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December 6, 2012 Volume 87 – Issue 13

THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

$838,313

THE PRICE OF A PRESIDENT PAGE 3 @THEEAGLEONLINE

2 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 theEAGLE

Photo of the Week

Events DEC. 7

FIRST FRIDAY FILM: THE DARK KNIGHT RISES

10 p.m. / Take a break from studying and enjoy free popcorn and drinks while watching “The Dark Knight Rises.” / Tavern / University Center Events / Contact: Sarah Mostyn, universitycenterevents@gmail.com

DEC. 10

DEC. 7

ON A SENSUAL NOTE’S FINAL CONCERT: APOCALYPSE MEOW

9:30 p.m. / All-male a capella group On A Sensual Note will be performing their final concert of the semester. / Kay Spiritual Life Center / Contact: onasensualnote@gmail.com

DEC. 12

STRESS-FREE ZONE

2 to 5 p.m. / Play games COVER PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE KAY STUDY LOUNGE and enjoy snacks while taking STARTING AT TOP) BY: DIANA ALVARENGA / THE EAGLE, ANA from studying before 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. / Students a break SANTOS / THE EAGLE, can study and enjoy snacks and finals. / MGC 200 / Center COURTESY OF ALYONA refreshments provided by AU’sVOGELMANN, for Diversity and Inclusion / chaplains / Kay Spiritual Life/ THE Contact: EMMA KNIGHT EAGLE Isaac Agbeshie-Noye, Center / Contact: Rev. Mark Schaefer, schaef@american. edu

202-885-3651 / www.american. edu/ma

Front Cover

JARED ANGLE/ THE EAGLE

Students read prayers by candlelight at a vigil for Israeli and Palestinian victims from the recent conflict in Gaza Strip, which J Street U at AU, AU Students for Justice in Palestine, AU Jewish Voice for Peace and Christians United for Israel at AU hosted. Go online to see the whole story. COVER PHOTO BY: ANA SANTOS / THE EAGLE

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NEWS

Fired Math Department secretary speaks out 4 | AU student wins election 6

Kerwin’s salary increases by about $31,000 annually

The late Drexel University President Constantine Papadakis was the highest paid president AU President Neil Kerwin at a private college in 2009 at a was paid $666,390 during the total compensation of approxi2011 fiscal year, according to mately $4.9 million according International Revenue Service to the Chronicle. This figure informs filed by the cludes $32,450 of University. deferred compenTop paid administrators at AU, including AU spent 46 persation and $12,335 salary, bonuses and other compensations cent of the Univerof nontaxable bensity’s $500 million efits. Neil total expenses in the Kerwin was same time period also ranked as the Kerwin on personnel, which third highest paid includes AU adminprivate college Donald istration, faculty and president in the Myers staff, according to a D.C. area, behind budget plan submitGeorge Washted to the Office of ington University Claudio Finance and TreaPresident Steven Grossman surer. Personnel Knapp at almost salaries and benefits $1.1 million and are the University’s Georgetown UniScott largest expenditure. versity President Bass The budget for John DeGioia at the next two years $911,918, accordwill be announced in ing to the ChroniFebruary. cle. However, both Salaries from: 2008 2009 2010 A fiscal year is the figures include 12-month period in almost $150,000 of which an organization operates KERWIN LISTED AS 65TH HIGH- deferred compensation and nonunder the same budget, accord- EST-PAID PRIVATE UNIVERSITY taxable benefits for Knapp and ing to the IRS. AU’s fiscal year PRESIDENT roughly $156,000 for DeGioia. begins May 1 and runs until The Chronicle of Higher April 31 of the following year. Education ranked Kerwin as KERWIN RECEIVED SALARY Kerwin made $666,390 in the 65th highest-paid private RAISES 2010, which includes: university president nationwide Kerwin’s salary has increased tCBTFDPNQFOTBUJPO for the 2009-2010 academic year. by almost $31,000 or approxitCPOVT Kerwin’s total compensation of mately 5 percent each year from t BOZ PUIFS DPNQFOTBUJPO $797,143 for this time period was fiscal years 2009 to 2011. While from the University, according to compared to those of 519 other this figure may account for inIRS forms filed by the University university presidents, which in- flation, the Board of Trustees last March, known as 990 forms. cluded $165,802 in deferred com- approved salary raises for KerKerwin’s total compensation pensation and nontaxable bene- win due to his performance and for 2010-2011 academic year fits. These are the most updated achievements. was $838,313, but this figure in- statistics comparing university “Under [Kerwin’s] leadercludes: presidents’ salaries across the ship, the university achieved or tQBSUPGIJTSFUJSFNFOUDPN- nation. exceeded its goals during the By PAIGE JONES

EAGLE STAFF WRITER

pensation t OPOUBYBCMF CFOFmUT  TVDI as health care or housing. The IRS forms said Kerwin worked 50 hours a week throughout the 2011 fiscal year.

review period, and the board sought to make sure his increase reflected that assessment,” Maralee Csellar from University Communications said in an email. The Board of Trustees determines salary raises for University vice presidents, provost and president based on their performances. The board also works with consulting firm Mercer to ensure these administrators’ salaries are “competitive but not excessive,” Csellar said in an email. The next three AU administrators with the highest salaries during fiscal year 2011 were: t %POBME .ZFST  DPSQPSBUF financial officer, vice president and treasurer t $MBVEJP (SPTTNBO  8BTIington College of Law dean and professor t4DPUU#BTT QSPWPTU Myers, Grossman and Bass

also received salary increases every year during this threeyear period, according to the IRS forms. AU currently allocates 19 percent of its expenditures to financial aid, according to the University budget plan. While this percent rose from last fiscal year’s 18 percent, AU is also allocating more financial aid toward need-based aid from merit scholarships, The Eagle previously reported. SG advocates for transparency in the budget as well, according to Reath. “More transparency will heighten the detail and research that the campus community can conduct before beginning conversations about budget priorities, Reath said in an email. “Good governance is always created in metaphoric sunlight.” PJONES@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

Healthy adult volunteers needed The National Institute of Mental Health is conducting outpatient research studies on fear and anxiety at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Be t hes da, Mar y lan d. Over a period of one to three visits of one to three hours each, participants will be interviewed and complete computer tasks during which heart rate will be recorded. Volunteers must be between 18-50 years of age, medically healthy, and not be taking medica tion. There is no cost for study-related tests. Compensation will be provided. F or more in fo rma tio n, pl ea s e c al l:

1 - 80 0- 4 11 - 12 2 2 ( TTY: 1- 8 6 6- 4 11- 1 01 0 ) Se h ab la es pa ñ o l

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Refer to study #: 01-M-0185 or 02-M-0321 D ep art ment o f H ealt h and H u ma n Ser vices Nat ion al Inst it ute s of H ealt h N at ion al Inst itu te o f Me nt al H ealt h The NIH Clinical Center, America’s research hospital, is located on the Metro red line in Bethesda, Maryland.

NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health

4 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 NEWS theEAGLE

SG allows student vote on new constitution By MADDI PRAISER EAGLE STAFF WRITER

The Student Government Senate bypassed the Judicial Board’s rules on Dec. 2, declaring that the student body would vote on the new constitution Feb. 5 and 6, regardless of previous rules requiring two-thirds of the student body to vote. The Elections Reform Bill, passed Nov. 18, removed the Judicial Board’s and the Board of Election’s policy that required 10 percent of the student body to sign a petition approving the Senate’s decision to hold a vote, 2013 Sen. Eric Reath said. “I personally am not the biggest fan of the current paper petition process,” Chloé Profit, chair of the Board of Elections said. “It is a lot of work for both the petitioners and the board. The BOE is looking into ways to create an online petition that will make the process easier.” Now, the Senate will be able to present the Student Associa-

tion to the undergraduate student body through a vote, according to Reath. “I knew as soon as we got all of the red tape out of the way, we would have a shot at this,” Reath said. “We are breaking down all of these artificial political barriers that essentially just create conflict for the sake of conflict.” The purpose of the new constitution is to restructure SG so there is less bureaucracy and more student advocacy, according to 2013 Sen. Brett Atanasio. Currently, SG is divided into the judicial, executive and legislative branches. The executive branch is divided into: t president, who is in charge of advocacy, t vice president, who is in charge of programming, t comptroller, who is in charge of finance t and a secretary, who is in charge of communications. The Student Association

Secretary claims she was fired for unionization efforts By AMBER COHEN EAGLE STAFF WRITER

The recently fired Math Department Secretary Stacey Lucien claimed both her involvement with unions and racial discrimination from her supervisors led to her job’s termination on Nov. 16. Lucien filed a charge with the National Labor Relations Board earlier this year, but the charge was dismissed after investigation, according to Maralee Csellar, assistant director of AU media relations.

“The University consistently and conscientiously complies with all rules and regulations

Judicial

Legislative Senate

President

Board of Representatives

Executive Vice President

Secretary

Executive

The new constitution streamlines the executive and legislative branches, cutting down SG’s “red tape” while focusing on advocacy.

President Advocacy

Programming

Finance

Communications

would divide the executive board into four vice president positions, which would include advocacy, programming, finance and communications. The president would then oversee the vice presidents. The Undergraduate Senate and Judicial Board would be replaced by a Board of Repre-

sentatives, which would serve an advisory role in the Student Association. “I think the best analogy is like a board of directors in a not-for-profit working with the CEO of the organization,” SG Senate Speaker Joe Wisniewski said. There would also be an Ex-

ecutive Committee made up of members from both boards. “This new fundamental change will allow us to advocate on the behalf of the students,” Reath said. “It is going to change how we work as a student government organization.”

The University also cannot comment on personnel matters, according to Csellar. After her experiences working with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics Chair Jeffrey Adler and her previous supervisor Jonathan Post, budget and personnel manager

not only to me but minorities in general,” Lucien said in an email to the mathematics and statistics department Dec 4. Adler said he could not comment on the matter and referred all questions to AU media relations. Post could not be reached for comment.

and negative nature.” He also cited two written warnings issued in Nov. 2011 and Aug. 2012. Two faculty members reached out to Adler about Lucien’s email to the department indicating her negative tone, according to the letter. “Your communication remains unprofessional, needlessly hostile, and disrespectful,” Adler said in the letter. Lucien claimed the administration does not want the staff to unionize. “[The College of Arts and Sciences] does not want us talking to people,” Lucien said. “I am for freedom of speech. If it’s within the law, no one can say ‘don’t do it.’”

“[The College of Arts and Sciences] does not want us talking to people,” -Stacey Lucien, former Department of Mathematics and Statistics secretary promulgated by the National Labor Relations Board and has applied these principles in relation to posting union material on campus,” Csellar said in an email.

Comptroller

in the College of Arts and Sciences, Lucien said she wanted to create a union. “My actions of forming a union was partly the results of Jeff Alder’(s) hostile attitude

In her termination letter obtained by The Eagle, Adler said he fired Lucien due to her Nov. 12 email to the entire department about the Chair election process which had a “hostile

MPARISER@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

ACOHEN@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

theEAGLE NEWS DECEMBER 6, 2012 | 5

New Leo Tolstoy bust vandalized BY JORDAN-MARIE SMITH EAGLE STAFF WRITER

An “A” with a circle around it, a known anarchy symbol, was drawn with a marker on the bust of author Leo Tolstoy between Dec. 1 and Dec. 2. The lettering underneath the bust was also colored in with black paint. The symbol was removed Dec. 3 by a grounds worker. Mark Feist, assistant director of grounds and vehicle maintenance and support services, was alerted of the situation after the Eagle inquired about the vandalism. Chemicals were used after the mark was erased to prevent the ink from bleeding into the stone, Feist said. “The vandalism of the Tolstoy bust remains an active investiga-

tion,” said Will Sowers, manager of administrative services for the Department of Public Safety. Sculptor Gregory Pototsky donated the bust to AU in mid-

College of Arts and Sciences Dean Peter Starr, who also helped place the bust on campus, said that this would not deter future projects from the IRC at AU. Hilary Bergen, a senior in CAS, attended the unveiling in NoI feel a little insulted personally vember. She was excited to have a symbol of Russian culture at AU, but was surprised by the vandalism. “The fact that someone would deNovember. face it is a slap in the face to AU Initiative for Russian Cul- everything the IRC has worked ture Executive Director Anton for,” Bergen said. “Even if you Fedyashin does not believe the have a problem with a policy, anarchy symbol was a direct at- government or ideology, you tack on the IRC or Tolstoy. need to appreciate that this was a “I feel a little insulted person- gift to our University from a disally, because as the executive tinguished sculptor and should director of the IRC I put a lot be a symbol of prestige and pride of effort into helping bring this instead of ridicule or a platform ANA SANTOS / THE EAGLE bust to campus,” Fedyashin said. for your political standpoint.” An anarchist symbol was removed from this statue on Dec. 3. “And I’m not alone in that.” JSMITH@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

“ ” -Initiative for Russian Culture Executive Director Anton Fedyashin

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6 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 NEWS theEAGLE

Army Corps of Engineers begins demolition of WWI munitions site By LEIGH GIANGRECO EAGLE STAFF WRITER

The bricks finally fell at 4825 Glenbrook Rd. Nov. 29, as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began demolition of the vacated residence that sits on top of a formerly used World War I defense site. The demolition will take approximately two weeks, after which the Corps will begin site cleanup, according to Army officials. They estimate more chemicals will be found at the center of the site, including the basement of the house, but do not expect to find munitions. “I don’t think we’re gonna find [munitions]. I think we’ve gotten the majority of the stuff out,” Dan Noble, Army Corps of Engineers project manager, said. Across the street, some residents looked on the demolition with relief, others with skepticism. In the house directly op-

posite from the site, resident Christine Dieterich stood with Harold G. Bailey, Jr., her lawyer. Dieterich voiced concerns during two restoration advisory board meetings about the safety and health of her family, especially her two children, during the cleanup and demolition. She requested the Army Corps relocate her during the cleanup, but the Corps refused multiple times. In the case of an accident, the Corps had provided a 742foot safety zone surrounding the house. However, the perimeter decreased to 194 feet, based on the probability of finding chemicals rather than munitions. The Corps already briefed some residents living within the zone, like Dieterich, on what to do in the case of an accident. Dieterich was instructed Nov. 28 on the voluntary “shelter in place” program, in which residents remain inside their

Student write-in candidate wins ANC seat By HEATHER MONGILIO EAGLE STAFF WRITER

Ror y Slatko, a sophomore in the School of Public Affairs, won the Advisor y Neighborhood Commission seat that represents most of Main Campus in the D.C. government. Slatko will represent Ward 3D07, the all-student district, that covers students living in Anderson, Centennial, Leonard, McDowell and Hughes Halls. Slatko was a write-in candidate and was not on the ballot on Election Day Nov. 6. Slatko plans to improve neighbor and student relations while discussing traffic problems, the Campus Plan and the

smoking ban, he said. “I think the best course of action I’m willing to take is making sure ever yone comes to the table,” Slatko said. Deon Jones currently represents Ward 3D07 on the ANC. Ward 3D07 became an all-student district in 2011, when the ANC redistricted the area, The Eagle previously reported. Joe Wisniewski, a junior in SPA, was also recently elected ANC 3D10 Commissioner, representing the Berkshire, Avalon and Greenbriar Apartments. Both students will begin their term in Januar y. HMONGILIO@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

homes during an accident. The 194-foot safety zone restricts the areas affecting AU’s campus to only the Watkins Building, according to Army officials. “I always knew this [demolition] was going to happen at ‘The Hole of Hades,’” Bailey said, referring to the house. “My daughter used to run at the track behind here. She would say, ‘I hope it doesn’t blow up while I’m running.’” AU President Neil Kerwin, who lives next to 4825 Glenbrook Rd., will remain at his home during the demolition and cleanup. “We’ve already been through this kind of training before in the past,” Kerwin said, referring to the shelter in place briefing. “We’re confident,” he said. “They’ve already demolished most of the house, from what I’ve seen so far.” LGIANGRECO@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

WILLA HINE / THE EAGLE

An excavator slams into the Glenbrook house.

SG advocates for larger student role on Board of Trustees By MADDI PRAISER EAGLE STAFF WRITER

Student Government is working to increase student influence in the Board of Trustees regarding the University budget. Class of 2013 Sen. Eric Reath and Class of 2015 Sen. Patrick Kelly each sponsored a bill in response to students’ interest in the Board’s decisions. Students pay for 81 percent of the University’s operating revenues, but Kelly said students have no say in how the revenue is spent.

Two bills were passed by the Senate on Dec. 2: one requiring the SG President Emily Yu to report the Board of Trustees’ meetings to the Senate and the other seeking to increase the number of student representatives on the Board’s committees. Brett Atanasio, a senator for the Class of 2013, is currently the non-voting student representative on the Board. The Board of Trustees currently only rotates one student between the Alumni Affairs Committee and the Audit Committee. Reath’s bill proposed

full-time positions on Board of Trustees’ committees. The SG president can appoint students through a written executive order to advocate for another student representative on the Board, according to Kelly’s bill. This legislation also requires the president to report the committees’ decisions to the SG Senate. “This is a great first step,” Reath said during the Senate meeting. “I urge you all not to only take this first step together, but all the steps to come.” MPARISER@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

SCENE

2012’s most important pop culture items 8 | Scene staffers pick the best albums of 2012 9

‘Argo,’ ‘Dark Knight’ among 2012’s best films THE SCENE PICKS ITS FAVORITE FILMS OF 2012, FROM CASH COW BLOCKBUSTERS TO CRITICALLYACCLAIMED INDIES. “ARGO”

In the surprising second act of his career, Ben Affleck (“The Town”) has reinvented himself as a talented director. “Argo,” Affleck’s third feature film, is a stunningly suspenseful piece that marries a straight-laced historical film with a humorously biting commentary on the movie industry. Based on a previously confidential mission during the Iranian hostage crisis, “Argo” reveals the larger-than-life circumstances that were involved in extraction of six American diplomatic workers out of Iran. Affleck directs and stars as Tony Mendez, the CIA operative who led the joint CIA-Canadian initiative to rescue the six employees of the U.S. Embassy

who were taking refuge in the Canadian ambassador’s home. In a plan so ridiculous it might work, Mendez and the six employees pose as a film crew making a cheesy sci-fi movie called “Argo.” With its excellent writing and talented cast of Hollywood favorites like Alan Arkin (“The Muppets”), Bryan Cranston (“Breaking Bad”) and John Goodman (“Flight”), “Argo” is a near-masterpiece in direction, turns an odd premise into a wholly enjoyable movie. -HOAI-TRAN BUI

“THE DARK KNIGHT RISES”

2012 may not have been my favorite year for film, but Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight Rises” definitely stood out among the rest. Eight years after the death of Harvey Dent/ Two-Face (Aaron Eckhart), the film opens with Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) hiding in his family mansion, far removed from fighting crime. At first, I must admit, I was a

little wary about the film. With such a beautifully chilling performance by Heath Ledger as the Joker for the second Batman installment, I was unsure how this film’s villain, Bane (Tom Hardy), would compare. But Hardy’s performance left me pleasantly surprised. And looking at Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Anne Hathaway for two hours was just another bonus. -KENDALL BREITMAN

“MOONRISE KINGDOM”

With every film he makes, Wes Anderson leaves a now-familiar and indelible trace. Such was the case with his latest film, the colorful, nostalgic “Moonrise Kingdom.” The plot was as Andersonian as ever: wise-beyond-their-years pre-teens, Sam and Suzy, fall in love and run away from society, finding solace for one night in a picturesque lakeside camp. The sumptuous visuals, costumes and meticulous

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 ≥

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF CINEMATIC, COURTESY OF WARNER BROS, COURTESY OF FOCUS FEATURES, COURTESY OF CLAIRE FOLGER

8 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 SCENE theEAGLE

ROUNDING UP 2012’S TV, FILM, MUSIC MARK LIEBERMAN — TAKE 5 THE YEAR’S MOST MEMORABLE DEVELOPMENTS IN THE WORLD OF ENTERTAINMENT. WELCOME BACK, HOLLYWOOD

D.C. web show wraps up series By EMILY CLAPP EAGLE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Welcome to the grungy 1990s, where angsty D.C. teens face the hardships of growing up, as they mature from adolescents into young adults. These hardships may include: heartbreak, hormones, relationships and sexuality. “Orange Juice in Bishop’s Park” is a web series that has entered its sixth and final season. The show has gained extensive popularity online, with hundreds of thousands of views and a viral viewership in over 140 countries. Some AU alumni have even participated in the show’s production. Series creator Otessa Ghadar said that the entire cast and crew is based in D.C., her hometown. “There’s amazing talent here and because this is part of new media that makes it easy to not have to be in the major cities such as New York or Los Angeles,” Ghadar said. New media is any sort of film or video with the primary focus on watching it online. AU graduates who have served on the crew include Dan Curl, Dylan Myers, Matt Harmelin, Habib Awan and John Napolitano, as well as current undergraduate student Emily White, according to Ghadar. Curl graduated in 2011, with a MFA in film from AU. He started

on the show as an intern and worked his way up, editing the show for the first season and becoming a location manager for the third (using the AU campus as a location). He also worked as a guest director for the fourth, fifth and sixth seasons. “AU professors stressed new media and using Web pages, Facebook, Twitter and blogs to spread new work,” Curl said. Curl also said that what he learned in the classroom helped prepare him for the show. Interning taught him an important lesson about the career field: “No job is too small,” Curl said. Ghadar said that she decided this would be the final season because there are other shows that she wants to develop and start. Most of the cast is going to college, so it was a good place to end. Ghadar said that her future plans include a 1970s sci-fi show and a sketch comedy. If there’s enough funding, both shows will be available online. THESCENE@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

“ORANGE JUICE IN BISHOP’S GARDEN” IS AVAILABLE TO WATCH ON ORANGEJUICEINBISHOPSGARDEN.COM AND ON THE YOUTUBE CHANNEL 2020PRODUCTIONSDC.

After a few years of relatively stymied momentum, the cinema delivered a veritable cornucopia of high-quality creations for all ages and tastes in 2012. “The Avengers” and “The Dark Knight Rises” commanded the box office with massive spectacle, emotional depth and intellectual ambition. Meanwhile, widely respected directors including Steven Spielberg, Robert Zemeckis, David O. Russell and Ang Lee offered characteristically Oscarworthy endeavors. The indie community fawned over the impressionistic beauty of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and the quirky realism of Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom.” This year’s movies provoked, imagined, dazzled, innovated and inspired

NEW SUPERSTARS REIGN

While reliable hitmakers like Rihanna, Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Ke$ha and Taylor Swift delivered catchy chart-toppers, three previously unknown artists catapulted to “phenomenon” status through alternative means. Gotye’s Sting-esque ballad “Somebody That I Used to Know” rose to prominence with the assistance of prime televi-

sion placement and a risqué music video. A well-timed lip-dub video and promotion from mentor Justin Bieber ushered Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe” into massive summer success, inspiring countless covers and parodies. Finally, the South Korean dance anomaly PSY took America by storm with his absurd dance moves and ubiquitous “Gangnam Style” refrain.

GOLDEN AGE: THE FINAL SEASON? Is the end of a television era approaching? The final season of “Breaking Bad” began airing on AMC. NBC announced official end dates for “30 Rock” and “The Office,” and unofficial ones appear to be looming for “Community” and “Parks and Recreation.” Despite these omens of finality, quality television continues to thrive. Showtime’s “Homeland” commanded the Emmy Awards with its passionate performances, while Lena Dunham’s provocative “Girls” inspired controversy, backlash, and backlash against its backlash. “Louie” continues to expand the boundaries of television comedy while “Suburgatory” and “New Girl” operate playfully within the network model. Television is alive and well.

A FOND FAREWELL

The entertainment world lost numerous talented individuals this year. To spotlight an arbitrary few: Whitney Houston, the R&B songstress with one of the biggest vocal ranges of any singer in history, passed away at 49. Michael Clarke Duncan, the intimidatingly proportioned star of “The Green Mile” and other well-received films, passed away at 54. These artists and many others deserve admiration and remembrance for their inspired careers. Though they are gone, they will never be forgotten.

POP CULTURE 101

We learned that Abraham Lincoln was a vampire hunter, or maybe not. We learned that love is temporary, if Amy Poehler and Will Arnett, as well as Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez are any indication. We learned that superheroes are money magnets, but we already knew that. We learned that I threw a wish in the well, don’t ask me, I’ll never tell. For better or worse, we learned that people can overcome negative reputations, as Ben Affleck did with his stellar thriller “Argo” and Chris Brown did with his Grammy award and collaborations with Rihanna. Pop culture: the ultimate learning tool. MLIEBERMAN@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

CHECK OUT THESE MOVIE REVIEWS ONLINE LIFE OF PI THE SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK KILLING THEM SOFTLY

theEAGLE SCENE DECEMBER 6, 2012 | 9

Scene staff’s favorite albums of 2012 FRANK OCEAN | CHANNEL ORANGE After its release this past July, Frank Ocean’s “channel ORANGE” has become the soundtrack to my first semester. In his debut studio album, Frank Ocean surprised audiences with his unconventional melodies, midtempo beats and unexpected instrumental arrangements. The album solidified Ocean as the new face of R&B, and an unconventional face as well. Earlier this year, Ocean became one of the first African-American R&B artists to openly announce he had fallen in love with another man in a letter he posted to his fans on Tumblr. Since then, “channel ORANGE” has received rave reviews and JODY AREMBAND / THE EAGLE

Healthy snack options JODY AREMBAND — THE COLLEGE FOODIE Eating out of a vending machine really isn’t satisfying. Every now and then I need a Butterfinger just as much as the next person, but it doesn’t take too much effort to make something that tastes so much better. These are all very easy and quick options for making yourself a delicious meal or snack from things that you do, or probably should, have in your fridge. SAVORY CUCUMBER AND TOMATO: THE POTATO CHIP SUBSTITUTE

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Slice a cucumber very thinly (almost like a chip). Place the slices on a baking sheet covered with a sheet of tin foil over them. Lightly drizzle olive oil or balsamic vinegar over your cucumber slices and put them in the oven for about 10-15 minutes or until crispy. This is delicious on its own or works amazingly with spinach and artichoke dip or hummus. A lot of people will make this with some parmesan cheese baked on, which is scrumptious. Either way, you can’t go wrong, and you’re eating a tastier and healthier option than anything from a vending machine. Another option is a tomato pizza. Again, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Slice up a tomato and lightly drizzle with

olive oil and top it with spinach, cheese and anything else you could imagine putting on a pizza, with the tomato acting as the bread and crust.

THE SUBSTITUTE FOR FRUIT GUMMIES: THE EASIEST SMOOTHIE EVER

I think that one of the best decisions I made (food-wise) this semester was buying a bag of frozen berries — they make for the best smoothies. I put a handful of berries and some milk in the blender until it’s creamy. It also works well if you add yogurt (any flavor or type) or peanut butter. I have this for breakfast sometimes or a snack later in the day. It’s also super tasty if you use ice cream for a treat. This way, I get all of the berry taste but more of the benefits and less preservatives.

THE SWEET CHOCOLATY TREAT

I really enjoy oatmeal with bits of chocolate, brown sugar and peanut butter in it. It adds a warm, oozy element like molten lava cake, but you also get other flavors and more fiber. Another option, one of my personal favorites, is spreading Nutella and peanut butter on a piece of whole wheat toast. Whole Foods, as well as other grocers, carries a peanut butter and chocolate combo spread that works well. They have a few different types, but the dark chocolate is by far my favorite. JAREMBAND@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

KENDRICK LAMAR | GOOD KID, M.A.A.D CITY It only came out this past October, but music critics and fans have almost instantly called Kendrick Lamar’s sophomore album “good kid, m.A.A.d city” a classic. And while it might not have earned that status quite yet, the album easily trumps any rap release this year. Recorded in Los Angeles and executive produced by Lamar’s mentor Dr. Dre, everything from its hazy hooks to Lamar’s own gremlin growl makes it an addicting listen. Lamar spits out so much brutal truth into every narrative-driven track (exemplified by songs like “The Art of Peer Pressure”) and manages to slip in some typical hip-hop bravado on “Backseat Freestyle.” The album’s popularity was also ramped up by somewhat melancholy party numbers like “Swimming Pools (Drank).” Forget all the hype surrounding him — Lamar is already well on his way to joining the ranks of rap superstars. — YOHANA DESTA

TAME IMPALA | LONERISM I loved Tame Impala from my first listen of their 2010 debut “Innerspeaker,” and their newest record “Lonerism” is a wealth of blissfully sprawling psych that, while inspired by its ‘60- and 70s-era predecessors, manages to build its own technicolor landscape. While the backbone of “Lonerism” is still the band’s signature textured, swirling riffs, Tame Impala’s newest record opts for a less linear path, incorporating an instrumental patchwork that’s more experimental and fully realized than their previous work. Frontman Kevin Parker’s simple melodies are as resonant as ever, as the album’s ruminations on being alone take the form of passive and plain-spoken observations. Tame Impala aren’t interested in being a cognitive exercise, and the spirit of “Lonerism” echoes through a blissful physicality, which even at its most languid is propelled by exuberant momentum. With “Lonerism,” Tame Impala has transcended the critical boxing in that accompanied their first album — “They’re psych revivalists!” “With Lennon-esque lead vocals!” — by creating an album with a panoramic scope that serves as the stepping stone between Tame Impala’s ‘60s forefathers and psych disciples of the future. — MAEVE MCDERMOTT

JUKEBOX THE GHOST | SAFE TRAVELS Jukebox the Ghost is yet another entry into the category of fluffy indie pop, but hey, at least they do it well. Their third album, “Safe Travels,” released on June 12, is decidedly dominated by cheery tracks laden with peppy guitar and piano with a synthy twist. Their lyrics, though a bit shallow and sappy, are undoubtedly adorable and performed with such energetic verve that it’s hard not to love each song. Some songs, like the ironically sunny “Adulthood” and the piano ballad “Devil on Our Side,” even abandon the initially optimistic subject matters of love and friendship to deal with deeper themes like aging or death. Despite the album’s insistence on keeping within the range of acoustic and synth-pop, Jukebox sometimes dabbles in sweeping orchestral sounds like in “Ghosts in Empty Houses.” —HOAI-TRAN BUI

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Ty Segall — “Twins” The Weeknd — “Trilogy” Grimes — “Visions” The xx — “Coexist” Beach House — “Bloom” Japandroids — “Celebration Rock”

10 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 SCENE theEAGLE

Sky Ferreira falls flat at DC9 SYDNEY GORE —Eagle Columnist

SYDNEY GORE / THE EAGLE

SKY HIGH — Indie pop chanteuse Sky Ferreira made waves this year with her EPs but delivered a lackluster performance at DC9.

After Sky Ferreira closed her sold-out show on Nov. 30 at DC9 with her popular track “Everything is Embarrassing,” it is only too obvious how accurate that title was for her performance. The 20-year-old downtown grunge pop goddess/model/ singer/actress didn’t seem to get sponsor Liberation Dance Party’s memo, standing stiffly on stage while her four-piece band jammed out behind her. Maybe she was nervous, stressed or simply didn’t care. Regardless, it was almost too awkward for comfort. Opening with “Lost In My Bedroom,” Ferreira seemed like she was lost in her head as she blankly stared out into the crowd through the cloud of smoke emitted from the stage, constantly covering her face with her voluminous blonde hair. Even though the cord to her microphone fell out and her background vocals played on, Ferreira’s band overpowered her voice until she switched over to acoustic tracks “Ghost” and “Sad Dream.” She didn’t quite recover

Indie flick ‘Beasts’ generates big buzz ≤ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

cinematography of this film were enough to make it memorable, but its acting performances amped up its hilariously beautiful human element. The children all speak like jaded adults, while the actual adults are beyond immature, amusingly played by Anderson regulars Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, and Jason Schwartzman, along with Tilda Swinton, Edward Norton and Bruce Willis. This film will be considered one of Anderson’s best for years to come. -YOHANA DESTA

“BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD”

“Beasts of the Southern Wild,” isn’t simply an aesthetically stunning and emotionally raw coming-of-age fantasy, but also one of the most compelling love stories of the year. The film tells the story of Hushpuppy, a 6-year-old girl (masterfully played by newcomer Quvenzhané Wallis) growing up with her father in the Bathtub, a vibrant bayou community. While technically set in the Southern Delta, the movie never establishes a firm setting, incorporating fantastical elements in which the Bathtub battles against not only cruel forces of nature and prehistoric crea-

tures, but most ruinously the influences of the outside world. The film’s cast of unknowns weaves a rich story of adversity, tragedy and redemption, as seen through the eyes of one of the year’s most resilient heroines. “Beasts” isn’t a romance in the conventional sense, but the film’s story of a young girl grappling to save her father and her beloved Bathtub community is as poignant story of love and loss as any I’ve seen on screen. -MAEVE MCDERMOTT

HONORABLE MENTIONS: ”Looper, ”Lincoln,” ”Seven Psychopaths”

THESCENE@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

from the shaky start, but the crowd enthusiastically cheered her on anyway. At one point, Ferreira sat down, an action nobody questioned until she stopped singing and said something along the lines of, “I’m sorry, I can’t hear myself, so I’m sitting near the speaker.” Despite these discrepancies, Ferreira presented herself as a versatile artist with a sound that ranged from pop to country to rock. Although her set was short, it was understandable due to the fact that she has only released two EPs, “As If!” and “Ghost.” Ferreira performed a total of nine songs, five of which were from “Ghost,” her most recent release. Ferreira’s acoustic songs really enabled the audience to see and hear the starlet for who she really is: a girl who has doubts, insecurities and dilemmas just like the rest of us. She accuses herself of being “steady or a head case.” She’s “bad on the outside, but a coward at heart.” Ferreira’s tiny and slender physique also makes her cloak of vulnerability stand out on top of the leather jacket, short skirt and biker boots that she wears

so valiantly. She may give off that “too tough to care” attitude, but anyone can see right through her as if she were a ghost. Of course, Ferreira doesn’t let fans bond with her for too long, emphasizing callous lines and profanity before angrily shouting “Don’t let me down” into the microphone. After examining every aspect of her entire performance, Ferreira really only conveys three emotions: angst, confusion or apathy. This isn’t necessarily bad, though. In fact, it’s typical considering her age. Ferreira’s music is easily relatable, but connecting with her while she sings them in person is utterly hopeless. Ferreira closed her set with her breakthrough track “Everything Is Embarrassing,” a painfully spot-on label for the show. For someone who’s been in the spotlight for the past four years of her life, she acted like she would rather go unnoticed amidst all the smoke. If anyone left DC9 unsure of how to feel, that’s probably what Ferreira intended. SGORE@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

theEAGLE SCENE DECEMBER 6, 2012 | 11

AUDIOPHILE

SUFJAN STEVENS

Looking for new music? DJs at WVAU share their thoughts on a range of recent releases.

SILVER AND GOLD Songwriter/composer delivers a six-disc Christmas compilation, which ranges from melodic to truly bizarre.

Let’s face it: this massive 59-song Christmas compilation has at least a couple of songs to offer for Sufjan fans of all perspectives. “Gloria” does Christmas like “The Avalanche,” lead by uplifting choral vocals, a banjo and swelling string compositions. “Christmas Infinity Voyage” and “Christmas Unicorn” bear the closest resemblance to Sufjan’s recent work, layering bizarre beats over auto-tuned vocals and glitchy experimental electronics to create sprawling 10+ minute Xmas pop epics. “Let It Snow” channels the bombastic yet melancholic multi-instrumental, quasi-classical pop approach of “All Delighted People.” All this clocks in over three hours, and there’s still time for a Joy Division cover halfway through the 12 minutes of “Christmas Unicorn.” “Silver and Gold” is an accurate microcosm of Sufjan’s last decade of work: inventive, uplifting, satirical and, at times, absolutely bizarre.

ROC MARCIANO RELOADED Long Island underground rapper favors old-school, versecentered sound.

Recommended If You Like: Andrew Bird, Christmas

Rather than building his songs around a catchy hook, Roc Marciano focuses more on layering laid-back but intelligent verses over trippy, turntable-heavy beats. The album strengthens its ties to mid-90s style with clips of people talking and samples from movies and TV that create a street-wise story arc throughout the album. Marciano doesn’t do a lot of acrobatics with his voice, which is essentially a low monotone throughout, with most of the sonic motion in the songs coming from heavy use of turntable scratching and reversing. The fluctuating volume and heavy use of backmasking can be a little overbearing, but overall, Marciano’s rhymes rise above the electric guitar and synth screams. RIYL: Raekwon, Nas, Danny Brown, early Outkast

By MAXWELL TANI “CLIMAX!” ON MONDAYS, 10 P.M. - MIDNIGHT

By SEAN MEEHAN “WE’RE HILARIOUS” ON SATURDAYS, 6 - 8 P.M.

COURTESY OF JOSEPH MORIARTY / STUDENT UNION BOARD

DROP THE BEAT — DJ A-Trak performed a free show in the Tavern on Dec. 1 for AU students. A-Trak became famous at the age of 15 after winning DJ competitions and has since released several albums.

EX-CULT EX-CULT

Ex-Cult goes beyond the usual threshold for punk with powerful results.

This self-titled release is more complicated than your usual brand of punk rock, as Ex-Cult members pull from their varied musical backgrounds for influences along with some from their producer, Ty Segall. While there is a hazy effect over the album as a whole, it allows for certain sounds to pop, like the melodic guitar and energetic percussion on “Knives on Both Sides” and “Young Trash.” It’s not hard to tell that every sound and effect has a purpose on this album, from the mild echo to the distortion. Running a little over a minute, the deceptively basic “Post Graduate” is a prime example of this. They don’t waste a second on bringing the track to the energy level they want and developing it with explosive guitar and vocal combinations. Their thoughtfulness goes well with how tight they are as a unit, which is what makes this release worth listening to. RIYL: Ty Segall, Black Lips, Jay Reatard By LEIGH HOPKINS

12 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 SCENE theEAGLE

Eagle Rants

Go ahead, speak your mind. We’ll probably print it.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Anyone else think Kerwin looks like a homelier Paul McCartney?

sharpening that pencil by hand‌ OY. It needs to be May now, please.

Love when you’re ready, not when you’re lonely.

That awkward moment when everyone, including you, thinks we’re such good friends when in reality I really can’t stand to be around you anymore. You think you’re so superior, that everything revolves around you, and that nothing is more important than what you have to say. Guess what? Just because you do what you do doesn’t make you any better than anyone else. Get that through your head and maybe then we’ll be back to normal.

Dear roommate I’m glad you and your boyfriend are having lots of sex and everything. But you do realize that he does have a room literally a floor down from us and no roommate? So why the hell are the two you always sexiling me!?

So. Much. Sexual. Tension. Can we just make out already girl?!

Let me rant about dry hands for a sec. Well, first they’re dry and uncomfortable. THEN you put lotion on, and you can’t even function! Doors are impossible to open, you can’t open deodorant caps, and don’t even think about

Dear handsome, tall, mysterious man that I saw at the Dav this morning at 11:15 who ordered a large coffee‌ Marry me? You have gorgeous hands. work hard, twerk hard. laugh loud, be proud. always chug, and always hug. I have burned through all of my eagle bucks in a feeble attempt to get to know the piping hot girl who works at the mud box some nights.

AN EPIC JOURNEY. AN IMPOSSIBLE DREAM. THE BIRTH OF A LEGEND.

ffff “A COMPELLING AND INSPIRING TALE.� “

�

- N o a h L e e , F I L M T H R E AT

RELENTLESS PASSION AND INSANE COURAGE‌ DANNY WAY IS A HERO FOR THE GENERATIONS.�

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- M i r i J e d e i k i n , E P Da i l y

“TRULY AN EMOTIONAL ROLLERCOASTER‌

INCREDIBLY INSPIRATIONAL.�

Holy hell you can’t sing. Make it stop. They may not be doctors, but the Wellness Center is a great resource for sex education questions and have certified health educators who are super knowledgeable! I am attracted to EVERYONE today. But seriously. All the rants about ‘you’ll find love when you aren’t looking for it’ are helping me to have a little patience‌ BUT AT THE SAME TIME WHAT IF I NEVER FIND ANYONE AND I GROW OLD ALONE AHHHH To the group of fine guys in TDR this morning for breakfast wearing suits‌ I would gladly do each and every one of you. Okay so I’ve come to accept the mediocre looks of the female student body here at AU. With that being said, I am currently looking for a girlfriend. Looks: tolerable; personality: tolerable; Organizational ability: required; Cooking ability: required. Car on campus is preferred. All interested applicants please apply through career source. Can be done for a maximum of 5 credits per semester. Thanks. I feel like there’s this unspoken bond between everyone in the library in the early hours of the morning. It’s like after something terrible happens to a community. We all know what we’re going through. Half the time I’m looking around, silently whispering, “It’s okay, man. It’s gonna be okay.â€?

- Don Simpson, SMELLS LIKE SCREEN SPIRIT

It’s like arson. You make a thing illegal; it begins to develop a mystique. I mean, how many of us can honestly say that at one time or another he hasn’t set fire to some public building? I know I have! SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH DC SHOESMUSICA BANDITO BROTHERSMUSICFILM “WAITING FOR LIGHTNING� STARRING DANNY WAY FEATURING TRAVIS PASTRANA LAIRD HAMILTON RODNEY MULLEN ATE CREATIVE ASSISTANT MAT HOFFMAN KEN BLOCKEXECUTIVEROB DYRDEK TONY HAWK COMPOSED BY NATHAN FURST SUPERVISOR RUDY CHUNG ASSOCI PRODUCER PAM “ZAM� ZAMOSCIANYK CINEMATOGRAPHER MICHAEL SVITAK DIRECTOR YOGI PROCTOR EDITOR ROMMEL MENDOZA PRODUCED BY MAX LEITMAN DARRYL FRANKLIN JACOB ROSENBERG HANA RIPPERGER-SUHLER EDITOR CAROL MARTORI PRODUCERS MICHAEL MAILIS RAY IBE JAY POLLAK SCOTT WAUGH MOUSE MCCOY WRITTEN DIRECTED BY BRET ANTHONY JOHNSTON BY JACOB ROSENBERG DANGEROUS SPORTS ACTION, SOME LANGUAGE AND THEMATIC MATERIAL INVOLVING DRUGS AND ALCOHOL.

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EX CL U SI AYS! PRCoIZntaEctGtheIVateEr forAWdetails.

Copyright Š DW Movie LLC 2012. All Rights Reserved.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7

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23rd St, NW (btwn M and N)202/419-FILM CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

WAITINGFORLIGHTNINGTHEMOVIE.COM / FACEBOOK.COM/WAITINGFORLIGHTNING AMERICAN UNIV. EAGLE

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

1/4 Pg (4�x 6�)

TUES 12/4

ACROSS 1 Mascara recipient 5 Lie in store for 10 Naval jail 14 __ rug 15 Swiss capital, to the Swiss 16 One and only 17 Hollywood 19 “My great hope __ laugh as much as I cryâ€?: Angelou 20 Impressive property 21 Dugout leader 23 Mattress make 24 Outdoor seating option 26 Airport screening org. 27 WC 29 Italian three 30 “Stop-__â€?: UGK hit 31 Classic theater name 33 Ignore socially 34 Festive centerpiece adorned with the starts 17-, 24-, 49- and 57-Across 39 Big cat¡s cry 40 Ballet bends 41 Flightless Aussie bird 42 Pickle¡s place 45 Computer application file extension 46 CBS-owned cable movie sta. 49 All the details, casually 52 Group of eight 54 Not taking sides 55 Pointed abode 56 Gets hitched 57 Venezuelan natural wonder 59 __ above the rest 60 Just right 61 Flower-loving buzzers 62 Peeps from pups 63 Pub game 64 Miss in Mex. DOWN 1 Most current news, with “theâ€?

By Gareth Bain

2 Crops up 3 Nissan compact 4 Assails 5 Blessed with skills 6 __ behind the ears 7 Yummy smell 8 Needing, with “ofâ€? 9 Sawbuck, to a Brit 10 HMS Bounty¡s illfated captain 1¡V¡s wisecracking TV mom 12 Cloak-anddagger doings 13 Former Prizm maker 18 And others, in bibliographies 22 Unhittable serve 24 Crotchety oldster 25 Stick up 28 Drinks in the a.m. 31 “I need a sweater!â€? 32 Baseball arbiter 33 Yearbook gp. 34 Five-time Olympic gold winner Nadia

SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Called to account 36 “Jeopardy!� host Trebek 37 Common dinner hour 38 Make really mad 39 Civil War soldier 42 Write quickly 43 Frightened 44 Central African country about the size of Massachusetts

46 Less fresh 47 “To be, or not to be� speaker 48 Ukrainian port 50 Thirsts (for) 51 Alleged Soviet spy Hiss 53 “Deadliest Catch� boatful 55 “__ fair in love ...� 56 Technique 58 “Dig in!�

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SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

SOLUTION TO WEDNESDA<¡S PUZZLE

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T DRINK THE BLUE MONSTER REHAB ENERGY DRINK. It literally tastes like dirt and gross tea. Never again. My bra is hurting meâ&#x20AC;Ś.can girls readjust their bras in public like how guys readjust themselves in public?

Level:

Š 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

OPINION

STAFF EDITORIAL

SG stuck on trivial arguments over constitutional rewrite

Creating timely and effective change has not been Student Government’s strong suit, and this is more apparent than ever in the debate over their new constitution. Last semester, the Senate voted to restructure how SG functions in order to encourage more student advocacy. Since Sept. 2, when Sen. Brett Atanasio proposed the idea of changing SG to AU Student Association, SG has struggled to turn this idea into reality. The AU Student Association would rearrange SG to operate less like the federal government

and become more advocacy-oriented. The legislative and judicial branches will be replaced with a Board of Representatives and an Executive Committee. A president would oversee four vice presidents with specific jobs such as advocacy and communication. The class councils would be cut and instead those representatives will work with the deans of their respective schools. Essentially, this plan was created to prevent internal conflicts from hindering meaningful dis-

tempting to bend rules and fight this battle since the beginning of the semester. Now here we are with one week left, and the student body referendum on this proposal still hasn’t taken place. Initiatives like becoming the AU Student Association are a prime example of SG’s inability to accomplish much when it comes to advocacy. SG is correct that their system should be reworked to become more conducive to representing students to the administration, but it needs to hap-

When an internal fight defines a change to promote the removal of internal fighting, something is wrong.

Gender cannot be defined DEREK SIEGEL | ETHICS WITH A SIDE OF TOAST Our society has a rigid definition of gender that separates us into the categories “man” and “woman.” This system, however, fails to acknowledge the existence and diversity of the trans community. Sometimes when pursuing social justice, we are challenged by information that may not be compatible with our experiences. In order to respect the trans community, we must accept that our knowledge of gender is incomplete. A more nuanced understanding distinguishes between sex and gender. Sex is biological, determined by our genitalia, hormones and secondary sex characteristics. We indicate sex with the words male and female. However, gender is a set of so-

cussion. SG is right to propose such an initiative; change is necessary and reformatting SG’s structure may be a solution.

cial expectations that may influence how we dress, behave and are perceived by others. Gender differs by culture, meaning that men in the United States have different gender expectations than men in Bangladesh. Gender isn’t something you can see. Having male genitalia indicates that I’m biologically male but doesn’t necessarily make me a man. I am a man because this is a gender that I feel comfortable associating with and that matches how I feel inside. Every individual can articulate their own gender. Those of us whose biological sex corresponds with our expected gender identity (female-bodied people who also identify as

But if the ultimate goal is to make SG less about internal conflict and more about advocacy, the current situation is embarrassing, to say the least. SG has been atwomen, for example) are called cisgender. Cisgender people rarely reflect on our gender as an internal feeling because society tells us that we are ‘normal.’ Like straight people don’t need to come out as heterosexual, cisgender people don’t need to come out as men or women. These identities are assumed. The fact that I am male biologically and identify as so doesn’t make me normal, only cisgender. An individual can be biologically male but feel like a woman inside. They may prefer to identify themselves as transgender, trans, a transwoman or simply as a woman. All trans people are different. Trans people may want to physically alter their bodies through surgery or hormone therapy, or they may have little interest in this. Either way, it’s considered inappropriate to ask a trans person whether they’ve had “the” surgery. Keep in mind that trans people also have sex-

ual orientations. We are the only people capable of fully articulating our gender identities. Some trans people, therefore, may desire to change their name and go by different gender pronouns in order to better reflect their identities. When we don’t respect their desired name or pronouns, we are sending the message that their trans identity isn’t authentic. Learning about trans identities can be overwhelming because it deconstructs much of what we know about gender. Even though sorting through these terms and concepts may be difficult for cisgender people, it isn’t a trans person’s responsibility to hide their gender or qualify their identities to us. Rather, we must learn to adapt our own understandings of gender in order to respect all the people we may encounter. Derek Siegel is a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences. EDPAGE@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

pen at the right time and with the right mindset. When an internal fight defines a change to promote the removal of internal fighting, something is wrong. If this new governing system comes out of arguments, nothing is going to change. SG cannot seem to achieve a consensus, and the drama of trying to change their structure will undoubtedly pour into whatever new structure they choose. Either way, until SG can get past petty arguments, no amount of reorganization is going to create positive change.≠ E EDPAGE@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

OP-ED

CUFI on protest This year, Student Activities recognized Christians United for Israel (CUFI) at AU as the newest pro-Israel organization on campus. CUFI is the largest proIsrael organization in the United States, with over a million members nationally and chapters on over 100 college campuses. CUFI at AU seeks to educate the student body about Israel and issues pertaining to citizens of people. The mission of CUFI is to provide a campus forum through which its members and every AU student can speak and act with one voice in support of the state of Israel. Last week, CUFI hosted Sgt. Benjamin Anthony on campus, a reservist in

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 ≥

14 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 OPINION theEAGLE

Respectful dialogue is necessary ≤ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) who has lent his life in support of the state of Israel and its citizens. During the program, approximately 50 students barraged Sgt. Anthony. They were escorted by University Public Safety. However, they harassed students as they left the program. While CUFI understands that not all individuals on campus hold a unified position on all issues, CUFI remains committed to the values of civility, dialogue and respect, values that are ingrained in our campus community. Sgt. Anthony came to our campus as a guest of our organization, our university and our country. CUFI was able to bring Sgt. Anthony all the way from Israel to deliver firsthand testimony, and the actions of a select few of our community have reflected on the morality of our entire student body, AU and college students across the United States. Despite the hostility demonstrated by other student organizations, CUFI remains com-

mitted to maintaining a peaceful campus community in which all views can be represented. This semester alone, CUFI has held multiple events and plans to hold more. On Dec. 4, CUFI joined AU Students for Israel to bring Zion Uness, a Jewish Ethiopian refugee to campus. In addition, on Dec. 4, CUFI co-sponsored a candlelight vigil with J Street, Jewish Voice for Peace and Students for Justice in Palestine for those who died in the recent Gaza escalation. We hope that this program is just one of many that will bring about a peaceful dialogue on campus and demonstrates who we are as a university community. CUFI is committed to standing with Israel and supporting Israel’s right to exist. We hope that CUFI can encourage other students at AU to support Israel and not be afraid to speak up. Amy Farina is a senior in the School of Public Affairs and president of CUFI at AU.

theEAGLE

The illusion of food prices SAM MENDELSON | SPORK We assume that if food is expensive, it will be better-tasting and higher-quality food. But in reality, this is artifice of the mind. The American food system is unique in its desire and ability to provide taste, quality, diversity and affordability. However, that distinctive relationship is skewed by another U.S. phenomenon: the obsession with higher prices and higher quality. Serendipity 3 in Georgetown offers more than frozen hot chocolate, legions of tourists and cutesy décor. The hot fudge sundae with Malagasy and Tahitian vanilla ice cream, chocolate sauce made of white cocoa beans, chunks of Chuao, Venezuelan chocolate, Parisian candied fruits, truffles and marzipan cherries at Serendipity 3 create perhaps the greatest dessert experience in the world. The only catch is the $1,000 price tag. It is hard to think about the price of the sundae with words like Malagasy, Tahitian, marzipan and Chuao, Venezuelan chocolate. A similar technique is used to describe the tagliatelle

American University’s student voice since 1925

EDITORIAL STAFF

noodles and white truffles of $95 mac ‘n’ cheese. Starbucks recently announced the introduction of the Costa Rica Finca Palmilera. A grande cup of the most exotic, rare, exclusive, reserved coffee Starbucks offers is an exorbitant $7. The $7 coffee pales in comparison to Kopi Luwak, coffee made from coffee berries from Sumatra. This coffee is almost $20 per ounce as compared to $5 per ounce of the Starbucks coffee. The taste: described as “Folgers. Stale. Lifeless. Petrified dinosaur dropping steeped in bathtub water” by The Washington Post’s food writer Tim Carman. A wide range of research has shown that people can rarely distinguish the difference between an expensive food and cheap food. The human brain registers greater levels of pleasure from wine that was labeled as more expensive when compared to the same wine at a cheaper price. Jimmy Kimmel recreated a similar test with Starbucks coffee where two cups of the same cheap pot of coffee were put into

Starbucks cups, and participants were told that one was the exclusive Costa Rica Finca Palmilera. Participant after participant ridiculously noted the “smoothness” and “boldness” of one cup of coffee over the other. Pricey food is not a new phenomenon. Expensive wine auctions, opulent 30-course dinners and high-priced bluefin tuna have all been widespread for much of the last century. This food is put on a pedestal of luxury that is beyond the typical fine dining experience. Price bypasses the tongue and instead rewires the human brain. On the flipside, Chef David Chang of Momufuku in New York has made delicious gnocchi by using instant ramen. Highpriced foods are often an abstract idea rather than a tangible reality of better taste. The $7 Starbucks coffee is just as much of an illusion as the $95 mac ‘n’ cheese and the $1,000 sundae. Sam Mendelson is a sophomore in the School of International Service.

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SPORTS

Terao, Herrin headline wrestling in Las Vegas

After earning a 10-2 major decision over Herrin, Hanke ended up making it all the way to the David Terao headlined the AU finals before picking up his first wrestling team’s performance at loss of the season against Misthe 31st annual Cliff Keen Las souri’s Dominique Bradley. Vegas Invitational Dec. 1. Aside from Terao and Her“Our guys wrestled well, and rin, John Boyle, at 141 pounds, David performed to our expecta- was another bright spot for the tions with his fifthEagles. Boyle place finish,” AU earned a 10-2 wrestling head major decision coach Teague Our guys wrestled over Arizona Moore told AU well, and David State’s MatAthletics. “This performed to our thew Kraus in result proves he expectations with his the first round, can compete with being fifth-place finish.” before the best in the sent to the concountry.” solation round Terao has after losing been one of AU’s to Harvard’s top grapplers Steve Keith, throughout the early portion of 5-0. 2012 and earned fifth place at Boyle was able to notch a sud125 pounds over the weekend. den victory over No. 12 Camryn The redshirt freshman’s break- Jackson of Michigan in the conthrough victory came when he solation round. Earlier this seaupset Michigan’s Sean Boyle, son, Jackson defeated No. 3 Miwho entered the competition chael Mangrum of Oregon State. ranked 13th in the country. As a team, AU finished tied for For his efforts in Las Vegas, 19th in the 32-team field after reTerao was named the AU Stu- cording 29.5 points. dent-Athlete of the Week. Terao’s “Overall, we had a good experecord sits at 12-5, after he fin- rience,” Moore said. “Our wresished second at the Brockport/ tlers faced a number of nationally Oklahoma Invitational Nov. 10 ranked opponents, and we know and fourth at the Keystone Clas- what we need to improve upon sic Nov. 18. for our first dual meet on Sunday AU’s Blake Herrin began his and the national championships run in the second round and in March.” reached the quarterfinals in the Ohio State (124.5 points) heavyweight division after de- edged out Missouri (123.5) for feating Northern Iowa’s Cody the team championship to win Krumweide, 6-3. the invitational for the second Herrin then squared off with consecutive year. Oregon State’s Chad Hanke and The Eagles will host No. 21 lost against the No. 6-ranked Maryland in the Bender Takeheavyweight in the nation. Her- down at 7 p.m. The Terrapins rin lost to California Baptist’s defeated the Eagles, 23-14, last Charles Merrill in his next and season. final match of the event. TTOMEA@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM By TYLER TOMEA

EAGLE STAFF WRITER

-AU wrestling head coach Teague Moore

EMMA KNIGHT / THE EAGLE

Alexis Dobbs will lead an AU team looking to avenge last year’s loss to George Washington University.

Eagles set for GW showdown at Bender By MICHAEL GARDNER EAGLE STAFF WRITER

The AU women’s basketball team is getting set to host crosstown rival George Washington in the “Phil Bender Day” game Dec. 8 at 2 p.m. The Eagles have bounced back after starting the season 0-3 and will look to continue their winning ways against George Washington . “We understand who we want to get shots when and where,” AU head coach Matt Corkery said. “But then it’s really a matter of the defense and what the defense gives us. What we’re doing on offense is improving and we’re getting better at figuring out what we’re supposed to do.” The Eagles closed November out in a big way, scoring a seasonhigh 85 points in a 28-point rout of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The game saw AU shoot a season-best 54.2 percent from the field and had 10 different players score. “We were pretty consistent

offensively the whole game, as well, being able to get field goals and not going for too many long drives without getting scoring opportunities, so that was good to see,” Corkery said. One player getting the scoring opportunities for the Eagles is Jen Dumiak, who has led the team in scoring in every game except the loss against No. 9 Maryland. “I think this year we have really good team chemistry,” Dumiak said. “Everyone supports each other, nobody’s selfish at all. It really helps when you have people on the bench supporting you and they’re bringing the energy, which picks you up on the court and it just helps everyone play better.” Those are pretty humble words for a 5-foot-10 guard who averages 17.5 points per game and leads the team in rebounds as well with 3.7 per contest. Dumiak has been just the tip of the iceberg for a much-improved Eagles offense, with guards Alexis Dobbs and Geleisa George aver-

aging 11 and 8.7 points, respectively. For AU, the below-.500 record is misleading for a team determined to win its last home game before January. “It’s exciting to have the opportunity to play at home,” Corkery said. “We’ve been on the road for [five games] so you could feel the energy of the players really looking forward to getting the chance to be at home. I think that [plays] a big part.” George Washington is coming off a 70-54 loss to Georgetown in which the Colonials shot only 36 percent from the field. This will be the team’s first game in a week, compared to the Eagles, who faced Coppin State Dec. 5 at Bender Arena. GW is led by Tara Booker, who scored a game-high 20 points with six 3-pointers in the loss to Georgetown. The Colonials lead the all-time series with AU 12-9 and defeated the Eagles last year, 60-49. SPORTS@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

16 | DECEMBER 6, 2012 SPORTS theEAGLE

SCHEDULE

PATRIOT LEAGUE STANDINGS

DEC. 6

DEC. 7

DEC. 9

Women’s track and field @ Navy Invitational at 4 p.m.

No games scheduled

Men’s basketball vs. Columbia at 2 p.m. Wrestling vs. No. 21 Maryland at 7 p.m.

Men’s basketball @ Maryland, Baltimore County at 7 p.m.

DEC. 8 Women’s basketball vs. George Washington at 2 p.m.

DEC. 10, 11, 12 No games scheduled

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Bucknell 8-1, 0-0 PL Lehigh 7-2, 0-0 PL Army 4-3, 0-0 PL Holy Cross 4-4, 0-0 PL Navy 4-5, 0-0 PL ≥ American 3-5, 0-0 PL Colgate 3-5, 0-0 PL Lafayette 3-7, 0-0 PL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Army 8-1, 0-0 PL Bucknell 5-3, 0-0 PL Navy 6-4, 0-0 PL Holy Cross 4-3, 0-0 PL Lafayette 3-5, 0-0 PL Colgate 3-5, 0-0 PL ≥ American 2-4, 0-0 PL Lehigh 2-5, 0-0 PL

Men’s basketball splits pair of games By JOSH PAUNIL EAGLE STAFF WRITER

Despite leading for nearly 30 minutes straight spanning the first and second halves, the AU men’s basketball team fell to Howard, 5550, at Burr Gymnasium Dec. 4. “We did not execute, and Howard took advantage of those opportunities,” AU head coach Jeff Jones told AU Athletics. Daniel Munoz and Stephen Lumpkins paced the Eagles in the narrow loss with 11 and 10 points, respectively. AU (3-5) outshot Howard from both the floor and 3-point line, but was outrebounded 37-23 and gave up 15 secondchance points. “We got beat on the boards tonight and we must do a better job rebounding the basketball as well as making open shots when they present themselves,” Jones said. Howard held Lumpkins to six points below his season average as they often threw double-, triple-

and even quadruple-teams at him. Only AU’s Tony Wroblicky was able to shoot above 50 percent from the field, finishing with eight points on the night. AU was unable to stop – or even slow down – the Bison during the game’s most critical moments. Howard’s Michael Phillips scored 11 straight points in less than six minutes, turning AU’s 4140 lead with 7:39 remaining into a 49-48 Howard edge with 1:59 left. It was the first Bison lead since they held a 14-12 advantage 8:52 into the game. Howard (2-7) never relinquished its late lead, knocking down six straight free throws in the last minute to secure the win.

AU EARNS WEEKEND WIN

Over the weekend, the Eagles recorded their largest margin of victory of the season when they defeated St. Francis (Pa.) 61-51 Dec. 1 at Bender Arena. Lumpkins finished with game-

Search committee formed for new athletic director By ERIC SALTZMAN EAGLE STAFF WRITER

AU has announced the formation of a search committee to look for a new athletic director following the departure of Keith Gill. President Neil Kerwin announced the members of the committee in his campus-wide email Dec. 4. Vice President of Campus Life Gail Hanson will chair the search committee. Associate Director

of Athletics and Senior Woman Administrator Athena Argyropoulos, field hockey head coach Steve Jennings, and current women’s lacrosse player Emily Maher will represent the athletic department. Other groups with representation on the nine-member search committee include the AU Alumni Association, along with several University academic figures and administrators. “You want to look to have

highs of 22 points and seven rebounds, notching 18 points in the first half alone. He also chipped in three assists and three blocks. “Thank goodness in the first half for Lumpkins,” Jones said. “Lump carried us [and] not just on the offensive side.” Munoz made the defensive play of the game when he stole the ball with St. Francis (0-6) in transition and about to convert an easy bucket. The steal, with 2:35 left in the game, led to a layup on the other end by Wroblicky, who posted 10 points, five rebounds, three assists and two blocks in 21 minutes. “It was definitely a huge play because it would’ve been a big swing,” Lumpkins said. AU hopes to bounce back from the Howard loss when it plays at Maryland, Baltimore County Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. The Eagles return to Bender Dec. 9 to face Columbia in their last home game of the semester. SPORTS@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM

people with experience in athletics, but you also want to see what different insights people have to bring to the table,” AU Chief of Staff David Taylor said in a phone interview. “You want to have a mix of people.” Taylor said that major search operations will begin when school resumes in January. He said he hopes that an athletic director will be announced by the end of the spring semester. Taylor will operate the day-today operations of the athletic program while the search is underway. He served in a similar role in 2006-07 before AU hired Gill.

RACHEL DEVOR / THE EAGLE

Tony Wroblicky and the Eagles will next face UMBC Dec. 6. The committee will partner with the search firm Parker Executive Search to find potential candidates. AU used the same firm when hiring Gill in 2007. Kerwin and the President’s office will have the final say in the selection, ultimately choosing among a short list of candidates selected by the committee. The next athletic director needs to be someone who continues to build upon the athletic and academic success seen under Gill, according to Taylor. “Now that we have the athletic program on a whole new level, you want to see where you can

go next,” Taylor said. Under Gill, AU captured 11 Patriot League team championships. In 2011-12, 121 studentathletes were named to the Dean’s List. A key for the new athletic director will be flexibility and being able to look at how AU can continue to compete and keep up with the national collegiate landscape, according to Taylor. He added that the new athletic director will be asked to continue current success, but also examine new ways to expand the program. ESALTZMAN@THEEAGLEONLINE.COM


December 6, 2012