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City of St. Francis Pioneer Days

The Courier

www.the-courier.org

Making the most of summer reading Chris Carrigan, Janet Swenson, Deb Tonn Reading Specialists, East Bethel Community School

a division of Independent School District 15 Community Education & Services | St. Francis, Minnesota

June 2012 | Volume 19, Issue 11

PAGE 16

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Summer vacation is here and parents truly want their children to enjoy summer and have a break from the rigors of school. The question comes up, “Should I make my child read during the summer?” There are many fun ideas for the warm weather that children will be eager to try. This brings to mind a sign posted on the wall at a dentist’s office. It read, “You only have to brush the teeth that you want to keep.” The message conveyed that meeting a long-term goal of having healthy teeth was going to take effort on a regular basis. This is similar to reading. We want our children to be able to read well in order to be successful in school and in life. Can we afford to let our children stop reading for the summer? Many children have spent precious time during the school year developing good reading habits. Let’s keep these valuable habits in place and continue growth in their reading skills. If children stop reading over the summer, their skills may not be as sharp and they possibly will regress. What kind of things can we do during the summer that put a fun spin on reading?

During the summer, there may be more time to visit the library, which offers a variety of reading SUMMER READING programs. Summer is also a great time to start reading a series. At the Anoka County Library, preschoolers through grade five students can join “Bookawocky,” reading at least five hours during the summer to earn a free pass to Bunker Beach Water Park. Look for a bright postcard coming in June, July and August from Independent School District 15. Kindergarten through grade 5 students can complete one or all of the fun reading/ writing activities. Upon returning a completed postcard at open house in August, students can choose one free book! Keep track of reading minutes on the summer reading log to be turned in to the classroom teacher in September. Visit www.stfrancis.k12.mn.us for more resources. Here are a few more ideas to keep reading alive (and fun) over the summer: } Make reading a family adventure. The whole family could enjoy a few books together. } Neighborhood children could read and act out a favorite story. } Children might like several shorter types of reading materials available such as magazines or newspapers. } Stories could be read on iPads or computers. Please help your child find ways to keep reading alive over the summer and continue to develop reading habits that will last a lifetime.

Lunch line to get a healthy makeover Wendy Klobe Nutrition services program supervisor

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s part of the federal mandates in the USDA Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, the menus at St. Francis High School and other Independent School District 15 schools will get a makeover this coming fall. Every student will have access to the new fresh lettuce greens and veggie bar with each meal purchased. The veggie bar will feature lettuce salad greens, reduced calorie ranch dressing, various fresh vegetables for toppings, such as carrots, celery, broccoli, red peppers, tomatoes and seasonable vegetable items when available. The changes to the lunch line are due to the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act which mandates placing an emphasis on eating fruits and vegetables. The slogan, “Make half your plate fruit and vegetables,” is what the district is in line to follow. ISD 15 Nutrition Services staff are required to make sure students take ½-cup fruit or ½-cup vegetable. For the 2012-13 school year, many choices will be offered each day. The USDA is de-emphasizing breads and other starches (extra bread and sugary desserts are restricted) and proteins are limited to 2-ounce portions as well (protein can only be offered in the entrée next year). Lowfat milk (including chocolate milk) continues to be the beverage served with the meal. The USDA collected feedback regarding school nutrition programs in developing these healthy changes. What does this mean to the hamburger line at the high school? More variety and more choices. Schools in Action..........................................2 Hamburgers had been offered every School Board Highlights.........................11 day. With the changes coming for Community Education............................13 next school year, other choices will be Pioneer Days Events.................................16 offered so that federal mandates can be Community & Business...........................24 met. New to the high school menu will Sports & Outdoors....................................33 be a sub sandwich line where students Life..................................................................37 can place their own veggie toppings on their sandwiches. Classified.......................................................40

June What’s Inside

Suzie Larson’s 2nd grade class from Cedar Creek Community School released butterflies they had observed from the larvae stage through their full life cycle. Students practiced their Minnesota State Standard in science, working as individual scientists and in a group. They worked on emphasizing evidence, open communication and skepticism they might have had when they watched the butterflies develop through their cycle of life. Sandra Benson, CCCS Community Relations Coordinator


The Courier - June 2012