internal Affairs. In recent months, the small IA unit has received an entirely new staff, new tools for tracking officer conduct and new influence over how police officers will be trained. Initially hired to improve administrative and procedural efficiencies, Schwering also will audit internal investigations to serve as an extra review of internal disciplinary matters. Straub says Schwering will bring a civilian, “35,000-foot” big-picture view to investigations. “For the first time in the history of the department,” Straub says, “now you have a civilian with extensive investigative experience watching that process, monitoring that process.”

T

he SPD Internal Affairs unit typically investigates about 60 to 100 complaints against officers each year. Investigators also review dozens of simpler internal and citizen “inquiries” into officer conduct without opening full cases on the complaints. All of those investigations are conducted with oversight from Ombudsman Tim Burns, who must sign off on the results of each investigation or inquiry. The ombudsman’s office reports Internal Affairs opened 102 investigations this year through the end of October. Of the 58 closed investigations, 10 cases have resulted in a finding of misconduct. It also has reviewed 96 inquiries. Previously a two-person unit, consisting of a lieutenant and sergeant, Straub has upgraded the supervising officer to a captain and added an additional sergeant. Capt. Rick Dobrow now runs the unit along with two sergeants, both new to Internal Affairs. “We were looking for people who are considered hard-chargers and really the cream of

the crop,” Straub says. “We want the very best investigators in there. We want people that have the best interests of the department and the community in there, that are going to ask the difficult, impactful questions.” Straub says he plans to send the sergeants to train with the Internal Affairs unit at the Los Angeles Police Department. One sergeant will specialize in use-of-force training and tactics; the other will receive training on administrative issues such as investigating policy and procedure violations. “We’re very impressed with what L.A. has done,” Straub says, noting it has a large IA division with a wealth of expertise. As the new team gets up to speed, Schwering says he is responsible for “quality control,” making sure best practices get integrated into everyday operations and auditing investigation findings. Burns says he likes the idea of having another civilian taking a critical look at the results of Internal Affairs investigations. He says it certainly can’t hurt. “Any time you can put more eyes on something,” Burns says, “you’re going to come out with a better end result.”

I

n hopes of identifying officer problems before they become significant disciplinary matters, the Internal Affairs unit also has adopted an early warning system that tracks officer behaviors and complaints to check for patterns. Straub says the database monitors a number of personal or professional red flags that could indicate an officer is headed for trouble. The software system logs officer complaints, absences, disciplinary issues, uses of force and other indicators to warn of any unusual trends. Straub argues the department has a responsibility to monitor the well-being and performance of

its officers, so it can provide help before small issues escalate into career-ending problems. “It’s not a ‘gotcha’ system,” he says. “It’s just the opposite. It’s how do we get somebody help very quickly.” An officer might be inexperienced or overworked or having problems at home, Straub says. The system helps supervisors gauge when they might need to step in to offer counseling, extra training or time off to deal with personal issues. “[Many police departments] kind of let people hit a brick wall, and then we do investigations,” he says. “You screwed up. Now you’re disciplined.” Burns called the system an important “insurance policy” for spotting troubling officer behaviors. Some small red flags may be hard to spot over long periods of time, but the database will keep track of all of those issues. “We need to see these things,” Burns says. “We need to proactively look at that officer’s performance.”

P

olice officials say another key structural change centralizes Internal Affairs and the SPD training academy under Schwering in hopes of formalizing a feedback loop from misconduct findings to police training. Straub says the department needs to take lessons from officer misconduct and share those with others to prevent future problems. Dobrow, who ran the Training Center before taking over IA, says linking misconduct findings back into the training side of the department will help officers recognize problems sooner and learn from other officers’ experiences. “We can train people to stay out of circumstances that might get them into trouble,” Dobrow says. “That’s a critical connection that we really haven’t had in the past.” As officers encounter different legal precedents or use-of-force issues, those examples can be shared through department-wide training. Straub says results from recent internal investigations already have been used to clarify records policies and other administrative procedures. Burns says improving communication between Internal Affairs and training seems to be an obvious step that should help the department improve officer performance. “I think it’s brilliant,” he says. “There’s always going to be a connectivity between what our officers do and how our officers are trained.” Schwering says he also plans to work with the city’s legal department to develop a matrix for matching certain levels of misconduct to the appropriate disciplinary measures. With the matrix, the department will establish expectations for different levels of progressive discipline. “People will have a general idea of ‘If this rule gets broken, this is the type of punishment, this is the type of range you would get,’” he says.

I

n the coming months, Schwering will spearhead the launch of body cameras throughout the patrol force, using his administrative and IT experience to troubleshoot what is expected to be a complicated transition. Schwering says he hopes to have a usage policy on body cameras finalized within the next 30 days, but it will still take several months to upgrade the SPD’s technical infrastructure to support the immense data from the video recordings. Police officials now expect to start rolling out body cameras on officers by the second or third quarter of next year. Schwering also will serve as the SPD “point person” for the U.S. Department of Justice Technical Assistance Review now underway. The review team has started conducting interviews throughout the department and will be examining use-of-force investigations from the past few years. Internal Affairs will work closely with the DOJ throughout the review. Schwering says he joined the department to take on new challenges and he looks forward to being part of creating a stronger local police force. “There’s obviously room for improvement,” he says. “[But] you’ve got a lot of good people that work here. I think you can really make this a better department.” n jacobj@inlander.com

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE HERE COMES SANTA

1.

The Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office ruled last Thursday a Spokane Valley sheriff’s deputy was “justified” in fatally shooting a man armed with a knife in June. Investigators say Roy Jacobs ignored repeated commands to drop the weapon and moved toward the deputies.

2.

Iran has agreed to freeze parts of its nuclear program in a historic six-nation agreement signed Monday. In exchange, Iran will receive temporary relief on certain economic sanctions.

3.

Disgraced Spokane developer Greg Jeffreys pleaded guilty to four counts of fraud and contempt of court last week, stemming from his deceptive dealings surrounding the vacant Ridpath Hotel and investment manipulations. Prosecutors are seeking an eight-year sentence.

4.

The U.S. Senate changed filibuster rules to limit delays against presidential nominees for federal positions. Outnumbered Republicans strongly opposed the change, calling it a power grab.

SARAH WURTZ PHOTOS

Jolly old Saint Nicholas landed at River Park Square Friday evening, and dozens of children craned their necks to catch a glimpse of Santa as he descended down the atrium escalator. With a wave of his finger, he lit the mall Christmas tree before dancing with elves and mingling with children, ready to whisper their wish lists into his ear.

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16 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

5.

An 11-year-old Colville boy recently convicted of conspiring to murder a classmate was sentenced to more than four years in juvenile detention.

What’s Creating Buzz The bounty that members of Aryan Nation, a white supremacist prison gang, allegedly placed on the two black teenagers accused of beating World War II veteran Delbert Belton to death. After Spokane police received word of the bounty, the suspects were moved from juvenile detention to protective adult custody.

FUN: Find video of Macklemore and Ryan Lewis riding scooters through Spokane and shopping at Value Village, plus other fun stuff on the blog under the ‘For Fun’ tag.

NEWS | BRIEFS

Work in Progress The city’s Use of Force Commission weighs in on progress at SPD; plus, Lakeland Village under fire NOT DONE YET

A month-old letter from the city’s USE OF FORCE COMMISSION surfaced last week in response to the Spokane Police Department’s ongoing reform efforts, commending initial progress, but also calling out three recommendations in need of additional attention. The Oct. 15 letter served as the commission’s written response to a six-month update in August on the police department’s implementation of 26 reforms recommended by the commission. Chairman Earl “Marty” Martin says they wanted to recognize early progress while calling attention to concerns raised during the sixmonth update. While the SPD has introduced new policies and training, the commission’s letter calls for police officials to follow through with a “culture audit” on officer attitudes, which commissioners have criticized for being in some cases defensive or demoralized. The letter also encouraged greater transparency during future union negotiations and reinforced commission support for an independent police ombudsman’s office, which remains under public debate in the wake of Proposition 1’s passage earlier this year. “We believe independence is an important value,” Martin says. As far as additional feedback, the letter explains “the Commission will reserve commenting on the evolution of specific recommendations until such time as the on-going efforts have had a chance to mature.” — JACOB JONES

BROKEN RULES

Lakeland Village, a state-run institution in Medical Lake for PEOPLE WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, broke federal law more than 40,000 times over the past two and half years by failing to provide adequate services to more than two dozen residents, according to a new review by investigators at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). In a letter to officials at the state Department of Social and Health Services, CMS described illegal cuts to services for 27 people with developmental disabilities. Before the cuts were made in 2011, David Lord, with the advocacy organization Disability Rights Washington, says these residents were receiving numerous services intended to help them develop life skills for reintegrating into the community. “These individual were essentially warehoused instead of being provided the kind of treatment they should have been getting,” Lord says. “You can’t just dump people in nursing homes.” Speaking to the Seattle Times, DSHS spokeswoman Chris Case said the letter was based on a “technicality” and a failure to provide evidentiary paperwork, but David Carlson, an attorney for Disability Rights Washington, says the state’s decision to deny treatment to these individuals was made in response to a 2011 directive to cut more than $1.8 million from the department’s budget. CMS is demanding Washington pay back as much as $16 million in federal matching dollars. The agency is also recommending that the feds conduct a civil rights investigation into the matter. — DEANNA PAN

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Under the Boot

ON INLANDER STANDS NOW

Next year the city will start booting the cars of parking “scofflaws” BY HEIDI GROOVER

I

n a database at City Hall, officials track booted with no response from the owner, the city more $4 million in unpaid parking tickets, will impound the car. Making it onto the scofflaw often seeing the same names — about 3,500 list comes with a $25 fee and getting booted will “frequent flyers,” who have four or more unpaid cost drivers another $50, but it’s still unclear tickets — appear over and over again. Now, one which impound lot the city will use and therefore man thinks he has a way to target just 10 or 20 of how much it’ll cost owners, on top of outstanding those drivers and make the whole lot listen. tickets, to get their vehicles out of impound. (The Dave Steele, with the city’s Business and Spokane Police Department contracts with tow Development Services Department, has been companies when they impound vehicles. Towing leading the overhaul of parking downtown: starts at $178 an hour and impoundment at $45 credit-card-friendly meters, sensors to erase extra a day, increasing with the size of the vehicle, time when cars leave parking spots and now tire according to the Washington State Patrol, whose boots to immobilize cars when the owner has rates SPD uses.) four or more unpaid parking tickets. The city Councilman Mike Fagan, who supports the council will vote in coming weeks on the bootprogram, says the city “bends over backwards” ing program, and Steele says he hopes to buy to give people chances to pay their tickets. The between 10 and 20 boots at $500 each early next city’s new parking meter system will make it posyear. sible to pay tickets online starting next month. “We want to just have enough “We are definitely a very, very forof them present that people recoggiving and very, very accommodating nize, ‘Oh yeah, you’ve got to pay government,” he says, “but, you know, Send story ideas to your parking tickets,’” Steele says, patience does tend to run out from time tips@inlander.com or emphasizing the program is more to time. … I think that’s what we’re seecall the tip line at about perception than trying to boot (509) 325-0634 ext. 264 ing right here.” every offending owner. If passed by the council, the law The ordinance would give would take effect in early January, but parking enforcement officers the authority to add the city would offer an “amnesty” period, warnsomeone with four or more unpaid tickets in coling people with enough tickets to get booted, lections to a “scofflaw list” and boot the car if the but not actually booting them until the summer. owner doesn’t respond by paying the tickets, beSteele says he’s still working with the municipal ginning a payment plan or challenging the tickets court to determine just how much help he can in court within 10 days. After 48 hours of being give people looking to pay off their debt before

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TWO FOR $40 The latest step in the city’s parking overhaul: a booting program losing their vehicle to an impound lot. He’s hoping the court will agree to allow people to clear their record by paying the base amount owed for the tickets, forgoing the interest and fees added by collections, but told a council committee meeting last week “courts are very reticent to give away what they see as public money.” Fagan and Steele say they believe most of the people racking up tickets are refusing, rather The top five offenders and how much than unable, to pay they owe. City of Spokane Parking tickets them. Center for range from $10 to $450, depending on Justice attorney the offense. Data from Spokane Municipal Julie Schaffer isn’t Court. so sure. Among its work on behalf of Matthew R. Hardie: $8,920 low-income people, the legal nonprofit Ian Wingate: $7,175 runs a relicensing program to help Bruce P. Reed Jr.: $6,830 people who’ve had their licenses susThomas C. Verhaag: $6,125 pended for failing to pay traffic tickets Sara Heller: $6,115 to get on payment plans and get their licenses back. (A recent change in state law means drivers can no longer have their licenses suspended for non-moving violations, like parking tickets, but Schaffer says it’s likely many of the clients she sees also have unpaid parking tickets.) While Schaffer says she’s glad a payment plan is an option in the booting program, she’s still worried about its potential impact on people who’ve been avoiding their tickets not out of spite for the city, but because they simply can’t afford to pay them. Schaffer says she’s concerned the method of warning people they’ve made the list (by mail) is unfair to those who may move often, and she would like to see a community service option for people who can’t find the money to pay their tickets. “You can’t get money out of people who don’t have any money,” she says. “Adding additional financial barriers is not going to help.” 

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NEWS | POLITICS

Idaho’s “Litmus Test” Medicaid expansion under Obamacare is shaping up to be a wedge issue in the 2014 race for Idaho governor BY DEANNA PAN

B

ack in 2010, Idaho’s cowboy Gov. Butch Otter was the first state executive to sign a law allowing his attorney general to sue the federal government if Congress passed the president’s signature health care law. But three years later, Otter has shown he’s willing to compromise his hard-line opposition to the Affordable Care Act as long as he can make the law work on Idaho’s terms: First, the governor formed a workgroup to study whether Idaho should form its own state-run health insurance exchange. Eventually, he persuaded recalcitrant GOP party members in the statehouse to create one. There’s still the question of Medicaid expansion, and whether Otter will follow in the footsteps of other Republican governors, including New Jersey’s Chris Christie, Ohio’s John Kasich, Arizona’s Jan Brewer and Michigan’s Rick Snyder, by extending the program to low-income adults. The Idaho Association of Commerce & Industry — a powerful business advocacy group — recently wrote to the governor, urging him to take the federal money for low-income health care. Otter, who already committed a task force to study the issue, has indicated he would sup-

20 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

port a Medicaid “redesign” that includes more personal accountability. If Otter had any plans to push for Medicaid, he now faces a wrinkle: On Saturday, Sen. Russ Fulcher, R-Meridian, announced his intention to run to the right of Otter in the May 2014 primary. The five-term state senator has accused Otter of having “lost touch” with the people of Idaho in establishing a state-run health insurance exchange. He said his first order of business would be “reversing Otter’s efforts to implement Obamacare here in Idaho, then providing a patient-powered alternative.” Idaho’s brewing gubernatorial fight is indicative of the “intramural conflict” within the state GOP, dividing the party’s more moderate and conservative factions, says David Adler, the director of the Andrus Center for Public Policy at Boise State University. Medicaid expansion already is emerging as a wedge issue — “a sort of litmus test for true conservatives,” as The Daily Caller put it — across the country for Tea Party candidates hoping to unseat Republican incumbents. “The reality is that Gov. Otter has an important po-

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has warmed (at least a little) to Obamacare. litical choice to make when it comes to Medicaid expansion,” Adler says. “For him, it will be an opportunity to embrace fiscal prudence and fiscal conservatism, as well as an opportunity to overcome the great burden imposed on the state from a financial standpoint.” So what would Otter’s pro-business argument in favor of Medicaid expansion look like? Mike Ferguson, formerly Idaho’s longtime chief economist and now director of the nonpartisan Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy, says it should be a “slam dunk.” Expanding Idaho’s low-income health care program would provide coverage to about 104,000 individuals, or nearly half of the state’s uninsured population. Accord-

ing to an analysis by the consulting firm Milliman, Idaho stands to save $403.9 million over a 10-year period starting in 2014 under Medicaid expansion, and even more if lawmakers totally eliminate the state’s catastrophic health care and county indigent programs. Those savings, Ferguson says, could “free up resources for other, more productive uses,” like public education spending, where Idaho ranks among the lowest in the country. Other than county and state budget savings, Ferguson says Medicaid expansion would a provide a much-needed boost to Idaho’s stagnant economy. He cites a 2012 study by University of Idaho economist Steven Peterson, which found that optional expansion between 2014 and 2024 would create some 16,000 jobs, generating $717 million in new payroll and $616 million in tax revenue, as a result of this new economic activity. Send comments to “A healthier population is more produceditor@inlander.com. tive,” Ferguson adds. “It makes for less strain in the economy when people are having their health care needs met.” Under the Affordable Care Act, the federal reimbursement rate covering newly eligible Medicaid recipients gradually decreases from 100 percent in 2014, 2015 and 2016 to 90 percent in 2020 and beyond. The state’s savings likewise will decrease over the time, says Ferguson, “but it’s still a small savings, not a net cost.” It would take an act of Congress to change the health care law’s reimbursement rate, and that’s impossible to predict. By delaying Medicaid expansion, Idaho is already passing up nearly $40 million in savings this fiscal year. If the Legislature doesn’t opt into expansion next session, Idaho will miss out on an additional $77.1 million in savings in fiscal year 2015. Without Otter’s endorsement, it’s unlikely that the Legislature will address the issue of Medicaid expansion in the next session, as lawmakers prepare for their re-election bids.  deannap@inlander.com

LETTERS

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22 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

THE APPLE CUP Washington St. at Washington Husky Stadium Seattle Fri, Nov. 29 at 12:30 pm

The Gunslinger Connor Halliday is guiding the Cougars to their first bowl game in a decade, one pass at a time

BISHOP SANKEY >> Year: Junior Hometown: Spokane High School: Gonzaga Prep Height: 5-10 Weight: 203 2013 rushing yds: 1,575

In a Rush Three seasons in, ex-Gonzaga Prep standout Bishop Sankey is leaving his mark on the Husky record book

BY HOWIE STALWICK

BY MICHAEL MAHONEY

O

N

pposing defenses have spent decades trying to figure out how to stop Mike Leach’s high-octane, no-huddle, pass-happy offense. In most cases, defenses have experienced little success and considerable frustration. Spokane native Connor Halliday knows the feeling, even though he’ll be playing quarterback for Washington State when Leach’s Cougars try to cement their first bowl berth in 10 years Friday at Washington. “He came in last year,” Halliday recalls, “and he tells you a little bit about the offense, but that’s it … even if you’re not getting it.” Halliday shared the starting job last season with Jeff Tuel, who now plays for the NFL’s Buffalo Bills. Both players were shocked to discover how much play-calling Leach entrusts with his quarterbacks. “He doesn’t call very many plays,” Halliday says. “I’d say 70 percent of the time … he’ll call the formation, and then I call the play.” ...continued on page 24

<< CONNOR HALLIDAY Year: Junior Hometown: Spokane High School: Ferris Height: 6-4 Weight: 190 2013 passing yds: 3,905

apoleon Kaufman. Chris Polk. Bishop Sankey. Before Washington visited Oregon State on Saturday, the school’s top three career rushers included Joe Steele, who broke Husky legend Hugh McElhenny’s season and career records and starred in the 1978 Rose Bowl. But in less than three full seasons, the former Gonzaga Prep star has supplanted Steele, achieving in purple everything Washington State fans could have envisioned in crimson. “We’ve had success in the ground game,” the nation’s thirdleading rusher understates in a phone interview after a chilly morning practice last week. “We really pride ourselves on running the ball.” Sankey set a Greater Spokane League record, rushing for 4,355 yards as a Bullpup — 359 against Mead in a 2010 game — and was GSL Most Valuable Player and Class 4A all-state as a senior. In December 2009 he made a verbal commitment to Washington State, offering hope to fans reeling from Paul Wulff’s ...continued on page 25

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 23

CULTURE | APPLE CUP

The MAC Gives Thanks to the Artists and Patrons of the 2013

• Steven Adams • Laura Blaker • Diana Botkin • Denise Bowles • Don Brown • John Buck • Maria Caldera • George Carlson • Felisa Carranza • Virginia Carter • Margot Casstevens • Clinton Chambers • Dale Chihuly • Jude Clarke • Melissa Cole • Gloria De Los Santos • Coral DeWilliam Studer • Larry Ellingson • Timothy Ely • Hulan Fleming • Neicy Frey • Steven Ford • David Forlano • Ric Gendron • Lila Girvin • Mel Griffin • Tobe Harvey • Sage & Tom Holland • Brenna Helm • Tamara Helm • Melville Holmes • Carlos Horcos • Betsey Hurd • Catherine Hysell • Dick Ibach • Aaron Johnson • Marty Jones • Ildikó Kalapács • Christina Klein • Dalas Klein • Bill Kostelec • Robert Kraut • Robert Krogle • Melissa Lang • Terry Lee • Joey Marcella • Roni Marsh • David Marty • Mel McCuddin • Alan McNiel • Karen Mobley • James Moore • Sean O’Connell • Kay O’Rourke • Kyle Paliotto • Charlie Palmer • Bruce Park • Cliff Rossberg • Brad Rude • Shawn Saumell • Jared Shear • Stephen Shortridge • Hayley ShortridgeGabriel • Patrick Siler • Robert Spannring • Sophie Stein • Paula Turnbull, SNJM • Judy Warner • Gordon Wilson • Mike Wise • Steven Young Lee • Ken Yuhasz •

Spokane Town Musicians Gordon Wilson Golden Ticket Selection

24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Spokane native Connor Halliday has thrown for almost 4,000 yards this season and has put WSU in line for a bowl appearance.

“THE GUNSLINGER,” CONTINUED... Halliday says Leach’s reasoning makes sense to him. Now, anyway. “He says, ‘I can give you a play, but how am I going to know if that play is going to be right?’” Halliday says. “‘You’re the guy out there that sees it. I’m on the sideline.’ “‘I can’t see where everyone is. I can’t see the leverage of the corner(back). I can’t see who’s blitzing. You’re the guy who can see all that perfectly. Why am I going to sit here and overrule you when you have a better view of it than me?’” Halliday starred in a pass-oriented offense at Spokane’s Ferris High School, but nothing fully prepares a quarterback for Leach’s pass-’til-youdrop style of offense. The Cougars pass more and run less than any other team in major college football (the 123team Football Bowl Subdivision). Halliday ranks third in the nation with 3,905 passing yards (355 per game), first with 597 pass attempts (a Pac-12 Conference record with a couple of games left to play), tied for 12th with 26 touchdown passes and, alas, first with 19 interceptions. Halliday has learned to tone down his gunslinger instincts this season, settling for the many short passes available in Leach’s offense instead of constantly looking to throw the long bomb. Halliday has thrown just two interceptions in the past three games, and he set an FBS record with 89 passes and Pac-12 records with 58 completions and 557 passing yards in an Oct. 19 loss at Oregon. Halliday might be even more respected for his leadership and toughness than his skill. Although he scatters just 190 pounds on a 6-foot-4 frame, Halliday is more than willing to take a hit. Asked to name the toughest player on the

team, hard-nosed linebacker Darryl Monroe immediately blurted, “Connor Halliday.” Monroe well remembers Halliday (unknowingly) playing with a lacerated liver most of the game in his first college start two years ago. Halliday simply waited until the end of the game to check himself into the hospital. “He’s the toughest quarterback I’ve ever known,” rugged WSU safety Deone Bucannon says. The Cougars are 6-5 overall, 4-4 in the Pac12; the Huskies are 7-4 and 4-4. Six wins makes a team bowl eligible — many observers consider WSU a lock for a bowl, regardless of Friday’s outcome — but seven wins guarantees a team will go bowling. “It would be terrible to put in all that work, build this program from where it was on up and leave it to old guys [bowl officials] making decisions,” Halliday says. The Cougars finished last four straight years prior to this season, and it took Halliday four years (counting a redshirt season as a freshman) to earn a full-time playing role. He says he never considered transferring, even to schools like Boise State (where father Duane was a backup quarterback), Eastern Washington and Idaho that recruited him out of high school. “I just love this place,” Halliday says. “There’s been some definitely tough times, some frustration, some nights of pulling my hair out. But ever since I’ve committed here, I’ve always wanted to be the guy that starts it — the first quarterback to turn this place around. Maybe I’m crazy, maybe I’m delusional, but I’ve never wavered from the thought that I’m the guy that can do it.” n

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“IN A RUSH,” CONTINUED... second campaign, a 1-11 debacle capped by a desultory Apple Cup loss. Thirteen months later, he broke Cougar hearts and inspired epithets like “traitor” when he declared his allegiance to the team they despise above all others, the University of Washington. After 11 games, WSU’s anemic rushing attack ranks 123rd — dead last — in the Football Bowl Subdivision at 60 yards per game, totaling 10 touchdowns with two runs of 20 yards or more. Averaging 143 yards, with 17 touchdowns and 19 rushes covering at least 20 yards, Sankey is a semifinalist for the Doak Walker Award, presented to the nation’s top college running back. Coug fans celebrating the possibility of a bowl game for the first time in a decade can only imagine him as the feature back in Mike Leach’s ballsout passing attack and wonder: What if? Sankey’s freshman year was about adjusting. His sophomore effort was the breakthrough. His junior season already is one of the most prolific by any UW running back; at 1,575 rushing yards, Corey Dillon’s single-season mark of 1,695 set 17 years ago is well within reach. “It’s offseason preparation, not being satisfied,” says Sankey. “There’s always room to get better. I’ve become more of a patient runner — when the hole opens, get through it and get to the next level.” The past three months’ highlights include a career-high 241 yards in an emotional rout of Cal, a school-record 40 carries against Arizona, and 208 yards vs. Illinois at Chicago’s iconic Soldier Field before 30 family members and friends. But it’s hard to top Oct. 5 at Stanford. Playing before his grandfather Albert — who underwent a corneal transplant two weeks earlier to restore

vision in his right eye and witnessed his grandson in action for the first time — he gashed the Pac’s best defense for 125 yards and two touchdowns. “It was a blessing,” says Sankey. “He really enjoyed being there, his first time seeing me play. ... I just wish we’d won.” The grounded 21-year-old credits his upbringing — born and raised in Ohio, he followed his father Chris, an Air Force sergeant, to Spokane — with making him who he is: “Growing up in a military family helped me adapt to different situations, taught me that you have to learn to make adjustments. You have to know who you are — it’s important to stay close to the people who are closest to you. ... My dad’s the biggest influence in my life; he taught me about life.” Gonzaga Prep also played a major role in his development; he offers shout-outs to football coaches Dave McKenna, H.T. Higgins, Nate Graham and Bob Cassano. Bulked up nearly 20 pounds from his G-Prep days, Sankey is a metronome for an inconsistent Husky team. Soaring up NFL draft boards to the third round, he’d be the earliest-drafted Spokanite since 1992, when Detroit picked kicker Jason Hanson of Mead and WSU in the second round. His toughness, durability, vision, balance, acceleration, blocking and receiving ability and nose for the end zone bode well for the next level. After rushing for three touchdowns Saturday, tying Kaufman’s UW career record of 34, he could be playing his final home game Friday in the Apple Cup. “I’ll have to go over it with my family,” says Sankey. “It’s not something I’m thinking about right now.” n

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OLYMPIA

Winners and losers in Washington’s new budget PAGE 18

MUSIC

CULTURE | DIGEST

Is the next Justin Bieber in Newman Lake? PAGE 41

JULY 4-10, 2013 | THE FINAL WORD IN LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

VENTURE AT THE DRIVE-IN

T

his summer, we ran a story about the region’s last drive-in movie theater, the Auto Vue Drive-In in Colville, and how it was set to close at the end of the season. The Auto Vue is still trying to find a way to make the necessary upgrades to continue on; its fate remains uncertain. But the days of movies under the stars in the Inland Northwest might have another hope in the form of two brothers who want to open a new drive-in, hopefully in or near Spokane city limits. Johnathan and Bryan Durbin began kicking around the idea for the theater in recent months. Last week, the two started a Facebook page to gauge the level of public interest in such a project. Within a day, they had more than 3,000 followers on their page. At press time it had more than 5,000 followers. “We were trying to figure out if we could make it successful here. We’re pushing forward here after seeing that,” says Johnathan, a 27-year-old Air Force veteran who also helps out at the Spokane Civic Theatre, where his brother does lighting and technical work. But there’s some work ahead of them. A digital projector, now essential for running new films at any theater, can run nearly $100,000. They also need a hell of a lot of land. Johnathan says he and his brother are charging ahead with the project, hoping to have a business plan put together soon before launching a crowd-funded effort

BY MIKE BOOKEY | PAGE 20

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JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

to get a theater ready for business by either this summer or the summer of 2015. The Durbins know they’re swimming upstream with their effort, opening something that has all but gone extinct in the region. Still, Johnathan thinks there’s a demand. “I see all these movie theaters shutting down, and to me it just seems that’s because they don’t have the income that they need to stay in business. But we’ve seen that this is something people want to support,” he says. — MIKE BOOKEY Follow the developments of the theater project at facebook.com/spokanedriveintheater.

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LISTICLES | If you’ve ever spent a few hours too many watching cat videos on the Internet when you should have been working, you know how important it is to procrastinate efficiently. To that end, I humbly submit to you MATT STOPERA, the only writer at BuzzFeed worth wasting your time on. Stopera’s oeuvre includes instructive epistles (“Why We All Need To Start Using The Word ‘Quiche’”), informative guides (“71 Reasons We Need To SAVE CORGIS FROM EXTINCTION”), and odes to the sexiest man on earth (“The 33 Most Jizz-Worthy Moments In Ryan Gosling’s 33 Years On Earth”). Next time you’re feeling some looming deadline pressure, resist the urge to click on your weird second cousin’s vague, inane Upworthy link and instead indulge in Ryan Gosling’s gleaming pectorals at buzzfeed.com/ mjs538.

TWITTER | Speaking of Upworthy — the heavily trafficked, social media-driven purveyor of feel-good, socially conscious YouTube videos — why hasn’t anyone invented an app that bans the site’s cloying click-bait from the Interwebz forever? While we wait in anticipation, at least we can follow @UPWORTHIT and @ DOWNWORTH on Twitter, which mock the site’s formulaic, hysterically chipper headlines with tweets like, “This Brave Young Woman Proves In Spectacular Fashion That She’s Allergic To Gluten, Not Life” and “He’s Not A Magician - So Why Is He Sobbing And Trying To Swallow Razor Blades On The Street Corner?” To avoid the compulsion to click on an Upworthy link ever again, there’s even the @UPWORTHYSPOILER Twitter feed. What’s the “single most mind-altering photograph humanity has ever taken”? Just a blurry picture of Earth from space. Yawn.

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 27

CULTURE | THEATER LOCAL & INDEPENDENT NEWS • INNOVATION • WELLNESS

Get your copy at hospitals, medical offices & select Inlander rack locations.

Patrick Treadway provides a powerful performance in Our Town. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

Town and Universe Interplayers has adapted Thornton Wilder’s Our Town without changing a thing, and that’s good BY E.J. IANNELLI

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/InHealthNW 28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

T

he three acts of Our Town might be better described as orchestral movements. The first two focus on daily life and young love in the small New Hampshire town of Grover’s Corners; they are the allegro and andante. The third, which deals with death and metaphysics, is the adagio, and the minor key that was only alluded to in the previous movements suddenly leaps to the fore. Largely through the efforts of artistic director Reed McColm, Interplayers has taken this concerto and made it a chamber piece. A play once known for the size of its cast (around 30, making it ripe for community theater’s take-allcomers inclusivity) has become a much tighter, eight-person ensemble work in which most actors play several roles. Our Town already asks so much of its viewers — props are mimed, and the fourth wall is repeatedly razed and rebuilt — that this doesn’t seem too great a demand on the imagination. Beyond that, the change introduces just enough novelty to scrub away the patina of familiarity while accentuating the play’s inherent modernity. Modernity isn’t an aspect of Our Town that has gone unnoticed over its 75-year existence, but it often gets mentally sidelined in favor of its apparent glorification of a hardworking, salt-ofthe-earth rural community, where the political makeup is matter-of-factly “86 percent Republican” and boys and girls marry for life out of high school. The relaxed, folksy charisma of the omniscient stage manager, played here superbly by Patrick Treadway, conceals his pacifist asides and his theologically abstract thoughts on the afterlife. In fact, the whole third act gently subverts everything up to that point, acknowledging these quaint small-towners to be more “blind” and “troubled” than they — or we — had previously suspected. Wilder, let’s not forget, was a translator of Sartre and an admirer of Gertrude Stein; his approach to Grover’s Corners is more Left Bank than Mayberry. If it’s hard to think of Our

Town in this more ambiguous light, therein lies some of its beauty. So far this season Michael Weaver has directed Church Basement Ladies and Brighton Beach Memoirs. Neither presented any great challenge to rise to, and he met them on their own terms. This new adaptation shows that Weaver is capable of far more given a bit of meat and ambition. Scene changes are fluid, with actors almost imperceptibly shedding clothes as they exit, only to reappear as someone else a short while later. Nothing seems hurried or lacking with respect to the large-cast original. The stage feels every bit as full. To achieve that fullness, what little cast there is has to go a long way. In at least one case, it falls to a single actor (here, Jerry Sciarrio) to animate eight different characters, and those that inhabit just one (Sarah Uptagrafft as Emily Webb) or two (James Pendleton and Page Byers) have to provide a solid dramatic core for the rest. Pendleton’s bright-eyed, golly-gee George Gibbs charms, whereas Uptagrafft is unfortunately prone to the same gaspy melodrama that has typified her roles since Church Basement Ladies. Byers and Maria Caprile both bring delicate differences to their matriarchal roles, with Caprile adopting a jaded monotone that benefits the wry humor of some of her lines. Sound effects like train whistles or clinking milk bottles embellish the actors’ prop-less efforts. Thematically, Our Town is microscopic as well as macroscopic, seeing the details of mundanity and the vastness of eternity as two essential parts of the same whole. Interplayers’ adaptation has remained true to this, shrinking the cast count while keeping both the subtleties and enduring appeal of Our Town unchanged. n arts@inlander.com Our Town • Through Dec. 14: Wed-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $28 ($22 senior/military, $12 student) • Interplayers Theatre • 174 S. Howard • 455-7529 • interplayerstheatre.org

S U P P LE M E N T TO THE IN LAN DE R

’Tis the Season Holiday Guide 2013

2 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

Come on,

Buddy. GET UP. TAKE OFF THOSE DAMN SWEATPANTS. YOU CAN DO IT. THE HOLIDAY SEASON ISN’T AN OPEN INVITATION TO ALLOW THOSE STICKY CANDY-CANE REMNANTS TO MAKE YOU ONE WITH YOUR EGGNOG-STAINED COUCH. NO MATTER HOW MUCH YOU TRY TO TELL YOURSELF THIS IS ACCEPTABLE JUST BECAUSE YOUR SHOPPING IS DONE AND NO ONE SEEMS TO HAVE NOTICED THAT YOU HAVEN’T GONE TO WORK IN TWO WEEKS, YOU ARE WRONG.

TURN THE PAGE AND YOU’LL FIND SOMETHING TO YOU DESERVE IT. YOUR FAMILY DESERVES IT. THOSE DAMN SWEATPANTS DESERVE IT. IN THIS GUIDE YOU’LL FIND ENOUGH PLAYS AND CONCERTS AND ICE SKATING AND SOUND OF MUSIC SING-ALONGS AND CRAFTILY LIT CRUISE BOATS TO MAKE EVEN THE JOLLIEST ELF PEE HIS TIGHTS. YOU’RE GOING TO DO SOMETHING THIS SEASON, GOT IT? SERIOUSLY. TAKE OFF THE SWEATPANTS. DO IN THE COMING WEEKS.

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GAMES AT THE TABLE

Presumably you’ve just packed your belly full of turkey, potatoes, rolls, stuffing, green beans and cranberry sauce. It’s going to take a while for that food to start moving along to make room for a sampling of the pies on the kitchen counter — time to get comfy and relax. Instead of taking a nap (although still quite acceptable after a feast like this), gather up the family and have some good old fashioned fun with a game or two. We’re not suggesting the digital variety, but a co-op video game like Mario Kart or Wii Bowling could be fun for all. It’s the older classics, though — Sorry!, Pictionary, Life, etc. — that can really get rowdy and fun, and may just make the extended family forget what’s most annoying about each other. If these board games aren’t on hand, try a more recent release that’s great for entertaining a multigenerational group, the always popular Apples to Apples (if it’s an adults-only affair, maybe the similar yet crude Cards Against Humanity). We also like the simple-tolearn crossword competition game Bananagrams, and its counterparts, Appletters and Pears in Pairs. If you don’t have any of these games, all you need is that 52-card deck in the junk drawer. Start a competitive round of “Pig” or “Snap.” The site classicgamesandpuzzles.com lists the rules and strategies of these and tons of other games. (CHEY SCOTT)

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Santa seems to make his rounds at local malls earlier every year, but it’s still perfectly OK to ignore the holiday season entirely until the day after Thanksgiving. Then go all out. The opening ceremony of the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s annual holiday lights show always happens on this official Christmas season kickoff day. It’s an event all Inland Northwesterners should try to experience at some point. An illuminated parade first heads through town, followed by the singing of classic Christmas carols and a spectacular fireworks show over the water. The 160-foot fir at the resort’s entrance is then lit up for the season with 40,000 LED lights. If you can’t make turnon of the official lights display, see it during one of the “Journey to the North Pole” holiday lake cruises, which depart at multiple times daily from the resort through Jan. 1. The holiday lights opening ceremony starts at 5 pm and is free to attend. Cruise prices: free for kids under 5 years, $5 kids ages 6-12, adults $19.75, seniors $18.75. (CS)

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For those who braved the insanity of Black Friday shopping, congratulations. For those who didn’t, congratulations to you as well. Corporate America’s holiday sales approach is a touchy subject for many, entirely overlooked by others. But with the birth of Shop Local movements and the growing number of “Small Business Saturday” events, it’s becoming trendier and more conscionable to avoid the malls and stick to Main Street. The weekend-long 29th Annual Festival of Fair Trade (Nov. 29-Dec. 1) isn’t on Main Street, per se, but Main Avenue, at the Community Building in downtown Spokane. With the intent of supporting the local economy as well as providing an income to global artisans, the gift fair offers an array of thoughtful, more sustainable choices. Items for sale — including jewelry, clothing, textiles, pottery and more — aren’t made in factories or sweatshops, but handmade by artisans and farmers in Nepal, Mexico, Guatemala and Chile. Those who want to learn more about the global fair trade movement can attend the festival-hosted benefit screening of the documentary Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide at the Magic Lantern Theatre next door. The festival is open from 10 am-5 pm; documentary at 2 pm. Free admission to festival, $5 suggested donation to see film. Visit festivaloffairtrade.com (CS)

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All that’s needed here is $1. That’s right, Christmas Tree Elegance raffle tickets are just $1 each. Of course, the more tickets you buy, the more chance you have to win one of the 18 specially themed decorated trees and accompanying items, including gift certificates and cash, all valued at around $5,000. Select your favorite tree and place your ticket in the bucket next to it. The fundraiser supports the Spokane Symphony and the continuation of classical music. Opening ceremony for the event happens today in the Davenport Hotel lobby. Trees will be on display for free at the Davenport and River Park Square Dec. 3-15, with tickets available at both locations. The winning tickets will be drawn Dec. 14 for the Davenport trees, Dec. 15 for the River Park Square trees. See symphonyassociates. org for more information on the various events. (LJ)

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This day marks the start of Advent. Traditionally it’s a time for Christians to prepare and mark down the days leading up to the Savior’s birth, but you can leave baby Jesus out of the equation easily enough. Advent candle wreaths have been around forever, but chocolate-making companies have cashed in on the countdown fun as well. Look for pop-out cardboard calendars at most stores; these contain little pieces of candy behind each day’s flap. No matter what you use to check off the days before Christmas — a shot of whiskey per night, or something else — Advent is a perfect way to gather the household together each night to share in the building excitement of the swiftly gone holiday. (LAURA JOHNSON)

Dragging your significant other to a ballroom dancing lesson can prove difficult. But when you explain that the Argentine tango is more overtly sexual than twerking could ever hope to be, that takes some of the argument out of it. When you further clarify it’s free, they should want to go, all the way. Sparks are sure to fly if you take the beginner class held at Club Corazon, where steps are broken down with the utmost patience. It’s just one more way to keep warm this winter. Classes happen every Monday at 7 pm, with free admission for newcomers. Visit spokanetango.com. (LJ)

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6 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

GET IT ON

It’s not news that making gingerbread people is a wonderful holiday tradition. But it’s time to take it a step further — create your gingery people with the right parts. Things don’t need to get X-rated, but who wouldn’t want to make and eat a gingerbread lady wearing a bikini or a gingerbread guy with a g-string frosted on? Maybe not if children are present, but if it’s just you and your gutter-minded loved ones, there’s no better way to have a ball while baking. (LJ) THU, DEC. 5

WARM GRANNY’S HEART

Don’t just send out a boring holiday greeting card with a photo of your adorable kids and puppy this year. Instead, spread cheer and impress your grandma with a handmade card; stick that cute photo inside. Learn the secrets of die-cut making and stamping at the Christmas card-making class at Hayden (Idaho) Library. Best of all, the class is free, all materials provided. The class goes from noon-2 pm. Call 208-772-5612 with questions. (LJ)

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FRI, DEC. 6

DIARY OF A MAD ELF

Kids screaming, irritated parents — the holiday dream combination. But for the fine folks working at the Santa’s Workshop at Macy’s, at least in the play The Santaland Diaries, this is something that must be endured. The next show at Coeur d’Alene’s Lake City Playhouse, Santaland follows the trials of a man who works as an elf at the iconic department store. Based on the short story by David Sedaris, showgoers can expect the author’s brand of dark humor to shine through. The play runs Dec. 6-22. Friday’s performance starts at 7:30 pm. $11-$17. Visit lakecityplayhouse.org. (LJ)

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The first run of The Nutcracker wasn’t successful in Tchaikovsky’s native Russia. Too bad the composer never got to appreciate the holiday tradition his work would become, especially in America. The State Street Ballet’s (out of Santa Barbara, Calif.) version of the show comes to town Dec. 5-8. The Spokane Symphony will provide the well-loved music for the dancers. The Sugar Plum Fairy, Clara, the Mouse King and the Nutcracker will all show at Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox. Saturday’s showtimes are 2 and 7:30 pm, with tickets $25-$75. Visit spokanesymphony.org. (LJ)

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The country-crooning Oak Ridge Boys take the stage at the INB Performing Arts Center on Dec. 9. SUN, DEC. 8

JINGLE ALL THE WAY

“Oh, it’s lovely weather for a sleigh ride together with you…” may be one of the many holiday songs you’ll croon as you cozy up under blankets next to loved ones, gliding through the pristine Selkirk Mountains in a one- (or two-) horse open sleigh. The Western Pleasure Guest Ranch outside of Sandpoint offers old-fashioned winter sleigh rides through the dense, snow-covered forest, both as transport to cut your own Christmas tree and as a nostalgic, holiday-time adventure. The ranch’s fleet of sleighs can accommodate groups of up to a dozen passengers per sleigh, which might be pulled by good ol’ Bud and Larry or the majestic Jet and Justice, some of the ranch’s draft horse teams. After your ride, cozy up in the lodge for hot cocoa, coffee and popcorn, or a country-style dinner. Kids age 5 and under/free, ages 6-12/$15, adults/$19. Rides offered Mon-Sat from 11 am-6 pm, Sun from 2-6 pm. westernpleasureranch.com (CHEY SCOTT) MON, DEC. 9

A COUNTRY CHRISTMAS

Some people wait all year to hear Christmas music, and surely many of them will be at this Monday evening country-gospel concert, featuring the award-winning Oak Ridge Boys quartet.

12 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

Never heard of them? There’s a good chance most millennials haven’t, since the group debuted back in the ’40s, though its current members have been making music and touring together under the name since the early 1970s. This year, the bearded oldies take the stage to croon out their biggest country Christmas and gospel hits, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the ORB’s current inception. $42-$52. 7:30 pm, at the INB Performing Arts Center. (CS) TUE, DEC. 10

TRIM THE TREE

I’m about to let you in on a little-known Inland Northwest holiday secret: Old World Christmas. The family-owned, Spokanebased company manufactures and wholesales hand-blown glass, keepsake tree ornaments. Retailers all over the U.S. sell the Merck family’s sparkly baubles, and Christmas enthusiasts collect them by the dozens. There’s a sizable inventory of OWC ornaments at the downtown Coeur d’Alene shop, Christmas at the Lake, along with hundreds of other unusual, specialty and themed holiday tree trimmings. Old World Christmas ornaments retail on average for about $15 apiece — not bad considering the craftsmanship and detail in each one. The glass ornaments are not only hand-blown, but hand-painted and glittered, making each one

slightly different from the next. Old World Christmas’s collectibles are a Yuletide enthusiast’s dream come true — there are ornaments for every hobby and interest imaginable, from gardening and baking to traveling, sports and pets. Holiday classics abound, and locals can start their own collections for quite a bit less than retail prices. As a thank-you to the Inland Northwest, the Merck family opens up the company’s factory outlet store to the public this time of year (and in the summer), offering their beautiful ornaments at wholesale prices as low as $4 apiece. You’ll have to carefully dig through boxes of assorted pieces to find your favorites, but that’s all part of the fun. The Old World Christmas factory outlet store is located at 4005 E. Main (between Freya and Havana), and is open Sat from 11 am-5 pm and Sun-Fri from 11 am-3 pm. (CS) WED, DEC. 11

SISTERS OF SONG

What’s the holiday season without a little nod to tradition, like classic Christmas songs that have survived over centuries to still be heard today. As expected, the verses performed by the Singing Nuns of the Mount St. Michael Convent are Christian in origin, but the beauty of the sisters’ voices accompanied by East Valley High School’s “Strolling Strings” ensemble is a

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Manito’s Gaiser Conservatory is lit up from treat a person of any religious background could enjoy. The sisters have been performing an annual Christmas concert for the public for nearly two decades; they again don their blue habits and take to the stage to remind us all of the reason for the season. $16/seniors and students, $20/adults. Group rates available. 2 pm and 7:30 pm, also on Dec. 12, same times, at the Bing Crosby Theater. (CS) THU, DEC. 12

CHEERY CABARET

When it was decided the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre would be no more (that all changed when CST was born again earlier this fall in new form) one of the area’s most prominent theater veterans, Ellen Travolta, stepped up to make sure that a fairly new Coeur d’Alene holiday tradition, started two seasons ago by CST, continued. “A Christmas Cabaret” features Travolta’s talents alongside local accomplished cabaret singer Mark Cotter and actor Jack Bannon, Travolta’s husband. See the trio’s lively show at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. $20-$25. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm, through Dec. 21. (CS) FRI, DEC. 13

MERRY AND BRIGHT

More than a decade ago when my family first began going to the Friends of Manito’s annual holiday lights display at the park’s Gaiser Conservatory, we never had to wait in line to enter the greenhouse, even on a weekend. In the time since, though, this annual event has grown to become tradition

Dec. 13-22.

for many more local families, who don’t miss the chance to “ooh” and “ahh” at the decked-out greenhouse’s magical appearance. It’s well worth a wait in the cold. Inside the tepidly warm plant paradise, visitors experience the conservatory’s most spectacular residents — giant cacti, tropical orchids, birds of paradise, towering palms — shrouded in the warm glow of LED lights. The shining star, more than 100 years old, is the greenhouse’s fuchsia-blossomed Christmas cactus, which volunteers carefully drape with matching pink lights. To top off the holiday splendor, numerous varieties of poinsettias are brought in and placed throughout the display. Attending the event is free, but donations are welcome to keep the volunteer-based organization continuing. Dec. 13-22, open from 8 am-7:30 pm daily, best viewing after 4 pm. (CS) SAT, DEC. 14

A MILLION BUCKS

On a December night 57 years ago, four of history’s biggest rock ‘n’ roll icons gathered inside a Memphis recording studio for what would become a legendary jam session. Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins came together to record for the first and only time. The Tony Awardwinning musical Million Dollar Quartet tells the story of what did and could have happened inside the studio’s four walls that fated night. Take a break from all that Christmas music and rock out oldschool instead. $32.50-$72.50. Dec. 14 at 2 pm and 8 pm; show runs Dec. 12-15 at the INB Performing Arts Center. (CS)

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HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 13

Holiday Pulse Food

The arrival of FIRE (816 W. S a • a a a. in Spokane around this time last year was quite an event, and it’s not hard to see why. The hip restaurant’s artisan pizza is handtossed, fastidiously topped and wood-fired as though every pie were a work of art. Alongside the build-your-own options, there are a few set toppings like the Billy (goat cheese, roasted red pepper, Kalamata olives, fresh arugula), the Crimini (mushrooms, thyme, garlic olive oil, mozzarella) plus an always intriguing daily special. Like Fire, MACKENZIE RIVER

Events

PIZZA & MORE PIZZA CO. ( 1 W. • a a. recently added a downtown location to complement its Northside and South Hill franchises, which ought to make it easier for holiday shoppers to enjoy a menu that prides itself on unique flavor combinations. Play it safe and traditional with the Bear Tooth Sausage (hot Italian sausage, diced tomatoes, red onions, red peppers) or go adventurous with the Caribbean chicken (spicy jerk chicken, sweet Caribbean sauce, pineapples, topped with fresh cilantro). Even their Buffalo Wing pizza features tempting, out-of-

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, DOWNTOWN SPOKANE IS THE PLACE TO BE. COME VISIT THE INLAND NORTHWEST’S MOST EXCITING DESTINATION.

the-ordinary toppings like celery and bleu cheese. A wide range of pastas, salads, burgers and steaks rounds out the menu. EUROPA (125 S. Wall • a . a. a a is renowned for its delicious Tuscan-style pies, but it’s a lot more than that. A full range of salads like the Steak Tenderloin and Harvest Pear, along with pastas, calzones and pastries, makes for a menu that can sate any appetite. Overwhelmed by choice? The chicken marsala gets consistent five-star praise.

ICE SKATING

Now Open - Riverfront Park’s Ice Palace is now open through March 2, Tue-Sun from 11 am-5 pm, and also Tue-Thu from 7-8:30 pm and Fri-Sat from 7-10 pm. Extended holiday hours TBA. Adults $4.50; kids age 3-12, military and seniors (62+) $3.50. Skate rental $3.50. (Free admission coupons available from participating downtown retailers & downtownspokane.org, good from Nov. 22-Dec. 19, excludes skate rental.) spokaneriverfrontpark.com (625-6601)

OUR TOWN

Runs through Dec. 14 - See this classic play telling the story of small-town America at the turn of the 20th century. Performances held Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm; select Sat and Sun matinées at 2 pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529)

THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER

Runs through Dec. 22 - A holiday musical telling the true story of the ships that transported Christmas trees across the Great Lakes. Performances held weekly Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507)

TREE OF SHARING

Through Dec. 12 - Spokane’s Tree of Sharing, the largest organization of its kind in the U.S., provides holiday gifts to thousands of low-income children, women and men in the Inland Northwest each year. Donated gifts are distributed to 50 community service agencies serving those in need. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. treeofsharing.org (290-0002)

SANTA EXPRESS

Through Dec. 23 - Youth (ages 4-12) can shop for affordable Christmas gifts ranging from 50 cents to $8. Proceeds benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Open Mon-Sat from 10 am-8 pm and Sun from 11 am-6 pm. Crescent Court skywalk level, 707 W. Main Ave. vanessabehan.org (535-3155)

FESTIVAL OF FAIR TRADE

Nov. 29-Dec. 1 from 10 am-5 pm - The 29th annual event features local vendors offering globally made gift items from jewelry and pottery to clothing and more, all handmade in sweatshop-free environments. Free admission. Community Building, 25 W. Main Ave. festivaloffairtrade.com (448-6561)

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE

Dec. 3-15 - Eighteen elaborately decorated holiday trees are displayed and available to win as part of a fundraiser raffle benefiting the Spokane Symphony. Trees are located on the mezzanine of the Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St., Dec. 3-14 from 10 am-9 pm, and at River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave., on the second floor, Dec. 3-15, from 10 am-mall closing each day. Cost: Free to view, raffle tickets $1 each. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

POPOVICH COMEDY PET THEATER

Dec. 5-6 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 7 at 11 am - The world-famous Popovich Comedy Pet Theater returns to Spokane, with all its four-legged principals in tow. See 15 cats and 10 dogs — all rescued from shelters — perform cute tricks. $9-$22. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-4704)

MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA CO

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THE NUTCRACKER

Dec. 5-8 Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sat-Sun at 2 pm - Santa Barbara, Calif.’s State Street Ballet dances to the music of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite, performed by the Spokane Symphony Orchestra. $25-$75. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

Shopping Mothers and daughters can shop together at APRICOT LANE (River Park Square • facebook.com/apricotlanespokane), which has a range of fashions that will appeal to shoppers of all ages and tastes. “We’re a boutique, so we carry pieces no one else would carry,” says store manager Rose Lange. “The biggest trends come straight from L.A., and we get six pieces of each item. It’s exclusive to us. So if you have an item, your girlfriend isn’t going to have it, too.” Surprisingly, all that exclusivity

CUTE BOUTIQUES

doesn’t come at a cost. Prices max out below $80. “Our biggest seller right now is our fleece-lined leggings,” says Lange. “You just have to touch it, and it sells itself.” If you want to snoop before you shop, visit Apricot Lane on Facebook or Instagram, where they frequently showcase new arrivals, great outfit combinations and special promotions. Fashion can be as fickle as it is fleeting, and that’s why it pays to call on ARTEMIS (1021 W. 1st • artemishop.com). This boutique deals in up-to-the-minute styles

in clothing, furniture and jewelry, which will put you ahead of the curve when it comes to the finer points of couture — like cuts, prints, colors and fabrics. Breadth doesn’t escape CALAMITY JANE’S (303 W. 2nd • bit.ly/CalamityJanes) either. This cool boutique can supply you with all the sweaters, cardigans, vests, scarves, jackets, dresses and leggings you need for an entire season. For the fashionconscious Cougs, Eagles or Bulldogs fan, it even has stylish university sports necklaces.

Bringing Christmas Back to the Crescent! Meet St. Nicholas | Special Treat for Children Live Music Buffet ~ Breakfast December 8th | From eight to two o’clock Adults $19.95 | Children (3-12) $12.95 Children under three are free Call to make reservations Call for all event catering too! 707 W. Main | 509.624.2253

Taking orders for Buche de Noel, Holiday Cookies, and Pumpkin Pie Take a Break from Holiday Shopping with a hot espresso and delicious French pastry!

LET YOUR LOCAL AUTHORS HELP YOU SHOP ARTEMIS

Cool Carriage

Nov. 29-Dec. 24 Fri 3-8 pm, Sat-Sun 12-5 pm, Christmas Eve 12-3 pm To the Spokane community, downtown’s horse-drawn carriage is the epitome of the Christmas season. The rides, both classic and timeless, allow the whole family to do something together, and can be a fun experience for all ages, toddlers to teens. The old-fashioned carriage takes riders throughout downtown Spokane to enjoy the festive sights and sounds of the city during the holiday season. If you see the slowmoving carriage while out and about, you might hear riders singing Christmas carols and see them munching on candy canes. If anything, you’ll at least hear the horses clop-clop on the pavement and the cheery jingle bells around their harnesses. The best part? The annual downtown carriage rides, sponsored by STCU, cost only a smile. Free • Departs from Wall and Main • downtownspokane.org SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Bestselling authors will be in store, helping you select your perfect holiday books at Auntie’s on Saturday, November 30, from 11 am to 4 pm. 11 am to 1 pm: Jess Walter and Kelly Milner Halls 1 to 3 pm: Kenn Nesbitt and Chris Cook with Rosanne Parry 2:30 to 4 pm: Trent Reedy and Shawn Vestal with Glenda Burgess We hope to see you there, too!

www.auntiesbooks.com

Shopping

ACTIVE LIFESTYLES

PISTOLE

LULULEMON (707 W. Main • ace oo co u u e onS o ane caters to both runners and yogis of any gender, with all the requisite gear for each activity and a pinch of style to boot. Some of their seasonal cold-weather running attire incorporates clever materials that keep you warm without adding weight. Or turning you into a

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living pressure cooker. Plus, there are Merino wool gloves with “tech-friendly” fingertips so you can still use your smartphone on frigid winter days, as well as goose-down wraps that are both form-fitting and cozy-warm. “Our holiday shopping bags are reusable, as always, and have a snap on the inside to make gift-giving super easy,” says Nina Gardner,

who handles community relations for Lululemon. “I’d rather take the time I spend wrapping and get a run in anyways. Spokane is such an active community, full of runners and yogis — I imagine they feel the same!” Pick up their four-page holiday guide full of gift ideas for men and women in their new downtown store. Whether you skate, snowboard or just dig the fashion, PISTOLE S o ard • sto e est e co will equip you with everything you need, including boards by Stereo and PowellPeralta or threads by Gnarly and Fallen. ATHLETA er ar Square, second floor • atheta a co , the Gap-owned specialty fitness store for women, has been making inroads in the Pacific Northwest and has just opened a brand new store in River Park Square. Their line of yoga, running and seasonal sport attire is as functional as it is fashionable.

Food

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INTERNATIONAL FLAVORS

Owned by KHQ anchor Stephanie Vigil and her husband Jay Underwood, MISO (River Park Square Food Court • misofreshasian.com) has quickly become a popular mid-shopping food stop due to its reliably fresh, fast, high-quality Asian fare. In addition to lots of vegetarian options, there are some great Eastmeets-West sandwiches like the Vietnamese bánh mi, which features Sriracha mayo, cilantro and a choice of meat, seafood or organic tofu on a bakery-style bun; or the increasingly soughtafter spring rolls, wrapped in light rice paper and served with a Thai peanut dipping sauce. “Our objective was to try to emulate some Southeast Asian street-vendor-type fare — something unique for a food court setting with what we think are healthier food options and flavors that aren’t your typical Thai or

teriyaki,” says Underwood. “It’s got our own vibe to it.” All dishes are wok-sizzled right in front of you, and the emphasis on speed means shoppers are guaranteed a “piping hot meal” in “less than five minutes.” You might want to move to PHỚ CITY (112 N. Howard • phocity509.com) if you’ve got a predilection for this classic Vietnamese soup. Although their menu features other tantalizing dishes like fish sauce wings and lemongrass tofu vermicelli, phở (pronounced “fah,” incidentally) is where they really excel. The website also makes it incredibly easy to place your order online for convenient carryout. For some authentic Thai cuisine, head to THAI ON FIRST (411 W. 1st), a favorite of foodies and spicy-hot addicts for more than two decades in downtown.

The City’s parking PARKING RANGERS  enforcement staff also serve as parking ambassadors, and they can give you directions and

answer your questions related to parking. Now known as the Parking Services Group, they work closely with the Downtown Spokane Partnership and downtown businesses. Kids 4-12 can find nice, affordable gifts at Santa Express. Proceeds from this annual fundraiser benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Santa Express is located in the skywalk level of the Crescent Court and is open seven days a week, through Dec. 23, Mon-Sat, 10 am-8 pm & Sun, 11 am-6 pm. Call 535-3155 is brought to you by the Downtown Spokane Partnership and the Business Improvement District in conjunction with the Inlander. For more info go to DowntownSpokane.net FOOD - Sandwiches to savor SHOPPING - Cute Boutiques

JUST FOR KIDS 

HOLIDAY PULSE 

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that light s up the holidays. Find the brands you love, and the gifts they’ll love, only at River Park Square in Downtown Spokane: Nordstrom, The Apple Store, Sephora, The North Face, Pottery Barn, and so much more. Visit riverparksquare.com to purchase gift certificates online; gift certificates can be mailed anywhere within the U.S., or picked up at the Concierge desk at River Park Square.

riverparksquare.com • 509.363.0304 808 W Main Ave • Spokane, WA

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PATIT CREEK (822 W. S ra ue • atitcreekcellars. com) opened its downtown tasting room this past June. Located across from the Davenport Hotel, it makes a great starting point for a short urban tour of some of the best vintners in Washington state. Here visitors can sample Merlot, Bordeaux and Cabernet Sauvignon wines from vineyards in the Columbia and Walla Walla valleys. “We have other varietals like our signature red blend called The Creek,” says Sonya Morrison, Patit Creek’s director of hospitality for Spokane. “It’s similar to the bordeaux, but it has Grenache [grapes] in the body so it’s a bit lighter.” An off-season hit this year is the lightly oaked chardonnay, which has seen sales continue into the autumn months. “Normally I think of whites as more summertime wines, but people are really enjoying it,” says Morrison. Patit Creek’s tasting room is unique in that it allows visitors to enjoy hors d’oeuvres that have been paired with appropriate wines. The winter menu, which rolls out in early December, will feature a cabernet cream cheese brownie. From there, head west to BARRISTER ( io Pacific Railroad • barristeri er .com), where each sip is enhanced by the rarity of the vintage. In 2012, for example, Barrister only produced about 3,200 cases of red wine and just 400 cases of white. But before you put it on your itinerary, be

sure to make a note of Barrister’s holiday hours. Every vintage — all of them red — produced by WHITESTONE WINERY ( . Post • hitesto e i er .com) comes from their family estate vineyard next to the massive outcrop of Whitestone Rock near Lake Roosevelt. Their tasting room offers at least five wines that derive from their exclusive Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot grapes. “We’re really well known for our Pieces of Red,” says tasting room employee Carrie Jorgens. “It’s a popular and award-winning blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.” Whitestone’s top-of-the-line blend is the St. Vincent Meritage: a deep purple mix of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc in a 6:3:1 ratio aged in new French oak barrels. Finally, cap off your mini-tour (there are even more wineries downtown) at the downtown tasting room for ARBOR CREST (River Park Square, third floor • arborcrest.com), another family-owned regional winery that is popular with oenophiles as well as causal wine drinkers. Their prize-winning varietals and blends include the acclaimed Dionysus meritage blend, Malbec and a Columbia Valley Syrah.

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See our local boy Bing on the big screen in the holida y classic White Christmas at the Bing Crosby Theat er on Dec. 15. SUN, DEC. 15

MON, DEC. 16

TUE, DEC. 17

Movies and Christmas are like apple pie and baseball — AllAmerican. But just like apple pies and baseball games, it’s better to partake with friends — or a whole theater of friends. So grab the whole family and come to the eighth annual Bing Crosby Holiday Film Festival to watch some yuletide classics. There are three movie showings scheduled and a live performance by Howard Crosby (Bing’s nephew). As if that isn’t enough, “On the Bus with Bing” is a newly scheduled event — participants will tour various places in Spokane that Bing frequented.     Holiday Inn starts at 12:30 pm, High Society at 3 pm, Howard Crosby performs at 5:30 pm and White Christmas at 6 pm. At the Bing Crosby Theater. Tickets are available at TicketsWest or at the door: $8 for adults (all day, does not include bus tour), children 12 and under free. (ELI FRANCOVICH)

For a kid, an allowance can be limiting, especially come the holiday season. That’s why the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery’s Santa Express fundraising event is so neat. It’s a store where kids ages 4-12 can get all their holiday shopping done. Prices ranges from 50 cents to $8 — i.e., allowance friendly. Additionally, volunteer “elves” are scheduled to be at the store to help young shoppers pick and wrap the perfect gift. Parents can wait outside and browse the Vanessa Village boutique, which offers plenty of cheap stocking stuffers. All proceeds from the sale go toward the nursery. Last year’s store brought in $80,000. The nursery hopes to break that record this year. The store opened on Nov. 23 and runs through Dec. 23. (EF)

There are Christmas lights and there are Christmas lights. Some households — especially of the South Hill variety — take their decorations pretty seriously. If you’re one of these fine households, I thank you. If not, I suggest you jump in a car and check out the elaborate decorations. The best Christmas light hunting can be found on the South Hill, in the Manito Park neighborhood. Pretty much anything off Grand Boulevard is good hunting, but don’t be afraid to venture farther in. And remember, trespassing is still trespassing, no matter how pretty the lights. (EF)

HOLIDAY FILM FESTIVAL

ALLOWANCE-FRIENDLY SHOPPING

CHRISTMAS-LIGHT STALKING

HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 19

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WED, DEC. 18

SORTING FOOD, GIVING BACK

It’s really nice getting cool things, especially during the holiday season because they’re usually free (as in gifts). That being said, giving can be even cooler.  Did you know every time you gift something, your brain gets a little shot of endorphins? Disclaimer: I just made that up, but it sounds right. Either way, consider giving back. One good option is volunteering at Second Harvest’s Help the Hungry food-sorting event. You’ll spend two hours sorting and boxing produce, bulk pasta, frozen vegetable or food drive items. Some notes: Volunteers must be 14 or older and be wearing closed-toed shoes. Sorting starts at 5:30 pm at the Second Harvest’s Asuris Northwest Health Volunteer Center. If you miss this one, don’t worry, the organization is always in need of more hands. To sign up contact: 252-6257 or volunteer@2-harvest.org. (EF) THU, DEC. 19

SHIPS AND CHRISTMAS TREES

We all have our own horror stories about finding a Christmas tree. It’s either the gardenvariety “We drove all over and they were so rude to us and all the trees were anemic runts,” or the hardier “I hiked for 30 minutes and then cut it down with my Leatherman Multi-Purpose tool.”

Volunteer and give back by helping sort

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20 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 IronGoat_Inlander_2unit_basic.indd 1 10/7/13 1:43:43 PM

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That’s cool and all, but chances are you never loaded your schooner full of fir trees, sailed them across Lake Michigan to Chicago, then sold said trees to German immigrants. Am I right? Well that’s what A Christmas Schooner is all about. It’s a musical presented by the Spokane Civic Theatre based on real-life events that occurred in the 19th century. It’s an award-winning production that ran for 12 consecutive seasons in Chicago after debuting in 1996, and here it’s in Spokane. Check it out at 7:30 pm; tickets cost $22-$30. (EF) FRI, DEC. 20

CAMPBELL HOUSE HOLIDAY TOUR

Ever wondered what a Spokane mansion circa 1910 was like? Wonder no more. Check out the historic Campbell House — in living color. Local professional actors will portray residents of the house in all their festive attire. Hosted by the MAC, regular admission ($5-$10) covers the house tour as well. The house will be open from noon until 4 pm. (EF)

VISIT FIRSTNIGHTSPOKANE.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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SAT, DEC. 21

SEASONALLY APPROPRIATE ALCOHOL

It’s been a long week. If you’ve faithfully dragged yourself to every event mentioned above, you’re bound to be tuckered out. So take a load off, don’t worry about getting cultured, giving back or shopping for your significant other’s present (well, maybe that last one). Instead, why not drink and watch the snow fall? Of course, you’ll want something warm — check out this deliciously sneaky concoction. You’ll be serenading your neighbors with Christmas carols before you know it. It’s simple: Simmer one 32-ounce jar of apple cider with about three cups of white wine. Add one teaspoon each of cloves and nutmeg and two tablespoons of cinnamon. Once it’s all incorporated, take it off the heat and squeeze half a lemon into it. Pour into glasses and add shots of Fireball — how much is up to you. (EF)

13TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

2014

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31ST DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PICK UP YOUR PASSPORT and return it when completed to one of our four convenient locations (Spokane Convention Center, INB Performing Arts Center, Bank of America, and River Park Square) during the First Night event. 7p.m. to 10 p.m. Complete information at firstnightspokane.org

Buttons Now On Sale!

BUY YOUR ADMISSION BUTTON EARLY & SAVE! • $15 through Dec. 30 • $18 on Dec. 31 • Children 10 & Under FREE

Admission buttons now available at Cenex Zip Trip Stores, River Park Square Concierge, Aunties Book Store & Aunties Annex, and Tickets West.

OVER 150 PERFORMANCES AT 40 LOCATIONS INB Performing Arts Center Haran Irish Dancers and Floating Crowbar 7 p.m., 8 p.m. & 9 p.m. and The Curt Show 10 p.m. & 11 p.m.

4TH ANNUAL 5K RESOLUTION RUN Starting in River Front Park at 6:45pm on New Year’s Eve, Entry is Free!! For complete race information go to firstnightspokane.org

SPONSORED BY NUMERICA CREDIT UNION

Hotel Packages Available

Convention Center Ballrooms A&B – 7 p.m. – 11:40 p.m. - Variety Show with Alex Zerbe, David Lichtenstein a.k.a., Leapin’ Louie, Dan Raspyni, The Comedy Circus Show and Charlie Williams, The Noise Guy. Miss Abbey’s Steampunk Spectacular, Blue Door Theatre, Bopping Heads and much, much more. North of Main Avenue Singing in the New Year Finale – IMAX Theatre 7 p.m. – 11:40 p.m., Free Carousel Rides sponsored by STCU, Fox 28 Main Stage dancing until midnight, Spokane Civic Theatre players at Wheatland Bank Drive-thru West of Post Street Ballet at the Bing, 48 Hour Film Festival, Comedy, Theatre, Drumming, Music, Crafts and Magic. South of Main Avenue Music and dance from Latin to rock and roll, visual arts, craft making and more

FREE PARKING & SHUTTLE SERVICE Shuttles every 10 min. from Riverpoint Campus

Midnight Fireworks Spectacular by

See package listings at www.visitspokane.org,

Get your Event Program in the 3-6pm at the Spokane Convention Center Crafts, Live Performances, And more...

December 19th issue of

Extended hours 7-9pm

HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 21

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Traditions of Christmas runs Dec. 12-23 at the Kroc Center in Coeur d’Alene. SUN, DEC. 22

SOUND OF MUSIC SING-ALONG

Do, re, mi, fa, so, la… ahem, just warming up for the Sound of Music sing-along. One can’t prepare too much when you’re about to — in public — combine your voice with Julie Andrews’ mellifluousness. At least there will be subtitles in case you get stuck somewhere between whiskers on kittens, cream-colored ponies and schnitzel with noodles. This showing of the classic musical not only includes the singing-along, but a costume contest. Come in one of those charming von Trapp children outfits, as a nun or as a crisp apple strudel. There will also be a prop bag full of items to use strategically throughout the film. It’s sort of like the Rocky Horror Picture Show, but with less bare skin and more vibrato. The INB Performing Arts Center, $25, 5 pm. (JO MILLER) MON, DEC. 23

TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS

There should be at least one thing you do during the holiday season that’s absolutely soaked in Christmas spirit. And the dancing elves, toy soldiers, Rockettes-style tap dancers, Christmas carols and live nativity at this performance of Christmas songs and traditions from around the world

22 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

definitely fits that criteria. The Kroc Center in Coeur d’Alene, $20-$33, 1 pm. Runs from Dec. 12-23. (JM) TUE, DEC. 24

SEE SANTA SKI

Why go to the overly crowded shopping malls to see Santa when you can see the jolly, red-clad man strapped to a pair of skis on a snow-covered mountain — presumably his natural habitat, right? Mr. and Mrs. Claus will be skiing and passing out treats at Schweitzer Mountain Resort from 11 am-1 pm. Then they’ll lead a balloon parade down to the village at 2 pm, where everyone will snack on cookies and tell Santa their heart’s desires until 4. (JM) WED, DEC. 25

HAVE A GREEN CHRISTMAS

Nothing says Christmas like four heaping trash bags full of glossy, red-and-green wrapping paper. We all have our traditions that make the yuletide special, but being inconsiderate toward Mother Earth doesn’t have to be one of them. For example, instead of buying wrapping paper, wrap gifts in a newspaper (but read it first!), old posters or scraps of cloth and secure them with ribbon you can reuse, instead of tape. Hand-make cards

from recycled paper. Have a potted Christmas tree that you can use again next year. Cut down on the extravagant light display. Give someone something you own that’s special to you instead of gifting only store-bought presents. Sure, being environmentally conscious isn’t exactly the focus of Christmas, but Christmas will still be Christmas without all the wastefulness. Promise. (JM) THU, DEC. 26

BE A KID

You worked your tail off. You cleaned the house for company, decorated to a T, baked 12 batches of cookies, made a five-course dinner and got everyone the perfect gifts. Now take the day after Christmas and spend it acting like a child. Why? Because children don’t have responsibilities. And besides, it seems like kids get to have the most fun on Christmas while the adults just do, you know, boring adult stuff. So now that the pressure’s off, take your turn. Go sledding, play mindless videogames, watch The NeverEnding Story, make snow angels in the front yard, get someone to read you a storybook, take a bath, and most important, completely ignore the mess created by the previous day’s festivities. (JM)

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FRI, DEC. 27

MAKE A FRIEND

This suggestion might seem weird at first. We are, after all, living in the 21st century, where getting to know someone means scrolling through his or her Facebook timeline, and charity can be a sympathetic “like” on a friend’s post about struggling with his gaming addiction. But come on, we can do better. The holidays are about giving, being together, warm fuzzies… blah, blah, blah. But the reality is some people just don’t have friends and family around. Find someone new in town, or someone down and out, or just a quiet someone — maybe a co-worker, person in your neighborhood, fellow churchgoer, or your regular checkout person at the grocery store. Invite him or her over for pie, tea and crumpets, or a few beers, whatever your style. Who knows? Maybe that person will be your new favorite human. (JM)

SAT, DEC. 28

GORGE ON CINNAMON ROLLS

By now, all of the holiday treats have probably been gobbled up and any left over are a bit stale. The new year fast approaches, and you know what that means. If you’re like most Americans, you’re about to obligate yourself to a year of healthy eating and exercise. However successful or fiasco-like that may turn out to be, take one more opportunity to savor the undeniable glory of melted brown sugar and butter-soaked bread. Thaw out a loaf of frozen dough that you can get in the freezer section at the grocery store. Roll the dough out flat and slather it with butter. Spread a generous amount of brown sugar on top, add a hefty sprinkling of cinnamon. Roll up the dough into a cylinder shape and slice it up into individual rolls (slice big for thick cinnamon rolls). Grease a pan and place the rolls in it, so they’re butted up against each other. Let the rolls rise for a while at room temperature, then bake for about 20 minutes at 350 degrees until golden brown. For the cream cheese icing, mix together 8 ounces of cream cheese, one stick of butter, a box of powdered sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla. (JM)

HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 23

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SUN, DEC. 29

EAT A WHEEL OF CHEESE

Not sure how you operate, but during the holidays I like to feel as gross as possible about myself. No — I’m dead serious. I’m a big eater. It’s gross, and I try to keep in check the rest of the non-holiday days of the year. But from Christmas Eve until New Year’s Eve, I usually can be found consuming as much as my stomach will allow because it is more socially acceptable to be gluttonous, and because I know I’m going to torture myself at the gym come Jan. 1. A few years ago, I discovered the sharp, piquant joy that is Cougar Gold cheese — made by hand at the WSU Creamery down in Pullman — at my grocery store, and brought a can home. Between Christmas and New Year’s, my husband and I ate the entire 30 oz. wheel of cheddar. How? You do it by eating Cougar Gold for breakfast. Cougar Gold for lunch. For snacks. With coffee. In front of the TV. Laying in bed with a book. Do yourself a favor: buy a can now and suck it down before your New Year’s resolutions

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of juice cleanses and morning yoga kick in. Trust me: Cheese doesn’t mix with fitness. Find it at local stores and at cougarcheese.wsu.edu. (LEAH SOTTILE) MON, DEC. 30

GET ALL NORMAN ROCKWELL

When Norman Rockwell was painting his portraits of American life, he had to have been imagining a place like Spokane, where horse-drawn carriages clop along the streets during the holidays, where holiday music emanates from invisible speakers downtown and twinkle lights brighten up the industrial facade of the city. A city where at the very center, there is an ice skating rink. Suit up the family in their winter finest and head down to Riverfront Park for an evening of skating and hot cocoa at the Ice Palace. Admission for kids is just $3.50, and for adults (13 and older) it’s $4.50. Rentals available. Visit spokaneriverfrontpark. com. (LS)

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• TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY Nov. 29 at 5 pm. Santa arrives 6 pm! Holiday entertainment and hot cider in Jeff Jones Town Square. • GET YOUR JINGLE ON Thurs. Dec. 6-8. Shopping specials and door prizes downtown all weekend. • GUY’S NIGHT OUT Thurs. Dec. 20. Evening shopping and specials downtown for last minute shoppers. • SANTA AT THE NORTH POLE Saturdays Nov. 30-Dec. 21 from 11am-3pm. Visit Santa Claus in the Cedar Street Bridge.

FREE PARKING Ring in the New Year with Helado Negro at the Bartlett on Dec. 31.

IN THE CITY LOT THANKSGIVING THROUGH NEW YEAR’S DAY

TUE, DEC. 31

DANCE ’TIL DAWN

There’s a lot to do in Spokane on New Year’s Eve — from the traditional Spokane Symphony performance of Beethoven’s Ninth at the Fox, to the glittery Lincoln Center party Bling in the New Year to First Night Spokane. But if pressed, we’re the types who like to ring in the new year with a good old-fashioned dance party. Spokane’s hippest soon-to-be-open joint, the Bartlett, has got you covered. Electronic artist Helado Negro comes to town, toting a catalog of warm, ethereal, upbeat tunes that reflect both his tropical South Florida upbringing and his newfound attraction to the woods of Connecticut. This is the exact opposite of the EDM rave stuff you’ll hear pounding away at lots of clubs; Helado Negro makes electronic music for the more mature, cocktail-sipping set. Get your tickets now for the show, which is 21-and-over only. They’re for sale at thebarlettspokane.com for $30 a pop. (LS)

SandpointOnline.com

Photo courtesy Bonner County Daily Bee

HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 25

The fur children can try convincing Santa they’ve

Holiday Treats

BENEFIT

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE 18 holiday trees are on display and available to win in a fundraiser raffle benefiting the Spokane Symphony. Trees are located on the mezzanine of the Davenport Hotel (Dec. 3-14 from 10 am-9 pm) and on the 2nd floor of River Park Square (Dec. 3-15, from 10 ammall closing). Free to view, $1/raffle ticket. spokanesymphonyassoc.org CRAB FEED & AUCTION Annual event benefiting local children’s organizations, including the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery and the Children’s Home Society of Washington. Dec. 7 at 4:30 pm. $65. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. downtownspokaneexchangeclub.com THE JACC’S SOIREE FUNDRAISER “The Sky’s the Limit” is the theme of this year’s annual soiree fundraiser, featuring dinner, live entertainment and more. Dec. 7 at 5:30 pm. $125. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter. org (208-457-8950) GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF The annual fundraiser benefiting Christ Kitchen features elaborate gingerbread houses decorated by local culinary teams, with the public voting for their favorites. Kids can also make their own gingerbread houses. Dec. 15 at 10 am. $1-$7. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. christkitchen.org (325-4343)

COMEDY

GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Five minutes per performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) FAMILY DINNER Live comedy improv show

26 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

based on audience suggestions about their family members. Fri at 8 pm through Nov. 29. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SEASONS GREETINGS Live comedy improv show using holiday cards and messages for inspiration. Dec. 6-17, Fridays at 8 pm. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) AN EVENING WITH MARIA BAMFORD Live comedy show. Dec. 7 at 9 pm. $16$20. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com (244-3279) CHRISTOPHER TITUS & RACHEL BRADLEY Live comedy show. Ages 18+. Dec. 15 at 8 pm. $25. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com (244-3279) MEG O’ROURKE The New York comedian presents an evening of stand-up. Dec. 27 at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. nYne Bar, 232 W. Sprague Ave. nynebar.com (474-1621)

COMMUNITY

HELP THE HUNGRY FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Volunteer shift times and need varies, sign up online at 2-harvest.org. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. (252-6267) RIVERFRONT PARK ICE SKATING The Ice Palace is now open through March 2; TuesSun from 11 am-5 pm, and also Tues-Thurs from 7-8:30 pm; Fri-Sat from 7-10 pm. Extended holiday hours TBA. Adults/$4.50; kids ages 3-12, military and seniors/$3.50. Skate rental $3.50. spokaneriverfrontpark. com (625-6601) HOLIDAY GIFT DRIVE Gift drive for new or gently used board games and arts and crafts supplies, to benefit families served

been good at “Santa Claws For Pets and People” at

by rural DCFS offices in the Spokane area. Drop off unwrapped gifts Mon-Fri between 8 am-5 pm, through Dec. 10. Empowering, Inc. Services, 1025 W. Indiana Ave. (6247104) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE 40-minute family lake cruises with a visit to Santa at the end. (No cruise on Thanksgiving Day.) Departs daily at 5:30 pm, 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm through Jan. 1. Kids ages 6-12/$5, kids under 5/ free; adults/$20, seniors/$19. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second Ave. cdalakecruises.com (208-6647268) SANTA EXPRESS The annual kids’ gift store benefits the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery and features allowance-friendly items for children to purchase as gifts for friends and family. Open daily through Dec. 23, MonSat from 10 am-8 pm, Sun from 11 am-6 pm. Crescent Court Bldg., Skywalk level. Items priced between $0.50-$8. Crescent Court, 707 W. Main Ave. vanessabehan.org TREE OF SHARING Community members can pick up a tag noting gift items requested by local charities serving those in need. Gift items must be returned by Dec. 12 for distribution to recipients. Pick up tags at Northtown, Spokane Valley, or River Park Square malls before Dec. 12. treeofsharing. org (290-0002) WOMEN & CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT VOLUNTEERS Volunteers are needed as prep cooks, servers, dishwashers, food platers and to work various other shifts during the week, Mon-Fri. Positions are weekly or biweekly, and a food handlers card is required. Submit a volunteer application online. wcfrspokane.org (324-1995) CDA RESORT HOLIDAY LIGHT SHOW The 27th annual holiday light display features more than 1.5 million lights, and is the largest on-water display of its kind in the U.S.

the Lincoln Center on Dec. 1.

Nov. 29-Jan. 1, 2014. Lighting ceremony, parade and fireworks show on Nov. 29 starting at 5 pm. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second Ave. cdaresort.com (208-7654000) DASHING THROUGH DOWNTOWN Enjoy downtown Spokane by horse and carriage, sponsored by STCU. Nov. 29-Dec. 24, Fri from 3-8 pm, Sat-Sun from noon-5 pm, and Mon, Dec. 24, from 12-3 pm. Free. Corner of N. Wall St. and W. Main Ave, downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org FESTIVAL OF FAIR TRADE The 29th annual event features local and globally-made handcrafts, clothing, jewelry, pottery and more, made in non-sweatshop environments. Nov. 29-Dec. 1 from 10 am-5 pm daily. Free admission. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. festivaloffairtrade.com (448-6561) DAYTON’S CHRISTMAS KICKOFF Fireworks show on Friday; lighted parade, hayrides, Santa’s workshop, live Nativity and more on Saturday. Nov. 29-30, starts at 11 am each day. Free. Dayton, Wash. historicdayton.com (509-382-4825) HOLIDAYS IN SANDPOINT Traditional tree-lighting ceremony featuring caroling, a visit from Santa and more. Nov. 29. Free. Downtown Sandpoint, Idaho. sandpoint. com (208-263-2161) SANTA CLAWS FOR PETS & PEOPLE Fundraiser event benefiting local animal rescue nonprofits, featuring Santa photos, a pet food drive, local vendors, adoptable pets, raffle, games and more. Dec. 1 from 12-2:30 pm. Free admission. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. wabr.net (590-9667) SOAP FOR HOPE DRIVE The sixth annual toiletry drive benefits local charities, including Hope House/StreetWise, Hearth Homes, Transitions for Women and more.

NEW OWNERS • NEW LOOK ard St. (625-6600) CHRISTMAS LIGHTS WALK A sanctioned volksswalk (5K or 10K) to view holiday lights displays. Flashlights recommended; homemade soups and bread served after. Dec. 14 at 5 pm. Free. Meet at Spokane Friends Church, 1612 W. Dalke Ave. lilaccityvolks.com (326-3575) WINTER DATE NIGHT Reconnect with friends or a loved one, sans kids, who can participate in programs and entertainment. Ages 3 mos.-11 years. Dec. 14, 6-9 pm. $10/ child. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. krocccda.org (208-667-1865) FRIENDS OF MANITO OPEN HOUSE The organization is selling calendars and locally-grown Poinsettia plants. At the Manito Meeting Rm., east of the Gaiser Conservatory. Dec. 14-15 from 4:30-7:30 pm. Free admission. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. friendsofmanito.org (456-8038) HOSPICE TREE Hospice of Spokane displays its Memorial Tree for community members to honor loved ones by purchasing a dove ornament to hang on the tree, with proceeds benefiting Hospice of Spokane. Dec. 14-23. River Park Square, Third Level, 808 W. Main Ave. hospiceofspokane. org (456-0438) CHRISTMAS LUNCH WITH SANTA The community center hosts a lunch with Santa, including photos and prizes; open to all. Dec. 17 from 12-1:30 pm. $8. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) MOBIUS KIDS’ LEGOMANIA Build elaborate bases, vehicles and create a winter wonderland, complete with snow. Ages 4-10. Dec. 18, 4-5 pm. $8-$10. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (3217124) CAMPBELL HOUSE HOLIDAYS See what the historic mansion would have been like during the holidays in 1910, with professional local actors portraying residents like the cook, the family and their visitors. Included in regular museum admission. Dec. 20 from 12-4 pm. $5-$10. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (363-5355) MOBIUS KIDS SHOP-N-DROP Parents can drop of children at Mobius Kids for holidaythemed activities while they finish Christmas shopping. Dec. 20 from 1-4 pm and from 5:30-8:30 pm. All ages of children welcome (must be able to use restroom independently). $15/child. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (321-7124) SCHOOL’S OUT DAY CAMP Day camps during Christmas vacation offer activities including swimming, rock climbing, crafts, games and more. Lunch and snacks provided. Ages 6-13. Dec. 23 and Dec. 30 from 9 am-4 pm. $45/session. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. krocccda.org (208-667-1865) MOBIUS KIDS’ BOXING DAY Celebrate the Canadian holiday of Boxing Day by building a box city across the museum floor. Dec. 26 from 10 am-1 pm. Free with museum admission. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org (624-5437) COOL CAMP Spokane Valley Parks & Rec hosts a winter day camp for kids, ages 6-11, with activities, crafts, games and field trips. Dec. 30-Jan. 2 from 8 am-5 pm. Online registration available, space is limited. $30/day or $100 for full camp. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. spokanevalley.org/recreation. (688-0300) FIRST NIGHT SPOKANE Annual family New Year’s celebration featuring more than 150 performers at 40 downtown locations, including live music, art demonstrations, comedy shows and free ice skating. Dec. 31

TOYS-4-TANS

from 7 pm-midnight. $5-$18, kids under 10 free. firstnightspokane.org (456-0580)

FILM

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG Screening as part of the Garland’s “Totally Tubular Tuesdays” series. Dec. 3 at TBA. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) RIFFTRAX LIVE: “SANTA CLAUS CONQUERS THE MARTIANS” Live screening of the movie with the commentary by stars of “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” Dec. 5 at 8 pm. $12.50. At Regal Cinemas Northtown Mall and Regal Cinemas Riverstone, CdA. fathomevents.com (800-326-3264) INTO THE MIND Ski and snowboarding film by Sherpa Cinema. Dec. 6 at 7 pm. $15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida. org (208-263-9191) SCROOGED Screening as part of the Garland’s “Totally Tubular Tuesdays” series. Dec. 10 at TBA. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (3271050) BING CROSBY HOLIDAY FILM FESTIVAL The 8th annual festival features classic Bing Crosby films, and a motor coach tour “On the Bus with Bing,” visiting Spokane places where Crosby lived and played (Dec. 15 from 1-4 pm, $20). Film fest: Dec. 14 at 11 am and Dec. 15 at 12:30 pm. $8, good both days. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) DOWNTOWN ABBEY PREVIEW PARTY See the first episode of the hit show’s fourth season before it officially airs in the U.S. Dec. 15 from 2-4 pm Free, reservations required. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. ksps.org (800-735-2377) CHRISTMAS SPECIAL Screening (film TBA) as part of the Garland’s “Totally Tubular Tuesdays” series. Dec. 17 at TBA. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) INLANDER GIVE GUIDE PRESENTS: ELF The Inlander’s Give Guide, the annual local philanthropy issue, hosts a screening of the holiday family film with proceeds benefiting Catholic Charities of Spokane. Dec. 18 at 7 pm. Price TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) RIVERFRONT PARK HOLIDAY FILM FEST Films to be screened include “Arthur Christmas,” “Elf,” “Disney’s A Christmas Carol” and “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” Dec. 21-24 and Dec. 26-29 at 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm and 5 pm daily. Free. Riverfront Park, IMAX Theater, 507 N. Howard St. (625-6600)

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CRAFTS

CHRISTMAS CARD MAKING CLASS Class on stamping and die-cut making. All materials provided. Dec. 5 from 12-2 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612) CRAFT FAIR Featuring handmade items by Providence staff and supporters. Dec. 6 from 8 am-4 pm. Providence Holy Family, 5633 N. Lidgerwood St. holy-family.org (482-0111) VINTAGE VIXENS HOLIDAY SHOW Local vendor gift fair featuring antique, retro and primitive items, paper crafts and more. Dec. 6-7 starting at 10 am each day. Riverwalk Plaza, 1003 E. Trent Ave. DECK THE FALLS Annual holiday gift sale featuring work by local and regional artists. Dec. 7 from 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108)

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Donations can be dropped off at any local AAA office. through Dec. 31. AAA Downtown Spokane, 1717 W. Fourth Ave. aaa. com/soapforhope TEDDY BEAR & BLANKET DRIVE Hosted by the Health Policy and Administration Association of Healthcare Students at WSU. Bears to go to children at Shriners Hospital for Children and Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital. New or gently used blankets to be donated to homeless teens at CrossWalk shelter. Dec. 3-4 at 11 am. WSU Riverpoint Campus, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. (3587500) LANDS COUNCIL HOLIDAY PARTY Annual holiday celebration hosted by the local environmental nonprofit. Dec. 4, 5:30-7:30 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. landscouncil.org (232-1950) SPOKANE BLIND BASEBALL FUNDRAISER Open mic Christmas carols, holiday trivia, silent auction and more. 25 percent of the night’s sales to be donated by Shakey’s Pizza to the nonprofit. Dec. 4, 5:30-8:30 pm. Free admission. Shakey’s Pizza, 9602 N. Newport Hwy. (464-0200) DECEMBER D’LIGHTS Holiday season kick-off celebration featuring hayrides, children’s activities, food, beverages, a tree-lighting ceremony and parade. Dec. 6 at 5 pm and Dec. 7 at 1 pm. Free. Rathdrum, Idaho. (208-687-2866) BREAKFAST WITH SANTA Pancake breakfast with Santa, kid’s holiday activities and more. Dec. 7 at 9 am. $4-$5. First Church of Nazarene, 9004 N. Country Homes Blvd. (467-8986) HOLIDAY BALL Formal holiday dance featuring music by the Desert Rose Band. Guests are asked to bring an appetizer to share and a food bank donation. Dec. 7 from 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Ponderay Events Center, 401 Bonner Mall Way, Ponderay. usadancesandpoint.org (208-699-0421) MOBIUS KIDS SANTA BREAKFAST The annual event benefits Mobius Kids Children’s Museum and includes breakfast and festive activities, including a visit with Santa. Dec. 7 from 8:30-10:30 am. $25. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. mobiusspokane.org (321-7121) WINTER FAIRE FOR FAMILIES Children’s crafts and activities, kids’ gift store, food, silent auction, craft fair and more. Dec. 7 from 11 am-3 pm. Free admission. Windsong School, 4225 W. Freemont Rd. spokanewindsongschool.org (326-6638) PAWS & CLAUS Bring your pet to sit on Santa’s lap and tell him he or she hasn’t been too naughty this year. Dec. 8 and 15 from 6-7 pm. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. (363-0304) TEDDY BEAR TEAS The library hosts its annual celebration of the American icon, encouraging participants to bring their favorite stuffed friend. See the library’s website for other branch’s events. Dec. 10 and 13 at 10 am. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5300) GAISER CONSERVATORY HOLIDAY LIGHTS The Friends of Manito’s annual holiday lights display showcases the Gaiser Conservatory’s plant collection decked out in thousands of lights. Best viewing after 4 pm. Dec. 13-22, 8 am-7:30 pm. Free, donations accepted. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. friendsofmanito.org (456-8038) NORTH POLE EXPRESS Train rides through Riverfront Park and a stop at the North Pole to visit Santa, with hot chocolate, cookies, crafts, and more. Reservations recommended. Children ages 5 or younger free with adult. $12. Dec. 14-15 and Dec. 21-22. Departs at noon, 2 pm and 4 pm (also at 6 pm, Sat only). Riverfront Park, 507 N. How-

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HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 27

The Inlander is hosting Elf on Dec. 18 at the Bing as a fundraiser for Catholic Charities

.

Holiday Treats

FAIR TRADE FESTIVAL Handmade artisan items and more. Dec. 8 at 8 am. Free. First Presbyterian Church, 521 Lakeside Ave., CdA. cdadowntownchurch.org (208-667-8446) KENDALL YARDS HOLIDAY BAZAAR Holiday gift bazaar featuring 20+ local vendors of food, artwork, handmade items and more, also includes photos with Santa. Dec. 14 from 10 am-3 pm. Free admission. The Nest at Kendall Yards, 1335 W. Summit Parkway. facebook.com/kendallyards (474-1316)

FOOD & DRINK

BLACK FRIDAY WINE SPECIAL Class on value wines to stock up on for the holiday season. Nov. 29 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) RED SATURDAY Instead of Black Friday, celebrate “Red Saturday” at a red wine tasting event. Nov. 30 from 2-4 pm. $5. Huckleberry’s Natural Market, 926 S. Monroe St. huckleberrysnaturalmarket.com (624-1349) SCOTCH SOCIAL The annual event hosted by the Connoisseur’s Club features 18 varieties of Scotch, a cigar bar and appetizers. Nov. 30 from 6-10 pm. $70. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane. com (327-8000) LET’S GET ZESTY Cooking class with Chef Adam Hegsted, featuring recipes to spice up holiday classics including prime rib, pot roast, sweet potato gratin and more. Dec. 3 at 5:30 pm. $50, reservations required. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208457-8950) DAVENPORT HOTEL HOLIDAY LUNCHEON Enjoy lunch at the historic hotel while it’s elegantly decorated for the holidays. Dec. 6 from 11:30-1 pm. $25. Davenport Hotel,

28 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

10 S. Post St. thedavenporthotelcollection. com (789-6819) CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON “Peace on Earth” holiday luncheon fundraiser featuring live entertainment and more. Dec. 6 at 11 am. $15-$18. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. corbinseniorcenter.org (3271584) SANTACON This event currently takes place in 300 other cities, and returns to Spokane for the second annual pub crawl. Starts at the Red Lion Barbecue. Ages 21+, participants are encouraged to dress as Santa or Mrs. Claus. Dec. 14, at 4 pm. Free entry. Downtown Spokane. santacon.info (206-310-4164) INLAND NW VEGAN SOCIETY POTLUCK Bring a plant-based (no animal products or honey) dish to share along with an ingredient list and the recipe. Dinner is followed by a guest speaker. Dec. 15 at 5 pm. Donations accepted. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. (315-2852) WINTER ALES TASTING Sample winter beers to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Dec. 21. $5. Huckleberry’s Natural Market, 926 S. Monroe St. huckleberrysnaturalmarket.com (624-1349) THE DAVENPORT’S CHRISTMAS DINNER Favorite and traditional holiday dishes from the hotel’s kitchen are served a la carte in the Palm Court Grill and the Safari Room. Reservations suggested. Dec. 25 from 12-8 pm. Prices vary. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. davenporthotelcollection.com (455-8888)

MUSIC

THE SHOOK TWINS Second annual “Home for The Holidays” concert featuring the Sandpoint natives with Anna and The Underbelly opening. Nov. 29 at 7:30 pm. $15-$18. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry. Also with Justin Lantrip and

Mama Doll on Nov. 30 at 7:30 pm. $12-$15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-267-7327) CELTIC THUNDER World music concert. Nov. 29-30 at 7 pm. $45-$60. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700) AVÉ! HOLIDAY CONCERT Featuring music from the 16th Century to the modern day, including the premier performance of a composition by William H. Mays, of Spokane. Dec. 1 at 3 pm. Free, donations accepted. Convent of the Holy Names, 2911 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (326-9516) THE VIVACE ACCORDION ORCHESTRA Concert showcasing the versatility of the accordion and featuring accomplished local performers. Dec. 1 at 3 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) SFCC ORCHESTRA HOLIDAY CONCERT Featuring music by Brahms, Bach and Beethoven, directed by Shelley Rotz. Dec. 2 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3720) SFCC CHORAL HOLIDAY CONCERT Directed by Nathan Lansing, featuring a program of holiday music. Dec. 3 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3720) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY “Christmas at the Kroc” holiday concert. Dec. 4 and 6 at 7:30 pm. $8-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org (208765-3833) SFCC JAZZ NIGHT HOLIDAY CONCERT Directed by Kevin Woods and Danny McCollim, featuring a holiday-themed program. Dec. 4 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3720)

EWU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Holiday concert also featuring the EWU Wind Ensemble. Dec. 5 at 5 pm. $3-$5. Eastern Washington University, Showalter Hall Auditorium, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/music (359-7078) THE JUBILEE CHRISTMAS TOUR Southern-style gospel Christmas concert featuring The Booth Brothers, Greater Vision and Legacy Five. Dec. 5 at 7 pm. Lake City Community Church, 6000 N. Ramsey Rd., CdA. (208-676-0632) “CRACKED PEPPER” Pepper, an awardwinning barbershop quartet, presents its sixth annual Christmas show “A Fractured Fairytale,” with guest quartets Amore, QTopia and In Harmony. Dec. 6 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 7 at 3 pm. $5-$25. Holy Names Music Center, 3910 W. Custer Dr. pepperquartet.com (953-1231) THE HOT CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO “Cool Yule” gypsy-jazz concert. Dec. 6 at 7:30 pm $10-$20. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, Washington State University, Pullman Campus. (335-8522) SHAWN COLVIN Concert by the singersongwriter. Dec. 8 at 7:30 pm. $45. Allages. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) “ANNUNCIATA E MYSTERIUM” Spokane Choral Artists’ holiday program, featuring music composed by Poulenc, Gabrielli, Biebl, Lauridsen and more. Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm. $12-$18. Salem Lutheran Church, 1428 W. Broadway Ave. Also on Dec. 8 at 3 pm. $12-$18. First Presbyterian Church, 521 Lakeside Ave., CdA. spokanechoralartists. com (251-6296) BACH FESTIVAL WINTER CLASSICS Concert featuring music by Bach, Britten, Chopin, Debussy and Franck, featuring Zuill Bailey on cello and Natasha Paremski on piano. Dec. 7 at 3 pm. $15-$30. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. barristerwin-

ery.com (924-1132) DE COLORES HANDBELL CHOIR Concert by the Spokane-based handbell choir. Dec. 7 at 6 pm. Free, donations accepted. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108) SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The orchestra performs its annual holidaythemed concert, “A Big Band Christmas,” featuring guest vocalists Nicole Lewis and Jon Brownell. Dec. 7 at 8 pm. $20-$26. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanejazz.org (4351007) HOLIDAY ON PIPES Concert by local organist Kenneth Fuller, featuring traditional Christmas Carols. Dec. 8 at 6 pm. Free, donations accepted. First Church of Nazarene, 9004 N. Country Homes Blvd. (467-8986) GONZAGA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conducted by Kevin Hekmatpanah, featuring Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto, with pianist Natasha Paremski as guest soloist. Dec. 9 at 7:30 pm. $10-$13. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) OAK RIDGE BOYS Country/gospel concert and Christmas show. Dec. 9 at 7:30 pm. $42-$52. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) SINGING NUNS CHRISTMAS CONCERT The Spokane-based choir presents its annual Christmas concert, joined by the Strolling Strings of East Valley High School. Dec. 11-12 at 2 pm and 7:30 pm, both days. $10-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND Blues/rock concert. Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm. $30-$62. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) MEAD HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ CHOIR “Holiday Harmony” concert featuring the award winning high school choir. Dec. 12 at 7 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS Musicalstyle performance featuring dancing and singing of traditional Christmas songs from around the world. Also featuring Patty Duke and her husband as Mr. and Mrs. Claus. Dec. 12-23, Thurs-Sat at 7 pm, also Sat at 3 pm, Sun at 3 pm and Mon, Dec. 23 at 1 pm. $20-$33. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. traditionsofchristmasnw.com (208-391-2867) I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Holiday musical-drama inspired by the nostalgia of WWII, performed in a dessert-theater format, featuring the church’s voice choir. Dec. 13 at 7 pm, Dec. 14 at 2 pm and 7 pm. $5. First Church of Nazarene, 9004 N. Country Homes Blvd. (467-8986) SOUNDS OF CHRISTMAS Concert featuring the NIC Wind Symphony, Cardinal Chorale and Chamber Singers and Cardinal Vocal Jazz. Dec. 14 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 15 at 2 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-665-2759) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS “The Secret of Christmas” concert, featuring guest soloists, ensembles and instrumentalists. Event also includes a bake sale and food drive, guests are asked to donate a food item. Dec. 14 at 7 pm. $10. Opportunity Presbyterian, 202 N. Pines Rd. spiritofspokanechorus.org (208659-7346) WHITWORTH CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL The annual concert features 120+ students performing choral works, readings and traditional carols. Dec. 14 at 8 pm, Dec. 15 at 3 pm. $15-$18. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. fox-

theaterspokane.com (624-1200) CLARION BRASS “This is What Christmas Sounds Like” holiday concert. Dec. 16 at 7:30 pm. $16-$18. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-667-1865) Also on Dec. 17 and 18 at 7:30 pm. $18. Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 127 E. 12th Ave. (325-7328) HARMONY FOR THE HOLIDAYS Holiday music and light opera featuring acclaimed vocalists Jonathan Mancheni and Isabella Ivy. Proceeds benefit Catholic Charities Foundation and Second Harvest Food Bank. Dec. 20 at 8 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) CHRISTMAS AT THE BING Holiday concert hosted by Douglas Webster, joined by Krista Curry, Jenny Shotwell, Chelsea LeValley and locals Krista Kubicek and Max Mendez. Dec. 21 at 7:30 pm. $18-$27. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops Series: “Holiday Pops Celebration” feat. conductor Morihiko Nakahara, the Symphony Chorale and Spokane Area Children’s Choirs. Dec. 21 at 8 pm, Dec. 22 at 2 pm. $26-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) SOUND OF MUSIC SING-A-LONG Screening of the classic holiday film with subtitles for the audience to sing along, as well as bags of props and a costume contest. Dec. 22 at 5 pm. $25. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Annual New Year’s Eve performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony featuring the Spokane Symphony Chorale. Dec. 31 at 7:30 pm. $23-$28. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ The Spokane Symphony’s formal New Year’s Eve party features live music with the Master Class Jazz Orchestra and a champagne toast at midnight. All proceeds benefit the Symphony. Dec. 31 at 9 pm. $65-$75. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphonyassoc.org (624-1200)

PERFORMANCE NUTCRACKER MINI PERFORMANCES Local children perform scenes from the classic holiday tale. Nov. 29-Dec. 1 from 1-3 pm. Performances held on first level, outside Nordstrom. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. riverparksquare. com (624-3945) TOY SHELF A family-oriented holiday show about toys in a workshop. Nov. 30 at 2 pm and 7 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokaneelitedance.com (509-227-7404) THE NUTCRACKER Ballet performed by the State Street Ballet, and musical score by the Spokane Symphony. Dec. 5-8. $25-$75. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) POPVICH COMEDY PET THEATER Circus-style show featuring tricks and feats performed by trainer/performer Gregory Popovich’s 10 dogs and 15 cats, all adopted from shelters. Dec. 5-6 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 7 at 11 am. $9-$22. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-227-7404) A CELTIC CHRISTMAS Holiday-themed dinner theater concert. Dec. 6-7, Dec. 10, 12 and Dec. 13-14 at 6:30 pm. $25-$35. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2. (208-448-1294)

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HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 29

The family-friendly First Night Spokane features more

Holiday Treats

JOY TO THE WORLD Holiday-themed performance by Festival Dance & Performing Arts, also featuring local musicians. Dec. 7 at 7 pm. $10-$16. University of Idaho Administration Bldg, 851 Campus Dr., Moscow. festivaldance.org POPVICH COMEDY PET THEATER Circusstyle stage show featuring tricks by trained dogs and cats, led by trainer and performer Gregory Popovich. Dec. 8 at 3 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208263-9191) ALLEGRO DANCE CHRISTMAS RECITAL “Twas the Night Before Christmas” annual holiday recital. Dec. 14 at 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208263-9191) MILLWOOD BALLET: THE NUTCRACKER Children of the ballet school present their

than 150 performers.

production of the classic holiday story. Dec. 14 at 7 pm and Dec. 15 at 2 pm. $12. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. companyballetspokane.com (869-5573) EUGENE BALLET’S NUTCRACKER Performance of the classic holiday ballet. Dec. 16 at 7 pm. $10-$25. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-9191)

THEATER

OUR TOWN Updated adaptation of the classic American play by Thornton Wilder. Through Dec. 14, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, select Saturday matinees on Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and 14. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. (455-7529) THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER Holiday family musical. Through Dec. 22, Thu-Sat

at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) A CHRISTMAS CABARET An evening of music, stories and laughter, featuring Ellen Travolta joined by Mark Cotter and Jack Bannon. Nov. 29-Dec. 21, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $20-$25. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. 2nd Ave. achristmascabaret.com (208-435-4000) THE CHRISTMAS TOY SHOP Holidaythemed play. Through Dec. 15, show times vary. $10-$12. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre. org (325-4886) THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE Musical performed by the Lewis & Clark High School Drama Dept. Dec. 5-14, Thurs-Sat at 7 pm. $10. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth. tigerdrama.com (354-7000) A CHRISTMAS CAROL Performed by StageWest Community Theatre in the style of a live radio broadcast. Dec. 6-15, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Dec. 8 at 3 pm, holiday brunch matinee ($25) on Dec. 15 at 2 pm. $10-$12. Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 639 Elm St. (768-2150) A DICKENS OF A DINNER Originally-adapted production of “A Christmas Carol” with a Victorian-style dinner. Dec. 6-7 and Dec. 13-14 at 6 pm. Reservations encouraged as seating is limited. $40-$45. The Lion’s Share, 1627 N. Atlantic St. lionaround.org (327-1113) THE SANTALAND DIARIES Holidaythemed, one-man comedy show, written by David Sedaris. (This show replaces the “Christmas Belles.”) Dec. 6-22, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $11-$17. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave., CdA. lake-

cityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) TINY TIM’S CHRISTMAS Holiday-themed comedy/mystery, performed as a sequel to “A Christmas Carol.” Dec. 6-15, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm (except Sat, Dec. 7). Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave., Ste. 1. libertylaketheatre.com (342-2055) THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER Holiday musical performed by the JACC’s Theatre Troupe. Dec. 12-15 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 15 and 22 at 2 pm. $15-$20. The JACC, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET Broadway musical about rock icons Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. Dec. 12-15, show times vary. $33-$73. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER Performance of the holiday musical. Dec. 14-22, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org (447-9900) THE LION, THE WITCH & THE WARDROBE Stage adaptation of the classic children’s fantasy story by C.S. Lewis. Dec. 13-22, FriSat at 7 pm, Sat at 4 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8$10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines, Ste. 3S. (892-5413) THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER Performed by students ages 8-17 in the Civic’s Academy, for the theater’s sixth annual scholarship benefit performance. Dec. 14 at 1 pm and 4 pm, Dec. 15 at 7 pm. $5-$15. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) AWAY IN A BASEMENT A holiday-themed musical comedy starring the lovable Church Basement Ladies. Dec. 19-Jan. 5, Wed-Fri at

DECEMBER 12 – 23 Kroc Center

1765 W. Golf Course Rd, CdA Produced by Laura Little Productions, Courtesy of CCT

2ND

Tickets can be purchased at:

1323 Sherman (Corner of 14th & Sherman, CdA) 208-391-2867 www.traditionsofchristmasnw.com

30 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Select Thurs (Dec. 26, Jan. 2) and Sat (Dec. 21, 28, Jan. 4) matinees at 2 pm. Christmas Eve show Dec. 24 at 2 pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529)

VISUAL ARTS

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Artwork exhibited by resident and invited artists, with all pieces for sale and new work added throughout the exhibition. Through Dec. 29, Thurs-Sun from 10 am-6 pm. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) HANDMADE ORNAMENT SHOW The annual show features handmade tree ornaments by local artists. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, FriSat from 10 am-6 pm, Sun from 10 am-3 pm. Tinman Gallery, 811 W. Garland Ave. tinmanartworks.com (325-1500) NORTHWEST TREASURES Handmade ornaments in copper, felt, glass, metal and more by local and regional artists. Through Dec. 31. Free. Gallery Northwest, 217 E. Sherman Ave., CdA. thegallerynorthwest. com (208-667-5700) 15TH ANNUAL SMALL ARTWORKS INVITATIONAL The annual exhibition features 39 local/regional artists, exhibiting more than 200 new works. Opening reception Dec. 6 from 5-8 pm, show runs through Dec. 31. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave., CdA. theartspiritgallery. com (208-765-6006) DECEMBER FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries and businesses display new artwork for the month. Dec. 6, most artist receptions from

5-8 pm, locations throughout downtown Spokane and beyond. See Inlander.com/ FirstFriday for complete event listings and an interactive map. Free. spokanearts.org HOLIDAY GIFT GALA The 8th annual event features work by 38 local and regional artists for sale, as well as custom gift baskets and more. Dec. 7 from 10 am-4 pm. Expanded holiday hours, open daily from 10 am-6 pm through Dec. 23. Free admission. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way., Uniontown. (229-3414) WINTER WONDERLAND The gallery hosts its annual holiday art exhibition reception Dec. 7 from 5-8 pm. Art Works Gallery, 214 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. sandpointartworks.com (208-263-2642) HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Four-day holiday event, featuring a pottery sale, expanded gift shop, book signings, kids’ activities and more. Dec. 12-15 from 10 am-6 pm. Free admission. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) ARTWALK Monthly art showcase throughout downtown galleries and businesses. Second Friday of the month (Dec. 13) from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. artsincda.org (208-292-1629)

ETC.

WINTER BLESSING Native American performances, food and more. Nov. 30 at 5 pm. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2467) ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS No experience or partner necessary. Mondays from 7-9 pm. $5. Spokane Tango, 2117 E. 37th Ave. spokanetango.com (688-4587)

COMPASS CLUB CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON Catered luncheon featuring entertainment by pianist Diane Copeland. Reservations requested. Dec. 3 at 11 am. $20. Manito Country Club, 5303 S. Hatch Rd. (4557789) RAINMAKER’S PAJAMA PARTY Client appreciation part featuring a performance by dueling piano performers from NYC, “Michael and Amy.” Dec. 6 at 6 pm. $75 for non-clients. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. therainlab.com/ (509-327-8000) THE TELLING OF WINTER TALES A literary reading featuring Jonathan Johnson and Shawn Vestal. Dec. 7 at 3 pm. Free. Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar St. losthorsepress.org (208-255-4410) HOLIDAY VINTAGE FASHION TEA Holiday-themed tea event featuring a live fashion show showing 100 years of Spokane’s vintage fashion history. Dec. 7 at 1 pm. $20. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. 9th Ave. (466-6677) JOHN STOCKTON AUTOBIOGRAPHY SIGNING The former Utah Jazz player and Gonzaga alum will sign copies of his autobiography, “Assisted.” (Note: This event was originally schedule for Nov. 9 but has been postponed until Dec. 7) Dec. 8 at noon. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) AUTHOR MATTHEW GONDER The author signs copies of his two memoirs, “Christmas On The Move Out West” and the sequel “Music On The Move Out West.” Dec. 10 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (8380206) 

d a e r b r e g n Gi F F O D IL CHRIST KITCHEN

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5, 2013 1 r e b m e ec Sunday, D otel H t r o p n e The Dav

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HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013 INLANDER 31

32 INLANDER HOLIDAY GUIDE 2013

The Real Thanksgiving It wasn’t all turkey during the original holiday feast BY ARI LEVAUX

T

he original Thanksgiving wasn’t exactly the Pilgrim-and-Indian lovefest we collectively misremember. But despite growing recognition of the degree to which the Thanksgiving story has been rewritten, the same analysis has not been applied to the holiday’s traditional foods. We still tend to cook the same dishes each year, dictated by habit more than history. The original Thanksgiving did not include turkey, pumpkin pie and other contemporary Thanksgiving staples, like women, children and football. But according to historians, it did include a lot of seafood, thanks to its location on the Massachusetts coast. Likely foods included cod, oysters and other shellfish, as well as venison. The first historical mention of turkeys at Thanksgiving was in the 1827 novel Northwood by Sarah Josepha Hale. The popularity of turkeys at Thanksgiving really took off in 1947, when the National Turkey Federation began presenting turkeys to American presidents in advance of every Thanksgiving. More recently, Tofurkey has met commercial success, allowing vegetarians and vegans to join in the modern ritual of using the turkey to celebrate what is sometimes referred to as “Genocide Appreciation Day.” One part of the Thanksgiving story that is true: Afterward, the Native Americans did indeed help the Pilgrims through the winter, which the Wampanoag tribe almost immediately came to regret. During the winter that followed that first

Thanksgiving, the tribe so vastly outnumbered the Pilgrims they could easily have wiped them out, forever changing the official start of the Christmas shopping season. Instead, just two years later, a Pilgrim preacher named Mather the Elder was able to thank God for smallpox, which by that point had wiped out the majority of the Wampanoag. Decades later, many of the remaining Wampanoag died in King Philip’s War, which by today’s standards would be considered a massacre. Compared to the holiday’s historical reality, the actual food that was served at Thanksgiving is much less depressing to think about. While there was no pie, the Pilgrims might have contributed stewed pumpkin, along with boiled bread (dumplings) and cheese curd fritters. And there might have been sobaheg, a Wampanoag recipe still made today by tribal members. Sobaheg includes a trio of vegetables commonly associated with Native American farmers: corn, beans and squash — aka the Three Sisters. Sobaheg also contains some kind of meat, like venison or even turkey. Centuries before European contact, the region’s Native Americans already had domesticated turkeys. According to historians, turkey wasn’t served during the original three-day bash. But if they’re wrong, and turkey snuck its way onto the original Thanksgiving table, it could very well have been via sobaheg. Some sobaheg recipes include clam juice, which I find exciting. Clam juice is like a simple version of oyster sauce, indispensable in my kitchen. Both clam juice and oyster sauce contain mollusk extracts, and both impart umami. Clam juice is more authentic to Thanksgiving than turkey, a reminder that there’s more to the Thanksgiving picture than what we’ve been fed. n

SEE SOBAHEG RECIPE ON NEXT PAGE >>

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 29

$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

FOOD | HOLIDAYS

NEW 3-Course Dinner Menu 3-6 pm daily

NEW MENU SELECTIONS SALAD Caesar or Garden ENTRÉE Braised Short Ribs • Coconut Prawns • Herb Grilled Wild Salmon Creole Chicken Pot Pie • Pan Roasted Chicken Penne Pasta DESSERT Signature Davenport Cheese Cake

SOBAHEG Ingredients (for a medium pot) 1 cup dry beans 2 cups hominy corn (dried, canned, or frozen); some recipes use corn grits 1 to 2 pounds turkey, white or dark meat 1 pound of winter squash, trimmed and cubed Two teaspoons each garlic and onion powder 8-oz. bottle of clam juice Salt or soy sauce to taste Optional: ½ cup raw sunflower seeds, pounded to a coarse flour — or use a coffee grinder to pulverize them. This adds a unique flavor, one that some might find a little too unique.

Herb Grilled Wild Salmon

Procedure There’s a lot of leeway, in terms of how mushy you like your corn, beans and squash. I like the beans soft, the squash and corn a bit more toothy. Adjust your procedure according to your tastes. Cook the beans in water until they’re nearly tender. If you’re using dried hominy corn — as opposed to canned or frozen — it should be cooked with the beans. While the beans are cooking, roast your turkey at 250° until it’s browned. Turn the oven off and let the turkey slowly cool. When the beans are soft, change the water and adjust the heat to medium. If using frozen hominy, add it now. Add onion and garlic powders. When the turkey is cool enough to work with, pull it into pieces and add them to the pot. Let it simmer. If using canned hominy, add it now. About an hour before serving time, add the squash chunks. Adjust seasonings with salt or chicken bouillon. If using it, add sunflower seed flour and stir it in.

509 789 6848 • palmcourtgrill.com Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane

30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

It’s a simple yet texturally diverse pot of stew, full of complementary flavors. If you want to take it even further, a dollop of cranberry sauce adds a refreshing zing — even if there weren’t cranberries at the original Thanksgiving. n

FOOD | COOKIES

Alberta Bake Shop owner Robie Calcaterra shows off some mint chocolate chip cupcakes. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Baking The Dream

Shadle Park gets a dose of snickerdoodles and fudge bars BY JO MILLER

A

s a 12-year-old, Robie Calcaterra liked to hang around the Northside bakery where her sister worked. Once she had kids, Calcaterra made them birthday cakes and other treats and baked for charity events. She always

loved baking. “I just wanted to do this for a living,” she says. “This is just me.” So after 30 years of working in the banking and medical fields, and most recently as an insurance analyst, Calcaterra

decided her heart wasn’t in it anymore. She got her baking certification, took her business plan to the bank and opened her bakery — along with her husband, Wayne — in the Shadle Park area at the beginning of this month.

FOOD | OPENING

The Real Deal Three friends bring their Thai food know-how to a new Gonzaga-area restaurant BY JO MILLER

T

he sound of trickling water from a fountain and the soft pings of instrumental music set the tone for the tranquil ambiance of the restaurant lined with orchids and other greenery. It’s definitely not the atmosphere this space on North Hamilton Street had when it housed Ionic Burritos, and then for a brief time, Rusty Roof’s Burger & Shake Shack. Now a wooden spirit house greets

you at the door, a large painting of the Buddha adorns the back wall and colorful table runners sprinkle the room — all from Thailand, says Juanita Allen, one of three owners of Our Thai House. She and two friends, Phonthip Tungkana and Amphonesy Moungkhoth, had been talking for a few years about opening a restaurant together and finally opened Our Thai House earlier this month. Tungkana and Moungkhoth, both

from Thailand, are no strangers to running restaurants in Spokane. Tungkana opened Phonthip Style Thai on East Francis Avenue after she came to the U.S. six years ago, and also started a restaurant while in Thailand. Moungkhoth started and ran Linnie’s Thai Cuisine on West Third for 20 years and Allen has a love for business and traveling throughout Asia. “Everyone brings a little to the plate,”

The display case inside Alberta Bake Shop houses a simple selection of muffins ($2.75), cookies ($1), brownies ($2) and cake slices ($3). Cookies range from snickerdoodles to double chocolate mint cookies to colorful frosted cookies in the shape of Volkswagens, purple cows and wiener dogs. Stacked in the middle are apple cake slices, dense like bread pudding, and fudge oat bars ($2). The latter, though they may look stiff and crumbly, are moist and chewy with soft oatmeal and pits of chocolate to savor. Many of the recipes Calcaterra uses were passed down from aunts in her grandma’s generation. Everything is scratch-made and simple. “You can count on your hand the ingredients that are in our products,” she says. Calcaterra also tries to keep everything as local as possible, buying flour from Shepherd’s Grain in Portland, milk from Spokane’s Family Farm and coffee from Roast House. She plans to have seasonally changing items and to bring in savory lunch items, too. “I’m busting at the seams, I’m so happy,” Calcaterra says. “I was really good at what I was doing for a living, but I wasn’t making people happy. This makes people happy.” Among those she makes happy are the kids who can draw on the floor when they come in. Yes, the floor is a chalkboard. So don’t be surprised if you come into Alberta Bake Shop and find your feet scuffing over sprawling happy faces and flowers. n Alberta Bake Shop • 5511 N. Alberta • Open Tue-Fri, 9 am-6 pm; Sat, 9 am–3 pm • facebook.com/AlbertaBakeShop • 241-3361

Allen says. “It’s the perfect mix of partnerships.” As head chef, Tungkana recommends and cooks up a non-spicy fish dish for me (I’m a weakling when it comes to spice). A mixture of vegetables — baby corn, red and green peppers and onion — along with pineapple and several portions of fish come bathed in sweet and sour sauce, served with a lump of rice and accented with a pink, hand-carved radish flower. All dishes on the menu can be ordered at your desired spiciness level: mild, medium, hot, very hot or extra hot. Choose from a wide range of items like som tum (papaya salad, $9), cashew chicken ($12), noodle dishes like pad thai ($11) and curries. Wash it down with Thai iced tea or coffee, or an imported Singha beer. “Everything is made fresh and everything is made exactly how [Tungkana] made it in Thailand,” Allen says. n Our Thai House • 1415 N. Hamilton • Open Mon-Sun 11 am-9 pm • 487-4237

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 31

R E D N O W EVER

FOOD | UPDATE

A T N A S E R WHE ? S A E D I S I H GETS ...

ecret s s i h w o n k We

Bartender Levi Alford pours a beer at Post Street Ale House. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

POST STREET ALE HOUSE

1 N. POST | 789-6900

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IDEAS T F I G W E N ER HAS D N A L N I E OUR LIST H Y T N O E N O Y FOR EVER nds 12/12

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ou’d think you should be going to this downtown beer bar for just that, a beer. But Post Street Ale House decided earlier this month to widen its horizons. The bar has added bourbon and whiskey to its menu — and 40 different choices of whiskey and bourbon, no less. You can pick a flight of four different pours for $15 if you need to taste the field, says assistant manager Darin Tomlinson.

But most still flock to the Davenport-owned pub for beers, which are half off during the super-popular happy hour, running from 4 to 6 pm every day of the week. And if you’re hungry late, check out the late-night specials at Post Street, including a $5 burger. If you want to drink local, and you should, they always have at least a half-dozen Inland Northwest brews on tap. — MIKE BOOKEY

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32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

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FOOD | SAMPLER

HAPPY HOUR

BAKERY CELEBRATIONS BAKERY 713 W. Garland | 327-3471 Whipped cream atop a cupcake? Sure! Celebrations reimagines cupcakes with flavors, frostings and toppings that feel like a party in your mouth. Try the Banana Split, a fragrant banana cupcake filled with strawberries and topped with a swirl of whipped cream, chocolate syrup and, of course, a cherry. LOVE @ FIRST BITE DESSERTS 11305 E. Sprague | 891-2501 This spot has something on its menu called the Chocolate Explosion, which was actually born from a batch of cupcakes gone wrong. Composed of chocolate cake, toasted chocolate cake bits and a whole lotta ganache, this creation has gained a devoted following and can be enjoyed every Thursday. All cupcakes are $2.75 and they’re enormous (some would even say the biggest in town). Wash them down with a tall cup of black coffee, free depending on which day you visit, and you’re good to go. PIE HUT 502 Church St. | Sandpoint 208-265-2208 This shop is tiny but mighty, with 35

Mon-Thurs 3-6 & 9-Close Fri 3-6 | Sat 11-5 | Sun All Day

1 Bottle Beer 2 Domestic Pints $ 4 Micro Pints & House Wines $ 5 Jagermeister & Fireball $ 5 Appetizers $ 50

to 40 pie flavors to choose from on any given day. Sour cream lemon is the best seller, and the Red Delicious is made not with apples but red berries — and it’s delicious. Soups and sandwiches add justification, but it’s all about the pies. SWEET DREAMS BAKERY 3131 N. Division | 747-6900 The bakery’s raison d’etre is wedding cakes, but nuptials aren’t the only reason to stop by: Deep, resonant chocolate frosting tops delicate chocolate cupcakes. Macaroons have a toasty sweet outer edge and a light, fluffy interior. The coconut frosting shot (yes, shot glasses full of frosting are available) contains shreds of coconut saturated in the creamy flavor of coconut milk.

$

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WHITE BOX PIES 28 E. Sharp | 927-8850 This eatery smells of fresh baked bread and pie crust. If that doesn’t tempt you to order a slice, we don’t know what will. Most everything at White Box is made on-site in a convenient location on your way through Spokane past Gonzaga. A great assortment of gluten-free options are available. 

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Chilled to Perfection Disney shows it gets what it’s like to be a young girl with Frozen BY MARYANN JOHANSON

O

h my goddess. Where did Frozen come from? It Fast-forward to the present, as Elsa comes of age didn’t come from Hans Christian Andersen; this and is about to be crowned queen (their parents died in bears little resemblance to supposed inspiration a shipwreck). Anna has spent years not knowing why The Snow Queen. It sprang from the grand Disney tradition her beloved sister has shut her out; Elsa is desperately of full-on, Broadway-style animated musicals. But unlike worried that her subjects will see her as a monster. The 2009’s throwback The Princess and the Frog, which felt like recipe for disaster is in place. nothing more than a tired retread, Frozen is — we can The villains here? Unintended consequences, good hope, anyway — the start of a new era for the wonderful intentions, and the pressures of conformity. When Elsa little subgenre Disney has claimed for itself. finally stops denying her Arctikinesis, she celebrates by Frozen is a princess story; Disney creating a wondrous mountain ice castle FROZEN is doubling down on the princesses — for herself, belting out a glorious anthem Rated PG there’s two of ’em here. But Disney is to female power. Not since Howard Directed by Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee Ashman’s remarkably astute lyrics for also doubling down on the hints of nascent feminism Brave hinted at, the sort of Starring the voices of Kristen Bell, Josh Beauty and the Beast and The Little Mermaid Gad, Idina Menzel bare-bones feminism which accepts that — which are far more about a girl’s girls and women might possibly want longings to be her own person than they more out of life than to get married. The princesses are are about finding romance — has there been a Disney sisters — the elder Elsa (the voice of Idina Menzel) and song like “Let It Go,” as Elsa tosses away “the good girl” the younger Anna (the voice of Kristen Bell) — and this is she “always [had] to be” and stops mostly the story of their troubled relationship. Which has believing that “conceal, don’t nothing to do with jealously that arises over them both feel” is a healthy way to live. liking the same prince. I had chills listening When Elsa and Anna are small children, there’s an to this: someone gets accident: Elsa’s paranormal ability to make things cold it. (The lyrics are by — a sort of Arctikinesis — knocks out Anna as they’re Robert Lopez and playing in supernaturally produced snow, threatening Kristen Anderson-Lothe little girl’s life. As part of the magical cure, Anna’s pez; they wrote the memory of Elsa’s ability is taken away — it’s probably a songs for Avenue Q.) good idea that they don’t play like this again — and their Writers and direcparents, the king and queen of Arendelle, decide that Elsa tors Chris Buck and should remain locked away lest she hurt anyone else; terJennifer Lee, with a rified of doing so, Elsa readily agrees. screenplay assist from

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Shane Morris, get it. Disney is finally getting it. Hearing that you’re not allowed to be yourself is stifling to a girl. Bottling yourself up is dangerous. In Elsa’s case, literally and on a grand scale. She doesn’t realize that, in her letting go of her inhibitions, she has accidentally covered all of Arendelle in ice and snow. In summertime. She didn’t mean to do that. Anna doesn’t know whether Elsa’s actions were deliberate, but Anna is determined to find her sister and convince Elsa to fix everything... and to let Anna back in as friend and family. There are boy characters, too. There’s handsome Prince Hans (the voice of Santino Fontana), whom Anna falls hard for. There’s goofy ice merchant Kristoff (the voice of Jonathan Groff), who helps Anna on her journey. There’s even talking snowman Olaf (the voice of Josh Gad), a byproduct of Elsa’s magic; as comic-relief sidekicks go, he’s one of the best Disney has come up with, and even gets one of the film’s best songs. The animation is gorgeous. The songs are soaring. There is real Disney magic here. It’s subverting much of what the Disney magic of old was spinning. Progress! And it goes down very easy. 

FILM | SHORTS

OTHER OPENING FILMS THE BOOK THIEF

There’s nothing Hollywood likes to tell more than a Holocaust story — especially in hopes of winning Oscars. So when the Markus Zusak bestseller The Book Thief came on the scene in 2005, it was only a matter of time before a movie studio gobbled it up. Told from the perspective of the young girl Liesel (Sophie Nélisse) who goes to live with a foster family during WWII (Emily Watson, Geoffrey Rush), the film depicts one family’s fight to stand up against the Nazis. (LJ) Rated PG-13

BLACK NATIVITY

For those in need of a little Jesus at the multiplexes this holiday season, this film adaption of Langston Hughes’ stage production is here to please. Plus, getting to see Jennifer Hudson sing on the big screen again could be worth the price of admission. When a single-mother (Hudson) is laid off from her job, she sends her son (Jacob Latimore) to live with her estranged parents (Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker) in Harlem. Much singing and messy plot points lead up to a forgiveness-filled, feel-good finale. (LJ) Rated PG

FROZEN

Frozen is a princess story; Disney is doubling down on the princesses — there’s two of ’em here. But Disney is also doubling down on the hints of nascent feminism Brave hinted at, the sort of barebones feminism which accepts that girls and women might possibly want more out of life than to get married. The princesses are sisters — the elder Elsa (the voice of Idina Menzel) and the younger Anna (the voice of Kristen Bell) — and this is mostly the story of their troubled relationship because Elsa is known to turn things into ice with her magical powers. (MJ) Rated PG

HOMEFRONT

Homefront, despite the title, is not a heartwarming Lifetime melodrama. It’s a wildly ridiculous action flick in which Jason Statham plays a former DEA agent now living in Middle of Nowhere, Louisiana, alone with his preteen daughter Maddy (Izabela Vidovic) since his wife died. After being burned on an undercover drugs op in New Orleans, Broker’s now just lying low, hanging out, not looking for any trouble. But then trouble comes his way when his daughter gets in a fight at school, enraging a local redneck (Kate Bosworth) and her brother (James Franco), the latter of whom just happens to be a meth dealer.

KILL YOUR DARLINGS

If you needed evidence that Daniel Radcliffe could survive a decade as Harry Potter should really check the actor as legendary poet Allen Ginsberg in this film about the early days of the beat movement. Here, we see Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac (Jack Huston) and William Burroughs brought together by the murder of David Kammerer by a mutual friend. It’s a seminal moment in American literature, but one most people haven’t heard of. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

PHILOMENA

Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give him up for adoption. Martin, a former government adviser and journalist out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. At a party, he hears of Philomena. Together, he and Philomena investigate the life of her lost son and find themselves exploring America looking for answers. Starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan — who also helped write the movie with Jeff Pope — the film, based on a true story, has received festival-circuit acclaim. (KS) Rated R

NOW PLAYING 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Based on his autobiography, this film tells the story of Solomon Northup, the free man turned slave in pre-Civil War U.S. It’s a heart wrenchingly amazing story about a man conned into slavery despite being a free citizen and his desperate fight for freedom. Chitewel Ejiofor finally gets center stage, but the film also features an all-star cast including Brad Pitt and Paul Giamatti. Definitely a powerfully artsy take on an old subject. (KS) Rated R

ABOUT TIME

British, redheaded and freckled, Domhnall Gleeson knows how to be awkward, because he already looks the part. Then you add Rachel McAdams and have a dramatic romance. The story follows 21-year-old Tim who finds out he’s inherited his family’s curse: the ability to time travel. Turns out, it’s a great way to get a girlfriend. A moment becomes moments, and his gift allows him to take a little more from each one. (KS) Rated R

PRESENTS

ALL IS LOST

We never learn the name of the grizzled yachtsman (Robert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know details about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma he needs to overcome, or even why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? Chandor refuses to waste time on such frills, allowing Redford’s status as iconic figure to do much of the heavy lifting. At Magic Lantern (SR) Rated PG-13

BAD GRANDPA

The Jackass crew makes its triumphant return as Johnny Knoxville takes on 86-year-old Irving Zisman, while he and his grandson, Billy, played by Jackson Nicoll, travel across country. Apparently the fake old people doing bad things trope hasn’t been beaten to death with a stick just yet, as Zisman performs ...continued on next page

at the

BING CROSBY THEATER

DECEMBER 17th, 2013 PRE SHOW: 6:30pm | SHOW STARTS: 7:00pm

Bring the whole family! TICKETS $5

Suggested Donation

Benefiting NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 35

FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI NOV 29TH - THUR DEC 5TH

KILL YOUR DARLINGS (100 MIN -R) Fri/Sat: 4:00, 8:00, Sun: 1:30, 5:30, Tue-Thu: 7:15

ENOUGH SAID (96 MIN PG 13) Fri: 6:00, Sat: 2:00, 6:00, Sun: 3:30, Tue-Thu: 5:15

WADJDA (98 MIN PG) Fri/Sat: 6:30, Sun: 3:00, Tue-Thu: 5:00

DEC 5, 6 & 7 FRIENDS OF THE BING

Popovich Comedy Pet Theater

ALL IS LOST (106 MIN PG 13)

BENEFITING

Fri/Sat: 4:30, 8:30, Sun: 1:00, 5:00 Tue-Thu: 3:00, 7:00

“grandpa’s” behavior. (But, of course, they attempt to help him through his illegal or just plain stupid predicaments.) Some of the highlights include, in typical Jackass fashion, thievery, crashing into giant penguins and putting a child stripper routine into a beauty pageant. (ER) Rated R

BLUE JASMINE

INEQUALITY FOR ALL (90 MIN PG) Tue-Thu: 3:30 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

NOW PLAYING

$2 OF EACH TICKET SALE GOES TO RESTORATION

901 W. SPRAGUE AVE | 509.227.7638

Spokane Fall

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the havenots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

says THANKS for helping make the 18th annual festival a success MAJOR SPONSORS Platinum Level ($3000 and up) Rita G. Frey (Media, Pennsylvania) Gold Level ($1000-2999) Avista Foundation, Inland Northwest Community, Foundation, Pacific NW Inlander Silver Level ($750-999) Humanities Washington, SCC Bronze Level ($500-749) 4 Seasons Coffee, Cathy Thompson, Torn Retina Productions

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BAKERY & FOOD DONATIONS Albertsons, (Millwood, East 32nd, Wandermere, Indian Trail, North Nevada, Liberty Lake) Rocket Bakery, Bumblebar, Grocery Outlet (East Sprague), Fred Meyer, Rosaurs, Cole’s Orchard.

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Hero ($200-499) Eric C. Johnson, Jerry LeClaire, Robin Redman, Fran Watson & Mary Rush Supporter ($100-199) Mitchell S. Frey, Peter and Janet Grossman, Janet E. Hays, Margie Heller, Sandi King-Hunt, Sharon & Steve McGrew, Ray and Marilyn Riches, Doug & Megan Walker

36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE CHRISTMAS CANDLE

The year is 1890, and the village of Gladbury, deep in the English countryside, is about to witness a miracle. Every 25 years, an angel grants a wish to whomever receives and lights a special candle. The new minister, David Richmond (Hans Matheson), does not believe in such nonsense and hinders the belief in the candle by ushering in the electric age via lights in the church. As minister and candle maker clash and tragedy strikes the town, both theologies collide in this good-hearted film based off Mac Lucado’s best-selling novel. (ER) PG

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

It’s 1985, and Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey), an occasional bull-rider and full time electrician, lives his life between the sheets of stranger’s beds on a noxious combination of alcohol and cocaine, sheltered in a haze of his own homophobic, red-neck stereotype. When he’s diagnosed with HIV Woodroof decides to live anyway. Across the border, he discovers drugs that could prolong lives of HIV victims but that are not FDA approved. Smuggling them across the border, and teaming up with transvestite Rayon (Jared Leto,) the two work to sell drugs to a community that is quickly dying off, as Woodroof finally begins to see past peoples’ surface. (ER) R

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. (ES) Rated R

ENDER’S GAME

Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by  insect-like aliens who killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another invasion by the “Formics” that may or may not come by training all kids in tactics and strategy in the hopes of finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who will win the war decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin (Asa  Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to attend the orbiting Battle School, because  Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis) think he could be the legendary-scale genius they’re looking for. (MJ) PG-13

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

FREE BIRDS

As Thanksgiving approaches, so does, apparently, the turkey buddy films. When two turkeys from opposite sides of the track team up to stop the Thanksgiving slaughter, they travel back in time to the very first Thanksgiving to take turkey off the menu, permanently. What ensues is a bunch of silliness and a lot of turkey jokes, just in time for the holiday season. Starring the voices of Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson. (ER) Rated PG

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses

crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

INEQUALITY FOR ALL

This film takes a look at the ever widening economic gap, following former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he attempts to shed light on the shrinking middle class. The 2007 Occupy Wall Street brought attention to the economic disparity that has emerged in American society today, but Reich takes it further, tracing the very origins of the gap, and discusses what can be done to improve an economy where the majority of the wealth is held in the hands of a very few. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated PG

LAST VEGAS

When Billy decides to finally tie the knot to a much younger woman, he calls out his senior friends for one last hurrah, which of course means a bachelor party in Las Vegas. This flick covers age by laughing at it. Features an all-star cast of actors including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline. (ER) Rated PG-13

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

After the events of The Avengers, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) battles and brings peace to the ethereal nine realms. Back on Earth, his love, astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), waits and continues to research with her quip-happy assistant Darcy Lewis (Kat Dennings). Unfortunately, the nine realms are coming into alignment for the first time in millennia, causing invisible interdimensional portals to appear, threatening to destroy the universe. (SS) Rated PG-13

WADJDA

Wadjda is a film that details beginnings. Directed and written by Haifaa Al-Mansour, the first ever Saudi Arabian woman film-maker, the feature describes the life of rebellious Wadjda (Waad Mohammed) who discovers a green bicycle in a store that she must have. Her mother, preoccupied with the fact that her husband may take on a second wife, dismisses the notion. Precocious Wadjda refuses to give up, though, and begins to earn money using her wits and entrepreneurship skills. At Magic Lantern. (ER) PG 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

12 Years a Slave

97

Gravity

96

All is Lost

88

Frozen

79

Hunger Games 2

73

Ender’s Game

57

Thor: The Dark World

57

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Jason Statham tries his hand at family life.

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And not surprisingly, Jason Statham kicks James Franco’s ass in Homefront

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ey! Jason Statham finally found a thing hanging out, not looking for any trouble. Trouble that works! Well, a thing that finally comes anyway: Maddy puts a bully in his place works for me. Lots of folks seem just on the school playground, enraging his methfine with the badass martial-arts machine he typihead mama (a truly scary Kate Bosworth), who cally portrays. But that’s so completely unintersics her meth-lord brother on Broker for having esting, so cold, and I was starting to wonder if he the audacity to teach his daughter how to fight, had anything else to offer. humiliating her son. He’s trying. With a decent script — not that There’s actually some almost-profound stuff this wholly qualifies — he’s got something. With here, not surprising as the screenplay is written the right costar, he can be downright warm and by Sylvester Stallone (based on a novel by Chuck charming. Weirdly and wonderLogan). Don’t laugh: As a writer, fully, it appears that costar is a Stallone is an astute observer of male HOMEFRONT kick-ass little girl. Once — in the machismo and suppressed emotion Rated R remarkable Safe— might have been Directed by Gary Fleder — hello, Rocky — and he makes us an anomaly. But now it’s twice. feel sorry for that grade-school bully, Starring Jason Statham, One more flick in which he’s James Franco, Winona Ryder who’s not getting appropriate adult teamed up with a tough 10-yearguidance at home. old girl, and it’ll officially be a But mostly, that’s not what trend — and perhaps the best thing that ever hapHomefront is about. It’s about discovering that pened to Statham as an actor. Bosworth’s brother is named Gator Bodine, Please don’t be misled. Homefront, despite played by James Franco in full-on crazy mode. the title, is not a heartwarming Lifetime meloWe realize it’s going to come down to Statham drama. It’s a wildly ridiculous action flick in vs. Franco. It does. Meth labs blow up real good. which Statham’s Phil Broker is both a former It’s all fairly ridiculous. Interpol cop and a former DEA agent now living Yet neither Stallone’s script nor Gary Fleder’s in Middle of Nowhere, Louisiana, alone with direction overplay the ridiculous stuff, and we’re his preteen daughter Maddy (Izabela Vidovic, never invited to take any of it too seriously. who is seriously awesome) since his wife died. Homefront maintains a bizarre, entertaining sense After being burned on an undercover drugs op of redneck soap-opera tragedy. With inevitably in New Orleans, Broker’s now just lying low, exploding meth labs. 

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 37

Nov 27th - Dec 4th

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COU RT O F The ca Amer se for Pear ican r l Jam BY MIK o ck ban as the E BOOK EY great d THE HYPOTHESIS

This is not a definitive declaration. The topic remains open to debate, but I hypothesize that it could be argued that Pearl Jam is the great American rock band. Others have come and gone, rising to the sort of prominence the Seattle quintet has reached, but those others have never sustained the sort of musical machinery and cultural relevance, and ability to continue to sustain such prowess, as we’ve seen with Pearl Jam.

THE DEFINITION

The great American rock band is defined as any outfit comprised of American citizens (or mostly American citizens), founded in the United States and continuing to reside in the United States, and playing music that can, at least in a general sense, be referred to as “rock music.” The word “band” implies that the group is not a solo effort flanked by rotating musicians or some sort of Guns

ROC K

N’ Roses bullshit, wherein the band exists essentially as a name only, its members having collectively given up any sense of operating as a unit. For the sake of this argument, “great” refers to longevity of both the band and its material, the band’s societal and cultural impact and the manner in which its reputation is catalogued in the minds of rock ‘n’ roll fans.

THE COMPETITION

You’ve likely realized by now that Pearl Jam’s competition for such a distinction isn’t as formidable as you initially perceived. The obvious challengers that might come to mind — the Who, the Rolling Stones, U2, Led Zeppelin and of course, the Beatles — all have been major influences on Pearl Jam, but, as you’ve likely realized now, are not American bands.

Who are we left with, then? Aerosmith? They should have quit with the asteroid song. Bon Jovi? It’s a solo project now that Richie Sambora walked out on the last tour. Van Halen? A great band at least needs a steady lead singer. Other acts you might mention are now playing casinos. Pearl Jam is playing, and selling out, arenas. In terms of all-time greats, you’d have to give a serious look to the Grateful Dead, who revolutionized live rock music and whose influence looms large nearly two decades after their lead singer and guitarist died. The Allman Brothers, a form of which still remains, could be ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 39

MUSIC | ROCK HISTORY “COURT OF ROCK,” CONTINUED... up there, too. The best challenger, and one that will probably get the heaviest support, is Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, an act that strives to exude a certain sense of American-ness in its songwriting and presentation.

THE EVIDENCE

SUNDAY DEC 8TH DOORS 6:30PM SHOW 7:30PM

SUNDAY JAN 12TH DOORS 6:30PM SHOW 7:30PM

MONDAY JAN 13TH DOORS 6:00PM SHOW 7:00PM

Sunday, Dec 1st Nov 27 - Dec 4

th

LE GIRLS

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm

OPEN THANKSGIVING

1pm-2am ALL WELCOME

Dance your ASS off until 4am all weekend!

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

Headstrong: Unitarian Universalism and the 7th Chakra Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, UUCS Minister

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

SUN

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

TUES

at Club Red 6pm-10pm

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

WED

SAT & FRI THURS WED

th

LE GIRLS

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am at Irv’s 8pm-2am

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm 415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450 40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

Pearl Jam’s story makes them especially deserving of this distinction. They came out of the ashes of a band whose lead singer had died and rose to almost immediate fame. Pearl Jam was shoveled on top of the grunge bandwagon, but the band was always a classic rock act, making big, technical sounds few, if any, other “grunge” bands displayed. They’ve been through other challenges along the way, including inner-band strife and the death of nine fans during a Danish festival performance. All the while, the band has existed both within and outside of the mainstream. It is hard to argue that a band whose 10th studio album debuted at the top of the charts in the U.S. and nearly a dozen other countries is not mainstream. That was their fifth album to debut at the top of the charts. (Oddly, Ten, the band’s top-selling album, never reached the top.) At the same time, Pearl Jam has always been fiercely independent, breaking away from their major label as soon as they could and waging an epic, albeit ultimately unsuccessful, battle against Ticketmaster. Surrounding Pearl Jam is this bizarre paradox: The band is simultaneously characterized as warriors of the rock ‘n’ roll scene — the only Seattle band to truly survive the explosion that hit there two decades ago — as well as ’90s hasbeens. This is odd, but Pearl Jam has almost always remained relevant. Not that album charts are the only metric of relevance, but it’s worth noting that the act Pearl Jam’s recent Lightning

Bolt knocked off the top of the chart was Miley Cyrus, whose relevance — albeit a blight on music and common decency — is unquestioned. Sonically, Pearl Jam is most easily identified by Eddie Vedder’s thunderous vocals. Yet their sound has evolved continually through their lifespan, evidence of a rock ‘n’ roll act that has remained creatively adventurous at a point when they could easily, and profitably, eschew new records for greatest hits-packed stadium tours. But no matter where their style has wandered over the years, Pearl Jam has always circled back to a sound and attitude that’s definitively rock ‘n’ roll — loud, big, brazen and always a little bit pissed off. All the while, the band has remained one of the best live touring acts in the business. Their live show alone — marked by unpredictable, lengthy set lists — is reason enough for Pearl Jam to be considered “great.” And it’s worth noting that Pearl Jam does very American things outside of their music — like speaking out about injustice, helping people who need help and staying true to their own ideals.

THE CONCLUSION

If rock ‘n’ roll was a competition, the members of Pearl Jam would likely be the first ones to say they would rather not play. Still, at a time when earnest rock outfits are all but extinct, there is value in having this discussion. Maybe there’s a comfort in acknowledging some sort of leader. A band that you can be proud of. A band you can go see, even if you haven’t listened to their albums in years, and be reminded that rock hasn’t died. Pearl Jam is that band. n Pearl Jam with Mudhoney • Sat, Nov. 30 at 7:30 pm • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • $69.50 and up • All-ages • ticketswest. com • 800-325-SEAT

PEARL JAM SAVED MY LIFE

In August of 2011, Jason Baldwin became a free man for the first time since he was 16 years old, convicted of murdering three 8-year-old boys in a small Arkansas city in 1994. As one of the West Memphis Three, Baldwin’s plight, and the plight of the other two men convicted as the result of a sloppy, corrupt investigation, caught the attention of Eddie Vedder and Pearl Jam, who worked for more than a decade to help the men get out of prison. When he got out of prison, Baldwin had nowhere to go, and that’s when Pearl Jam’s philanthropy wing, the Vitalogy Foundation, stepped in. Now living in Seattle, here’s what Baldwin had to say about Pearl Jam: “Since the first Paradise Lost documentary was released in 1996, Eddie Vedder has contributed his money, time, energy and reputation to not only freeing Damien [Echols], Jessie [Misskelley] and myself, but to ensure that continued justice efforts for the three slain boys are not forgotten. Since our release was contingent upon the unjust Alford Plea, which prohibited compensation for our years of wrongful imprisonment, Ed has also helped ensure that we are able to live happy and productive lives. For me in particular, a major goal of free life has long been to pursue higher education. In June, I completed an Associate of Arts degree, thanks to the generosity of a scholarship provided by Pearl Jam’s Vitalogy Foundation. Each band member decides where 20 percent of the proceeds will go, and Ed chose to help me pursue my dreams. I am so thankful to him and to Pearl Jam for everything they’ve done for me.”

MUSIC | LOCAL SCENE

Winter Tunes

Combat the early darkness and freezing temps with songs recommended by local musicians BY LAURA JOHNSON

F

or an entire month, holiday music is all-consuming. But after the gifts have been unwrapped and glowing fixtures taken down, which songs are there to help stave off the winter 1. “King’s Crossing” by Elliott Smith I always seem to listen to a lot of Elliott Smith this time of year. This song has my attention right now. It makes me feel calm during this potentially stressful time of year.” — Henry Nordstrom of Dead Serious Lovers 2. “Yes I Know” by Memory Tapes Besides Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas Is You,” this is my favorite winter song; I love [Dayve Hawk]. — Cody Thompson of Nude Pop 3. “Because” by the Beatles I don’t think there’s a more chilling vocal performance in history — those harmonies. Something about it makes me cold and look forward to summer that much more. — Matt Legard of the Colourflies

blues? We asked Inland Northwest musicians what tunes make the seemingly never-ending season bearable. Here are eight suggested tracks: 4. “Me vs. Maradona vs. Elvis” by Brand New I just love this song. I remember spending hours of my winters in my room when I was younger listening to that album; me and my friends trying to write songs like that, that album was a big part of my growing up. — Turtle Gunion of Death By Pirates

7. “Snow (Hey Oh)” by Red Hot Chili Peppers This is our band’s song. We end up playing a ton of shows at home in the winter, also at ski resorts. “Snow (Hey Oh)” gets us in the mood to play on stage when it’s freaking cold outside. — Flying Mammals

5. “No Quarter” by Led Zeppelin Next time you are driving in falling snow, crank up that song, I defy you to not love your surroundings. — Elton Jah, reggae Elton John cover artist

8. “River” by Joni Mitchell For me, this song perfectly captures the mismatch between the overzealous happiness of the holiday season and the wintry, melancholy feeling of longing and wanting to be somewhere else. — Liz Rognes, singersongwriter n

6. “Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels)” by Arcade Fire I think snow is beautiful and all ... I just don’t like walking through it, driving in it, or shoveling it. Being cold and wet just isn’t my bag. But listening to this song, I can at least be thankful that I’m not “living out in the snow.” — Eric Shears of Half Zodiac

See more winter song selections at Inlander.com/music.

Wednesday Nov 27th

SALLY BOP JAZZ & WHISKEY WEDNESDAY Happy Birthday Kelli!

Thursday Nov 28th Closed for Thanksgiving!!! Friday Nov 29th

JESSE WESTON TRIO Saturday Nov 30th

THE BUTTERBALL: Vinyl Butter Reunion Show

Sunday Dec 1st

HAPPY TIME PRICES ALL NIGHT Monday Dec 2nd

TRIVIA - 7pm

with Tom the Bonana King!!!

Tuesday Dec 3rd

TONE DEAF TUESDAY KARAOKE - at 9!

Wednesday Dec 4th

SALLY BOP JAZZ & WHISKEY WEDNESDAY

25 Craft Beers & Craft Cocktails 120 E. Sprague Ave.

Stay up to date on conditions & news all season long. IN THE INLANDER December 19 January 16 February 13 TO ADVERTISE IN THE SNOWLANDER SERIES: SALES@INLANDER.COM • 509.325.0634 EXT. 216

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MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FOLK MAMA DOLL

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/28

H

BEATS ABADAWN & ERASERFASE

I

BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, DJ Yasmine THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Seli ZOLA, Fus Bol

t’s shows like these that make going out in the middle of the week worth it. Portland artist Abadawn — who’s been called a “true punk rap” artist — brings his weird, left-of-normal style to the Mootsy’s stage this week. Just when you think rappers are all starting to sound the same, Abadawn comes along. His frank, snarling style has been praised by mags like Complex, and has taken him to the stage as an opener for titans like Talib Kweli. Along with him comes Eraserfase, a fascinating beatmaker fresh off a tour opening for Del. Eraserfase makes beats that are trippy and psychedelic — the kind of stuff that will turn on both seasoned beatmakers and newbie raver kids. — LEAH SOTTILE Angry Xmas Tour feat. Abadawn, Mine+Us, Eraserfase • Wed, Dec. 4 at 9 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570

Friday, 11/29

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Darin Schaffer BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB (467-9638), SixStrings n’ Pearls BOLO’S, Torino Drive BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Not Guilty J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Oracles Kitchen THE CELLAR, Kosh and Jazz Cats J CHAIRS COFFEE (340-8787), Open Mic of Open-ness COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Nate Ostrander, The Jam Band COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Ron Kieper Jazz Trio THE COUNTRY CLUB, Truck Stop Betty CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Whack A Mole THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (7473946), Gretchen & the Wolf J THE HOP!, Saxeus, Autolycus, The Hep Cats, Switchin’ to Whiskey IRON GOAT BREWING CO. (4740722), The Iron Goat Trio IRON HORSE BAR, Scorpius IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JONES RADIATOR, Jesse Weston Trio J KNITTING FACTORY, All That Remains, Motionless in White, Soil, Helldorado LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Kevin Gardner

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

ey, Terrible Buttons freaks: you’ve heard Mama Doll, right? If you haven’t, here’s the deal: Sarah Berentson — the tiny singer and keyboard player in the Buttons with the big, old voice — has started this side project with Austin Case and Jen Landis. Together, the three women form a sound that is beautiful while being bare and primal in a feminine sort of way. The band’s music is simple, with only ukulele strumming and maybe the beat of a floor tom. Mama Doll is all about the way these women harmonize, and about the things they say. Yes, it’s pretty. But Mama Doll is also sort of dark and haunting, so if you’re a Buttons fan, you’re going to love this band. — LEAH SOTTILE Mama Doll with the Shook Twins, Justin Lantrip • Sat, Nov. 30 at 7:30 pm • Panida Theater • 300 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • $12/$15 day of show • brownpapertickets.com • (208) 263-9191

NYNE, The Divine Jewels O’SHAY’S, Arvid Lundin and Carla Carnegie J THE PEARL THEATER, Home for the Holidays with Shook Twins, Anna and The Underbelly PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, The Powell Brothers ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Steve Livingston, Triple Shot, DJ JWC SEASONS, Dan Mills TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Maxie Ray Mills ZOLA, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve

Saturday, 11/30

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Jazz Guyz BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB (467-9638), SixStrings n’ Pearls BOLO’S, Torino Drive BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Not Guilty THE CELLAR, Kosh and Jazz Cats COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Nate Ostrander, The Jam Band COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Eric Neuhausser THE COUNTRY CLUB, Truck Stop Betty CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jesse Weston Trio FEDORA PUB, Mike Morris

FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Whack A Mole THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Vendetta II IRON HORSE BAR, Scorpius IRV’S, DJ Prophesy J JONES RADIATOR, Vinyl Butter Reunion, Butterball LA ROSA CLUB, Will Foster Band THE LARIAT (466-9918), The Ricks Brothers Band LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Nick Grow NYNE, DJ C-Mad J PANIDA THEATER (208-263-9191), Home for the Holidays feat. the Shook Twins, Justin Lantrip, Mama

Doll (See story above) PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Emily Baker J THE PHAT HOUSE, Paul Abner ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Last Chance Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), DJ Sonny SEASONS, Dan Mills J THE SHOP, Angela Marie Project J SPOKANE ARENA, Pearl Jam (See story on page 39) ZOLA, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve

Sunday, 12/1

J CARR’S CORNER, Buckthorn Borthers, Zebrana Bastard, Gardening Angel

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus J REVEL 77 (280-0518), Hannah Siglin ZOLA, Ron Greene

Monday, 12/2

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic J CALYPSOS (208-665-059), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Blues Jam hosted by Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Gag, The Lot Lizards, Collateral Damage, Septic Schizo, Chemical Restraint PJ’S BAR & GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck RICO’S, Open mic

Tuesday, 12/3

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers LION’S LAIR (456-5678), DJs Nobe and MJ

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. J RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (3217935), Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Open mic with Frank Clark SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Q

Wednesday, 12/4

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Benefit Show feat. the mother THE CELLAR, Barry Aiken J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic IRV’S, DJ Prophesy LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ron Criscione J MOOTSY’S, Angry Xmas Tour feat. Abadawn, Mine+Us, Eraserface (See story on facing page) J THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic with Mike Bethely RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared

ZOLA, The Bucket List

509.535.9309

Coming Up ...

BELLTOWER, Runaway Symphony CD release party, Dec. 5 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Will Fontaine, Dec. 5 CHATEAU RIVE, Rick Estrin & The Night Cats, Dec. 5 KNITTING FACTORY, Adventure Club with Dvbbs, Dallask, Hunter Siegal, Dec. 5 JOHN’S ALLEY, Gypsy Lumberjacks, Dec. 5 JONES RADIATOR, Moses Wiley, Sally Bob Jazz, Dec. 6 INTERPLAYERS THEATRE, Guitarist Paul Abner, Dec. 6 THE HOP!, 5 Times Over, The Nixon Rodeo, Beyond Today, Coming ALice, Undercard, Dec. 6, 7 pm KNITTING FACTORY, Smile Empty Soul, Acidic, First Decree, Evolved, Dec. 6, 8 pm LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Fabio Undulata, Dec. 6 NYNE, Luke Pate, The Longnecks, Mishap, Dec. 6 MOOTSY’S, Terrible Buttons, Jail Weddings, Historian, Dec. 6 LA ROSA CLUB, Cedar and Boyer, Dec. 7 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Los Rusteros, Dec. 7 THE SHOP, EWU Music Dept. and Guests, Dec. 7 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Damaged Goods, Mautam, Wicked Obsession, Dec. 7 MOOTSY’S, Handsome Jack & The Handsome Devil, The Spirit Animals, Dec. 7 THE HOP!, F@$kface Unstoppable, Kissing Candice, Dec. 7 BING CROSBY THEATER, Shawn Colvin, Dec. 8 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Chris Isaak, Dec. 8 KNITTING FACTORY, Jake Miller with Action Item, Air Dubai, Dec. 8 MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Dec. 11 JONES RADIATOR, Six-Strings n’ Pearls, Dec. 12 NYNE, Eric Himan, Dec. 12 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Lewis-Clark State College Saxophone Quartet, Dec. 12 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Brother, Dec. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Metalachi, Dec. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Will Hoge, Red Wanting Blue, Dec. 13 CARR’S CORNER, 2PIECE, Roulette Delgato, Cordell Drake, Jay Cope, Dec. 13 MOOTSY’S, Marshall McLean Band, Kori Henderson, Dec. 13 REVEL 77, Gardening Angel, Dec. 14 BING CROSBY THEATER, The Shook Twins with Morning Ritual, Dec. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Blistered Earth with Helldorado, In Denial, Dec. 14 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Celebration Strings, Dec. 19 LAGUNA CAFÉ, Robinsong, Dec. 20, CARR’S CORNER, Best of Friends, Josh Withenshaw, Dec. 20

6412 E. Trent Spokane Valley

BENEFIT TO SEND

TO MEMPHIS IN THE SPRING!

Dec 7th at 7pm

LIVE MUSIC Bakin Phat VooDoo Church Pat Coast Band Whack-A-Mole

Find us on FaceBook @ thecountryclubcda to see our upcoming events

NOVEMBER 29 and 30

“TRUCK STOP BETTY” Sunday & Monday Funday with cornhole tournaments at 6.30 each night. $10 entry Twofer & Trivia Tuesday hosted by Dave & Janet at 6.30. Great food and drink specials. Thirsty Thursday with country dance lessons at 8 and $2 wells and PBR from 6 - 10.

208.676.2582

216 E COEUR D'ALENE AVE

Great Music, Great Flavor, No Bull!

Doors Open at 4pm.

Every Wednesday night compete in the

Country Clubs Karaoke Contest with cash prizes starting at $100.

Stop by for our weekday events. Monday night Football, Thursday Ladies night with FREE line dance lessons and happy hour every weekday from 4 to 6.

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 43

MUSIC AWESOME ACCORDION

The accordion may have found more of a permanent home in Spokane after last year’s World Trophy Accordion Championship was held here. Many may stereotype the multifaceted instrument as intended for one genre of music — polka. Since the competition came to town, not only has support for the accordion increased in Spokane, the instrument has also been recognized as one that can play many types of music with versatility and harmony. Highlights of this upcoming performance include 13-year-old Naomi Harris, who competed in last year’s competition, as well as the Portatos, an accordion band that covers hits like “Surfin’ U.S.A.” and “The Final Countdown.” And don’t forget the Vivace Accordion Orchestra. — EMERA L. RILEY Accordion Celebration feat. The Vivace Accordion Orchestra of Spokane • Sun, Dec. 1, at 3 pm • $10 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

COMMUNITY PRE-FEAST RACE

The season of giving is here, and so is the annual Turkey Trot run. On what’s looking to be a crisp Thanksgiving morning, hundreds of Spokanites will gather in Manito Park to take part in this local tradition. Runners from all over town participate in the annual race to get in their pre-feast calorie burn before stuffing themselves with taters and pie. Organized by the Bloomsday Road Runners Club, participants are encouraged to donate nonperishable food or cash to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank as their race entry fee. Everyone is invited to take part, uniting in the spirit of giving. Choose from 2-, 3- or 5-mile routes. — BRONWYN DOUBET BRRC Turkey Trot 2013 • Thu, Nov. 28, at 9 am; arrive early to sign waiver and drop off donations • Manito Park Duck Pond • 1702 S. Grand • brrc.net

DRINKING SCOTCHY SCOTCH SCOTCH

Scotch whiskey isn’t just for Ron Burgundy. The amber liquid is something everyone — 21 and over, of course — can enjoy one slow, warming sip at a time. That’s what the Connoisseur’s Club at the Lincoln Center wants to show you at its Scotch Social. Offering 18 varieties of the best Scotland has to offer, cigars for purchase and an abundance of heavy appetizers, the seemingly steep price of $70 per person is absolutely worth it — especially if your Thanksgiving guests have gotten the best of you the previous two days. — LAURA JOHNSON The Connoisseur’s Club Scotch Social • Sat, Nov. 30, from 6-10 pm • $70 • 21+ • The Lincoln Center • 1316 N. Lincoln • thelincolncenterspokane.com • 327-8000

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

People & Pets Welcome

Benefitting Washington Basset Rescue & Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary

$1 Raffle Tickets Games with Prizes Silent Auction PHOTOS WITH

MADDIE

(the Bulldog of Gonzaga)

SUn, DEC 1st  12 - 2:30PM

FILM LAUGH TRACKS

Some old movies are just so terrible and cheesy the only bearable way to sit through them is to be drunk, stoned (hey, it’s legal now) or while listening to sidesplitting live commentary. The latter is what audiences get at a RiffTrax show — live screenings of classic, super-dorky films with goofy, sometimes inappropriate remarks by some of the funny guys who starred on the legendary cult-comedy show “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The next RiffTrax hitting the Inland Northwest features the 1964 sci-fi holiday fiasco Santa Claus Conquers the Martians, which regularly makes lists of the worst films ever made. It can be really fun, though, when paired with the insight of former MST3K crewmembers Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett. — CHEY SCOTT RiffTrax Live: Santa Claus Conquers the Martians • Thu, Dec. 5 at 8 pm • $12.50 • Regal Cinemas Northtown and Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA) • fathomevents.com

LINCOLN CENTER’S MONROE BALLROOM 1316 N. Lincoln St., Spokane

$5 Santa Claws Photos

(Kids, Fur-Kids, or the whole family)

Dog and Cat Food Drive  Adoptions  Howliday Shopping

For more info, visit:

wabr.net

FREE EVENT with over 15 non-profit vendors! S pokane p uBlic R adio celebrates

MaRdi gRaS aS

with

B eau S oleil avec Michael Doucet

Love Cats?

F eB . 23, 7:30 p - B ing c RoSBy T heaTeR

TICKETS MAKE

GREAT

SHOPPING SUPPORT LOCAL

If the thought of rushing out to big-box stores for Black Friday feels kind of icky, save your dollars and shopping list for Small Business Saturday, a movement that began gaining steam nationwide during the worst of the recession years. You won’t find insane doorbusters at local shops, but plenty of businesses are offering modest discounts, treats and other activities, kicking off the holiday shopping season. Stop by all the hubs of local shopping, including the Garland District, downtown Coeur d’Alene and the various pockets of downtown Spokane. Following an idea from Sherman Alexie, local authors will sign books at indie bookstores, including Auntie’s. Pick up the Inlander’s new Shop Local Guide, available at most Inlander racks, to know where to go. — LISA WAANANEN Small Business Saturday • Sat, Nov. 30 • Shop at any locally owned business; many offer special discounts and promotions • search the hashtag #SmallBusinessSaturday for local deals

GIFTS! $ 38 $ 30

OUTLETS / 800.325.SEAT www.TICKETSWEST.com

* o t h e r f e e s a p p ly

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DESIGN SPIKE NORTH DIVISION BICYCLE SHOP

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Follow Chey Scott’s

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 45

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BENEFIT YOGA CLASS The 7th annual Thanksgiving Day class benefits Second Harvest. Attendees are asked to donate food or cash in lieu of a class fee. Nov. 28, 8:30-11:30 am. Yoga Shala, 505 E. 24th Ave. (270-6353) TEDDY BEAR & BLANKET DRIVE Hosted by the Health Policy and Administration Association of Healthcare Students at WSU. Bears to be delivered to kids at Shriners Hospital for Children and Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital. New or gently used blankets to be donated to homeless teens at CrossWalk. Dec. 4-5. Riverpoint Campus, 600 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (358-7640) HOLIDAY PAWTINI PARTY Hosted by the Spokane Humane Society and the Diva Dog Pet Boutique, featuring adoptable pets, a canine fashion show, pet photos with Santa and more. Dec. 5, 6-9 pm. $5-$10. Comfort Inn University District, 923 E. Third Ave. facebook. com/events/230245963802400 THE JACC’S SOIREE FUNDRAISER “The Sky’s the Limit” is the theme of this year’s annual soiree fundraiser, featuring dinner, live entertainment and more. Dec. 7 at 5:30 pm. $125. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

COMEDY

HUGE SAVINGS! FIGHTIN’ CREEK IS YOUR ONE-STOP SHOP

FOR ALL YOUR TOBACCO PRODUCTS! Cartons s a as low

20!

$

g Chewin as o c c a b o T low as

$ 89

8

FIGHTIN’ CREEK MARKET Open every day 5am-11pm On the corner of HWY 95 & Elder Rd. | 18 miles South of CDA 12727 W. Elder Rd | Worley, ID | 208.664.7040 1.866.51.SMOKE | FightinCreek.com

HOME OF THE LOWEST CIGARETTE & TOBACCO PRICES YOU CAN FIND! 46 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Second and fourth Thursdays at 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. bootsbakery.com (703-7223) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Five minutes max per performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. See weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. uncledscomedy.com (483-7300) FAMILY DINNER Live comedy improv show based on audience suggestions about their family members. Fridays at 8 pm through Nov. 29. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) AN EVENING WITH MARIA BAMFORD Live comedy show. Dec. 7 at 9 pm. $16$20. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com (244-3279)

COMMUNITY

FEED THE NEIGHBORHOOD Free meals provided. Volunteers also needed to cook and serve food. Wednesdays, 4:30-6 pm. Free. Feed the Neighborhood, 7th Ave. and Catherine St. , Post Falls. (208-661-5166) HOLIDAY GIFT DRIVE Gift drive for new or gently used board games and arts & crafts supplies, to benefit families served by rural DCFS offices in the Spokane area. Drop off unwrapped gifts Mon-Fri from 8 am-5 pm through Dec. 10. Mondays-Fridays, 8 am-5 pm through Dec. 10 Empowering, Inc. Services, 1025 W. Indiana Ave. ((509) 624-7104)

COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER The third annual community dinner includes traditional dishes and is free to community members. Nov. 28, 11 am-4 pm. Free. Fedora Pub, 1726 W. Kathleen Ave. fedorapubandgrille.com (208-765-8888) SANTA CLAWS FOR PETS & PEOPLE Fundraiser event benefiting local animal rescue nonprofits featuring Santa photos, a pet food drive, raffles, adoptable pets, games and more. Dec. 1 at noon. Free admission. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. (590-9667) SOAP FOR HOPE DRIVE The sixth annual toiletry drive benefits local charities, including Hope House/StreetWise, Hearth Homes, Transitions for Women, and others. Donations can be dropped off at any local AAA office, through Dec. 31. AAA Downtown Spokane, 1717 W. Fourth Ave. aaa.com/soapforhope MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Dec. 3 at 1 pm. Free. Bell-Anderson Financial, 12309 E. Mirabeau Parkway. bellandersenfinancial.com (993-1816) GSI’S LEGISLATIVE FORUM A panel of local and regional state legislators discuss the recent special session and what to expect from the upcoming session in January. Reception to follow the forum. Dec. 4 from 3-5 pm. $50/ members, $80/nonmember. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. greaterspokane.org (624-1393) INLAND NW NONPROFIT SUMMIT Hosted by the Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce, featuring a keynote presentation by Patrick McGaughey. Dec. 4, 10 am-1 pm. $89. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. mirabeauparkhotel.com (924-4994)

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

Get the scoop on this weekend’s events with our newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

LANDS COUNCIL HOLIDAY PARTY Annual holiday celebration hosted by the local environmental nonprofit. Dec. 4, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. landscouncil. org (232-1950) SPOKANE BLIND BASEBALL FUNDRAISER NIGHT Open mic Christmas carols, holiday trivia, silent auction and more. 25 percent of proceeds that evening to be donated to the nonprofit. Dec. 4, 5:30-8:30 pm. Free admission. Shakey’s Pizza, 9602 N. Newport Hwy. (464-0200) CATCHING FIRE COMPETITION A Hunger Games-inspired party with competitions and more. Grades 6+. Dec. 5 at 4 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) PULLMAN HOLIDAY FEST & TREE LIGHTING Tree lighting ceremony with live entertainment, refreshments and the 3rd annual Kid’s Jingle Bell Fun Run (ages 12 and under). Race entry: $10/ child, accompanying adults are free. Dec. 7 from 4-6 pm. Downtown Pullman. pullmanchamber.com (334-3565)

CRAFTS

FESTIVAL OF FAIR TRADE The 29th annual event features globally-made handcrafts, clothing, jewelry, pottery and more, made in non-sweatshop environments around the world. Nov. 29-

Dec. 1 from 10 am-5 pm. Free admission. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. festivaloffairtrade.com (448-6561) CHRISTMAS CARD MAKING CLASS Class on stamping and die-cut making. All materials provided. Dec. 5, 12-2 pm Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612) FALL CRAFT FAIR Featuring handmade items by Providence staff and friends. Dec. 6 from 8 am-4 pm. Providence Holy Family, 5633 N. Lidgerwood St. holy-family.org (482-0111) VINTAGE VIXENS HOLIDAY SHOW Local vendor gift fair featuring antique, retro and primitive items, paper crafts and more. Dec. 6-7 at 10 am each day. Free admission. Riverwalk Plaza, 1003 E. Trent Ave. DECK THE FALLS Annual holiday gift and craft sale featuring work by local and regional artists. Dec. 7 from 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108)

FILM

RUSH Film based on the true story of Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, show times vary. $6. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) HALF THE SKY Screening as part of the 29th annual Festival of Fair Trade (Nov. 29-Dec. 1). featuring stories of women and girls around the world living in horrific circumstances. Also includes a pre-film discussion “Moving Beyond the Paralysis: Steps for Making Positive Chance.” Nov. 30 at 2 pm. $5. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (448-6561) CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG Screening as part of “Totally Tubular Tuesdays.” Dec. 3, show time TBA. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050) RIFFTRAX LIVE: “SANTA CLAUS CONQUERS THE MARTIANS” Live screening of the movie with the commentary from the stars of “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” At Regal Cinemas Northtown and Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA). Dec. 5 at 8 pm. $12.50. fathomevents.com (800-326-3264) INTO THE MIND Screening of the ski and snowboarding film by Sherpa Cinema. Dec. 6, 7 pm. $15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida. org (208-263-9191) SCROOGED Screening as part of “Totally Tubular Tuesdays,” show time TBA. Dec. 10. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) CHARIOTS OF FIRE Screening as part of the “Great Sports Films at the Library” series. Dec. 11 at 5:30 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5300) BING CROSBY HOLIDAY FILM FESTIVAL The 8th annual holiday film festival features screenings of classic Bing Crosby films, and a motor coach tour, “On the Bus with Bing,” featuring places in Spokane where Crosby lived and played (Dec. 15 from 1-4 pm, $20). Films: Dec. 14 at 11 am and Dec. 15 at 12:30 pm. $8, good both days. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) DOWNTOWN ABBEY PREVIEW PARTY See the first episode of the hit

show’s fourth season before it official airs in the US. Prizes for best costumes, refreshments, activities and more. Dec. 15, 2-4 pm. Free, reservations required. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. ksps. org/da4-party (800-735-2377) INLANDER GIVE GUIDE PRESENTS “ELF” Give Guide, the paper’s annual local philanthropy issue, hosts a screening of the holiday film “Elf” with all proceeds benefiting Catholic Charities of Spokane. Dec. 18 at 7 pm. TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com

FOOD

TASTEFUL THURSDAYS Live music and product samples every Thursday through Dec. 19, from 5-7 pm, featuring local food vendors and musicians. Free. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. 5th St. moscowfoodcoop.com (208-8828537) BLACK FRIDAY WINE SPECIAL Class on the best value wines to stock up on for the holiday season. Nov. 29, 7 pm. $20, RSVP required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how No-Li’s beer is made. Fridays at 5 pm and 6 pm; and Saturdays at 3 pm and 4 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) VINO! WINE TASTING Friday features sparkling wine and Champagne and mimosas by the glass. Saturday features top Italian selections, including cheese and crackers. Nov. 29, 3-6:30 pm and Nov. 30, 2-4:30 pm. $10 per event. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) RED SATURDAY Similar to Black Friday, celebrate “Red Saturday” with a red wine tasting event. Nov. 30 from 2-4 pm. $5. Huckleberry’s Natural Market, 926 S. Monroe St. huckleberrysnaturalmarket.com (624-1349) SCOTCH SOCIAL The annual event hosted by the Connoisseur’s Club, features 18 varieties of Scotch, cigars and appetizers. Nov. 30 from 6-10 pm. $70. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000) LET’S GET ZESTY Cooking class with Chef Adam Hegsted, featuring recipes to spice up holiday classics including prime rib, pot roast, sweet potato gratin and more. Dec. 3 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON “Peace on Earth” holiday luncheon fundraiser featuring live holiday entertainment and more. Dec. 6 at 11 am. $15-$18. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. corbinseniorcenter.org (327-1584) DAVENPORT HOTEL HOLIDAY LUNCHEON Enjoy a lunch in the hotel, elborately decorated for the holiday season. Dec. 6 from 11:30 am-1 pm. $25. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. davenporthotelcollection.com (789-6819) GLOBAL BUBBLY Sparkling wine tasting class, featuring nine wines from around the world. Dec. 6 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. (343-2253) WINE & CHEESE TASTING Sample cheeses and wine from around the world and discover new wine and cheese pairings. Dec. 7 at TBA. Huckleberry’s Natural Market, 926 S. Monroe. (624-1349)

SMALL VINEYARDS OF SPAIN Wine tasting class featuring direct import Spanish wines. Classes now offered both Fri and Sat, Dec. 13-14, at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket. com (343-2253)

MUSIC

CELTIC THUNDER World music concert. Nov. 29-30 at 7 pm. $45-$60. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700) PAUL ABNER GUITAR SERIES Concerts every Saturday by the local Grammy-hopeful soloist Paul Abner. Saturdays at 2 pm. Free. Rocket Bakery, 157 S. Howard. (838-3887) AVÉ! HOLIDAY CONCERT Holiday concert featuring music from the 16th Century to the modern era, including the premier performance of a composition by William H. Mays, of Spokane. Dec. 1 at 3 pm. Free, donations accepted. Convent of the Holy Names, 2911 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (326-9516) VIVACE ACCORDION ORCHESTRA OF SPOKANE Concert showcasing the versatility of the accordion featuring local performers. Dec. 1 at 3 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) SFCC ORCHESTRA HOLIDAY CONCERT Featuring music by Brahms, Bach and Beethoven, directed by Shelley Rotz. Dec. 2 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3720) SFCC CHORAL HOLIDAY CONCERT Directed by Nathan Lansing, featuring a program of holiday music. Dec. 3 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3720) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS Local women’s chorus specializing in fourpart a capella harmony in a barbershop style. Meets on Tuesdays at 6:45 pm. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. (218-4799) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY “Christmas at the Kroc” holiday concert. Dec. 4 and Dec. 6 at 7:30 pm. $8-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org (208-765-3833) SFCC JAZZ NIGHT HOLIDAY CONCERT Directed by Kevin Woods and Danny McCollim, featuring a holidaythemed jazz program. Dec. 4 at 7 pm. $2-$5. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3720) EWU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Also features the EWU Wind Ensemble. Dec. 5 at 5 pm. $3-$5. Eastern Washington University, Showalter Auditorium, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/music (359-7078) THE JUBILEE CHRISTMAS TOUR Southern-style gospel Christmas music concert featuring The Booth Brothers, Greater Vision and Legacy Five. Dec. 5 at 7 pm. Lake City Community Church, 6000 N. Ramsey Rd., CdA (208-676-0632)

PERFORMANCE

NUTCRACKER MINI PERFORMANCES Local children perform scenes from the classic holiday tale. Nov. 29-Dec. 1 from 1-3 pm. Performances held on the first level, outside of Nordstrom. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. riverparksquare.com (624-3945)

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess TOOK THE WIND OUT OF HER ZALES

Around Valentine’s Day, my beloved boyfriend of a year kept hinting about a big surprise. He’d been talking about moving in with me, and I was expecting a proposal and a ring. I got a fondue pot. I have two children and, apparently, the idea that a man should put a ring on a woman’s finger before moving in with her and her kids. He said he’d propose when he was ready. Then, by accident (I think), he left his Amazon.com page open on my comAMY ALKON puter, showing the tackiest, cheapest ring in the world and a pocketknife for himself (which cost more than the ring). I told him to move in and forget the ring. I bought myself a ring, but that didn’t work. I felt unvalued and ashamed. We fought often, and he ended up moving out. He wants me back, but I don’t want to live with him without the stupid ring. We’re both too needy to live apart. Can we salvage this? —Heartbroken Mama The man you love did give you a shiny object that you could show off to the girls at the office, even if the admiring remarks you were hoping for weren’t “Look at that thing! It’s twice the size of Miranda’s Crock-Pot!” and “Ooh, is that stainless steel?” Diamond engagement rings can seem like a completely stupid thing to want. They’re absurdly expensive and hard to tell from lab-created rings available at a fraction of the cost. And what good are they, really? As evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller jokes in “The Mating Mind”: “Why should a man give a woman a useless diamond engagement ring, when he could buy her a nice big potato, which she could at least eat?” Well, the answer is that men can walk away after sex and women may walk away with a bunch of little mouths to drag around and feed, so women evolved to seek reliable signs that a man has access to resources and a willingness to provide them. Any hump ‘em and dump ‘em smooth talker can make promises. The most reliable signs of commitment are those economists call “costly signals,” meaning that they require substantial effort or financial investment and are therefore difficult to fake. Basically, only a guy who’s madly in love with you would be willing to prove it with an object as wildly expensive and useless as a diamond. That’s why buying yourself a ring didn’t work and why you felt “unvalued and ashamed” when your boyfriend got down on one knee, but only so he could plug in a moderately-priced kitchen appliance and propose, “How ‘bout we put stale bread cubes on sticks and dunk ‘em in melted cheese?” Being too needy to live alone is reason to get a dog or paste a face on your robot vacuum cleaner, not rush into a lifelong commitment. The way to figure this out is by spending time together without living together until he’s ready to commit or you’re ready to throw in the towel. But pick a date to take stock of whether progress is being made so you aren’t hanging on endlessly. As they say in the fondue world, there comes a time when a guy needs to either dip or get off the pot.

PARADISE LUST

I want to break up with my girlfriend, but we are supposed to go to Costa Rica and have already paid for the house we’re renting for the month with her friends. Is it ridiculous to wait till after Costa Rica to break up? —I Sound Like A Jerk When you put off canceling a relationship to avoid canceling your vacation, even posing for photos can get complicated. You might find yourself trying to put a native person or pre-Columbian artifact between the two of you to avoid blurting out, “Hey, can you stand a little farther away from me? It’ll make it way easier to crop you out.” Unfortunately, you can’t do much to cushion the blow when she invariably squeezes out of you that you stuck around long after you stopped loving her, which will make her feel stupid and humiliated, in addition to the usual fun feelings that come with being dumped. Barring some immediate need for your emotional support (like your partner’s grandma’s impending funeral or bail hearing), the kindest thing you can do is break up as soon as you know it’s over — even if it bummers up your travel plans and means you’ll eat some costs. Letting your girlfriend go without you to Costa Rica might allow her to look back fondly on both the relationship and the vacation — in a way she couldn’t if she were flipping through her trip photos saying, “And this is the guy who wanted nothing to do with me kissing me under a jungle waterfall.” n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR TOY SHELF A family-oriented holiday show about toys in a workshop. Nov. 30 at 2 pm and 7 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokaneelitedance.com (509-227-7404) LIVING WINDOW DISPLAY Festival Dance Academy students ages 4-14 pose and perform in costume for a “living window” display, with holiday music and hot cocoa. Dec. 4 from 6-8 pm. Free. Downtown Moscow. festivaldance. org (208-883-3267) THE NUTCRACKER Ballet performed by the State Street Ballet, and musical score by the Spokane Symphony. Dec. 5-8, times vary. $25-$75. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

SPORTS

SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sundays from 4:30-7 pm and Wednesdays from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed from 7-9:30 pm; Sat from 1-4 pm. $2/visit. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division St. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (456-3581) BRRC TURKEY TROT A fun run/walk to raise money and food donations for Second Harvest Food Bank. Nov. 28 at 9 am. Entry by donation. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (868-6433) SKI INSTRUCTOR CLINIC Aspiring instructors can partcipate in a two-day clinic taught by professionals. Nov. 2930. Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area, I-90. skilookout.com (208-774-1301) VILLAGE LIGHTING CEREMONY The holiday season begins with a visit from Santa, hot cider, Christmas carols, a craft bazaar and more. A toy drive benefiting Toys for Tots also takes place. Nov. 30. Silver Mountain Ski Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt. com (866-344-2675) SNOW STOMP First annual snowshoe event. Dec. 7 at 9 am. $40-$110. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. parks.wa.gov (922-6080) WWE LIVE Wrestling matches featuring CM Punk, Randy Orton, Daniel Bryan and others. Dec. 8 at 6 pm. $15-$95. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000)

THEATER

OUR TOWN Updated adaptation of the classic American play by Thornton Wilder. Through Dec. 14, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, select Saturday matinees on Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and 14. $12$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529) THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER Holiday family musical. Through Dec. 22, ThuSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (3252507) A CHRISTMAS CABARET Featuring Ellen Travolta with Mark Cotter and Jack Bannon. Nov. 29-Dec. 21, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $20-$25. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second Ave. achristmascabaret.com (208-4354000)

THE CHRISTMAS TOY SHOP Holidaythemed play. Through Dec. 15, show times vary. $10-$12. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (325-4886) A CHRISTMAS CAROL Performance of the classic holiday tale, a collaboration between the U of Idaho Theatre Dept. and the Idaho Repertory Theatre. Dec. 4-7 and 11-14 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 8 and 1415 at 2 pm. $6-$8. University of Idaho Hartung Theater, 709 Deakin Ave., Moscow. (208-885-6111) STAGE II SHORTS Performance of short student-written plays. Dec. 4-5 at 7 pm. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. whitworth.edu/theatre (777-3707) THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE Musical performed by the Lewis & Clark High School Drama Dept. Dec. 5-14, ThursSat at 7 pm. $10. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth Ave. tigerdrama. com (354-7000)

VISUAL ARTS

GREG ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY “Photography as a Philosophical Question” featuring the SFCC instructor’s work. Through Dec. 11. Free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3725) HANDMADE ORNAMENT SHOW The annual show features handmade tree ornaments by local artists. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm, Sun from 10 am-3 pm. Fridays, Saturdays, 10 am-6 pm and Dec. 1, 10 am-3 pm through Nov. 30 Tinman Gallery, 811 W. Garland Ave. tinmanartworks.com (325-1500) WEST CENTRAL FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS Gallery showcase featuring a variety of Spokane artists’ work including paintings, wood crafts, pottery, jewelry, photography, quilts and more. Dec. 4-20, dates and hours vary. Free. Salem Lutheran Church, 1428 W. Broadway Ave. (328-6260) SMALL ARTWORKS INVITATIONAL The 15th annual exhibition features 39 local/regional artists, and more than 200 new works. Opening reception Dec. 6 from 5-8 pm, show runs through Dec. 31. Free admission. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave., CdA. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) 30-30-30 30 participating artists created 30 works of art over 30 days, with each piece selling for $30 during a oneday exhibition. View art before the sale Dec. 5 from noon-5 pm and Dec. 6 from 8 am-3 pm. Sale on Dec. 6 from 4-7 pm. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third St., Moscow. (208-883-7036) ART & ARCHITECTURE FACULTY EXHIBIT Annual exhibition featuring work by faculty of the University of Idaho’s College of Art & Architecture in all media and taking all forms. Reception Dec. 6 from 5-8 pm. Runs Dec. 6-Jan. 18, 2014. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-885-3586) FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries and businesses display new artwork for the month of December. Dec. 6, most receptions from 5-8 pm. Locations throughout downtown Spokane and beyond. See Inlander.com/FirstFriday for complete listings.

WORDS

BOOTSLAM All-ages competitive performance poetry. Poets have three minutes per round to present one original poem without the use of costumes,

props, or musical accompaniment. Dec. 1 at 7:30 pm. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org AUTHOR JANE CODY The author of “Birthing Eternity” reads from and signs copies of her work. Dec. 3 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) AUTHOR KAREN SPEARS ZACHARIAS Reading and signing of the novel “Mother of Rain.” Dec. 5 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) AUTHOR PAULA MARIE COOMER The Clarkston, Wash.-based writer and cook will sample dessert recipes from her new cookbook “Blue Moon Vegetarian.” Also featuring music by the Palouse Choral Society. Dec. 5 from 5-8 pm/ Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-2669) JESS STEVEN HUGHES Book signing by the author of “The Sign of the Eagle.” Dec. 6 from 3-8 pm. Free. Hastings, 1704 W. Wellesley Ave. (327-6008) THREE MINUTE MIC Open mic poetry night hosted by Spokane Poetry Slam’s Isaac Grambo. Dec. 6 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206)

ETC.

ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Lessons for beginning to advanced dancers. Thursdays, lessons from 7-8 pm, dancing from 8-9 pm. $5. Spokane Women’s Club, 1428 W. 9th Ave. (534-4617) ARTS ANONYMOUS 12-step program for artists to explore, expand and receive support for their work in any media and at all skill levels. Meets Saturdays from 3-4:30 pm. Free. St. Luke’s Rehab Center, 711 S. Cowley. (280-0325) ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS No experience or partner necessary. Mondays from 7-9 pm $5. Spokane Tango, 2117 E. 37th. spokanetango.com (688-4587) SPOKANE MAGNUSON CLUB MEETING December meeting on the topic of police accountability, including a discussion by local social justice leaders Tim Connor, Liz Moore and Breean Beggs. Dec. 2, 11:30 am. $15. Red Lion Hotel River Inn, 700 North Division Street. (328-9526) ADULTS WITH AUTISM A panel of local adults present their struggles, aspirations and insights into the adult autistic experience. Dec. 3 at 8:30 am. $40. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. (939-7621) COMPASS CLUB CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON Catered luncheon featuring entertainment by pianist Diane Copeland. Reservations requested. Dec. 3 at 11 am. $20. Manito Country Club, 5303 S. Hatch Rd. (455-7789) SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays of the month (Dec. 3) at 6:30 pm. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th Ave. (844-1776) LIGHTENING THE LOAD OPEN HOUSE The local faith-based hoarding remediation program will open its doors to the public. Dec. 4 at 11:30 am. Free. Lightening the Load, 2702 N. Perry St. lighteningtheload.org (850-3905) HOLIDAY VINTAGE FASHION TEA Holiday-themed tea event featuring a live fashion show of 100 years of Spokane’s vintage fashion history. Dec. 7 at 1 pm. $20. Spokane Woman’s Club, 1428 W. 9th Ave. (466-6677) n

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ACROSS 1. Get back to 5. Rainy day planner? 9. Seven-time French Open winner Chris 14. Crate & Barrel rival 15. Small: Suffix 16. Where one’s name might go, on a form 17. HBO’s “Real Time” host 19. Gives up 20. ____ bargain 21. Sweet-talk 22. A high concentration of volcanoes allows Iceland to produce a lot of it 27. “I gotta hand ____ ya ...” 28. Number of weeks per annum 29. ‘60s teach-in organizer: Abbr. 30. Vowel sound in “puzzle” 33. Bank nos. 35. Ubiquitous 2013 Internet meme

50 50 INLANDER INLANDER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 28, 28, 2013 2013

THIS ANSW WEEK’S E PAGE RS ON 53 ... and a hint to each set of circled letters 38. “The Man in the Crow’s Nest” poet T.E. ____ 39. Brief online messages 42. Welcome ____ 45. Sra.’s French counterpart 46. “Don’t go!” 47. Negative result that can’t be undone 53. Get a rise out of? 54. One guilty of pseudologia 55. Loaf on the job 56. She played Hope on “thirtysomething” 61. 1% group 62. Van Halen’s “Live Without ____” 63. Jessica of “Sin City” 64. Darted 65. “The Lucy-____ Comedy Hour”

66. Inits. of warning on an office computer DOWN 1. Bone that’s part of a “cage” 2. Word with jump or bunny 3. Speed: Abbr. 4. Buddy 5. Novelist Zora ____ Hurston 6. Alternative 7. Starting squad 8. ____ Majesty 9. Yosemite peak 10. Old: Sp. 11. Provides funds for 12. Staggered 13. Law enforcement weapons 18. The “60” in “going 60”: Abbr. 21. Overused expression 22. USO audience

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31. Proclaimed loudly 32. Tracey of sketch comedy 33. Letters in some church names 34. Tad

36. Matter of life and death: Abbr. 37. “At Last” singer James 40. Maestro’s gift 41. One of Beethoven’s nine: Abbr. 42. Not so spicy 43. Pupil surrounder 44. Like “King Lear” 48. Modern party aid 49. Coeur d’____, Idaho 50. 1980s Houston Oilers coach Ed 51. Christine of “Chicago Hope” 52. History text unit 56. Foaming at the mouth 57. Hightailed it 58. “Treasure Island” author’s monogram 59. Org. with a pair of gloves in its logo 60. Witnessed

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52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Cheers

Hayden Super One Foods Me: Black man, you with your 2 kids going through the cheeses and then the yogurt section, couldn’t help but notice how beautiful you are, I said something like “that’s a great idea, some yogurt” You agreed. You seem nice and a patient Mom. I said to one of your daughters “pick the Peach Mango” You said something to them about going to their Fathers on Wednesday. Coffee possible? 54555music@ gmail.com

way lets connect and do coffee with cream. cowboydownsouth@ yahoo.com

every week I write a cheers to you because you blow me away my love. Every moment, good and bad, has been made infinitely better since you became part of my life. I have fallen so madly in love with every moment we spend together. You are my rock, the one person I can count on to hold my hand and be my friend through the sunny days and the stormy weather. I am so proud of you baby, you have worked so hard to get to where you are in life and I am truly inspired every day by your strength. You make my world such a wonderful place and I am honestly in awe of you. I never knew I could love and be loved so much until you came into my life and changed it forever, true story, for real life lol. I love you honey, dottie mo

people actually used this to try and meet others. About a month later, I’m in the breakroom and my coworker grabs the new Inlander and goes straight to the I Saw You section. Suddenly she says, “”Hey, Hank. This sounds like you.”” Sure enough, the description of me standing at the bus stop where I caught the bus every day after work and carrying the violin I played during lunch a couple days a week, was undoubtedly me. The post ended with, “”Let’s make beautiful music together.”” Oh my gosh. I had no idea who it could be, but that’s part of the deal, right? Worse, word spread around not just work, but the entire nine-story building, and soon everybody was asking me questions like, “”Who are you making music with today, Hank?”” I was not about to reply to the post, but the riddle was killing me. In the meantime, the teasing at work is non stop--even from the security guards. I talked about it at home and kept puzzling over it. And then after a few days I remembered something. A couple weeks before the article was posted, I saw the mail sitting on the kitchen counter and there was an envelope from the Inlander. But I was preoccupied at the time and didn’t give it any more thought. Suddenly it all made sense to me. I confronted Kathy and accused her of sending in the post. She laughed, “”Oh, I got you good, didn’t I?”” I had to admit that she did. What a relief to be able to explain to my coworkers that my wife had pranked me. And we’ve been making beautiful music together ever since.

McHottie I saw you working at the new McDonald’s on Division. 16 year old maybe, tall, blue eyes, and a cute half smile. Just before I went to order, you left the register to go refill the napkins, and some old guy took my usual oreo McFlurry order. Even though I didn’t need a napkin, I asked you for one and you flashed that gorgeous smile of yours. I would share a McFlurry with you any day. Mr. Skier When I saw you, you took me off my feet. Literally. You took off your helmet and shook that gorgous blond hair of yours. When I made eye contact with those beautiful blue eyes, I lost all control of my snowboard. When I looked up from the icy cold ground, you were staring right at me holding back your laughter. That’s when I realized I actually do know you, Mr. Par 3 boy. Let’s go snowboarding together! Satellite Waiter with the uncommon name. I see you quite often. I try to flirt with you, but I’m not very good at it... Interested in me or not, I think you are marvelous. You Lost Your Cell Phone no lost and found here at the Inlander. Look at Craigs list November 22 listing title is “You lost your smart phone”. Volcano I saw you at the Volcano E-Cig Shop on E. Sprague Ave. on Wednesday, November 21, 2013 at 3:30 pm. You were like a cat. A cat in the hat. You’re not too short, you’re not to tall, but you were by far the fairest of them all! Your long blonde hair and heavenly smile put Jenny McCarthy to shame. I said hi and you smiled. Next time I will go for it and ask for your first name. Sandpoint Yokes Yokes French Vanilla connection. She followed me and I followed her to the creamer section in Yokes in Sandpoint, we took turns flirting with each other until I mentioned I had seen our brand a lot cheaper at another store and you turned and left. I stood there thinking how much I wanted to share everything French with you, creamer, fries, wine, kisses. Thinking you felt the same

Taco Del Mar Ok, I’ve seen you working downtown, at Taco Del Mar. You came in from the back, and our eyes met. You had an amazing smile, with perfect eyes, and a calmness to your voice. I felt like, I had known you, for a life time. You are so, my type of girl. You caught me, looking at you several times, and smiled at me. Wish, I had the guts, to do something, other than admire you from a distance. I wish, I knew, everything about you. Frank’s Diner You: striking blonde, nice shape and classy. You move like you know what you’re doing. Me: just a guy whose heart beats

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” a great deal faster at breakfast. Dinner? Movie? Coffee date? Are you in a relationship now? Do you date? Valley Walmart The girl with long dark brown hair, blue eyes, and black puffy jacket. I work there and was monitoring the self check out one day, you were buying Thanksgiving decorations and salad mixings. Our eyes met and we shared a moment. Are you celebrating the holiday with someone special? Charlie Where are you? I have talked to you a few times, I have been looking for you! Your never home. Let’s talk some more over coffee or drinks. You know where to find me.

Cheers Happy Thanksgiving to find a way into your arms would be my wish for this hoilday season. Please know, I love you !! Time Can’t Erase “Mylady” Two years ago the light that is you beamed in to my life. Out of fear on so many levels I pushed you away as hard as I could. You are the most amazing woman I have ever met. I don’t think there has been a day since, that I haven’t regretted the way things turned out or thought of you. I so wish we could, “put the past away”. Either way, I wish you nothing but love and happiness!! My Polka Dotted Love Almost

Nickleback! Cheers to Nickleback. I remember the first song that I listened “Rockstar”, when it just came out so many years ago. Actually at that moment I didn’t find it so good to be honest. But this year, last week, I heard at the gym “How you remind me”, I literally fell in love with them, with his vocalist actually, maybe it sounds silly but there’s something inside of me when I listen and watch their videos, watching and listening to Chad makes me smile and wanting to scream like a crazy person! The things I REALLY love about them are Good music. Good lyrics, even the dirty stuff! They put on a fantastic live show. They have a (roughly) 20 minute drum solo at said live show. I love how much their songs sound alike to me and the lyrics are not that complex, I don't have to think that Not Your Typical Cheers It has been hard when I listen to them. Tight about 8 years I have lived in this Black Shirts! Ryan Peake is cute! town and at times I feel it is 8 years :) I REALLY, REALLY, REALLY want too many. With all of the negativity them to come back to Spokane!! I splashed across headlines, honestly feel that Nickleback has taking over the mindset of most more talent than the Beatles and of us, I feel it may be overdue for some positivity and genuine Rolling Stones combined!! But you know what I love more gratitude. This is a cheers to the than Nickleback? I love the stories community that had my back when that are in this I SAW YOU section I was just starting out my modeling of the Inlander every week. I love career. Years later, national ads, the stories of missed connections international exposure, dozens of that could have been amazing. The magazine prints and covers, and people who are bordering stalkers now VOGUE RUSSIA, you were (it's a fine line). Those people who pay it forward! and the people who have nothing better to do than type a huge rant to get your attention! If you have any amazing stories from the I SAW YOU section, send them to ChrisB@inlander.com because they are going to be doing a story about them. Thanks! Sheri J. is this week’s winner

WINNER!!

Sweet Music “One summer day a few years, I was reading The Inlander at home when I reached the I Saw You section. I told Kathy, my wife, that one woman I worked with read and commented on these posts during lunch and I couldn’t believe

of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! Send in your CHEERS so you too can be entered to win 1 dozen “Cheers” cupcakes at Celebrations Sweet Boutique.

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Feel the

L VE

of your donation

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

all there to not just lend helping hands, but loving hearts. Ronnie Ryno at Glamarita, Mary Tafuri of Tafuri Studios, Douglas and Amy Mccoy, Bobby Wilkins, Renee OrNay (Parkins), Sonny Moeckel, Sonna Brado, Zoe Boysen, Nick Henderson, the lovely people at Spokane CDA Women’s magazine, Jen Harvey, Alexi Sage, The Inlander (for my cover SO many thanks to you for going above and beyond the call of duty when my second family- family members, Amy and Douglas, had the unfortunate event of being robbed and having their hearts broken. You have restored my faith in humanity. My heart swells with joy when I think about all you did for them and cannot thank you enough. They share a place in my heart that cannot be touched by anyone else. Thank you, also, for the privilege for allowing us to use your salon for channeling our artistic energies in the form of photo shoots and videos! Thank you to the USAF, the members of education and financial aid at Fairchild: my dream of returning to school to pursue my Master’s in Nursing has finally become a reality. There are no words. There are so many more to thank, but mostly, just the communities here, fashion, music, and art, for being an inspiration when the clouds are grey. My dreams may be larger than this city, but now this city has a part of my heart all it’s own.

Lack of Manners You: 5’9” man, dark hair, late 30’s in business attire. Me: 5’3” woman, late 50’s, crippled hunched stature with a cane. Last Tuesday afternoon around 4:00pm while both exiting the 5-Mile Numerica branch, you fell in right behind me and let me get the door for you. When we reached the second door of the vapor lock exit, I had much difficulty opening that door, rocking it back and forth, finally I turned around to push with my back side, using all of my weight and cane for leverage. I said to you “It’ll take a sec, but I should be able to get it,” and you replied, “NOOOOOO problem,” and waited until I was finally able to push open that door for us. Fortunately for you, you must have never been injured, diminished or put into a disability condition to know how hard it may be just to take care of yourself. Unfortunately for you, that if that time may come for you, and you find yourself in a situation that the easiest of tasks become quite difficult, I hope you can still say “NOOOOOO problem”, and mean it, because I may not be around to open your doors for you that day.

law enforcement know and ticket will be written. Protecting our children is always a persons first adult thought. More parents should raise cain.

RE: Disgusting To the person complaining on students standing in school buses. My wife was a school bus driver and it is against the rules/laws. My wife says to get the bus number and times and let

Picture Taking Shame on the employee at Spokane Arena last night, ejected for taking pictures at the concert last night. Because I was in a wheelchair and couldn’t run and hide, while everyone around me is doing the same thing! This is the 21st century, everyone has a cell and is recording (the Knitting Factory does not care nor any other venue that I know of) I am not going to post it or sell it. Almost everyone there was recording or taking snaps. But people can smoke cigarettes and weed in a non smoking building, but I can’t take pics of the concert? (and no I was not using a flash) I recorded the entire incident, so if there is an attorney out there hit me up! Because there is nothing on the ticket, nothing posted, nothing said over the intercom about this. Dude! Ya it was a good idea to buy my husband a rocket for his birthday. But dude, really? You go into such detail about what engine to buy and which rocket to choose, but you left out the 9 volt battery WTF?

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 53

The Case for Being Alone Keep in mind: Alone doesn’t mean lonely BY SCOTT A. LEADINGHAM

“I

’m alone, not lonely.” Looking back on those words years later, I can’t help but think: “Amen, buddy.” They came in an email from a college friend who had graduated, moved to a new city, started a job and was navigating the world of post-baccalaureate adulthood — a world that didn’t include dorms, weekend house parties and student cheering sections. In other words: the real world. I could write an email now with the same sentiment. In a culture that seems so desperate to marry off people, to quantify a person’s worth in the concept of long-term relationships, of having three kids, a mortgage payment and a white picket fence, I feel comfortable saying the same thing now that my friend said seven years ago. Just because I’m not married or cohabitating with someone or planning for my yet-to-be-conceived kids doesn’t mean I’m lonely. Nor does it mean I’m an iconoclastic recluse devoid of emotion who shuns contact with other humans. I’m not, in fact, the subject of Simon and Garfunkel’s “I Am A Rock”: I’ve built walls. A fortress deep and mighty, that none may penetrate. I have no need for friendship, friendship causes pain. It’s laughter and it’s loving I disdain. I am a rock. I am an island. ... And a rock feels no pain. And an island never cries. Quite the opposite. On the precipice of turning 30, I

54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 28, 2013

am painfully aware that my path in life is very normal. I seek and cultivate friendships and intimate relationships. I enjoy the company of friends and family. I may very well “settle down” one day. Doing so could include getting a dog (though I should first work on not killing houseplants). Kids? Yes, a possibility (though, again, houseplants). All of those things are unions not to be entered into lightly. Not to equate marriage with owning a house or dog or having kids, but they do share a common denominator: They are serious long-term commitments. If you, like me, are someone who feels nervous about the prospect of being tied down to anything, you would do well to reconsider whether long-term commitments are right for you, at least at this time in your life. I often tell people that my goal in life is to move in one carload. Furniture be damned. I can buy a cheap bed anywhere. Yes, I realize this is an invitation for psychoanalysis. “He sounds like a commit-a-phobe,” you might say. Sure, call it what you will. I call it self-awareness.

FOR WHOM THE MARRIAGE BELL TOLLS

Who is marriage for? Your spouse? Your kids? Some greater societal good? (Cynical: Insurance and tax benefits?) Certainly some unmarried guy who prides himself on solitude and independence isn’t the best person to dole out marriage advice. But Catholic priests do. Why can’t I? If you hang around on Facebook, you may have

come across a personal essay by Seth Adam Smith. The provocative title, “Marriage Isn’t For You,” made for easy and wide sharing on social media. “Having been married only a year and a half, I’ve recently come to the conclusion that marriage isn’t for me,” Smith began. Despite the catchy premise, his point was not to justify why he ended his young marriage. Rather, he employed the classic bait-and-switch. Marriage, indeed, wasn’t for him. Rather, it was all about and for his spouse. It was an institution for her. And realizing that made him a better, more committed husband (or so the fairytale-like ending leads us to believe). I won’t play armchair marriage counselor, because I don’t know enough (or anything) about his marriage to wax poetic about it. However, I do know enough about myself — and the failed marriages I’ve encountered and grew up with — to know why I take such commitments so seriously. And why I avoid them at this point in my life. I’m a selfish bastard, which isn’t to say I’m greedy or that I don’t care for others. That’s not the case at all. What I mean is that I want a lot out of life — to find happiness and fulfillment in whatever I do, to engage in the experiences (work and recreational) that I enjoy, to share those experiences with people who similarly enjoy them. I want that for all people, especially someone with whom I’m in a relationship. But too often I’ve seen individual goals and aspirations lost for the sake of another person. “Marriage is all about making sacrifices,” we’ve all heard so many times. If that really is what marriage and long-term relationships are about, then count me as a committed, lifelong bachelor. I don’t want my significant other to sacrifice anything for me. I want that person to live a life of fulfillment and joy. And I want that person to similarly share in mine. If that way of viewing relationships means I’ll be “alone” for the rest of my life, then that’s OK. I’ve had enough practice knowing what being alone feels like. I can tell you it doesn’t feel anything like loneliness. Not in the least. n

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 INLANDER 55

NOVEMBER 30

TH

4:30 PM • DOORS OPEN & FLUTE MUSIC BY DALE YOUNG

5 PM • WINTER BLESSING BEGINS Join us for an evening of friendship and sharing CEO Welcome: Dave Matheson Winter Blessing: Story & Prayer Traditional Native American Performances $10,000 Charity Giveaway Complimentary Fry Bread and Huckleberry Jam Fireworks

1 8 0 0 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 | CDAC A S I N O . COM |

/ CDAC A S I N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 11/28/2013