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EDITORIAL

Power referendum is not a straw poll

Frightening formals Guests raided closets for their most hideous formal wear at Heritage Center fundraiserPage 21

Voters should understand implications of approving referendum In a choice that is deceptively simple, the Vero Beach electorate is being asked to allow the City Council to lease the power plant property. Far from clear to many voters, though, are the full implications of approving the Nov. 8 referendum. Contrary to what many are leading the public to believe, the Vero Beach City Council already has authority to negotiate with Florida Power and Light. This referendum is not necessary in order for the Council to pursue negotiations. What the City Council is not authorized to do without voter approval is to lease the power plant property as part of a sale of the utility. That permission is what the Council now seeks, even though, with negotiations still in the early stages, important details of the lease and the sale are yet unknown. With increasing persuasiveness, some are making the case that a “no” vote on the Nov. 8 referendum is the only means voters have of

paving the way for a second referendum, one that might be held in early 2012, when negotiations between the City and FP&L have concluded. Voters will then be in a better position to make a more informed and considered decision. If the City Council is able through the Nov. 8 referendum to secure permission to lease the power plant site, that governing body, apart from Mayor Jay Kramer, appears determined to sell the city’s electric utility without ever coming back to voters for their consent to a fully and finally negotiated agreement. To date, the City Council has not been willing to pass even a non-binding resolution expressing support for a second referendum. If they would take that simple step, many who now question the wisdom of this referendum would be more inclined to support it. With the Nov. 8 decision less than two weeks away, here are a few points to consider:

Tripping the light fantastic The pairings are set for Dancing with Vero’s Stars to benefit the Healthy Start CoalitionPage 23

CONTINUES ON PAGE 11

All for education The Education Foundation celebrates 20 years of helping studentsPage 18

 Massive layoffs loom as Piper suspends jet programPage 3

LETTERS 12 22  CALENDAR  ENTERTAINMENT 26

TO ADVERTISE CALL MARTINE FECTEAU 772.696.2004 MARK SCHUMANN 772.696.5233

What does the referendum vote on November 8th mean for you? More than a year ago, the City Council asked FPL to pursue a potential purchase of the electric system in Vero Beach to help lower electric bills for residents. We’ve been working closely with the City to put together an agreement that is in the best interest of both Vero Beach and our current customers. The referendum on November 8th will help move the negotiations forward. The referendum is not to approve the full purchase and sale agreement. Instead, it simply gives the City approval to lease the land on the power plant site to FPL, removing a potential roadblock if the sale moves forward. If you are one of the many residents who have voiced support for continuing to pursue a sale of the electric system in Vero Beach, you will want to make sure your voice is heard on November 8. Visit www.FPL.com/verobeach for more information.

Sponsored by Florida Power & Light Company

Reach More Than A Zip Code Advertise your business in Vero Beach Newsweekly to reach every home on the barrier island, plus communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, Vero Beach Country Club, Indian River Club, Pointe West and Bent Pine.

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To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

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worldwide economic recession hit, but that extra time is set to run out on Dec. 31. By terms of the contract, Piper would be required refund some money to the state and county. However, Piper is in talks with the state for another extension. County Administrator Joe Baird said if such a deal were struck, he would be in favor of granting Piper more time to weather the economic storm. “If the state was agreeable, my recommendation to the board would be that we amend the agreement to give them more time,” Baird said. “I do think it is in the best interest of the county.” Baird noted that Piper has an annual payroll of $48 million and contributes in many ways to the local economy.

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Piper will increase the number of personnel dedicated to our sustaining engineering function,” he added. Also left to be determined is the $32 million incentive package the state and county came up with to keep Piper in Vero Beach when it was considering where to build the PiperJet. The company has invested in capital improvements related to the physical plant, but will fall far short of the hiring requirements that were part of that agreement. When the layoffs are fully realized, the company will have about 650 employees. When the agreement was first struck, Piper promised to have over 1,000 employees working at the factory. Piper asked for an extension of the employment benchmarks when the

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VERO BEACH -- The announcement by Piper Aircraft this week that it was suspending its jet program and eliminating over 200 jobs was another in a series of missteps the company has suffered through since being bought by Imprimis and the Brunei Ministry of Finance in 2009. That purchase came with much fanfare and expectations that, with the backing of the Sultan of Brunei, Piper would have the funding to bring to production what was then called the PiperJet and later rebranded the Altaire. However, in the interim there have been wholesale executive changes, a now-abandoned attempt to enter the Light Sport Aircraft market, the alienation of many

of the company’s long-time dealers with changes in their sales program and now the suspension of the jet program. At one time, Piper officials said they had over 200 advance orders for the new jet, which was redesigned and renamed the Altaire last October. The first version of the PiperJet was slated to roll late this year, but that was pushed back to 2014 when the re-design took place. The company is now re-trenching and focusing on its core line of turboprops and piston-engine aircraft. “Going forward as a company, we will step up product improvements for our turboprop and piston-powered product lines,” said Interim President and Chief Executive Officer Simon Caldecott. “As a result,

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

O C T O B E R

Piper abandons jet program, to miss employment quota

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Meetings galore on referendum, FP&L offers some lease terms BY BARBARA YORESH VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH – Three meetings within a week have underscored questions which still linger regarding the proposed Nov. 8 referendum giving the Vero Beach City Council authority to lease the city’s power plant site to Florida Power & Light. At a meeting this week brought forward by the City Council, FP&L for the first time offered initial terms it would like to see in a lease. FP&L project manager Ryan Fair said if the referendum is approved, the company is willing to pay the city $1 million per year to lease the power plant site if a sales contract agreement can

be reached. FP&L officials said they had just put the proposal together the night before and the city and its negotiating team had yet to respond to any of the details. FP&L’s Letter of Intent offers to buy the city electric utility for up to $100 million in cash. Fair said that factoring in an additional $17 million in assumed city employee pension obligations as well as about $24.5 million in transmission upgrades to the plant would bring the total price for the plant to about $130 million. He estimated that it would take between two to three years to make the improvements which

would include FP&L paying approximately $5-6 million to relocate a substation. The proposed deal would ensure employment for current city electric utility employees for two years. Although Fair said he could not cite definite dates for the plant’s commencement of upgrades and subsequent decommission – at which time the property would be returned to the city – he targeted completion for 2017. “We have worked very well with the city in structuring an overall deal and we believe we can have a purchase and sale agreement by the end of the year, “Fair said. Concurrently, the city and its transactional attorneys as well

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as FP&L officials are working to help settle the city’s contractual obligations with its existing power suppliers. When asked if FP&L would walk away from further negotiations with the city if the referendum is defeated, Fair was somewhat evasive. “I can’t say FP&L will walk away and I can’t say it won’t. We’d view it as an obstacle we’d have to assess and then re-assess with the city on how we’d have to proceed. We view the referendum as a necessary step,” Fair said. Acting City Attorney Wayne Coment confirmed that if the Nov. 8 referendum to give the City Council the authority to execute a lease failed and yet the city and FP&L came to terms on a sales contract, “we’d have to go back and do another referendum to nail down the lease.”

Confusion about the referendum One sticking point has been the referendum itself. A question whether it is “binding” or not has led to voter confusion. According to Coment, voter approval of the referendum gives the City Council the authority to enter into a lease arrangement with FP&L as well as a sale of the utility if council believes it will be of benefit to the city. The Special Call meeting was convened this week to give further clarification to questions raised at last Thursday’s Florida Power & Light Open House and a “town hall” sponsored by former Mayor Warren Winchester. The public meeting was requested by Councilman Brian Heady and supported by Vice Mayor Pilar Turner and Council-

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Winchester’s Town Hall session held last week was attended by about 70 people including Kramer who, with Winchester and city Utilities Commission Chairman Herb Whittall, an-

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Coment said he had contacted the state’s Division of Elections general counsel to define the parameters Council Members needed to uphold in discussing the referendum at a public meeting. Coment drafted a memo to Council outlining the need for “an abundance of caution.” “The prohibition has to do with using public funds to expressly advocate a position one way or another. They need to police themselves,” Coment said. Section 106.113 of Florida Statutes stipulates guidelines regarding the expenditure of public funds on issues to be decided by the electorate. Publicly conducted city council meetings are advertised and incur additional costs. A breach of Section 106.113 of Florida Statues by inadvertently creating a “political advertisement” or “electioneering communication” could result civil penalties of up to $1,000 for each violation.

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Florida Statue prohibits use of public funds for political advertisement

swered questions. Also in attendance were Vice Mayor Turner, City Council candidates Dick Winger and Ken Daige and County Commissioner Gar y Wheeler. One key individual involved in the city ’s negotiations with FP&L was missing, however. City Manager Jim O’Connor was invited to attend Winchester’s meeting, but was advised Oct. 18 by a majority of council members not to go because doing so could be counter to Council’s previously adopted policy to sell the city ’s electric utility. Although O’Connor assured Council Members he could properly conduct himself at the meeting, he agreed not to attend. Although he was out of town for the Special Call meeting, O’Connor was hooked into the proceedings via telephone. Winchester has said he would support the sale of the utility “if the price is in the neighborhood it should be. The power plant has ser ved the community well, but it can no longer compete with the big companies.” He termed the Nov. 8 referendum “a bogus referendum” and predicted that if approved by voters, “within three weeks someone will go to court and file against it.” “We do not have a lease in hand. We do not have a sales contract in hand. To me, a blank piece of paper is not a lease. We have nothing that comes close to a lease or a sale,” Winchester said. Also last week , FP&L held an open house which about 150 people attended. Citizens were able to meet with FP&L officials about a range of issues and were provided with information about the utility, which has the lowest electric rates in the state.

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woman Tracy Carroll although Mayor Jay Kramer and Councilman Craig Fletcher voiced misgivings. Although initially intended as a forum for the public to ask questions concerning electric utility matters, it also included a presentation by FP&L representatives who revealed their initial provisions of a proposed lease.

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Police Chief Dappen asked by City Manager to retire VERO BEACH -- City Manager Jim O’Connor has asked Police Chief Don Dappen to step down by Dec. 1 over what O’Connor characterized as differences in management philosophy. Dappen in an e-mail reply to O’Connor’s request said he was in the state’s Deferred Retirement Option Program and his retirement age under that program was not until 2014. Dappen said O’Connor’s reply to him was that he would discuss changes “in the command structure” upon O’Connor’s return from completing his move from his former home in Winchester, Va., to Vero Beach. O’Connor has the authority to remove Dappen as police chief or from the department itself, but said Thursday he has not decided what action he will take.

Developers revive County Road 510/U.S. 1 commercial-residential development INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A group of local developers, backed by California investors, are rekindling a massive commercial-residential project in Wabasso that first failed when the recession hit in 2007. Joe Paladin, manager of the Vero Beach-based Black Swan Consulting and Entitlements LLC, is steering the project through the various county and state requirements for Orchid Quay LLC, of Irvine, Calif. He said his clients have their financing in order to complete what he estimated would be 350 town houses and more than 250,000 square feet of commercial space, including restaurants and offices. The county in March 2006 approved the 113-acre Bristol Bay project, southeast of U.S. 1 and County Road 510, for 497 British Colonial-style town houses and 92,500 square feet of commercial space. Paladin hopes to have the project started in eight months.

County Commission approves new district map INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Indian River County Commission have approved new district maps, largely similar to the present boundaries, that maintains Sebastian and the barrier island divided by district lines. State law requires all districts to be roughly equal in population and be adjusted following every U.S. Census count. And in a 5-0 vote commissioners gave final approval to a map that will govern County Commission elections for the next 10 years. The School Board is scheduled to address the new districts Oct. 25 since board members are proposing to adopt the commission’s system of district numbers. State law requires county commissioners and school board members to live in different districts so they can represent differing parts of the county.

City decides against additional stop signs in Live Oak Road neighborhood VERO BEACH -- City officials have decided not to add stop signs as a traffic deterrent in the neighborhood between Beachland Boulevard and Live Oak Road, west of State Road A1A, though it will continue to monitor traffic. At a community meeting last month to address residents’ concerns about traffic, City Manager Jim O’Connor agreed to increase police enforcement in that area. A group of residents along Live Oak Road came to the council earlier this year saying that motorists often speed down their road as a cut-through between S.R. A1A and the Barber Bridge. Some early proposals, including closing off Live Oak Road at S.R. A1A and prohibiting left turns from Live Oak Road onto S.R. A1A, were opposed by some other residents in the area who thought the actions would just push traffic onto neighboring streets.

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GIFFORD — Tammy Adams has been appointed the new director of development at the Gifford Youth Activity Center. Adams is a charter member and currently president-elect of the Rotary Club of Vero Beach Oceanside. She served on the boards of the Mental Health Association (conceiving the highly successful TurtleTrax fundraiser idea) and the American Red Cross

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A proposal by state Rep. Debbie Mayfield to name the 17th Street Bridge in recognition of former Indian River County Commissioner Alma Lee Loy has passed its first committee hurdle in Tallahassee. Mayfield’s House Bill 15, which would designate the Vero Beach span as “Alma Lee Loy Bridge,” passed the House Transportation & Highway Safety Subcommittee unanimously. The Vero Beach Republican’s efforts to rename the bridge last legislative session came up short. The bill containing the Loy designation — and numerous other road designations — bounced back and forth from House to Senate in the session’s waning moments before running out of time. Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, will push the bill in the Senate this session, which starts Jan. 10. Identical House and Senate bills need to pass by the 60-day session’s end, and Gov. Rick Scott has to sign off to make the designation official.

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House bill designating ‘Alma Lee Loy Bridge’ moves forward

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The new intensive care unit at Indian River Medical Center will be named in recognition of philanthropists Champ and Debbie Sheridan, hospital executives announced. The couple became Indian River Medical Center Foundation’s first milliondollar donors to The 21st Century Campaign in 2005, just as the campaign was getting off the ground. The 21st Century Campaign’s $50 million goal included capital improvements and completion of the hospital’s new Emergency Room and The Heart Center. The naming of the unit represents a total commitment of greater than $2.5 million made by the Sheridans over the past six years and into the future. Last year, Vero Beach residents Lorne and Heidi Waxlax donated $1 million to the hospital to build a new post-anesthesia recovery room. The Sheridan Intensive Care Unit and Waxlax Recovery Room groundbreaking are slated for Nov. 9 at 2:30 p.m. The newly constructed units will extend north on the 37th Street side of IRMC.

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Association of Fundraising Professionals Indian River Chapter have named their National Philanthropy Day winners. Recipients include: Outstanding Individual Philanthropists -- Barney and Hariot Greene, nominated by Indian River State College Foundation. Outstanding Corporate Philanthropist -- U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, nominated by Indian River Medical Center Foundation. Outstanding Volunteer Fundraisers -- Karl M. Steene, nominated by The Sun Up Center. Unsung Hero of the Year -- David M. Taylor, nominated by Indian River Habitat for Humanity. Additional individual honorees being recognized for their contributions include: Mary P. Graves, Kip Jacoby, Dawn E. Michael, Donna Peters and Sue M. Tompkins, nominated by Education Foundation of Indian River County. Additional corporate nominees being recognized include: Piper Aircraft, Vero US 1 Nissan & Route 60 Hyundai and Wal-Mart/Sam’s Club. The National Philanthropy Day ceremonies will be held Nov. 15 at Riverside Theatre.

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Indian River Medical Center names intensive care unit after Champ and Debbie Sheridan

Association of Fundraising Professionals announce award winners

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- The Board of County Commissioners agreed to pay $40,000 toward a 17-mile hiking-bicycling trail connecting the Indian River Lagoon with the headwaters of the St. Johns River. Fellsmere City Manager Jason Nunemaker last week told the commission he was seeking a $5.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation from its $527 million Transportation Investment-Generating Economic Recovery fund and asked for $100,000 toward a local match. Phil Matson, director of the county Metropolitan Planning Organization’s staff, said he could justify $40,000 — or 40 percent of what Nunemaker asked for — because 40 percent of the 11-mile greenway extension would go through unincorporated portions of the county.

North Treasure Coast Chapter. She co-chaired the Ambassadors Committee for the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce for two years and was a member of the fundraising committee for the Environmental Learning Center. She also was responsible for distributing locally more than $80,000 in grants and donations through the Wal-Mart Foundation.

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County Commission to contribute $40,000 for hiking-bicycling trail

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Teacher of the year coaches colleagues to excel BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Cheryl Conley is modest about being named the 2011 “Teacher of the Year” by the Florida Department of Education, and being chosen as one of four top finalists for the national title. “A lot of it has to do with luck,” says the former fourth-grade teacher at Osceola Magnet School, who beat out 180,000 public school teachers in Florida last year for Macy’s annual award program. What she means is that she was lucky people took notice of her love of teaching and passion for children, enabling her to win $10,000 and a year traveling the state as an ambassador for education. However, she is not modest about her new role as a teacher-coach in the Indian River School district, where she affects the lives of many more students than the 22 that were enrolled in her fourthgrade classes. Nor is she reticent about speaking up about the pros and cons of the new state mandated system of teachers’ evaluations. “I’m optimistic about the new appraisal system,” says Conley, 39, referring to Governor Rick Scott’s initiative beginning to end tenure for new teachers and to implement a merit pay system. “The trouble is its so darn complex.” Conley is a straightforward Texas native who had been teaching in Indian River County only three years before she snagged the state title. She won by making learning fun and accessible, not by adhering to a 41-point teaching assessment tool devised by Dr. Robert Marzano and adopted by

lawmakers in Tallahassee. Marzano’s matrix charts teachers’ incremental growth, development and evaluations with the goal of improving public education. Currently, the new assessment is given to all teachers employed by the district and comprises 50 percent of their annual evaluation score. “The other 50 percent is based on test scores measuring where the students were when they came to a teacher and where they are now,” says Conley. Teachers with tenure can opt to be rewarded by higher test scores, or they can remain on their current pay structure by retaining their tenure. Currently, Florida is ranked one of the lowest in the nations for teacher pay and for educational funding. According to Conley, principals used to conduct one or two formal assessments per semester of new teachers. Now, there are at least two formal assessments, plus an informal review and a walk-through during class hours using the Marzano teaching framework, which examines 41 specific skills. The new law says that all teachers hired after July 1, 2014 will no longer earn tenure, but will work on an annual contract with the district. Conley recognizes the value of new teachers enthusiastic about entering the profession and she is excited about empowering them through this new system. In the past, she says, new teachers were the first to be let go in budget cuts and layoffs. Now, if any teacher does not achieve satisfactory evaluations for three years, not only will they be terminated, but they can lose their license to teach in Florida.

In Conley’s new role as a teacher-coach, she helps teachers not only save their jobs, but hopefully exceed the new standards that have been set. Having completed her year as a Christa McAuliffe ambassador for education this summer, she now coaches teachers at Storm Grove and Oslo middle schools by offering support and guidance. “I try to set a good example,” says Conley, one of three teacher-coaches in the district, whose easygoing personality provides teachers with a mentor to whom they can discuss their concerns. “I give some advice and ask a lot of probing questions. I help teachers become more reflective about their practice,” she says. Some of the teachers she coaches are new to the profession, others are experienced teachers that are new to the district, and still others have either requested coaching or it has been recommended that they receive it. “I took this job to effect as many students as I can by helping more teachers, being more visible, getting into more classrooms,” explains Conley. Conley was a middle school science teacher for seven years in Houston, Texas before moving to Indian River County. After taking a brief hiatus to raise her own children, she began substitute teaching at Osceola Magnet. In 2007, she was poised to become the PTA president at Osceola when a teaching position became available and she was hired. A graduate of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas, Conley holds a Bachelor of Science degree in academic stud-

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Cheryl Conley was named 2011 Teacher of the Year by the Florida Department of Education.

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ies and a specialization in life/earth science. At Osceola, she was also the science coordinator and the fourth- and fifth-grade science advisor. Known for her creativity, Conley would dress up as Alfred Einstein on Halloween to teach the concepts of chemistry to her fourth-graders by examining dry ice, glow-in-the-dark lighting, and slime. For a biology lesson, she hung a gigantic cell from the ceiling showing the nucleus, organelles and vacuoles using tarp, string, construction paper and balloons. She also wrote a rap song about cells to the music of “I Got a Feeling,” by the Black-Eyed Peas, which she taught to her students. In 2010, Conley was nominated by Osceola principal, Susan Roberts, for the district title of teacher of the year. Ultimately, she was the second Indian River County teacher to receive the state honor, the first, Beachland Elementary teacher Margaret Myrick Ingram, was awarded the title in 1998. Conley was the first district teacher to be named a finalist for the national award. Last year, between travels, Conley began hosting “Classroom Connections,” a show broadcast on local Comcast Cable television highlighting different school programs throughout the district. This year, in addition to her coaching duties, she hosts both “Classroom Connections” and “Beyond the Books,” which features educational personalities and community partnerships, including Mardy Fish, whose foundation supports after school programs, United Way, March of Dimes, and Dollars for Scholars. “I have found that the majority of teachers came into this profession for the right reasons,” says Conley. “Teaching is not a job that turns off at the end of the day.” She reminds people that teachers continue working after school is over, sometimes late into the night grading homework, preparing lessons, and figuring out ways to reach a diverse group of students. Sometimes, it is overwhelming and teachers can forget why they’re in the profession, she says. The new appraisal system “is a great way to identify leader teaches,” says Conley. The new law seeks to reward the most ambitious and competent teachers, while still providing job protection for teachers who maintain the status quo. Teachers in targeted subjects such as math and science also earn more. Right now, the district is going through a learning curve, says Conley. There is uproar about using test scores to evaluate teachers’ performances and she questions if an individual teacher’s scores are an accurate measure. “When you look at an individual who has 22 students, some of the factors that can make an impact are outside of a teacher’s control, such as a

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Conley now works for the school district as a teacher-coach. student’s discipline issues or absences,” she says. While recommended by the state, Marzano’s assessment framework is not mandated. Other districts are using Charlotte Danielson’s rubric, which looks at four domains of teaching practices, and still others are using a hybrid of both. “When schools build a team attitude, that may be a more reliable measure of overall success,” says Conley, who points out that a larger population is

a better gauge of outcome and a unified effort is always going to win in the long run. During Conley’s year as ambassador and in the first months as a teacher-coach, she has been most impressed with the dedication of teachers to their students. “It’s nice to see us all working together to benefit the kids,” she says. “But, it’s hard to be measured by something you don’t even understand.”

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Community Forum EDITORIAL

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No simple choices in City Council election While some insist that the City Council race is a single-issue election, the choice facing voters is far more complex, and with ramifications that will for generations to come effect the level of city services and property taxes. Clearly there exists a consensus for selling the electric utility. So, the question of whether or not to sell really isn’t the issue. Some would have the public think otherwise, but one of the central questions in this election is more about how to negotiate in a way that will result in the best deal possible for the city. Other important concerns have to do with the Council’s ability to guide the city through what will surely be difficult and even painful choices. Vero Beach’s government doesn’t just need to down size. It needs to rightsize. Levels of services, staffing, and taxation will all have to be adjusted in the next few years. Initiating change is one thing. Overseeing it is quite another. And this is why we have reservations about the two incumbents, first term council members Tracy Carroll and Brian Heady. We applaud Heady and Carroll for sticking to their mandate to sell the electric utility. However, their zeal to

sell has overtaken their ability to get the best deal possible as negotiations go forward. For evidence of this overzealousness, we need look no further than the bizarre public contempt shown for the work done by their own consultant. That appraisal of the electric utility has been criticized as too high, though the city’s transactional attorney, Richard Miller, called the appraisal a “very comprehensive job.” Miller said the report will be used as a starting point in negotiations. (Oct. 13 Press Journal). And then there is the unfortunate muzzling of City Manager Jim O’Connor. Exercising his own good judgment, O’Connor had agreed to answer questions at a gathering of citizens who might be skeptical, or even opposed to the Council’s plans for the utility. Heady and Carroll directed O’Connor to rescind his offer to appear before the group. Countermanding the city manager’s decision to help interested voters better understand the utility issue is an example of a contemptuousness of staff and of the public, and is an example of a troubling tendency to micromanage. Fortunately there are two reasonable alternatives to Carroll and Heady. Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing good by doing right.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Richard Winger, vice chairman of the city’s Finance Committee, is by far the most qualified. Not only does Winger have an impressive resume of business experience, he also has managed organizations in transition. He is conciliatory, deliberative, and yet determined. Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor

Barbara Yoresh Contributor Martine Fecteau Account Executive Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

Of the four candidates in the current field, if we could only have one to represent the city at the negotiating table, we would choose Richard Winger. And if we had to rely on only one of them to steer a deliberate and steady course through the turbulent waters of change, we would again choose Richard Winger. The other candidate well suited to bring to the Council deliberativeness, patience, a listening ear, and an inquiring mind, is former councilman Ken Daige. Some seem reluctant to endorse Daige because he was not returned to office in the last election. While we hear that concern, we also believe that defeat can be instructive. Daige is clearly wiser for the experience. Given his dedication to serving the city, we would welcome seeing Ken Daige returned to office.

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A long and perhaps painful period of adjustment for the city will surely follow the divestment of its utilities. City leaders will

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Several City Council members, as well as a number of business and civic organizations, are all in one way or another saying this referendum is non-binding. Whether doing so intentionally or otherwise, they are misleading the public. In characterizing this referendum as “nonbinding,” proponents are gaining support from voters who might otherwise reserve their approval until the full and final details of the lease have been negotiated.    While passage of this referendum does not obligate the Council to lease the property, or to sell the power plant, it will, if approved, commit voters to accept the terms of a lease that has yet to be negotiated. Some maintain that the city charter requires that a lease be approved by voters, and not just the concept of leasing this property for the purpose stated in the referendum. Even acting City Attorney Wayne Coment, citing case law, advised the City Council in its June 21 meeting that the prudent approach would

Despite the fact that details of a lease have yet to be negotiated, some argue that the Council is acting responsibly in bringing this question to the voters in the Nov. 8 election. They point to the fact that the city is saving the $25,000 it would cost to hold a special election after a lease is negotiated with FP&L, presumably by early 2012. Given the multi-million dollar price tag for the consultants and attorneys involved in this transaction, $25,000 seems a relatively small price to pay to ensure compliance with both the letter and the spirit of the city charter. Asking the voters to make a decision without giving them an opportunity to consider all the facts that would be available once negotiations are concluded, simply to save $25,000, is penny-wise and pound-foolish, and is almost surely an invitation to a legal challenge. The fact that this referendum is being rushed to a vote now has nothing to do with saving $25,000. Rather, it is a shrewd attempt to exclude the voting public from participating in the final decision on the lease of the power plant land and on the sale of the city’s electric utility.

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necessarily have to make difficult decisions about appropriate levels of service, staffing and taxation. These hard choices are unavoidable if the city is to cure itself of its addiction to the use of utility transfers as a way of subsidizing the general fund. As the city is rightsizing, it will be helpful if the majority of city voters can remind each other that they agreed to make these changes. Council members Brian Heady and Tracy Carroll may well have been elected on their promise to get the city out of the power business. While we support that agenda, we would at the same time suggest that Heady and Carroll do not have a mandate to violate either the “letter” or the “spirit and intent” of the city charter. Vice Mayor Pilar Turner seems equally inclined to let this referendum be the last word voters will have on the lease of the power plant property and the sale of the electric system. None of the current council majority seems inclined to trust “the average voter.” And so, our concern is as much with the process as the outcome. By leading voters to believe that a “yes” vote is necessary in order for negotiations to continue, and by disingenuously claiming that that this referendum is non-binding, some are doing the public a disservice. While it is almost surely a good idea to sell the electric utility, it is simply not sufficient to suggest that the end justifies the means. There has to be some higher value and we would suggest that value is respect for the letter and the spirit and intent of the city charter. It seems perfectly reasonable to vote for the Nov. 8 referendum, so long as one understands the City Council will then be empowered to negotiate the exact terms of a lease on the power plant property. Voters should be clear, though, that if the referendum passes there almost surely will be no second referendum. However you vote on Nov. 8, just be clear about the choice you are making.

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Curiously, some civic leaders are telling us that Florida Power and Light will walk away from an opportunity to acquire more than 32,000 new customers, if the poorly timed, vaguely worded Nov. 8 referendum is rejected by voters. That claim does not square with the facts. For example, at the public information event held last week, members of the FP&L’s negotiating team were clear that they have NOT taken the position that the company will necessarily break off negotiation if the referendum does not pass. FP&L’s negotiators may very well be able to appreciate that some who vote “no” on the referendum will be doing so, not in opposition to a sale, but as the only means available to them of expressing their desire to vote on a fully and finally negotiated agreement.

be to present to voters a negotiated lease. Coment said the courts have protected, “the voters’ need to be informed.” Section 5.05 of the city charter provides that the present site of the power plant “…may not be sold, leased, traded, or given away by the city unless such sale, lease, trade, or gift is approved by a vote of the electors of the City of Vero Beach.” (Emphasis added.) This provision in the charter is the reason why the current referendum will likely be challenged in court.

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Why so few candidates for office this time around? (Editor’s Note: In extending to each of the four City Council candidates an invitation to write a Letter to the Editor, our one request was that the letters not be written as an appeal for votes. We did not encourage or request the candidates to write on any specific issue, but rather encouraged them to explain their position on some matter of importance to voters.) To the Editor: I have been asked to write an article about an issue of importance to our community. Two previous articles have been disallowed by the editors of this newspaper, one which discussed issues involved with my candidacy, the second on volunteerism in our community. The editors have suggested repeatedly that I write about the referendum, but as there is a City Council meeting (Tuesday night) with representatives from Florida Power & Light discussing potential lease stipulations,

anything I write about that may not be accurate upon publishing.  I have been told repeatedly that a letter may NOT support my own candidacy… Perhaps the third try will be the charmer. Why are there only four individuals running this year for City Council, when last year 11 volunteered? Could the media and the mud flinging of ousted councilmen be to blame? Could the personal affronts and attacks on those volunteers giving their time as community servants be not deemed on the balance of personal priorities “worth it” to citizens? Does the full time workload of preparation, meetings and public events -- for parttime pay -- disallow most working members of the community from taking on the role? Yes, yes and yes. Our City is made up of 11 square miles, with 15,200 residents (down 2,500 from the 2000 census!) Of those, roughly 30 percent are over 65, but 50 percent are considered workforce age

and the caregivers of the 20 percent under 18. Our City is NOT made up solely of rich retirees, but they are the ones most vocal, most prolific in writing to the media, most willing to open their wallets to candidates and who regularly run for City Council! Where are the working parents, the small business owners, the bank executives, the Realtors and teachers – why of course, they are working! When Council reconstituted many of the Boards and Commissions this year, some had very few applicants with the vast majority being retirees. While their service is greatly appreciated, one wonders if the Board is then representative of the community in totality. Board, commission and Council meetings are usually in the day, to accommodate City staff, yet that timing does take way from increased involvement of the working public. The recently reconstituted City Recreation Commission now includes

working moms with children using the facilities, a 20-something member, a past recreation employee and a high school referee, all volunteers ready to serve our City and all the residents, not just complain and find fault but engage on the issues! Many cities have instituted Citizen Academies to inform, educate and involve citizens and youth on their city, its needs and projects, in an attempt to not only educate but also to encourage participation. Other cities have changed Board and Commission meetings to evenings, to early mornings, and allow flexible scheduling to meet the needs of the volunteers.  Through community education, open-mindedness and a City finally listening to its constituency, my hope is for a well-informed Council and it Boards representative of all of the residents of Vero Beach. Tracy Carroll Tracy Carroll is seeking a second term as a member of City Council

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Historically, having all the facts helps a referendum To the Editor: With all the talk about what is wrong with the current referendum on the lease of the power plant I thought I would take some time and reflect about what happened nearly 35 years ago. The question to sell to Florida Power & Light was asked back then but the process was handled differently. It began on July 9th, 1974 with Council directing John Little and Fred Carlsen to investigate the possibility of selling the Vero Beach electric system to FP&L. Then on October 23, 1975 Council started meeting with the Senior Vice President and Assistant Treasurer of FP&L to undertake negotiations. The result was a contract to sell the Vero Beach electric system to FP&L for the price of $42,606,000. At that time the rate disparity per 1000KWH was 32.4 percent exclusive of City utility tax and County franchise fees. Following this, studies were done by the City staff and the account-

ing firm Ernst and Ernst. Results indicated the City would have $10,500,000 cash available for investment after the transaction, at a time money could be invested long term at 7½ percent translating to $787,500 yearly. The impact on the General Fund which would include investment income and changes in City operating structure was to be a positive $156,500. Overall, a sale to FP&L in 1976 would have resulted in lower taxes and lower utility rates. Needless to say when the referendum was put to the voters the result was 2 to 1 in favor of selling. The referendum question in 1976 was notably different than the question we are faced with today. When the question was asked in 1976 negotiations had already been concluded and a full presentation of the terms of the sale including the lease and the total price has been presented to the public. The voters had also been provided the full impact statement by Ernst and Ernst as well as

other options besides the sale to FP&L. The referendum question presented on Sept 7th, 1976 read as follows: “Should the Charter of the City of Vero Beach be amended by the addition thereto of “Section 11(C)-1. Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in Section 11(C) or in any other provision of the Charter of the City of Vero Beach, or in any ordinance of the City of Vero Beach, the City of Vero Beach may sell, convey, transfer, encumber or lease the municipally owned electric power plant and system to Florida Power and Light Company substantially under the terms of its formal proposal dated May 27, 1976 and addenda dated July 22, 1976 and July 23, 1976.” The referendum clearly recognized there was language in the Charter which presented challenges to the sale to FP&L. The action was to first remove and amend this language, then allowed the Council options to sell the utility system to FP&L according to specific

proposals. These proposals were identified in the referendum, available for public inspection, and had previously been presented during Council meetings. In the end though state and federal regulatory commissions would not allow the sale and Vero Beach remained as the sole provider of electric to established boundaries Today we are faced with a situation where the public is being asked to answer a referendum question without any knowledge of terms, price and impact. Keep in mind, in the previous sale attempt to FP&L there was only one referendum question, not two. It follows then that we ought to keep a process that did not end in legal challenges, one which gave the public clear information on the impact of the sale. It would be most wise to repeat that history. Perhaps a beneficial sale could follow. Jay Kramer Jay Kramer is Mayor of Vero Beach

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To the Editor: With every election season attacks on incumbents are inevitable. This election season is no different. As an incumbent I am a recipient of much of the criticism. Council members have a management role. Council decisions are the highest authority with respect to the management of the city. Council exercises management authority by setting policy for city staff. It is the duty of staff to implement those directives. Council has been criticized for not controlling speakers which begs the question “which speakers need to be controlled?” Clear thinking voters know limiting the information the Council has on issues is not in our collective best interest. Good decisions are made when all facts and viewpoints are known. A former mayor suggest the behavior of the 2010-2011 elected officials demonstrates they are ill prepared

to make appropriate evaluations and the current Mayor should “crack the whip,” “turn loose” the dogs and limit the public debate! As a public servant my job is to represent and I can’t represent citizens if I do not listen to them. I have been criticized for not building consensus and being a dissenting vote. But we are not precluded from making individual decisions. In fact that is exactly what we should do. After making our own individual decisions we vote on the issue and the majority decision becomes policy. When one member dissents the criticism is “what happened to courtesy and listening with an open mind.” But when people are not guided by underpinning principles they make contradictory decisions. Often being a dissenting vote is simply adherence to these principles. It is suggested that in November, voters of Vero Beach need to fire

incumbents. Allegations of incumbents being sponsored by a special interest abound. But to suggest I am a special interest sponsored candidate only demonstrates lack of knowledge. We have all had enough of “throw-enough-mud-and-somewill-stick” style of politics. I have been told “Government should run like a business.” I disagree. Government should run like a government. Let me explain: Business tries to outdo and eliminate the competition. Government should not be trying to outdo or eliminate other governments. Business tries to maximize profits, get the most money for their product or service. Government should not be trying to get the most money it possibly can from taxpayers. Business tries to seek new markets, new sources of income. Government should not be trying to find new ways to tax us, new

sources of income. Business uses advertising to market its products and convince consumers they can’t do without a product or service. Government should not be in our face with ads or propaganda, but rather government should be a silent partner there to support and protect us while providing essential services. Business seeks out top level management offering huge salaries and bonuses while searching the best markets for cheap labor. Government should not be offering outlandish salaries to top management and should offer living wages to the workers that keep things running. I understand “government should run like a business” is a popular belief but I am convinced the facts prove government should run like a government. Brian Heady Brian Heady is seeking a second term as member of City Council

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Government should be run like a government

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Ken Daige Ken Daige is a candidate for City Council

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operate the city without the electric fund. FP&L has not completed due diligence and states it needs more time. We are told negotiations are on-going or have not begun. FP&L stated in July it would deliver the data collected from the City of Vero Beach that was used to the draft their April 2011 Letter of Intent and to date that has not happened. City residents deserve to know the terms of a possible lease to FP&L before a vote. A referendum is not needed to talk. The city is already talking to FP&L.

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process of negotiations over a possible sale. The City Council as our elected representatives do not project confidence of thought for the process, procedure and detail necessary to assure a confident voter. Expecting us to give our rights away to allow Council to decide terms for us for a fair price for the whole electric system is disrespectful. We need to ensure during the process of the proposed sale to FP&L that our best interests as city residents are kept in mind and any decision is based on supported facts and figures. Vero has completed the due diligence of her assets, but not a business model explaining the costs to

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The residents of Vero Beach require an unbiased budget analysis of the cost of doing business as a municipality with and without our electric asset. There is no other way to know if we are getting the best possible terms for a financially beneficial deal for the financial health and future of the city and her residents. We need to know how our city services and lifestyle will be affected. The voter is asked to agree to a blank piece of paper. Our city charter requires an actual lease as with the 1976-77 utility referendum ballot question. We need a referendum on an actual lease. Respect is due an intelligent and informed voter who needs and requires information. Uncertainty clouds the

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To the Editor: I respectfully take this opportunity to repeat that I am not against any possible sale to Florida Power & Light. We need clear direction and solutions to financially strengthen Vero Beach to assure a positive, healthy lifestyle for our families and businesses. The FP&L Letter of Intent is binding till December, keeps the dialogue open with FP&L and prevents the city from being able to explore any other options except the possible sale to FP&L. We should require an abundance of caution because the community has been divided by perceptions associated with the proposed sale to FP&L.

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City needs a business model with respect to FP&L sale

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Making room for liberals and conservatives By Milt thoMas

I saw a long-time friend recently and he said he’s been reading my columns. Naturally, I was then anticipating a response of approval or disapproval, but instead he remarked he never realized I was so liberal. I responded that I didn’t think I was really liberal, more of a moderate, but being a moderate today seems to be a vanishing species, kind of like the middle class. I’m not consciously focusing my criticisms toward conservatives or liberals in this column, but merely trying to point out some of the more outrageous political views these days regardless of party, and I try to do it in a light-hearted way with my tongue firmly implanted in my cheek. If I seem to pick on conservatives, it is simply because today’s conservatives generate much more source material. In fact, they leave my tongue and cheek in a perpetual cramp. From my vantage point as a self-

described centrist, it seems that if I look to the far, far left, I see pot smoking anarchists living in trees and eating bark. When I look to the far, far right, I see the current crop of presi- MILT THOMAS dential aspirants. Liberals think conservatives are fat cats trying to turn the clock back to 1776. Conservatives think liberals are anti-American communists. Whatever their views, I believe the continuum of political discourse in our country is broad enough to include both liberals and conservatives. At least that’s how I interpret the United States Constitution. Actually, today’s political extremes are far more tame than they were in the 1950s. That’s when real communism was a threat and anti-communist paranoia was at its peak. Senator

Joseph McCarthy saw a communist conspiracy behind every use of the color “red.” At least the hysteria he created had some basis in reality since the Soviet Union’s leader had promised to bury us, at the same time stocking Cuba with nuclear missiles to keep that promise. If you believe conservative radio commentators, the liberal “threat” to our existence today is at least as ominous as the communist threat was 60 years ago. I don’t blame the disc jockeys of doom for saying what they do, however. It is a free country and this is how they make a living. But if we are to remain a free society, we must, as listeners, be able to discern the difference between the threat of nuclear-armed communists and latte-sipping liberals. Right now our country is in an economic funk that can be blamed on politicians at both ends of the continuum. It’s kind of like the story about two fellows who go tiger hunting.

One pitches a tent while the other decides to hunt for tigers. He comes face to face with two huge man-eaters and runs back to the tent with those tigers in hot pursuit. Just as they leap for the kill, he pulls back the tent flap and yells to his friend, “You skin these two! I’ll get a few more.” George Bush certainly gave us the tigers and opened the tent flap, but Obama seems to feel if he can just regulate tiger behavior they won’t eat him. This year’s crop of Republican presidential candidates blames Obama for failing to get the tigers out of the tent. So, the question is, if one of them becomes president, will he or she attract more tigers or simply try to repair the tent? Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/ author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

Perfect pitch: ’You’ve got to be present to win’  By ReveRend scott alexandeR

It was one of those jarring moments that brings a saving truth about life into clear and helpful focus.  I was driving down a particularly grimy, industrial portion of the New Jersey Turnpike – you know, past all those oil refineries spewing their ugly flames and odors near New York City – when I spied this huge billboard advertising a gambling casino in Atlantic City.  There was a 12-foot likeness of the casino’s famous owner, grinning broadly, holding handfuls of green cash, and the accompanying quote read, “You’ve got to be present to win!” I was instantly struck by the absurdity and emptiness of this advertising pitch. Now I’m sure it is true – on the surface of it -- that if you are looking to “win” money at a casino gambling table you must indeed

be “present” at that business establishment.  But the larger and more useful spiritual thought that came to me when I spied that billboard was that to “win” at the business of life, you must regularly REVEREND be truly “present” SCOTT ALEXANDER to the place and the moment you are in – and a windowless, glitzy, noisy casino seems the last place on earth for such enriching, mindful connection with your existence. I am passionately persuaded that when it comes to our ordinary, daily lives, we’ve got to be “present to win.” Every day we must each strive to be fully and mindfully engaged with

life right where it touches us, in all its subtly, intricacy, charm and grace.  This can often be accomplished simply by reminding ourselves to tune our senses to the rich sights, sounds, smells, and sensations which are ever and always around us.  It is all too easy – amidst all of life’s inevitable distractions and diversions -- to essentially “sleepwalk” through our days, only marginally paying attention to the dance of life around us. One way to combat this tendency toward stupor is to simply remind ourselves every morning when we arise to pay attention -- truly pay attention -- to the life that is at hand this day.  Whether you are eating your breakfast alone, talking a walk on the beach with your spouse, sharing a cup of coffee with an old friend, playing on the living room floor with a grand-

child, looking at the morning clouds through your bedroom window, or reading poetry before bedtime in your favorite armchair, you can easily call yourself to full and relaxed attention. Lifesaving mindfulness can come to us whenever we remind ourselves to focus on what is at hand, right where life touches us this moment. So the larger-than-life casino mogul had it precisely right, although in a far different way than he ever imagined.  “You’ve got to be present to win,” if there is a greater truth in this life we share, I don’t know it.  Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

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Esther & Ed Tobey with Carolyn Lange

Rita Pierce and Janey Franklin fill out their raffle cards

The Crooked Creek Band entertains the crowd

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Barbecue just seems to taste better outdoors with a live band playing and the river in sight. Enjoying the cooler autumn night air and a golden sunset, members of the Coastal Conservation Association gathered for their favorite cause on the deck of the River House. Bono’s catered a tasty spread as the Crooked Creek entertained the family-friendly crowd and kids played on the lawn. PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON Treasure Coast Chapter pres- Tyler and Zander Beane with Aiden & Alek Fettig get ready ident, Lange Sykes, said the to check out the fishing gear and boats group’s main function is to “protect Florida’s waters and to keep recreational angler’s interests in Washington’s sight. This is a billion dollar industry in Florida so it is a major asset to our tourism.” To that end, the CCA supports full-time paid lobbyists to promote its causes in Washington, D.C. “The reason people come to Florida is because of the beautiful rivers and oceans and the lifestyle it offers,” said Carolyn Lange, a local Realtor with Lange Sykes. “It is vital that we Dan Dougherty and Bob Vatland not lose the integrity of our waterways.” Conservation is serious business, but this event was a time to kick back and enjoy some great friends, food and dream about taking home one of the Maverick and Hell’s Bay boats that were on display. There was lots of fishing related raffle prizes available as well.   Boys and their dads checked out the rods and reels displayed, each hoping they would win a good one to take on their next big fishing trip. Kai Martin and Kerry Firth listen to the Crooked Creek Band

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Cultural Council kicks off season at Osceola Bistro

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The Cultural Council held its Season Kickoff Party last week to reveal its can’t-do-without Event Planner at the brand new Osceola Bistro. Guests noshed on Lobster Fritters with tarragon aioli , Tuna Ceviche on plantains and a wonderful array of delicious temptations at the council’s yearly season opener at the former Greenhouse Cafe. The Cultural Council puts the planner together each year to help organizations set the best date for their fundraising or cultural event.  It has become one of Vero’s key assets to knowing “Who, What, Where and When.” Bev Paris, one of the top media figures in Vero, said “the planner is an absolute go-to item for setting dates, but it is also a great place to get your events seen by so many at once.” Chris Bireley, the owner of the Osceola Bistro, said that “visibility” was why he connected with the Cultural Council for the event as well. He said, “I wanted to let downtown and Vero know that we’re excited about the different organizations here and we’re willing to contribute in any way we can.” Bireley, who was born and raised in Vero Beach, said that he felt his true American bistro with its fresh, locally grown products were going to be a hit.  If the food offered at this event was any indication, diners better get their reservations in early.

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Karl Steene, Quentin Walter, Martin Lavander, Marcia Littlejohn and George Paxton

George & Rita Ziegler, Sue & Hank Dinenno and Sharon Sandel

Anita Kent, Barbara Schlitt Ford, Piper Vetromile and Trish Mitchell of Youth Guidance

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Jim & Julia Keenan with Lorne Coyle

Rosalie Hakker, Christy Murphy, Sheila Clancy and Barbara Stewart

PR Powerhouses Beverly Paris and Tammy Adams

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Mark Wygonik and Dr. Bob Loewinger taste Lobster Fritters from server Amanda Stickles

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Education Foundation celebrates 20 years of success BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Education Foundation supporters, with a proud history of giving Indian River County students, teachers, and school administrators a helping hand, celebrated 20 years of success with a “Going Platinum” dance. Everyone attending had in some measure been a champion to see that through education and guidance every child is able to achieve the skills they will need to be productive adults. Cynthia Falardeau, the executive director, and Program Coordinator Mary Minor were praised by John

Campione, a past president and Adrian Smith, the current president.   Campione said, “Our organization is very fortunate to have such generous donors and especially both Cynthia and Mary.” Jay Hart, also a past president, said “Education is these kids’ ticket to success and will give them opportunities in life like no other.” The dining room at Quail Valley River Club was decorated with record albums of hit songs which had either gone platinum or had a school related title. Buffet stations were set around the room and on the outside deck

as board members and supporters were enticed on the dance floor by the Dee Dee Wilde Band playing jazz, R&B and classics. Newest board member Brian Elwell said he had worked as a CPA with many of the non-profit agencies. “I think they are a strong board and a very successful organization and I just hope to be a part of continuing their work,” he said. The Education Foundation’s success is partly due to its independent nature.   The foundation supports any student that needs help whether they are from a public, charter or private school.   This al-

lows them to avoid the bureaucracy and red tape that comes from traditional funding sources. Their newest program, “Vision for Reading,” is an exciting new venture.   This program will purchase electronic gauges which can scan the student’s vision easily to see if the may have visual issues which may be a hindrance to their ability to read. President Adrian Smith says this is just one of the six current programs which benefits the whole school system and has made the organization such a benefit to the community over the last twenty years.

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Jennifer Jones, Jeanine Harris and past President John Campione

Shelagh McCracken, past President Jay Hart and Exec. Dir. Cynthia Faladeau

Lynn Hall, Kathy Carlson, President Adrian Smith, Jennifer & Chip Watson

Dale & Matilde Sorensen and Mary Beth & John McDonald

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Brian & Ginna O'Connor and Ladd & Elizabeth Bourne

Francine Devitt, Shirley Becker, Chris & Dave Smith

Toby, Tuny and Christopher Hill with Larry & Patrice Stowe

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Glenda & Sean Grady with Robyn & Sam Jelmby

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Heritage Center holds unique Halloween costume fundraiser BY CHRISTINA TASCON

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Heritage Center Director Rebecca Rickey said, “Let’s put the ‘fun’ back in ‘fundraiser!’” While some dress up for Halloween as evil creatures , the Heritage Center ’s theme was even more frightening – outof -fashion formal wear! Guests of the Frightening Formals on 14 event dug out their wildest tuxedos and dresses from the dark recesses of their closet that were either thrust upon them for past wedding party functions or in style many years ago. Duane Selby,  a .k .a “Big Daddy,” was wearing an outlandish white suit and matching fedora that he said he actually wore for his own wedding years ago. Cathie Caller y, came up with the concept and organized ever ything . She said she got the idea from a segment on Good Morning America . “I saw this show on women who put on a ‘Mom Prom’ that was unique and brought in a lot of money and I thought, I want to do something like that.”   She said it was a “nobrainer ” to combine a Halloween costume party with frightening formals . Rickey said “Joe Tessier volunteered his DJ ser vices ; Luc y Church brought in her Zumba f lash mob dancers and practically ever ything else was donated. “ She added, “because of the great generosity of our sponsors Bill Br yant, Seacoast National and Cruise One, and our incredible hard working committee, I think it was a success and we would love to make it a regular Halloween event.”

Gloria Cutting, Susan Viviano, Cynthia Baita, Robin Votaw, Cathy Hart and Jackie Dungan

Gina & Larry Wattles with Kurt & MarilynWallach

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Lucy Church (front right) leads her Zumba class in a flash mob dance of “Thriller” by Michael Jackson

Carnival Confections kills with this goulish cake donated for the event

PLEASE VISIT US AT OUR NEWLY OPENED STORE Vero Beach Fashion Outlets 1866 94th Drive, Vero Beach, FL (772) 563 9947

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Attendees filled the dance floor all night

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Community Calendar Every Friday: Farmer’s Market from 3-6 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. Contact Susan Keiffer by email: SusanKieffer22@bellsouth.net or call the Main Street office, 772-480-8353. Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Located in the parking lot just south of Humiston Park on Ocean Dr. www.VeroBeachOBA. com, 772-532-2455. Oct 28: Halloween All Night Party at The Skate Factory, 485 27th Ave. SW. Glow skate, races, costume & dance contest. All night skating 7 pm -6 am, $17.50. Evening-only skating, 7-11 pm, $8. 772-794-3373. Oct 28: Intrepid Gallery presents, “Artists at Work” with sculptor Carolina Rojas at the Richardson Center, Mueller Center, Indian River State College, $20, 772-462-7880. Oct 28: “Phantasies & Phugues” American Guild of Organists, fundraiser for the Student Scholarship Fund, 7 pm, Christ by the Sea, 3755 A1A, 772469-2306, ryan.casten@ccovb.org Oct 28-30: Pirate Themed Haunted House, 5:30-9:30 pm, interactive games, spook tours, haunted shipwreck. Riverside Children’s Theatre, 3280 Riverside Park Dr., 772-2316990 for advance tickets. $5-$10. www.riversidetheatre.com. Oct 28-31: Haunted House, Old Vatland Bldg., 1110 US1, 6 pm, $4-$6, to benefit Rebel Hogz with a Cauz 4H Club fundraiser. 772-473-6877. Oct 29: Halloween Party at the Cobalt Room, 6-10 pm, $20, costume contest, buffet and DJ dance party. Vero Beach Hotel & Spa, 3500 Ocean Dr., 772-469-1062. Oct 29: Fall Fest Family Fun, Food, face painting, dunk tank, prizes. THURSDAY, OCT. 27

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If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. Grace Lutheran Church, 1150 41st Ave., 10 am-1 pm. 772-562-2904. Oct 29: Brit Bash Car Show at Riverside Park, British autos and motorcycles by MG Car Club of Fla. Register 8:30-11 am. Free to visitors, exhibitors should contact Danica Perhacs, 772-770-0083 or email britbash@comcast.net. Oct 29: All American Mutt Show & Howl-o-ween at Humane Society, 6230 77th St., noon, $10 per vehicle, hayrides, bounce house, haunted barn & more. 772-388-3331 x19. Oct 29: Halloween Parade & Costume Contest by VB Recreation Dept., 10 am, from Freshman Learning Center along 14th Ave. downtown to Community Center, costume contest after parade (ages 0-17), 772-567-2144, applications for floats at covb.org. Oct 29: Halloween Costume Competition & Dance, Italian American

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Civic Association, 1600 25th St., 7 pm, $10, music by Deja Vu. 772-7781522, iacavb.com. Oct 29: Oktoberfest at Pointe West, 1999 Pointe West Dr. by the Jr. League. Games, authentic German food & beer, $5, children under 3 free. 2-7 pm. 772-563-9287, JLIR.org. Oct 29 & 30: Treat-or-Treat Halloween Costume Skate with candy giveaway at The Skate Factory, 485 27th Ave. SW, 1-4 pm, $8, 772-794-3373. Oct 29-30: “Our Town” at the Waxlax Center for the Performing Arts, St. Edward’s, 7 pm Saturday, 2 & 7 pm Sunday. steds.org. Oct 30: Art in the Park by Vero Beach Art Club, 3000 Ocean Dr. in front of Humiston Park, 10-4 pm. 25-30 Members’ art show. Pottery, paintings, jewelry and more. 772231-0303, VeroBeachArtClub.org. Nov 2 & 3: “Going Baroque” Fan-

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fare Show, 7 pm, exhibits at 5:30 pm. Nov. 2nd, $15 performance only, Nov. 3rd, dinner and a show, $45. Baroque Music, Indian Dance, Royal Court Dancers, Italian Guitar. IR Charter High School, 6055 College Ln., 772567-6600. Nov 4: Downtown Gallery Stroll, 5-8 pm, along Historic Downtown Vero Beach on 14th Ave. and nearby streets. Free to the public, food and refreshments available. Call 772-5625525 or 772-299-1234. Nov 4: Darby’s Fine Art Opening Reception for Joel R. Johnson, Contemporary Watercolorist, 5-8 pm. 1902 14th Ave., 772-480-0491, darbyfineart.com. Nov 4: “Building 429 Fall Tour” (Christian Rock Band) at Vero Beach High School’s Performing Arts Center, 7 pm, 1707 16th St. Tickets $12$25 at iTickets.com or 800-965-9324. Nov 4, 11 & 18: Master of the King of the Hill Tennis Tournament, The Boulevard and Tennis Club, 1620 Boulevard Village Ln, $8, 5:00 and 6:30 pm. Tennis tournament, raffles, cash bar and dinner. Fundraiser for Youth Guidance. 772-770-5040, ircyouth.com Nov 5: Children’s Art Fair, “Going Baroque” 10 am-3 pm, IR Charter High School, 6055 College Ln., 772567-6600, fairytale craft fair, sand castle art, photo booth, royal costumes. Food vendors, yo yo and hula demos, free to public. 772-567-6600. Nov 5: Fighting Indian Football Boosters Annual golf tournament at Sandridge to benefit VBHS Football, $75 entry fees for golfers who pre-register, it is $10 extra to register late. Dave Morby, 772-571-7323, fightingindiansfootballboosters@yahoo.com. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

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Laura Guttridge said she came to be a mother late at 45 and because of her age was incredibly nervous about the birth of her baby.   When she was at the hospital, volunteers from Healthy Start were there to prepare her and reassure her all through the process. She says, “They were there for me when I needed them most.  How could I not be there for them now?” Stars are expected to raise funds and will look to surpass the record $24,000 Judy Van Saun raised last year.   She told the new stars, “Approach everyone to get those donations, but most of all remember to just have fun.”

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There was a sense of anticipation and some trepidation in the Crystal Room at Costa d’Este with the introduction of the latest batch of “stars” for Healthy Start’s Dancing with Vero’s Stars. The celebrity dancers were given their instructions and then offered a pep talk by last year’s winner Bobby Guttridge before being introduced to their new partners. Dancers included two past Chris Dale Dancers, Danielle Zimmerman and Beth Shestak, plus last year’s winning dance partner, Karren Walter of Indian River Ballroom.

Then up to the stage came the nervous stars to meet their partners.  Pairings will be Carl Fetzer with Danielle Zimmerman; Laura Guttridge with Tom Isola; Stacey Miller with Robert Scott; Mark Rodolico with Sandra Redfield; Joey Schlitt with Beth Shestak; Melissa Shine with Barry Trammell; Susanne Sweeny with Joe Wynes; Charlotte Terry with Roger O’Brien; Dr. Glenn Tremml with Karren Walter and Buck Vocelle with Amy Trammell. The event is a fundraiser for the Healthy Start Coalition and everyone agreed to participate because of their connection to the cause.

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Dancing with Vero’s Stars pairs dancers with local celebrities

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Stars and Dancers break the ice with a little fun posing for the camera

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Joey Schlitt and Beth Shestak were evenly paired Already dubbed the couple with the most personheight-wise as the tallest couple ality, Mark Rodolico and Sandra Redfield

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Laura Guttridge and Tom Isola

Megan Raasveldt and Dr. Glenn Tremml

Stacey Miller and Robert Scott

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Front: Charlotte Terry, Susanne Sweeny, Melissa Shine, Stacey Miller & Laura Guttridge Back: Dr. Glenn Tremml, Joey Schlitt, Mark Rodolico & Carl Fetzer

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Todd Rundgren to play Entertainment Calendar Sunrise Theatre Nov. 3 COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES

Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 communityconcertseries.org Nov 18: Atlantic Ringers, 7:30 pm, free with suggested $5-$15 donation

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at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Oct 27: Paul Dosal, Ph.D., Florida’s Hispanic Heritage: Commemorating 500 Years - Florida Humanities Series,  Free Admission. 7 pm Nov 6: Cellist Ian Maksin, $20.  4 pm Nov 20:  “An Afternoon with Basie, Ellington, & Friends,” Jazz on Sundays, $20 in advance/$25 at door/Students Free.  2:30 pm

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Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 irsavero.org Nov 20: Brevard Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 pm $50 each, season tickets $260-$290

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Todd Rundgren’s latest studio album is a collection of classic Robert Johnson songs. FORT PIERCE -- Songwriter, video pioneer, producer, recording artist, computer software developer, conceptualist, and, most recently, interactive artist Todd Rundgren will be appearing at the Sunrise Theatre on Nov. 3. Rundgren has been in the music game going back to 1960’s, but it was his seminal “Something/Anything?,” on which he played all the instruments, sang all the vocal parts, and acted as his own producer, that catapulted his career. His recorded music includes, “The Hermit of Mink Hollow” and “A Wizard, A True Star,” as well as such hit singles as “I Saw The Light,” “Hello It’s Me,” “Can We Still Be Friends,” and “Bang The Drum.”

His latest studio album, “Todd Rundgren’s Johnson,” a collection of classic Robert Johnson songs, was released this April. Rundgren formed Utopia in 1974, and embarked on an entirely new approach to the concept of interactive musicianship. Standout Utopia offerings included “Oops! Wrong Planet,” “Adventures in Utopia,” and “Oblivion.” Along the way, Utopia combined technical virtuosity and creative passion to create music that, for millions, defined the term “progressive rock.” In the studio he has helped produce albums by Patti Smith, Cheap Trick, Psychedelic Furs, Meatloaf, XTC, Grand Funk Railroad, and Hall and Oates.

3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Children’s Theatre: Oct 28-30: Pirate Themed Haunted House, $5-$10 Stark Main Stage:   Oct 27-Nov 13: Boeing-Boeing, 2 pm, 7:30 pm and 8 pm, $57-$73

SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org

Nov 11&12: “Out of This World” 7 pm, $20$25, free for students under 18

SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Oct 28: Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers, 8 pm, $39-$49 Nov 3: Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, 7 pm, $39-$49 Nov 4, 5 & 6: Late Nite Catechism, 8 pm, 3 & 8 pm and 3 & 7 pm, $35

TREASURE COAST SYMPHONY Emerson Center at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Nov 13: Featured solo by cellist Aziz Sapaev, 3 pm, $15-$20

VERO BEACH CHORAL SOCIETY Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 772-569-8165 Nov 3-5: “Better Music Reading in Three Days” $15 Varied time over 3 days. Dec 9 & Dec 11: Winter 2011 Concert, “Tidings of Joy: Sounds of the Season,” at Dec 9 at 7:30 pm and Dec 11 at 3 pm

VERO BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 3001 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-0707 verobeachmuseum.org Oct 27: “Warm Nights, Cool Music” Jazz Concert series in the park, James Archer Trio, $10, 5-7 pm

VERO BEACH OPERA GUILD 772-569-6993 Box Office: 772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Oct 29: Live at the Met: Mozart’s Don Giovanni, noon, Majestic Theatre, 772-770-0774 Nov 5: Live at the Met: Wagner’s Siegfried, noon, Majestic Theatre, 772-770-0774

VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Avenue verobeachtheatreguild.com Nov 10-25: The 1940’s Radio Hour, $20-$22, Walton Jones 1940’s play about a radio broadcast.

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1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

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N E W S W E E K L Y

1920 14th Avenue, Vero Beach, FL 32960 (772) 770-4870 Hours of operation: Closed on Mondays. Tuesdays through Thursdays 5-9PM; Friday and Saturday 5-10PM, Sunday 5-9PM.

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French Quarter Restaurant

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tions to our less than stellar experience. She included the fact that efforts were already being addressed for better staff training and said that she would bring our service issues to the management’s attention. The bartender went further by buying our two glasses of wine which reflected the goodwill of this establishment. The original owner and brainchild of the French Quarter was Chef Ian Greenwood. Though we hear that Ian is now happily retired in a new home in Mexico, we miss his incredible attention to detail in creating a superb dining experience. We hope that current owner-Chef John Warren will address issues as reviewed. We look forward to our next visit.

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Due to disappointment with both entrees, we did not finish either. Hoping to try to end our meal on a highnote, we opted for dessert and coffee. The dessert selections were minimal; however, as recommended by our waiter, we decided on the Chocolate Cheesecake with pecan crust and Bread Pudding with Rum Sauce. Thankfully, coffee and desserts arrived a bit prompter than previous courses of the meal. The Cheesecake - topped with whipped cream and a thin drizzle of chocolate sauce - was thick and dense, but with a grainy rather than smooth texture. It was accompanied by chunks of assorted seasonal melon. The Bread Pudding arrived in a large sundae dish with only a dollop of whipped cream; no rum sauce to be found. The glass dish was suspiciously as warm as the pudding. Had everything been warmed together before arrival? The Bread Pudding was satisfying but not enough to stand on its own. Before our departure, we decided to visit the front bar for a final glass of house Cabernet. We were pleasantly surprised to find a friendly bartender who expressed thoughtful condolences and offered possible explana-

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The Cajun Shrimp and Grits consisted of shrimp in a simple brown sauce that was rich and tasty. However, the grits in this dish closely mimicked that of grilled, pre-formed polenta, a close cousin to the southern style version. The grits-polenta was not bad at all, just not what I expected. The shrimp themselves were the biggest disappointment - too chewy for my taste. The Lobster-stuffed Mushroom Caps topped with melted cheese looked tempting when brought to the table. However we soon discovered portions of the lobster to be nearly over-cooked and some mushroom caps seemed rubbery rather than tender. Due to the initial long wait for the appetizers, once they finally arrived we immediately ordered our entrees hoping they would be delivered more promptly. Unfortunately it was another 20 minute wait before the arrival of our main courses. Our entree selections were Jambalaya and Shrimp Etouffee, both obvious choices for a restaurant specializing in authentic French-Cajun cuisine. Instead of a traditional classic, the first entree was a confusing “deconstructed” Jambalaya served on a regular dinner plate. The dish consisted of a single piece of grouper, a few prawns, baby scallops that seemed both dry and “lonely” and yellow rice with a vegetable medley. Missing was any form of sauce to tie the dish together other than a small amount of a bland red sauce that tasted of a canned variety. The Shrimp Etouffee arrived with mussels, some small scallops and the same yellow rice and vegetables. This dish did feature a flavorful, rich brown sauce and though a bit tame for Cajun standards, the sauce was fine for my timid pallet. Unfortunately the shrimp in this dish were again chewy.

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As you approach the French Quarter restaurant, you’re greeted by a beautiful flowered archway framing the main patio entrance. A few steps more reveal a delightful garden setting that welcomes your arrival and beckons you to dine al fresco. Though the outdoor seating was tempting, on this night we chose to dine inside. When walking into the bar and main dining room, you notice the rich yellow-gold walls, awash in low lighting; carnival masks, beads and baubles quickly suggest a Mardi Gras theme. Framed canvases of vintage wines and tasteful artwork featuring musical instruments set an appropriate tone for this small but cozy restaurant and wine-only bar. Once seated, our waiter immediately took our drink order; we chose a bottle of Alexander Valley, Cabernet, 2008, which promptly arrived. The wine was pleasantly smooth. We sipped and chatted while anticipating the beginning of a great meal. The French Quarter’s name-sake includes authentic Cajun-inspired cuisine and since we chose to share several appetizers, our first choice was the Cajun Shrimp and Grits. The other two selections were Lobster Stuffed Mushroom Caps and a Caesar salad. The French Quarter’s version of the classic Caesar salad is a bit different, yet so good it’s been a customer favorite in Vero Beach since the restaurant opened its doors more than six years back. The Caesar enjoyed this particular evening did not disappoint. Unfortunately the remaining two appetizers were less then what we had anticipated.

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The French Quarter cozy, but misses the mark

Sports Vero swimmers set goal of advancing to state meet

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PHOTO BY TAMMY AUSTIN

Austin Todd took first in the 100m butterfly with a time of 1:01.22 in last week’s meet at St. Edward’s.

BY MICHAEL BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Vero Beach High School boys’ and girls’ swim teams head into the class 3A-District 7 Swim Meet at Jupiter’s North County Aquatics Complex focused on sending most of their squad to regionals. Coming off matching 4-3 seasons, the Fighting Indians boys and girls are led by 2010 all-area selection Colin Mackay, along with honorable mentions Austin Todd and Jessica Richardson. “Going into districts we feel very confident as a team,” Todd said. “Based on times that we have already

been swimming, we should have around 20 people moving on to regionals. All three boys’ relays, as well as the girl’s relays, should move on to regionals as well.” Fifth-year coach Brian Ihnen has guided his team through the season with his trademark laid-back approach, and he’s gotten some great results from the team. “Swimming for Coach Ihnen has been a great experience,” Todd said. ”When we went to states in 200 freestyle and 200 medley relays in 2009, we could have easily gotten nervous and uptight. But the entire trip, Coach was keeping

us loose by making jokes and being himself.” Todd is a member of the 200 freestyle relay team, which has set a goal of advancing past districts and regionals and reaching the state meet. Teammates J.D. Seroski, Eric Behymer and Mackay recently beat the St. Edward’s 200 freestyle relay team by over 11 seconds. “J.D. Seroski and Eric Behymer both worked really hard this summer, swimming twice-a-day,” Todd said. “That has been a big help to our relay teams. Colin Mackay and Jessica Richardson have legitimate shots to move on to states in the 50 freestyle

for boys’ and girls’ respectively.” Mackay, an excellent all-around competitor, turned in a time of 56.96 in the 100 in last year’s regionals to just miss qualifying for the state meet. He was also part of last year’s 200 freestyle and 200 medley teams which placed fifth in regionals and also just missed qualifying for the state meet. Richardson turned in meet-best times of 25.38 and 55.64 at St. Edward’s last week in the 50 and 100 freestyle. She was also part both the 200 freestyle and 200 medley relays which beat the Pirates by almost five seconds and seven seconds respectively.

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SPORTS

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Wednesday, November 2nd 6:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors Team Velocity vs. Florida Eye Institute Indian River Dentistry vs. Wal-Greens/BCM Storage Real Living All Florida vs. Orchid Island Construction My Electrician

Clark Chiropractic Strickland Automotive

8:30 p.m. vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Cunningham’s

8:30 p.m. vs. Team Velocity vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

Wednesday, November 9th 6:30 p.m. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Team Velocity Real Living All Florida vs. Orchid Island Construction My Electrician vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage Select Floors Strickland Automotive Stevi B’s

7:30 p.m. vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Florida Eye Institute

Select Floors Cunningham’s

8:30 p.m. vs. Clark Chiropractic vs. Indian River Dentistry

Monday, November14th 6:30 p.m. Real Living All Florida vs. Stevi B’s Florida Eye Institute vs. My Electrician Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Lowther Funeral Home Team Velocity vs. Clark Chiropractic

Tuesday, November 8th 6:30 p.m. America’s Best Auto Body vs. Tailgators New Vision Eye Center vs. Diamond Cutters * Mulligan’s Beach House vs. Piper Aircraft *

Tailgators VOVN New Vision Eye Center

Piper Aircraft

Stevi B’s State Farm Precision Cuts Services Indian River Dentistry

Wednesday, November 16th 6:30 p.m. Select Floors vs. Clark Chiropractic Real Living All Florida vs. Indian River Dentistry Stevi B’s vs. My Electrician Florida Eye Institute vs. Strickland Automotive Clark Chiropractic Team Velocity Orchid Island Construction Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

7:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Cunningham’s

7:30 p.m. vs. Cal Builders vs. Indian River Taekwondo vs. Mulligan’s Beach House *

Thursday, November 10th 6:30 p.m. vs. New Vision Eye Center 7:30 p.m. vs. America’s Best Auto Body

Tailgators

Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks 16, Indian River Federal Credit Union Seminoles 0 Razorbacks scoring: TD Alexander Beare, 2 PAT James Hassell Outstanding Players: Aiden Fettig and Tyler Beare Seminoles Outstanding Players: Louis Brown and Chauncey Johnson FloridaScapes Lawn Service Gators 16, Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 6 Gators scoring: TD Dylan Redmon, TD 2 PAT JJ King, 2 PAT Jacob Jenkins Outstanding Players: Joey DeLuke and Ethan Campbell Buckeyes scoring: TD Devin Willis Outstanding Players: Major Croom and Steven Spankle Tot-Time Results October 22nd Gold Coast Turbine Inc. Saints 0, Atlantic Pool Cleaning Bears 0 Saints Outstanding Players: Will Russell and Harrison Reeb Bears Outstanding Players: James Diskin and Anthowne “Deuce” Montgomery

COED A DIVISION PLAYOFFS

Seed 5

Tuesday, November 15th 6:30 p.m. vs. Seed 2 (Game 1)

Seed 4

7:30 p.m. vs. Seed 3 (Game 2)

7:30 p.m. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Strickland Automotive Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. State Farm Lowther Funeral Home vs. Precision Cuts Services 8:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. Orchid Island Construction

7:30 p.m. vs. VOVN vs. America’s Best Auto Body

Vero Beach Radiology Associates Titans 0, Indian River Federal Credit Union Browns 0 Titans Outstanding Players: Miller Armstead and Will Holderman Browns Outstanding Players:Sage Morrow and Sean Connolley AT&T Real Yellow Pages Eagles 0, Wells Fargo Chargers 0 Eagles Outstanding Players: Tyrone Davis and Peirce Genoni Chargers Outstanding Players: Ashton Wetmiller and Andrew Bikel

Thursday, November 17th TACKLE FOOTBALL Winner of Game 2

6:30 p.m. vs. Seed 1 (Game 3)

Winner of Game 1

7:30 p.m. vs. Winner of (Game 3)

Jr. Midgets Results October 22nd AT&T Real Yellow Pages Chargers 0, Wells Fargo Lions 0 Outstanding Players: Chargers, Hunter Parris; Lions: Robbie Sanders Midgets Results

COED B DIVISION PLAYOFFS

Tuesday, November 15th 6:30 p.m.

Seed 4 Seed 3

vs. vs.

Seed 1 (Game 1) Seed 2 (Game 2)

7:30 p.m.

Winner of Game 1

vs.

Winner of Game 2

October 20th Ace Plumbing Patriots 13, Play It Again Sports Packers 6 Patriots: Landon Wilson 50 yd. TD, Tyler Burch 1 PAT, Drew MacFarlane 45 yd. TD Packers: Willie Mosley 7 yd. TD Norris & Company Real Estate Vikings 12, Indian River Federal Credit Union Cardinals 6 Vikings: Erin Payne 22 yd. TD, 45 yd. TD Cardinals: DeMarcus Harris 8 yd. TD

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Clark Chiropractic State Farm Precision Cuts Services Strickland Automotive

Cal Builders Indian River Taekwondo

October 22nd Bill Baysura with Dale Sorensen Real Estate Sparta 18, Children’s Discovery Volunteers 0 Spartans scoring: TD Blake Bales, TD Zachariah Sigmon, TD Liam Baysura Outstanding Players: Zach Miller and Drew Hurley Volunteers Outstanding Players: Torrey Pursel and Trace Rahal

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7:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church/Xpress Mattress vs. Precision Cuts Services vs. 1st Church/Don’s Imports vs. State Farm

Thursday, November 3rd 6:30 p.m. vs. Diamond Cutters Piper Aircraft America’s Best Auto Body vs. Cal Builders

Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 13, Children’s Discovery Volunteers 6 Buckeyes scoring: TD Major Croom, TD Steven Spangler Outstanding Players: Jean Galbard and Jacob Smith Volunteer scoring: TD Andrew Klipstine. Outstanding Players: Chase Hill and Jason Mercuri

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Orchid Island Construction Edward Murphy MD Surgery Jim Rott Home Improv. Lowther Funeral Home

7:30 p.m. vs. VOVN vs. Mulligan’s Beach House vs. Piper Aircraft *

October 20th Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks 12, Wells Fargo Irish 0 Razorbacks scoring: TD Alexander Beare, TD Raines Holmes Outstanding Players: Collin Nance and John Bierman Irish Outstanding Players: Vance Mullanack and Jack Carpenter

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Monday, November 7th 6:30 p.m. vs. Florida Eye Institute 1st Church / Xpress Mattress Indian River Dentistry vs. My Electrician Stevi B’s vs. Cunningham’s 1st Church/Don’s Imports vs. Lowther Funeral Home

Tailgators New Vision Eye Center Diamond Cutters

FLAG FOOTBALL Jr. Mighty Mites Results

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7:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors vs. My Electrician vs. Florida Eye Institute vs. Indian River Dentistry

Tuesday, November 1st 6:30pm vs. Indian River Taekwondo Tailgators vs. Mulligan’s Beach House Diamond Cutters New Vision Eye Center vs. Piper Aircraft

Indian River County Recreation Department Football Scores

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Perfection Paint & Body Cunningham’s Orchid Island Construction Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

Indian River County Recreation Department Coed Fall Schedule

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Indian River County Recreation Department Men’s Fall Schedule 2011

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SPORTS

This week at Vero Beach High School Who: Vero Beach High School (6-1) vs #5 (8A) Wellington High School (1-6) Where: The Citrus Bowl, 7:30 p.m. What they did last week: Vero Beach lost to St. Lucie West Centennial, 17-14 at home. Wellington lost at Jupiter, 30-9. What you should know: Vero Beach is coming off its worst game of the season, in which the Fighting Indians were shut out for nearly the last three quarters against St. Lucie West Centennial. The Fighting Indians defensive line surrendered over 200 yards for the third consecutive game last week, and face an Eagles squad which was beaten by three touchdowns by pass-happy Jupiter team. Vero Beach quarterback Nick Madden has nearly 1,700 yards passing with 17 touchdowns and just one interception. All-State receiving candidate Charlie Miller has 29 receptions for 761 yards and seven touchdowns receiving, and running back Dentist Hall has 457 yards rushing and six touchdowns. Wellington has scored just 84 points all year and has surrendered 197 points on defense. Their two quarterbacks, Grand Smallridge and Tyler Vanacore, have a combined 560 yards passing with four touchdowns and seven interceptions. Running backs Grant Smallridge and Andy LeMay have run for a combined 327 yards on 97 carries with four touchdowns. PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

Indian River Soccer Association U13 player Joshua Knight scores a goal during a Saturday morning game.

Vero Beach Sports Calendar Thursday, October 27 – Volleyball District Finals, 6:30 p.m. at home Friday, October 28 – Football vs Wellington (homecoming), 7:30 p.m. at home Friday, October 29 – Girls Soccer vs Tallahassee, 11:00 a.m. at Hobart Park Monday, October, 31 – Boys Soccer vs Jensen Beach, 4:30 p.m. away

Tuesday, November 1 – Boys and Girls Golf State Championships, 8:00 a.m. at Mission Inn Resort and Country Club, Howey-in-the-Hills Wednesday, November 2 – Boys and Girls Golf State Championships, 8:00 a.m. at Mission Inn Resort and Country Club, Howey-in-the-Hills – Boys Soccer vs Jensen Beach, 6:30 p.m. away – Volleyball Regional Quarterfinals (TBA)

Superior Auto Service Family Owned and Operated “Old Fashioned Service” Superior Auto Service employs ASE Master Mechanics to provide diagnostic and repair services on all American, European & Asian vehicles. We install premium and original equipment parts only! Owner Bill Marion, a certified ASE Master Mechanic, has been repairing vehicle in Vero Beach since 1987 at the same location.

(772) 569-1410 1212 23rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32960 · www.verobeach.com

Valvoline Expresscare of Vero Beach Quick Lube Owned and Operated by Superior Auto Service

(772) 778-6645 Under New Management

PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

Franklin Johnson carries the ball for the Indian River Federal Credit Union Seminoles against the Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks in a junior mighty mites flag football game.

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Henry Harvey ‘Skip’ Martin III of Vero Beach, died Oct. 13, 2011, at VNA Hospice House. He married Louise Larimer Martin, who survives in Vero Beach. Skip worked many years in the family business, Martin Motors in Mill Hall, Pa. attending auto auctions and selling cars. In 1981, Skip and his wife moved to Vero Beach. He retired in 2003 from the State of Florida as a Highway Engineer. I He is survived by his wife, two sons, Henry Harvey (Buzzy) Martin IV of Vero Beach and daughter-in-law Tammy, and James Stephen Martin of Lighthouse Point and one daughter, Kathleen (Kai) Martin of Vero Beach. In addition he has one granddaughter, Francesca Martin Fox of Stamford, Conn., and two grandsons, Henry Harvey (Skippy) Martin V of Vero Beach and Zachary Taylor Martin of Lighthouse Point. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach or Vero Christian Church.

Elijah McCloud Elijah McCloud, 73, died Oct. 5, 2011, in Vero Beach. He was born in

Beverly Ingham Moyer, 85, died Oct. 8, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Washington, D.C., and lived in Vero Beach for five years, coming from Palm City. She was an editorial researcher for Reader’s Digest for more than 20 years. She was a member of Living Lord Lutheran Church in Vero Beach and formerly a choir member at the Congregational Church, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. Survivors include her husband of 59 years, Philip Moyer of Vero Beach; son, Jeffrey Moyer of Briarcliff Manor; daughter, Kimberly Ingham Ensminger of Ringoes, N.J.; and seven grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Salvation Army, 2655 Fifth St. S.W., Vero Beach, FL 32962. An online guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Marcia K. Schubert Marcia K. Schubert, 82, died Sept. 20, 2011, at her home. She was born in Akron, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Miami. She was a member of St. Augustine Episcopal Church in Vero Beach. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority and the Red Hat Society. Survivors include her husband, Kenneth A. Schubert of Vero Beach; daughters, Lisa Schubert of New York City, Carol Kuntz of Winter Park, Robin Sells of New Paltz, N.Y. and Wendy CONTINUES ON PAGE 32

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Norma Clinton Macomber, 80, died Oct. 8, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Haverhill, Mass., and lived at the Isles of Vero. She retired from the Andover, Mass., school system after 32 years of teaching. She volunteered for the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization, the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, and was a member of American Legion Post 39 Auxiliary and Vero Beach Veterans. Survivors include her daughter, Kim McCabe-Kofman of York Harbor, Maine; son, Mark Edward Mc-

Henry Harvey ‘Skip’ Martin III

Beverly Ingham Moyer

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Mona Curley-Sperry died Oct. 8,

Norma Clinton Macomber

Irene S. Mahlstedt, 90, died Oct. 8, 2011, at VNA Hospice House. She was born in Sugar Grove, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach for 28 years, coming from Connecticut. Before retirement, she worked as a medical records administrator. She was of the Episcopal faith. Survivors include her son, Thomas Mahlstedt, and daughter, Jennifer Mahlstedt, both of Georgetown, Mass., and one grandchild. A guestbook may be signed at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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Mona Curley-Sperry

Philip B. Riner, 83, died Oct. 10, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. He was born in South Bend, Ind., and moved to Vero Beach in 1984, coming from St. Louis, Mo. He was the advertising manager for Lincoln St. Louis. He was a member and former president of the Automotive Advertisers Council. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Lois A. Riner of Vero Beach; son, Todd Riner of Denver; daughter, Nancy Bertelsmeier of Kansas City, Kan.; and three grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Irene S. Mahlstedt

Garfield, Ga., and had lived in Indian River County for 60 years. Survivors include his wife, Viola McCloud; daughters, Diane M. Hurst and Anita C. Smith, both of Oslo, Shirley B. Hayes of Miami, and Brenda J. Grimsley of Fort Myers; sons, Toney E. McCloud and Alan Tyrone McCloud, both of Oslo; brother, Wesley McCloud of Vero Beach; sister: Annie Spencer of Miami; and eight grandchildren.

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Donald John Beyrand, 79, died Oct. 12, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Farrell, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach since the mid-1980s, coming from Detroit. Before retirement, he worked for Chrysler as a clay modeler. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach, where he was a member of the choir and a cantor. Survivors include his daughter, Michelle Gardner of Las Vegas; sons, Gary Beyrand of Houston, Craig Beyrand of Milford, Mich., and Christopher Beyrand of Pontiac, Mich.; seven grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Philip B. Riner

Cabe; sister, Lorraine Menter of Zephyrhills; and six grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. Services: There will be no services.

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Donald Beyrand

2011, at Harbor Chase in Vero Beach. She was born in Sylvan Grove, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 24 years, coming from Canandaigua, N.Y. She had a career in the insurance industry and retired from Loomis & Co., where she was a commercial lines insurance agent. Survivors include her husband, Donald; daughter, Marla J. Curley; sons, Craig E. Curley and Donald E. “Gene” Curley Jr.; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to The First Presbyterian Church Building Fund, 520 Royal Palm Blvd., Vero Beach, FL. 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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William Elisha “Bud” Jenkins, 85, died Oct. 12, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was a lifelong resident of Vero Beach. He owned the only racetrack in Indian River County, the Vero Beach Raceway, and was owner of a Florida State Championship race car team in 1967. He served in the Coast Guard during World War II. He was a member of First Baptist Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his sons, Greg Jenkins and Brian Jenkins, both of Vero Beach, and Doug Jenkins of Sebastian; daughters, Debbie Bledsoe and Pat Mach, both of Vero Beach; sister, Anna Marie Smith of Vero Beach; 12 grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his son, Carl Curtis Jenkins; and daughter, Billie Marie Jenkins. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

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William Jenkins

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Obituaries

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Hammarstrom of Houston; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society , 3375 20th St., Suite 100, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Raymond Sofranko Raymond Sofranko, 87, died Oct. 8, 2011, at VNA Hospice House. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from Lorain, Ohio. He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Esther Urbanski Sofranko of Vero Beach; son, Larry Sofranko of Malta, Ill.; daughter, Kathy Polosky of Lorain; brothers, Bill Sofranko of Cleveland, Ohio, Paul Sofranko of California and Tom Sofranko of Avon, Ohio; 12 grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice of Indian River County, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guest book may be signed at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Clifton Williams Clifton Williams, 60, died Oct. 8, 2011. He was born in Denmark, S.C., and lived for 35 years in Vero Beach, coming from Bartow. Survivors include his fiancé, Priscilla Hudson of Vero Beach; daughters Peggy Byron, Mary Williams-Taylor and Pearlie Williams, all of Bartow, and Keeyetta Hudson of Vero Beach; sons: Clifton Williams of Bartow, Tony Besler of Tampa and Euton Morris of Vero Beach; brothers, Paul Williams of Bamberg, S.C., McKinley Williams of Columbia, S.C., Joseph Williams of Long Island, N.Y., and Roger Williams of Crescent City; sisters, Elizabeth Bullet of Palatka, Kathryn Chisolm of Denmark, S.C., Alice Ingram, Anna Belle McMillian, Betty Wilkans and Monistine Washington, all of Cresent City, and Samella Williams of Palatka.

Nancy Winter Nancy G. Winter, 70, died Oct. 10, 2011, at her home. She was born in Chicago and lived in Vero Beach for nine years, coming from her birthplace. She was a jewelry designer. She owned and operated Winter Designs of Vero Beach. She was a member of John’s Island Club, Indian River Shores. Survivors include her sons, David Schwartz of New York City and Alex Schwartz of Durham, N.C.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Riverside Theatre, 3250 Riverside Park Drive, Vero Beach, FL 32963-1877. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Medical Center. She was born in New Port, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 48 years, coming from Melbourne. Before retirement, she was employed with the state of Florida as a park ranger for 10 years. Survivors include her sons, Kenny Willoughby and William Willoughby, both of Melbourne; daughters, Kimberly Gehrke of Vero Beach and Lorraine Aiken of Melbourne; brothers, Sonny LaTulipe of Richmond, Va., Louis Butch LaTulippe of Palm Bay and Ronald LaTulippe of Homewood, Ala.; sister, Esther LaTulippe of Melbourne; 13 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. A guest book may be signed at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Jannie Pearl Pearce Jannie Pearl Cooper Pearce, 86, died Oct. 5, 2011. She was born in Eastman, Ga., and lived in Vero Beach. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her husband, the Rev. Dr. Jim Brown Pearce Sr.; 16 children; brothers, Johnny and David Cooper; sister, Mattie Cooper Hanna; 57 grandchildren; 102 great-grandchildren; and 13 great-great grandchildren.

Floyd Donald Queen Floyd Donald Queen, 68, died Oct. 12, 2011, at his home. He was born in Harmony, N.C., and lived in Vero Beach since 1972, coming from North Carolina. He worked for Piper Aircraft in Vero Beach and later retired after working 18 years with Indian River County. Survivors include his son, David Queen of Vero Beach; daughter, Rockette Haberlack of Long Beach, N.Y.; brothers, James Queen of Vero Beach and Wayne Queen of Statesville, N.C.; sisters, Carolyn Widner of Sebastian and Lynda Ford of Vero Beach; and six grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Linda Biggles Linda Lorraine Biggles, 66, died Oct. 17, 2011 at Sebastian River

John Clayton John Oscar Clayton, 54, died Oct. 12, 2011, at his home. He was born in Fellsmere and lived in Vero Beach for six years, coming from Fort Pierce. He was employed as an electrician with the construction industry. He was a member of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church in Fellsmere. Survivors include his wife, Janelle Yearby Clayton of Vero Beach; sons, John Clayton Jr. of Vero Beach; stepson, Javerious Yearby of Oslo; daughters, Yolanda Woods, Lashounda Judon, Jada Clayton and Janevea Clayton, all of Vero Beach, and Kachina Judon of Orlando; brothers, Henry Clayton of Fort Pierce and Theodore Clayton of Palm Bay; and sister, Cynthia Stamps of Lakewood. A guestbook is available at www.sarahsmemorial.com.

Lois Marie Daniels Lois Marie Daniels, 90, died Oct. 15, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Indianapolis and moved to Vero Beach in 1944 from Tallahassee. She was the office manager and bookkeeper for Golden River Fruit Co. before her retirement. She was a member of King’s Baptist Church, Vero Beach. She served as an officer in the VFW auxiliary. Survivors include her daughters, Sandra Daniel of White City, and

Penny Crowe of Vero Beach; sons, Gene Daniels Jr. and Richard Daniels, both of Okeechobee; brother, David Harlan of Crawfordville; eight grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Condolences may be sent through www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Dean Estep Dean Allen Estep, 57, died Oct. 14, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Altoona, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for many years, coming from Pennsylvania. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War. He was employed by Jim Baird Cabinetry. Survivors include his daughter, Deanna Cangialosi of Vero Beach; mother, Martha Cherry of Tipton, Pa.; and brother, Mike Estep of Pennsylvania.

Walter Jones Walter H. Jones, 87, died Oct. 19, 2011, at his home. He was born in Chicago, wintered in Vero Beach since 1983 before moving permanently to Vero Beach in 2004, coming from Union, Maine and Willsboro, N.Y.He ran his own marketing consulting business until his retirement. He was a member of St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife, Patti Sherman Jones of Vero Beach; sons, W. Steven Jones of Rio Verdi, Ariz., and Scott D. Jones of Valley Village, Calif.; daughter, Kathleen Jones Dyer of Flanders, N.J.; stepson, William Mallia of Plymouth, Mass.; sisters, Dolores Nejedly and Margaret Johnson, both of California; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to American Heart Association , P.O. Box 840692, Dallas, TX 75284. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

John Paul Kistler, Sr. John Paul Kistler, Sr., 75, died Oct. 14, 2011 following a brief illness in Johnson City, Tenn. He was born June 25, 1936 in Pittsburgh. He graduated from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh and shortly thereafter moved to Vero Beach, the place he would

33

OBITUARIES

!

Annie M. Potanovich

Jack O’Neil Jack W. O’Neil, 85, died Oct. 19, 2011 at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Milwaukee and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Chicago. He was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his daughters, Connie O’Neil Ambrose of Louisville, Ky., and Eileen O’Neil Grigutis of New Albany, Ind.; com-

Burton Leroy Rhodes Burton Leroy Rhodes, 88, died Aug. 8, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Huntington Woods, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for 19 years, coming from Fort Lauderdale where he moved in 1942. He was a member of First United Methodist Church of Vero Beach, a Master Mason and member of the Scottish Rite Valley of Lake Worth and the Hi-12 Club of Vero Beach. Survivors include three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of one’s choice. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Marie Ann McGovern Marie Ann McGovern, 73, died Oct. 19, 2011 at her home in Vero Beach. She was born in Brooklyn, NY and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years coming from New Windsor, NY. Mrs. In Vero Beach, Marie was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church, a member and avid tennis player at the Moorings Club. Survivors include her sons, Michael McGovern of Circleville, NY,

Alfred Bagshaw Alfred Allen Bagshaw, 83, died Oct. 21, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. He was born in Henryville, Ind., and lived in Wabasso for 52 years, coming from Henryville. He worked as a machinist for Piper Aircraft for 28 years before retirement. He was a member of First Baptist Church of Fellsmere. Survivors include his stepdaughter, Joyce Edwards of Vero Beach; brother, Donald Bagshaw of Taylorsville, Ky.; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. An online guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

N E W S W E E K L Y

William Ahrens Lake, 93, of Vero Beach, passed away Oct. 9, 2011 at VNA Hospice House. He was born in New York City on April 12, 1918. In 1999, he moved to Vero Beach, where he continued his work as a Hospice volunteer. He was also a member of the Vero Beach Country Club and St. Augustine of Canterbury Episcopal Church. He was an avid golfer and enjoyed playing the game until the age of 92. Survivors include: his loving wife of 12 years, Betty Jane Lake; his son, William A. Lake Jr. and his wife, Virginia, of Austin, Texas; his daughter, Debra L. Lusk and her husband, Michael, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; his granddaughter, Whitney Lake Harlan of Austin, Texas; his grandson, William A. Lake III of Austin, Texas; his granddaughter, Danielle M. Count of New Cumberland, Pennsylvania; his great-grandchildren, Jamison, Reina, and Vivian of New Cumberland, Pennsylvania and Ainsley of Austin, Texas. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Diabetes Association at P.O. Box 11454, Alex-

Dr. Donald J. Murray, 76, died Oct. 16, 2011. He was born in Coral Gables and lived in Vero Beach. He was on the board of directors for the Homeless Family Center, Vero Beach, for several years. He was vice mayor of Indian River Shores from 1999 to 2003. Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Ann Cossaart; daughter, Peggy Davis of Alexandria, Va.; sons, Jim Murray of Greenville, S.C., and Michael Murray of Orlando; brother, John Murray of Coral Gables; and six grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Homeless Family Center, P.O. Box 650855, Vero Beach, FL 329650855. An online guest book may be signed at www.lowtherfuneralhome.

Vaddere Martin Stinson, 80, died Oct. 19, 2011, at Consulate Health Care in Vero Beach. She was born in Vernon and was a lifetime resident of Wabasso. Before retirement, she worked as a registered nurse at Indian River Medical Hospital. She was a lifetime member of the Allen Chapel AME Church in Wabasso and a member of the Eastern Star. Survivors include her sons, Robert L. Stinson of Coconut Creek, Luther G. Stinson Jr. of Cocoa Beach, Kenneth T. Stinson of Palm Bay and Kerry L. Stinson of Wabasso; daughters, Ellen J. Stinson of Melbourne, Teresa Dawkins of Vero Beach and Sheila J. Smith of Vero Beach; sister, Willie Mae Green of Vero Beach; 27 grandchildren; and 30 great-grandchildren. An online guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

B E A C H

Donald J. Murray William Ahrens Lake

Vaddere Stinson

V E R O

Annie M. Potanovich, 83, died Oct. 15, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Bluefield, W.Va., and lived in Vero Beach for 23 years, coming from Bridgeport, Conn. She was a member of the Red Hat Society in Vero Beach and the Asbury United Methodist Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband of 33 years, George of Vero Beach; and one grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

!

Marie Ann McGovern, 73, died Oct. 19, 2011, at her home. She was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years, coming from New Windsor, N.Y. She was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. She was a former member of The Moorings Club, Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Michael McGovern of Circleville, N.Y., Mark McGovern of Darien, Conn., and Patrick McGovern of Rye Brook, N.Y.; daughter, Deirdre Barnes of Fair Hope, Ala.; brothers, James Haigney of Vero Beach, William Haigney of Huntington, N.Y., and Stephen Haigney of Syracuse, N.Y.; sister, Margaret Taylor of Lynbrook, N.Y.; and nine grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

Mark McGovern (Deirdre) of Darien, Ct. and Patrick McGovern (Christine) of Rye Brook, NY; daughter, Deirdre Barnes (Tim) of Fair Hope, AL; brothers, James Haigney (Timothy Sanchez) of Vero Beach, Bill Haigney (Ellen) of Huntington St., NY and Steve Haigney (Teresa) of Syracuse, NY; and sister, Margaret Taylor (Frank) of Lynbrook, NY and 9 grandchildren. An online guestbook is available at www.strunk funeralhome.com

2 0 1 1

Gary L. Kohlston, 56, died Oct. 15, 2011, in Vero Beach. He was born in Jersey City, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for 48 years, coming from New Jersey. He worked as a mason. Survivors include his daughter, Rachel Kohlston of Vero Beach; and sister, Jean Whitson of Cocoa Beach. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Marie McGovern

panion, Pat Cannon of Vero Beach; two grandchildren; and one greatgrandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Vero Beach, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guest book may be signed at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

2 7 ,

Gary Kohlston

andria, VA 22312 or www.diabetes. org. A guestbook may be signed at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

O C T O B E R

call home for the next 45 years. Paul was a devout Catholic, a member of St. Helen Church in Vero Beach and a loving husband, father and friend to many. He was a realtor in Vero for over 30 years, finding joy in helping other put roots down in the town he had come to grow so fond of. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the charity of one’s choice or simply help someone in need during these difficult economic times in memory of him. Condolences may be sent at www.coxgifford seawinds.com.

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Real Estate

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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – October 13-October 19

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O C T O B E R

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

9590 Maiden Ct. W Old Orchid 11/1/2009 $389,000 10/17/2011 $335,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Macy Barcia Billero & Billero Properties Gene Billero

1437 Island Club Sq. W Island Club Riverside 5/9/2011 $290,000 10/14/2011 $240,199 RealHome Services & Solutions Steve Sibiga David Walsh & Assoc. RE Ashley Harris

N E W S W E E K L Y

1233 River Reach Dr. Riverwind 8/16/2011 $299,900 10/19/2011 $300,000 MarreroTeam.com Real Estate Tammy Bogart Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Karen Smith

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

6257 Coverty Ct. Woodfield 12/10/2010 $269,800 10/14/2011 $260,000 ML Executive Realty Inc. Monette Lesme Laurel Agency, Inc. Karen Hall

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4205 Amelia Plantation Ct. Amelia Plantation 8/4/2011 $263,000 10/14/2011 $257,000 RE/MAX Premier Prop Showcase Spencer Simmons Dale Sorensen Real Estate Megan Raasveldt

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

106 Thunderbird Dr. Sebastian Highlands 3/16/2011 $214,990 10/17/2011 $200,000 Billero & Billero Properties Hollie Billero Buldo Sebastian Realty, Inc. Dave Samuelson

V E R O

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

B E A C H

Mainland Real Estate Sales – October 13-October 19

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18

Education Foundation celebrates 20 years of success BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Education Foundation supporters, with a proud history of giving Indian River County students, teachers, and school administrators a helping hand, celebrated 20 years of success with a “Going Platinum” dance. Everyone attending had in some measure been a champion to see that through education and guidance every child is able to achieve the skills they will need to be productive adults. Cynthia Falardeau, the executive director, and Program Coordinator Mary Minor were praised by John

Campione, a past president and Adrian Smith, the current president.   Campione said, “Our organization is very fortunate to have such generous donors and especially both Cynthia and Mary.” Jay Hart, also a past president, said “Education is these kids’ ticket to success and will give them opportunities in life like no other.” The dining room at Quail Valley River Club was decorated with record albums of hit songs which had either gone platinum or had a school related title. Buffet stations were set around the room and on the outside deck

as board members and supporters were enticed on the dance floor by the Dee Dee Wilde Band playing jazz, R&B and classics. Newest board member Brian Elwell said he had worked as a CPA with many of the non-profit agencies. “I think they are a strong board and a very successful organization and I just hope to be a part of continuing their work,” he said. The Education Foundation’s success is partly due to its independent nature.   The foundation supports any student that needs help whether they are from a public, charter or private school.   This al-

lows them to avoid the bureaucracy and red tape that comes from traditional funding sources. Their newest program, “Vision for Reading,” is an exciting new venture.   This program will purchase electronic gauges which can scan the student’s vision easily to see if the may have visual issues which may be a hindrance to their ability to read. President Adrian Smith says this is just one of the six current programs which benefits the whole school system and has made the organization such a benefit to the community over the last twenty years.

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

O C T O B E R

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2 0 1 1

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SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Jennifer Jones, Jeanine Harris and past President John Campione

Shelagh McCracken, past President Jay Hart and Exec. Dir. Cynthia Faladeau

Lynn Hall, Kathy Carlson, President Adrian Smith, Jennifer & Chip Watson

Dale & Matilde Sorensen and Mary Beth & John McDonald

29

SPORTS

!

Wednesday, November 2nd 6:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors Team Velocity vs. Florida Eye Institute Indian River Dentistry vs. Wal-Greens/BCM Storage Real Living All Florida vs. Orchid Island Construction My Electrician

Clark Chiropractic Strickland Automotive

8:30 p.m. vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Cunningham’s

8:30 p.m. vs. Team Velocity vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

Wednesday, November 9th 6:30 p.m. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Team Velocity Real Living All Florida vs. Orchid Island Construction My Electrician vs. Wal-Greens / BCM Storage Select Floors Strickland Automotive Stevi B’s

7:30 p.m. vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Florida Eye Institute

Select Floors Cunningham’s

8:30 p.m. vs. Clark Chiropractic vs. Indian River Dentistry

Monday, November14th 6:30 p.m. Real Living All Florida vs. Stevi B’s Florida Eye Institute vs. My Electrician Edward Murphy MD Surgery vs. Lowther Funeral Home Team Velocity vs. Clark Chiropractic

Tuesday, November 8th 6:30 p.m. America’s Best Auto Body vs. Tailgators New Vision Eye Center vs. Diamond Cutters * Mulligan’s Beach House vs. Piper Aircraft *

Tailgators VOVN New Vision Eye Center

Piper Aircraft

Stevi B’s State Farm Precision Cuts Services Indian River Dentistry

Wednesday, November 16th 6:30 p.m. Select Floors vs. Clark Chiropractic Real Living All Florida vs. Indian River Dentistry Stevi B’s vs. My Electrician Florida Eye Institute vs. Strickland Automotive Clark Chiropractic Team Velocity Orchid Island Construction Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

7:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors vs. Perfection Paint & Body vs. Real Living All Florida vs. Cunningham’s

7:30 p.m. vs. Cal Builders vs. Indian River Taekwondo vs. Mulligan’s Beach House *

Thursday, November 10th 6:30 p.m. vs. New Vision Eye Center 7:30 p.m. vs. America’s Best Auto Body

Tailgators

Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks 16, Indian River Federal Credit Union Seminoles 0 Razorbacks scoring: TD Alexander Beare, 2 PAT James Hassell Outstanding Players: Aiden Fettig and Tyler Beare Seminoles Outstanding Players: Louis Brown and Chauncey Johnson FloridaScapes Lawn Service Gators 16, Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 6 Gators scoring: TD Dylan Redmon, TD 2 PAT JJ King, 2 PAT Jacob Jenkins Outstanding Players: Joey DeLuke and Ethan Campbell Buckeyes scoring: TD Devin Willis Outstanding Players: Major Croom and Steven Spankle Tot-Time Results October 22nd Gold Coast Turbine Inc. Saints 0, Atlantic Pool Cleaning Bears 0 Saints Outstanding Players: Will Russell and Harrison Reeb Bears Outstanding Players: James Diskin and Anthowne “Deuce” Montgomery

COED A DIVISION PLAYOFFS

Seed 5

Tuesday, November 15th 6:30 p.m. vs. Seed 2 (Game 1)

Seed 4

7:30 p.m. vs. Seed 3 (Game 2)

7:30 p.m. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Strickland Automotive Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. Edward Murphy MD Surgery 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. State Farm Lowther Funeral Home vs. Precision Cuts Services 8:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church / Xpress Mattress vs. Jim Rott Home Improv. vs. 1st Church / Don’s Imports vs. Orchid Island Construction

7:30 p.m. vs. VOVN vs. America’s Best Auto Body

Vero Beach Radiology Associates Titans 0, Indian River Federal Credit Union Browns 0 Titans Outstanding Players: Miller Armstead and Will Holderman Browns Outstanding Players:Sage Morrow and Sean Connolley AT&T Real Yellow Pages Eagles 0, Wells Fargo Chargers 0 Eagles Outstanding Players: Tyrone Davis and Peirce Genoni Chargers Outstanding Players: Ashton Wetmiller and Andrew Bikel

Thursday, November 17th TACKLE FOOTBALL Winner of Game 2

6:30 p.m. vs. Seed 1 (Game 3)

Winner of Game 1

7:30 p.m. vs. Winner of (Game 3)

Jr. Midgets Results October 22nd AT&T Real Yellow Pages Chargers 0, Wells Fargo Lions 0 Outstanding Players: Chargers, Hunter Parris; Lions: Robbie Sanders Midgets Results

COED B DIVISION PLAYOFFS

Tuesday, November 15th 6:30 p.m.

Seed 4 Seed 3

vs. vs.

Seed 1 (Game 1) Seed 2 (Game 2)

7:30 p.m.

Winner of Game 1

vs.

Winner of Game 2

October 20th Ace Plumbing Patriots 13, Play It Again Sports Packers 6 Patriots: Landon Wilson 50 yd. TD, Tyler Burch 1 PAT, Drew MacFarlane 45 yd. TD Packers: Willie Mosley 7 yd. TD Norris & Company Real Estate Vikings 12, Indian River Federal Credit Union Cardinals 6 Vikings: Erin Payne 22 yd. TD, 45 yd. TD Cardinals: DeMarcus Harris 8 yd. TD

N E W S W E E K L Y

Clark Chiropractic State Farm Precision Cuts Services Strickland Automotive

Cal Builders Indian River Taekwondo

October 22nd Bill Baysura with Dale Sorensen Real Estate Sparta 18, Children’s Discovery Volunteers 0 Spartans scoring: TD Blake Bales, TD Zachariah Sigmon, TD Liam Baysura Outstanding Players: Zach Miller and Drew Hurley Volunteers Outstanding Players: Torrey Pursel and Trace Rahal

B E A C H

7:30 p.m. vs. 1st Church/Xpress Mattress vs. Precision Cuts Services vs. 1st Church/Don’s Imports vs. State Farm

Thursday, November 3rd 6:30 p.m. vs. Diamond Cutters Piper Aircraft America’s Best Auto Body vs. Cal Builders

Photography by Michael Siegel Buckeyes 13, Children’s Discovery Volunteers 6 Buckeyes scoring: TD Major Croom, TD Steven Spangler Outstanding Players: Jean Galbard and Jacob Smith Volunteer scoring: TD Andrew Klipstine. Outstanding Players: Chase Hill and Jason Mercuri

V E R O

Orchid Island Construction Edward Murphy MD Surgery Jim Rott Home Improv. Lowther Funeral Home

7:30 p.m. vs. VOVN vs. Mulligan’s Beach House vs. Piper Aircraft *

October 20th Vero Radiology Associates Razorbacks 12, Wells Fargo Irish 0 Razorbacks scoring: TD Alexander Beare, TD Raines Holmes Outstanding Players: Collin Nance and John Bierman Irish Outstanding Players: Vance Mullanack and Jack Carpenter

!

Monday, November 7th 6:30 p.m. vs. Florida Eye Institute 1st Church / Xpress Mattress Indian River Dentistry vs. My Electrician Stevi B’s vs. Cunningham’s 1st Church/Don’s Imports vs. Lowther Funeral Home

Tailgators New Vision Eye Center Diamond Cutters

FLAG FOOTBALL Jr. Mighty Mites Results

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7:30 p.m. vs. Select Floors vs. My Electrician vs. Florida Eye Institute vs. Indian River Dentistry

Tuesday, November 1st 6:30pm vs. Indian River Taekwondo Tailgators vs. Mulligan’s Beach House Diamond Cutters New Vision Eye Center vs. Piper Aircraft

Indian River County Recreation Department Football Scores

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Perfection Paint & Body Cunningham’s Orchid Island Construction Wal-Greens / BCM Storage

Indian River County Recreation Department Coed Fall Schedule

O C T O B E R

Indian River County Recreation Department Men’s Fall Schedule 2011

THE STORY BEYOND OUR

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