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OU student finds success despite hearing impairment (page B1) The University of Oklahoma’s independent student voice since 1916

T H U R s DaY, m a R C H 2 9 , 2 012

W W W.O U DA I LY.C O M

2 011 S I LV E R C R O W N W I N N E R

DIVeRSITY

OU faculty diversity has little parity Racial, ethnic minorities misrepresented by university faculty AJINUR SETIWALDI Campus Reporter

The representation of racial and ethnic minorities in the OU faculty is disproportionate compared with the demographics of the student population, despite affirmative action and equal opportunity plans. Approximately 62 percent of

students at OU were white in 2010, and more than 71 percent of fulltime faculty members were white, according to the 2011 OU Factbook, which lists data for fall 2010. Black full-time faculty members represented a little more than 2 percent of the faculty, and there were 35 black faculty members on campus, according to the OU Factbook. Black students represented more than 5 percent of the student population. This falls below the average of 7

percent black college and university faculty in the U.S., according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. About 79 percent of all faculty were white. Asian students made up more than 5 percent of the student population at OU and more than 10 percent of full-time faculty, according to the OU Factbook. The number of American Indians in the faculty, about 3 percent, was low compared

Fall 2010 full-time faculty

see RACE paGe a2

White : 1,038 (71.1%) American Indian/Alaskan native: 42 (2.88%) Asian: 157 (10.75%) Black/African American: 35 (2.4%) Hispanic: 47 (3.22%) International: 109 (7.47%) Other: 8 (0.54%) Not reported: 24 (1.64%)

Source: 2011 OU Factbook GrapH By James CorLey

ReGeNTS

cOMMUNITY SeRVIce

Board to vote to add limits New admission criteria to include entrance essay CHRIS MILLER

Assistant Campus editor

she said. “We had a huge number of students in those areas prior to Y2K. And that came and went, and the job market just shriveled up into nothing. Now the demand has picked back up.” Career Services allows students to upload resumes and apply for jobs at more than 7,000 companies through a

An upcoming OU Board of Regents vote could put an end to OU’s automaticadmission criteria. The regents will consider an agenda item that would require high-school students to complete an application essay for fall 2013 admission and provide teacher or counselor recommendations for fall 2014 admission, according to the regents’ meeting agenda. The policy is intended to admit a class with a higher degree of success than the current automatic-admission policy that approves students based on a combination of ACT, GPA and class rank factors, according to the agenda item’s rationale. Data from several sources show that standardized test scores are strongly correlated with family attributes over which students have no control, and this can unfairly disadvantage some student populations, according to the agenda. “Internal research demonstrates that by using a number of measures beyond ACT, GPA and class rank, [OU] can select students with a greater likelihood of persistence and graduation,” according to the agenda. If approved, the new admission process will be a significant improvement and change, according to the agenda. To ease the transition, Oklahoma residents entering in the fall 2013, 2014 and 2015 semesters will be admitted if they conform

see CAREER paGe a3

see VOTE paGe a9

meLodie LettKeman/tHe daiLy

Austin Kipp, management informations systems sophomore (left); doug Gaffin, University College dean (center); and Caleb forbes, University College freshman, help dig a hole for a tree Wednesday. The tree was the 1,000th tree to be planted by OU students during annual Arbor day celebrations.

Sooners put down new roots Arbor Day volunteers plant 1,000th tree since event’s creation

making lasting improvements to the Norman campus’ landscape. OU Arbor Day 2012 celebrations included an outdoor picnic, speeches by university adCHRIS MILLER ministrators and the planting of Assistant Campus editor 75 trees, including the 1,000th Hundreds of OU students, planted by event volunteers in the faculty and staff came togeth- event’s history. Participants congregated at er Wednesday with the goal of

11:30 a.m. at David A. Burr Park for a hamburger picnic and speeches, the latter of which began when UOSA president and event master of ceremonies Hannah Morris thanked attendees for their interest in campus beautification. Morris specifically thanked Molly Shi Boren, wife of OU President David Boren, and

members of the OU Landscape and Grounds Department for their dedication to improving the overall look of campus. Morris introduced Boren, who said it was fitting this year’s event was held in David A. Burr Park. OU Arbor Week was launched see ARBOR paGe a3

eMPLOYMeNT

Career Services benefits upcoming graduates Department helps Sooners seeking jobs SAM HIGGINS

Campus Reporter

Oklahoma’s unemployment rate and efforts by OU Career Services are helping graduating students find jobs. As of January, Oklahoma’s unemployment rate was 6.1

percent, compared to the national rate of 8 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In January 2010, the Oklahoma unemployment rate was 7.2 percent, the highest since 1990. Management information systems senior David Blaine Lewis Jr. will graduate in May and already has a job lined up with ConocoPhillips in Bartlesville, he said. The field

wasn’t his first choice, but it was best for him in terms of finding a job. “I wanted to be a lawyer and still have a passion for law,” Lewis said. “I would like to practice criminal defense law, but the job market for lawyers wasn’t ideal, so I chose to pursue a job right out of undergrad.” Lewis said he attributes getting his job to attending

the Fall Career Fair held by OU Career Services in Lloyd Noble Center. Despite the low unemployment rate, the hardest job a student will ever have is finding a job, Career Services director Bette Scott said. Certain fields are better for employment than others, Scott said. “The hot majors right now are in the IT-related fields,”

eDITORIAL VOL. 97, NO. 127

© 2012 OU Publications Board FREE — Additional copies 25 cents Campus ........................ Classifieds .................. Life & Arts ................... Opinion ...................... Sports .........................

A2 B7 B1 A4 B6

The Daily’s open record requests

Legislators must stop divisive abortion rhetoric

Requested document and purpose

The communication from the House over the personhood Act illustrates the damaging power of dirty tactics. (Page A4)

NOW ONLINe AT

SPORTS

Student crowned Miss Hispanic OU on Wed.

Sooners win first Bedlam series of season in OKc

If you missed out on the pageant, see the competition and which student took home the title. (Multimedia)

The OU softball team sent the OSU Cowgirls packing with a 4-0 loss Wednesday at Hall of fame Stadium. (Page B9)

KeLsey HiGLey/tHe daiLy

Carlos lopez, University College freshman, (right) plays his guitar while Aneesh Shukla, University College freshman, reads the newspaper Wednesday on the North Oval. See page A10 for more photos of the day.

Date requested

The most recent OU Information Technology budget — To learn how funds are distributed and whether funding is allotted to pay fines for Internet piracy.

March 15

The number of students who have been cited for inappropriate OU Wi-Fi use — To learn how often the university intervenes in cases of Internet piracy using the strike system.

March 15

A list of all 2012 Big event sites — To compare the number of sites this year to previous years; to gather information about the site locations.

Wednesday

Visit OUDaily.com/openrecords for a complete list of The daily’s requests

A2

Campus

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

Campus

OUDaily.com ››

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Historians, lawyers and social scientists will debate about the nature of religious freedom as part of a free symposium Monday on campus.

Race: Lack of faculty diversity a national issue Continued from page A1

Today around campus A workshop, “Capstone Central: Doing Library Research for Your Capstone Paper,” is open to students of all majors from 3 to 3:45 p.m. in Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A seminar about using technology for academic success, part of Student Success Series, will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Wagner Hall, Room 245. A lecture, “Women and Political Change in the Middle East,” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. OU Write Club’s open mic night for writers will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at Café Plaid. An information fair for OU Club Sports will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. in Couch Tower’s social lounge. The fair serves to get out information about the club sports offered at OU. Hamburgers, chips and drinks will be provided for those who attend. The OU Juggling Club will meet from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140. A free flute recital featuring Sarah Frisof will take place from 8 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 The 36th Annual Medieval Fair will take place through Sunday at Reaves Park. Admission is free. A forum about the future of American journalism will be held at 3 p.m. at Burton Hall, Room 210. A session about citing sources using Zotero, a Firefox add-on, will be held at 3 p.m. at Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A master class taught by mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall. The baseball team will play Kansas State at 6:30 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 7 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

SATURDAY, MARCH 31 The baseball team will play Kansas State at 2 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 2 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

SUNDAY, APRIL 1 The softball team will play Kansas at noon at Marita Hynes Field.

to the student population, more than 5 percent. Under-representation of minorities within faculties is a national problem as well, according to the American Federation of Teachers, which released a report to promote racial and ethnic diversity in faculty members. Opposition to affirmative action efforts and the national trend away from creating and filling full-time tenure faculty positions are the two major national factors that contribute to the underrepresentation, according to the federation’s report.

Diverse faculty benefits students Well-educated minority faculty members, like minority staff members and students, offer the college community varying perspectives that prepare students to interact better in the community, said human relations professor George Henderson in an email. Henderson became the third full-time black faculty member in 1967, according to his biography. He has written multiple books on race relations and diversity about OU, including “Race and the University: A Memoir” in 2010. There is a problem with racial representation in the OU faculty, Henderson said. But the solution is more complex than simply recruiting more minorities, he said. There are more black and Hispanic males in prison than in college, Henderson said. “The black and Hispanic male pipeline has shrunk disproportionately,” he said. Furthermore, there is a small pool of possible minority job applicants, and few of them are retained or promoted, Henderson said. OU is constantly working to create and maintain a diverse culture among its

Daily File Photo

George Henderson lectures Sept. 6 in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Heritage Room. Henderson has lectured and written a book, called “Race and the University: A Memoir,” about diversity at OU.

“The black and Hispanic male pipeline has shrunk disproportionately. ... Furthermore, there is a small pool of possible applicants and few of them are retained or promoted.” George Henderson, human relations professor

students and employees, OU spokesman Michael Nash said. The applicant pool is constantly changing and only represents a snapshot in time.

Five years with little change The percentages of minorities have stayed consistent for the past five years, keeping within one percentage point, according to data from the Factbooks. OU directors select faculty and staff based on the qualifications of the applicant and the value he or she brings to the campus, Nash said. OU’s affirmative action plans are based on a formula, Provost Nancy Mergler said in an email. The formula attempts to determine the number of professors of

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a race or ethnicity or gender available in the workforce. The formula looks at currently employed tenured or renewable professors at certain universities, Mergler said. It also considers how many people are graduating with degrees. The percentage of minorities and women in each OU academic unit is compared with the percentage of minorities and women in the national availability pool for the discipline based on the formula, Mergler said. Deans, chairs and directors are informed of the number needed to mirror national availability data. Meeting the national availability is only the initial goal of enriching the diversity of faculty across the campus, Mergler said. “We are all obligated to

continue to strive for greater diversity of faculty to better help our students prepare for the workforce of the 21st century,” Mergler said. The national availability data predicts that 17 percent of the regular faculty, not including deans, should be minorities, according to Mergler’s data. About 20 percent of regular faculty at OU are minorities. It’s dangerous to focus just on ratios and percentages of minority faculty, Henderson said. Instead, the faculty should be viewed as a team that has a broad range of competence from acceptable to excellent, Henderson said. Most institutions want the best available minorities for their faculty, and OU is one of them. “It’s time for more departments to stop trying to only hire minority superstars,” Henderson said. Diversity for minorities should look like diversity for whites: average, above average and excellent, Henderson said.

In a Tuesday news story, “Courses challenge students’ abilities,” an infographic comparing the number of A’s given in rigorous and gen-ed courses was mislabeled. The labels indicating which line is which were erroneously swapped. A Tuesday news story, “Restaurants bid for space,” incorrectly stated the number of restaurants that submitted bids for the space in Adams Center currently occupied by Burger King. Nine restaurants, including Burger King, bid for the space before the March 16 deadline. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

Continued from page A1 in Burr Park in 1997, he said. “Molly Boren is the person who kept talking about it ... and getting students involved from the beginning,” he said. “[The inaugural event] happened right here on the day that we also dedicated David Burr Park.” Since 1997, students have taken the mission of Arbor Day to heart and stepped up in remarkable ways, Boren said. When ice storms struck campus in December 2007 and damaged more than 3,600 trees, students took the initiative to begin cleanup, Boren said. “The campus was devastated ... it looked like bombs had literally been dropped on campus,” Boren said. “Students came forward on a very cold, rainy day, and they turned out as volunteers. They picked up limbs. They helped us repair trees.” The work students did on that one day alone is estimated in value at over $150,000, Boren said. “The work they did on that day helped us bring the campus back to the beauty we’d had before,” Boren said. “Many of us thought we’d never get back to where we were before, and it happened because everyone joined in together.” That communal spirit has taken root in the Arbor Day ethos, and Wednesday���s participants were able to take part in the planting of Arbor Day’s 1,000th tree, a water oak, which could someday grow to be one of the largest trees on campus, Boren said. “Planting a tree is an unselfish act because you’re planting them for those that come after you,” Boren said. “It’s an act that ties you here, brings back memories of your time here.” After the speeches, participants were invited to walk

Above: UOSA President Hannah Morris (left) and OU President David Boren share a laugh after Clarke Stroud, vice president for Student Affairs, encourages members of Omega Psi Phi to do their signature barks during Wednesday’s Arbor Day opening ceremonies. The fraternity was among seven recognized for outstanding work on adoptan-area locations on campus.

Photos by Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

to the College of Continuing Education, where trees were waiting to be planted. When volunteers arrived at the site, university-provided shovels and saplings resting on their sides were already positioned for the coming work. As groups began digging and planting, OU Landscape and Grounds Director Allen King described his annual

Arbor Day preparations. “I start [planning] right after the first of the year, trying to find an area that’s in need of trees, some place that’s really good and functional like this wide-open area right here,” King said, m o t i o n i n g t o t h e l aw n where the sounds of volunteers putting shovels to dirt echoed behind him. King tailors his Arbor Day

Left: Huston Huffman Center staff member Tyler Webb prepares the ground for a new tree during Wednesday’s Arbor Day celebrations outside the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education. Students, faculty and staff came together to plant 75 trees on campus.

purchases to each year’s planting site, he said. “I usually put my order in for trees according to what the ground’s like, what’s been growing good here,” he said. “With this big of an area, I’ve selected trees that will grow to be monstrous. I mean, we want big, big trees for this area.” The trees purchased by OU for Arbor Day events are

part of the landscape department’s annual budget and come, whenever possible, from local nurseries, King said. “We purchase as close to home as we can, and these are trees we would have planted anyway,” he said. Since participating in a tree-planting ceremony in sixth grade, King said similar events have always held a special place in his heart. “When I go back home, I get to see this tree I planted,” King said. “I may be telling my age, but it’s amazing how large it’s become.” King’s landscaping employees welcome the help improving the look of campus, but he said he also hopes students take pride in their work. “Of course, we’ll come out tomorrow and do a little cleanup, but the bottom line is the students planted [trees],” King said. OU Outreach Advanced Programs employee Debbie Bergman was among the participants who took time after completing her work to pose for pictures with her now-upright sapling. Bergman had not participated in Arbor Day before and said the proximity of the planting site to Kyle McCarter Hall of Advanced Studies, where she works, encouraged her to take part. “I like the idea of coming back to the tree again in a couple of years and keeping an eye on it,” Bergman said. “One of our students was out helping us too, so he can come out and see it as well. I told him he can bring his kids some day.” Bergman and Nguyen’s experiences are not uncommon, King said, and that’s why he enjoys the event. “The planting of trees, when I watch students plant them, I reminisce about what me and my sixth-grade class did that year,” King said. “It kind of gives you an ownership of the campus.”

1244 N. Interstate Dr. at Robinson Crossing 405.307.0455

Continued from page A1 database, Scott said. “We are the go-between between students and employers for internships and full-time positions,” Scott said. “Every day some employer is going on and posting jobs.” If students get job offers, they should consider more than just the pay, Scott said. “ You should choose your first job not by how much you will get paid but from how much you will learn,” Scott said. “You’re not going to retire with your first job, or at least you hopefully won’t.” Students without job offers can consider applying for graduate school to make them more competitive when the market is better in the future, said Clay Wesley, OU Graduate College recruitment and engagement liaison. Graduate school enrollment during the past 100 years has spiked when there is a major war or depression, which happened in 2008 and 2009, Wesley said. “You’re starting to hear a lot more that a master’s degree is the new bachelor’s degree, so a lot of jobs are more easy to secure by going on a further two years,” Wesley said.

GO AND DO OU Job Expo WHEN: 12:30 to 3 p.m. April 5 WHERE: Lloyd Noble Center

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A multimedia concert, performed by the OU Symphony Orchestra and featuring music from Disney’s “Fantasia” and “Fantasia/2000,” and Disney costume parade for children will be held from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Sharp Concert Hall.

The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu.

ARBOR: Event beautifies campus, creates lasting changes

Here we treat you like Family . . .

The baseball team will play Kansas State at 1 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Corrections

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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Campus

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

Campus

OUDaily.com ››

Laney Ellisor, campus editor Kathleen Evans, assistant campus editor Chris Miller, assistant campus editor dailynews@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Historians, lawyers and social scientists will debate about the nature of religious freedom as part of a free symposium Monday on campus.

Race: Lack of faculty diversity a national issue Continued from page A1

Today around campus A workshop, “Capstone Central: Doing Library Research for Your Capstone Paper,” is open to students of all majors from 3 to 3:45 p.m. in Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A seminar about using technology for academic success, part of Student Success Series, will take place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Wagner Hall, Room 245. A lecture, “Women and Political Change in the Middle East,” will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. OU Write Club’s open mic night for writers will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at Café Plaid. An information fair for OU Club Sports will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. in Couch Tower’s social lounge. The fair serves to get out information about the club sports offered at OU. Hamburgers, chips and drinks will be provided for those who attend. The OU Juggling Club will meet from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Fitness Center, Room 140. A free flute recital featuring Sarah Frisof will take place from 8 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 The 36th Annual Medieval Fair will take place through Sunday at Reaves Park. Admission is free. A forum about the future of American journalism will be held at 3 p.m. at Burton Hall, Room 210. A session about citing sources using Zotero, a Firefox add-on, will be held at 3 p.m. at Bizzell Memorial Library, Room 149D. A master class taught by mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Pitman Recital Hall. The baseball team will play Kansas State at 6:30 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 7 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

SATURDAY, MARCH 31 The baseball team will play Kansas State at 2 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. The softball team will play Kansas at 2 p.m. at Marita Hynes Field.

SUNDAY, APRIL 1 The softball team will play Kansas at noon at Marita Hynes Field.

to the student population, more than 5 percent. Under-representation of minorities within faculties is a national problem as well, according to the American Federation of Teachers, which released a report to promote racial and ethnic diversity in faculty members. Opposition to affirmative action efforts and the national trend away from creating and filling full-time tenure faculty positions are the two major national factors that contribute to the underrepresentation, according to the federation’s report.

Diverse faculty benefits students Well-educated minority faculty members, like minority staff members and students, offer the college community varying perspectives that prepare students to interact better in the community, said human relations professor George Henderson in an email. Henderson became the third full-time black faculty member in 1967, according to his biography. He has written multiple books on race relations and diversity about OU, including “Race and the University: A Memoir” in 2010. There is a problem with racial representation in the OU faculty, Henderson said. But the solution is more complex than simply recruiting more minorities, he said. There are more black and Hispanic males in prison than in college, Henderson said. “The black and Hispanic male pipeline has shrunk disproportionately,” he said. Furthermore, there is a small pool of possible minority job applicants, and few of them are retained or promoted, Henderson said. OU is constantly working to create and maintain a diverse culture among its

Daily File Photo

George Henderson lectures Sept. 6 in Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Heritage Room. Henderson has lectured and written a book, called “Race and the University: A Memoir,” about diversity at OU.

“The black and Hispanic male pipeline has shrunk disproportionately. ... Furthermore, there is a small pool of possible applicants and few of them are retained or promoted.” George Henderson, human relations professor

students and employees, OU spokesman Michael Nash said. The applicant pool is constantly changing and only represents a snapshot in time.

Five years with little change The percentages of minorities have stayed consistent for the past five years, keeping within one percentage point, according to data from the Factbooks. OU directors select faculty and staff based on the qualifications of the applicant and the value he or she brings to the campus, Nash said. OU’s affirmative action plans are based on a formula, Provost Nancy Mergler said in an email. The formula attempts to determine the number of professors of

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a race or ethnicity or gender available in the workforce. The formula looks at currently employed tenured or renewable professors at certain universities, Mergler said. It also considers how many people are graduating with degrees. The percentage of minorities and women in each OU academic unit is compared with the percentage of minorities and women in the national availability pool for the discipline based on the formula, Mergler said. Deans, chairs and directors are informed of the number needed to mirror national availability data. Meeting the national availability is only the initial goal of enriching the diversity of faculty across the campus, Mergler said. “We are all obligated to

continue to strive for greater diversity of faculty to better help our students prepare for the workforce of the 21st century,” Mergler said. The national availability data predicts that 17 percent of the regular faculty, not including deans, should be minorities, according to Mergler’s data. About 20 percent of regular faculty at OU are minorities. It’s dangerous to focus just on ratios and percentages of minority faculty, Henderson said. Instead, the faculty should be viewed as a team that has a broad range of competence from acceptable to excellent, Henderson said. Most institutions want the best available minorities for their faculty, and OU is one of them. “It’s time for more departments to stop trying to only hire minority superstars,” Henderson said. Diversity for minorities should look like diversity for whites: average, above average and excellent, Henderson said.

In a Tuesday news story, “Courses challenge students’ abilities,” an infographic comparing the number of A’s given in rigorous and gen-ed courses was mislabeled. The labels indicating which line is which were erroneously swapped. A Tuesday news story, “Restaurants bid for space,” incorrectly stated the number of restaurants that submitted bids for the space in Adams Center currently occupied by Burger King. Nine restaurants, including Burger King, bid for the space before the March 16 deadline. Visit OUDaily.com/corrections to see an archive of our corrections

Continued from page A1 in Burr Park in 1997, he said. “Molly Boren is the person who kept talking about it ... and getting students involved from the beginning,” he said. “[The inaugural event] happened right here on the day that we also dedicated David Burr Park.” Since 1997, students have taken the mission of Arbor Day to heart and stepped up in remarkable ways, Boren said. When ice storms struck campus in December 2007 and damaged more than 3,600 trees, students took the initiative to begin cleanup, Boren said. “The campus was devastated ... it looked like bombs had literally been dropped on campus,” Boren said. “Students came forward on a very cold, rainy day, and they turned out as volunteers. They picked up limbs. They helped us repair trees.” The work students did on that one day alone is estimated in value at over $150,000, Boren said. “The work they did on that day helped us bring the campus back to the beauty we’d had before,” Boren said. “Many of us thought we’d never get back to where we were before, and it happened because everyone joined in together.” That communal spirit has taken root in the Arbor Day ethos, and Wednesday’s participants were able to take part in the planting of Arbor Day’s 1,000th tree, a water oak, which could someday grow to be one of the largest trees on campus, Boren said. “Planting a tree is an unselfish act because you’re planting them for those that come after you,” Boren said. “It’s an act that ties you here, brings back memories of your time here.” After the speeches, participants were invited to walk

Above: UOSA President Hannah Morris (left) and OU President David Boren share a laugh after Clarke Stroud, vice president for Student Affairs, encourages members of Omega Psi Phi to do their signature barks during Wednesday’s Arbor Day opening ceremonies. The fraternity was among seven recognized for outstanding work on adoptan-area locations on campus.

Photos by Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

to the College of Continuing Education, where trees were waiting to be planted. When volunteers arrived at the site, university-provided shovels and saplings resting on their sides were already positioned for the coming work. As groups began digging and planting, OU Landscape and Grounds Director Allen King described his annual

Arbor Day preparations. “I start [planning] right after the first of the year, trying to find an area that’s in need of trees, some place that’s really good and functional like this wide-open area right here,” King said, m o t i o n i n g t o t h e l aw n where the sounds of volunteers putting shovels to dirt echoed behind him. King tailors his Arbor Day

Left: Huston Huffman Center staff member Tyler Webb prepares the ground for a new tree during Wednesday’s Arbor Day celebrations outside the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education. Students, faculty and staff came together to plant 75 trees on campus.

purchases to each year’s planting site, he said. “I usually put my order in for trees according to what the ground’s like, what’s been growing good here,” he said. “With this big of an area, I’ve selected trees that will grow to be monstrous. I mean, we want big, big trees for this area.” The trees purchased by OU for Arbor Day events are

part of the landscape department’s annual budget and come, whenever possible, from local nurseries, King said. “We purchase as close to home as we can, and these are trees we would have planted anyway,” he said. Since participating in a tree-planting ceremony in sixth grade, King said similar events have always held a special place in his heart. “When I go back home, I get to see this tree I planted,” King said. “I may be telling my age, but it’s amazing how large it’s become.” King’s landscaping employees welcome the help improving the look of campus, but he said he also hopes students take pride in their work. “Of course, we’ll come out tomorrow and do a little cleanup, but the bottom line is the students planted [trees],” King said. OU Outreach Advanced Programs employee Debbie Bergman was among the participants who took time after completing her work to pose for pictures with her now-upright sapling. Bergman had not participated in Arbor Day before and said the proximity of the planting site to Kyle McCarter Hall of Advanced Studies, where she works, encouraged her to take part. “I like the idea of coming back to the tree again in a couple of years and keeping an eye on it,” Bergman said. “One of our students was out helping us too, so he can come out and see it as well. I told him he can bring his kids some day.” Bergman and Nguyen’s experiences are not uncommon, King said, and that’s why he enjoys the event. “The planting of trees, when I watch students plant them, I reminisce about what me and my sixth-grade class did that year,” King said. “It kind of gives you an ownership of the campus.”

1244 N. Interstate Dr. at Robinson Crossing 405.307.0455

Continued from page A1 database, Scott said. “We are the go-between between students and employers for internships and full-time positions,” Scott said. “Every day some employer is going on and posting jobs.” If students get job offers, they should consider more than just the pay, Scott said. “ You should choose your first job not by how much you will get paid but from how much you will learn,” Scott said. “You’re not going to retire with your first job, or at least you hopefully won’t.” Students without job offers can consider applying for graduate school to make them more competitive when the market is better in the future, said Clay Wesley, OU Graduate College recruitment and engagement liaison. Graduate school enrollment during the past 100 years has spiked when there is a major war or depression, which happened in 2008 and 2009, Wesley said. “You’re starting to hear a lot more that a master’s degree is the new bachelor’s degree, so a lot of jobs are more easy to secure by going on a further two years,” Wesley said.

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A multimedia concert, performed by the OU Symphony Orchestra and featuring music from Disney’s “Fantasia” and “Fantasia/2000,” and Disney costume parade for children will be held from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Catlett Music Center’s Sharp Concert Hall.

The Oklahoma Daily is committed to serving readers with accurate coverage and welcomes your comments about information that may require correction or clarification. To contact us with corrections, email us at dailynews@ou.edu.

ARBOR: Event beautifies campus, creates lasting changes

Here we treat you like Family . . .

The baseball team will play Kansas State at 1 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park.

Corrections

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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• Thursday, March 29, 2012

Opinion

Mary Stanfield, opinion editor dailyopinion@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

Editorial

Column

Deceptive rhetoric limits debate

Take the break to live your life on a leap of faith

Our View: Oklahoma House comments on the Personhood Act reveal divisive, unacceptable discourse.

diminish) real rights in the real world.

Deceptive use of facts

It includes the claim that this bill is supported by medical professionals in obstetrics and family pracThe “Personhood Act,” which would define life tice. Of course, it fails to mention the opposition of as beginning at conception, was approved by the the Oklahoma State Medical Association. Oklahoma House Public Health Committee on It also references a 2011 Gallup poll, Tuesday. It will move to a full House vote, claiming it showed “60 percent of women and having been passed by the Senate, it is The Our View quickly on its way to becoming a law. is the majority believe abortion should either be illegal or allowed only in limited circumstances.” It’s We’ve been vocal about our distaste for opinion of The Daily’s true that 60 percent of women in the U.S. this bill, but recent communication from the nine-member said abortion should be allowed in few or no House has revealed a deeper concern. The editorial board cases, but that is in comparison to the other press release drafted by the House’s media options, which were “most” or “all.” division was rife with misleading facts, diviChoosing “few” over “many” is hardly the same sive rhetoric and damaging assumptions that attack as choosing “only in limited circumstances.” Out of and discount opponents of this bill. that 60 percent, only 24 percent said abortion should We expect better from our representatives. And be illegal in all circumstances. And 50 percent of you should, too. Maybe it’s not unexpected, and maybe it’s not new women consider themselves “pro-choice.” — after all, abortion debates always are the most Discounting the opposition controversial and the least logical. Just dropping the Worse, though, is the language that entirely disrewords “pro-life” or “pro-choice” is enough to induce gards — and demonizes — Oklahoma’s pro-abormouth-foaming in otherwise rational people. But Oklahomans have become far too complacent tion rights constituents. Another quote from Billy states: “A vote for this measure simply declares that with the state of the abortion debate. For too long, the state of Oklahoma values life and believes every the public has watched while the politicians who child is a gift and deserving of protection. That is not represent it resort to illogical arguments, blatant emotionalism, outrageous attacks and outright mis- a controversial viewpoint.” By couching the debate in these terms, Billy fails information to silence their opponents. These tactics to acknowledge any possible legitimacy in the arguderail and obscure the conversation — an undesirments of her opponents. This statement both misable effect no matter which side you’re on. characterizes the possible effects of the bill and disMisleading characterization respects the opposition by implying that there could not possibly be any rational basis for disagreement. The release includes assurances from Rep. Lisa In doing so, it implies that any group that disagrees Billy, R-Purcell, that the bill would not, as opponents with this bill must not value the lives of children. have claimed, interfere with in vitro fertilization, Whether or not you’re supportive of abortion contraception, abortion, emergency contraception, rights, you must recognize that our legislators are medical research and treatment of ectopic pregnantasked with finding answers that will most benefit cies. But if this is the case, why didn’t the author inthose they represent. Their duty is to hear all the clude specific language to that affect in the bill? arguments involved, deliberate between them and The new version of the bill does mention that it choose the solution that works best for Oklahoma. will not interfere with contraception and fertility In order to do that, they must listen equally and treatments. But it ignores the other serious concerns mentioned by committee members. The committee fairly to all sides of any debate. They — and the pubvoted to table several amendments that would have lic — need access to all the facts, free from emotionalism and dismissive tactics, in order to make the specifically protected these other rights. Billy goes on to claim that this bill is nothing more best decision. Democracy relies on free and open dialogue bethan a statement of intent — it won’t actually change tween even the most disparate, passionate groups. anything. We have our doubts about that. This kind of disrespectful, dismissive and misleadIf you want to make a statement, hold a press ing rhetoric stands in the way of that discourse. conference or write a blog. Laws are not for making statements; they are for creating enforceable Comment on this at OUDaily.com doctrines that regulate behavior and protect (or

Column

Media perpetuates sex violence

W

ith Women’s OPINION COLUMNIST History Month ending and Sexual Assault Awareness Month upon us, it is important to consider how America regards women as victims and how our culture perpetuates sexual assault. Kayley Gillespie The National Sexual kayley.m.gillespie-1@ou.edu Violence Resource Center seeks to raise awareness about sexual violence and preventative measures in April. The 2012 campaign is devoted to encouraging a conversation on how communities and individuals can connect and respect one another in order to prevent sexual violence. Human sexuality has emotional, social and physical components. Our values, interactions, behaviors and feelings are included in its construction. Healthy constructions of sexuality prevent sexual violence. American culture breeds sexual violence. The sexual and demeaning language in music, the sexual images on television and the link between adolescent media consumption and sexual activity testify to how society has failed the innocent. In the age of social media, it’s no surprise that children are exposed to more advertising and media sources than ever before. This would be beneficial if Drake rapped about respecting women or environmental sustainability. Instead, Drake raps about how taking advantage of women is a mere pastime when “there ain’t much to do” and includes various references to drugs, alcohol and guns. Money is privileged throughout this song, “Motto,” which is the number 1 Billboard Top 100 rap song this week. Objectifying women and materializing all aspects of life is not new to the music scene. According to an article in the Western Journal of Medicine, sexually explicit songs set to music videos with provocative clothing and suggestive motions represent at least 60 percent of all music videos. As much as 80 percent of all movies shown on television have

sexual content. This contributes to the 143 incidents of sexual behavior teenagers view each week. Sexual violence is on the rise, partly because youth are desensitized to sexualized messages that are presented as common and without consequence. In addition to teenage pregnancy and STDs, there is a very real risk for viewers to adopt the values, beliefs and behaviors they are exposed to. The sexually explicit climate in the U.S. exacerbates not only the entertainment industry, but also the sex trafficking industry. This is a national and, more frighteningly, state issue. Because sex is so normalized and communication technologies link 90 percent of the world’s population, sex trafficking victims come from every corner of the globe and many end up in the connecting highways of the Bible Belt. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 300,000 children in the U.S. are at risk every year for commercial sexual exploitation. The U.S. is the number one destination for child sex trafficking in the world. And the U.S. is the primary producer and consumer of child pornography. With social media spreading destructive images of children and youth in risqué clothing and poses, it’s no wonder sexual assault is an issue. We are socialized to believe women should be objects of a man’s gaze. Music videos and TV maintain this idea. Women are prey. The former CEO of Disney, Michael Eisner, once said, “We have no obligation to make art. We have no obligation to make history. We have no obligation to make a statement. We are here to make money.” Who would have guessed that the former CEO of Disney and rap star Drake would have so much in common? The issue isn’t just rap music or Disney or reality television. We cannot blame a single entity, but we can take responsibility for how we are influenced and how we spend our time. The culmination of all forms of media today is destructive to our identities, counterproductive to equal rights movements and perpetuates sexual violence. Kayley Gillespie is a literature and cultural studies junior.

O

ver the last Opinion columnist week, everybody has been talking about springbreak-this and springbreak-that. Most of the time, I hear people talk about how they went home and slept Kimm Johnson for seven days straight or kimm.johnson@ou.edu just brought in some extra dough by staying in town and working. So when people ask me what I did for spring break, I have to contain my excitement. Truth be told, I loved my spring break. And it wasn’t the huge party scene everyone assumes for college students. It was the opposite: I went on a community service road trip to Washington, D.C., through a campus organization called Students Today Leaders Forever. To say that I signed up for this trip on a whim would be the understatement of the century. I didn’t really know anyone who had gone on a trip or was going this year. All I really knew was that I was about to get on a charter bus with 35 strangers, and we would be stopping in six different cities. There, we would do three hours of community service, go visit the attractions at the location, then hop on a bus and drive to the next destination. I did not know where we would sleep, what we would eat, what community service we were doing or who else signed up for this. And I didn’t realize any of this until a few days before the trip. By the time I figured this out, I had lost my phone and been told not to bring my laptop. But I made it onto the bus, flustered and worried that I would be kickin’ it Henry David Thoreau style with people who wanted nothing to do with me. Once the wheels got rolling, we did the typical getting to know you exercises. I went through them halfheartedly, thinking I would probably only talk to two or three people on the trip anyway. I couldn’t have been more wrong. By around 8 p.m., we made it to Little Rock, Arkansas, and slept in a tae kwon do dojo. We had a miniature lesson and met the highest-ranking black master in tae kwon do. Afterward, we did cheesy Camp Crimson-esque activities, which made me think, “Oh great, these people are going to try to be my best friends and then see me on the South Oval and pretend like we never met.” Throughout the next several days, we did outdoor cleaning community service, and it was revealed to us that this was more of a leadership and bonding trip than anything else. On the second day, after our community service cleaning up a YMCA camp, we walked around downtown Nashville, Tenn., and were introduced to a little something we called dance bombing. If you watch the Ellen DeGeneres show, you know where I am going with this. We would start a video camera and then dance behind random strangers. This was a turning point. Seeing everyone be crazy and have so much fun together without any judgment was a really different, exciting experience. Now that we were all starting to enjoy ourselves, some friendships started forming. By the third night, we got even closer. We did an exercise where we talked about our strengths and weaknesses, and these 35 strangers were sharing things they had never told anyone. It didn’t feel fake, and it didn’t feel forced. From then on, it felt like we had built a true community. Next, we headed to a state park and cleaned up a river. The whole time, we talked to one another about everything and anything. We actually enjoyed each other’s company rather than feeling plagued by it. Having everyone in such close proximity made me think we would eventually start bickering, but it never happened. In part, I have to say it was because of the positive mindset of the trip’s leadership. When we couldn’t get to a location in time to take showers at night, we had to wake up at 5 a.m. to take them instead. But that wasn’t how they told us. Instead, they said we would get to shower in the morning. Those little positive spins on things really kept up the family environment and morale. I could literally go on and on about the little things like that, and if you ever see me on campus, I would be ecstatic if you asked me about it. But I’m going to fast forward to when we met the other busses. And that was the first time we realized how close we really were. On the way back to Norman, we literally did not want to leave the bus because we were so close. I have never felt so bonded to 35 people in my life. We all talked about how some of the people we have been friends with for years are not even that close to us. Every day since then, I have talked to somebody from the trip, and they never fail to brighten my day. Sometimes you should take a leap of faith. Will it always be as crazy and fantastic as the trip I just described? No. But you only live once. Don’t be afraid that things will turn out horrible. Take things one day at a time and branch out to new organizations and opportunities in Norman. You might actually find something that is better than an awesome spring break of partying. What you might find is people who surprise you, people who encourage you and people who will mold you into a better person. You might just find something worth living for. And isn’t that half of the reason we are in college anyway? Kimm Johnson is an environmental design and professional writing senior.

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Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

The Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage invites you to a symposium on

Religious Freedom in America: Constitutional Traditions and New Horizons Monday, April 2, 2012 10:15-11:45 a.m. - Panel 1: The Founding and Early Republic Scholars Room, Oklahoma Memorial Union Thomas Kidd, Baylor University God of Liberty: Alliances for Religious Liberty in the Founding Era Vincent Phillip Munoz, University of Notre Dame Religion and the Founders: Competing Visions Steven Green, Center for Law and Democracy, Willamette University The School Question and Nineteenth Century Disestablishment 12-1:30 p.m. - Luncheon* Governors and Regents Rooms, Oklahoma Memorial Union *Reservations required (iach@ou.edu) Robin Fretwell Wilson, Washington and Lee University The Erupting Clash Between Religion and the State Over Contraception, Sterilization and Abortion 2-3:30 p.m. - Panel 2: Contemporary Dimensions of Religious Freedom Scholars Room, Oklahoma Memorial Union Roger Finke and Robert R. Martin, Penn State University The Societal and Legal Impact of Free Exercise Guarantees: Findings from Quantitative Research Charles Haynes, First Amendment Center Religion in the Public Schools: What’s Required, What’s Permitted, What’s Commendable Rick Tepker, University of Oklahoma College of Law Marriage Equality, Religious Freedom and the Pursuit of Happiness 4-5 p.m. - Panel 3: Debating the Contours of Religious Freedom in America Scholars Room, Oklahoma Memorial Union ������������������������������������������������ Allen Hertzke, University of Oklahoma The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. Accommodations on the basis of disability may be arranged by contacting the IACH at (405) 325-7697.

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NATION

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

HISTORY

Letters soften author’s image

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Hemingway’s personal papers show care, love BOSTON — Ernest Hemingway shows a tenderness that wasn’t part of his usual macho persona in a dozen unpublished letters that became publicly available Wednesday in a collection of the author’s papers at the Kennedy presidential library. In a letter to his friend Gianfranco Ivancich written in Cuba and dated February 1953, Hemingway wrote of euthanizing his cat “Uncle Willie” after it was hit by a car. “Certainly missed you. Miss Uncle Willie. Have had to shoot people but never anyone I knew and loved for eleven years,” the author wrote. “Nor anyone that purred with two broken legs.” The letters span from 1953 to 1960, a year before the prize-winning writer’s suicide. Whether typed or written in his curly script, some of the dispatches arrived on personalized, onionskin stationery from his Cuban villa Finca Vigia. The author also wrote from Europe, while on safari in Africa, and from his home in Idaho. The two men met in a Venice hotel bar in 1949, bonding despite a two-decade age difference because they’d both suffered leg wounds in war. “I wish I could write you good letters the way you do,” Hemingway wrote in a January 1958 letter from Cuba. “Maybe it is because I write myself out in the other writing.” E xper ts say the letters demonstrate a side to Hemingway that wasn’t part

NATION NEWS BRIEFS 1. CHICAGO

9/11 victims denied investments by alleged al-Qaida member

JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSUEM/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ernest Hemingway (second from right), and Gianfranco Ivancich, right, dining with an unidentified woman, left, wife Mary Hemingway, second from left, and Juan “Sinsky” Dunabeitia, center at Hemingway’s villa Finca Vigia in San Francisco de Paula, Cuba.

“We have come at a most interesting time. Just in time to see the great Hemingway cry because he has to kill a cat.” of his persona as an author whose subjects included war, bullfighting, fishing and hunting. The Kennedy library foundation bought the letters from Ivancich in November, and Hemingway Collection curator Susan Wrynn met the now-elderly gentleman in Italy. “He still writes every morning,” she said. “Hemingway encouraged him to.” The letters, as a whole, show the author had a gentle side, and was someone who made time to be fatherly and nurturing to a younger friend, said Susan Beegel, editor of scholarly journal The Hemingway Review.

Hemingway’s letter about his cat’s death also showed the author’s struggle to separate his private and public lives. Hemingway told how a group of tourists arrived at his villa that day. “I still had the rifle and I explained to them they had come at a bad time and to please understand and go away,” he wrote. But one wasn’t deterred, according to the letter, saying, “We have come at a most interesting time. Just in time to see the great Hemingway cry because he has to kill a cat.” Hemingway also asks about his friend’s sister

Adriana Ivancich. The young Italian socialite became a muse for the writer after they met at a duckshooting outing in Italy. The woman was the model for the female lead in Hemingway’s novel “Across the River and into the Trees,” Beegel said. Experts say Hemingway credited her visit to Cuba in 1950 with inspiring him as he crafted the Pulitzer Prizewinning “The Old Man and the Sea.” He wrote of the literary award in a June 1953 letter to his friend, saying, “The book is back on the Best Seller lists due to the ig-noble Prize,” a line Beegel sees as self-deprecating humor. Hemingway went on to win the Nobel Prize in Literature the next year. The Associated Press

MENTAL HEALTH

A federal judge has barred victims of the September 2001 terror attacks from claiming money an alleged al-Qaida member invested with a Chicago futures brokerage firm. U.S. District Court Judge Matthew Kennelly on Tuesday granted a government motion to reject the victims’ claims to nearly $7 million. The U.S. Department of Justice claims Abu al Tayyeb, through an associate, deposited nearly $27 million into an account with R.J. O’Brien & Associates in 2005. But poor investment decisions caused the money to dwindle. Federal officials froze the assets and are attempting to get the money. Victims’ attorney Sean Carte says they might amend their legal argument, adding there are a number of ways to get the money. The Associated Press

2. CLEVELAND

Sick pilot forces plane to make emergency landing At least one of five century-old incandescent light bulbs still works after being pulled from the cornerstone of a Cleveland-area building along with a time capsule. The Plain Dealer reports GE Lighting began a 100th anniversary celebration of the Nela Park operation on Monday at one of the park’s original buildings at the East Cleveland research center. The lead-box time capsule held photos of Nela founders, journals, a book of technical specifications and a Plain Dealer. The 40-watt light bulbs were packed in sand above the box. A special socket was used to show off one bulb’s longevity. The rest went to a research lab. The Nela industrial park is the headquarters of GE Lighting, and is listed as an historic place by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Associated Press

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Depression could play key role in Afghan deaths

UE!

Soldier suffered emotional trauma after Iraq tour OLYMPIA, Wash. — The U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians suffered a traumatic incident during his second tour in Iraq that triggered “tremendous depression,” his lawyer said Wednesday. Lawyer John Henry Browne said he could not discuss the details of the matter because it remains classified. But he expects the issue to become a focal point in the case against Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales. “It caused him tremendous depression and anxiety,” Browne said. The lawyer previously said Bales experienced other major dangers in his deployments, including a serious foot injury and head trauma. In addition, a fellow soldier’s leg had been blown off days before the Afghanistan massacre, he said. Bales was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and other crimes. He is being held at a U.S. military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. A defense team is now in Afghanistan to collect evidence and interview other U.S. soldiers who knew Bales. “Everyone they’ve spoken to in the military has nothing but amazingly positive things to say about him,” said Browne, who is not part of the team in Afghanistan. Due to security concerns, Browne doesn’t think the team will visit the villages where the killings occurred. The investigators are likely to stay in Afghanistan a few more weeks. Browne questioned the

atbtanning.com

TED S. WARREN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

John Henry Browne, right, the attorney for Robert Bales, listens to testimony in Island County Superior Court, in Coupeville, Wash on Dec. 16, 2011. Bales is accused of killing 16 civilians in Afghanistan.

U.S. government ’s case against Bales, noting there is no preserved crime scene to assess. “It’s going to be a difficult case for the prosecution to prove,” Browne said. Bales has indicated that he had no recollection of prescription drugs he may have been taking before the shooting — something the attorney took as an indicator of larger memory problems. The lawyer also said his client has a sketchy memory of the night of the shootings. U.S. military officials said Bales was drinking on a southern Afghanistan base on March 11 before creeping away to two villages at night, shooting his victims and

setting many of them on fire. Nine were children. Bales has had incidents involving alcohol and violence in the past. In 2002, He was arrested for a drunken assault of a security guard at a Tacoma casino. That charge was dismissed after Bales completed 20 hours of anger management training. In 2008, a couple accused an intoxicated Bales of grabbing a woman’s hand and thrusting it toward his crotch before kicking and punching the woman’s boyfriend, according to a police report. Prosecutors declined to pursue that case. The Associated Press

*Some restrictions apply.

WORLD

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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AFGHANISTAN WAR

Afghan forces to shoulder more security responsibilities Training program endures through recent attacks MONS, Belgium — Afghan forces will soon start taking charge of security for threequarters of the nation’s 28 million people, NATO’s top military commander said Wednesday, a milestone as the country assumes the lead for protecting the majority of its population. Adm. James Stavridis also insisted the training of the Afghan army and police was proceeding very well, despite attacks in which Afghan soldiers have turned their weapons on their U.S. and NATO partners. “Very shortly we will announce further transition that will encompass 75 percent of the population,” Stavridis said in an interview with The Associated Press. He did not elaborate further on the exact timing of the announcement. NATO leaders are meeting in Chicago in May to map out a strategy to support the Afghan security forces after the withdrawal of most allied troops at the end of 2014. NATO forces have already handed over authority for about half the population, including the capital, in the first two tranches of a transition that started last year. This is the first public prediction that after the third phase occurs Afghan security forces will be assuming the lead for protecting the majority of the population. The war has been increasingly unpopular in both the United States and Europe, where governments are focused on cutting defense

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WORLD NEWS BRIEFS 1. SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR

El Salvador’s president denies gangs benefited from truce The president of El Salvador is denying that his government rewarded street gangs for a truce that appears to have led to a dramatic drop in homicides in one of the world’s most violent countries. About 30 gang leaders were transferred to lowersecurity prisons this month. Police records show homicides dropped by more than 50 percent in the following weeks. The chaplain of El Salvador’s army and police says that’s because of a truce he negotiated between the feared Mara Salvatrucha and Mara 18 gangs. President Mauricio Funes told reporters Wednesday that the gangsters were transferred so they could communicate the truce to jailed underlings. He denies accusations his government rewarded the gangsters for the truce. The Associated Press

2. SANAA, YEMEN

MUSADEQ SADEQ/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Canadian soldiers, right, part of the NATO led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) attend a graduation ceremony of Afghan soldiers at a military training center in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 14. Afghan forces will begin assuming security for 75 percent of Afghanistan’s population.

expenditures as part of wider austerity measures. The NATO training mission has been hit hard recently by a series of attacks by members of the Afghan security forces. Last month, a gunman killed two senior U.S. military advisers involved in the training program in an attack inside the Interior Ministry in Kabul. The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the killings,

saying it was in retaliation for the burning of Qurans at a U.S. bases. Stavridis said the target of over 350,000 security forces members will be achieved this summer, several months ahead of plans. “The strategy is sound and is providing results,” he said. The process of transitioning to Afghan lead was accelerated last year. Instead of a six-stage process, the plan was changed

to now achieve the transition in five steps, with the last starting as early as mid-2013 instead of 2014 — when most NATO troops are scheduled to depart Afghanistan. Long-term funding for the force — estimated at over $4 billion a year — and how contributions would be divided up between coalition members and other donors, remain unresolved. The Associated Press

Al-Qaida and Iran harness unrest to gain influence A top U.S. diplomat in the Middle East says al-Qaida and Iran have used the turmoil and uncertainty in Yemen to increase their influence. Jeffery Feltman, the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs, said national dialogue and a smooth transition to elections in the next two years would help counter al-Qaida and Iran. Feltman said Iran, like al-Qaida, exploits instability in Yemen, pointing to increased Iranian influence in parts of Yemen. He did not elaborate. Al-Qaida-linked militants have taken over parts of southern Yemen. Speaking in Sanaa Wednesday, Feltman said the U.S. is sending an additional $36 million in humanitarian aid to Yemen this year to tackle poverty and other humanitarian issues in the impoverished country. The Associated Press

March 29-April 1 Thursday, March 29 Intramural Update: Softball Entries | 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the Huston Huffman Fitness Center front desk. Cost is $60 per team or FREE if all participants live in OU Housing. Fee includes divisional, all campus and coed (double elimination) tournaments. Events begin April 9. For more information visit http://www.ou.edu/far or call Jonathan Dewhirst, (405) 325-3053.

Friday, March 30 CAC Mom’s Day: “Home Is Where Your Mom Is” | Campus Activities Counsel presents Mom’s Day 2012. There will be various events Friday through Sunday to welcome the moms of OU to campus. Please visit cac.ou.edu for more information and a complete list of events. Intramural Update: Coed Soccer Tournament Begins | Cost is $30 per team of FREE if all participants live in OU Housing. Late entries are available, please contact Jonathan Dewhirst at (405) 325-3053 or visit http://www.ou.edu/far for more information. Housing Fair | 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Food Court. If your student is interested in looking at different housing options, come by for great information on different apartment complexes and housing options around Norman! Approximately 15 housing options will be on site to answer questions and provide information about leasing. OU Baseball: OU vs. Kansas State | 6:30 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. Fans First Weekend, FREE K cards and FREE admission with a valid OU ID. Visit soonersports. com for more information. OU Softball: OU vs. Kansas | 7 p.m. at the Marita Hynes Field. Oklahoma Spring Festival, FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information. Art After Hours: The Santa Fe and Taos Art Colonies | 6 p.m. at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. In the early 20th century, Santa Fe and Taos became an important refuge for Eastern artists seeking relief from industrialized urban centers and inspiration in the unfamiliar. Work by the Taos Society of Artists and Los Cinco Pintores will be discussed. Light refreshments will be served. Lego-U | noon-2 p.m. in Crossroads Lounge, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Individuals and campus organizations will compete to build campus buildings out of Legos. There will be awards presented for different categories as well as a speed building competition. Presented by the Union Programming Board. There’s ALWAYS SOMETHING at the union, www.ou.edu/upb. Campus Awards Ceremony | 4 p.m. in Holmberg Hall. Join President David L. Boren at this annual awards ceremony honoring the top students at OU. FREE Movie: “Mission Impossible 4” | FREE screening at 6, 9 p.m. and midnight in Meacham Auditorium, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Enjoy a movie date with your family and friends, courtesy of the Union Programming Board and Campus Activities Council.

Saturday, March 31 Young Talent in Oklahoma Exhibition | 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Lightwell Gallery, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. This exhibition is free and open to the public. A reception and awards ceremony will be held from 2-4 p.m., but the exhibit will be open all day. Housing & Food Awards Ceremony | 10 a.m. at the Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center. This annual event is to recognize student leaders who exemplify the tenets of community building, scholarship and leadership within student housing government and Residence Life. Southern Sprinkles | 11 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Food Court. Have a sweet tooth? Come fulfill your craving by decorating a cupcake just the way you like it! Round-Up Rodeo | 2-4 p.m. in the Oklahoma Memorial Union Food Court. Games, crafts and activities for all ages! OU Baseball: OU vs. Kansas State | 2 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. FREE K cards, post-game autographs and FREE admission with a valid OU ID. Visit soonersports.com for more information. OU Softball: OU vs. Kansas | 2 p.m. at the Marita Hynes Field. Senior Saturday, 250 FEE Allee Allen senior posters, bingo night and FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information. Mom’s Day Tea | 2:30 p.m. at Boyd House. OU’s First Lady, Molly Shi Boren, invites students and their moms to historic Boyd House for Mom’s Day Tea. All students and their families are welcome to attend. Boyd House is located at the intersection of Boyd Street and University Boulevard and adjacent historic Campus Corner. No reservations are needed and parking is available in the lot behind Boyd House. Part of the Campus Activities Council’s Mom’s Day. Sooner Showdown Talent Show | 3:30-5:30 p.m. in the Scholars Room, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Enjoy a free, casual production of OU’s most talented students. With talents ranging from singing to dancing to comedy, this show is sure to be a crowd pleaser.

Sunday, April 1 Country Time Cookin’ and Awards Banquet | 10 a.m.-Noon in Beaird Lounge, Oklahoma Memorial Union. Before you leave for the weekend, top by and grab some brunch and help us honor OU Mother of the Year and OU International Parent of the Year. OU Softball: OU vs. Kansas | Noon. at Marita Hynes Field. FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information. OU Baseball: OU vs. Kansas State | 1 p.m. at L. Dale Mitchell Park. FREE OU ice cream helmets and FREE admission with a valid OU I.D. Visit soonersports.com for more information. Sutton Concert Series: The Magic of Music | 2:30 p.m. in Sharp Concert Hall, Catlett Music Center. Multimedia concert and Disney costume parade for children. Featuring selections from Disney’s Fantasia, Fantasia/2000 and other musical surprises. Contact the Fine Arts Box Office for tickets and information, (405) 325-4101.

This University in compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, genetic information, age, religion, disability, political beliefs, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This includes but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. For accommodations on the basis of disability, please contact the sponsoring department of any program or event.

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• Thursday, March 29, 2012

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vote: Regents to consider construction projects Continued from page A1 to current automatic-admission criteria, but they may be required “to participate in activities or utilize services designed to ensure academic success,” according to the agenda. The meeting agenda refers to the proposed changes as the Common Application or holistic process, which is now used at 456 institutions in 46 states. “Universities that have implemented holistic admissions have experienced benefits in several dimensions, including higher persistence and graduation rates,” according to the agenda. The Common Application also allows universities to design more effective intervention and assistance programs from the increased information collected and evaluated in the process, according to the agenda. If the new approach is approved, it will still be subject to a vote by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education before it is implemented, according to the agenda. In addition to the Common Application, the regents will consider an agenda item

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Mom’s Day

OU to open campus to Sooner mothers “Home is Where Your Mom Is” will kick off with new event mid-day Saturday Connor Sullivan Campus Reporter

Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Members of the OU Board of Regents listen as the OU Chant is sung at the closing of Wednesday’s Arbor Day ceremonies in David A. Burr Park.

to improve the Oklahoma Memorial Stadium’s eastside suites, Santee Lounge and Kerr McGee Stadium Club. The improvements would have a guaranteed maximum construction price of $950,000. If approved, early construction would commence this spring and be completed during the summer. The work would be undertaken at the conclusion of the 2012 home football

season and completed prior to the 2013 football season, according to the agenda. The regents also will consider the on-campus construction of a Scholars Walk and the Radar Innovations Laboratory. If approved, construction of Scholars Walk, a pedestrian mall honoring outstanding students that will run north from Lindsey Street to tie into the Brooks Pedestrian Mall, is expected to commence in early or

mid-year 2013, according to a press release. Pending the regents’ approval, the approximately 36,000 square-foot Radar Innovations Laborator y would be located on the Research Campus. It would provide space for radar researchers and create an open working space for research efforts. The regents will meet at 9:30 a.m. today in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Scholars Room.

The Campus Activities Council’s Mom’s Day will feature several events to welcome mothers to campus Friday through Sunday. Themed “Home is Where Your Mom Is,” Mom’s Day 2012 will feature a number of first-time events. Mom’s Day chairwoman Rachel Simpson is attempting to make the visiting moms feel welcome at OU. “We hope mothers can see how much they are loved, appreciated and respected and simply enjoy all OU has to offer,” Simpson said. The weekend is for all mothers, whether they be visiting mothers of OU students or students who are mothers, council assistant director Quy Nguyen said. This year, organizers have added a few events, including the Southern Sprinkles and the Round Up Rodeo event, both of which take place Saturday, Simpson said. During the Southern Sprinkles event, cupcakes will be made available for decorating from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Round Up Rodeo will feature games and crafts from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Both events will be in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Will Rogers Room. Simpson has headed the push to reach as many different students as possible this year, she said. “We have worked extra hard this year through social media sites, yard signs and other means of publicity to reach as many people as possible and let them know of our events,” Simpson said. Visit OUDaily.com for a full schedule of events

honors college

Journal to showcase undergraduate work Diverse collection of research papers will show off students’ hard work PAIGHTEN HARKINS Campus Reporter

The politics of power. Mutilation of female genitals. Cultural sensitivity in medical practices. All are broad topics that make up a small portion of the essays in this year’s “The Honors Undergraduate Research Journal,” an annual compilation of some of the best research papers written by OU honors students. The diversity of this year’s journal is what makes it interesting for students, student editor in chief Grae Rose said. “We have freshmen to seniors (publishing) and everything from zoology to literature,” Rose said. The variety in the journal is a clear representation of the “imagination and intelligence of our student body,” adviser Amanda Minks said. “Each issue is a snapshot of the “Each issue is innovative research and writing a snapshot of produced by undergraduates in the innovative the Honors College, which is really impressive,” Minks said. research and Journals like this serve to show undergraduate students that what writing produced they’re doing for classes is impor- by undergraduates tant and understood, Rose said. in the Honors “[The journal] kind of legitimizCollege.” es the efforts of undergraduate students because a lot of people look Amanda Minks, at the undergraduate programs or Adviser listen to people talk about doing research papers, and they don’t really see that as an autonomous piece of legitimate academic research,” Rose said. “It’s just a paper that they’re writing for a class.” The editorial board received more than 113 submissions and selected 12 of the best papers to publish, Rose said. Last year, the journal only received about 30 papers and published 10. The increase in submissions can be attributed to the group’s effort to gain publicity; the editorial board chalked, hung posters and spoke to honors classes about the journal. “There’s a lot more visibility, and I think people got a lot more excited than they did last year,” Rose said. The final publication should be completed in April, Rose said. Free copies will be available all over campus.

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Year: Senior Major: International and area studies Class: Violence in Culture in the Developing World Topic: “Female Genital Mutilation: Two Ideologies at War” Length: 20 pages Outline: The paper focuses on motives and culture behind female genital mutilation in Africa and why eradication efforts haven’t worked. Why: “I’m always one to go for the touchy topics. They just interest me. It’s important to write about those topics because not many people do. I wanted people to actually learn about the issues, know about the issues and have the guys and girls understand it and be able to go forward having that knowledge.”

Year: Senior Major: Spanish Class: Literature in Medicine Topic: “Understanding the Hispanic Medical Perspective” Length: 15 pages Outline: The paper addresses ways doctors and health care providers can address the needs of the Hispanic population while still being sensitive to its culture. Why: “I thought it was an important topic. A lot of times the (pre-medical) course work is so focused on, ‘How does this chemical reaction work?’ or ‘How does this disease work in the body?’ or ‘What’s this equation?’ and little of it really focuses on human contact and doctor-patient relationships, which is half of being a doctor.”

Year: Junior Major: Multidisciplinary studies Class: Native American Philosophy Topic: Diabetes in the Pima Indian tribe Length: About 10 pages Outline: The paper focuses on the American Indian Pima tribe, which was once very healthy but became less so after colonization and westernization. Why: “I’m pre-med, so I wanted to write about something related to that, and this just kind of fell into place.”

Year: Freshman Major: University College Class:

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Composition II

Topic: Regulations implemented on biological research that make it harder for average people to get involved Length: 10 pages Outline: The paper focuses on the importance of citizen science, why it’s not as prevalent as it used to be and why it’s important for biological research tools to be more available. Why: “It was supposed to be a research paper over what we’re interested in, and I got really interested in it.”

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Campus in Photos

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

Ricardo Patino/The Daily

Mild weather took a class out of the classroom to do yoga Wednesday outside Carpener Hall. Overcast skies kept the sun from beating down on students, creating a comfortable climate to relax in.

The Daily’s

CAMPUS SNAPSHOTS Wednesday

Above: Hannah Kraemer, University College freshman, sketches Disney characters and soaks up some sunshine Wednesday on the North Oval lawn. Many students can be spotted reading, playing frisbee or even napping outside during the warm spring weather.

Left: A member of Omega Psi Phi fraternity hugs Molly Shi Boren on Wednesday after the organization received recognition for its work on its Adopt-An-Area location. The fraternity was one of six greek organizations honored for their contribution to the progam during the Arbor Day opening ceremonies at David A. Burr Park.

Left: Quinn Reid, University College freshman, relaxes in a tree Wednesday on the North Oval. Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

photos by Kelsey Higley/The Daily

Above: Jacquelyn Porter, University College freshman (center), takes advantage of the Student Sucess Series seminar on time management Wednesday in Wagner Hall. The lecture taught students how to budget their time by doing simple things like making color-coded calendars and to-do lists. Right: Career sesrvices employee Sarah Welch receives a burger at the Arbor Day picnic Wednesday at David A. Burr Park. The picnic was followed by a ceremony and the planting of 75 trees by students, faculty and staff.

Melodie Lettkeman/The Daily

Looking for something new to make? Let Coco help you bake a cake — French style

Life&arts

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T h u r sday, M a rc h 2 9, 2 012

Local Business

student life

The sound of community

Boutique freshens Campus Corner Birdie sells flowers, arrangements for wedding ceremonies Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

Nikki Self/The Daily

Amy Galoob, special education sophomore, sits in her teaching class that talks about maintaining the classroom. Galoob was born deaf, but she has cochlear implants that allow her to easily interact with teachers and peers. She receives assistance from sign language interpreters and classmates, but has otherwise flourished in the OU community .

Despite impairment, Sooner finds stability, success on campus

Nick Williams

Life & Arts Reporter

There are stories all around the campus — in classrooms, across the dorm hallway, throughout the Oklahoma Memorial Union during the lunch rush. A walk down the South Oval is a stroll past a library’s worth of living narratives still being written. Most are average, many are plain boring, but there are a few stories that have a humbling and uplifting thread running through their pages. Meet Amy Galoob, a special education sophomore, Colorado-native and member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. A passerby’s glance would illuminate a pretty, friendly, brightly observant undergraduate, but underneath the cover is a student who lives every day with a challenge many on campus don’t experience. “I was born profoundly deaf,” said Galoob, sitting down for lunch. She was wearing a broad smile that one cannot help but reciprocate. A daughter of two hearing-impaired

parents, Galoob was born with little to no hair cells, which are responsible for making the follicles found in the inner ear that pickup and transmit sound information to the brain. Galoob’s older sister and younger brother are hearing impaired as well. However, with the help of cochlear implants, Galoob is able to listen and communicate in normal, everyday conversation — as well as dish out her delightful sense of humor. “It’s really a good gift, actually,” Galoob said. “I’m able to unplug and sleep like a baby every night.” Bright and articulate, Galoob attends and participates in all regular classes for special education majors — in fact, she was recently asked by one of her professors to stand in front of one of her lecture hall classes and speak about her experience with hearing impairment. However, Galoob also receives a bit of assistance from interpreters who translate lessons into sign language, as see implant page B3

The aroma of fresh flowers may not be what you’re expecting when you walk into Birdie, one of the many boutique-looking shops on Campus Corner. It may look like a typical boutique, but the shop has a floral twist. After graduating from OU in 2006 with a degree in elementary education and completing her KATIE student teach- HUSKERSON ing, Birdie owner Katie Huskerson realized she needed to pursue a career outside of teaching. “I loved my experience in the education department, but I realized I wanted to do something a little bit more visually creative,” Huskerson said. S o she and her husband opened Birdie in October 2009. Initially, the store sold clothes as well, but that changed three months ago. “We originally started out as a split shop where we had flowers on one side and clothing on the second side, but within the last three months we actually stopped selling clothing,” she said. “That entire side of the store is now devoted for event and wedding production.” T h e s u c c e s s o f t h e i r a rrangements for weddings and events made the change necessary, Huskerson said. Initially, Birdie would get busy with floral arrangement orders a few months in the spring, but the see flowers pageB4

AT A GLANCE Birdie WHERE: 566 Buchanan Ave HOURS: 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Thursday to Saturday; 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. INFO: 405-579-0299

film

Classic movies re-released as part of ‘Reel Cinema’ program Cinemark Theatres to return well-known movies to big screens nationwide spring, summer Westlee Parsons Life & Arts Reporter

The sun was blazing through the east-facing window in the Old Science Hall, right into my eyes, when film and video studies professor Misha Nedeljkovich asked if I would like to take another seat where my corneas would be safe. Nedeljkovich then opened the conversation using my near-blinding experience to explain what films are. “Everything in film is unrepeatable; a moment in time,” he said. Nedeljkovich explained that the moment when the light flickered across my face was something only a film could preserve. This poetic introduction to what films are and why they should be

AT A GLANCE Reel Cinema A nationwide movie program started by Cinemark Theatres that re-releases classic films to theaters for a one day in the spring. Source: cinemark.com

cherished led into a series of conversations with the Film and Media Department about Cinemark Theatres’ return of classic films to the big screen this spring through their program, “Reel Classics.” These films include classics

photo provided

In Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather Part II,” Michael Corleone (right), played by Al Pacino, accepts his role as head of see movies page B4 the Corleone mafia family. The 1974 film returns to the big screen as part of Cinemark Theatres “Reel Cinema” program.

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LIFE&ARTS

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

Cookin’ with Coco Bake your own classic recipe for French bread with simple ingredients Known as cake in France, this dish is perfect for picnics

T

here is an expression in French, “long comme un jour sans pain,” that means “long like a day without bread.” It’s a phrase that says it all. But fear not, my bread-loving friends, you can make your own delicious French bread. It’s easy, cheap and has countless variations. One of the most common bread-based recipes in France is called a cake. Don’t be confused by the name; it’s not the sweet dessert you initially think of. It’s actually a bar-shaped, salty, stuffed bread. Cake is perfect for spring, as picnics are coming back in season. One of the most classic recipes is the olive and bacon cake. To make your own cake, you need:

right in your own oven. Looking for a more American take? Add ground beef, barbecue sauce and cheddar cheese for a bread you won’t forget. For more complex recipes, add a chicken cooked in butter with zucchini, sour cream and Parmesan. Or you could add salmon with chives, sour cream, mozzarella and lemon juice. The only rule is to be generous in the quantity of ingredients you add, but try to respect an equal ratio of meat and vegetables to stuffing and cheese. This is the perfect recipe to use on leftovers, and it lasts up to a week in the fridge. Since the basic recipe of the cake is neutral, it also can be used to make sweeter renditions. Add half a cup of sugar, some yogurt, three mashed bananas and chocolate chips. You just made yourself a delicious dessert. Don’t like chocolate? Try some walnuts, melted butter, brown sugar, cinnamon and honey. The best part is the recipe doesn’t stop with main courses and desserts. For a fancy bread-based breakfast, try some bacon muffins. Follow the same basic recipe with only one egg and three-fourths cup of milk. Add some caramelized onions for a sweeter taste. Then, instead of a PHOTOS BY MELODIE LETTKEMAN/THE DAILY loaf pan, pour the mixture into a muffin pan halfway Coco makes an alternate version to his cake recipe, which up. Add some more cheddar cheese so your muffins includes tomatoes and onions instead of olives and bacon. will have a warm cheese center, then pour the rest of Pour the tomatoes into the egg and flour mixture. The cake the mix on top. Bake at 375 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes or until should be baked at 350 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes. the knife comes out clean. more creative with different styles of cake. Like the French saying implies, you should never Consider exchanging the bacon for tuna and go a day without bread, and now that you have adding in some tomatoes or pickles. You have a these simple and easy recipes, there’s no reason you completely different cake that goes perfectly with a should. salad. Or find a stronger cheese like blue cheese or goat cheese and add some sun-dried tomatoes, prosciut- Coco Courtois is an exchange student from France to, olive oil and basil. The result is an Italian delicacy studying journalism.

• 3 eggs • 2/3 cup of flour • 2 teaspoons of baking powder (unless you use selfrising flour) • 4 slices of bacon • 1 cup of green olives, pitted and chopped • 2 generous cups of cheese (cheddar for a sharper taste, a white cheese for a softer one)

Start by chopping your bacon in small bits and cook it in a pan. Keep an eye on it, you don’t want it to become too crunchy, since you will cook it again in the oven. In a large bowl, beat the eggs, then add the flour, baking powder, chopped olives, cheese and the bacon — grease included. Stir everything together until you have a pastelike consistency, then spread it into a buttered 9-by5-by-3 -inch loaf pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes or until you can insert a knife in the center and it comes out clean. This basic recipe is delicious both hot and cold. It also makes for a good snack, or it can be a great way to add flavor to a sandwich. Now the real fun begins. You can definitely be

Enjoy delicious food and great company Enjoy this Mom’s Day.

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Life&Arts

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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Miss Hispanic OU

Contestants take the stage seeking cultural crown

Top: Deisy Escalera, energy management junior, and Astrid Rodriguez, energy management senior, await the final announcement of Miss Hispanic OU 2012 during Wednesday night’s pageant after Pamela Peralta, University College freshman, was crowned first runner-up and given a $250 scholarship. Escalera eventually won the crown and the $1,000 scholarship that accompanied it. The contestants competed in interview and resume presentation, formal wear, talent, cultural talent and on-stage question categories. Bottom: Pamela Peralta instructs event attendees at the Miss Hispanic OU on how to make a Hispanic dessert during the Miss Hispanic OU pageant Wednesday in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. Peralta also performed a salsa-influenced swing dance accompanied by a partner during the evening’s events. Of the three women competing, Peralta was named the contest’s first runner-up.

AT A GLANCE Pageant winners Miss Hispanic OU 2012 Deisy Escalara

Photos by Chelsea Lott/The Daily

Deisy Escalera performs during the talent portion of the Miss Hispanic OU 2012 contest Wednesday in the Oklahoma Memorial Union’s Meacham Auditorium. Escalera was one of three undergraduate Hispanic women to compete in the contest, which celebrates the cultural contribution of Hispanic women on OU’s campus. Escalera was eventually named winner of the pageant.

implant: Impairment inspired Galoob to teach disabled children Continued from page B1 well as classmates who send her notes from each class. “I’m usually able to hear my teachers just fine, but sometimes there are some important details I might miss, like test dates,” she said. “So I definitely appreciate having interpreters and classmates who help me out in that.” As a resident of the Alpha Chi house, Galoob’s sense of community is only solidified by the friendships she has with her sisters. “My roommate is responsible for my complete rescue and safety in case of a fire or tornado emergency,” Galoob said. “But joining Alpha Chi was such a great move for me, and I love all my friends there.” However, being hearing-impaired does come with its handy hidden talents. Most notably, Galoob has the ability to read lips. “It was quite useful in middle and high school when gossip was very popular,” Galoob said. “But I’ve toned back a bit.” The transition from high school to college

was a bit rocky, Galoob said. But she said she has finally found some stability at OU. Galoob’s experience has influenced her future goals. She plans on specializing in teaching disabled children and students. Hidden talents and greek groups aside, Galoob also is the new president of the Association for Disabled Students on campus. Although it’s a role she’s only inherited this semester, Galoob has big plans and deep passion for the group. Although it seems life for Galoob is enjoyable and well defined, she admits her path has not always been this straight. Growing up with her challenges with hearing, as well as the trials of speech therapy, Galoob described her childhood by progressing through a handful of schools, searching for the one that would best meet her needs. “There were definitely times it was difficult and hard to do. Always meeting new people, not really having that group of friends you go through elementary, middle and high school with,” said Galoob. “But overall, I just love talking with people. And I really feel like I’ve finally found a solid home here at OU with a great school and great friends.”

First runner-up Pamela Peralta

OUDaily.com Read complete coverage of the Miss Hispanic OU pageant. oudaily.com/life&arts

YOU ARE INVITED! Public Master Classes

Marilyn Horne Former Star of the Metropolitan Opera, praised by critics as having “the greatest voice of the 20th Century”

7 p.m. Friday, March 30 Pitman Recital Hall Catlett Music Center OU Arts District Free and Open to the Public For more information, go to www.ou.edu/finearts - THE PRIDE OF OKLAHOMA

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Life&Arts

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

fLoWeRs: moVies: Norman needs art cinema, film professors say Shop sells Continued from page B1 local art, jewelry Continued from page B1 shop now stays busy with orders year round, she said. The shop has weddings scheduled from this coming weekend through May 2013. Today, most of Birdie is covered from floor to ceiling with houseplants, ranging from orchids to ferns. Behind the mountains of houseplants in rich colored pots, there is a station set for creating flower arrangements. Wills Brewer, a sales associate at Birdie, said the boutique tries to keep local plants in stock. “Most of our houseplants are out-sourced from McAlister, (Okla.),” Brewer said. Brewer, a Norman native, started working at Birdie in early January, he said. The owners asked him to work there because they felt like he had a good eye for natural design, which is important to the floral ar rangements designed at Birdie, Brewer said. “I [had also] always kind of wanted to tr y out arranging flowers,” Brewer said. “It sounded like a relaxing job, and I had no real reason to say no.” Natural design means Birdie only uses flowers that aren’t dyed or placed with plastic bows. “The arrangements are as natural as you can get,” Brewer said. “We try to stay away from cheesy. “ The fl o ral ar rang ements for weddings isn’t the only thing Birdie has to offer Campus Corner. The shop also sells single stem flowers, handpoured candles, organic soaps and local art. “ We a l s o o f f e r t e rrariums, air plants, just things that are not your typical flower shop finds,” Huskerson said. Birdie also supports the Oklahoma economy by selling art and jewelry made by local artists, she said. “Half of the jewelry is made by Reese Truesdell w h o o w n s Wi l d Ha re Beadery and Dana Joy Scott who is the co-owner of The Social Club,” Brewer said. Birdie participates in local business networking where local shops sell items from local artists or from other local shops. There is not a competition between the shops, but more of an effort to keep Norman a self-sustaining community, he said. Huskerson said their sense of community and support with other businesses is not just about the economy, but also about supporting artistic endeavors. “Being in a creative field, we want to support others’ creativity, so if we can introduce someone to a painter or a jewelry artist we like to showcase their work as well,” she said.

such as “The Godfather,” “Casablanca” and “Lawrence of Arabia.” Nedeljkovich said he is a fan of the new re-release program because not only does it make some of the most influential movies in the history of film accessible to a new generation, but it also gives viewers a big-screen effect they can’t get when they watch a movie on a television or computer. “It is a great idea not to just release all films, but films of some significance,” Nedeljkovich said. Not only should American classics be re-released, but also influential foreign films that are seen as classics to countries across the world, he said. Many of the films are coming up on anniversaries of their making, said Katrina G. Boyd, film and video studies professor. Boyd said she believes this is a big reason why several of these films are being re-released — in order to pique interest in purchasing memorabilia. “I’m sure Cinemark has some sort of marketing scheme for these re-releases,” Boyd said. “It could be that they think these particular films will have a big draw.” It used to be common for theaters to re-release films decades ago, Boyd said. She explained that from the 1920s through the ’40s, rereleases were common because there was no other way people were going to be able to see the films again, since there was no VHS system at the time. Boyd said the practice is similar to Disney’s re-release of DVD versions of classic films from the Disney vault each year. “Hollywood has always cannibalized its own product,” Boyd said. Despite whatever marketing gimmick may be behind Cinemark’s program, Boyd said there is undeniable value in the opportunity to see these classic films as they were meant to be seen. “I do think it is nice to go back and see things on

photo provided

The 1927 film, “Wings,” tells the story of two World War I fighter pilots who are in love with the same woman. “Wings” comes to Cinemark Theatres as part of its “Reel Cinema” program in May. The exact date will be released after the showing of “The Godfather Part II” on April 26.

GO AND DO ‘Godfather Part ii’ WHEN: 7 p.m. April 26 WHERE: Cinemark Tinseltown, 6001 Martin Luther King Blvd. PRICE: $6 INFO: 405-424-0461

the big screen,” Boyd said. “Something like ‘Lawrence of Arabia’ is made to be on the big screen.” With its wide shots, the classic film didn’t translate well to television, she said. The re-release program offers a window into an era of the art that many people forget about in the hustle of today, said Andrew Horton, the Jeanne H. Smith Professor of Film and Media Studies. “[People] are reaching a point where we are exhausted with the fast, text messaging, bop-bop-bop thing that we are wanting to see something else,” Horton said. Horton agrees with Nedeljkovich that significant

“[People] are reaching a point where we are exhausted with the fast, text messaging, bop-bop-bop thing that we are wanting to see something else.” ANDREW HORTON, FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES PROFESSOR

foreign films also should be re-released. On one of his final exams, Horton asked his students to discuss their three favorite foreign comedies they had seen during the semester. “One student wrote the he liked the Israeli comedies, because he didn’t know Israelis could laugh,” Horton said. This is why Horton said it is important to not just show classic American films, but also the classics of other cultures. “What we are missing in Oklahoma is the art cinema,” Nedeljkovich said. These are places where you can see films that you

wouldn’t normally get to see like foreign films, revivals and other genres that don’t make it to the big screen in Oklahoma, he said. All three professors spoke passionately about the need for a local arts cinema in Norman, because many college towns in the United States have a community cinema that shows a variety of classic and independent films. As a result, many students and Norman locals will miss out on this opportunity rather than make the drive to Oklahoma City’s Cinemark Tinseltown theater to watch these films, which is why

Norman’s art community needs to create an art cinema. Nedeljkovich said he was surprised there was not already a push in the community for some kind of local independent film center. T h e re a re o p t i o n s i n Oklahoma City for those who are willing to actively pursue less mainstream film, Horton said. Aside from the Cinemark program, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art has a 200-person theater that shows independent and foreign films, he said. While many local mainstream theaters showed the best picture nominations before this year’s Academy Awards show, the museum went even further and brought all the foreign films that were nominated to its screen, Horton said. This was an opportunity moviegoers couldn’t find anywhere else at the time, he said.

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Lindsey Ruta contributed to this story.

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Life&Arts

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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music

Aerosmith promises new album in 3 months LOS ANGELES — Aerosmith has reunited with Jack Douglas, who produced the band’s key 1970s albums, and quietly recorded a new studio album even as its lead singer traded jokes with Jennifer Lopez on “American Idol.” Steven Tyler said Aerosmith was finishing two final songs for the as-yet-untitled album, its first since 2004’s “Honkin’ on Bobo,” and that he expected it to be released in about three months. Joined Wednesday by Joe Perry, Tom Hamilton and Joey Kramer at a Los Angeles mall, Tyler revealed three track titles: “Legendary Child,” ‘’Beautiful” and “Out Go the Lights.” Earlier in the week, the band announced that its 18-stop US “Global Warming Tour” begins June 16 in Minneapolis. “We will not let you down,” Tyler told reporters and cheering fans. The “Idol” judge is engaged to model Erin Brady. Asked in an interview about what will be his third marriage, Tyler joked: “I cannot stop falling off stage and falling in love.” Tyler said he reached out to Douglas — who produced

Katy Winn/The Associated Press

Steven Tyler (left), Joey Kramer, Joe Perry and Tom Hamilton of Aerosmith, pose for pictures at the Aerosmith news conference announcing the 2012 Global Warming Tour on Wednesday in Los Angeles. The Global Warming Tour will play in 18 markets beginning June 16.

1974’s “Get Your Wings,” 1975’s “Toys in the Attic” and other seminal albums from the multiplatinum Boston band — and the other group members joined him in Los Angeles. The group’s 15th

studio album will feature tunes built around guitar riffs from tour jam sessions and some previously shelved songs. “We have a lot of songs that are very dear to us that we’ve

written over the years,” Tom Hamilton said. “And we can feel it when it’s the perfect time to whip them out. And we’re having that kind of experience now.” Tyler said he had used

elements from tracks that didn’t make previous albums. “All the things that are left over aren’t necessarily finished. So we take those riffs and we do them again,”

he said. “Because they are Aerosmith riffs. They’re our children, so to speak.” The four members of the band — guitarist Brad Whitford did not attend — arrived at the mall in separate vehicles but seemed in good spirits and played down their famed infighting. Tyler acknowledged that the band had argued over which songs to include: “Are we going to Tom’s or Joe’s or mine? It’s always a fight. And plus it’s a whole lot more,” he said. “I think what you guys should be worrying about is the fact that we’re still together after forty years and what you’re about to hear, which is a new record. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.” Perry had leveled criticism at “Idol” in the past but credited the show for lifting Tyler’s spirits. “He’s having a great time. I think he’s happier now doing it, frankly,” Perry said. Hamilton said the band will benefit from Tyler’s experience on a live television show: “Everything from how to appear to the public, how to go for it. ... As long as the rock is there, everything is cool.” The Associated Press

Review

‘Game of Thrones’ fans get ready for Season 2 plunge

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“People who discovered Martin’s books after they watched the first season might feel a bit of a letdown, because now they know what they’re missing.” Kingdoms after the death of King Robert Baratheon (young actor Jack Gleeson doesn’t get enough credit for his strong portrayal of Joffrey, one of TV’s most vile villains). In the first season, Joffrey executed Ned Stark, and House Stark is scattered, with things looking especially bleak for Stark daughters Sansa and Arya (Sophie Turner, Maisie Williams). Ned’s widow, Lady Catelyn (Michelle Fairley) and son, Robb (Richard Madden), work to form an uneasy alliance with Renly Baratheon (Gethin Anthony), one of Robert’s surviving brothers. Another brother, Stannis (Stephen Dillane), also shows up. And Renly and Stannis — both of whom make an impact in these early episodes — do not like each other. Got all that? I’m leaving a lot out, and there may come a time when you realize that there is so much going on that the story doesn’t really advance

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very much in the first four episodes. But it doesn’t matter, because part of the joy of watching this series is reveling in Martin’s imagination, in the way he has created a whole world that has some relation to Earth and medieval England but is a colorful land all its own. And there’s joy in the witty dialogue, especially the lines that come from the clever and manipulative Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage, who deser vedly won an Emmy for his work in Season 1) — and in returning to the characters themselves, all portrayed vividly by a sprawling cast. This season does feel the loss of Ned, who provided the series a much-needed center that it doesn’t have yet, making its episodic nature feel even more so. And once again, especially at the beginning of the fourth episode, there are scenes that aren’t for the squeamish. People who discovered Martin’s books after they watched the first season might feel a bit of a letdown, because now they know what they’re missing. But this is an impressive return, and if the first four episodes feel like a long warmup, at least they also feel like they are pointing to big events ahead. The Associated Press

K S C E E L N F O A T K L É C P E B U L E F E N HE TH DT ND AL LI AN INA G I R O THE

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In an early Season 2 episode of Game of Thrones, Cersei Lannister (L ena Headey), queen of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros, learns of the existence of a king she has never heard of. “Another king?” Cersei asks sardonically. “How many does that make, five? I’ve lost count.” Cersei is a pretty nasty person, but it’s easy to empathize with her on this score, especially if you haven’t read George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels that inspired Game of Thrones. Season 2 of Game of Thrones is even more dense and layered than Season 1, adding several new characters (of course, it made room by killing off a few key ones in the first season). Sometimes it is best to let this all wash over you, but series writer-producers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss continue to do an admirable job of distilling Martin’s prose while keeping the storytelling coherent. The early episodes for this season (HBO sent four for review) have more subplots than I can gracefully fit into a relatively brief review, but here are the key things to know. (Warning to those still catching up: Spoilers lie ahead.) The sadistic, petulant young Joffrey Baratheon, son of Cersei, is king of the Seven

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• Thursday, March 29, 2012

OUDaily.com ››

SPORTS More online at

The OU football team is well into the spring season and preparing for its second scrimmage of the year, which will be this Saturday.

Greg Fewell, sports editor Kedric Kitchens, assistant sports editor dailysports@ou.edu • phone: 405-325-3666

| Track & Field: The Oklahoma track team is competing in the Texas Relays this weekend, one of the most prestigious meets of the year.

COLUMN

MEN’S GOLF

Sooners making tracks

OU seeks lead in conference

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he OU men’s tennis team has been riding a recent wave of momentum as of late. The Sooners are currently on a four-match win streak. Not only have they been defeating their opponents, but they have been winning rather easily, with the closest margin of victory coming against the University of Tulsa yesterday (5-2). The Achilles’ heel of the team at the start of the season was its inability to close out matches. In late February when the team hosted the perennial tennis power, the Pepperdine Waves, they had a chance to take a lead in the match but couldn’t win some crucial points. The result was a 4-3 loss to the Waves. Even more recently, the Sooners traveled to Charlottesville, Virg., to face off against the University of Virginia Cavaliers. The team played one of its worst matches of the year, losing 6-1. The team also lost to Ole Miss in January at the ITA Kickoff 4-0. “We had a lot of opportunities in our first match to win and we didn’t close any of them out,” head coach John Roddick said. “That was the theme for the early part of the season. It’s safe to say that the team is taking advantage of those opportunities now early and often.” Roddick knows that he has an extremely talented team this year. He just has been looking for more consistency in gaining an early lead in matches and holding on to those leads, if not adding to them. The team also needed a better ability to close out tight matches. Roddick knew there would be some growing pains because of the tough schedule. He said he viewed the beginning of the season as a learning process for the team. By scheduling tough matches early, Roddick hoped the team would be ready to compete for a Big 12 conference title and to ultimately make the NCAA’s. Not only have Roddick’s players learned from their early struggles, they are now being rewarded for their recent success: They were voted in the Big 12 coaches poll to finish second in the conference behind Texas. The Sooners were only three points away from being the favorites to win the Big 12. Knowing that the Longhorns are picked as the favorites to win the conference will add to the intensity of their match as the top two teams face off at 6 p.m. Friday in Austin. The team has really begun to play its best tennis the past few weeks and is doing well right as conference play is slated to begin. Being only a few votes short to be the favorites in the Big 12 conference accurately shows how much the team has grown the past few weeks and the potential it has to get even better. The Sooners are peaking at the right time and should be considered the favorites to win the conference. Cameron Strock is a business sophomore.

Tournaments spreading OU across the country KRISTEN SMITH Sports Reporter

Traveling constantly is tough on anyone and balancing schoolwork with that travel adds to the load. However, its something the OU men’s golf team has mastered. Most team members have been playing golf since at least high school, so they have grown accustomed to booking flights, hotels and whatever else is necessary to arrive at a tournament prepared and ready. “Most of these guys have been playing long before they got here,” coach Ryan Hybl said. “They understand how to travel. What’s different is we might miss a Monday and a Wednesday, which might be more than what they were used to.” Missing school, however, does not necessarily mean the men are lagging in their studies. If a player is not doing well in a class, he doesn’t get to travel. The university also has invested a lot in ensuring OU athletes stay on top of their assignments. “ The athletic department has put so much into academics and the team has anything from tutors to mandatory study hours, so their lives are pretty structured,” Hybl said. Even though the team travels often, members get to play some pretty challenging courses from the

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While collegiate teams typically spend the majority of the season traveling around a small area of the country for conference matchups, the Sooner golf teams do not have the same luxury. Just a little over half way through the season, the team has already covered a big part of the country and has even travelled as far as San Juan, Puerto Rico. for the first competition of the spring season. Thus far, the men’s team has visited Erie, Colo. (1), Franklin, Tenn. (2), Macon, Ga. (3), Shreveport, La. (4), Dallas (5), San Antonio (6), Greensboro, Ga. (7), San Juan, P.R. (8), and Tempe, Ariz. (9). The team will also make an appearance on the west coast at the end of the season when it travels to California to compete in the NCAA championships.

We s t C o a s t t o t h e E a s t Coast. At the end of April, the Sooners will tee it up in the Aggie Invitational at Traditions Golf Club, which is known to golf insiders as a rigorous collegiate course. If the team makes it to internationals, they will compete at the famed Los Angeles Riviera Country Club, which recently held the 2012 Northern Trust Open, a PGA tournament. “ We p l a y s o m e h a r d courses throughout the season,” junior Abraham Ancer said. “Brickyard in Georgia is one of them, and also

Riviera if we make it.” Along with playing tough courses, the team ventures to some unique locations. In February they traveled to San Juan, Puerto Rico to play in the Puerto Rico Classic, an invitation-only tournament. “[To play in this tournament] it’s who you know, or who invites you,” Hybl said. “It’s a selective process and our team was also invited to play there two years ago.” In visiting such exclusive locations, the team still has free time to explore its surroundings. Even if they don’t get to sightsee, the

players may get access to elite and otherwise private courses before they play their actual tournament. “Last year we went to Arizona and got to play Whisper Rock, which was cool,” Ancer said. “We also go to play at Scottsdale Golf Club.” Despite the squad’s demanding travel schedule, Coach Hybl tries to fit in time to treat his players to something special whenever possible. Still, players and coaches know they are there for one primary thing, and that is to win tournaments.

BY THE NUMBERS Oklahoma Golf

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The Sooners will compete in a total of 13 tournaments throughout the 2012 golf season.

The Honors College at the University of Oklahoma presents a Presidential Dream Course Lecture

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Of the team’s 13 total tournies this season, the Sooners will only get the luxury of playing in Norman for one of those contests.

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When all is said and done, Oklahoma will have made appearances in eight states in addition to the team’s brief trip to San Juan, P.R., earlier this year.

2 BEN WILLIAMS/THE DAILY

Freshman Dane Webb defends the net during the Sooners’ March 12 victory over the Louisville Cardinals. The Sooners beat Louisville 6-1. Since that match, Oklahoma has gone 5-1 with the team’s only loss coming on the road against a very strong Virginia squad.

The team is also receiving very little rest between road trips. The Sooners only had two days between its final round in Puerto Rico before it had to tee off in Greensboro, Ga. Likewise, the team only had five days rest between its previous two tournaments.

Please join us for a free lecture: “Is Double Belonging Possible? Necessary? Testimony from a Buddhist-Christian” by Paul Knitter, Ph.D. Union Theological Seminary Thursday, March 29, 2012 4:00 pm (booksigning after the talk) Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Robert S. Kerr Auditorium (free parking at the site)

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Paul Knitter is the Paul Tillich Professor of Theology, World Religions and Culture, at Union Theological Seminary, New York as well as Professor Emeritus of Theology at Xavier University. He is the author of No Other Name?, One Earth Many Religions: Multifaith Dialogue and Global Responsibility, Jesus and the Other Names: Christian Mission and Global Responsibility, Introducing Theologies of Religions, and most recently, Without Buddha I Could Not Be A Christian: A Personal Journey of Passing Over and Passing Back.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. For accommodations on the basis of disability, call 325-3350. This publication is printed at no cost to the taxpayers of the State of Oklahoma

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

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Research Participants Conflicting information-processing study at OUHSC seeks 17-19 year old volunteers. Single 2.5 hour test session, flexible hours, cash compensation. Include your name, phone, e-mail. Contact: 405271-4214 xt 46073. Email blas-espinoza-varas@ouhsc.edu

Research volunteers needed! Researchers at OU Health Sciences Center need healthy volunteers ages 18 to 30 who have a parent with or without a history of an alcohol or drug problem. Qualified participants will be compensated for their time. Call (405) 456-4303 to learn more about the study and to see if you qualify. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. PT Leasing Agent needed. Flexible schedule, 20-25 hours per week. Must be able to work Saturdays. Experience in customer service preferred, $7.50-$8.00 hourly. Call 360-7744.

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Military Sales & Service Company has an opening for a part-time Electronics salesperson to work at Tinker Air Force Base exchange, primarily on weekends, for 7-10 hours per week. If you desire parttime work, are available on Friday/Saturday/Sunday, have general knowledge of computer and audio/video hardware and good communication skills, please apply. Call Tamarra 469-221-4147 STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in Norman 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.

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Spring Specials

HOROSCOPE By Bernice Bede Osol

Copyright 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 2012 The year ahead could be an impressive one where your earnings are concerned. Interesting currents are stirring that could put you in the right place at the right time to make some impressive financial gains.

$445 $515 $440 $510 $700

ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It’s good that you are a courageous individual, but you need to be able to distinguish between bravery and just plain foolhardiness. Don’t try to buck the odds. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- There’s a chance you could get in way over your head if you challenge someone in a debate who has a firmer grip on the facts than you do. Know when to back off.



 

 

      

       

  

   



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Monday- Very Easy Tuesday-Easy Wednesday- Easy Thursday- Medium Friday - Hard

Instructions: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. That means that no number is repeated in any row, column or box.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If you already have your hands full trying to keep your own affairs in order, don’t additionally attempt to sort out another person’s muddled affairs. Mind your own beeswax. CANCER (June 21-July 22) --When one of your important goals is at stake, keep everyone else at bay. Unfortunately, taking on a partner could be more of a hindrance than a help. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --When it comes to important career matters, don’t rely on anybody else to handle things. If you delegate your responsibilities to a party who makes a mistake, you’ll only have yourself to blame. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Go ahead and let your hair down at a

social gathering, but be careful not to wear out your welcome. To be on the safe side, be among the first to leave. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --Even if it takes a bit of doing, be as tolerant as possible with certain companions who are not in harmony with your goals and purposes. Make allies, not enemies. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -Generally, things that we criticize in others are reflections of our own shortcomings. Instead of trying to correct the flaws of your colleagues, work on your personal imperfections. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be particularly careful about getting yourself involved in a financial arrangement that is outside of your particular field of expertise. The lesson you learn could be an expensive one. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --There is nothing wrong with looking out for your self-interest, provided you’re not trying to feather your nest at the expense of someone else. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --Should an associate come to you requesting assistance, by all means do what you can to help. Just don’t volunteer to take on something that’s beyond your capabilities. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --Avoid joining an activity with friends that is much too costly for your wallet to handle. Simply knowing it is beyond your means would put a damper on it for you.

Universal Crossword Edited by Timothy E. Parker March 29, 2012 ACROSS 1 “Poison� plant 6 Abandons bachelorhood 10 Ending where neither side wins 14 A Muse or dryad 15 Bump up against 16 Absurdist art movement 17 “Sweeney Todd� prop 18 Cutthroat 20 Mixes smoothly 22 “Cheers� accountant 23 Angry feeling 24 Chanel of fashion 26 Comparatively cashless 28 2007 Bostonbased mystery 32 White House nickname, honest 33 “Code� lead-in 34 Flippant 38 One with pants on fire? 40 Aunt Jemima product 43 Drifting ice sheet 44 Fanny pack feature 46 Who Seth begat 48 Grp. with a famous journal 49 How a book is usually read 53 Baby’s enclosure

3/29

56 “King ___� (Elgar cantata) 57 Real estate buy 58 TV screenmeasuring unit 60 Full of mischief 64 Utter 67 “Saturday Night Fever� dance genre 68 Nicholas I was one 69 Cookie many take apart 70 Brilliance of performance 71 All dried up 72 Change the decorations of 73 Scout accomplishments DOWN 1 About one in three Bosnians 2 1,500-mile Eurasian chain 3 Labyrinth 4 “A.S.A.P.!� 5 Andalusian city 6 A big spender may flash one 7 Bard’s black 8 Manatee lookalike 9 Audiophile’s acquisition 10 Banned bug killer 11 Diameters halved 12 “O Come Let Us ___ Him� 13 Transaction at a racetrack

19 Sounds from the flock 21 Surgical souvenirs 25 Word in old wedding vows 27 Fall on ___ ears 28 Square dance partners 29 Sad item, for short 30 A stone’s throw away from 31 More quick to the helm 35 Belgrade resident 36 Unspecified quantity 37 Planetary revolution 39 Off-color 41 “Do ___ others as you ...� 42 “His Family� author Ernest 45 Arrive

unexpectedly 47 Burned with liquid 50 Peddler 51 Performance extension 52 Home’s counterpart 53 Most novels have them 54 Wingless, bloodsucking insect 55 Floral perfume 59 With color 61 Guernsey, e.g., in the English Channel 62 Fish with an elongated body 63 “Get your red-___!� 65 A verb for you 66 “Not a moment ___ soon!�

PREVIOUS PUZZLE ANSWER

3/28

Š 2012 Universal Uclick www.upuzzles.com

FINISH WHAT YOU STARTED By Joyce Manning

B8

Sports

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

SPRING FOOTBALL BRIEFS Defensive backs to battle for spot Senior cornerback Demontre Hurst has one cernerback position sealed up for the Sooners. However, with the graduation of Jamell Fleming, OU will look to fill a position Fleming had locked down seemingly all season. There are a couple of familiar faces in the race to fill that position in juniors Joe Powell and Gabe Lynn, the latter of whom saw time on the field last season. Incoming freshman Kass Everett, a highlytouted secondary player who has both Bob and Mike Stoops already singing his praise also is in the mix. Of course, when September rolls around, it is possible senior Aaron Colvin, a player Bob Stoops has said can play just about anywhere in the secondary, could fill the void at corner while another player fills in for him at safety.

Sooners looking to solidify RBs The Sooners had a slew of running backs make departures from the team last season. However, the team will have no shortage of players in the backfield this season. Oklahoma has a trip of juniors in returners Brennan Clay and Roy Finch and junior college transfer Damien Williams. In addition to those three contributors, the Sooners will get their returning rusher from last season, Dominique Whaley, back after he suffered a season-ending knee injury last season. Sto ops has said e ven though Whaley will sit out spring practices, he is recovering well and is expected to be able to play when the season rolls around.

Strait returns as assistant coach Mike Stoops will not be the only former Sooner returning to the OU football staff for the 2012 season. The university has announced former cornerback Derrick Strait, the 2003 Nagurski and Thorpe award winner, will return to OU as a defensive quality control assistant. Strait will help out defensive coordinator in a somewhat limited role. However, being one of the most decorated cornerbacks in the Bob Stoops era, his advice will undoubtedly be welcome. Daily staff reports

Column

ROWING

Men’s basketball fans lucky to have Kruger’s commitment

Honors, awards abound for OU

Sports Columnist

Kedric Kitchens

Assistant Sports Editor

Greg Fewell greg_f@ou.edu

M

en’s basketball coach Lon Kruger made several stops before reaching Norman to attempt to rebuild an ailing OU program. However, it all began in Kansas. The Silver Lake, Kan., native led Kansas State to back-to-back Big Eight championships while earning two conference Player of the Year honors. After graduating, Kruger didn’t stay away from his alma mater for long, returning in 1979 as an assistant coach. In1986, he became the head coach of the Wildcats. K-State made the NCAA tournament in each of Kruger’s four seasons and made it as far as the Elite 8. The list of ties Kruger has with Kansas State is long indeed. That’s why when Frank Martin left the university to become the head coach at South Carolina on Tuesday, Kruger’s name naturally came up in the discussion of who would take over the K-State job. Fo r tu nat e l y f o r O U fans, the Sooners will not be looking for their third coach in as many years. Kruger said in a press release Wednesday that he has no interest in taking the job and that he is “100 percent Oklahoma and excited about that.” The Kansas State job made a lot of sense f o r K r u g e r. How e ve r, Oklahoma, as down as the team has been in recent years, could make as much

astrud reed/the daily

OU basketball coach Lon Kruger yells instruction to his players during the Sooners’ March 3 game against the Texas A&M Aggies. Kruger has turned down the chance to return to his alma mater to stay at OU.

sense for a few reasons. For one, Kruger has constantly rebuilt programs throughout his career. Look no further than his last team, UNLV. The Runnin’ Rebels were in terrible shape when Kruger arrived. In a few seasons, though, Kruger had the team in the right direction. He has had similar turnarounds in other areas of the country, taking Florida to its first Final Four in school history and becoming the only Big 10 coach ever to sign three consecutive Illinois Mr. Basketball winners while at the University of Illinois. For another thing, Kruger’s current situation is perfect for how he likes to

have been returning home, going back to his alma mater and inheriting a program that has made the NCAA tournament in consecutive seasons. Kruger is ready for a new challenge, though. He’s ready to make his own tradition at a new program, and Oklahoma fans should feel lucky to have him. Greg Fewell is a journalism senior

The University of Oklahoma Joe C. and Carole Kerr McClendon Honors College Invites the Public to UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH DAY Saturday, March 31, 2012 OCCE Forum Building, 1704 Asp Avenue SESSION I, 8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Civic Engagement, Room A-1 Presenters: KatieBeth Gardner, Kelsey Kehlbeck, Hannah Kellogg Humanities I, Room A-2 Presenters: Jared Curran, Gerard Keiser, Patrick Winterrowd Health Issues I, Room A-3 Presenters: Jasmine Casey, Jay Kumar, Alim Ramji Economics, Technology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jerod Coker, Jennifer Quitoriano Engineering, Room A-5 Presenters: Alana Denning, Nhung Duong, Napat Kiatsakdawong, Zixin Wang, Henry Ware Education, Psychology, Sociology, Room A-6 Presenters: Trenton Haltom, Ewelina Ignaczak, Rachel Renbarger History I, Room B-1 Presenters: Cameron Dabiri, Joseph Foote, Ryan Geary, Meghan Riley Environments, Room B-2 Presenters: Madeline Dillner, Krystal Gayler, Stephen Pittman, Robert Rhoades, Juliet Sutton Computers, Room B-3 Presenters: Bryan Hoke, Joshua Maddux and James Shipe, Jeremy Rand, Khue Tran, Kevin Windham International Issues I, Room B-4 Presenters: Hallie Arias, Abby Coppedge, Amanda Niedzwiecki, Thomas Simpkins, Lena Tenney

help is just a phone call away

9

number

build his teams — from the ground up. At OU, Kruger has the ability to recruit hard-working players who are willing to buy in to his philosophy. The Sooners already made steady improvement in Kruger’s first season. Now that he has a chance to get out and recruit, the team’s future appears to be even brighter. It’s true the K-State job would have made a lot of since for Kruger. He would

The Sooners’ varsity eight earned Conference USA’s Boat of the Week honor, released by the conference March 20. This is the first Boat of the Week award OU’s squad has ever won. The crew consists of juniors coxswain Carly Schueler, Rebecca Staff and Meghan Farrell, seniors Ivy Brown, Brooke Sheppard, Nikki Furmanek and Nicole Bladow, sophomore Kristin Clift and freshman Kellie O’Reilly. The varsity eight boat is undefeated in its first two regattas of the season, including a seven-second upset victory over No. 19 Texas in March. The rowers competed in C-USA against Texas, Kansas, Kansas State, Tenness e e, Alabama, Central Florida, Tulsa and SMU. The awards kept coming for OU as 40 rowers were named to the C-USA Academic Honor Roll. The Sooners’ 40 selections ranks third in the conference behind 47 from UCF and 46 from KSU. For athletes to be eligible for the Commissioner’s Honor Roll, they must maintain a cumulative GPA of a 3.0 or better. “We take great pride in our performance in the classroom and these young women are doing a great job of balancing their studies with a quite rigorous athletic schedule,” OU coach Leeanne Crain said in a press release Tuesday.

crisis line

325-6963 (NYNE)

OU Number Nyne Crisis Line

8 p.m.-4 a.m. every day

except OU holidays and breaks

St. Thomas More University Parish Holy Week Mass Times April 5th Holy Thursday: 7:00pm

April 6th Good Friday Veneration of the Cross: 7:00pm April 7th Easter Vigil Mass 5:00pm April 8th Easter Sunday 8:30am, 11:00am, 5:00pm

100 E. Stinson

SESSION II, 10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Biomedical Engineering, Biochemistry, Room A-1 Presenters: Alexander Aria, Kevin Buettner, Nicholas Kirch and Brandon Smith, Jui-wen (Ryan) Liu, Abigail Overacre, Thomas Whittaker Humanities II, Room A-2 Presenters: Marcus Autry, Nicole Catterlin, Alison Frech, Brandon Harney, Jake Morgan, Mary Stanfield Health Issues II, Room A-3 Presenters: Morgan Fortner, Aamina Shakir, John Sosanya, Brian West Zoology, Room A-4 Presenters: Jordan Chapman, Nathan Clark, Maureen Lewis, Danielle Martin, Kristy Nguyen, Ross Sheline U. S. Politics, Room A-5 Presenters: Savannah Collins, Zach Deaton, Clayton Dodds, Jon Reynolds, Katherine Sasser Linguistics, Room A-6 Presenters: Ashley Davenport, William Fernandez, Pengpeng Jiang, Evan Pederson, Madison Sandefer, Tiegan Willoughby History II, Room B-1 Presenters: Grant Ashley, Kayla Pittman, Erin Smith Biochemistry, Physics, Room B-2 Presenters: Zachary Eldredge and Michael Reynolds, Madeline Murrell, Lauren Price, Mubeen Shakir, Nathan Thomas International Issues II, Room B-3 Presenters: Stuart Downey, Kristina King, Kiersten Strachan Fine Arts, Conference Room A Presenters: Elyse Emerich, Matthew Kaney, Austin Lintner, Dillon Votaw, Meredith Tyler, Nicole Arnone, Joel Behne, Alicia Clark, Carl Culley, Kate Dinsmore, Jamie Goldman, Shannon Hucker, Andrew Koslow, Emily Luhrs, Connor McCollum, Sophie Menas, Zachary Splittstoesser, Chelsea Stavis

SPORTS Oklahoma

Thursday, March 29, 2012 •

COLUMN

OK State

4

0

OU secures Bedlam win TOBI NEIDY

Sports Reporter

CHELSEA LOTT/THE DAILY

Freshman Georgia Casey runs to third base during OU’s game against Indiana on March 11. The Sooners beat the Hoosiers 4-1 for their 10th straight victory of the season. The team went on to win five more straight games before losing on the road to the No. 15 Baylor Bears.

PLAYER PROFILE

Keilani Ricketts Year: Junior Position: Pitcher Hometown: San Jose, Calif. Game stats: Ricketts finished with a .69 ERA with 10 strikeouts and only one hit allowed.

Chamberlain’s slide into home beat the throw and gave OU its third run of the game and its first comfortable cushion over the Cowgirls. “Lauren’s being led by veterans like (Jessica) Shults and (Keilani) Ricketts and she doesn’t act like a freshman,” Gasso said about trusting in her youthful player. “She

has the international experience that helps playing in big venues like this. You can see the maturity and confidence that she has as an athlete in this game.” After Chamberlain’s first inning RBI, Sooner bats scored single runs in the next two innings to put the Cowgirls in a hole that the team wouldn’t be able to overcome. Sophomore third baseman Javen Henson put the nail into the coffin with a home run in the sixth to give OU its final run of the game. And to compliment the offense, Sooner starting pitcher Ricketts finished with 10 strikeouts and allowed just one hit during the contest. It was par for the course for the OU ace, who is having a stellar year for the Sooners thus far. Ricketts, who finished with

Bold games are in Norman *Games held in Oklahoma City

Stay connected with the sports desk for news and updates about Sooner sports by following the action at

@OUDailySports twitter.com/OUDailySports

Greg Fewell is a journalism senior

E V R E S E N R O S E H N I T T S ON 24th Annual

Summer in Santa Fe June 22-29 2012

More than 2,200 participants from varied backgrounds have experienced the University of Oklahoma’s Summer in Santa Fe program: a one week travel study program designed for anyone interested in learning more about the intriguing culture, history and the arts of the southwest. For detailed course information please visit our webpage at citd.ou.edu/santafe or call (405) 325-5101

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a .69 ERA after tonight’s performance, showed composure even when the Sooner defense gave up two errors that allowed Cowgirl players to get on base. “The difference between Ricketts from this year and last is that she’s much more mature in tight situations,” Gasso said. “She also has that international experience that has helped her gain that maturity.” The victory ended the deadlocked series, giving the Sooners the 71-70 lead in the overall series.

ith the regular SPORTS COLUMNIST season now a thing of the past, the men’s gymnastics team is exactly where it wants to be — on top. However, none of that will matter if the team does not take care of busiGreg Fewell ness in the post-season. greg_f@ou.edu The Sooners ended the season with a huge road win Saturday, defeating No. 5 Minnesota and No. 6 Ohio State in Minneapolis. It was just the latest in a long line of signature wins for OU’s 2012 squad. Since the team’s only loss of the season to No. 2 Illinois, the Sooners have put together their top three scores of the season, all over 355, and taken down nine of the nation’s top 15 teams. The team has definitely been hot. However, now the Sooners have to find a way to keep that momentum with two weeks off before their next meet. Oklahoma does not hit the floor again until the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Championships on April 7 in Colorado Springs. Then, the team has to wait another week and a half before finally kicking off the NCAA championships back home in Norman. While an off week during the season can be a blessing for a struggling team, it can just as easily be a weakness for a healthy team on a roll. However, if Oklahoma is the championship-caliber team coach Mark Williams believes it is, the Sooners should be able to walk into Lloyd Noble Center on April 19 ready to compete. Williams knows a thing or two about national championship-caliber teams having coached five of them himself. After the team’s victory over Stanford earlier this year, he said his team has what it takes to win it all. “If we can continue to compete like that and stay healthy, we’re going to be in the mix,” Williams said. The Sooners have continued that level of competition. Seemingly, the only team that can stop OU is OU. However, as already mentioned, the team will have to find a way to stay ready to compete. The Sooner gymnasts, though, say that will not be a problem. The upperclassmen on the team are used to competing at NCAA’s. Hosting the event, though, adds a whole new element for the Sooners. The gymnasts want to put on a show for their home fans, possibly even gain a few more, and most importantly, win the program’s ninth national title in the friendly confines of Lloyd Noble Center.

ING S A LE NOW UMMER ! S 12 FOR ALL 20 F AND

AT A GLANCE Softball conference schedule March 23 at Baylor March 24 at Baylor March 25 at Baylor March 28 vs. Oklahoma State* March 30 vs. Kansas March 31 vs. Kansas April 1 vs. Kansas April 5 vs. Texas Tech April 6 vs. Texas Tech April 7 vs. Texas Tech April 11 at Oklahoma State April 13 at Texas A&M April 14 at Texas A&M April 15 at Texas A&M April 18 vs. North Texas April 20 vs. Missouri April 21 vs. Missouri April 22 vs. Missouri April 25 vs. Oklahoma State April 28 at Central Arkansas April 29 at Central Arkansas May 4 vs. Texas May 5 vs. Texas May 6 vs. Texas May 11 at Iowa State May 12 at Iowa State May 13 at Iowa State

Sooners have to keep focused

W

Sooners beat instate rival with strong performance The Sooners needed all seven innings to secure the victory, but when all was said and done, OU had topped instate rival Oklahoma State 4-0 to regain control of the Bedlam series. With the bases loaded and no outs in only the first inning, the Big 12’s home run leader, Lauren Chamberlain, planted her cleats into the right side of the batter’s box with her bat tightly pressed up against her jersey. Giving off a demeanor of a seasoned veteran at the plate rather than a freshman who was experiencing her first Bedlam softball matchup, Chamberlain strategically leaned into the batting stance to simulate a bunt and then pulled back to release a soft floater that cleared the Cowgirl infield defense. The single, while not the usual power-type shot that Chamberlain is used to, gave No. 7 OU its first run en route to the team’s 4-0 victory over Oklahoma State at Hall of Fame stadium in Oklahoma City. “I was pumped to see this place packed with fans across the state after hearing about it for so long,” Chamberlain said. “I just took the at bat and wanted to produce some RBIs for our team because the runners in front of me worked hard to get on base.” And Chamberlain’s batting intelligence wasn’t the only factor that the Trabuco Canyon, Calif., native brought to the plate in her first experience against the in-state rival. Chamberlain also showed her wheels on a green light from head coach Patty Gasso at third base after junior outfielder Brianna Turang sent a shot to the left side.

B9

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B10

• Thursday, March 29, 2012

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Thursday, March 29, 2012