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Fall

Guide

Watkins Glen Harbor Hotel . . . . . . . . .2 Jamison Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 171 Cedar Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Dougs Lawnmower Service . . . . . . . . .4 E Stanley Paving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Gustin’s Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vein & Laser Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Bath Country Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Windmill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Interstate Batteries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 First Heritage Federal Credit Union . . .7 O’Shaughnessy Antiques . . . . . . . . . . .8 Wade’s Building Supply, Inc . . . . . . . .8 Corning Building Company . . . . . . . . .9 Belhurst Estate Winery . . . . . . . . . . .10 Eddy Lumber Company . . . . . . . . . . .10 Penn Yan Sewing Machines . . . . . . . .10 Richard Winters Real Estate . . . . . . .10 Asthma & Allergy Associates . . . . . . .11 Beers Tree Service, Inc . . . . . . . . . . .11 Bong’s Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Johnny’s Wholesale, Inc . . . . . . . . . .12 Hilton Garden Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 ISAAC Heating & Air Conditioning . . .13 Red Newt Cellars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Lamb & Webster, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Croft Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Haughey-Wood Funeral Home . . . . . .16 Rockwell Museum of Western Art . . .16 Ackley $ Son . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Market Street Chiropractic . . . . . . . . .17 Ferenbaugh Campground . . . . . . . . .18 Uncle Mike’s Kennels . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Everything Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Ray Forker Excavation . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Antiques At The Establishment . . . . .20 Ralph’s Truck & Auto Repair . . . . . . .20 Coopers Sporting Goods . . . . . . . . . .21 Monahan Party Rentals . . . . . . . . . . .21 Express Trailer Sales & Service . . . . .22 Stained Glass Works & Antiques . . . .22 B&D Bargain Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Bob Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Sarrasin’s On The Lake . . . . . . . . . . .24 State Line Camping Center . . . . . . . .24 Callahan and Hooey, Inc . . . . . . . . . .25 Stewart P. Wilson, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Chemung County Humane Society . .26 Mazourek Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Corning’s Gaffer District . . . . . . . . . . .27 Cumming Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Geneva On The Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Jims Equipment Repair . . . . . . . . . . .28

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

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Halloween-inspired treats Part of the fun of Halloween is arriving home after a day of trickor-treating and having some spooktacular treats to enjoy. Whether you're hosting a Halloween party or simply feeding a group of hungry, costumed kids, fun recipes that turn ordinary foods into spooky specialties are essential. MUMMY WRAPS Take the "pigs in a blanket" concept to a new level with this clever treat. Simply wrap hot dogs with strips of dough cut from refrigerator biscuits or breadsticks to simulate the look of mummy shrouds. Place them on cookie sheets. Cut small slits for eyes and place peppercorns or black mustard seeds to serve as the eyes. Bake for about 15 minutes, or until golden brown. To serve upright, place shish kabob skewers in the mummies before

baking and then stick the mummies in a piece of craft foam covered in cheesecloth. CHEESY FINGERS What's scarier than dismembered digits on a plate? All it takes is a package of mozzarella string cheese, a knife & some small, thin slices of green and red bell peppers for this gross delicacy. Cut the cheese sticks in half and then use a knife to carve straight indentations to simulate the bends in the skin around the knuckles of the fingers. At the top, carve out a flattened area for the fingernail. Then place very small slices of red or green peppers to serve as the spooky fingernails. Adhere with a dab of cream cheese. BOTTOMLESS BOG This eerie bog will make children question what is inside. Make a large bowl of green gela-

tin dessert and pop in different edible creepy crawlies before allowing the gelatin to set. Gummy worms, grape "eyeballs," sour fish, pieces of fruit tape, and anything else you can think of can be added. Kids will scoop out the dessert and discover the frightening things inside. SKULL POTATOES Turn ordinary potatoes into something seemingly more sinister. Halve baking potatoes and carve each half into a skull shape, sort of like the outline of a pear. Bake until the potatoes are cooked through. Frost with sour cream. Use pieces of cheese to mimic decaying teeth. Black olives can be eyes and nose sockets of the skull. QUESADILLA GHOSTS An open-faced quesadilla can be turned into a spooky specter. Cut ghost-shaped pieces from

flour tortilla shells. Sprinkle with shredded Monterey jack cheese and allow to bake in the oven until the cheese has melted and the ghosts are crisp. Spread sour cream over the cheese and then use slices of scallion for the eyes and a ring of jalapeno pepper for a mouth. Ghosts can be made gory with salsa as blood. VAMPIRE VEGGIES What if veggies could suck blood? Conduct this science experiment and enjoy eating the research afterward. Cut the ends off of stalks of celery. Place the celery in a tall glass filled half-way with tomato juice overnight. The celery should absorb the juice through the thin channels in the stalks. The next day kids can bite into the stalks and see the red streaks inside.

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011

Simple Projects to Celebrate Autumn (MS) -- As leaves turn and the fall weather cools, nature becomes a playground for imagination with its deep reds, oranges, yellows. And, of course, many children start planning their costumes early, using every excuse to dress up before Halloween actually rolls around. With these quick and easy craft projects, the whole family can enjoy celebrating one of the most colorful seasons of the year. 1. Leaf Book Craft: With a few easy-to-find supplies, you and your kids can preserve the riches of cheerful outdoor foliage with this handmade leaf book that can be pulled out again and again over dreary winter days. What you'll need: - Bag to collect leaves - Clear contact paper

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Ruler Scissors Construction Paper Stapler or Hole Punch and Twine - Glue Stick (optional) Instructions: Collect colorful leaves in a bag and spread them on a newspaper when you get home. Place your favorite leaves on the contact paper, peeling the back off of one piece of the paper. After you carefully arrange the leaves, peel the back off the second piece of contact paper and carefully lay it on top of the first piece. You may need to use the ruler to push out any air bubbles that come up. Repeat these steps as many times as you like to make multiple pages. Take two pieces of construction paper,

placing one on top of the stack of leaf pages and one on the bottom. Staple the sheets together on the left side to make a book or punch two to three holes and tie the pages together with twine for an outdoorsy look. Take any additional craft items such as glitter, markers or crayons and make a colorful design on the front to complete your book. 2. Costume Creations: Halloween is in the air and with it every costume you can imagine. With these paper costume designs based on the characters of the best-selling book The Costume Trunk from Paddywhack Lane, children can play dress-up every day this fall. What you'll need: - Cardstock paper - Scissors

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Markers Crayons Glue (non-toxic) Tape Ribbon Yarn Glitter Newspaper

Instructions: Download the various costume designs from w w w. p a d d y w h a c k l a n e . c o m , including a Princess Crown and Wand, Bumble Bee wings, and a Pirate's Hat. Print out the designs on your cardstock paper. Lay out newspaper on your kitchen or dining room table to help keep messes to a minimum. Using all of your markers, crayons, and glitter, have your child personalize each costume piece. When finished and dry, follow the

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 instructions on each design to create the finished look. Each costume piece is sized to match that of a child ages 3-7. 3. Balloon Ghost: This adorable and easy ghost craft is perfect for Halloween decor in your home. What you'll need: - 1 White latex balloon per ghost - Scissors - 2 white grocery bags per ghost - Tape - Black marker Instructions: Cut the handles off the white plastic grocery bags. Leaving the seam at the bottom of the bags together, cut the bags into strips. Blow up a white balloon. (For home decorating purposes, you might want to pick up helium balloons at the party store so they fly). Tape the two

FALL GUIDE plastic bags around the end of the balloon, leaving a few inches at the bottom, leaving the tied section of the balloon at the top if you blew it up yourself. (If you purchased helium balloons, keep the tied side down). Using the black marker, draw two eyes and a mouth on the balloon, making any face you wish. If you blew up the balloon yourself, tie a string to the top and hang from the ceiling or mantle. If you used a helium balloon, tie a string to the bottom and let it float through the air. Fall is a great time to take advantage of so many wonderful natural resources, from overflowing pumpkin patches to bursting apple orchards. A few supplies and a little planning go a long way in keeping kids busy, using their imagination and creativity throughout this delightful season.

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FALL GUIDE

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

Autumn's the Perfect Time of Year to Fall Into a Hammock It's a mildly blustery fall day. The sun is shining, the temperature pleasant, just a touch on the cool side. The light breeze gently rustling your backyard trees lifts loose colorful leaves, crafting a swirling rain of reds, yellows, oranges and browns. It is, in a word, lovely. So wouldn't it be perfect to be stretched out in a hammock, lazily soaking it all in? The only problem: You've already packed away your own rope hammock until next Memorial Day. Because that's what you're supposed to do, right? You take your hammock down during long bouts of bad weather, and you store it in a dry place each summer's end. Anyway, everyone knows hammocks are just for summer. You don't see other people lounging around in theirs the rest of the year, do you? Maybe not, but that's their loss! Recent textile advancements mean that, increasingly, quality hammocks are designed with allyear in mind, top manufacturers say. "The only limit to how much of the year you now can enjoy a hammock is your own imagination," commented Walter R. Perkins III, CEO of The Hammock Source, home to such trendsetting brands as Hatteras Hammocks and The Original Pawleys Island Rope Hammock. Traditionally, hammock rope has been woven from cotton -and cotton, no matter the quality, eventually rots from prolonged weather exposure. But with many top hammock-crafters having switched to weathertough synthetics, consumers

needn't settle anymore for products they have to baby, or even stow away at summer's end. Several new-generation rope and fabric fibers are not only incredibly strong and surprisingly soft, but also resistant to rot, mold, mildew, fading, and staining. "If something as laid-back as a hammock can possibly undergo a revolution, then these new synthetics are it," observed Bill Rosso, president of Nags Head Hammocks, one of the world's leading producers and retailers of hand-woven hammocks. But all this heightened durability still won't keep you warm should a cold wind whip up. The rope hammock was designed, after all, so that air could reach you from all sides. Besides dressing yourself appropriately for the weather, the best way to avoid the bulk of cold drafts is to opt for a fabric hammock instead of a rope model. That way, the only air directly hitting you is from above. But if you already own a good all-weather rope hammock, replacing it right now probably seems extravagant. There is, said Perkins, an economical alternative. "Tying a quality fabric hammock-pad onto your rope hammock will boost warmth tremendously," he explained. "Actually, even laying an old blanket inside the hammock will do wonders. "Of course, if it's the dead of winter, you'll definitely want a blanket to put on top of you, too!" Even better, invite someone special to join you. You'll both be the warmer, and happier, for it.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

FALL GUIDE

Use the Right Tools for Autumn To-Do Lists Ask any homeowner and he or she is bound to have a to-do list of little chores around the house that need to get done. These tasks are made much easier with the right tools. Depending on individual skill level, many homeowners already have basic tools on hand, such as hammers and screwdrivers. Others may have a more extensive collection of tools available for projects, such as saws, sanders and electric drills. For homeowners who don't have certain tools, there may be no need to purchase new ones for specific projects. Many tools can be rented, such as floor sanders, carpet cleaners, saws and others. Find out if items can be borrowed from friends or family members - and whether they might want to help with certain tasks. Before any project is started, homeowners should take inventory of what they have and what they will need to complete a project. Taking shortcuts can lead to frustration and more money spent fixing mistakes. Make a list and have all of the gear available and ready for use. Here are some common projects and the tools that will be needed. ★ Gutter cleaning: Cooler weather means leaves and debris will collect in gutters and downspouts. A sturdy ladder, gloves, garden hose, small shovel, and bucket will be needed to clear out the debris. Be sure the ladder is placed so that it is on level ground. ★ Cleaning siding: A rented power washer can make quick work of cleaning grimy siding

and hard-to-reach windows. ★ Landscape clean-up: Now may be the time to pull out whithered plants and put away lawn furniture. Many homeowners like to prune shrubs and trees before the cold weather sets in. A hedge trimmer can quickly shape shrubbery. An auger can help dig up dead annuals and clean out planting beds. Rent a wood chipper to make mulch out of felled tree branches. ★ Painting: When cooler weather arrives, homeowners tend to look inside for projects. Painting is a popular way to spruce up rooms with little financial investment. Rollers, brushes, paint trays, masking tape, edgers, and drop cloths will be needed for the task. ★ Flooring: Perhaps installing a new floor is on the to-do list. Many laminate and vinyl products make it easy for homeowners to do the work themselves. A more extensive project, such as installation of tile or hardwood, can be done by a contractor. Flooring needs may require a power saw or razor for cutting the flooring -- depending on the material. Other tools include adhesive, spacers, measuring tape, knee pads, eye protection, and clean-up materials.

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011

November Calendar of Events TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1 Music ■ Karine Poghoysan | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5. 735-1853. Activities ■ NaNoWriMo Write In | Noon-6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 502. Kids’ activities ■ “Happy Tales” storytime | 6:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Read with a trained therapy dog. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little” storytime | 10:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. To d d l e r s. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool story t i m e | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Popcorn and Movie: “Cars 2” | 6-7:45 p.m., Big Flats Library, 78 Canal St., Big Flats. All ages. 562-3300.

735-1853. ■ OAR | 9 p.m., Elmira College, Speidel Gymnasium, Elmira. $20. 735-1853. ■ Wee Readers | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 2-5. 739-4581. Food ■ Harvest dinner | 5-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion Post, 8 River Road, Corning. Clubs ■ Corning Area Retired Teachers | 11:30 a.m., Radisson Hotel, Denison Parkway, Corning. All area retired educators welcome. 523-8008. Classes and Lectures ■ “National Life-Writing Month” with Jennifer Jackson | 6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ “Cooking Healthy on a Budget” | 6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ BE: Lab | 1-5 p.m., Hornby Town Hall, Hornby Road, Hornby. 936-3713. ■ “Forcing Bulbs for Winter Bloom” | 4:30-6 p.m., Steuben County Office Building, 3 E. Pulteney Square, Bath. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Music ■ Amadi Azikiwe | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5.

Activities ■ Holiday Fair Extravaganza | 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Arnot Ogden Medical Center, 600 Roe Ave., Elmira. Kids’ Activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 9363713, Ext. 503. ■ Movie/Book Club | 6:30 p. m . , Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 8 and up. Register, 739-4581. ■ Kindermusik Toddler Storytime | 10:3011 a.m., Big Flats Library, 78 Canal St., Big Flats. 562-3300. Clubs ■ Elmira Button Club | 11 a.m.-2 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 95 Main St., Big Flats. Classes and lectures ■ BE: Lab | Noon-4 p.m., Campbell Town Hall, Main Street, Campbell. 9363713. ■ “Disaster Assesment Basics” | 6-9 p.m., Red Cross Chapter House, 911 S t owell St., Elmira . Register, 7343317. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3 ■ Karaoke Entertainment

Music with Lowell Taylor | 9 p.m.-1 a.m.,

Anthony’s Grill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. 734-4210. ■ Chamber Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes | 7:30 p.m., Wellsboro High School auditorium, 225 Nichols St., Wellsboro, Pa. $20, students $5. (570) 724-4939. Activities ■ Holiday Fair Extravaganza | 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Arnot Ogden Medical Center, 600 Roe Ave., Elmira. ■ “GreenFire” film screening | 6:30-8:30 p.m., Tanglewood Nature Center, 443 Coleman Ave., Elmira . www. t a n g l ewoodnaturecenter.com Kids’ activities ■ “Blankets, Books, and Slippers Story Ti m e ” | 7-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Dress in pajamas. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Bond with Your Baby | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages birth to 2 years. 739-4581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Mommy and Me Yoga” | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Pre-walking children. Bring a baby blanket. Yoga props provided. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ BE: Lab | 1-5 p.m., Caton Town Hall, Hendy Hollow Road, Caton. 936-3713. ■ “Creating an Effective Resume” | 1-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a list of job titles,

FALL GUIDE

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 descriptions, dates, employers, flash dri ve or CD. Laptops encoura g e d . Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org ■ “Knifty Knitters” | 3:30 p. m . , Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Families with children 9 and up. Register, 739-4581. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 9 p.m.-midnight, The Cellar, Market Street, Corning. ■ Whiskey Creek | 8-11 p.m., Radisson Hotel, Denison Parkway, Corning. ■ Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes chamber concert | 7:30 p.m., Chri s t Episcopal Church, Corning. 734-8198, www.osfl.org ■ KapEye and Peao | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., M a l o n ey ’s Pub, 57 Pulteney St., Hammondsport. ■ Fully Loaded | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., The Hot End, 101 Prescott Ave., Elmira Heights. ■ Blackberry Smoke | 8 p.m., Mansfield University, Straughn Hall, Mansfield, Pa. $15. www.tix.com Activities ■ Exhibit reception | 4:30-6:30 p.m., Corning Community College Atri u m Gallery, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. “The Day on Fire” by Tedd Arnold. Free, public welcome. 962-9297. ■ “Variety Show 2011” | 7 p. m . , Horseheads High School auditorium, Fletcher Street, Horseheads. Presented by the Horseheads High School Greenroom Players. $7. ■ Nature Strollers | 10-11 a.m., Sperr Pa rk, Big Flats. Sponsored by the Tanglewood Nature Center. www.tanglewoodnaturecenter.com ■ Holiday Fair Extravaganza | 7 a.m.-4 p.m., Arnot Ogden Medical Center, 600 Roe Ave., Elmira. ■ Exhibit reception | 5-7 p. m . , Community Arts of Elmira, 413 Lake St., Elmira. “Afghan Portraits: Windows to the Soul” by Connie Frisbee Houde. Free public welcome.

Kids’ Activities ■ Cuddle Up | 10:30-11 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Children under 3. 776-4613. Food ■ Fish fry | 4-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion, 8 River Road, Corning. $10. Takeouts available. ■ Pyrohy sale | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church, 410 E. McCann’s Blvd. Elmira Heights. Call to order, 734-2232. ■Classes and lectures ■ “Download Library eBooks” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org ■ “Literature Databases Online” | 1-3 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Music ■ Detour | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Erwinna Tavern, 820 Addison Road, Painted Post. 936-9708. ■ Whiskey Creek | 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Brady’s Pub, Elmira. ■ The Cats | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Anthony’s Grill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. $3. 734-4210. Activities ■ 18th Annual Craft Fair | 9 a.m.-3 p.m., E l m wood Baptist Church, 230 Elmwood Ave., Elmira Heights. Lots of vendors, baked goods, kids table, and more. FREE ADMISSION. (733-2506) ■ Dom Lisi benefit | Noon, Local 1000 Union Hall, 100 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Music by the Sam Pallet Band, Project K, Wastin Tyme, Manny and Paul Duo, food, Chinese auction, games, prizes. $15. 329-1501, 936-8069, 329-9810, 654-7610. ■ Annual bazaar | 9 a.m.-2 p. m . , Centenary United Methodist Church, 3 W. Washington St., Bath. ■ Holiday bazaar | 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., St. James’ Episcopal Church, Lake Street, Hammondsport. Lunch available. ■ 9th annual craft group | 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Jasper-Troupsburgh High School, 3769 State Route 417, Jasper. Proceeds to

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PAGE 10 benefit school yearbook. ■ “ Variety Show 2011” | 7 p. m . , Horseheads High School auditorium, Fletcher Street, Horseheads. Presented by the Horseheads High School Greenroom Players. $7. ■ Artist talk | Noon, Community Arts of Elmira, 413 Lake St., Elmira. “Afghan Portraits: W i n d ows to the Soul” by Connie Frisbee Houde. Free publ i c welcome. Kids’ Activities ■ Cool Kids: Tri-City Opera | 10-11 a.m., Corning Community College, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. Free, public welcome. 962-9476. ■ Family Movie Matinee: “Zookeeper” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Trap and skeet practice | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Corning Fish and Game Club, Hornby Road, Corning. ■ Free pool | Noon-4 p.m., Village Inn, 413 Park Ave., South Corning. ■ Girl Scout Mystery Movie Day | 10 a.m., The Glen Theater, North Franklin

FALL GUIDE Street, Watkins Glen. Free for registered girl scouts and their families. R e g i s t ration ava i l a ble at the event. 796-6202. ■ Storytime | 10 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3 and up. 5692045. ■ “Vote for Your Favorite Animal” | 2:303:30 p.m., Tanglewood Nature Center, 443 Coleman Ave., Elmira. www.tanglewoodnaturecenter.com Food ■ Tony Pulos Memorial Breakfast | 6-10 a.m., Watkins Glen Elementary School cafeteria, 612 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. Proceeds to benefit Schuyler Hospital. $5.

Classes and Lectures ■ “Selling Safely Online: eBay and More” | 1-3 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org ■ “Downloading eBooks from Your Library” | 10-11:30 a.m., Watkins Glen Public Library, 610 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. Register, 535-2346, watkins@stls.org ■ “Mixed Media Hodge Podge” | 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Franklin St. Gallery, 209 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. Presenter Linda Fazzary. $65. Register, 535-2571. ■ “Facebook for Beginners” | 1-2:30 p.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Register, 7394581. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6 Activities ■ Artist tour | 2 p.m., Community Arts of Elmira, 413 Lake St., Elmira. “Afghan Portraits: W i n d ows to the Soul” by Connie Frisbee Houde. Free public welcome.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7 Kids’ Activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Libra ry, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 0-18 months. 7394581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint 2010” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 6840360, belab@stls.org TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8 Kids’ Activities ■ “Happy Tales” storytime | 6:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Read with a trained therapy dog. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6

FALL GUIDE

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little” storytime | 10:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. To d d l e r s. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Readers Theatre: Dragons | 6-7 p.m., Big Flats Library, 78 Canal St., Big Flats. All ages. 562-3300. ■ Wee Readers | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 2-5. 739-4581. Clubs ■ Corning Area Women’s Club semi-annual scholarship card party | 12:15 p.m. business meeting, 1 p. m . party, Radisson Hotel, Denison Park way, Corning. Bring guests, dessert, books for exchange. 936-8708.

Classes and lLectures ■ “The S.A.L.S.A. Life” | 12:30 p.m., Corning Community College Triangle Lounge, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. Presenter Stan Pearson II. Free, public welcome. 962-9476. ■ “Macintosh Computers” | 6-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Music ■ Jellyfinger | 7-10 p.m., Rock Bottom BBQ, 361 Baker St. Ext., Corning. 9625611. Activities ■ Meet the Artist: Klaus Moje | 6 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Register, 438-5600. ■ “Sit and Chat” crafting | 4-6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a project. Music and refreshments provided. 936-3713, Ext. 502.

■ Orchesis | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5. 7351853. Kids’ Activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 9363713, Ext. 503. ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11 a.m., Big Flats Library, 78 Canal St., Big Flats. Ages 18 months to 5 years. 5623300.

PAGE 11 Academic Drive, Corning. Part of the Midday Concert Series. Free, public welcome. 962-9698. ■ Karaoke with Lowell Taylor Entertainment | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Anthony’s Grill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. 734-4210. Activities ■ Orchesis | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5. 7351853.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10

Kids’ Activities ■ “Blankets, Books, and Slippers Story Ti m e ” | 7-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Dress in pajamas. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Bond with Your Baby | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages birth to 2 years. 739-4581.

Music ■ Mansfield University Clarinet Consort | 12:30 p.m., Corning Community C o l l e g e, Learning Center, R004, 1

Food ■ Roast beef dinner | 4 p. m . , Sullivanville United Methodist Church, 69 Old Sullivanville Road, Sullivanville.

Classes and Lectures ■ Books Sandwiched In | Noon, Watkins Glen Public Library, 610 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. Frank Steber will discuss his new book on Captain James Hope. 535-2346.

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PAGE 12 $8. Takeouts available. Call 769-5119 for curbside service. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11 Music ■ Phyzz | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., The Log Cabin, State Route 415, Campbell. 527-8806. n Mike Cavalier | 8-11 p.m., Club 57, Seneca Road North, Hornell. Activities ■ Friday Free Film: “I Was a Male War Bride” | 7 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713. Kids’ activities ■ Teen Cooking Club | 3:30-5:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Teens and tweens. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Ve t e r a n ’s Day program | 2 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503, www.ssclibrary.org ■ Cuddle Up | 10:30-11 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Children under 3. 776-4613. Food ■ Fish fry | 4-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion, 8 River Road, Corning. $10. Takeouts available. Classes and lectures ■ “PowerPoint II Project: Reinventing the Family Slide Show” | 2-4 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Prerequisite: Microsoft PowerPoint I or ex p e rience with PowerPoint. Laptops encoura g e d .

Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org ■ “Genealogy Online” | 1 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. SATURDAY, NOV. 12 Music ■ Vinyl Roots | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Anthony’s Grill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. $3. 734-4210. Kids’ activities ■ Teen Screen: “Green Lantern” | 12:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Free. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ National Gaming Day | 10-11:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503, www.ssclibrary.org ■ Family storytime | 9:30 a.m., Montour Falls Library, 406 E. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-7489. ■ Storytime | 10 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3 and up. 5692045. ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required. Clubs ■ C h a m p a g n e - W h i r l - A - Ways square dance club | 7-7:30 p.m. early rounds, 7:30-10 p.m. dance, Vernon Wightman Elementary School, 216 Maple Heights, Bath. 776-6990. Classes and Lectures ■ “Buying Safely Online” | 1-3 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry,

300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org ■ “Test Drive an iPad” | 10-11:30 a.m., Watkins Glen Public Library, 610 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. Register, 535-2346, watkins@stls.org ■ “Felted Hat Making” | 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Franklin St. Gallery, 209 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. Presenter Sandi Cirillo. $35. Register, 535-2571. ■ eBook workshop | 1-2:30 p. m . , Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13 Food ■ Sunday brunch | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion, 8 River Road, Corning. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14 Music ■ Trio Cleonice | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5. 7351853. Kids’ Activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 0-18 months. 7394581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Introduction to Windows 7” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360,

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 belab@stls.org TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 Kids’ Activities ■ “Happy Tales” storytime | 6:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Read with a trained therapy dog. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little” storytime | 10:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Toddlers. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool story t i m e | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Wee Readers | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 2-5. 739-4581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Healthy Grocery Shopping on a Budget” | 6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ “The Future of Small” | 8 p. m . , Corning Community College Triangle Lounge, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. Presenter Paul McEuen. Free, public welcome. 962-9144. ■ “Client Assist: Providing Emergency Assistance Part I” | 6-9 p.m., Red Cross

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FALL GUIDE Chapter House, 911 Stowell St., Elmira. Register, 734-3317. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16 Music ■ Amstel Quartet | 8 p.m., Elmira College, Gibson Theatre, Elmira. Part of the Encore Performing Arts Series. $10, seniors $8, students $6, youth $5. 735-1853. Activities ■ Comedian Craig Robinson and his Nasty Delisious Band | 8 p.m., Mansfield University, Straughn Hall, Mansfield, Pa. $20. www.tix.com Kids’ Activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 9363713, Ext. 503. Classes and Lectures ■ “Genealogy with the Steuben County Historian” | 1 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 9363713, Ext. 502.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17 Music ■ Karaoke with Lowell Taylor Entertainment | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Anthony’s G rill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 Water St., Elmira. 734-4210. Activities ■ 2300 Degrees: Honky Tonk Holiday | 5:30-7:30 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Free, public welcome. 438-5500. ■ “Sylvia” | 8 p.m., Corning Community College Science Amphitheatre, 1 Academic Dri ve, Corning. $10, students and seniors $5. Donations accepted for the Chemung County SPCA. 962-9448. ■ Bond with Your Baby | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages birth to 2 years. 739-4581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Evening for Educators” | 4-5:30 p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, The Studio, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Fr e e. Register, 438-5429. ■ “Client Assist: Providing Emergency Assistance Part II” | 6-9 p.m., Red Cross Chapter House, 911 Stowell St., Elmira. Register, 734-3317. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18 Music ■ Lucky Ducks | 9 p. m . - m i d n i g h t , Patrick’s, 303 College Ave., Elmira. ■ Mike Cavalier | 7-10 p.m., Sarrasins, State Route 54, Penn Yan. Activities ■ Friday Free Film: “Julie and Julia” | 7 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713. ■ “Sylvia” | 8 p.m., Corning Community College Science Amphitheatre, 1 Academic Dri ve, Corning. $10, students and seniors $5. Donations

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011 accepted for the Chemung County SPCA. 962-9448. Kids’ Activities ■ Cuddle Up | 10:30-11 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Children under 3. 776-4613.

Classes and Lectures ■ Artist-in-Residence lecture | Noon, Corning Museum of Glass, The Studio Lecture Room, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Presenters Veronika Beckh and Adrianne Evans. Free, public welcome. 974-6467. ■ “Be a Super Shopper: Preparing for Black Friday and Cyber Monday” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a notebook. Laptops encoura g e d . Register, 6840360, belab@stls.org SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19

Food ■ Fish fry | 4-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion, 8 River Road, Corning. $10. Takeouts available. ■ Pyrohy sale | 10 a.m.-2 p.m., St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church, 410 E. McCann’s Blvd. Elmira Heights. Call to order, 734-2232.

Music ■ 25th anniversary party with Meads Creek | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Erwinna Tavern, 820 Addison Road, Painted Post. 9369708. ■ Mike Cavalier | 7:30-10:30 p.m., Union Block Bistro, Shethar Street, Hammondsport. ■ Suspect | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Anthony’s Grill, Holiday Inn-Riverview, 760 E. Water St., Elmira. $3. 734-4210.

■ Phyzz | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., Harry’s Inn, 308-310 E. 14th St., Elmira Heights. 734-0202. Activities ■ “Sylvia” | 8 p.m., Corning Community College Science A m p h i t h e a t r e, 1 Academic Dri ve, Corning. $10, students and seniors $5. Donations accepted for the Chemung County SPCA. 962-9448. Kids’ Activities ■ Family storytime | 9:30 a.m., Montour Falls Library, 406 E. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-7489. ■ Storytime | 10 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3 and up. 5692045. ■ “Fall Feast with the Critters” | 2:303:30 p.m., Tanglewood Nature Center, 443 Coleman Ave., Elmira. www.tanglewoodnaturecenter.com ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required. Classes and Lectures ■ “Genealogy Research in the SSC

PAGE 17 Library” | 1 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 9363713, Ext. 502. ■ “Be a Super Shopper: Preparing for Black Friday and Cyber Monday” | 1-3 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a notebook. Laptops encoura g e d . Register, 6840360, belab@stls.org ■ Artist panel discussion | 1 p.m., International Motor Racing Research Center, 610 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. “The Art of Formula One.” Free, public we l c o m e. www.racingarchives.org ■ “Smartphon vs. Smartphone” | 1011:30 a.m., Watkins Glen Public Library, 610 S. Decatur St., Watkins Glen. Register, 535-2346, watkins@stls.org ■ “Digital Photography for Artisits” | 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Franklin St. Gallery, 209 N. Franklin St., Watkins Glen. Presenter Andrew Gillis. $55. Register, 535-2571. ■ “Test Drive an iPad” | 1-2:30 p.m.,

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PAGE 18 Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Register, 739-4581.

p.m., Corning Museum of Glass, 1 Museum Way, Corning. Included in museum admission. 438-5401.

SUNDAY, NOVEMER 20 Activities ■ “Sylvia” | 2 p.m., Corning Community College Science Amphitheatre, 1 Academic Drive, Corning. $10, students and seniors $5. Donations accepted for the Chemung County SPCA. 962-9448.

MONDAY, NOV. 21 Kids’ Activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ B a by Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 0-18 months. 739-4581. Classes and Lectures ■ “Excel for the Holidays: Mailing and Gift Lists” | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Prerequisite: Microsoft Excel I or experience with Excel. Laptops encouraged. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22

Kids’ Activities ■ Families Explore: America | Noon-4

Kids’ Activities ■ “Happy Tales” storytime | 6:30 p.m.,

Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Read with a trained therapy dog. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little” storytime | 10:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. To d d l e r s. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool storytime | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Wee Readers | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 2-5. 739-4581. Food ■ Pork chops | 5-7 p.m., John P. Eaton American Legion Post, 8 River Road, Corning.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 Classes and Lectures ■ iPad workshop | 6-7:30 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Some iPads will be available or bring your own. Register, 936-3713, Ext. 502. ■ “Macs and More” | 6-7:30 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23 Music ■ Mike Cavalier | 9 p.m.-midnight, The Village Marina, Harbor Drive, Watkins Glen. Activities ■ “Sit and Chat” crafting | 4-6 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a project. Music and refreshments provided. 936-3713, Ext. 502. Kids’ Activities ■ “Thanksgiving Then and Now” | 1-3

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503, www.ssclibrary.org ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 9363713, Ext. 503. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25 Music ■ Phyzz | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Rock Bottom BBQ, 361 Baker St. Ext., Corning. 9625611. ■ Mike Cavalier | 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Brady’s Pub, Water Street, Elmira. Kids’ Activities ■ Black Friday Video Gaming | 1-3 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Teens and their families. ■ Cuddle Up | 10:30-11 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath.

Children under 3. 776-4613. Classes and Lectures ■ Photographs and computers | 2-4 p.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Bring a camera and laptop or flash dri ve. Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org

Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Laptops encoura g e d . Register, 684-0360, belab@stls.org

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26

Kids’ Activities ■ “Music and More” | 3:30 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, 300 Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Baby Lapsit | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 0-18 months. 7394581.

Music ■ Fully Loaded | 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m., Cap’n Morgan’s, 36 Bridge St., Corning. 962-1616. Kids’ Activities ■ Family storytime | 9:30 a.m., Montour Falls Library, 406 E. Main St., Montour Falls. 535-7489. ■ Storytime | 10 a.m., Fred and Harriett Taylor Memorial Library, 21 William St., Hammondsport. Ages 3 and up. 5692045. ■ Teen Cafe | 7-10 p.m., Chemung County YMCA, 425 Pennsylvania Ave., Elmira. $3. High school ID required. Classes and Lectures ■ “Skype for the Holidays” | 1-3 p.m.,

SUNDAY, NOV. 27 MONDAY, NOV. 28

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 Kids’ activities ■ “Baby Bookworms” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. 6 weeks-18 months. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ “Chicken Little” storytime | 10:30 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, 300 Nasser Civic Center

PAGE 19 Plaza, Corning. Toddlers. 936-3713, Ext. 503. ■ Absolute Otaku Angels | 4 p. m . , Southeast Steuben County Libra ry, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. Anime-manga group for teens. 9363713, mcconnells@stls.org ■ Preschool story t i m e | 10:30-11:30 a.m., Dormann Library, 101 W. Morris St., Bath. Ages 3-5. 776-4613. ■ Wee Readers | 10:30 a.m., Horseheads Free Library, 405 S. Main St., Horseheads. Ages 2-5. 739-4581. WEDNESDAY, NOEMBER. 30 Kids’ Activities ■ “Little Red Hen’s Friends Storytime” | 10:30-11 a.m., Southeast Steuben County Library, Nasser Civic Center Plaza, Corning. P r e s c h o o l e r s. 9363713, Ext. 503. Classes and Lectures ■ “Message for Success” workshop | 1-5 p.m., Chemung Va l l ey History Museum, 415 E. Water St., Elmira. $95. Register, www.threelakescommunication.com/seminarsworkshops.htm.

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Prepping the fireplace for the season (MS) - People looking to embrace the cold-weather season often find snuggling up in front of a roaring fire is both relaxing and warming. Fireplaces are popular components of homes across the country. Ensuring fireplaces are prepared for a season of use is important from a safety standpoint and for personal comfort as well. The U.S. Fire Administration states that heating fires account for 36 percent of residential home fires in rural areas every year. Often these fires are due to creosote buildup in chimneys and stovepipes. All home heating systems require regular maintenance to function safely and efficiently. One of the most important steps to fireplace maintenance and preparation is having the entire thing cleaned by a professional. A chimney sweep provides a variety of services. According to Ace Chimney Sweeps of Maryland, a chimney sweep will clean out the entire chimney. Many use a high-powered vacuum so that there is no soot or dust entering the home. Depending on the range of services, some sweeps also offer a series of inspections of the chimney, interior flue and checks of

attic spaces for any damaged areas that will need repair. The next step will be securing your source of fuel. Many home-

ing on the inside of the chimney. Synthetic logs are also available, but use caution because they may burn unevenly and put out high-

A room with a fireplace is a welcome retreat on a cold, windy day.

owners contract with a provider of seasoned firewood. A delivery of one or two cords of wood may take the average fireplace user through the season. Wood can also be purchased at supermarkets or picked up free in different areas. It's not adviseable to use wood that has just been cut down. It likely contains high levels of moisture that will result in more smoke than burn power, and could lead to deposits form-

er levels of carbon monoxide. Follow directions on the packages of these products carefully. It is important to inspect a fireplace screen or guard to ensure it can safely protect against embers escaping the fireplace. In homes where there are young children, an added barrier may be needed in front of the fireplace to prevent little hands from touching the hot screen. It is vital to open up the chim-

ney flue before starting any fire. This allows fresh air to feed the fire and will enable smoke to exit the home. Failure to open the flue can result in smothering, dirty smoke filling the home quite quickly. The flue should be closed after the fire is completely extinguished so that animals and outside debris don't enter the home via the opening. Be sure to have a metal container for removing and storing hot ashes handy. Embers and ashes can stay hot for quite some time, so they should be placed outdoors, ideally far from the home so they don't set anything ablaze. Educate household members about the rules of fireplace use. They should be aware that no items should be discarded into the fire to avoid the emission of toxic fumes or dangerous embers. All it takes is one stray ember to start a huge fire. Also, improper fuel materials may lead to the buildup of flammable creosote on the chimney. A fireplace can be a focal point, a source of home heating and just a nice place to which to retire when the weather is cold. Preparing the fireplace for use and maintaining it properly are the keys to a safe season of use.

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Plan now for safe winter driving (MS) - Thanks to global climate change, many of the weather patterns we've grown accustomed to in the past are no longer the norm today. It seems much of the country experiences shorter than normal days of moderate spring and fall weather, with seasons simply switching from scorching sun one moment to chilly temperatures and snow the next. That means it's never too early to take a refresher course in preparing for safe winter driving. Winter weather takes all of the usual road hazards and steps them up a notch. Slippery roadways, congestion, road rage, pedestrian traffic - all of these situations seem magnified when the weather is poor and daylight is waning. Although winter driving may be frustrating, there are ways to prepare for the season and prevent accidents and injuries. Prepare It's important to check that a vehicle is in top shape before the cold weather sets in. Pay special attention to the tires. If tires are bald or their wear is signficant, that could prove hazardous on weather-slicked roads. Have tires replaced before the first snowfall. The same can be said when switching from regular performance tires to all-weather or snow tires. Be sure to change all of the tires on the car, even if it is just a front-wheel drive vehicle. Now is the time to also get a tuneup on the vehicle. Cold weather can make it hard for a car to perform at

its best, and any problems should be eliminated before they spiral out of control. Be sure to top off any fluids in the car, especially windshield washer fluid you might need to improve visibility during a storm. Check the function of wiper blades and change them if they aren't up to snuff. Consult with a mechanic to find out if it is adviseable to switch motor oil viscosity during the winter to improve flow through the engine and help with cold start turnover. It also helps to stock up on supplies should you get stranded or stuck: - snow shovel - scraper/brush - tire chains - flashlight (with extra batteries) - abrasive material, like cat litter, sand, or salt - jumper cables - flares or reflective triangles - brightly colored cloth to signal for help - empty water-tight container with candles, matches or lighter, bottled water, and a snack - sleeping bags or blankets, ski caps, and mittens - first-aid supplies Skidding How best to maneuver a car when it starts to skid depends on how the vehicle handles. If the rear wheels skid, turn the steering wheel, and subsequently the front wheels, in the same direction of the skid. If the front wheels skid, take your foot off

the gas and shift to neutral. Don't try to steer immediately; the skid may slow, and traction could return. Then you can steer in the direction you want to go and put the car back into drive. Keep in mind that even with expert maneuvering it can be tricky to recover from a skid on ice. Snow tires are not infallible and may be ineffective on icy roadways. Leaving Space One of the best things a person can do when driving in winter weather is to slow down and add much more room for reacting to roadway conditions. Driving slowly and braking slowly may help to prevent skids. Also, should a skid occur, having more room between you and another vehicle helps you to maneuver elsewhere or come to a stop without causing an accident. When visibility is poor, leaving extra room means you can react if something suddenly veers into the path of the car or you missed seeing it through the snow and sleet. Stranded or Stuck Should the car break down or it becomes stuck in the snow, there are some things you can do. Be sure to steer or push the car to a safe location, if possible. Put up warning flares or triangles so that you are visible and leave the four-way flashers on if the battery is operable. You can try "rocking" the car, by putting it in drive and hitting the

gas, then in reverse and pressing on the accelerator to create a valley in the snow that might free the car. Use your abrasive material to provide traction. You can also attempt to shovel out the tires. If the car is inoperable, stay in the vehicle out of harm's way and call for help on a mobile phone. Leave a window cracked open if you will be running the engine for periodic heat. The National Safety Council says that you can run the engine for heat about once every hour, or every half hour in severe cold. Be sure to clean snow from around the end of the tail pipe to prevent carbon monoxide buildup. For extra heat, don blankets or a sleeping bag to prevent hypothermia. Driving in winter conditions can be exhausting and hazardous. Being prepared for common scenarios decreases risk of accidents.

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FALL GUIDE

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

November Regional Calendar ALBANY Times Union Center www.timesunioncenter-albany.com or (518) 487-2000 ■ Nov. 15 | Further, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 23 | Guns N Roses, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 27 | Andre Rieu, 6 p.m. ■ Dec. 7-11 | Disney on Ice ■ Dec. 26 | Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 3 p.m., 8 p.m. Palace Theatre www.palacealbany.com or (518) 476-1000 ■ Nov. 4 | Jerry Seinfeld, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 5 | Masters of Illusion, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 9 | Joe Bonamassa, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, 2 p.m. ■ Nov. 13 | Albany Symphony Orchestra, 3 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Celtic Thunder Christmas, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 27 | Mannheim Steamroller, 4:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 30 | Alice Cooper, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 1 | Chicago, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | Albany Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Albany Symphony Orchestra, 3 p.m. ■ Dec. 8 | Jim Brickman, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 9 | Dark Star Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 10 | Olivia Newton-John, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 17 | Albany Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m.

BINGHAMTON The Broome County Arena broomeforum.com or 778-6628 ■ Nov. 3 | Jeff Dunham, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Bill Gaither Homecoming, 2:30 p.m.

■ March 24, 2012 | Georgia Guitar Quartet with Baritone Robert Sims, 7:30 p.m. ■ April 21, 2012 | John Pizzarelli Quartet with Jessica Molaskey, 7:30 p.m.

The Broome County Forum broomeforum.com ■ Nov. 5 | Hammer of the Gods, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 6 | “In the Heights,” 3 p.m., 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Binghamton Philharmonic, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 2 | Tony Delauro’s Christmas Revue, 8 p.m.

Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes www.osfl.org or 936-2873 ■ Nov. 4 | Chamber concert, Christ Episcopal Church, Corning, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Youth Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, Christ Episcopal Church, 4 p.m. ■ Dec. 11 | Clemens Center, 4 p.m.

BUFFALO First Niagara Center www.hsbcarena.com ■ Nov. 13 | Further, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 21 | Andre Rieu, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 27 | Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 3 p.m., 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 30 | Jeff Dunham, 8 p.m.

CORNING Corning-Painted Post Civic Music Association www.corningcivicmusic.org or (800) 531-3679 All concerts at The Corning Museum of Glass. ■ Nov. 12 | Tierney Sutton Band, 7:30 p.m. ■ Feb. 25, 2012 | Crossroads, 7:30 p.m.

Valley Folk 171 Cedar Arts Center Drake House www.valleyfolk.org ■ Nov. 5 | Brother Sun, 7:30 p.m.

ELMIRA Clemens Center www.clemenscenter.com or 7348191 ■ Nov. 5 | $10,000 Party fundraiser, 6:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 8 | Laura Ingalls Wilder, 10 a.m., 12:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 14 | Comedy Club, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | “In the Mood,” 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 17 | Thursday Morning Musicales, 10:15 a.m. ■ Nov. 18-19 | “Peter Pan” ■ Nov. 26 | Common Time, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 29 | “Drumline,” 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Annual Arctic League

Broadcast, 10 a.m. ■ Dec. 11 | Orchestra of the Southern Finger Lakes, 4 p.m. Encore Performing Arts Series, Elmira College Tickets $10, discounts for students, senior citizens, groups. www.elmi ra.edu or 735-1853 ■ Nov. 1 | Karine Poghoysan, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 2 | Amadi Azikiwe, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 9-10 | Orchesis, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 14 | Trio Cleonice, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | Amstel Quartet, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 6 | Mark Spicer, Gibson Theatre, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 8-11 | “Ordinary Days,” Watson Arena ENDICOTT Endicott Performing Arts Center www.endicottarts.com or 785-8903 ■ Nov. 4 | An Evening with Phil Jordan, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 11-20 | “Annie” ■ Dec. 2-4 | An EPAC Christmas ■ Dec. 9-11 | “The Nutcracker” GENEVA Smith Opera House www.thesmith.org or (866) 355-LIVE ■ Nov. 12 | Ben Folds, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 17 | Warren Haynes Band, 8 p.m.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011 ■ Nov. 27 | “The Nutcracker,” 3 p.m. ■ Dec. 5-6 | Christmas with the Calamari Sisters, 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 7 | Christmas with the Calamari Sisters, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 10 | Guy Lomabrdo and His Royal Canadians, 7 p.m. ■ Dec. 11 | Imani Winds, 3 p.m. Stonecutters at Belhurst www.belhurst.com or 315-781-0201 Located on Route 14. All shows free. ■ Nov. 5 | The Acoustic Movers, 7-11 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | The Deceivers, 7-11 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Misfit Karma, 7-11 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | The Boogiemen Unplugged, 7-11 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | The Acoustic Movers, 7-11 p.m. ■ Dec. 10 | The Deceivers, 7-11 p.m. ■ Dec. 17 | The Boogiemen Unplugged, 7-11 p.m. ■ Dec. 24 | Msfit Karma Christmas, 7-11 p.m. ITHACA Bound for Glory Anabel Taylor Hall, Cornell University 844-4535, wvbr.com/bfg ■ Nov. 6 | Joe Crookston and the Bluebird Jubilee, 8-11 p.m. ■ Nov. 13 | Anne Hills, 8-11 p.m. ■ Nov. 20 | Mustard’s Retreat, 8-11 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Guy Davis, 8-11 p.m. Cornell University Concert Series Bailey Hall - 273-4497 or www.cornellconcertseries.com

FALL GUIDE

■ Nov. 16 | “Water is Rising: Music and Dance amid Climate Change,” 8 p.m.

Cornell University Fall Community Concert Series ■ Nov. 4 | Juan Carlos Garvaryo, Barnes Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 8 | Jean Ferrad, Anabel Taylor Chapel, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 11 | John Haines-Eitzen, Miri Yampolsky and Nicholas DiEugenio, Barnes Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 13 | Cornell University Winds, Bailey Hall, 3 p.m. ■ Nov. 17 | Cornell Steel Band and World Drum and Dance Ensemble, Willard Straight Hall Memorial Room, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 17 | Karin Nelson, Anders Jormin and Jonas Simonson, Sage Chapel, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Cornell Chamber Orchestra, Barnes Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | New York Young Men Singing, Ford Hall, Ithaca College, 3:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 20 | Cornell Symphony Orchestra, Bailey hall, 3 p.m. ■ Nov. 21 | Cornell Unniversity Jazz Combos, Carriage House Cafe hayloft, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 22 | Cornell Chamber Singers, Barnes hall, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 2 | Cornell Chorale, Sage Chapel, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | Cornell University Jazz Band, Barnes Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 4-5 | Sage Chapel Lessons and Carols service, Sage Chapel, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 6 | Cornell Gamelan

Ensemble, B20 Lincoln Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 11 | 8th annual Cornell Concerto Competition Finals, Barnes Hall, 8 p.m. Hangar Theater www.hangartheater.org or 273-8588 ■ Nov. 3 | Jorma Kaukonen, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | “Final Days: Everything Must Go,” 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 9-16 | “It’s A Wonderful Life: A Radio Play” ■ Dec. 17 | “Home for the Holidays,” 8 p.m. Finger Lakes Chamber Ensemble www.fingerlakeschamberensem ble.org or 272-4839 ■ Dec. 4 | 102 E. First St., Ithaca, 4 p.m. Kitchen Theatre Company The Clinton House, 116 N. Cayuga St. www.kitchentheatre.org or 272-0403 ■ Nov. 30-Dec. 18 | “The Mystery of Irma Vep” State Theatre www.stateofithaca.com or 277-8283 ■ Nov. 5 | Joan Baez and Kris Kristofferson, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 6 | Circus Wunderbar, 1 p.m. ■ Nov. 8 | Joe Bonamassa, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 11 | Rob Bell, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | Drive-By Truckers, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Dark Star Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Ray Davies, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | Harlem Gospel Choir, 8 p.m.

PAGE 23 ■ Dec. 11 | Brian Regan, 8 p.m. MANSFIELD, PA. Mansfield University mansfield.edu or tix.com ■ Nov. 4 | Blackberry Smoke, Straughn Hall, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | Craig Robinson and his Nasty Delicious Band, Straughn Hall, 8 p.m. NEW YORK CITY Madison Square Garden www.thegarden.com or (212) 3077171 ■ Nov. 4 | Enrique Iglasias, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 7-8 | Jay-Z and Kanye West, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 10 | Further, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 13 | Foo Fighters, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 14 | Josh Groban, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | Katy Perry, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 21-22 | Taylor Swift, 7 p.m. ■ Dec. 1 | Bob Seger, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 14 | My Morning Jacket, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 16 | Swedish House Mafia, 8 p.m. Radio City Music Hall www.radiocity.com or (212) 3077171 ■ Nov. 11-Jan. 2, 2012 | “Radio City Christmas Spectacular” NIAGARA FALLS Seneca Niagara www.senecaniagaracasino.com or (877) 873-6322 ■ Nov. 5 | Patty Smyth and Scandal, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | Michael Franks, 8 p.m.

PAGE 24 ■ Nov. 19 | J. Medicine Hat, 3 p.m., 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 25 | Clint Holmes, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Air Supply, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 7-11 | Frankie Avalon and Susan Anton NICHOLS Tioga Downs www.tiogadowns.com ■ Nov. 4 | Aaron Kelly, 7 p.m., 9 p.m. ■ Nov. 5 | Cindy Lane-Newcomb, 4 p.m., 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | Grandma Lee, 7 p.m., 9 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Peter Alden, 7 p.m., 9 p.m. ROCHESTER Water Street Music Hall www.waterstreetmusic.com or (585) 325-5600 ■ Nov. 2 | Taking Back Sunday, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 3 | Chamberlin, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 4 | The Movement, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 9 | The Features, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 10 | Assembly of Dust, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 16 | This Life, 8:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 17 | Awolnation, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 18 | Donna the Buffalo, 8:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Big Eyed Phish, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 21 | Chameleons Vox, 8:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 23 | Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, 9 p.m. ■ Nov. 25 | The Ready Set, 6 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | John Brown’s Body, 8:45 p.m. ■ Dec. 8 | OAR, 7 p.m. ■ Dec. 22 | Me Talk Pretty, 7 p.m.

FALL GUIDE SALAMANCA Seneca Allegany Events Center www.senecaalleganycasino.com or (888) 913-3377 ■ Nov. 5 | Lindsey Buckingham, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 19 | Tanya Tucker, 7 p.m. ■ Dec. 2-4 | Lee Greenwood SYRACUSE Landmark Theater www.landmarktheatre.org or (315) 475-7980 ■ Nov. 19 | Bill Cosby, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 30 | Manheim Steamroller, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 2 | Celtic Thunder Christmas, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, 1 p.m., 5 p.m. UNCASVILLE, CONN. Mohegan Sun Arena www.mohegansun.com ■ Nov. 12 | Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 3 p.m., 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 13 | Straight No Chaser, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 8 | | Jay-Z and Kanye West, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 25 | Staind, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Bob Seger, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | 311, 8 p.m. VERONA Turning Stone Casino Resort (877) 833-SHOW ■ Nov. 3 | Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | Brass Transit, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 14 | Tower of Power, 8 p.m.

■ Nov. 20 | Larry King, 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 26 | Gloriana, 8 p.m. ■ Nov. 29 | Alice Cooper, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 2 | Olivia Newton John, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 3 | David Archuleta, 8 p.m. ■ Dec. 7 | Frankie Valli, 8 p.m. (sold out) ■ Dec. 20 | Kenny Rogers, 8 p.m. WILLIAMSPORT, PA. Community Arts Center www.pct.edu/COMMARTS or (800) 432-9382 ■ Nov. 5 | “Deer Camp the Musical,” 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 11 | “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 12 | REO Speedwagon, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 15 | “Beakman on the Brain,” 7 p.m. ■ Nov. 18 | Super Diamond, 7:30 p.m. ■ Nov. 28 | Mannheim Steamroller, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 1 | “Neil Berg’s Broadway Holiday,” 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 4 | “Nutcracker,” 4 p.m. ■ Dec. 8 | Judy Collins, 7:30 p.m. ■ Dec. 13 | Williamsport Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Ticketmaster ■ Ticketmaster charge by phone: (800) 745-3000. ■ Online: www.ticketmaster.com ■ Area Ticketmaster outlets include The Information Center, Centerway Square, Market Street, Corning and Macy’s at The Arnot Mall, Big Flats.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

Halloween Holiday Trivia Orange and black are Halloween colors because orange is associated with the Fall harvest and black is associated with darkness and death. Jack o’ Lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the Samhain holiday. Pumpkins also come in white, blue and green. Great for unique monster carvings! Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who would celebrate the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes. Tootsie Rolls were the first wrapped penny candy in America. The ancient Celts thought that spirits and ghosts roamed the countryside on Halloween night. They began wearing masks and costumes to avoid being recognized as human. Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States. Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for trick-or-treaters with Snickers #1. Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first. Bobbing for apples is thought to have originated from the roman harvest festival that honors Pamona, the goddess of fruit trees. Black cats were once believed to be witch's familiars who protected their powers.

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

FALL GUIDE

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Five Easy ways to winterize your home Routinely cleaning gutters throughout the fall and early winter is just one way you can help reduce the risk of damage caused by winter weather. When summer draws to a close and autumn arrives, homeowners must place a precedent on readying their homes for the winter months. Often referred to as "winterizing," the process is meant to ensure a home can withstand harsh winter weather while proving a safe haven from the elements. As autumn arrives, homeowners can take several steps to get their homes ready for whatever winter has to offer with the following tasks. ☛ Fix the leaks. A leaky home will prove an expensive home during the winter months. A home with many leaks will be much colder to inhabit, and homeowners typically turn up the heat to counter drafts that can make a home feel like a meat locker. But turning up the thermostat isn't the answer. Instead, fix leaks in the fall before the cold weather arrives. Leaks should not be very hard to find. On the first breezy autumn afternoon, walk around the house in search of any drafty areas. These drafts will be noticeable and often occur around doors and window frames, electrical outlets and even recessed lighting. Homeowners have a

host of options at their disposal to plug leaks, be it door sweeps that block air from entering under exterior doors to caulk applied around leaky windows. When using caulk outdoors, be sure to use a weather-resistant caulk or, if sealing brick, use masonry sealer. ☛ Add insulation upstairs. Homeowners who have an attic in their homes might want to consider adding some insulation up there. Experts recommend a minimum of 12 inches of insulation in the attic. That might prove costly, but a poorly insulated attic is akin to opening the front door and letting the heat out. It might be best for lessthan-handy homeowners to hire a professional to insulate the attic. But do-it-yourselfers might find it good to know that if the ceiling joists, which are often 11 inches or less, are visible, then the attic is in need of additional insulation. Such joists won't be visible in an adequately insulated attic. ☛ Put up the storm windows. It's nice to open the windows in the spring and summer and let the warm air waft in through the screens. But when summer is over, it's time to put up the storm

windows once again. Storm windows add an extra layer of protection from the elements and are especially valuable in homes with single-pane glass windows. Homeowners who don't have storm windows should consider upgrading their existing windows. Such a project isn't cheap, but newer windows will almost certainly lead to lower heating costs, meaning the project will essentially pay for itself over time. Homeowners who can't afford to replace all of their windows don't have to replace them all at once. Instead, replace them a few at a time and make the rooms where you spend the most time each winter the first on the list to receive new windows. ☛ Be diligent with the gutters. Leaves falling from trees is an idyllic image associated primarily with autumn. Unfortunately, when leaves fall they often fall into the gutters. Routinely clean the gutters once the leaves start to fall. Clean gutters will allow snow and rain to effectively drain through the gutters. If the gutters are clogged, snow might have nowhere to go when it begins to melt, and roof damage might result. Such damage is costly but preventable in

most instances. One of the easier preventive measures to take is to routinely clean the gutters of leaves and other debris that accumulate during the fall. When cleaning the gutters, make sure they are properly aligned. Poorly aligned gutters can lead to a host of problems. One such problem is flooding. If downspouts are not properly aligned with the rest of the gutters, then water might not be directed away from the home as it's intended. Instead, water might be directed toward the home, resulting in flooding or additional water damage. ☛ Have the furnace cleaned. Experts recommend annual furnace cleanings. Before cold weather arrives, turn the furnace on to make sure it's still working. An unpleasant odor should appear when first turning on the furnace, but it shouldn't last very long. If the odor sticks around, turn the furnace off and call a professional. Once winter arrives, routinely replace the filters. This makes the furnace operate more efficiently and can also reduce the risk of fire.

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FALL GUIDE

Figuring the turkey-to-person ratio (MS) -- Thanksgiving holds different meanings to different people. Some feel it is a day for being generous or giving thanks through unselfish deeds. Others feel it is a time to sit around with family sharing stories of the year. Still many others simply look forward to the day for football. No matter how you view Thanksgiving, one thing is for sure, filling up on turkey is an integral part of the holiday. If turkey is the centerpiece of your celebration -- as it should be -- then be sure to have enough turkey on hand to adequately feed all of your guests. Although they will be filling up on trimmings and side dishes as well, the first thing they will spear with a fork is a nice slice of juicy turkey. There is some conventional wisdom with regards to how big a turkey to buy. Most chefs or home cooks say that having a pound to one-and-a-half pounds for each adult at the holiday table is adequate. Children will likely eat a half or quarter of that amount. If you want to ensure leftovers, then you can increase the size of the turkey slightly. Therefore, if 10 adults and 5 children will be at Thanksgiving dinner, multiply 10 by 1.5. That equals 15. Multiply 5 x .5, which

equals 2.5. Add the two totals together, and you're left with 17.5 pounds. A turkey in that range should be adequate to feed guests. If your guests are known to be hearty eaters or if leftovers are essential, round up to a 20pound bird. Keep in mind it will be necessary to check the size of

select a reliable meat thermometer. There are standard and digital models available. Some digital thermometers enable you to insert the prong in the turkey and then stretch a heat-proof wire to the digital unit, which remains outside of the oven. This way you can set a timer or set a

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

Thanksgiving Quiz 1- What utensils did the pilgrims use at thanksgiving? 2- Thanksgiving is only celebrated in the United States. True or False? 3- Name of the famous rock where the pilgrims landed? 4- The Greek Goddess of Corn is 5- What foods were served at the first thanksgiving? 6- The original thanksgiving lasted how long? 7- What vegetable did the pilgrims have available for thanksgiving but did not use because they thought it was poisonous? 8- What Indian tribe was invited to spend thanksgiving with the pilgrims?

your oven prior to purchasing the turkey to ensure the bird will fit inside with a roasting pan. Otherwise, you may have to downsize on the turkey and cook more side dishes. Once the size of the turkey is determined, it all comes down to the cooking. Naturally, the larger the bird the longer the cooking time. Instead of leaving cooking to chance, or to the unpredictable pop-up plug included with the turkey, take the time to

cooking temperature. The thermometer will beep when the turkey is done. The USDA recommends poultry be cooked to 165 F. Be sure to check the temperature at the wing and the thickest part of the breast. After cooking, let the turkey rest around 10 minutes after removing it from the oven. This will enable the juices to stay within the meat and keep it moist. And isn't a moist turkey the ultimate goal? Then slice and serve to guests.

9- The first department store that held a Thanksgiving parade was? 10- What was the name of the ship that the pilgrims came over on? 11- Who was instrumental in declaring Thanksgiving Day a National holiday? 12- What year was the first Macy's Thanksgiving Parade? 13- The day after Thanksgiving is called? 14- What was the original name of the pilgrims?

Saturday | October 29 | 2011

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Saturday | October 29 | 2011


Fall Guide, October 29, 2011