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Service Allows Students To Buy Notes Online

Student Raising Funds For Specialized Vehicle

Tron Is A Visual Trip With Well-Orchestrated Sound

Sharks Basketball On A Mid-season Upswing

Pint-Sized Columnist Ponders On Ordeals

New website lets students make some extra cash by selling their notes from class online through www.FlashNotes.com.

Student afflicted with muscular distrophy is seeking funds to purchase a van that will then be heavily modified for his use.

With Daft Punk in charge of the soundtrack, Tron offers viewers a cinematic thrill ride chock-full of trance-inducing visuals.

Shark basketball team sinking teeth into opponents with a balanced attack. Team has won 11 games by at least 12 points.

The highs and lows of being short in a culture that seems perpetually amazed at someone of small stature.

TURN TO NEWS, PAGE 5

TURN TO NEWS, PAGE 7

TURN TO A&E, PAGE 11

TURN TO SPORTS, PAGE 12

TURN TO FORUM, PAGE 15

"I have a dream" 1929-1968

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

WOLFSON CAMPUS PANHANDLING

Kicked To The Curb New legislation pushes the boundary of a no-panhandling zone north and west of its original coverage area, which now includes Wolfson Campus. TURN TO HOMELESS, PAGE 5

AKEEM BRUNSON / THE REPORTER

ADMINISTRATION CHANGES

COLLEGE-WIDE SMOKING BAN

New Deans

Breathe Easy

The Wolfson and Kendall campuses both have new deans of students, each with a brilliant professional background.

College officials are considering banning smoking on all eight of Miami Dade College's campuses.

TURN TO NEWS, PAGE 4

By Monique O. Madan monique.madan001@mymdc.net

MDC SOFTBALL

Softball Ladies

Miami Dade College is considering becoming a smoke-free campus. The decision to possibly ban smoking will be made by the Support Staff Council, the Faculty Union and the academic, student and administrative deans at all eight MDC campuses.

The Lady Sharks gear up to defend their 2010 NJCAA Softball title. TURN TO SPORTS, PAGE 13

TURN TO SMOKING, PAGE 9

GREGORY CASTILLO/ THE REPORTER

INDEX: PLEASE RECYCLE

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A&E

Got News? Let Us Know. Contact Us:

mdc.thereporter@gmail.com

(305) 237-1253

10-11

SPORTS

12,13

FORUM

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THE REPORTER IS THE FREE BIWEEKLY STUDENT NEWSPAPER AT MIAMI DADE COLLEGE. ALL CONTENT IS PRODUCED BY MDC STUDENTS. THE REPORTER IS A PUBLIC FORUM FOR EXPRESSION.

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TV Veteran To Speak At Wolfson Campus Michael Putney, senior political reporter for WPLG Channel 10, will share his experiences at Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. Second Ave., Room 7128 on Jan. 24 at 10 a.m. as part of the Miami Dade College Journalism Speaker Series. Putney is the host of “This Week in South Florida With Michael Putney.” He has worked as a journalist for more than 40 years, reporting on a variety of stories with an emphasis on government and politics. Other journalists that will be featured as part of the Speaker Series later this year include: Pulitzer Prize-winning Miami Herald cartoonist Jim Morin, USA Today reporter Alan Gomez and Miami Herald breaking news editor Pat Andrews. The program includes a presentation by the journalists and a 15-minute question and answer session. All programs are free and open to the public. —Krystal Acevedo

COURTESY OF WLPG CHANNEL 10

Speaker Series: Michael Putney, senior political reporter for WPLG Channel 10, will speak at Wolfson Campus on Jan. 24. For more information, contact Manolo Barco, adviser to The Reporter. T (305) 237-3477 B mbarco@mdc.edu

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Wolfson Campus Professor Publishes Two New Books

West Campus Exhibits Local Artist's New Works

The Student Life Department at InterAmerican Campus, 627 SW 27th Ave. will be hosting Club Rush Jan. 24 in the flag courtyard for all students interested in joining a student organization. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. where students have refreshments and have the opportunity to make custom 4” x 18” aluminum street signs. Some of the groups present at the Club Rush will be: Alpha Mu Gamma National Foreign Language Honor Society, Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society in education, Psi Beta Honor Society in psychology and The Council for Exceptional Children. “Participation in student organizations enhances the personal and educational development of our students,” said Tony Delgado, director of student life at the IAC.

Wolfson Campus history professor and historian, Paul S. George, has recently published two new books. Mt. Sinai, 60 Years of Excellence and Innovation is about the founding and development of Mt. Sinai Medical Center. It focuses on the philosophy of the hospital, and how GEORGE they helped develop Miami Beach, among other accomplishments. Roddey Burdine, His Family and Their Name Sake Store is a book about the history of the Burdines family and their beginnings in Mississippi, and the development of the Burdines department store. “I hope to get people to gain an understanding of retail, growth of a store and the founding of a department store,” George said. George has been a professor at Miami Dade College for 20 years.

Miami Dade College West Campus, 3800 N.W. 115th Ave., hosted the opening of local artist Charles Ber n stei n’s latest col lec t ion, Charles Bernstein: Then and Now, on Jan. 14. Aside from being featured in the July 2010 issue of Poets and Artists O&S, Bernstein has exhibited his work at the Barbra Gillman Gallery and the Dorsch Gallery. Bernstein’s latest collection is a mixture of abstract and concrete pieces with nature as the usual subject matter. “We’re thrilled to have Charles Bernstein’s dynamic, beautiful work in the West Gallery,” said Steve Kronen, reference librarian at West Campus. “Charles, actually, is one of many artists who have displayed their work here over the last few years.”

—Rafael Tur

For more information, contact Tony Delgado T (305) 237-6154

Kristen Tabone Woodward, a well-known artist, printmaker and faculty member of Albright College’s art department, hosted the the official opening of her Unclear Intentions exhibit at Miami Dade College’s InterAmerican Campus on Jan. 13. Her artwork is inspired by biblical treatments of gender. Woodward’s art work is fash-

GREGORY CASTILLO / THE REPORTER

AIA Honors Outstanding Miami Dade College Student The American Institute of Architects Miami chapter honored David Monnar as one of its student of the year recipients on Nov. 20 at the Gusman Center for the Performing Arts at Downtown, Miami. The AIA Student of the Year Award is given to students who are well-rounded with exceptional academics and show proficient architectural talent. Monnar, 22, is an architecture major at The Honors College at Kendall Campus. He came from Cuba two years ago. Monnar is applying to such prestigious institutions such as the Southern California Institute of Architecture, Cornell University and the Illinois Institute of Architecture. —Akeem Brunson

Neurosurgeon To Recieve Award For Work In Haiti The Homestead Campus will be hosting Heroes Day on Feb. 4 at 11 a.m. in Room F222. T he e vent w i l l feat ure Dr. Bar t h A. Green, a neurological surgeon who specializes in back injuries, cancer and spina l f usion. He GREEN is teaming up with Jackson Memorial Hospital to gather lead surgeons to go to Haiti and provide free ser-

vices and necessary surgeries for Haitians who were affected by the earthquake that took place last year. Dr. Green will share his experiences in Haiti as well as tell stories, show pictures and videos of all the progress they’ve done in helping Haitians in need. He will be presented with an award in recognition of his efforts to help the people injured in Haiti.

—Roudy Mauricin

ioned f rom homemade paper and deals with feminine-related themes such as reproduction, seduction and metamorphosis. Her encaustic and paper target oil paintings will be displayed at the InterAmerican Campus, 627 S.W. 27th Ave, Room 3113 until Jan. 25. —J.C. Urbina For more information, contact Glory Winters T (305) 237-6186 or John Adkins T (305) 237-2395

Meek Center Library Receives Grant

Free Massage Therapy At Medical Center Campus

The Carrie P. Meek Entrepreneurial Education Center has been selected to receive a Great Stories Club grant from the American Library Association. The Great Stories Club is a prog ra m desig ned to encou rage younger generations to read, discuss and relate to literature. The program is possible with support from the Young Adult Library Services Association, and financial funding provided by Oprah’s Angel Network. As part of the grant, the center will receive 11 copies of each of the following books: Hate List by Jennifer Brown; Dope Sick, by Walter Dean Myers and The Brothers Torres by Coert Voorhees. The library was also awarded a hundred dollar cash grant to support the program. The books are expected to be available at the library by the end of January.

The Medical Center Campus’ Massage Therapy Program is offering 50-minute relaxation massages as a part of their clinical practicum course during both spring and summer semesters. Each student in the program is required to massage a minimum of 20 clients a semester. There is no charge for the services, but the students do accept donations toward the Massage T herapy St udent A ssoc iat ion Fund. Funds that are collected go toward educational tools for the students. A portion is donated to a charitable organization. —Kirsten Rincon To request an appointment for a massage, contact: Donna Fishkin T (305) 237-4293 B dfishkin@mdc.edu

—Laura Vargas

Got News?

—Roudy Mauricin

For more information, contact Nicole Bryant T (305) 237-5223

THE REPORTER

InterAmerican Campus To Host Club Rush Event

Exhibit Deals With Biblical Treatments of Gender

Hard At Work: David Monnar receives Student of the year Award from the American Institute of Architects Miami chapter.

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JAN. 17, 2011

If you have a news tip, contact us and let us know. Please include your name and contact information.

Contact Us: mdc.thereporter@gmail.com (305) 237-1253

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

—Mark Overton The exhibit is scheduled to run through January. For more information, contact Steve Kronen T (305) 237-8905

Broward-Downtown Miami Bus Route Altered Miami Dade College students com mut i ng f rom t he G olden Glades Park and Ride terminal will now have a longer trip to Wolfson Campus. Effective Jan. 10 the 95 Express transit from C.B. Smith Park and Ride to Miami Downtown Terminal will discontinue its stops due to commuters request for a more direct route to Downtown Miami. The 95 Express final stop before going to Downtown Miami will be at the Hollywood Tri-Rail station. Students who commute with the 95 Express Bus from Golden Glades will have to take the longer routes on the 277 and 77 buses. A not her option for students traveling to Downtown is the use of Tri-Rail and transferring to the Metro Rail route ending at Government Center. According to information on the Broward County Transit website, the routes adjustments were made “to improve passenger experience with low ridership on reverse trips and to introduce an additional 95 Express Miramar route with service to major employers in the Miami Civic Center area.” —Akeem Brunson

Rodeo To Be Held In Homestead Campus The Student Life Department at Homestead Campus will host its third annual rodeo show on Jan. 19 in the café courtyard from 12 2 p.m. This year’s event will feature a wide-array of activities such as line dancing, mechanical bull rides, various prize giveaways and an authentic barbecue. The event is free and open to the public. —Mark Overton For more information, contact Homestead Campus Student Life T (305) 237-5065

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THE REPORTER

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JAN. 17, 2011

BRIEFING

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(305) 237-1254

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monica.suarez006@mymdc.net

1 MARK PULASKI / THE REPORTER

2 ANDREA ORELLANA / THE REPORTER

PHOTOBRIEFS

Around The College

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'Haiti, We Will Rise Again:" Cleeford Thomas leads a group of members of the Haitian Boukan Club on a march in honor of those who died in the earthquake which devastated Haiti on Jan. 12, 2010. The walk was part of “Haiti Remembrance Day,” which was held by the club on the anniversary of the tragedy.

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Soulful: Wolfson Campus Student Gaslaine Platon performs during “Haiti Remembrance Day,” an event held by Wolfson Campus' Haitian Boukan Club exactly one year after the earthquake that destroyed much of Haiti's infrastructure on Jan. 12, 2010.

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Low Visibility: A heavy fog covered the parking lot in front of building M at Miami Dade’s Kendall Campus. Students driving to school suffered delays while driving to their respective campuses. A dense fog advisory was in affect for South Florida until shortly after 10 a.m.

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Building Up: Wolfson Campus’ new Student Support Center is currently under construction. The six-floor building is expected to open in 2013, at a cost of $25 million.

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Book Rush: Frustrated students wait in a long line at the North Campus Bookstore, as they bought essential material for the new semesters.

GREGORY CASTILLO / THE REPORTER

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MARK PULASKI / THE REPORTER

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

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MARK PULASKI / THE REPORTER

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THE REPORTER

KENDALL CAMPUS

WOLFSON CAMPUS

A Wise Addition To Kendall Campus

New Dean Flies East To Wolfson InterAmerican's Vanessa BirdArizmendi will be Wolfson's new dean of students as of Feb.1.

Veronica Owles joins the Kendall Campus family as dean of students, starting Jan. 18. She previously worked at FIU. By Anna Carabeo anna.carabeo001@mymdc.net Veronica Owles has been named the new dean of students at Kendall Campus. Owles, who served as the associate and assistant director for campus life and orientation at Florida International University for the last 10 years, said her focus will remain the same at MDC: the students. “I am very excited about [Owles] joining us,” said Kendall Campus President Lourdes Oroza. “She brings fresh ideas and has a strong background in student affairs.” Owles will be taking over for Sol Gonzalez, who served as interim dean of students for the last year and a half. Gonzalez will return to her previous position as director of the New Student Center at Kendall Campus. “I am happy to return to my previous position,” Gonzalez said. “I find it very rewarding to serve the students and the college and I feel that as long as I provide for the students, I will return to the New Student Center gladly.” Owles holds a doctorate degree in higher education administration from FIU; a master’s degree in higher education counseling and development from George Mason University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Longwood University, both in Virginia.

She also teaches a gay and lesbian across society class at FIU’s Biscayne Bay Campus. She has been teaching the course since the spring semester of 2008. Owles, said she feels the transition to MDC will be a smooth one. “The Kendall Campus has a similar student population to FIU’s,” Owles said.

COURTESY OF VERONICA OWLES

From FIU to MDC: Kendall Campus welcomes Veronica Owles as their new dean of students.

By Alexandra de Armas alexandra.dearmas001@mymdc.net Vanessa Bird-Arizmendi has been tabbed as the new dean of students at Wolfson Campus. Bird-Arizmendi, who has served as the chairperson of the teacher education program at InterAmerican Campus for the past four years, will assume her new role on Feb. 1. “I am thrilled that the college has given me this opportunity to continue growing,” Bird-Arizmendi said. “I am looking forward to improving a very comprehensive program and serve the students from a holistic perspective. I plan to assist them in education and personal goals.” Bird-Arizmendi replaces Herbert Robinson, who has been at Miami Dade College since 1989. Robinson has served as dean of students at Wolfson Campus since 2003; prior to that, he was the dean of students at Kendall Campus. “I have mixed emotions about leaving,” Robinson said. “I enjoyed doing what I was doing but I’m also tired. I’ve been in higher education for 43 years in different universities.” Among the responsibilities of the dean of students: The recruitment of high school students, the advisement department, testing, financial aid, student life and to support students outside of classroom, according to Wolfson Campus President

Mercedes Quiroga. “I plan to bring experience, excellent communication skills, a lot of enthusiasm and an excellent work ethic to Wolfson Campus,” BirdArizmendi said. Bird-Arizmendi earned a law degree from Inter American University of Puerto Rico’s School of Law; a doctorate in administration, supervision and curriculum of physical education from Florida State University; a Master of Science in education administration and supervi-

sion from University of Bridgeport and a Bachelor of Arts in secondary education in physical education from University of Puerto Rico. As chair of the teacher education program, a college-wide position within the school of education, she oversaw a program that trains and prepares professors to teach upper and lower division courses. Our loss [at InterAmerican Campus] is their gain at Wolfson,” said Oneyda Paneque, an associate professor at the school of education.

AKEEM BRUNSON / THE REPORTER

InterAmerican's Loss, Wolfson's Gain: Wolfson Campus starts off new year with new dean of students, Vanessa Bird-Arizmendi.

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VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

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(305) 237-1255

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monique.madan001@mymdc.net

WOLFSON CAMPUS PANHANDLERS

Panhandling Ordinance Cleans The Streets For Wolfson Campus Wolfson Campus is now protected under City of Miami's nopanhandling zone, which was expanded in November. FROM HOMELESS, FRONT

By Julie McConnell julie.mcconnell001@mymdc.net The City of Miami has extended a no-panhandling zone to prohibit aggressive panhandlers from Wolfson Campus and surrounding city attractions. On Nov. 24, Miami's City Commission passed an ordinance to widen a no-panhandling zone that covers streets north and west of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of MiamiDade County, American Airlines Arena, Bicentennial Park and Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Campus. The expansion was unanimously approved among city commissioners and signed into law by City of Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado. “The city has an aggressive panhandling ordinance, but in downtown, we have a particularly difficult problem with panhandlers because of all the attractions that we have—the arena, the Adrienne Arsht Center—and so it's a particularly [large] area where people come to panhandle," said Miami Downtown Development Authority Executive Director Alyce Robertson. The original ordinance was passed in 2008 to include streets in Downtown Miami and surrounding areas to prohibit aggressive panhandling. "I led an effort to establish the panhandling ordinance in 2008 in response to complaints of aggressive panhandlers, from residents and merchants in the Downtown Miami area," said

Marc Sarnoff, City of Miami commissioner for district two. Gabriel Garcia-Vera, 22, social work major, was one of the main students who attended the vote. Wolfson Campus was not asked to participate for the original ordinance’s vote made in 2008 or included within the zone itself. "We went because the first time that they actually created the ordinance, they excluded the college and in Wolfson Campus we were having a tremendous issue with the panhandlers," said Garcia-Vera, also the Student Allocation and Programming Board chairman. He described the frustration of a prior meeting with city commissioners that took place in October. "I think when we went, we had this whole thing happen where we were really just focused on the issue which was panhandling within itself as opposed to a lot of other political engines which kind of got off topic and they really spoke about homelessness," said Garcia-Vera. Wolfson Campus students returned in November to attend another meeting with city commissioners about panhandling. "The second time around, we just reiterated our feelings that this is not a homeless issue because at Miami Dade College, especially at Wolfson Campus, we work so much with the homeless community. We do fundraisers and all this other stuff; it's not about the homeless issue, it's about the aggressive panhandling issue which our students face," said Garcia-Vera. Wolfson Campus Student Government Association President

Jennifer Sotolongo, 20, English literature major and Garcia-Vera spoke on behalf of the college. "In addition to students from Miami Dade College, there were people from all around the Downtown community,” said Garcia-Vera. “They listened to each one of us briefly for about a minute or two, and then they went down the line and the council had their own comments to say, and from there, they took a vote from the commission." The ACLU and other critics counter that aggressive panhandling was already banned for the City of Miami, so there was no need for an additional ordinance. They also argued that arresting people for panhandling made solving homelessness more difficult by giving those arrested criminal records. The ACLU could not be reached for comment for this story. “I find it alarming and frankly sad for the homeless people that are mainly affecting them. I know that they probably rely a lot on the kindness of others and now they’re limited as to where they can ask for help,” said Julia Garcia, 24, education major. “I see it as ineffective…I think more what’s triggering these laws is probably the tourism around this area. A lot of areas like the Design District are going for this whole ‘up-and-coming’ image [and panhandling] maybe reflects badly on that image. For instance, Key Largo, where I go all the time, each church takes different days to feed the homeless. To me, that says something about the community and the county that they care about the people. Not just 'oh, let me just care about the people that come in and bring money to this area.'”

FLASHNOTES.COM

New Website Delivers Notes In Less Than A Flash FlashNotes.com provides a new and easy way for students to obtain class notes. By Monica Suarez monica.suarez006@mymdc.net Students are finding a new way to get class notes in a flash. More than 5,000 students from 12 universities are using FlashNotes.com, a site that allows students the opportunity to buy or sell class notes. “There is value and a need for quality content for students to study,” said Mike Matousek,

founder and chief executive officer for the site. “We host a secure, safe, easy-to-use site for that purpose.” According to Katie Greenwald, public relations director for Flemming Hitchcock and Associates, FlashNotes.com’s marketing company, FlashNotes.com is a tool that helps students academically and financially. “As more notes go up for classes at Miami Dade, more students will have the ability to buy quality notes to help them study and or replace missed information, whether it be from not under-

standing the course content, language barriers, insufficient note taking or missing class,” Greenwald said. To be eligible to buy or sell notes, students must create a free account and distinguish the university they attend. The college or university will then be added to the list of schools to purchase notes from. Students interested in selling notes must post a minimum of one page for the price of $1.99 or higher. They may publish as many pages as they wish, with a size limit of 150 megabytes.

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

Once a set of notes is purchased, FlashNotes.com does a direct deposit into the seller's bank account the Friday following the sale. Kaleb Dumont, a finance major at Kent State University, sold his notes for a high-level science course. “When I first heard about FlashNotes I saw a possibility to make money,” said Dumont. “ I knew I took good notes so I wanted to make money based on my hard work. I've earned $130. It took me five minutes.” FlashNotes.com allows a pre-

view of the notes before buying them, the chance to rank each note posted and the opportunity to connect with classmates. All transactions and deposits are done through PayPal. Once purchased, the notes are sent to the buyer via e-mail as an attachment. However, not everyone is a fan of FlashNotes. Errika Dansey, a nursing major at North Campus, is not impressed. “I don’t think FlashNotes is that effective,” Dansey said.

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THE REPORTER

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NEWS

COURTESY OF SUNSET MOBILITY

MARK PULASKI / THE REPORTER

MARK PULASKI / THE REPORTER

KENDALL CAMPUS STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

On The Road To Independence Luis Vazquez, a student at the Kendall Campus, is raising funds in an effort to purchase a vehicle—and his independence. By Mark Pulaski mark.pulaski001@mymdc.net Luis Vazquez is your average 21-year-old college student. He has a passion for sports, loves music, and enjoys spending time on Facebook; he hopes to land his dream job working as a computer technician for the Miami Heat. Like other students his age, he is struggling to earn his independence. The solution seems simple enough; all he needs is a car. But things aren’t that simple. Vazquez was born with a severe type of muscular dystrophy, a hereditary disease that weakens the muscles that move the body. Due to the disease, he has a speech impairment and is confined to a motorized wheelchair. He currently relies on MiamiDade Transit Special Transportation Services to get around. “I have limitations just like everyone else, but I'm capable of do-

ing a lot of things a person without a disability can do,” said Vazquez, a computer information technology major with a 4.0 GPA at MDC’s Kendall Campus. The modifications necessary for Vazquez to drive include: remote entry, automatic extending ramps, lowered fully-automatic power sliding door, easy-out front seats, kneeling suspension system, non-skid floor covering, automatic wheelchair lock-down, as well as high-tech door, lift and driving controls. The van will be controlled by a joystick, much like the one used to maneuver his wheelchair. Modifications are estimated to cost $100,000. They will be paid for by Vocational Rehabilitation—a federal-state program that works with people with disabilities in order to help them prepare for, gain or retain employment. As part of the conditions of the agreement, Vazquez must provide the van,

"I have limitations just like everyone else, but I'm capable of doing a lot of things a person without a disability can do." which can be no more than a year old. He hopes to purchase a 2011 Chrysler Town and Country Limited Edition minivan—MSRP $38,660—that will be able to accommodate his wheelchair, and the technology needed for him to drive. Vazquez’s family provides a wealth of emotional support for him, but they can’t match the financial support needed to purchase the van. His father is the main source of income for the family. Vazquez’s

Moving Forward: (Left) Twenty-one-year-old Luis Vazquez hopes to purchase a vehicle to enable him to be more independent . (top right) Vazquez wishes to purchase a vehicle such as this one—a Chrysler Town and Country, which will be able to accommodate his wheelchair and the technology needed for him to drive. (Bottom) The van will be controlled by joystick, giving Vazquez similar controls to the one used on his wheelchair.

mother is unable to work because she has to care for him and his 29-year-old sister, Elizabeth, who also suffers from MD. Vazquez receives Supplemental Security Income benefits, but those funds, he says, barely cover his current expenses. To raise funds for the van, Vazquez set up a blog to collect contributions toward his goal. “[Getting the van] will change my life in many ways because I will finally feel free,” Vazquez said. No one knows that better than Vazquez’s friend, David Mayuri, 22, a business administration major at MDC, who also has MD. Mayuri owns a heavily-modified vehicle like the one Vazquez is trying to purchase. It changed his life. He is now more self-sufficient; Mayuri is able to take classes at both the Kendall and Wolfson campuses, something that was impossible before. “Luis has been telling me he doesn’t go out much; he’s always stuck at home,” Mayuri said. “I un-

derstand, because I used to be like that. Now I go wherever; whenever.” Paul Edwards, the director of ACCESS at North Campus, who is blind, is thrilled for the advancements. “There are more and more devices that are making vehicles more accessible,” Edwards said. “We’re looking at the distant future, but a car was unveiled last year that actually drives itself independently. So, conceivably, one of these years I—as a blind person—may be able to own my own car and drive it by myself.” Vazquez wants people to realize that regardless of the hardships they may face, they must take responsibility of their own destiny. “In order to have success in life, you have to fight for it,” Vazquez said. “Otherwise, it won’t come along by itself.”

To help Luis reach his goal, visit:

 WWW.MAKELUISDREAM COMETRUE.BLOGSPOT.COM

SERVICE LEARNING

Reaching Out To Community Kendall Campus begins a service-learning project where MDC students can help K-12 students in the community. By Melissa Adan melissa.adan001@mymdc.net Miami Dade College students will soon have the chance to help brush up the writing skills of K-12 students in Miami Dade County. A new service learning project called Community Outreach Program, will be available for MDC students who are interested in tutoring. The program currently has seven MDC adjunct professors on staff. “The program’s goal is to help the students become better writers and perhaps more importantly, to encourage them not to be afraid VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

of challenges,” said David Tulloch, director of the Communications Resources Center at the Kendall Campus. Beginning Feb. 9, COP will hold tutoring sessions every Wednesday from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Kendall Campus Room 2207. “In addition to one-on-one sessions, the youngsters will be given the use of our state-of-the-art computers and printers, as well as access to special online writing exercises and diagnostics," Tullock said. This program is accessible to all schools in Miami-Dade County. Students, K-12, may enroll through their school resource officers. The project has been “brewing”

for the past two years, with Tulloch’s inspiration pushing it forward. “When I was little, I learned that self-satisfaction can be achieved through helping others less fortunate than I,” said Tulloch. Any MDC student interested in participating must be registered as a “service learning student” and must have taken or currently be enrolled in ENC 1102. "MDC students are sophisticated and mature enough to allow kids from the community to be tutored and share their space,” said Alissa Stone, part-time CRC tutor. MDC students may go online to apply for the service learning position, where they can receive handson experience tutoring school children.

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NEWS

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COLLEGE-WIDE SMOKING BAN

Thinking Of Kicking The Habit FROM SMOKING, FRONT

MARK PULASKI/ THE REPORTER

Smokescreen: A student smokes a cigarette outside Kyriakides Plaza at Miami Dade’s Wolfson Campus. Approval for the college-wide smoking ban would require a decision from the college's executive committee.

MARK PULASKI/ THE REPORTER

Lights Out: Bill Colantuono smokes a cigarette at Wolfson Campus' Kyriakides Plaza. Bill is one of many smokers that would be effected by the ban.

Vox Populi

An approximate date for a decision to be made has not been determined. “This [idea] was motivated by our desire to promote health and wellness among the College’s stakeholders,” Montoya said. “This is a collective decision that will be made.” Approval would need to be secured from the College’s Executive Committee, the College President and the District Board of Trustee, according to Montoya. If the ban is implemented, any person who works, studies or visits the College will have to leave campus to smoke. It has not been determined what penalties violators would face. “Smoking succession workshops are being considered for faculty who need help quitting,” said Milagros Fernandez, executive chair of the College Wide Support Staff Council. “We need to look at the bigger picture; we aren’t the only school that has considered this.” Six schools in Florida have completely or partially banned smoking on campus. Locally, Florida International University implemented a smoking ban on Jan. 6. The University of Miami prohibits smoking around health-related buildings. In addition, the University of Florida went smoke-free in July of 2010. Edison State College, Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences in Orlando and Warner University in Lake Wales have also instituted some sort of smoking ban. “There’s about 466 colleges nationwide that restricts smoking on premises. College students are definitely targets of the tobacco industry; most people who start smoking are under the age of 21,” said Liz

Students react to possible ban on smoking across Miami Dade College. —By Reporter Staff

“I smoke a lot so I think it’s ridiculous. We’re not in high school, we’re in college.”

“They shouldn’t ban it completely, but in the long run it will benefit the health of many.”

Nicolas Gallardo, 18, graphic design

Ximena Cuadra, 19, mass communication

"If they were to make an area to smoke, that would be a good idea but other than that it would cause a lot of problems." Jose Pavon, 22, physician assistant

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

Williams, American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation project manager. “The idea is not to punish, but to educate.” According to the ANRF, 53,800 people die every year from secondhand smoke exposure. “This is great. Smoking is a bad habit. This is my first year and I see it everywhere on campus,” said Angeleek Ealy, a 19-year-old freshmen at North Campus, about the possible smoking ban. “Stopping it at colleges will make it easier for people to stop.” But Wolfson Campus student, Mitchell Alvaraz disagrees. “I think that smoking on campus should not be banned,” Alvarez said. “I myself am a smoker but I do like to be respectful of other people. I’ll go up to the patio on this building [Wolfson Campus, building one]. You know, you don’t do it in peoples face... why can’t I smoke?” So what will smokers with the itch to light up do if the ban is passed? “Those who plan to continue smoking will just have to do it when they are not on campus,” Montoya said.

Vox Populi See student's reactions and thoughts on a possible college-wide smoking ban.

"I think that’s wonderful, that’s perfect. Because I was walking behind someone and blew smoke by me and it was smelly and nasty. I think the campus should do that. That’s wonderful, perfect. No smoking." Camesha Francois, 19, nursing

APPETIZING.

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THE REPORTER

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JAN. 17, 2011

A&E TRON: LEGACY: FILM REVIEW

A&E

Mark Pulaski, A&E Editor

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New Tron Lives Up To Legacy Left By Original

(305) 237-1254 //

mark.pulaski001@mymdc.net

Stunning scenery, electrifying action, and a thumping soundtrack by Daft Punk make Tron: Legacy a spectacle to see.

By Rafael Tur rafael.tur001@mymdc.net

COURTESY OF RELATIVITY MEDIA

Season Of The Boring: (From left) Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman—once prominent actors­—fail to deliver in their roles as Behmen and Felson, drowning in a plot that seems to have been written by a child. SEASON OF THE WITCH: FILM REVIEW

Cage Fails Again In Casting Spell Featuring bad acting, cheesy hair extensions, vague dialogue and a poorly-written script, Season of the Witch isn’t worth the price of admission and is sure to disappoint.

By Zayda Costa zayda.costa001@mymdc.net Set in medieval times, Season of the Witch is a fantasy-adventure film directed by Dominic Sena (Gone in 60 Seconds, Swordfish) and starring Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman. After twelve years of fighting in the crusades, Behmen (Cage) and Felson (Perlman) grow shameful of killing innocent people in the name of God and decide to quit their holy services. On their trek back home, the two former knights come across a village that has been contami-

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nated by the Black Plague. Behmen and Felson try to flee, but are recognized as crusaders and reported to church officials. They are given the ultimatum of being arrested or transporting an accused witch (Claire Foy) to the monastery for trial. T he y de c ide onc e more to ser ve the church. During their que s t t he y a re ac c ompa n ie d and helped by a priest (Stephen Campbell Moore), a knight (Ulrich Thomsen), a former t hief named Hagamar t he Sw indler (Stephen Graham) and an altar boy/knight named Kay (Robert Sheehan). The acting in this film was terrible. Nicolas Cage was extremely lazy during the whole movie; his facial expressions were stagnant and his dialogue was monotone from beginning until the end. Ron Perlman spent the entire movie wearing a wink and a smile and delivering cheesy one-liners.

For example, when Behmen remarks that they haven’t seen a soul all day, Felson replies: “Keep your souls, let me find a chicken.” Bragi F. Schut’s screenplay was poorly written. The character’s dialogues were vague and filled with clichés. During one scene when Felson throws holy water at the witch, Behmen replies with: “We’re going to need more holy water.” The script feels like it was written by an eighth grader. Season of the Witch was just as bad as Nicolas Cage’s hair extensions used during the movie. It’s definitely not worth watching.

Tron: Legacy takes us back to the illuminated digital world of the 80’s classic film. Sam Flynn (Garrett Hedlund), son of the original protagonist Kev i n Fly n n (Jef f Br idges), is lu red i nto “T he Gr id” a g ia nt light-up cit y where people are identified as computer programs and ever y thing from airplanes and motorcycles, to clothes and table utensils are decked out in neon lights. Sam arrives only to find the grid taken over by Kevin’s digital alter-ego Clu, whose ruthless tyranny over the city has forced Kev in into ex ile. Upon arrival, Sam is quick ly volunteered for fast-paced g lad iator ia l ga mes featuring races of Tron’s signat ure light c ycles leav ing t heir trademark light trails and occasionally ending up in incredibly brutal crashes.

Sam’s life is saved by his fat her’s protégé Quor ra (Ol iv ia Wilde)— last of a race of computer programs called Isomorphic Algorithms. ISO’s are a genetically f lawless organism Kevin explains as a manifestation of evolved data, a nd t hey may hold t he key to human survival and evolution. Quorra reunites Sam w it h his father but the happiness of the reunion doesn’t last long as they learn that the portal back into the real world is closing in a few hours. Not just that, Clu’s dominion over “The Grid” has turned escape into a suicide mission. The film runs 125 minutes with a heavy amount of dialogue. Make no mistake; Tron’s action, disco scenery and a soundtrack composed by electronic music group Daft Punk will surely make the film the best IMA X theatre ex perience of 2010— or at t he ver y least, Daft Punk’s longest music video.

4 out of 5

Tron: Legacy—Jeff Bridges, Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde —2 hours 7 min—Rated PG

2 out of 5

Season of the Witch—Starring Nicolas Cage, Ron Perlman —1 hour 35 min—Rated PG-13

COURTESY OF RELATIVITY MEDIA

Illuminating: (From left) Olivia Wilde, of House fame, stars alongside Garrett Hedlund in Tron: Legacy, the sequel to the 1982 cult classic Tron.

Upcoming Events Jan. 19: Jazz Vibraphonist Gary Mayone Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus, 300 N.E. Second Ave., will host jazz vibraphonist Gary Mayone on Wednesday, Jan. 19 from noon to 1 p.m. in Room 1261. He is a prominent member of the South Florida music scene, and has more than 50 CD recordings to his credit. Mayone will be featured as a part of the ongoing series, Jazz at Wolfson Presents, which offers monthly live shows from renow ned jazz musicians and is currently the only continuously

running jazz series in MiamiDade County. All events in the series are free and open to the public. —Mark Pulaski For more information, contact Michael Di Liddo T (305) 237-3930

at North Campus, 11380 N.W. 27 Ave., on Jan. 28 and 29 at 8 p.m. The performance will celebrate women’s contribution Calypso. Award-winning performers Singing Saundra, Queen Fayola and Princess Kizzie will participate. General admission is $15. Faculty and student admission is $10 with a MDC ID. Free parking will be available in the lot next to the theater.

Jan. 28: Women of Calypso Miami Dade College’s Cultural Affairs Department will host the “Women of Calypso” at the William and Joan Lehman Theater

—Vanessa Martinas For more information, contact Elizabeth Doud T (305) 237-3303

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

The Reporter is looking for designers to aid in production. Applicants must be proficient in: Adobe InDesign CS4 Adobe Illustrator CS4 Adobe Photoshop CS4 For Information, please call: (305) 237-3368 Or, e-mail Art Director Lazaro Gamio: lazaro.gamio@gmail.com

THE REPORTER

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JAN. 17, 2011

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SPORTS

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MEN'S BASKETBALL

Balancing Act: Sharks Charge Toward Playoffs The MDC Sharks basketball team is looking to extend their season into March with their impressive play. By Carlos Sanchez carlos.sanchez034@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College men’s basketball team has 12-5 record going into the second half of the season, as they prepare for Southern Conference play. The Sharks, ranked fifth in the state, have won 11 games by at least 12 points. The team is averaging 81.6 points per game and is allowing 67.4 points per contest. Multiple players are averaging double figures in scoring per game; freshmen guard Xavier Munford, 16.1; sophomore forward Maurice Kemp Jr., 16.0; sophomore guard Zachary Lamb, 13.2 and freshmen guard Darwin Ellis, 12.5. Head Coach Matt Eisele credits his teams success to unselfish play. “We preach a healthy mixture of both offense and defense,” Eisele said. “These kids are really buying into it and are playing at 110 percent.” Difficult last-second losses to Tallahassee Community College and

Chipola College have placed the Sharks just outside of the nation’s elite. However, Eisele is happy with how well his young team responded to the early hardships. “We could easily have 14 or 15 wins right now and be top five in the country,” Eisele said. “It’s a testament to the kids, who have shown more desire and drive, even after a tough lost.” Kemp, regarded by Eisele as the teams most valuable player, leads the Sharks with just under 9.8 rebounds per game and has proven his presence and ability on the defensive side of the ball. “I’m usually called on to guard the other teams’ best player,” Kemp said. “For me, I take the most pride in this part of my game, while leading by example for the younger guys on the team.” Lamb, a second-year starter is providing the veteran presence, an attribute that has become a valuable asset during crunch time, something that his younger teammates have fed off.

GREGORY CASTILLO/ THE REPORTER

Shooting Stars: Sharks guard Xavier Munford dribbles against a defender from St. Petersburg College. The Sharks lost a heartbreaker as time expired to St. Petersburg College by 3 points on Jan. 8, at Kendall Campus. “As team captain, I have to be the vocal leader out there,” Lamb said. “It’s my job to make sure all the guys are communicating.” With highly anticipated conference match-ups against Broward College and Palm Beach State College on the horizon, Eisele plans on shortening practices to allow for detailed focus on individual game plans. “We are a young team, but the kids will be ready,” Eisele said.

“We preach a healthy mixture of both offense and defense,” ... “These kids are really buying into it and are playing at 110 percent.”

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

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THE REPORTER

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JAN. 17, 2011

SPORTS ATHLETICS STAFF

// SPORTS Hector Gonzalez, Sports Editor

//

(305) 237-1254 //

Football Veteran Strengthing MDC Teams

hector.gonzalez012@mymdc.net

Don Soldinger, brings his coaching skills from the University of Miami's field to MDC's teams. By Jessica Ferralls jessica.ferralls001@mymdc.net

GREGORY CASTILLO/ THE REPORTER

Comeback Kids: (From left) Stephanie Marino, Stephanie Buendia, Noemi “Bubbles” Rodriguez, Kristen Exposito, Katrina Miguel, Veronica Fukunisihi and Ashley Selveira Come off a national championship title in 2010 the MDC Women’s Softball Team looks to return to their national championship caliber status

Golden Girls While a large part of last year's title-winning team has left, a strong nucleus of players remain. (Photos below) ALL PHOTOS BY GREGORY CASTILLO/ THE REPORTER

Kristen Exposito Infielder

Veronika Fukunishi Outfielder

Stephanie Buendia Center Fielder

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LADY SHARKS SOFTBALL

Ladies In Uniform

Don Soldinger, a former University of Miami running backs coach, knows what it takes to be a winner. While at UM, he was part of two national championship teams. Today, Soldinger, who coached at UM from 1984 to 1989 and then again from 1994 to 2005, is spreading his knowledge at Miami Dade College. He has served as the assistant strength and conditioning coach for the past two years. Soldinger works with the softball, baseball and men’s basketball teams. Among the exercises he puts athletes through: Towel benches, box squats, training bed lifts and power lifts. Miami Dade College head softball coach, Carlos Caro, whose team won the junior college national championship last year, credits Soldinger with getting his team into shape. “He did a great job for us, to the

point that we hit at least one home run per game,” Caro said. “They did an overall good job and it showed up on the field.” Len Walencikowski, the strength and conditioning coach at MDC, said Soldinger’s expertise has been a great asset. Soldinger has been active in athletics since 1968. He was the assistant football coach at Miami Coral Park Senior High School from 1968 to 1972; defensive coach at Miami Killian Senior High School from 1972 to1976; the head coach at Miami Southridge Senior High School from 1977 to 1983 and from 1990 to1994 where he won two state championships. He was also a scout for the Miami Dolphins from 1989 to1990. “Don is a great coach in doing what we do,” Walencikowski said. “We teach kids that if [they’re] going to play for a championship, why would you play with 70 percent of your ability? If you’re a competitor you should play at 100 percent of your ability.”

MDC’s softball team will play to keep their national title for a second year in a row, with help from returning players. By Maloha Acevedo maloha.acevedo001@mymdc.net The Miami Dade College women’s softball team is ready to defend their national title. There is buzz that the Lady Sharks, who defeated Wallace State Community College in the National Junior College Athletic Association National championship game last May, can repeat. Matching the accomplishments of last year’s team will be a difficult task. The Lady Sharks finished with a 51-7 record. Head Coach Carlos Caro said his team is ready for the challenge. “The key to success is really simple, care about each other, keep it simple, hard work, be supportive and positive,” Caro said. “We teach our athletes to work one percent harder everyday so at the end of each month they’re 30 percent better.” The team has lost some of its cogs from last year’s squad. Some of those players include pitcher Erika Bennett and infielder Amanda Lara, both who are now at Marshall University, catcher Vivian Morimoto and pitcher Geovanny Nunez. Infielder Rebecca Hall is attending California State University, Fresno and infielder/outfielder Nicole Rodriguez has moved on to Lee University. Despite the losses, the team has a solid nucleus returning. Among

that group: infielder Kristen Exposito, outfielder Veronika Fukunishi, center fielder Stephanie Buendia and infielder Noemi Rodriguez. “Last year we reached perfection,” Buendia said. “This time we have a lot of talent, but we need to work really hard to gain chemistry, mesh together and push each other to work harder.” Caro said the team has added two former players to its coaching staff —Simone Miyahira and Simone Suetsugu— to help with the defensive and hitting part of the game. Incoming freshman pitcher Rachel Meagley, 18, who was recruited from Spokane, Wa., will attempt to fill the shoe’s of last year’s ace, Bennett, who was 26-2. Meagley said she is excited to be part of the team. “I’ve worked hard in practice, running and working out to get ready for college softball,” Meagley said. “We are just looking on becoming a family, which will help us succeed.” Last season, batting and power hitting were a main factor in the team’s success, with Exposito providing 19 home runs. This year’s team is expected to rely on base running and defense. Caro is confident his team is up to the challenge. “I always believe we can win,” Caro said. “I always have faith.”

GREGORY CASTILLO/ THE REPORTER

Molding Bodies: Don Soldinger, brings his strength and conditioning skills from the University of Miami's field to MDC's teams.

Scoreboard Women's Basketball ————————————————————

Women's Basketball ————————————————————

12/10 Tallahassee Community College, 77-58 Loss

01/12 Broward College

01/03 @ Community College of Rhode Island, 77-42 Win

01/14 Hillsborough Community College

01/05 @Florida State College at Jacksonville,incomplete

01/15-02/19 FCCAA Souther Conference Games vs. St. Petersburg College @ St. Petersburg, Fla. vs. Brevard Community College @ Melbourne, Fla. vs. Indian River State College @ Fort Pierce, Fla. vs. Broward College @ Davie, Fla. vs. St. Petersburg College @ St. Petersburg, Fla. vs. Palm Beach State College vs. Brevard Community College @ Melbourne, Fla. vs. Indian River State College @ Fort Pierce, Fla.

01/06 Monroe Community College, 73-67 Win MDC WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: 5-11, as of 01/12/2011 Scores are current up to date of production

Men's Basketball ———————————————————— 11/13 St. Petersburg College, 93-81 Win 11/27 State College of Florida,Manatee-Sarasota, 74-62 Win 11/29 IMG, incomplete 12/02-12/04 Panhandle Classic, Marianna, Fla. Southern Sp. Academy, 117-85 Win Gulf Coast Community College, 75-66 Win Northwest Florida, 56-71 Loss 12/11-12/12 FCCAA JUCO Shootout, Ocala, Fla. College of Central Florida, 86-79 Loss Gulf Coast Community College, 92-86 Win 12/16 St. John's River Community College, 71-60 Win

Behind The Lens Watch behind-the-scenes footage of Kendall Campus Bureau Chief Gregory Castillo and the ladies during the team photo shoot.

Schedule

01/01-01/03 MDC Classic, Kendall Fla. Community College of Rhode Island, 67-46 Win Pasco-Hernando Community College, 83-69 Win 01/08 St. Petersburg College, 67-64 Loss MDC MEN'S BASKETBALL: 12-5, as of 01/12/2011 Scores are current up to date of production

Noemi "Bubbles" Rodriguez Infielder

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

Men's Basketball ———————————————————— 01/15-02/02 FCCAA Souther Conference Games vs Broward College @ Davie, Fl vs Indian River State College vs Palm Beach State College @ Lake Worth, Fl vs Brevard Community College vs Indian River State College @ Fort Pierce, Fl vs Broward College vs Palm Beach State College

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FORUM

CHANGE YOUR THINKING

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JAN. 17, 2011

Hanging on the telephone at MDC Ask Andrea

Contacting school officials is an arduous game of phone tag that results in unanswered questions and unaddressed concerns.

ASK ANDREA IS AN ADVICE COLUMN RUN BY ANDREA ORELLANA, FORUM EDITOR FOR THE REPORTER. TO SUBMIT A QUESTION, SEND A 250-WORD EMAIL TO ANDREA.ORELLANA001@MYMDC. NET. PLEASE INCLUDE FULL NAMES FOR PUBLISHING. ALL CONTENT IS SUBJECT TO EDITING FOR CLARITY.

Dear Andrea, I had casual sex for the first time recently. I always knew I didn't believe in it. My parents always taught against it, especially me, their only daughter. But I wanted to challenge my beliefs. It was my first and my last time. It felt gross to be so unattached during such a personal act. Now I don't know what to do with these feelings. I'm feeling so low, like I've disappointed myself and I can only turn to my best friend, who had the same experience. I need a new perspective. -Not So Casual Dear Not So Casual, Feel low for a while and get it out of your system but steer clear of feeling regret; take this as an opportunity to learn about yourself and your gut instincts which are, more often than not, correct. It's completely normal to challenge the ideals taught to you, but be prudent in choosing the ones you act against. The case quite often is that you don't have to get in the water to know you'll get wet. -Andrea

Adoptive Identity Dear Andrea, I met my biological mother for the first time four years ago. Two summers ago, I spent the fourth of July weekend with her in New York and she introduced me to a few of her close friends. She didn't introduce me as her daughter or her relative or anything, just as Anna. She later excused herself and explained to me that not many people—in fact, none of her New York friends—know that she had a daughter because she was so young when it happened and it's such a touchy subject for her. The thing is: I'm very open with the people I'm close to and have written short stories and other pieces that have to do with my biological mother's pregnancy and my adoption, so it's not a strange story to hear, for anyone who knows me. Dilemma: If I were to introduce her to anyone in the future, should I introduce her as my biological mother, or just by her name? -Annakrizia R. Dear Annakrizia R., As cheesy as it’s going to sound, you have to do what’s most comfortable for you, after all, that’s what your mother did. I think you’ll find that as open a person as you are, it’s going to be uncomfortable omitting the fact that she’s your biological mother to others. -Andrea

By Alcides Decena alcides.decena001@mymdc.net The phone is not dead—although it may seem that way after calling the same person numerous times and getting no response. You expect this kind of treatment from scorned lovers or insurance agents, but not from school officials or employees. If you have never had to contact anyone at Miami Dade College, and were able to handle everything by yourself, you have a secret the world needs to know. To the rest of you that don’t posses this power— prepare for some hardship. Trying to get in touch with the financial aid department is a perfect example; it always leaves a bad taste in your mouth and it doesn’t take much to know why. Tr y calling financial aid and you’ll see what I’m talking about. It’s a hassle. You’ll be bounced from person to person— if you're lucky enough to get to speak to someone live. Sometimes it takes 30 minutes until someone picks up the phone. All of that for someone to fix your problem in less than five minutes. It’s enough to leave a student frustrated and with an impending ulcer.

11/9/10 2:18 PM

Contacting people, especially people who are on the college’s directory listing, shouldn't be like pushing a boulder up a hill. You get put on hold before hearing the dreadful words: “They’re in a meeting. I can direct you to their voicemail to leave a message.” The voicemail, you would think, is the lesser of two evils, but then you hear the words: “You cannot leave a message for this number because their inbox is full.” At this point, you’re bleeding from your ears. Why do administrators, department heads, athletic coaches, professors and such, constantly have their voicemail inbox full?

“You expect this kind of treatment from scorned lovers or insurance agents, but not from school officials or employees.” Do they not listen to their messages? Is it possible that they purposely leave their voicemail inundated? What is a student to do, when the quest for the answer comes to a sudden stop? The phone can’t be dead. Unfortunately, many of these questions can’t be answered for MDC students because their messages have never been returned.

Mailbox LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number, and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department, and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to MDC.THEREPORTER@GMAIL.COM, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

Vol. 1, Issue 4 Nov. 15, 2010 "Feast 4 Thought" —Sarah Dawood

Sarah Dawood's "Thoughts on Thanksgiving" seeks to justify colonialism, militarism and the negation of any people she deems inferior. Declaring herself a "completely non-biased" observer of US history because she "isn't American" (a specious argument itself), Dawood asserts that the "English settlers were far superior to the Native Americans. They had strength in numbers. They won fair and square.... [T]he pilgrims deserved the land." Would Dawood have us believe that India (pop. 1 billion) deserves the land of her native Pakistan

VISIT US ONLINE: WWW.MDC.EDU/THEREPORTER

Miami Dade 3x8.indd 1

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Not So Casual

UNDERGRADUATE

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(pop. 184 million), that Germany deserved Poland in 1939 or that the schoolyard bully deserves the swing you sit on because his fists are bigger than yours? Dawood invokes both turkey and bald eagle in her essay, but seems to conflate the two, Thanksgiving no more than a celebration of the United States' "powerful national security" state. Perhaps next Thanksgiving Ms. Dawood will toast those Pilgrims who were fed in a faraway land where they'd grown hungry for the sake of that Jesus who himself had fed the hungry once and, at another meal altogether, was sorrowed knowing how such mercy would be betrayed. Perhaps Ms. Dawood will even share the pumpkin pie with others. -Steve Kronen, Faculty Librarian/ Assistant Professor, West Campus

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THE REPORTER

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JAN. 17, 2011

FORUM

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// FORUM Andrea Orellana, Forum Editor //

(305) 237-7657//

andrea.orellana001@mymdc.net

BODY IMAGE

Short Like Me

The Reporter is the free biweekly student newspaper at Miami Dade College. All content is produced by MDC students. The opinions in this newspaper do not necessarily represent those of the administration, faculty, or the student body.

A chronicling of the daily struggles as a 'Short-American,' in an image-obsessed culture.

By Andrea Orellana andrea.orellana001@mymdc.net Whenever bullying comes up, I think about how genuinely lucky I feel to have dodged, somehow, the childhood horror of being pushed around. The only reason I even know what bullying is has a lot to do with the fact that I’ve always been partial to Nick-at-Nite and its vast assortment of semi-antiquated family sitcoms. I’ve never experienced full-on white bigotry, but I did watch a lot of All in the Family; and I don’t think I’ve ever been an unwed Jewish woman, but The Nanny certainly taught me my share of Yiddish. And so was the case for the topic of being bullied; I’d just never experienced it first-hand. By the time my peers and I entered the treacherous grounds of puberty, I realized that would no longer be the case. I was cursed, like anyone, with the acne that always seemed to fail in its timing and blessed with my lack of need for silicone implants, so in these respects, peers could only relate and not torment.

But the one personal feature of mine that differed most prominently from all my friends, the one thing my pituitary gland wasn’t addressing was: my height; a fact that the joke-makers in my life have always regurgitated. To my complete annoyance, it’s been a prime cause of double-takes over the years. Most interact ions centering around my height usually go like this: Double-takers: “Wow, you’re so short!” Me: “And you are very observant.” I was 4’10” in the 6th grade. Eight years later, the only difference is the diminished hope I have of it ever increasing. And that’s just fine with me. Even in college, it comes up quite a bit. Depending on my mood and amount of hours slept, some days it’s insulting, but most of the time, it’s just a good measure of how often I encounter a person that wouldn’t know politeness if it slapped them on the face and then pointed and laughed for the remainder of the day. Every other pair of pants I’ve owned in my life does a good job of reminding me; every group photo I’ve ever been in, every hug I’ve ever given. My height takes a stab at the most ordinary daily activities. No one needs to point it out to me (honest). And yet for some reason, people, as if following a guidebook that everyone above 4’11” has received, blurt it out as if I’ll be caught un-

Editorial Board Monique O. Madan Editor-in-Chief Alexandra de Armas North Campus Bureau Chief Gregory Castillo Interim Kendall Campus Bureau Chief Lazaro Gamio Interim Wolfson Campus Bureau Chief Monica Suarez Briefing Editor Mark Pulaski A&E Editor Hector Gonzalez Sports Editor MANUEL PALOU / THE REPORTER

“Double-takers: 'Wow, you’re so short!' Me: 'And you are very observant.'” aware of the information. The worst part is that I don’t spend my day surrounded by giants. At least if I lived in a place where the average height was crazy tall, the comments would not go unwarranted, for then I truly would be an interesting sight. But in Miami, where the average height, at a staggering 5’5”, is only half a foot taller than mine, I have to continually ask myself why people are so obnoxious. Don’t misunderstand, however. The flip side comes with several key

advantages. Navigating the crowd at a concert is extremely easy when you can slip through people and especially if onlookers think you’re a child. Hiding things in the fridge is easiest when I’m the only one with my vantage point. And flirting with the opposite sex is facilitated when men are reminded that I will never be taller than them (even with heels on, even with multiple pairs of heels on). Sure I have to pull off nothing short of professional acrobatics just to be able to reach the damn spice cabinet and stand on my tiptoes if I want Subway employees to pay attention to me, but I’m just like you. I’m happy with the knowledge that bigger is not always better, except where men are concerned (I’m referring to the naturally high amounts of testosterone in males, of course).

VIDEO GAME RATINGS

New Labels On Violent Games Redundant California proposal of large labels on violent video games a misguided effort at curbing teen violence.

By Ernesto Ferris ernesto.ferris001@mymdc.net If you take a look at any video game on the market today, it’s got a little notice on the bottom corner. It’s called the ESRB rating system and since the early 90’s, it has been deeming what content is and is not an appropriate purchase for minors. America is an interesting place, however, since a certain state (we’re looking at you, California) wants to incorporate a two-inch label that would be required on the cover of any “violent video game.” This wouldn’t such a bad thing if it weren’t for the ramifications implied. You’re probably wondering why I am babbling on about a bill that has nothing to do with Florida, but

LAZARO GAMIO / THE REPORTER

should California begin to incorporate a second warning label on video games, other states will be more likely to deal with this issue on home turf. Strikingly, according to a political poll (Empirical Legal Studies, 2007), 60% of U.S. consumers want the regulation of violent video game sales. That’s where this bill comes in. The problem does not lie within the actual display of a “violence” precaution, but it is a fact of complete redundancy to try and come up with yet another way of telling people what’s in the game. We already have the rating sys-

tem; it seems like a waste of time and tax-payer money to execute a second one. An age-old argument for video game regulation and censorship is that the violence in games is allegedly said to influence minors negatively. However, one has to realize that violent crimes among teenagers are caused by a lot of different factors and people have seemed to use video games as a primary scapegoat for unruly behavior. Mind you, mostly every form of media has been blamed for corruption; from books to music to even television.

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Is it possible that these notices will follow the way of the “explicit material” sticker that seems to grace the cover of various albums and which exemplifies censorship in a privately funded industry? Will we have two versions of video games, one where splicers or zombies are killed with blood and guts and another that claims to be the more “wholesome” alternative? In any case, the video game industry is facing the possibility that many consumers may very well lose interest after finding that the trademark gore and dark, violent tones negatively affect the product quality. It seems like the greatest solution here is responsibility. Responsibility starts at home and video game companies can only do so much. Instead of blaming video games for today’s hostile youths, let us begin the regulating at home.

Andrea Orellana Forum Editor Anna Carabeo Multimedia Editor

Art Department Lazaro Gamio Art Director Akeem Brunson North Campus Photo Editor Manuel Palou Designer

Issue Staff Krystal Acevedo, Maloha Acevedo, Melissa Adan, Zayda Costa, Alcides Decena, Jessica Ferralls, Ernesto Ferris, Vanessa Martinas, Roudy Mauricin, Mark Overton, Kirsten Rincon, Carlos Sanchez, Rafael Tur, J.C. Urbina, Laura Vargas

Advertising Gregory Torrales gregoryj.torrales001@mymdc.net (786) 237-8414

Letters to the Editor The Reporter welcomes letters to the editor. All submissions should be 300 words or less and must be typed. Writers must include their full name, contact number, campus, student number, and e-mail address. Faculty and staff should include the title, department, and extension. All letters are subject to editing for purposes of brevity and clarity. Letters can be sent via e-mail to mdc.thereporter@gmail.com, with the subject “letter to the editor.”

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The Reporter, Vol. 1, Issue 6