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THL IVY

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TO

Tile l~ev. san1ue1 Hart, N\. rs.., D. D., D. c. L., CLASS OF '66, FOR MANY YEARS PROFESSOR OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN THIS COLLEGE, AND ALWAYS ITS FAITHFUL FRIEND

AND SUP-

PORTER, TH IS BOOK IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED

BV THE

CLT\SS OF 190 I •

?0~~~ '" ~~ ~r " ~ '~"' t3i1A~l) Of l~lfDR) MANAGING EDITORS FRANCLS ELY WATERMAN, CoNNECTICUT. JAMES MOSGROVE HUDSON, NEw YoRK.

LITERARY EDITOR A GU T US TALCOTT WYNKOOP, NEw YoRK.

ART EDITOR JAMES ALBERT WALES, NEw jERSEY .

ASSOCIATE EDITORS AUGUSTINE HUGO WELLS ANDERSON, RHODE IsLAND. JOHN DA ULBY EVANS, CONNEC'I'ICUT. ARTHUR PAUL KELLEY, NEW HAMPSHIRE. WALTER ALFRED MITCHELL, CONNECTIC UT. RICHARD EUGENE PECK, CONNECTICUT.

Editorial .J'

.J'

Tf J-\

COLLEGE ANNUAL fills a position of peculiar responsibility. It is not a mere catalogue of fraternities, societies and associations, nor is it intended to be either a literary or a humorous publication; but it should aim to be the true index of college life. As such, the literary and the humorous both have places between its covers, but they are the means and not the end. College life is not all work, nor is it all fun, and its many different phases should be reflected in the ideal annual. It should contain enough of the literary to make it worthy of perusal, and enough of the humorous to make it entertaining. This is the ideal for the attainment of which we have striven. We know that it is beyond us; we realize that we can not hope to succeed in every respect, and so it is with feelings of deep anxiety that we submit, for judgment, this, the twenty-eighth volume of the IvY. Where we have failed, may future boards take warning; may they learn to keep away from the Scyllas which we have encountered and from the Charybdises into which we have fallen. But where we have succeeded may the classes of future years follow our example and press ever onward toward the attainment of perfection, and may the IvY ever serve as a reminder of happy college days to those sons of old Trinity who have taken their places on the battlefield of life. The editors wish to thank most heartily all who have assisted them in the production of this book by literary or artistic contributions.

9

T rinity College HARTFORD. CONN .

.:l.:l HIS college was chartered by the State of Connecticut in 1 23. Its first class was graduated in 1827. It was founded by Episcopalians under the leadership of the Right Rev. Thomas Church Brownell, and has been fostered especially by members of that communion, but it is governed by a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees not under ecclesiastical control. While attached to the interests of its church, it is not sectarian. It h as included among its students men of every faith. It is a generously equipped secular institution, religi ous in spirit and motives, but not ecclesiastical. It gives its advantages to a11 properly qualified candidates, irrespective of religious affiliations. The corps of instruction consists of eleven professors, five lecturers, seven instructors and a librarian. <!hnn:s.es .1:rt ~ust\:ucti.on The College offe rs four co urses of instruction, viz.: I. A CouRsE IN ARTS. II. A COURSE IN LETTEUS AND SCIENCE. III. A Co RSE IN Scm:-~cE. IV. A Co unsE IN LE'lTEns. The co urses extend over four years, with the exception of the Course in Science, which is completed in three years. After 1900 it is proposed that the Course in Science shall a lso be one of four years. Students completing the Course in Arts receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Students completing the Course in Letters and Science or the Course in Science, receive the degree of Bachelor of Science, and those completing t he Course in Letters receive the degree of Bachelor of Letters. Students who do not propose to pursue all the studies of any of the regular courses may be permitted , under the name of special studen t s, to attend any class in such studies as upon examination they a re found qualified to pursue. Upon honorable dismissal, they are entitled to a certificate from the President, stating the studies which they have pursued. In certain departments the Co11ege offers also instruction for graduate students. The departments of instruction in the College number twenty-four, including eighty-two elective and voluntary courses.

T

~rx.e ~tiuci :plc .ot ~txstnt.cti.o tt The number of the teaching force, large relatively to the number of those taught, admits of a close relation between instruct01路s and students. Each student is held accountable for his work every day, and receives personal encouragement and guidance in a deg ree impossible where the number of the taught is greater. Practical research and laboratory methods a re applied wherever possible. ~h.c ~iln;ax;g

The College Library, numbering 40,000 volumes, is under the superintendence of a professional librarian, who guides the students in the use of books. They have also at their command the Watkinson Reference Library of 50,000 volumes, the Library of the Connecticut Historical Society, and the Hartford Public Library with its well-stocked rea ding roo ms. 10

~ctbox a.toxi.cs

nu.a ®t,s.ctlJcttocu

The Jarvis Physical Laboratory contains in addit ion to the lecture and apparatus rooms, a large laboratory for work in the elementary courses, a reference library, and several smaller laboratories adapted and devoted to advanced work of a special characte r. The lal.Joratory has a very complete equipment for work in all the branches of Physics. Special attention bas been given to making the facilities for work in electricity as complete as possiblt-. The department is provided with standard apparatus for elec· trical measurements, and bas a workshop, steam engine, and direct current and polyphase a lternating current generators for its special use. The Jarvis Chemical Laborato ry is well equipped for work in general experimental and organic chemistry, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and in assaying and gas analysis. The main laboratory has desk space for thirty !tudents working at one time. This room is devoted to work in general experimental chemistry and qualitative analysis. For work in quantitative analysis and organic chemistry separate laboratories are provided and properly equipped. A room set apart for assayi ng is fitted up with suitable furnaces and other necessary material. The new Hall of Natural History contains biological, botanical, geological and m iner al og icallaborato ri~ s provided with eYery modern equipment. The Obse rvatory contains a six and n half inch refractor, a tw9 and a half inch transit, a standard clock, a chronograph, a smaller refractor, a portable transit, a sextant, and conveniences for the simpler work in astronomical photography.

Q5nm.un:sin nx amt

~t hl.eti:.c ~i.et.a

A Gymnasium is supplied with the best apparatus, in the use of which the students a re trained by a special instructor. An Athletic Field on the college grounds is to be extended and perfected at an expense of $10,000, contributed by friends and alumni of the College. ~.el to:ursTxi+rs , .§dxolaxstri.ps and ~>.:i~cs The Russell Fellowship, yielding about $400, is awarded biennially to a member of the graduating class of superior ability who engages to pursue an approved course of graduate study at Trinity College or at some foreign university. The Holland Scholarships, each having an annual value of $600, are awarded to the students attaining the highest rank in the Junior, Sophomore and Freshman classes respectively. Prizes of the aggregate value of $490 are awarded in the several departments.

:E£JJ.CU5.C5 The amount of the Treasurer's bills each year varies from $177.50 to $242.50. Board can be obtained at $3.50 a week and upwards, making the cost of board for thirty-seven weeks at the lowest rate, $129.50. The amount of the Treasurer's bills can be reduced to holders of beneficiary scholarships of "·hich there are more than fifty .

.§lituntion. The buildings of the College are situated on a site commanding beautiful views in the south part of Hartford, itself one of the most beautiful cities of New England. T he largest of the buildings, more than 600 feet in length, intended to form the west side of a great quadrangle, is of stone in the English secular gothic style, and is one of the most notable collegiate buildings of the conn try. The Jarvis Laboratories, t he Hall .of Natural History and the Gymnasium, a re tasteful and commodious structures of brick. Four of the college fraternities have special chapter houses. For cata logues a pply to the President or to the Secretary of the Facul ty. 11

College Calendar 1899 Sept. Nov. Dec.

21 Thursday Christmas Term begins. 1 Wednesday All Saints' Day. 29 Tha nksgi ving Recess begins at 1 P.M. 1 Friday Thanksgiving Recess ends a t 2 P . M. 21 T hursday Christmas Recess begins at 1 P.M.

1900 Jan. Feb.

Thurscfhy 29 Monday 3 Saturday 11

.._ 22 28 April 12 13 15 23 May 2 3 4

Tbursf]ay

Washington's Birthd ay. Prize Contest.

Wednesday Thursday Friday Sunday Monday Wednesday

Ash Wed nesday .

Thursday Friday

5 Saturday 5 12 24 Thursday 30

Christmas Recess ends at 5.45 P.M. Christmas Examinations begin. Christmas Examinations end. Trinity Term begins. Toucey Scholar appointed .

Easter Recess begins at 11 Good Friday. Easter Day. Easter Recess ends at 5.45

Oratorical Ffiilr4/!'i=rnl A . M.

P.M.

Last day for receiving essays for the Chemical Prizes. Last day for receiving essays for the Tu t tle Prize. Last day for receiving essays for the Douglas a nd Metaphysical Prizes. Greek Prize Examination. Last day for receiving essays for the P ri zes in History a nd Political Science. Examinations for the M athematical Prizes. Ascension Day.

Wednesday Memorial Day. 12

June

3 10 14 21 22 22 23 2-1-

Sunday Thursday Friday

Whitsunday. Trinity Sunday. Trinity Examinations begin. E xamin ations for Admission begin. Trinity Examinations end. Examinations for Admission. Annual Meeting ofthe Board of Fellows (evening).

Saturday Sunday 25 Monday 25 25 25 2G Tuesday

Examinations for Admission. Baccalaureate Sermon. Annual Meeting of the Corporation (evening) . Senior and Junior Standing published. A ward of Prizes. Class-Day. Annual Meeting of the Corporation and of the Association of the Alumni.

'

27

Wednesday

SEVENTY-FOURTH COMMENCEMENT.

Trinity Vacation begins.

Sept. 17 Monday 20 Thursday

Examinations for Admission begin. Christmas Term begins at 5.45 P. :u.

Dec.

Christmas Recess begins at 1

20

l:l

P . ~1.

Senatus Academicus

The Rt. Rev. TuOl\IAS

1ARCL! CLARK, D.D., LL.D.

The Rt. Rev. WILI. IAM WOODR UFF NILES, D.D., LL.D. The Rt. Rev. HENRY CODMAN POTTER, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L.

*The Rev. THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE, Hartford.

ex o!Jicio PRESIDENT, The Rev. GEORGE H . CLARK, D.D .,

Hartford.

CHARLES J. HbADLY, LL.D.,

Hartford . New Haven.

*C HARLES E . GRAYES, M.A.,Treasurer, The Rt. Rev. WILLIAM W. NILES, D .D., LL.D., D.C.L., * The Hon. WILLIAM HAMERSLEY, LL.D.,

Concord, N. H . Hartford. Riverside, Conn .

L KE A. LOCKWOOD, M.A.,

Hartford.

* The Rev. FRANC IS GooDWIN, M.A., WILLIAM E. CURTIS, M .A.,

New York.

J. PIERPONT MORGAN, Esq.,

New York.

JouN H . S. QuicK, M .A.,

Chicago. Hartford.

*jACOB L . GREENE, M . A., Secretary, The Rev. WILLIAM H. VIBBERT, D.D.,

New Yo rk.

JOHN SABINE SM ITH, M.A.,

New York . Philadelphia.

路j-SYDNEY G. FisHER, L.H. D.,

Hartford .

*JAMES G. GooDWIN, Esq.,

Washington.

WILLIAM J. BoARDl\fAN, LL.B, * P. HENRY WoODWARD, B.A. ,

Hartford.

路j路 ROBERT THORNE, M.A.,

New York.

"i"WILLIAM S. COGSWELL, M.A.,

Jamaica, N.Y.

The Rt. Rev . CHAUNCEY B. BREWSTER, D.D. ,

Hartford.

*These m e mbers of tbe Corporation form tbe Executive Committee. t Elected by the Alumni.

14

Faculty .;f.

.;f.

THE REv. GEORGE WILLIAMSON SM ITH, D.D., LL D. PRESIDENT: and Hobart Professnr of 1\fetaphysics, 115 Vernon Street (office 13 Seabury Hall).

THE REv. THOMAS RUGGLES PYNCHON, D.D., LL.D. Brownell Professor of Moral Philosophy, 15 Seabury Hall.

···· ··············· ··········· ································· ········· Professor of the Latin Language and Literature.

TnE REV . FL.A.VEL SWEETEN · LUTHER, PH.D., Trinity. Seabury Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy, and Secretary, 1 Columbia Street.

THE REv. HENRY FERG USON, M.A. Northam P rofessor of History and Political Science, 123 Vernon Street.

CHARLES FREDERICK JOHNSO , M.A., L.H.D. Professor of English Literature, 69 Vernon Street.

THE REv. JOHN JAMES McCOOK, M.A. Professor of Modern Languages, 396 M a in Street.

WILLIAM LISPENARD ROBB, PH.D., Berlin. Professor of Physics, 11

Vernon Street.

ROBERT BAIRD RIGGS, PH.D., Gottingen. Scovill Professor of Chemistry and Natural Science, and Registrar, 35 Forest Street.

WINFRED ROBERT MARTIN, LL.B., PH.D., Tiibingen. Pro fessor of Oriental and 1\fodern Languages, 21 Jarvi• Hall.

F RANK COLE BA BBITT, P u .D ., Harvard. Pro fessor o f t he Greek L a ng uage and L iterature, 14 S eab u ry Hall .

T HE HoN. WI LLIAM II Ai\l E RSLEY, LL.D. Lecturer on La IV, 739 Main Street 15

,

CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER, L.H.D., D.C.L. Lecturer on English Literature, 37 Forest Street.

CHARLES COFFING BEACH, M.D. Lecturer on Hygiene, 199 Main Street.

WILLIAM DENISON MORGAN, M.A., M.D. Lecturer on Anatomy and Physiology, 1 08 Farmin gto n Avenue .

FREDERICK ROBERTSON HONEY, PH.B. Instructor in Drawing and Descriptiy路e Geometry, New Haven.

\

WILLI.AM HARRY CHICHELE PYNCHON, M.A., Harva rd. Instructor in Natural Science, 13 Columbia Street.

THE REv. JOEL FOOTE BINGHAM, D.D., L.H.D. Lecturer on Italian Literature, 484 Farmington Avenue.

WAf.,DO SELDEN PRATT, M.A., Mus.D. Instructor in Elocution, 86 Gillett Street.

STANLEY SIMO DS, PH.D., Johns Hopkins. Instructor in charge of the Department of Latin, 22 J a rvis Hall.

HENRY JONES BLAKESLEE, B.S. Assistant in the Physical Laboratory, 791 Park Street.

CHARLES WHITNEY MIXTER, PH.D., Harvard. Assistant in the Department of History and Political Science, 149 High Street.

HAROLD LOOMIS CLEASBY, B.A. Assistant in the Classics, 3 Northam Towers.

WILLIAM NEWNHAM CARLTON, Librarian, 40 Jarvis Hall.

GEORGE BERNHARDT VELTE, Instructor in the Gymnasium, 4 Francis Ayenue.

The stated meetings of the Faculty are h eld on Monday morning

16

a t 10 o'clock.

Board of Fellows • Presiden t, THE PRESIOEN'l' OF THE COLLEGE ex officio.

Senior Fellows, FRANKLIN HA:IULTON FOWLER, M . A . The Rev. LUCIUS WATE RMAN, D.D . ALEXANDER TAYLOR MASON , M . A., LL.B . WILLIAM BEACH OLMSTED, B . A. AMBROSE SPENCER M U RRAY, :\1 . A. EDWARD MANSFIELD ScuDDER, M . A . , LL.B.

Junio r Fellows, The Rev. JonN TAYLOR HUNTINGTON, M . A. The Rev. JoHN JA~IES l\lcCooK, M .A . GEORGE EMERSON BEERS, M.A., LL.B. The Rev. FREDERICK WILLIAM HARRIMAN, M.A . PERCY SHELLEY BRYANT, M.A. FRANK ELISHA JOHNSON, M.A.

Association of the Alumni President, WILLIAM CoNVERSE SKINNER, M.A.

VIce• President, GEoRGE LEWIS CoOKE, M.A., LL.B.

Secretary, FREDERICK EVEREST HAIGHT, PH.D.

Treasurer, FRANK ELISHA JoHNSON, M.A.

Stllndlng Committee, The PRESIDENT. The TREASURER . The Rev. SAMUEL HART, D.D. GEORGE HENRY SEn£S, M.A. HoWARD CooKE VIBBERT, M.A.

17

New England Association of Alumni IS)tlfcer~ .

1900

President,

LuKE A. LOC KW OOD, '55. Vice- President,

W. C. SK INNER, '76. TreiJsurer,

Secretary,

P. S . B RYANT, '70.

F. W. HARRIMAN, '72. Ex ecutive Committee,

D r. W. D. MORGAN, '72.

Rev. S. HAH'I', D.D., '66.

New York Association of Alumni IS)fficers, 1900 President,

Rev. WM. H. VIBBERT, D.D., '58. Vice• Presidents ,

A. S. l\1URRAY, Jr ., ' 71. Rev. NEWTON PER KUIS, '6 1.

Rev. C. H. W. STOCK ING, D.D., '60. FRANKLIN H . FoWLER, '61. Secretary sod Treasurer,

SAMUEL F. JARVIS, Jr., '89. Ex ecutive Committee,

Chairman-RooT. T HORNE, '85. F. E. HAIGHT, '87. E. L. PURDY, '84. G. P. COLEMAN, ' 90. V. C. PEDERSON, '91. $

$

Philadelphia Association of Alumni ®meers, 1900 President,

J.

E\\'ING MEARS, M .D., '58. Vice-Pres ident,

WILLIAM DRAYTON, '71.

-

Secretary,

SYllNEY G. F ISHER, '79, 328 Chestnut Street, P hil adel phia. Ex ecutive Com mittee,

H. GoRDON McCouGH, '75.

SYDNEY G. F ISHER, '79. 18

Pittsburgh Association of Alumni ®meers, 1900 Pres ident,

L.

~I. PLUMER,

'74.

Secretary,

Viu·President,

M. K. KosTER, '87. Bx ecutive Committee,

A. P . BuRGWIN, '82.

W . R . BLAIR, '75. ~

Hon. Jos. BuFFINGTON, '75.

~

Alumni Association for the District of Columbia and Vicinity ®meers, 1900 1st Vice-President,

President,

E. M.

2d Vice-President,

GEo. A. Woo DWARD , '55.

GALLAUDET, '59 .

WM. FELL jOHNSON,

' 66.

Treasurer,

Secretary, S. HERB ERT GIESY,

J.

'85.

\V. CLARK, '63 .

.!& .!&

California Association of Alumni ®meers, 1900 President,

Rt. Rev. W.

F. NICHOLS,

D.D., '70.

Secretary and Treasurer,

Rev.

F. H . C II URCII (now of Tacoma, Wash .)

.!&

~

Boston Association of Alumni ®meers, 1900 President,

Rev. E.

T. SuLLIVAN,

'89.

Viu·Presidents,

W.

C. BROCKLESBY,

'69.

Re\·.

WILLIAM PRESSEY,

'90.

Scretary,

C. C. BARTON, Jr., '93.

]. H. GOODSPEED,

'66.

Treasurer, .)&

HORTON G. ID E,

.)&

'94.

Detroit Association of Alumni ®meers, 1900 President, SIDNEY T. M ILLER,

Vice-President,

N.

c.

'87. Secretary,

LO\"ER!Dr.E, '86.

A. K. 19

GAGE,

' 96.

College Chronology Charter of Washington College granted, 1823. Jarvis and Seabury Halls built, 1824 . College opened, September 23, 1824. Brownell Hall built, 1845. Name changed to Trinity College, 1845. Statue of Bishop Brownell presented, 1 64. Campt s sold to the City of Hartford as a site for the new State Capitol, 1872. Ground broken for the new buildings, 1875. New Seabury and Jarvis 路Halls occupied, 1878. Northam Towers built, 1882. St. John Observatory built, 1883. Provisions for special students and a degree in science expanded, and elective studies introduced into higher co urses , 1 84. President's House built, 1885. Alumni Hall and Gymnasium built, 1887. Jarvis Hall of Science built, 1888. A Professional Librarian appointed for the College Library, 1899. Hall of Natural History built, 1900. ~t.esi.dcnts

Rt. Rev. T. C. Brownell, D.D., 1824. Rev. Nathaniel S. Wheaton, D.D., 1 31. Rev. Silas Totten, D. D., 1837. Rt. Rev. John Williams, D.D., 1848. Rev. Daniel R. Goodwin, D.D., 1853. Samuel Eliot, LL.D., 1 860. Rev. John B. Kerfoot, D.D., 1864. Rev. Abner Jackson, D.D., 1867. Rev. Thomas R. Pynchon, D.D., 1874. Rev. Geo. Williamson Smith, D.D., 1883.

::?0

THE MAIN BUILDINGS,

VIEW FROM THE CAMPUS. THE BISHOP. ALUMNI HALL AND GYMNASIUM.

THE JARVIS LABORATORIES.

'Neath the Elms.

'Neath the elms of our old Trinity, 'Neath the elms of our old Trinity, No more shall we m eet, Our classmates to greet, 'Neath the elms of our old Trinity. CsoRus-'Neath the elms of our old Trinity, 'Neath the elms of our old Trinity, Oh, it's seldom we'll meet in the moonlight so sweet, 'Neath tlie elms of our old Trinity. On the hills of our old Trinity, In the halls of our old Trinity, There is right merry cheer, There are friends true and dear, In the halls of our old Trinity. College days are from care and sorrow free, And oft will we seek in memory The days that are past, Far too joyous to last, 'Neath the elms of our old Trinity. Then we'll sing to our old Trinity, To our dear old Alma Mater, Trinity, We're together to-day, And to-morrow away, Far away from our old Trinity.

22

College Colors DARK BLUE AND OLD GoLD.

College Yell Rah-Rah-Rah I Trinity I Boom I Rah, Boom I R ah, Trinity!

23

Long Live Old Trinity By

J. H.

BROCKLR~BY .

'65.

Am-" Gay and Happy."

I.

Long shall live our dear old college, Student life so gay and free, Drinking at the fount of.knowledge, Long shall live old Trinity.

CHORUs-Long live Trinity! let us twine Garlands for her brow divine; Alma Mater, glory to thee, Long shall live old Trinity. II. While the night-winds breathe their chorus, Through the clamb'ring vine, \Ve, the moonbeams watching o'er us , Student voices intertwine. CHORUS. III.

Chant the love of Alma Mater, We who at bet路 altar kneel; Fondest love, which we 'll ne 'er barter, Be with us through woe and weal.

CHORUS. IV. Distant waters rippling measure, Fleeting in their moonlighj; glee, Tell us that too soon our pleasure Ends at dear old Trinity. CHORUS.

24

Graduate Students

ROOM.

UESIDBNCK.

NAMB.

HENRY JoNES BLAKESLEE, 13.S.,

I Hartford,

791 Park St.

HAROLD LooMis CLEASBV, B.A.,

I Hartford,

3 N. T.

} Hartford,

At the University of Gottingen.

Assista.nt in the Physicctl LuborttiOI'!J~ )

Assistant i n l!J e C/(ts:o;ics,

WooLsEY McALPINE joHNSON, B.A., H. B. RUSSELL FELLO\V,

ALPHONSO DESALVIO, B.A., Student in the llnrljQ)'(t Theologiea.l Seminm·y,

JA~!ES RIEDELL TucKER, B.A., ~ale, PrinciJl((/ of t11e East Jlartford lltfJII S<·hool,

RAY~!OND

SANFORD YEOMANS, B.A.,

f

I Boston J'.fass.,

f

'

I East Hartford,

f

Ando•·er,

25

j

(

Hartford Theological Seminary.

E. Hartford.

Andover.

Senior Class

1900 CLAss MoTTo,

"'ErOLJ.WL 8'

CLASS COLOR~,

an:

0Lo GoLD ANO BROWN.

CLASS YELL-

Wo-te--widee-wo, t e widee-;vire, castire, casto, te-widee-wo, te-widee wish, wish , wish, boon. 1900 !

速ftic.e\:.s CIIRISTMAS TBRM.

President,

M . ]. BRINES,

TRINITY TERM.

]. G. MciLVAINE.

Vice-President,

J. K.

Secretary,

J.

Treasurer,

L. H .

BURl',

R. H.

Fox.

Chronicler,

P . L.

BRYANT,

P. L .

BRYAN'!' .

CLE:I1ENT,

G. MciLVAINE,

26

A. S. F.

TITUS.

w. PRINCE.

History. $

$

HERE was a time, at that, not so long ago, when a frightened mob of" watery, pulpy, slobbery freshmen" came tumbling down between the lines of grinning demons who cried, "Fresh! Fresh! Fresh!" at the top of their voices. What a rude awakening for the spoiled darlings of twenty preps! But the pulpiness soon wore off under the kindly, though autocratic, hammering of '"99 "-peace to their ashes-and soon we, in our turn, were forging the raw material into shape. This period of Sophomoredom was one of hard play and hard work; for. despite the fact that at the end of Freshman year we knew it all, there were still some few very minor details we could absorb to fill up a cranny here and there in our gray matter. Then came the awakening. Junior year beheld us standing around in knots, struggling to come to a realization of our separate and collective missions in life, and to find a solution of the soul-absorbing problems of ethics. In this year we were allowed to elect anything under the sun, even the mighty mysteries of History were no longer barred to us-and many grew pale and wan plucking the elusive date. After a summer vacation spent in hard study under various" conditions," we emerged into the perfected state and walked the campus clothed in o ur own righteousness-Seniors at last ! Then came the feast of reason-the contemplation of our own minds through the medium of Psychology-a new dragon sent out to fill the devastating place of Metaphysics. An unknown world lay before us, and not even the keen intellectual remembrance of ethics could lessen the zeal with which we pursued the elusive idea through cribriform plates, optic-thalami, and pineal g lands till we came at last to the sensorium, only to learnalas !-that matter was-well-" no matter," a nd mind-well-" never mind." Up to the midyear exams the college had been monotonously quiet; even the relaxation of beginning a new term, with marks to burn, failed to aro use the college body which was fast reaching a state of nervous prostration from inactivity. So Nineteen Hundred held a sm oker, to seek out the reason for it all, and, if possible, to arouse a little enthusiasm; to quote from the d aily papers: "The smoker recently given by Nineteen Hundred was a great success." Such successes, be it remarked in passing, are apt to breed ennui in the men whose a nimation is suspended for four weeks. But "the feasting and the folly and the fun" is nearly over; soon we too will join the ranks of the graduates; in four years we may come back to be "rubbered at" in chapel by the unregenerate, and Nineteen Hundred will be only a date-to outsiders, yes-but to ourselves it will be more than anyone dare express. All the memories of four seething years will be compressed into four magic figures at whose mention will flash back upon us the phantasms once so r eal-lost ideals will haunt us as we think of the "might-have-been" and again our hearts will yearn for the days of Nineteen Hundred at dear old Trinity. Yet who would go back to that day of September, inety-six, when we had all our life before us. Then we knew not where we stood-much less do V..â&#x20AC;˘e know now-but we have no time to waste in morbid introspection ; our shoulders are at the wheel of time, and to cease from straining means annihilation. So now, as we stand on the threshold of a new and wider life, let us pledge a last time, in friendship's wine, the class of Nineteen Hundred, who, led it well or led it ill, were true to their motto: ETOLfJ-OL 8' dE[. P. L. B.

T

â&#x20AC;˘

27

Seniors ROOM.

RESIDENCE.

NAME.

South Manchester, Conn.,

Alexander Arnott, A. X. P. , James Watson Brad.in, Jr., A. ~. <!>., 速.

. E.,

2J. H.

6 Park Terrace.

Hartford,

Sophomore Dining Club, Track Team (1).

Moses James Brines, A. X. P.,

速.

N. E .,

1 J. H.

Westerly, R.I., .

Glee Club (1) (2 ) ( 3) (4), Leader o f Glee Club (3) (4), Jesters (1) (2) (3) (4), Executive Committee of Jesters (3) (4), College Q uartet (1) (2) (3) (4) , President of Class (4) 1st term, Senior Honorary Society , P r esident of M usical Organiza tio ns (4).

Percy Leon Bryant,

41 J. H.

Cincinnati, 0.,

::S. A. E. ,

Luther H a rold Burt, fl. K . E.,

Har-tford,

Theodore Grafton Case, fl. K . E. ,

Granby, Conn.,

124 Collins Street. 14 J. H .

1900 Ivy Board.

John Kay Clement, fl. \ll .,

Sunbury, Pa.,

9 J. H.

German Club, Mand olin Club (2) ( 3 ) (4), Glee Club (1) (2) (3).

Samuel Willia m Coons, fl . \ll .,

Ballston Spa, N.Y.,

Roderick Hanison Fox, (s.), A. fl . <!>.,速. N. E.,

Bradford, Pa.,

10 J. H.

J.

H.

Sophomore Dining Club, President o f Class (3) 1st term, Glee Club (1 ) (2).

Haslett M cKim Glazebrook, A. fl . <!>., 速. r. E.,

Elizabeth, N.j.,

35J. H.

Baseball Team ( 1) (2) (3) (4 ), Captain o f Baseball Team ( 4 ) , Sophomore Dining Club, German Club, Basketb all Team (1) (2) (3) (4 ), Captain of B a sk etb all Team ( 2) (3) (4) , Junior Ball Committee, Senior H o norary Soci ety, President Tennis Association (4), Glee Club (3) (4), President German Club .

Pittsfield, Mass.,

Monroe Gleason Haight, fl . \ll. ,

llJ. H.

Manager o f Football Team (4), President of C lass (3) 2d term , Sophom ore Dining Club, Junior Ball Committee, German Club, Assistant Manager Baseball Team, Assis t ant Manager Football Team.

Sunbury , Pa.,

William Cameron Hill, fl . \ll. ,

Man agin,; Editor 1900 Ivy, G e rman Club, Sop hom ore Dinin g Club, Mandolin C lub, (4).

28

9J. H.

ROOM..

RRSIDENCB.

NAME.

37 J. H.

Harry Archer Hornor, A.ll.. <t>., <t> B. K. , ®. N. E., New Orleans, La., Sophomore Dining Club, Jesters (1) ( 2) (3) (4) Stage Manager of Jesters (3) (4), Executive Committee of Jesters (2) (3), Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4), Mandolin Club (1), Class President (1) 1st term , Literary Editor 1900 Ivy, Senior Honorary Society, Salutatorian, College Marshal.

Frederick Welles Prince,

"S. <t>., <t>. B.

K., ®. N. E.,

66 Vernon Street.

Hartford,

German Club, Sophomore Dining Club, Mandolin Club (3) (4), Managing Editor 1900 Ivy, Junior Ball Committee, President of Class (2) 2d term, Senior Honorary Society, Class Day Presirlent.

37 J. H .

Lakewood, N.j.,

David Louis Schwartz, A. ll.. <t>., ®. N. E. ,

Track Team ( 1 ) (2), Glee Club (1) ( 2) (3) (4) , Mandolin Club (1) (2) (3) (4), Leader of Mandolin Club (4), Chairman Junior Ball Committee, German Club, Manager of Baseball Team (3), Senior Honorary Society, Assistant Manager Track T eam , Sophomore Dining Club, President Class (2) 1st term, Representath·e to New England Intercollegiate Association, '99-1900, President Athletic Association.

Hartford,

33 Ward Street.

Charles Thomas Smart (s.), A . X. P. ,

Hartford,

24 Sisson Avenue.

Edwin Pemberton Taylor, Jr., (L. s. ), "'· Y.,

Hartford,

41 Wethersfield Avenue.

Hartford,

428 Washington Street.

Ernest Leon Simonds, A. X. P., <t>. B. K., Mandolin Club (4) .

1900 Ivy Board , German Club.

Simon Louis Tomlinson, ll.. K. E ., <t> . B . K. , Junior Ball Committee, Valedictori an .

Ellsworth Morton Tracy, A . X . P. , <t>. B. K. ,

Waterbury, Conn.,

l4N. T.

RESIDENCE.

ROOM.

1900 Ivy Board .

NAMR.

Thomas Prossor Browne, Jr., ll..K.E .,®.

.E.,

New York, N. Y.,

29 J. H.

Sophomo r e Dining Clnb, Tablet Board, Football Team (1) (2) (3) (4).

64 Hungerford Street.

Robert James Fagan,

Hartford,

John Gilbert McTivaine, >¥ . Y.,

Philadelphw, Pa.,

17 S. H.

Mandolin Club (1) (2) (3), Jesters (2) (3) (4) , Junior Ball Committee, Sophomore Dining Club , German Club, Senior Honorary Society, President of Class (4) 2d term , Manager of Track Team (4), Executive Committee Jesters (4), President of Missionary Society (4) .

Allen Sterling Titus, I. K. A.,®,. N. E.,

Buffalo, N. Y.,

Jesters (2) (3), Executive Committee Jesters (3), 1900 Ivy Board, German Club. 29

5N.T.

RRSIOENCB.

NAME.

Walter Blakelee von Hagen Arundel, 6..

Pittsburgh, Pa.

\[!.,

Inwood-on-Hudson, N.Y.

Frank Tracy Baldwin, 6. . .j, _, .

Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

RoelifHasbrouck Broohs, 6.. K. E .,

Hartwell, 0 .

Arthur Henry Bryant, :S. A . E., South

John Dixon Burchard, 6.. K. E. ,

Providence, R. I.

Delancey Walker Fiske,\[! Y .,

Buffalo, N Y.

Samuel Richard Fuller, A. 6. . <t>. ,

West Hartford, Conn.

Amasa Clark H a ll, A . X . P .,

Wethersfield, Conn.

Chauncey Karl H a rris,

Rochester, N.Y.

Da vid Ba ldwin Jewett, 6.. K. E . ,

Detroit, Mich.

Karl Franz Frederick Kurth , A. X. P .,

Syracuse, N.Y.

Deniso n Richm o nd, A. X . P. , .

Elgin, Ill.

Granville Hudso n Sherwood, A. 6.. <t>. , Cliffo rd Kn o x Wood, <1>.

orwalk, Conn.

r.

Huntington, N.Y.

6. . ,

30

Junior Class

l90l CLASS CO!..ORS, CLASS MoTro, RED AND BLUE.

Novus ordo saeclorum.

C!..ASS YELL-

Kiyi, Kiyi, K i, Yippi, Kiyi!

Hullabaloo! Red and Blue! 1901 !

速tticcl.:s TRINITY TERM.

CHRISTMAS TBRM .

President,

GoDFREY BRINI..EY,

Vice-President,

A. H.

Secretary,

W.

J.

McNEIL,

Treasurer,

W.

J.

:\lcNEt!.. ,

Chronicler,

F.

DERilY,

H . D.

31

J.

M.

E.

WALKER. \VA TERMAN.

REGINALD FISKE. REGINALD F ISK E. Wt!..SON, Jr.

I

History ._,c

._,c

OW ONCE MORE it becomes the task of the Class Historian, so-called, to commit to a single page the momentous doings of that class which, in the period of her existence-now nearly three years-has shown herself, at least, worthy of the position she claims, and, who knows, worthy of her happily-chosen motto, "A New Order. " What the class has done is not a thing of obscurity. One has to have been but an onlooker to find that in all the branches of college life, from the day 1901 entered, she h as been amply represented. Take the Freshman year. Didn't we put up the huskiest kind of a fight in the immortal rush, and didn't we furnish famishing upper classmen with the heartiest kind of good cheer? And, too, did we not give our adversaries such a rub in the Underwood meet th at, in spite of the inability of one of our strongest men to compete, we all but won the cup? These and all the other doings of our Freshman a nd also of our Sophomore years have been well set forth by my predecessors in office, so that all I may do is to make passing mention of them. The 99-01 banquet, then the indoor meet, and the spring games of the first year, all tell in glowing characters of our prowess. And the next year fo und us back at the old stand with true Sophomore spirit, and surely in that year we showed ourselves individually and collectively to be Sophs oftradition. The third year, toward whose close we are fast nearing, has been one in which our class has ad ded to her name an ample share of honors. We began our Junior year as we began the others. Everybody on hand in good time to superintend the all-absorbing event of push-rush and festivities thereafter, and look after our baby proteges. Then the footbaiJ season spoke throughout of naughtyone, when, with the captaincy and five out of the eleven regular pla ces, the class helped make the team one of the snappiest, most encouraging ones Trinity has had in the field. Football over, basketball, too , found reliance on 1901. Christmas then passed and the short intermission until exams., and Juni or week came 'round to be honored by us. This we did well, all must admit. And tar be it from me to exclnde the banquet on the night after the ball , when with noughty-three we did full justice to the time-hon ored customeven to capturing fro m admiring onlookers that small red flag. The annual indoor meet showed our class to be the foremost in track athletics, for sixteen and a half points out of a possible thirty-two isn 't a bad score when there were three o ther competitors besides onrselves. To have the holders of the McCrackan cup for two successive years is also to o ur credit, we think. For the remainder of the year we shall no doubt do our best to hold up our end of college prestige. Spring games are, at time of writing, a thing of the future , as is also baseball seaso11, but 1901 can't but hope to help in keeping Trinity's name a fair one. H. D. W., JR.

N

32

Juniors ROOM .

RESIDEN C E.

NA.MB.

41J. H.

Providence, R . 1.,

Augustine Hugo Wells Anderson,::$. A. E. , 1 9 01 I v y Boar d .

Robert Ba yard Bellamy, 1'. Y., 0. N. E..

JJoston, Mass. , .

4

. T.

Football T eam ( 1 ) ( 2) ( 3), Baseball Tea m (1) ( 2) ( 3) , Basketba ll Team Ct ) ( 2) ( 3), M a nage r Basketball Team (3) .

Newington junction, Conn., 5 N. T.

Godfrey Brinley, 1. K. A., 0 . N. E. ,

1901 Junior Ball Committee, Captain Track Team ( 3 ) , Track Team (1) ( 3 ) , German Club ( 2) (3 ) , Football Team (2 ) ( 3 ) , Basketball Team (1 ) ( 2) ( 3), Manager Basketball Team ( 2 ) , Class President 1st term , 3d year.

George Graham Burbanck, A. X. P. , .

Tompkinsville, N. Y .,

17N. T .

Sunbury, P a .,

12J. H .

Glee Club (1) ( 2 ) ( 3 ) , College Quartet ( 2 ).

Martin Withington Clement, D.. 1'.,

Sophomore Dining Club, Footb all Tea m (3), B as ket b all Tea m ( 2 ) ( 3 ) .

Newington Junction ,

H a rry Hamilton Cochrane,

Newington.

M a nd o lin Club (3) , Banj o Club (3) .

33 J. H.

Aubrey Henry Derby , A. X. P., 0. N. E .,

Newark, N. j.,

Reginald Fiske, 1'. Y ., 0 . N. E . , .

ProT·idence, R. 1.,

6J. H.

Oldto wn, Me ., .

24 J. II.

Norwich, Conn.,

15 J. H.

r.,

30 J. H.

Baseb a ll Team (1) (2) (3), Soph o m o r e Dining Club.

H a rold Morrell Folso m, Frank Halsey Foss, D. . K. E .. John Stuart Hills, ~ . 1'.,

Brooklyn, N.

James Mosgrove Hudson, ~ . 1'.,

S_1•racuse, N. 1'.,

7 J. H.

Football Team (3) , Sophomore Dining Club, German Club ( 3) , Chairman 1901 Junior Ball Committee, Business Manager 1901lvy , Tablet Board .

Arthur Paul Kelley, <1>.

r. u.,

. T.

Nashua, N. H., .

1

Brooklyn, N. Y.,

18J. H.

1901 Ivy Board.

William John Mc~eil, D.. K. E., 0 . N. E. .

Baseball Tea m (1) ( 2 ) , Sophomore Dining Club, Glee Club (1) ( 2), Manager Baseball Team (3 ) , Assistant Manager Baseball Team ( 2 ). 33

NAME.

RBSIOENCE.

Edward Jarvis King l\1ason,

Suffield, Conn.

Walter Alfred Mitchell,

Hartford,

ROOM.

Suffield. 72 Vernon Street.

Glee Club ( 3 ) , Mandolin Club (3), Banjo Club ( 3 ), 1901 Ivy Board.

Frank Stephen Morehouse, A. X . P. ,

South Kent, Conn.,

3]. H.

Dramatics (2).

Richard Eugene Peck, I. K. A. , 速.

. E ., .

10 N. T.

Bridgeport, Conn.,

Baseball Team ( 1 ) ( 2) ( 3 ), S o phomore Dining Club, German Club (2) (3), 1901 Ivy Board, 1901 Junior Ball Committee, Assistant Manager Football Team (3), Class President (2) 1st term.

Harold Hunting ton Rudd.

\}i.

Y. ,

Knoxville, Ill.,

6J. H.

Sophomore Dining Club, Banjo Club (3), Track Team (3).

Edgar Augustus Sheldon, J. K . A .,

Chateaugay, N.Y.,

Edward Collins Stone,

Hartford,

40 Allen Place.

Hartford,

105 Washington Street.

24]. I-1.

Football Team ( 3), Banjo Club ( 3 ) .

Francis Raymond Sturtevant, A . X . P .. Football Team ( 1) , Track Team ( 1).

Arthur Reginald Van De Water,

\}i .

Y., 速. N. E.,

New York , N. 1'.,

19 S. H.

Baseball Team (3) , Sopho more Dining Club, German Club ( 2 ) , Class President ( 1 ) 2d term.

James Albert Wales, A. X . P.,

Bayonne, N . J ., .

4]. H.

Managing Editor T a blet Board (3), Art Editor 1901 Ivy, Mandolin Club (3) , Track Te a m (3 ) .

James Merryman Walker,

A.~.

<l>., 速. N. E .,

Brooklyn, N. Y.,

44]. H.

Dramatic Club ( 1) ( 2) (3) , Glee Club (1 ) ( 2 ) ( 3 ), Executive Commit t ee of Dramatic Club (3), German Club (3) , 1901 Junior Ball Committee, Sophomore Dining Club, Assista nt Sta ge Manager of Dramatic Club ( 2) (3) , Class Presid ent (3 ) 2d term.

Francis Ely Waterman,

\}i.

Y.,

Hartford,

137 Lafayette Street.

Business Manager 1901 Ivy, German Clu b ( 3 ).

Charles Hathern

Wheeler,~ . \}i ., .

Clinton, N. Y.,

7J. H.

Sophomore Dining Club , 1901 Junior B a ll Committee, Football Team ( 2 ) (3), Mandolin Club (1 ) ( 2 ) ( 3 ) , Banjo Club (3), L eade r Banj o Club (3), Ass ista nt Manager Musica l Organizati o ns ( 3 ), Man ager M a ndolin Club ( 3 ). Jr.,~. K. E., Sophomore Dining Club, Glee Club ( 2 ) (3).

Hugh Dempster Wilson,

Augustus Talcott Wynkoop, A .

~.

<l>. ,

Brooklyn, N. Y. ,

25] . H.

Utica, N. Y.,

38J. H.

German Club (3) , Literary Editor Tablet (3), Literary Editor 1901 Ivy.

.§.pe.cia.t .§tmlen.t.s ROOM.

RBSIDF.NCE.

NA.\18.

William Purnell Brown, A.

u.

3 ]. H.

Centreville, Md.,

<l> .. ®. N. E.,

Football Team (1) (2) (3), Baseball Team (1) (2) (3) , Basketball Team (1) (2) (3), German Club (2) (3). Captain Football Team (3), Sophomore Dining Club , Class President 2d term, :.!d year.

John Daulby Evans, 6.. K. E., 0.

Hartford ,

. E.,

114 Vernon Street.

Sophomore Dining Club, Business Manager of Dramatic Clnb ( 3 ), Executive Com mittee of Dramatic Club (3), 1901 Junior Ball Committee, Banjo Club (3) , Manager of Banjo Club (3), Assistant Manager of Track Team (3).

Hartford,

Robert James Fagan,

64 Hungerford Street.

RRSIDBNCB.

NAME.

Arthur Eugene Arvedson, I. K. A.,

Carpentersville, IlL

Nathaniel Julius Cable, 6.. K. E.,

New Haven, Conn.

Samuel Walden Cooke, Jewett Cole,

\{1,

New Milford, Conn.

Y ..

Chester, Ill.

:.S. A. E.,

J\ew Haven, Conn.

Franklin Whittemore Dewell, I. K. A.,

New Milford, Conn.

Winter Hamilton Everest, 6.. 'ii.,

Mexico, Mex.

Henry Townes Forrester, 6.. K. E. ,

Gildersleeve, Conn.

Owen Warner Gildersleeve,

Suffield, Conn.

Hubert Dana Goodale,

Woodbury, Conn.

John Graham Hargrave,

San Mateo, Cal.

William Morse Nichols, 'ii. Y.,

Bridgeport, Conn.

Carlos Curtis Peck, I. K. A.,

Port Kennedy, Penn.

*Edward Franklin Powel, I. K. A.,

Hartford, Conn.

Everett Eugene Stacey, A. X. P., Otis Jewett Story, I. K. A.,

Chillicothe, Ohio.

William Parker Wharton, 6.. K. E.,

. Howard, Penn.

*Deceased.

35

Sophomore Class

1902 CLASS MoTTO, """

I

f'/

CLASS COLORS, '

VlJV 17"0VOS" , VCTTfpOV VtK'r].

CRIMSON AND GRAY.

CLASS YELL-

Hullabaloo, horray, horray, Whoop it up for the Crimson and Gray, Rah-ray-ri-roo, Trinity, Trinity, '02 !

CHRJ STMAS TERM.

TRINITY TERM.

. Vice-President,

JAMES HENDERSON,

E. M.

RoGERs .

Secretary,

H. R.

WHITE,

A. B.

QuAfLE.

Treasurer,

H. R.

Wu!TE,

A. B.

QUAILE.

President,

R. N.

WEIBEL,

Chronicler,

A. T. McCooK.

36

W.

H.

WHEELER.

History ~

~

HE SOPHOMORE YEAR is possibly the most do ubtful and difficult quarter of the college course, so that now, with the end clearly in sight, we draw a sigh of real reEef-not, however, unmixed with sorrow that we are this much nearer the close of our sojourn here. When first a class emerges from its swaddling clothes a nd takes a place-small though it be-among the powers of the earth, it is looked upon with great interest and no small suspicion. The interest is a roused by a desire to see whether the tree is to be inclined as the twig was first bent, whether the class is to be trusted to carry out the college traditions and further its welfare morally, mentally and physically. The suspicion is often nothing more than a vague impression that Sophomores are by nature bad, completely bad-the unfortunate result of v;hich is that everyone is ready to cry out at the first mistake made, and, too often . t o find an imperfection where none exists. We confess that we held this same somewhat biased opinion last year, but for some reason or other our views have now sustained a complete change. This introduction touching our grievances is merely to inOuence our critics, not to overlook our faults, but to treat them like those of people who are fortunate enough to bear some title other than Sophomore. In a fair light we hope a nd expect to prove ourselves worthy sons of Trinity. On the football team we have been well represented the year past, thus main taining our standing of the autumn before. That we a re a n important factor of the baseball team is well known, and, though no inter-class games have yet been held, the fact that we were champions last year leads us to expect a creditable showing this. On the track we are and have been prominent, last autu mn scoring a victo ry iu dual meet over our newly arrived fellow students ; and in indoor athletics we were second of the classes, coming out far above our two more unfortunate competitors. The less said about the push-rush the better-but here we are digressing from the subject of athletics. As we lo ok upon this record we feel a pride which must be considered just, even by those m ost ready to belittle o ur doings. The St. Patrick's Day occurrences showed the sand of that portion of the class which, placed in a position hard to accept and yet hard to decline, succeeded in surmounting apparently insurmountable obstacles, literally beginning at the foot of the ladder and wo rking its way to the top and victory. But outside of the physical part of college life there are many tasks to be performed difficult to state, indeed, but felt by every college man; and in this less conspicuous part of our ex istence we have also acquitted ourselves well. Our mistakes, at least, have been fewer than those of many of our forerunners. We have tried this year the experiment of bringing Freshmen into shape without kicking them into it. We hope the experiment will prove successful, both for our own credit and the good of our successors, but this can only be shown at the graduation of 1903 . Not only over the Freshmen, however, should a Sophomore's influence be exerted; there are many ways in which he can turn the course of college affairs for the better or for the worse. In these we feel we have done well, though of this we ourselves can not be the judges. But this much we know: our growth, together as individuals and outward and upward as a whole, has been real a nd effectual; and it is our hope that this growth has been so firmly and rightly directed in the formative years of our college course that we may always be an honor to ourselves and to our Alma Mater. A. T . McC.

T

37

Sophomores RESIDKNCR.

NAMB.

Philip Lockwood Barton (L.s.), William Perry Bentley (s.), Edmund Janes Cleveland, Jr., Jewett Cole (s.), Saxon Cole (s.), Joseph Baird Crane (s.), Robert Burton Gooden, Edward Goodridge, Jr., James Henderson, Fred Augustus Higginbotham (s.), Charles Hawley Bill (L.s.), George Herbert Holden, Harry Leslie Howe, William Stewart Hyde, Jacob Alexander Laubenstein (L.s.), Anson Theodore McCook, Edmund Sawyer Merriam, Karl Philip Morba, Carlos Curtis Peck (L.s. ), Alfred Burnett Quaile, Edgar Martin Rogers, Marshall Bowyer Stewart, Joseph Pemberton Welles Taylor (s.), Charles Edward Tuke, John White Walker, Richard Nicks Weibel, William Hardin Wheeler, Howard Russell White, Albert Lincoln Wyman,

Framingham, Mass. Plainville. Hartford. Chester, Ill. Chester, Ill. Waterbury. Sa nta Barbara, Cal. Exeter, N. H. Somerville, Mass. Waltham, Mass. Hiawatha, Kan. Huntingt o n, N. I'. Thompsonville. South Manchester. CollinsTri/le. Hartford. Hartford. Hartford. Bridgeport. New York, N. Y. Washington , D. C. Linden, Md. Plainfield, N.]. Philadelphia, Pa. Hartford. Garn erville, N. Y . Little Falls, N. Y. Michigan City , Ind. Hartford.

38

ROOM.

12

J. H .

27 J. H. 191 Sigourney Street. 42 J. H. 4:.!

J.

H.

llN. T. 19 N. T. 16 S. H.

4J. H. 1

J. H .

10N. T. 19N. T . Thompsonville. Bouth Manchester. 32

J.

H.

396 Main Street. 314 Collins Street. 32 Capitol Avenue. 37

J.

H.

8 J. H. 12N. T. 39 J. H . 16 S. H . 17

3 36

J.

H.

J. H. J.

H.

15 N. T.

36 J. H. 101 Hudson Street.

.§p·.e.ci:at .§tmlent.s. NAMB.

Herbert Stanley Bradfield, Edwin Schively Carson, Edward Bruce Goodrich, Charles Heald Lane, Julius Levin, Edward Henry Lorenz, Tbeophilus John Minton Syphax,

ROOM.

RESlOBNCE.

Buffalo, N. Y. Chestnut Hill, Pa. Littleton, N. H. Freeport, 111. Hartford. Hartford. Philadelphia, Pa.

44]. H. 17]. H. 15 N. T.

32J. H. 9 Forest Street. 96 Garden Street. 2]. H.

RBSIDENCB.

NAME.

Richfield Springs, N. Y.

*James Whiting Allen, Harold Simeon Backus, Nathaniel Julius Cable, . William Lawrence Carler, Fred Raymond Clapp, . Samuel Walden Cooke, John Henry Maginnis, . Anthony Toomer Porter, Jr., Otis Jewett Story,. Arthur Henry Weed, .

AndOl'er, Conn. New Haven, Conn. Hartford, Conn. Albion, Ind. Stamford, Conn. New Orleans, La. Charleston, S. C. Chillicothe, Ohio. Claremont, N. H.

* Deceased.

39

Freshman Class

l903 CLAS

MOTTO,

CLASS COLORS,

Non Instrenui Laboramus.

OLIVE GREEN AND WHITE.

CLASS YELL-

Bim-boom-brama kootra, Hip-hi-dra Hullabaloo:....hullabaloo Rah-rah-rab, Rickety-axe coax-coax, Rickety-axe coax-coax , Rah r ah ree, rah rah ree, Trinity 1903 !

@ftic.el;s CT-TRJ ST.M AS TERM.

TRINITY TERM.

H. L . G.

President,

ADKINS HENRY,

llice-President,

E.

Secretary,

CHARLES TOWNSEND,

Jr.,

1(. W .

TRENBATH.

Treasurer,

CIIARLES TOWNSEND,

Jr.,

R. \V.

TRENBATH.

Chronicler,

c.

0.

THOMAS,

S. ST. JOHN MO RGAN .

..1-0

w.

MEYER.

CRAI G.

/)1Y'Itl'l/')llln

History .:: .:: "

H

ISTORY REPEATS ITSELF:" This trite, yet none the less true, saying applies well to the successive classes which enter and leave old Trinity from year to year. Although our deeds have o f necessity been few thus far by reason of our being yet young in our college life, nevertheless we verily believe that in our class "History repeats itself," fo r we have fulfi lled the duties and embraced the opportunities which came to each class before us as it traversed the verdant plain of Freshman year. We have probably been fresh ; we would not have been of the ordin ary stamp ot F reshmen, if we had been otherwise. We consider it not a fault, but an attribute instinctively possessed by our kinrl. The afternoon on which our class made its debut , the elements had combined in making the weather m ost disagreeable, but as the hour for our "first chapel " drew near, the clouds began to break, and surely it was an o men pr opitiou s for o ur future that the sun looked down in all its glory upon the class of 1903 as its members emerged from chapel in a somewh at undignified m ann er. However, w e had the satisfaction of knowing that various contiguous bodies bad at some time in the past acted the passive part in similar proceedings. Soon we were called upon to show o ur physical strength as a class, and acting on that principle, " good thing; push it a long," we succeeded in checking three times the ad vance of a certain body of young men for whom we have the highest esteem, and as a result w e were declared victors of the push-ru sh. A rush of a somewhat different nature took plac-e later in the evening. Later in the Fall we were matched a gainst the Sophomores in a field meet. Generally S,Peaking, 1903 won some of the points and the rest went to 1902. To display further our athletic prowess we launched a football team, which, in the only game it played, sustained defeat under most remarkable circumstances, for it had as opponents twelve men-eleven players and the umpire. Our banquet to the Juniors and the excitement aroused March 17th, owing to various differeaces of opinion in regard t o posting class numerals, were strong factors in binding the members of the class t ogether. As life is the correspondence of an organism to environment, thus by contact with Trinity and by conforming to her ways, her customs and what she demands ofher sons, we have taken into ourselves and made part of ourselves that life which has for its environment our college; and may we make it a life full of vigor and strength, that we may act for the honor and welfare of our college, our fellows and ourselves.

41.

Freshmen

NAME.

Henry Day Brigham,

RESIDE?\:CR.

ROOK.

J.

East Orange, N.j.

10

Duncan Hodge Browne,

New York, N. Y.

29 ]. II.

Charles Erastus Bruce, Jr. (L.s.),

Elmira, N. Y.

11

Henry Bernard Carpenter,

Bridgton, Me.

Philip Safford Clarke,

Point Pleasant, N.].

Ora Wilfred Craig,

Asbland, N. H.

Richard Arthur Edward s,

Portland.

H.

J. H.

8N. T.

28]. H. 6N. T.

39

J.

H.

Karl Herbert Penning,

Washington, D. C.

5]. H.

James Philip Garvin,

Sanbornville, N. H.

8N. T路

Harry Clifford Golden ,

Kittanning, Pa.

Jarvis McAlpine Johnson,

Hartford.

26

J.

H.

69 Vernon Street.

William Larcher,

Pro6dence, R.I.

4N.T.

Malcolm Appleton MacLean,

Bay City, Mich.

15]. H.

Robert Lincoln McKeon,

Brooklyn, N. Y.

37

Henry Louis Godlove Meyer,

St. Louis, Mo.

30

Samuel St. John Morgan ,

Hartford.

Arthur Chadwell Short,

St. Louis, k!o.

J. J.

H. H.

123 Sigourney Street. 31

J. H.

Edmund Crawford Thomas (L.s.),

Tamaqua, Pa.

27]. H.

Christopher Carson Thurber,

Nor!Vich.

13

J. H.

J. J.

Charles Townsend, Jr.,

Elizabeth, N.].

13

Robert Wight Trenbatb,

Somenrille, N.].

28

H. H.

William Winton Tucker,

Buffalo, N. Y.

Hervey Boardman . Vanderbogart,

Troy, N.Y.

26]. H.

Harold Clifton Van Weelden (L.s. ),

Babylon, N. Y.

33

42

7N. T.

J. H.

,.ยงp.e.dnt .ยงtmt.ents. 31 J. H . 848 Park Street. West Hartford .

Bethel. Hartford. West Hartford. Cambridge, Md. Washington, D. C. Saybrook Point. Chicago, Ill. South 1\fanchester. Detroit, 111ich.

Edward Johnson Dibble, Edw ard William Fothergill, Robert Ash ley Gaines, Ad kin s Robert George Walter

ROOM.

RESIDENCE.

NAME.

Henry, Carey McKean, Douglas Rankin, Slater Trumbull,

James Rogers Vei tch, Howard Bell Ziegler,

Q"J;..ntne.cti.cnt

35 29 18 18 9 11

J. H. J. H. S. H . S. H. N. T . N. T .

:g.ea9:U:.e ot c'l,\-d .ยงtmt.ents. Hartford.

Samuel D. Lindsay (1),

223 Park Stred .

.ยงnnxnntt:!J. Course in

Arts.

Course in Letters and S cience .

Course in Science.

Course in

Total.

Letters.

Seniors,

14

1

6

21

Juniors,

19

5

5

29

Sophomores,

20

4

9

33

Freshmen,

21

3

Special Students,

24 2-1,

Undergraduates,

131

Graduate Students,

6

Total,

137

ABBREVJATIONS-J. H., Jarvis Hall; S. H ., S eabu ry Hall; N. T., Northam Towers.

43

Secret Fraternities

I. K. A.

Founded 1829.

Epsilon Chapter of Delta Psi. Established 1850.

Phi Kappa Chapter of Alpha Delta Phi. Established 1 877.

Alpha Chi Chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Established 1879.

Beta Beta Chapter of Psi Upsilon. Established 1880.

Connecticut Alpha Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Established 1892.

Tau Alpha Chapter of Phi Gamma Delta. Established 1893.

Alpha Chi R.ho, Founded 1895.

45

The Local Fraternity of

~

I. K. A.

~

Founded 1 29

At Trinity College

47

Active Members

ALLEN STERLING TITUS. GODFREY BRINLEY. CARLOS CURTIS PECK. RICHARD EUGENE PECK. EDGAR AUGUSTUS SHELDON. CHARLES HAWLEY HILL. ARTHUR CHADWELL SHORT. CHARLES TOWNSEND, JR.

4

I

Fratres in Urbe

CHARLES E. GRAVES, '50. CHARLES J. HOADLY, '51. JOT-IN H . BROCKLESBY, ' 65. WILLIAM C. BROCKLESBY, '70. ARTHUR K. BROCKLESBY, '70. WILLIAM D. MORGAN, '72. ROBERT G. ERWIN, '74. WILLIAM C. SKINNER, ' 76. GEORGE W. BEACH, '80. HERMANN LILIENTHAL, '86. ER EST DEF. MIEL, '88. GEORGE W. ELLIS, '94. CHARLES L. BURNHAM, '98. ROBERT W. GRAY, '98.

49

Corporation

President,

JOHN HENRY STEVENS QUICK. Secretary and Treasurer,

J CHARLES LUTHER BURNHAM. CHARLES EMMET GRAVES. WILLIAM CLAIBORNE BROCKLESBY. WILLIAM DENlSOr

MORGA~,

M.D.

REv. JOHN H UMPHREY BARBO R.* WILLIAM STERLING COGSWELL. WILLIAM CONVERSE SKINNER. EDWARD MANSFIELD SCUDDER. REv. ERNEST DEFEMERY MrEL. ARTHUR COLLlr S GRAVES. GEORGE WATSON BEACI-I. THOMAS

McKEA~.

HOBART WARREN THOMPSON. ALEXANDER TAYLOR MASON. • Deceased.

50

I. K. A. Graduate Members Burnham, C. L., '9 . * Butler, M . ., ' 4 4. * Caldwell, C. E ., ' 8 2. * Campbell, C. I., ' 30. Candee, H. S., '93. Carpenter, J. S., '79. Carpenter, J. T ., '88. Carpenter, R. H., '81. Chapin, D. D., '56. Chapin, W. M., '74. *Chapman, C. R., '47. Clapp, F., '55. Clark, A. l\1., '77. Clark, E. S., '65. Cla rke, R. M., '45 . Clemont, P. W ., '68 . Coggeshall, G. A., '6 5 . Cogswell, G. E., ' 97. Cogswell, W. S., ' 61. Collins, W. F., '93. * Comstock,}. C., '3 . * Conyngham, C. M ., '59. * Cossit, P. S., '4 5 . * Co wling, R. 0., ' 61. * Curtis, W. E ., '43. Daves, G., '57. Davies, W. G., '60. * DeForrest G. A., '55. * Delancy, T. J., '40. *Delano, F. R., '65. Deming, W. C., '84. Dewell, F. W., '01. * DeZeng, E., '40. *Dick, J. M., '54. *Dirickson, L. L., '41. *Dorsey, W. H. I., '36. Downes, L. T., '48. * Driggs, T. I, '48.

Abbott, C. W., '49 . * Abbott, J. P., '49. Adams, G. z., '39. * Adams, J. R., '49. Allen, E. T., '41. Andrews, C. M., '84. * Anistaki, J., '37. Arvedsov, A. E., '01. *Ashe, J. B., '30. *Backus, C. A., '52 . Bacon, F. S., '99. Bacon, J. W., '46. Bakewell, J .. '59 . *Barbour, J. H., '73. Barclay, R., '80. Bartlet, H. P., '72. * Bayard, W. H., '41. * Bayley, J. R., '35. Beach, E. S., ' 83. Beach, G. W., '80. *Belden, . M., '48 . * Benton, M. F., '58. Benton, J. R., '97. *Bond, J., '40. *Bondurant, W. E., '63. Bowman, C. W., '87. *Brainard, N. L., '43. *Brander, II. M., '45. *Brandt, L ., '49. * Brewer, '"路 L., '38. Brinley, E. H., '49. Brinley, P., '47. Brocklesby, A. K., '70. Brocklesby, J. H., '65. Brocklesby, W. C., '69. * Browell, T . S., '35. *Buchanan, J., '53. Bull, W. M., '39. 51

Hopson, G. B., '57. Horton, P. A., '68. Hotchkiss, C. E. , '82. Hovey, H. E., '66. Hubbard, G. A., '94. Hyde, T. McE., '90. *Ingalls, T., '52. J ackson, R. E., '45. *Jarvis, J. S., '57. *Johnson, E. P., '65 . Johnsou, W. F., '66. *Jones, C. H., '35. *:Kellogg, H. L., '36. * Ke1路, J., '43. *King, H. W., '36. *Lambert, D., '36. *Lansing, C. A., '66. Leaken, W. R., '80. *LeRoy, A. N., '42. LeRoy, J., '69. *LeRoy, T. 0., '42. Lilienthal, H., '86. Lynch, R. L eb., '90. Mack, J. E., '71. * l\Tallory, G. S., '58. Mallory, R. H., '92. *Mallory, W. H., '60. Marble, F. P., '82 . *Marshall, J. , '42. Mason , A. T., '81. *Matthe wson, J., '46. McConi he, A., ' 9. McConibe, l\1. S., '92. McConihe, \\'., '90. *Mcintosh, J. H., '5R. McKean, T. H., '92. McKennan, J. D., '76. McLemore, M . C., '89. *Meech, H. J., '42. Miel, E. DeF., ' 88. * l\lillard, A. B., '36. *Miller, N., '47. Moffett, G. H., '78. Moore, C. E., '76. Moore, D. S , '64. Morgan, G. B., '70.

*Dyer, A., '70. Ellis, G. W., '94. Erwin, J. B., '76. Erwin, R. G., '74. Evans, S. K., '95. *Faxon, E., '47. *Ferrill, W. C., '78. *Foote, 1., '42. *Franklin, E. C., '54. *Gadsden, C. E., '50 . *Gadsden, J. A., '50. Gallaudet, B. B., '80. Gallaudet, T., '42. *Gardner, H. G., '65. Gowen, F. C., '82. *Goddard, F. M., '96. *Gordon, 0. K., '58. Graves, A. C. , '91. Graves, C. E., '50. Graves, D. C., '98. Graves, G., '49. Graves, H. S., '92. Graves, R. S., '94. *Gray,J. W., '72. Gray, R. W., '98. *Hale, C. F., '47. Hale, C. S ., '62. *Halsey, A. , '37. *Hamilton, I-I. C., '51. Hamilton, I. K., Jr., '91. Hardee, C. H., '81. *Harris, T. L., '41. *HascH, B. D., '49. * Hasell, L. C., '50. Hawley, F. M., '61. *Hazlehurst, G. H., '42. Hazlehurst, J. W., '51 . Hazlehurst, R., '41. *Henry, J. F., '34. *Hewlett, S. H., '74. Heydecker, H. R., '86. *Heyward, J. F., '48. Hoadly, C. J., '51. Hollister, J. B .. '84. Holly, J. A., '91. *Hopson, E. C., '64. 52

Scudder, H., '91. *Scud der, T., '54. Scudder, W ., '89. Sedgwick, W. R., '84. Shannon, J. W., '87. * Sherman, H. B., '38. Sherman, H. M., '77. *Sherwood , W. B., '36. *Shipman, P. W., '82. Short, Wm., ' 69. * Singletary, G. E. B., '49. Skinner, W. C., '76. Small, E. F ., '74. *Smith, C. H., '36. Smith, J. H., '74. * Smyth, J. W., '5 2. Starr, J. , '56. *Starr, S., '29. Stedman, R. S., '63. * Stirling, W. H., '44. * Stone, J. A., '44. Stone, L. H., '87. * Stoughton, N.C., '38 . Story, 0. J ., '01. ·• sumner, A. E., '61. Sutton, E . B., '76. Taylor, C. E ., '92. * Taylor, F. L., '43. Taylor, H. E., '96. *Taylor, W. F., '4 -J.. * Terry, C. E. , '5:. * Thomas, E. H., '41. Thompson, H. W, •, 3. *Todd, C.]., '55. Tolles, W. A., '46. * Tracey, W. D., '42. * Tracey, J. R., '39. *Tudor, I-I. B., '50. Turner, J. H., '38. *VanZandt, C. C., '51. *VanZandt, W., '29 . *Varley, C. D., '41. Wainwright, F. C., '88. Wainwright, J. l\1., '95. *Wainwright, W. A.M., '64· *Wait, J. T. , '35.

Morgan, \V. D., '72. *Morgan, W. F., '35. Morrill, C. A., '67. *Mowry, D. S., '67. Nelson, H., '87. Nelson, W. B., '81. Nicholls, G. H., '39. *Nich ols, R. W ., '33. Noyes, A. H., '89. Olmsted, \V. B., '87. Olmsted, J. F., '84. *Overfield, J. L., '55. *Pardee, D. W., '40. Parks, S. H., '82 . Paine, J., '92. Paine, 0. T., '96. *Paine, R. T. , '32. *Payne,]. W., '61. *Peake, C. F., '42. Peck, T. M., '80. * Peck, W. E., '71. *Perkins, L. H., '34. Peters, G. E., '50. Peugnet, L. D., '93. *Phelps,]. S., '32. Potter, Louis, '96. *Powel, E, F., '01. *Pr octor, C. I-I., '73. Quick, G. A., '94. Quick, J. H., '98. Quick, J. H. S., '58 . Quick, W. F., '92. Richnrdson, L. W., '73. Richardson, R. D., '71. *Ripley, P., '47. *Robertson,]. A., '5-l,. Rodgers, G. W., '87. Rodgers, R. E. L., '117. *Rogers, R. C., '45. Rowland, E., '57. *Sargent, G. D., '51. Sawyer, J. L., '50. Scott, E. G., '57. *Scudder, C. D., '75. Scudder, E. M., ' 77. *Scudder, H. J., '46. 53

White, J. G., '54. White, R. A., '81. Wiggin, A. H., '68. Willard, D. , '95. * Wolcott, F. H.,' 6. *Wolcott, S. G., '47. *Wood, H . S., '71. Woodbury, T. C., '71. Woodward, G. A., '55. Woodworth, F. A., '80. Wright, A. E., '89. Wr ight, M. R., '9 1.

Warner, L. F., '85. *Warr en, E. I. , '80. \Varren, G. T ., '90. Warren, J. M., '32. *Warren, W. H., '34. ¡warren, W. H., '90. *Warin g, C. M., '36. Wash burn, L. C., '81. *Way, J. A., '37 . *Webb, E . C., '75. *Webb, W. E., '40. Webb, W. W., '82. Welch , L. E., '86. â&#x20AC;˘ Deceased.

54

The Fraternity of

~

Delta Psi, ~ F ou nded in

1 ~47 ,

At Columbia College and University of New York

Roll of Chapters ALPHA,

DELTA,

EPSILON,

LAMBDA,

Prn, UPSILON,

SIGMA,

TA U,

Columbia College. U ni v ~rsi ty o f P ennsylvania.

Trinity Colleg e. Willi a ms College. University of Mississippi . Univ~rsity

of Virginia.

Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

55

The Epsilon Chapter

Active Members PHILIP LOCKWOOD BARTON. HENRY DAY BRIGHAM. CHARLES ERASTUS BRUCE, JR. JOHN KAY CLEMENT. MARTIN W lTIILNGTON CLEMENT. ROBERT HABERSHAM COLEMAN. SAM EL WILLIAM COO 1 S. MONROE GLEASON HAIGHT. WILLIAM CAMERON HILL. JOH N STUART HILLS. JAMES MOSGROVE Il UDSON. JOliN HENRY MAGIN IS. THOi\1AB 11cLEAN. HENRY LOUIS GODLOVE 1IEYER. ALFRED BURNETT QUAILE. CHARLES HATHERN WHEELER.

57

Graduate Members of the Epsilon Chapter ~

~

Allen, E. S., '94. Allyn, A. W., '61. Appleton, C. A., '82. Appleton, E. D., '80. Appleton, H . C., '85. Arundel, W. B. Von H., 1900. Atkinson, J. G., '64. Austin , W. M., '98. Bacon, J. R., '92. Balch, F. A., '98. Baldwin, F. T ., 1900. Barnwell, R. W., '72. *Barnwell, S. E ., '72. Barton, C. C., ' 69. Barton , C. C., Jr. , '93. *Beckwith, C. M., '88. Beers, G. E., '86. Benedict, L. LeG., '88. Bibb, W. A., '75. Blackwell, J. , Jr. , '66. Bliss, G. H. , '64. Bohlen , D. M., '82. Bowen, A., '63. Brainerd, J. B., '82. Brandegee, J. E ., '74. * Brandegee, L. C., '77. Breckenridge, A. E., '70. *Breese, H . L., '57. Brenton, C. , '99. Brigham , H . H., '76. *Brown, T. M ., '64. *Buckingham , W. B., ' 69. Bulkeley, J. C., '93. Bulkeley, W. E. A., '90. Burke, E . F., '95. Burr, W. H., '78. Butler, W., '58. Cady, J. C., '60. Camman, E. C., '96.

*Carter, C. L., '54. *Cenas, B. C., '56. Chapin, F. W., '79. Chapin, W. V., '78. Chapm an, T . B., ' 0. Cheever, J.D., Jr., '81. Clark, J. W., '63. *Clemson, T. G., '56. Cliffo rd , S. W., '68. Clyde, W. P., '62. Coleman, R. H., '77. Comfort , B. F., '89. Cookson , F. M., '6 1. * Coxe, J. N., '55. Crane, R. M., '55. *Curtis, F. R., '80. Curtis, G. M., '80. Curtis, R. H., '68. Curtis, W. E., '75. *Darrell, A. S., '59 . *Dayton, W. B., '56. Deal, J. A., '72. DeForest, J. G., '82. DeRossett, A. L., '62. *DeRossett, E. S., '64. Devendorf, G. S., '55. Dobbin: E. S., '99. DuBois, G. M., '74. Du Bois, H. 0. , '76. Eaton , W. H., '99. E dson, S., '55. Edwards, A. N., '76 . Elbert, W. N., '79. Ellis, A. L., '98. Elton, J.P., '88. Elwell, G. E., '70. Everest, W. I-I., '01. Finch, E. B., '91. Fisher, T. R. , '62. 58

FitzGerald. F., ' 9. Fordney, T. P., '62. Fuller, J. R., '70. *Fuller, S. G., '58 . Fuller, S. R., '70. Gardner, C. H., '70. Gibson, B. S., '69. *Glazier, T. C., '60. Goldthwaite, A. C., '99. Goodspeed,]. H., '66 . *Goodwin, G. H., '62. Graham, C. M., '50. Grannis, F. 0., '73. Greene,]. H., '91. Haight, F. E., '87 . Hall, A. C., '88. Hall, C. L., '92. Hall, F. DeP., '78. Hallett, W. T., '62. Harding, N ., '73. Harraden, F. S., '67. Harris, W. R., '58. * Hartshorne, E. M., '56. Hayden, R. C., '93. Hazelhurst, G. A., '79. Henderson, E . F., '82. Hendrie, G. T., '97. Hendrie, S .. '87. Hill, G. H., '91. *Hi ll , W. C., '93. Hitchings, H. B., '54. *Hoffman, C. F., '51. Hoisington, F. R., '91. Holbrooke, G. 0., '69. Holbrooke, S., '67. Hotchin, S. F., '56. Hull, A. S., '66. Ingersoll, G. P., '83. *Jardine, H. D., '68. Jarvis, S. F., Jr., '89. Jennings, A. B., '61. Kane, G., '75. *Kerr, E . L., '55. *Ki rby,]. W., '65. Knoblock, A. F., '55. *Lamson, W., '56.

Lawrence, C. V., '56. â&#x20AC;˘ Leacock, J. H., '58. Lewis, C. A., '93. *Lewis, E. B., '65. Lewis, E. G., '92. *Lewis,]. I., '62. Lewis,]. W., '93. Lewis, S. S., '61 . *Lewis, T. C., '71. Lewis, W. H., '65. Lincoln, F. T., '76. Lincoln, G. W., '75. Macauley, G. T., '90. l\Iacauley, R. H., '95. *Mackay, W. R., '67. Martind ale, H. S., '79. McClory, H., '51. McCullough, D. H., '73. McCook, E. McP., '90. McCough, H. G., '75. McLean, T., '75. Miller, H., '80. *Miller, P. S., '64. Miller, S. T., '85 . *Mines, F. S., '64. *Mines,]. F., '54. Morgan, B. T., '61. Morse, J. F., '66. Murray, A. S., Jr., '7 1. Murray, F. W. , Yale, '77. Murray, R., '73. Nelson, R. H., '80. Nichols, G. G., '67. *Norris, E. C., '61. Norris, H., '63. *Norton, F. L., '68. Nott, R. H., '71. Orton, W. 0., '92. Owen, F. W., '84. Padgett, P., '76. *Palmer , C. C., '51. Parker, B., '93. Parker, R. P., '94. Parsons, H., '83. Parsons,]. R., Jr., '81. Parsons, W. W., '96. 59

Strawbridge, J., '95. Stro ng , C. i\l., '64. Strong,]. R., '82. Sumner, C. A., '56. Swenson, E. P., '75. Swenson, S. A., '81. Talcott, A. B., "90. Talcott, C. II., '91. Thompson, H. R., '87. Thompson, S. C., '72. Thorne, N. D., '71. Thorne, R., '85. T o tten, C. A. L., ' 69. Trowbridge, C. C., '92. Trowbridge, S. P. B., '83. *Underhill, G. B. , '73. VanZile, E. S., '84. Vibbert, A. D., '99. Vibbert, H. C., '68. Vibbert, W. H., '5, . * Vibbert, W. W., '94. Wanzer, C., '66. Waterman, L., '71. Waters, G. S., '87. * Watson, W. C., '6:1. Watts, E. B., '73. *Week s , R. D., '93. Welsh , R. F., '95 . W histler,W . G. McN.,'57. '' White, F. W., '78. Wilcox, F. L., ' 80. Wilcox, E. P., ' 80. * Wildman, T. G., '57. Williams, C. C., '71. Williams, C. G. , ' 0 . Wilson, W. C. D., '93 . Wilmerding, H. , '81 . Winkley, R. L ., '79. Woodin , W . R. , '58. Woodruff, E. H ., '82. Wright, G. E ., '74 . Young , A.M. , '8 2.

Parsons, E., '96. Pattison, G. B., '81. Paxon, H. C., '51. Pearce,]. S., '62. Pearce, R., '93 . Peck, B. D., '96. *Peck, D. L., '62. Perkins, G. E., '81. * Pierce, H. H., '58. *Pinckney, F. S., '62. Platt, Chas., Jr., '75. Platt, Clayton, '7-!-. *Platt, W. A., '75. Pot t er, A. H., '92. Read, H. P., '84. *Roosevelt, F., '83. Russell, F. G., '80. Russell, I. D., '92. Russell, H., '84. Rutherford, H . V., '76. Schulte, E. D. N., '97. Schulte, H. von W. , '97. Scott, H. B., '78 . Scudder,]. A., '97. Sheldon, W. C., Jr.,' 2 . *Shreve, W. I., '83. Sibley, A. S., '92. Sibley, M . M., '97. Smallwood, S. B ., '63. *Smith , H. S., '62. *Smith, I. S., '64. Smith, I. T., '91. Smith, R. H ., '69. Smith, W . G. W., '71. Stark, B ., Jr., '79 . Stark, W . M ., '75 . *Stedman, T. W ., '74 . * Steele, H. D. , ' 51. Sterling, E. K., '99. *Stevens, S., ' 65 . *Stillwell , R. M. , '70. * D eceased.

60

The Fraternity of

~

Alpha Delta Phi

~

Founded in 1 8 32

At Hamilton Co1lege

Roll of Chapters HAMILTON, CoLUMIJIA, YALE,

.

AMHERST, BRUNONIAN, HARVARD, HuDSON, BowDOIN, DARTMO UTH, PENINSULAR, ROCHESTER, WILLIAMS,

.

MANHATTAN , 1\IJ: JDDLETOWN , KENYON , UNION, . CORNELL, PHI IC\PPA, JoHNS HOPKINS, MINNESOTA, ToRONTO, CHICAGO, MAGILL,

Hamilton College, Columbia College, Yale University, Amherst College, Brown University, Harvard University, Western Reserve University, Bowdoin College, . Dartmouth College, University of Michigan, University of Rochester, Willia ms College, . College of the City of New York, Wesleyan University, Kenyon College, . Union College, Cornell University, Trinity College, Johns Hopkins University, . University of Minnesota, Toronto University, University of Chicago, Magill University,

61

1832 1836 1837 1837 183 7 18 37 1841 1841 1845 1846 1850 1851 18 55 1856 1858 1859 1869 1877 1889 1892 1893 1896 1897

The Phi Kappa Chapter

Active Members. HERBERT STANLEY BRADFIELD. JAMES WATSON BRADIN, JR. WILLIAM PURNELL BROWN. RODERICK HARRISON FOX. HASLETT McKIM GLAZEBROOK. ADKINS HENRY. HARRY ARCHER HORNOR. ROBERT LINCOLN McKEON. DAVID LOUIS SCHWARTZ. EDMUND CRAWFORD THOMAS. WILLIAM WI TON T UCKER. I

JAMES MERRYMAN WALKER. RICHARD NICKS WEIBEL. HOWARD RUSSELL WHITE. AUGUSTUS TALCOTT WYNKOOP.

63

Fratres in Urbe .;f.

.;f.

lion. EowAIW B. BENNET!', Yale, '66. PERCY S. BRYANT, Phi Kappa, '70. C!!AllLES II. BuNCE, Yale, '60. GEORGE F. CADY, Wesleyan, '69. DAVID S. CALHOUN, Yale, '48. GEOilGE II. DAY, Geneva, '73. Rev. E. S. FERRY, Wesleyan, '82. IJORACE S. FuLLER, M.D., Amherst, '5R. ARTHL'R L. GILLETT, Amherst, '80. CllARLES A. GoODWIN, Yale, '98. MAITLAND GRIGGS, Yale, '96. CHARLES E. GRoss, Yale, '69. FREDERICK H. L. HAMMOND, Wesleyan, '88. PANET'l' M. HASTINGS, M.D., Hamilton , '39. EDWARD B. HATCH, Phi Kappa, '86. FREDERICK VAN H. HuDSON, Dartmouth, '60. HARWOOD HUNTINGTON, Phi Kappa, '89. Rev. JoHN T. HuNTINGTON, Phi Kappa, '50. THO~IAS F. LAWRENCE, Yale, '99. SOLON C. KELLEY, Amherst, '92. L. P. WALDO MAR\'IN, Yale, '92. LEONARD MoRSE, Amherst, '71. Rev. KINGSLEY F. NORRIS, Amherst, '73. ED WARD C. PERKINS, Yale, '98. HENRY A. PERKINs, Yale, '96. Hev. THOMAS R. PvNCIION, D.D., LL.D., Phi Kappa, '41. W. H. C. PYNCHON, Phi Kappa, '90. RoBERT WELLS RooT, Williams, '96. RoBERT H. ScHUTZ, Phi Kappa, '89. Hon. NATHANIEL SHIPMAN, Yale, '48. Hon. GEoRGE G. SILL, Yale, '52. ROBERT S. STARR, Phi Kappa, '97. HEY. CHARLES C. STEARNS, Yale, '72. C. M. STEARNS, Johns Hopkins, '98. Rev. SAMUEL M. STILES, 路wesleyan, '60. SA~IUEL B. ST. JOHN, M.D., Yale, '66. MELANCTHON STORRS, M.D., Yale, '52. HE 'RY E. TAINTOR, Yale, '65. ARTHUR R. THOMPSON, Yale, '96. DAVID C. TWICHEL L, Yale, '98. DAVID VAN ScHAACK, Phi Kappa, '91. Prof. WILLIS'l'O N WALKER, Amherst, '83. PHrLIP C. WASHB URN, Phi Kappa, '96. ARTHUR C. WILLIAMs, Yale, '98. 64

Graduate Members of the Phi Kappa Chapter .;!.

.;!.

Chipman, G. C ., '45. *Chipman , G. S., '78. Chrystie, T. M . L ., '63. Church, S. P ., '41. *Churchman , C. , '93. Churchman, E . G., '95. Clapp, F. R., '02. Clark, A. F., '75. Codman, A., '85 . Coe, G. J. , '74. Coit, C. W. , '82 . Cole man , G. P., '90 . Coley, J., '6 2. *Conklin , H. H., '38. Cook, P. , '98. Cooke, G. L., '70. Cooke, 0. D., '44. Cowl, M. L., '83. Crane, T. , '45. Crocker, H . D., '84. *Crosby, D. G., '51. Cullen, J., Jr. , '93 . Curtiss, H. C. , '81. Davenport, J. S., '98. *Dickinson, E. L., '93 . Dingwall, E. A., '92. Dingwall, H. R., '95. Drane, H. M., '52. Dyett, W. F ., '96. Elliott, J. H. , '72. Fisher, R., '56. Flagg, E . 0., '48. *Flagg, J. B., '46. * Flower, S., '45. Foot, E . H ., '98. Foote, C. E., ' 76. Freeland , C . W., '81. *Fuller, F. B., '92. Fuller, S. R. , '00. * Geer, G. J., '42.

Allen, H. W., '97. Alroy, S., '92. Andrews, R., '53. Applegate, 0., Jr., '87. Armstro ng, D. M .. '58. Barber, \V . W., '88. Barto, R. V., '82. Beecroft, E. C., '97. Bellinger, E. B., '72. Bixby, R. F., '70. Blackmer, W. C., '78. Boa rdman, W. H. , '85. Boardman, W. J. , '54. Booth, T. R., '5 2. Bowie, C. L ., '93. Bowman, J. P .. '5 3. *Brainard, E. \V. , '42 . Brainard, J., '51. Braina rd , J. M ., '84. Briscoe, J. , Jr., '95. Brownell, H. B., '88. Bryan, W., '75 . Bryant, P . S. , '70. * Bulkeley, C. E., '56. *Buxton, J. B., '72. Buxton,}. C., '73. Cameron. J. I. H. , '79. Cameron, L., '86. *Capron, A., '45. Cary, II. A., '93. Carter, B. M. , '82. Carter, C. H., '82. Carter, G. C., '87. Carter, J. R., '83. Carter, J. S., '98. Carter, L.A., '93. Carter, S., '94. Chase, F., '52. Cberitree, T. L., '90. Cheshire, J. B. , Jr. , '69. (1 5

Gilmore, A. P., '74. Glazebrook , F. H., '99. Goodwin, J., '86. * Goodwyn, W. S., '38. Gordon, T. H., '71. Graham, H. C., '61. Graham, J ., ' 72. Grinnell, H., '97. Griswold, B. H., '66. Hager, W. C., '79. *Hall, G. R., '42. Hamlin, A. C., '87. Hamlin, E. P. , '95. Hamlin, G. N., '91. Harding, A., '79. Hatch, E . B., '86. Hays, J. McC. , '86. Hays, W. W, '58 . Hazelhurst, G. B ., ' 77. * Heath, J. F ., ' 38. Hedrick, C. B., ' 99. H enshaw, C. H., '5 3 . Heister, I., '76. * Hills, G. M., '47. Hills, J. D., '78. Hills, G. H., '84. Hills, R., '84. Holcomb, B. T., '59 . Holley, W. W., '61. *Hooff, J. L., '46. Hooker, S. D., ' 77. Hooper, G. G., '66. Howell, G. D. , '82. Hubbell, J. H ., '56. *Humphrey, G. F., '85. *Hunter, C., '78. Huntington, G. S., '81. *Huntington, H . K ., '67. Huntington, J. T ., '50. Huntington, J. W ., '83. Huntington, R. W ., ' 64. Huntington, H., ' 84. Huske, J., '77. Hutchins, R. H. , '90. Ide, H. G., '94. Ingersoll, C. M ., '39.

*Ives, A. M ., '56. *Jacobs, E. C., '55. *James, C., '61. *Jewett, P. A., '37. *Kennedy, F. , '68 . Kerner, H. S., '99. Kidder, H. , '92. *Kirtland , J. , '70. * Kneeland , G. , '80. Kurtz, C. M ., '83. Kurtz, J. E. , '77. Lampson , E . R., Jr., '91. Langford , A. M. , '97. Langford, W. S., Jr., '96. Leaver, H. K ., '59. Littell, J . S. , '90. Littell, S. H., '95. Littell, E . G., ' 99. Lockwood, L . V., '93. Lyma n, A. J ., '78. McGann, J. M ., '95. Maddox, W. T., '59. *Mallett, W. P., '40. Middlebrook, L. N., '48. Moore, J. A., '97. Mock, L. C., '78. Morgan, W. F., '88. Morrison, P. B., '94. Morse, B. K., ' 99. *Morss, J. R., '47. Newton, E. P., ' 81. Norton, G. H., '75. *Olmstead, H. , '42. Onderdonk, A. H. , '99. Page, J. H., Jr., '97. Palmer, N., '45. Peabody, F . B. , '45. Perry, J. B., '72. *Perryma n , E. G., '55. *Peters, W. C. , '48. *Pitts, C. H ., '65. Plumb, J . F., '91. Plumer, L. M., '74. Plumer, S., Jr., '97. Porter, T. A. , '76. Potts, F . H ., ' 68 . 66

Stewart, W. J . S. , '88. Stone, M., '80. *Stone, S. , '80. * Storm, C., '39. Sullivan, F. R., '66. Thurman, A. W ., '67. Tracy, E ., '55. ...Vanderpoel, A.M., '89. Va n Schaack, D., '9 1. Wadsworth, L. F., '44. Warner, A. J. , '42. Warner, D. T., ' 72. Warner, M. C ., '88. Washburn, P. C., '96. Watson, S. N., '82 . Wesley, P . R., '94. Whaley, P . H., '74. Wheaton, C., '49. Whitlock, H . R., '70. *Williams, E. W ., '53. * Williams, J. H., '54. Wilson, G. H., '93. Woodruff, F. D.,' 3. *Yale, H. A., '46.

Prescott, 0. S., '44. Preston, J. A., ' 55. Putnam, W . T ., '88. Pynchon, T. R., '41. Pyuchon, W. H. C ., '90. *Randall, E. D., '92. Reynolds, L. G., '98. Rich, E . A., '99. Richardson, F. W. , '84 . Robbins, J . P., '99. * Sartwelle, W. D., ' 75 . Schiitz, R. H. , ' 89. Sch iltz. W. S., '94. Senne t t , L. F., '89. Sherwood, G. H., '00. Sistare, C. G., '47 . * Smith, P ., '90. Smyth , J . D., ' 74. Snow, A. H ., '79. Snyder, E ., '72. Starr, R. S ., '9 7. *Stimson, L. B., '48. Stewart, G. T ., '78. â&#x20AC;˘ Dt:ceased .

67

The Fraternity of

~

Delta Kappa Epsilon

&

Founded in 18-J,.J,

~ ~

At Yale University

Roll of Chapters PHI, THETA, XI, SIGMA,. GAM~! A, Psi, UPSILON, CHI, BETA, ETA, KAPPA, LAMDDA, PI, IOTA, ALPHA ALPUA, OMICRON, EPSILON, RHO , TAU, M u, Nu, BETA PHI, PHI CHI, PSI PHI, GAM~IA Pui, Psi OMEGA, BETA CHI, DELTA Cm, Prrr GAMMA, GAMMA BETA , THETA ZETA , ALPHA CHI, PHI EPSILON, SIGMA TAU, DELTA DEL'rA , ALPHA PHI, TAU LA.MDDA, DELTA KAPPA ,.

Yale University, Bowdoin College, . Colby University, Amherst College, Vanderbilt University, University of Alabama, Brown University, niversity of Mississippi, University of North Carolina, University of Virginia, Miami University, Kenyon College, Dartmouth College, Central University, Middlebury College, University of 1\lichigan, Williams College, Lafayette College, Hamilton College, Colgate University, College of the City of New York, University of Rochester, Rt\tgers College, DePauw University, Wesleyan University , Rennsel a er Polytechnic Institute, Adelbert College, Co rnell University, Ryracuse University, Columbia College, University of California, Trinity College, University of Minnesota, Massachusetts Institute of Tecluwlogy , University of Chicago, University of Toronto, Tulane University, University of Pennsylvania, 6

1844 1844 1845 1846 1847 1847 1850 1850 1851 1852 1852 1852 1853 1853 1854 1855 1855 1855 1856 1856 1856 1856 1861 1866 1867 1867 1 68 1870 1871 1874 1876 1879 1889 1890 1893 1898 1898 1899

The Alpha Chi Chapter

DUNCAN HODGE BROWNE. THOMAS PROSSOR BROWNE, JR. LUTHER HAROLD BURT. ' ATHANIEL JULIUS CABLE. THEODORE GRAFTON CASE. EDGAR JOHNSON DIBBLE. JOHN DA ULBY EVANS. FRANK HALSEY FOSS. MALCOLM APPLETON MAcLEAN. WILLIAM JOH

McNEIL.

SIMON LEWIS TOMLINSON. HUGH DEi\l PSTER WILSON, JR.

6!)

'

\

The Connecticut Alumni Association of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity

Officers President-Col. jACOB L. GREENE, Michigan, '61. Secretary and Treasurer-CHARLES P. CooLEY, Yale, '91.

Members The four hundred Alumni of the Fraternity in the State of Connecticut.

Fratres in Urbe Alden, H. W., M. I. T., '93. Ayres, W. A., Yale, '64. Bacon, Dr. W. T ., Yale, '68. Baldwin, H. S., M. I. T., ' 96. Beardsley, E. R., Yale, '79. Booth, T. B., M. I. T., '95. â&#x20AC;˘Bull, C. W., Yale, '63 . Calkins, F. H., C. C. N. Y., '80. Camp, J. S., Wesleyan, '78. Case, Hon. W. C., Yale, '57. Clark, C. H., Yale, '71. Collins, A., Yale, ' 73. Conant, G. A., Amherst, '78. Cone, J. B., Yale, '57. Cooley, C. P., Yale, '91. Cooley, F. R., Yale, '86. Day, A. P., Yale, '90. Davis, F . W., Yale, '7 7. Forrest, C. R., Yale, '65. Freeman, H. B., Yale, '62. Freeman, H . B., Jr., Yale, '92. Graves,]. A., Yale, '72.

Greene, J. L . , Michigan, '61. Howe, D. R., Yale, '74. Hyde, F. E., Yale, '79. Hyde, W. W., Yale, '76. Ingalls, Dr. P. H ., Bowdoin, '77. *Leach, J. A., Wesleyan, '93. Matson, W. L., Yale, '62. Parker, Rev. E. P., Bowdoin, '56. Pattison, Rev. Harold, Rochester, '92. Porter, J. A., Yale, '78. Pratt, W. W., Adelbert, '85. Prentice, Hon. S. 0., Yale, '73. Robbins, E. D., Yale, '74. Ryce, L. C., Yale, S., '86. Starr, Dr. P. S., Yale, '60. St. John, W. H., Yale, '91. T a ylor, J. M., Williams, '67. Tucker, J.D., Yale, '61. Utley, G. B .. Brown, '99. Way, C. L., Yale, '85. Welch, A. A., Yale, ' 82. Williams, Rev. H. D., Amherst, '91.

*Decea"'!d. 70

Graduate Members of the Alpha Chi Chapter. $

$

Johnson, Charles Amos, '92. Johnson, Edwin Comstock, 2d, '88. Johnson, Frederick Foote, '94. Leaf, Edward Bowman, '85. Lecour, Joseph Henry, '91'. Leonard, Loyal Lovejoy, '96. Linsley, Arthur Beach, '82. Loomis, Hiram Benjamin, '85. Lord, James Watson, '98. Loveridge, Henry Clarence, '80. Lund, Frederick Albert, ' 99. Mead, Ralph Cutler, '99. Mitchell, Samuel Smith, '85 . McCulloch, William Hug h, '91. Olcott, William Tyler, '96. Pedersen, Victor Cox, '91. Penrose, John Jesse, Jr., '95. J'limpton, Howard Daniel, '9 7. Purdy, Charles Edward, ' 8. Ramsdell, Julian Elroy, '92. Reese , Ward Winters, '95. Reiland, Carl George, '97. Reineman, Adolph William, '81. Reineman, Robert Theodore, '83. Remington, Charles Hazard, '89. Rogers , Wellington James, '80. Smart, John Harrow, '95. Smith, Joseph Sewall, Jr., '94. *Smith, Oliver Alcott, '94. Stockton, E lias Boudinot, '91. Stoddard, Solomon, '94. Strong, Albert William, '94. Strong, Charles Henry, '01. Stuart, Albert Rhett, Jr., '8 . Stuart, William Clarkson, '88. Thurston, Theodore Payne, '91. Walker, William Dundas, '82. Warner, William Alfred, '99. Waters, Charles Thomas, '87. Weed, Arthur Henry, '02. Weed, Charles Frederick, '94. Wharton, William Parker, '01. Wheeler, Francis Melville, '83. Wildman, Walter Beardslee, '98. Willcox, Reginald Norton, '99. Williams, Francis Goodwin, '89 Wright, Arthur Henry, '83. Wright, Boardman, '89. Wright, George Herman, '91. Wright, William George, '91. Wright, Frederick Amaziah, '94.

Anderson, Alexander Hopkins, '87. Barrows, John Chester, '80. Barrows, William Stanley, '84. Bartholomew, Dana Wightman, '97. Baxter, Irving Knott, '99. Bates, Robert Peck, '93. Benson, Reuel Allan, '99. Benton, William Lane Hall, '89. *Bidwell, Lawson Brewer, '80. *Bidwell, Walter Davison, '81. Birdsall, Paul, '86. *Bishop, Nelson Howard, '92. Black, Harry Campbell, '80. Bowie, William, '93. Brewer, Seabury Doane, '82. Brooks, Roelif Hasbrouck, 1900. Burchard, John Dixon, 1900. Brown, George Israel, '88. Burnham, John Bird, '91 . Burton, Richard Eugene, '83. Cartwright, Morgan Rouse, '98. Chapman, Thomas Bion, '83. Cole, Marc Wheeler, '97. *Cook, Charles Smith, '81. Coster, Martyn Kerfoot, '87. Coster, William Hooper, '91. Coster, Charles Calvert, ' 97. Cowles, Arthur Woodruff, '81. Crabtree, Albert, '92. Danker, Walton Stoutenburg, '97. * Dauchey, Nathan Follin, '85. Davis, Cameron Josiah, '94. Deuel, Charles Ephraim, '87. Eastman, Roger Charles, '88. Fleming, David Law, '80. Forrester, Henry Townes, '01. French, George Herbert, '92. *Goodrich, William Sloo, '82. Graff, Henry Addison, '86. Grint, Alfred Poole, '81. Griswold, Clifford Standish, '90. Hall, Gordon, '92. Hamilton, Charles Anderson, '82. Hammond, Otis Grant, '92. Holden, Seaver Milton, '82. Hopkins, Louis Albert, '97. Horne, Charles Albert, '93. Hubbard, William Stimpson, '88. Humphries, Harry Richard, '94. Jewett, David Baldwin, 1900. *DeceasCi). 7~

The Fraternity of

~

Psi Upsilon ~ Founded in 1 ~33

At Union College

Roll of Chapters TrrETA,

Union College.

DELTA ,

New York University.

BETA,

Yale University.

SIGMA ,

Brown University.

GA~BIA,

Amherst College.

ZETA,

Dartmouth College.

LAMODA ,

Columbia College.

KAPPA,

Bowd oin College.

Ps1,

Hamilto n College.

X1,

Wesleyan Univers ity .

UPS ILON, _ .

Unive rsity of Rochester.

IOTA,

Kenyon College.

PHI,

University of Michigan.

PI,

Syracuse University.

Cru,

Cornell University.

BETA BETA,

T ri nity College.

ETA,

Lehigh University.

TAU,

University of Pennsylvania.

Mu,

Uni versity of Minn esota.

RHO ,

University of Wisconsin.

OMEGA,

Unh路ersity of Chicago.

73

The Beta Beta Chapter.

Active Members. ROBERT BAYARD BELLAMY. HBNRY BERNARD CARPENTER . REGINALD FISKE. JAMES PHILIP GARVIN. EDWARD BRUCE GOODRICH. EDWARD GOODRIDGE, JR. JARVIS McALPINE JOHNSON. WILLIAM LARCHER, JR. ANSON THEODORE McCOOK. JOHN GILBERT MciLVAINE. EDMUND SAWYER MERRIAM. SAMUEL ST. JOHN MORGAN. GEORGE DOUGLAS RANKIN. HAROLD HUNTINGTON RUDD. EDWIN PEMBERTON TAYLOR, JR. JOSEPH PEMBERTON WELLES TAYLOR. WALTER SLATER TR MB ULL. ARTHUR REGINALD VAN DE WATER. t

FRANCIS ELY WATERMAN. WILLIAM HARDIN WHEELER.

74

Fratres in Urbe P rof. A. R. Merriam, Beta, '77 .

J a mes P. Andrews, Beta, '77. Rt. Rev. Chauncey B. Brewster, Beta , '68.

Charles Shiras Morris, Beta Beta , '96 .

J ohn H. Buck , Beta, "91.

John J. Na irn, Bet a, '80.

H on . J ohn R. Buck, X i, '62.

Francis P a rsons , Beta , '93.

Clarendon C. Bulkely, Beta Beta , '7 5.

Arthur P erkin s, Beta, '87.

P hili p D. Bunce, M . D., Beta, '88.

Edw a rd L . P ollock, Bet a , '84.

Chas. W . Burpee, Beta, '83.

Hen r y Roberts, Beta, '77.

E . W . Capen, Gamma, '94.

Henry S. Robinson, Beta, '89.

William S. Case, Beta, '8 5.

J ohn T. Robinson, Beta, '93.

Albert St. Clair Cook, Beta, '89.

Lucius F . Robinson , Beta, '85.

Willia m H . Corbin, Beta, '89.

Ed w ard W. Robinson, Beta Beta , '96 .

G. Pierrepont Davis, M.D., Beta, '66.

E. F . Sanderson, Gamma, '96.

J . H . Kelso Davis, Beta Beta, '99 .

George H. Seyms, Beta Beta, '72.

John C. Day, Beta, '57.

Henry P . Schauffier, Gamm a , '93.

Louis N. Denniston, Xi, '02.

Forrest Shepher d, Beta, '92.

Leona rd A.. Ellis, Beta Beta, '98.

Arthu r L . Shipman, Beta, '86.

Chas. E . Fellowrs, Beta, '56.

H on . Josep h H. Sprague, Alpha, '51.

Rev. Prof. Henry Ferguson , Beta Bet a, '68. Lewis E. Stanton , Beta , '55. Samuel Ferguson , Beta Beta , '96.

J a mes U. T a intor , Bet a, '66.

Geo rg e H. Gilman, Beta, '90.

Franklin H . Taylor, Pi, '84 .

T . Welles Good ridge, Beta Beta , '92.

James R. Turnbull , Beta, '92.

Wilbur F . Gordy , X i, '70.

Rev. Joseph H. T w; chell, Bet a, '59 .

Hon . Wm . Hamersley, LL.D., Beta Beta,'58.

Chas. Dudley Warner, L. H. D., P si , '51.

Hon. Joseph R. H a wley, LL. D., P si, '4 7.

Edga r F. Waterman, Bet a Bet a, '98.

R. W. Huntington , Beta, '89.

Lewis S. Welch , Beta , '89 .

Prof. Cha rles F. Johnson, Beta, '55.

Charles G. Woodward , Bet a Bet a, '98.

Fra nk E . J ohnson, Beta Beta, '84.

P. Henry Wood w a rd , Bet a, '55 .

75

Graduate Members of the Beta Beta Chapter *Alexander, H. W., '57. Backus, B. E., '70. Bailey, l\1. K., '79. Baldwin, L. B., '60. Barbour, H. M., '70. Barbour, I-I. G., '96. Beardsley, W. A., '87. *Beaupillier, A. L., '56. *Beckwith, J. W., '52. * Bent•dict, S., '47. Benjamin, W. H. , '57. *Betts, J. H., '44. Birckhead, J. B., '94. *Birckhead, \\". H., '61 . *Bishop, H., '61. Blair, W. R., '75. Bolles, E. C., '55. *Bostwick, H. P., '46. * Bostwick, W. L., '51. Bowdish, J. T., '73. Bowles,]. H., '60. Boylston, C. W., '78. Brady, R. McC., '90. Bredin, W. S., '80. Brevoort, E. R., '68. *Brewer, A. L., '53. *Bridge,J., '47. Brinley, G. M., '88. Bronson, M., '52. Broughton, C. DuB., '95. • Brown, T. M., '50. Brown, J. E., '83. Brundage, R. B., '78 . Buffington, J., '75. Buffington, 0., '79 . Bulkeley, E. B., '90. Bulkley, C. C., '75. Bulkley, W. H., '73.

Bull, F. S., '91. Bull, W. A., '91. * Bull, A. B., '59. Burgwin, G. C., '72. Burgwin, J. H. K ., '77. Burgwin, A. P., '82. Burke, E. N., '76. Burrage, F. S., '95. *Cady, D. K., '55. Cammann, D. M., '72. Campbell, R. M., '78. Carpenter, C., ' 2. Carpenter, S. B., '73. Carter, II. S. '69. Chase, H. R., '72. Child, C. G., '86. Child, E. N., Jr.,' 5. *Clark, G., '70. *Clerc, C. M., '45. Clerc, F. J., '43. Coggeshall, M. H., '96. Coleman, C. S., '82. *Collins, J. B. J , '74. *Colt, W. U., '44. Corson, D. S., '99. Cotton, D.P., '71. Cotton, H. B. , '74. Craik, C. E., '74. Crawford, J. W . R., '88 . *Crosby, W. L., '80. Cummins, A. G., '51. Cunningham, J. R., '85. *Dashiell, E. F., '46. Davis, J H. K., '99. *Dayton, M. B ., '63. *Dewey, D.P. , '64. Dickerson, E. N. , Jr. , '74. Dockray, E. L ., '83. 76

Douglas, G. W., '71. Douglas, A. E., '89. *Douglass, M., '46. Downes, L. W., '88. Drayton, W., '71. Drumm, T. ]., '74. *DuBois, J. C., '53. *Easton, G. C., '5 1. Edgerton, F. C., '94. Edgerton, J. W., '94. Edmunds, C. C., Jr., '77. Ellis, L.A., '98. Elmer, \V. T., '81. Elwyn, T. L., '92. *Ely,]. F., '64. Emery, R., '51. Emery, W. S., '81. Everest, C. S., '71. Ferguson, E. M., '59. Ferguson, H., '68. *Ferguson,]. D., '51. *Fergus011, S., '57. Ferguson, W., '63. Ferguson, W., Jr., '93. Ferguson, S., '96. Fiske, D. W., '00. Fiske, G. McC., '70. *Flower, Samuel, '45. *Fogg, T. B., '52. Fowler, F. H., '61. French, G. A., '89. French, L., '53. Frye, P H., '89 . Gage, A. K., '96. Gage, W. H., '96. Gallaudet, E . M., '56. Gardiner, E. R., '56. George, J. F., '77. George, J. H., '72. George, T. M. N., '80. Giesy, S. H, '85. *Gilman, G. S, '47. Golden, H. L., '83. *Goodrich, A. B., '52. Goodrich, J. B., '66. Goodridge, E., '60.

*Goodridge, F., '57. Goodridge, T. W., '92. Gould, C. Z., '82. *Greene, F. H ., '82. Greene, G , '83. Green, H. D , '99. *Green, V., '60. Greenley, H. T., '94. Gregory, H. M., '56. Gwinn, F. W., '72. * Hall, S., '54. Hamersley, W., '58. *Harriman, F. D., '45. Harriman, F. W., '72. *Hart, G., '70. Hart, S, '66. Hartley, G. D., '93. Hayden, C. C., '66. *Hermann, S., '57. *Hewitt, S. G., '77. Hickox, G. A., '5 1. Hicks, G. C., '56. Hicks,]. M., '54. * Hicks, W. C., '48 Hicks,\\". C., Jr., '91. Hicks, DeF., ',96. *Hitchcock, W. A, '54. Hitchcock, W. I-I., '84. *Hoff, H., '82. Holway, 0., '80. Hubbard, E. I<., Jr., '92. Hubbard, L. Dei<., '93. Hudson, R., '71. *Hugg, G. W., '62. Hurd, A. D., '77. *Hurd, J.D., '74. Husband, C. H., '89. Hyde, E. M ., '73. Hyde, F. B., '98. Ingalls, F. C., '99. *Isbell, C. M., '63. *Jackson, A., '60. *Jackson, W. A., '83. *Johnson, E. E., '59. J ohnson, F. E , '84. Johnson, G. D., '54. 77

Nichols, W. l\1, '01. iles, W. W., ';)7. Niles, E. C., '87. Niles, W. P., ' 93. Oberly , H. H., '65. Olmsted, C. T., '65. *Olmsted, II K., '46. Owen, H . C., '99 . *Paddock, B. H., '4 *Paddock,]. A , '45. Paddock, L. R., '50. Paddock, L. H , '88. Paddock, R. L ., '94. Paris, I., Jr. , '76. Parker, C. P., '73. Parrish, H , '91 Pattison, A. E, '80. Pelton, H. H ., '93. Penfield, W. D., '62. *Pettitt, W. F., '46. Phillips, C. W., '71. *Polk, A. H., '53. *Pond, C. M., '5 . Potwine, Vv. E , '79. Pressey, E. A., '92. Pressey, W., '90 *Preston, T. S , '43. Purdy, E. L., '84. *Purdy,]. S., '49. Raftery, 0. H., '73. Remsen, H . R, '98. Rinehart, E. J ., ' 76. Roberts, B. C., '95. *Roberts, W. J., '75. Robinson, E. W., '96. Rogers, L . W., '91. Rogers, W. E ., '77. *Rudder, W., '48. Saltus, R. S , '92. Saltus, L., '87. Sargeant, G. W., '90. Scarborough , J., '54. Scott, E. N., '89. *Scott, J. T., '91. Sco tt, W. G., '88. Sexton, T. B., '60.

*Johnson, S. W., '81. Johnson, F . F., '94. Johnson, W. MeA., '98. Jones, C. W., '81. Jones, E. P. , Jr., '77. Jones, W. N., '88. *Kelley,]., '44. Kempe, E. A , '81. Kendal, G. T , '99. Kertnett, L. M., '70. Kissam, E. V. B., '69. *Kittredge, A. S., '57. Kloppenburg, H. W., '58. *Knickerbacker, D. B, '53. Kramer, F. F., '89. *Krumbhaar, W. B. , '55. Lanpher, L.A., '80. Leffingwell, C. S. , '54. Leffingwell, E. DeK., '95. Lewis, G. F ., '77. Lindsley, C. A., '49. Lobdell, F. D., '85. *Long, W., '43. Loveridge, D. E., '50. *Luther, R M, '90. Mackay-Smith, A., '72. *Macklin, R. B., '5K Magill, G. E ., '84. Marshall, M. M., '63. Mather, W. G., '77. * McConihe, S ., '56. McCook, P. ]., '95. * 1cCook, G. S , '97. McCrackan, ]. H., '82. McCrackan, W. D., '85. Mcivor, N. W., '82. Mears, J . E., '58. Mo rris, F., '64. Morris, B. W.,Jr., '93. *Morris,]. H., '45. Morris, C. S., '96. Mowe, W. R., '70. *Neely, A. D., '85. Neely, H. R., '84. Nichols, W. F ., '70. Nichols, J. W., '99. 78

*Tremaine, C. H. B. , '66. *Truby, ]. M., '79. Tullidge, E. K ., ' 76. Tuttle, R. C, '89. * Tuttle, R. H. , '46. Upson , A. I., '88. Valentine, W. A., '72 . *Van Nostrand, C. A., '77. *Vincent , S. , '58. Wakefield,]. B., '46. Warner, B. E., '76. *Warren, S. B. , '59. Waterman, E. F., '9 Webb, W . R., '78 . Webster, L ., '80. *Webster, W. H., '61. *Welles, H. T., '43. Welles, L. H., '64. Whitcome, F. B., ' 87. Whitney, H . E ., '74. Williams, ]. , '90. Willson, C. T ., '77. *Willson, D. B. , '79. *Winchester, S. F., '66. *Witherspoon, 0., '56 . Woodle, A. S , '90. Woodman, C. E., '73. Woodward, C. G. , ' 98. Worthington, E. W., '75. Yardley, T. H., '92. Ziegler, P., '72.

Seymour, C. H. , ' 52. Seyms, G. H. , '72. *Shaw,]. P. C. , '71. Sherman, S., '50. Short, W. S., '83. Shreve, B. F . H ., '7 Smith, C. B. , '54. *Spencer, W. G., '53. Stanley, G. M., '68. Stanley,]. D., '77. Stedman, T L ., '74. *Steele, 0. R. , '53. *Sterling,]. C., '44. Stocking, C. H. W., '60. Stoddard, E . V., '60. Stoddard , J., '71. Storrs, L. K., '63. Stotsenberg, J. H ., '50. Stout, J. K., '70. * Studley, W. H ., '50. Sullivan, E. T ., ' 89. Sutton, MeW. B. E, '99. * Syle, H. W., '67. Syle, L. D., '79. Taylor, E. B., '73. Taylor, J.P., '43. Tibbits, W . B., '61. Tibbits, C. H., ' 8 7. Tingley, G. C., '52. Travers, E. S., '98. *Deceased.

Names of 1nemb~rs to be initiated in italics.

79

The Fraternity of

Sigma Alpha Epsilon At the University of Alabama

Roll of Chapters Boston Univt<rsity. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Harvard University. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Trinity College. Cornell University. Columbia University. St. Stephen 's College. Allegheny College. Dickinson College. Pennsylvania State College. Bucknell University. Gettysburg College. University of Virginia. Washington and Lee University. University of North Carolina. Davidson College. Wofford College. University of Georgia. Mercer University. Emory College. Georgia School of Technology. Tulane University. University of Michigan. Adrian College. Mt. Uni on College. Ohio Wesleyan University. Cincinnati Universit y.

Ohio State University. Franklin College. Perdue University. North Western University. University of Illinois. Central u niversity. Bethel College. Southwestern Presbyterian Universit:v. Cumberland University. Kentucky State College. Vanderbilt University. University of Tennessee. University of the South. Southwestern Baptist University. University of Alabama. Southern University. Alabama A. and M. College. niversity of Mississippi . University of Missouri. Washington University. University of Nebraska. University of Arkansas. University of Texas. University of Colora do. Denver University. Leland Stanford, Jr., University. University of California. University of Louisiana.

0

The Connecticut Alpha Chapter Active Members J900 PERCY LEON BRYANT.

J90J AUGUS'l'INE

IJ. \V.

ANDERSON .

J902

J E\VETT

SAXON COLE.

COLE.

Graduate Members of Connecticut Alpha Chapter ALLEN,

J AlliES,

BRYANT,

JonE,

H. H., '95. S. H., '93. MATHER, \V. Y., '99. l\1ECHTOLD, R. II., '9\J. MILLER , W. J., '92. NEILL, A., Jr., '99. PRATT , A., '98. PRATT, F. E., '95. PRATT, N. T.' '94. s~u·ra, F. C., '99. SMITH, H. l\1., '93. TnrrsoN, A. H., JR, '98. \\'OFFENDEN, R. li ., '93.

W. R., '98. A. B., '00. Bt'NN, ]. B , '99. COLE, A., '98. COLE, F. B., '93. DEAN, E B., '93. FOR\VARO,]. F., '96. FREKCll, ,v. T., '93. GOLOEN, w. B., '99. GUNDACKER, II. j., '97. riA~lLIN, G E .• '95. IIATIJA\YAY, .\. H., '97. IlAY\\'ARD, II. w ., '97. ZooK,

S.

1..:.,

'96.

In Urbe

c.

D. BROWN.

J.

H L

H. BUR!)ICK.

RE\'.

s. s.

L.

F.

COWLES. CROSSFIELD,

M.

F. FoRwAtw.

J.

F. E.

D. RE\·.

II. 1\l. 81

s~IITII.

J.

P. FAUCON.

DOOLI'l'TLE. PRATT.

The Fraternity of

Phi Gamma Delta Founded in 1 848

At Washington and Jefferson College ~

~

Roll of Chapters Mu, lo'!'A Mu, Pi ]OTA, OMEGA

ALPHA CHI, CHI, TAU ALPUA, Nu DEUTERON, THETA Psr,. KAPPA Nu,. 0M.EGA, UPSILON, Nu EPSI.LON, BE'l'A SJG~1~ DEUTERON, BETA CHI, XI, DELTA,.

PI,. ALPHA, GAMMA Pill, BETA Mu, . OMICRON, ZETA DEUTERON, DELTA DEUTERON, BETA DEUTERON, RHO CHI, OMICRON DEUTERON,. RHO DEUTERON, . THETA DEUTERON, SIGMA, • LAMBDA DEUTERON,

Mu, Mu SIGMA, ZETA, LAMJlDA ,

Psi, TA U, ' ALPHA DEUTERON, GAMMA DEUTERON, KAPPA TAU,

Nu, PI DEUTERON, ZETA Pm, DELTA XI,

Cm IoTA, P1 DELTA, Cs1 Mu,

University of Maine, . . . Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Amherst College, Union College, Trinity College, Yale University, . Colgate University, Cornell University, Columbia College, . College of the City of New York, New York University, . . University of Pennsylvania, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Pennsylvania College, Bucknell University, Allegheny College, Washington and Jefferson College, Pennsylvania State College, ] ohns-Hopkins University, University of Virginia, . . Washington and Lee University, Hampden-Sidney College, Roanoke College, . Richmon d College, Ohio State University, Wooster University, Ohio Wesleyan University, Wittenberg College, Denison University, . University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota, .• Indiana University, . De Pauw University, . Wabash College, . Hanover College, . Illinios Wesleyan University, Knox College, . University of Tennessee, Bethel College, . Kansas University, . William Jewell College, University of California, Universitv of Illinois, . University of Nebraska, University of Missouri, 2

1899 1889 1891 1893 1893 1893 1875 1888 1888 1866 1865 1892 1882 1883 1886 1858 1882 1860 1848 18 8 1 91 1859 1868 1870 1866 1890 1878 1882 1868 1884 1885 1892 1890 1871 1856 1866 1864 1866 1866 1890 1856 1881 1886 1881 1897 1898 1899

Tau Alpha Chapter

Active Members 1901 ARTHUR PAUL KELLEY.

1902 WILLIAM STEWART Il YDE.

jACOB ALEXANDER LAUBENSTEIN.

1903 KARL HERBERT PENNING.

].l.MES ROGERS VEITCil.

Graduate Members of Tau Alpha Chapter CHARLES jUDD,

'93.

Loms IsAAC BELDEN,

WILLIAM EuGENE CONKLIN,

'93.

'95. FRANK RAYMOND YOUNG, '95. ARTHUR FLETCHER MILLER, '95. GEORGE FRANCIS LANGDON, '96. jOSEPH HENRY BUELL, '96. WILUA)I CuRTis WHrrE, '97. Jo EPH DE\"11\iE FLYNN, '97. IlERMAN E. TULL, '97. MADISON BROWN BORDLEY,

PERCI\"AL SARGENT SMITIIE, NoRMAN M ILO Looi\us,

'9L .

Ex '98.

CHARLES ANDREW l\10NAGHAN 1

' 94.

'95. '95. CHARLES H UBBELL STREET, '96. JAMES WALTER GUNNING , '96. LEROY KILBOURN HAGENOW, '96. PERCIVAL MATSON WOOD, '97. SANFORD IRYING BENTON, '97. ALBERT DUMOND MERWIN, Ex '98. CLARENCE ALEXANDER S~IITH, ' 99. RAYMOND SANFORD YEOMANS, '99. CL IF FORD KNox Wooo, Ex 1900. liAROLD SIMEON BACKUS, Ex 1902. SAM UEL WILKINSON MAG IRE,

'93.

ALFRED HALLET WEDGE,

Fratrcs in Urbe R. J. Clapp, Pi Iota, '93. Samuel S. Hotchkiss, Nu Deuteron, '92. Dr. Arthur B. Kellogg, Nu Epsi lon, '90. Dr. Clifford B. Brainard,

Kenneth E. Ke11ogg, Omega, '93. j ames W. Gunning, Tau Alpha, '96. joseph D. F lynn , Tau Alpha, '97. Nu Deuteron, '98.

The Fraternity of

~

Alpha Chi Rho

~

Founded in 18!l5

At Trinity College

Roll of Chapters PHr Ps1, .

Trinity College.

Por CHr, .

Polytech nic Institute of Brooklyn.

PHI PHr,. PHI UPSILON, .

niversity of Pennsylvania . Iowa State University.

84

The Phi Psi Chapter Active Members f900 ELLSWORTH MoRTON TRACY. MosEs JAMES BRINES. ERNEST LEON SIMONDS. ALEXANDER ARNOTT. CHARLES THOMAS SMART.

f90f GEORGE GRAHAM BURBANCK. F R AN K STEPHEN MoREHOUSE. jAlliES ALBERT 'VALES. AUBREY HENRY DERBY. FRANCIS RAYMOND STURTEVANT.

f902 KARL PH IL I P MoR nA. J AMES HENDERSON. EDGAR MARTIN RoGERS. J oHN \V rnTE WALKER. THEOPHILUS MINTON SYPHAX. R onERT Bu RTON GooDEN. CHARLES EDWARD TUKE. E DWI N S c HI\'ELY C ARSON. FRED AUGUSTUS H I GG I NBO'l'HAM. JOSE PH BAIRD CRA N E. GEORGE HERBER'!' HOLDEN. MARSIIALL BOW YER STEW ART.

f903 HAROLD C L I F TON VA N W EELDEN. HoWARD BELL ZIEGLER. ROBE RT WIGHT TRENBATIL PHILIP SAFFORD CLARKE. ORA. WILFRED CRAI G. CIIRISTOI'llER CARSON TH URBER . HERVEY B OARDMAN VA NDERBOGART.

85

Fratres in Urbe

F. H. Hastings, Phi Psi, '96. Carroll C. Beach, M . D., Phi Psi, '96. A. M. Sturtevant, Phi Psi, '98. H. J. Blakeslee, Phi Psi, '98. H. L. Cleasby, Phi Psi, '99. V. F. Morgan, Phi Psi, '99. A. C. Hall, P hi Psi, Ex 1900.

Alumni Members of the Phi Psi Chapter Addis, Emmett, '99.

"McElwain, Frank Arthur, '99.

Beach, Carroll Charles, '96.

:-.forgan, Victor Forrest, '99.

Benson, Lloyd Raeburn, '99.

Rice, Harry Landon, '99.

Blakeslee, Henry Jones, '98.

Richmond, Denison, Ex 1900.

Buck, Frederick Earle, '98.

Rouse, William Herman, '96.

Cleasby, Harold Loomis, '99.

Sherriff, Herbert Thomas, '97.

Colloque, Orrok Paul, '99.

Stacey, Everett Eugene, Ex 1901.

Eardeley, William Applebie, '96.

Sturtevant, Albert Morey, '98.

Hall, Amasa Clark, Ex 1900.

Walker, Robert, h '91.

Hastings, Francis f omer, '96.

Walker, William Taylor, '97.

Henry, Charles William, '99.

Ziegler, Carl Gottlob, '97.

Kurth, Karl Franz Frederick, Ex 1900.

Ziegler, Paul, b '72.

86

Phi Beta Kappa Founded in 1776

At William and Mary College

Roll of United Chapters Bowdoin. Colby. Dartmouth. University of Vermont. Middlebury. Harvard. Amherst. Williams. Tufts. Brown. Yale. Trinity. Wesleyan. Union. University of City of New York. College of City of New York. Columbia. Hamilton. Hobart. Colgate. Cornell. Rochester. Syracuse. Rutgers. Dickinson. Lehigh. Lafayette. University of Pennsylvania. Swarthmore. Johns Hopkins. William and Mary. Adelbert. Kenyon. Marietta. DePauw. State University. Northwestern. University of Minnesota. University of Nebraska. State University.

ALPHA OF MAINE, BETA OF MAINE, ALPHA OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, ALPHA OF VERMONT, BETA OF VERMONT, ALPHA OF MASSACHUSETTS, BETA OF MASSACHUSETTS, GAMMA OF MASSACHUSETTS, DELTA OF MASSACHUSETTS, ALPHA OF RHODE ISLAND, ALPHA OF CONNECTICUT, BETA OF CONNECTICUT, . GAMMA OF CONNECTICUT, ALP!lA OF NEW YORK, BETA OF NEW YORK, GAMMA OF NEW YORK, DELTA OF NEW YORK, EPSILON OF NEW YORK, ZETA OF NEW YORK, ETA OF NEW YORK, THETA OF NEW YORK, IOTA OF NE\\" YORK, KAPPA OF NEW YORK, ALPHA OF NEW jERSEY, ALl'llA OF PENNSYLVANIA, BETA OF PENNSYLVANIA, GAMMA OF PENNSYLVANIA, DELTA OF PENNSYLVANIA, EPSILON OF PENNSYLVANIA, ALPHA OF MARYLAND, ALPHA OF VIRGINIA, ALPHA oF Orno, BETA oF Omo, GAMMA OF 0Hro, ALPHA OF INDIANA, ALPHA OF KANSAS, ALPHA OF ILLINO IS, ALPHA OF MINNESOTA, ALPHA OF NEDRASKA, ALPHA OF IOWA,

!:!7

Beta of Connecticut Chartered 184-5

Officers Vice-President,

President, Rev.

T.

R.

Rev.

PvNCHON, D . D., LL.D.

J.

T.

HUNTINGTON, M . A.

ecretary, Rev.

SAMUEL HART, D. D.

Treasurer, GEORGE LEWIS CooKE,

M.

A.

Assistant Treasurer,

Assistant Secretary,

HARRY ARCllER HORNOR.

FREDERICK WELLES PRlNCE .

Class of f 899 Elected in June, 1809 AUBREY DARRELL VIBDERT.

HENRY DANIEL GREEN.

Class of f 900 HARRY ARCHER HORNOR.

ERNEST LEON SIMONDS.

FREDERICK WELLES PRINCE.

SIMON LEWIS TOMLINSON.

ELLSWORTH MORTON TRACY.

88

/I I f hu

Graduate and Honorary Members Ackley, W. N., '63. Alcorn, E . C., '74 Alling, S. H ., '92 . Andrews, C. M., '84 (h 1896). Andrews, S.]. (h 1867). Applegate, 0., '87 . *Ash, T. R., '64. Atwood ,]. M., '49. Bacon,]. W., '46 . Bailey, M. K ., '79. Bakewell,]., '59. Barber, F. M ., '9 1. Barbour,]. ll., '73. Barrows, W. S., '84. Barton, C. C., '69. Bates, J. M., '72. Bates, R. P . , '93. Bates, W. H , '72. *Beardsley, E. E., '32 (h 1846). Beardsley, W. A., '87. Beers, G. E., '86. Belden, H. M., '88. *Belden, N. M., '48 . Benedict, L. LeG., '88. *Benedict, S., '47. Benton,]. R., '97. Benton, R. A., '64. *Bidwell, L. B, '80. Birckhead,]. B., '94. Black, H. C., '80. Bolles, E. C., '55. Bowie, W., '93. Brainard,]., '51 (h 1856). Brainard,]. M , '84. Brewer, A. L., '53. *Bridge,]., '47. B r igham, H. H., '76. Brocklesby, A. K., '70. Brocklesby, J. II. , '65. Brocklesby, W. C., '69.' Bronson, l\1., '52. Broughton , C. D., '95.

Brown,]. E., '83. *Bro\vn, T. M, '50. Bryan, \V., '75. Buffington, J., '75. Bulkley,\\'. H., '73. Burgwin,]. H. K., '77. Burrage, F. S., ' 95. Burton, R. E ., '83 (h 1896). *Butler, C. l\1 . , '33 (h 1852). *Capron, A., '45. Carpenter,]. S., '79 . Carter, G. C., '87. Chapin,\\". V., '78. *Chapman, C. R., '47. Chase, F., '52. Chase, M. F. , '97. Cheshire, J. B, '69 (h 1896). *Chipman, G. S. , '78. *Clark , G. H . , (h 1863). Clark,]. W., '63. Cleasby, H . L., '99. Clerc, F.]., '43. Coit, C. W., '82, Coleman, C. S., '82. Coleman, G. P. , '90. Collins, W. F., '93. *Colt, \V. U., '44. Colton, C. (b 1854). Conklin , W. E , '93. Conover, T. A., '90. Cooke, G. L , '70. Coster, :M. K., '87. *Cowling, R. 0., '61. Crabtree, A., '92. Crawford, ]. W. R., '88. *Crosby, D. G., '51. Cummins, A. G., '51. *Curtis, F. R., '80. Curtis, R. \\'., '96. *Curtis, T. W. T. (b 1858). *Curtis, W. E., '43. *Cushing, J. T., '37 (b 1845).

Ha11, G., '92. * Hall, S., '54. Hallam, G. R., '59. Hamersley , W., '58 (}J 1 96). Hamilton, C. A., ' 2. Hamlin, G. E ., '95. Harding A., '79. Harraden, F S., '67. * Harriman, F D., '45 (h 1896). Harriman, F. W., '72. Hart, S., '66. Harwood, E. (h 1861 ). * Hawke, W. W. (h 1861). Hayden, C. C., '66. * Haydn, T. L ., '56. Hedrick, C. B., '99. Henderson, E. F., '82. Henry, C. W., '99. Hermann, S., '57. Hickox, G. A, '51. Hicks, G. C., '56. Hicks,]. M., '54. Hiester, I., '76. Hills,]. D., '78. Hoadly, C ] , '51. Holbrooke, G. 0., '69. *Holcombe, D. E ., '56. Holcombe, G. !-I., '96. Holclen, S. M., '82. Holway, 0., '80. Hooker, S.D ., '77. Hopson, G. B., '57. Hotchkin, S. F., '56. Hovey, H . E ., '66. * Howard, H., '91. Hubbard, G. M ., '75. Hubbard , W. S., '88. *Hugg, G. W., '62. Hughes, I. W., '91. Hull , A. S., '66. Humphries, R. F., '92. * Hunt, E. K. (h 1 51). Huntington, G. S.,'Sl (h1896) Huntington,]. T., '50. * Huntington, ]. W., ' 83 . * Hurd, J. D., '74.

Davies, W. G , '60. Davis, C.]., '94. Dean, E. B., '93. Dickerson, E. M ., '74. Dockray, E. L., '83. Douglas, G. W . , '71. Douglass, A. E., '89. * Driggs, T. I , '48. DuBois, G. Mel., '74. DuBois, H. 0., '76. * Dyer, A., '70. Edmunds, C. C , '77. Emery, R., '54. Evans, S. K , '95. 'Everest, C. W., '38 (h 1848). Fairbairn, R. B., '40 (h 1845 ). *Faxon, E., '47. Fell,]. W , '89. Ferguson, H , '68. * Ferguson,]. D., '51. Ferguson, S , '96. Fischer, C. L., '60. Fiske, G. McC., '70. * Flower, S, '45. Flynn, J. D., '97. Frye, P. H., '89. Gallagher,]. D., '95. Gallaudet, B. B, '80. Gallauclet, T, '45 (h 1851). George, T . M. N., '80. George,]. H, '72. * Giddings, G. W ., '49. Gilbet路t, G. B., '96. *Gilman, G. S, '47. Goddard, F. M., '96. Golden, H . L ., '83. Gordon, T. H., '71. Gowen, F. C., '82. Gower, H . B, '49. Graham,]., '72. * Gregg, D, '54. Gregory, H. T, '54. GrennelJ,]. S. (h 1858). Griswold, C S., '90. Gunning,]. W . , '96. * Hale, C. F ., '47. 90

Huske, J., '77. Hutch ins, R. H ., '90. *Jackson, A., '60. *Jacobs, E. C., '55 . Jennings, A. B., ' 6 1. Johnson, C. A., '92. ·*Johnson, E. E., '59 . *Johnson, E . P., '65. J ohnson, F. E., '84. Johnson, F. F . , '94. Johnson, G. D., '54. Johnson, W. MeA., '98. Jones, C. W., '81. *Jones, L. H, '52. Judd, C., '93. *Kelley, J., '44. Ker, G., '43. *Kerfoot,]. B. (b 1865 ). Kissam , E. V. B., '69. Kittridge, A. S., '57. *Knickerbacker, D. B., '53. Lanpher, L. A., '80. Lawto n, E. F., '91. Lecour, J. I-1., '98. Lilienthal, H ., '86. Lindsley, C. A, '49 (h 1 96). Linsley, A. B., '82. Lockwood, L. A., '55. Lockwood, L. V., '93. Loomis, H. B., '85. Lover id ge, D. E ., '50. Luther, F. S. , '70. M ackay,]. (h 1854) . * Mackay, \\'. R , '67. *Mallo ry, G. S. , '58. *Marble, N. E. (h 18 61 ). Mayo, l\1. C., '93. l\lcCook, G. S., '9 7. l\lcCook , J . J. , '63. McCook, P. ] ., '95. McCra ckan, J, II., ' 8 2. l\IcE lwa in , F. A. , '99. Met calf, II . A., '66. * Miller, P . S., ' 64. Miller, \\'. ]. , '92 . :\Iitchell, S. S., ' S5.

Moffett, G. H., '78. Moore, C. E . . '76. Morgan, \V. F., '88. * Mulchahey, ]., '42 (h 1882). Murray, J. B., '62. Neely, H. R., '84. Newton, E. P., '81. Nichols,\\'. F., '70. 'Nichols,]. W., '99. Niles, E. C., '87. Niles, W. P., '93. Niles, W. W. , '57. *Norton, F . L., '68. Olmsted, C. T ., '65. *Paddock, B. H., '48. *Paddock,]. A., '45. Paddock, L. H., '88. Paddock, L. S., '50 (h 1896). Page, D. C. (h 1851). Parker, T. H. , '98. Parsons, A. T., '71. Parsons, I-I., '83. Parsons, J R., '81. Pattison, A. E., '80. Pattison, G. B ., ' 1. *Payne, W., '34 (h 1854). Peabody, F. B., '4R. Pedersen, V. C , '91. Perry,]. B., '72. *Pettit, \V. F., '46. Phair, P D., '94. *Pierce, H. H., '58. Plumb, J. F., '91. Potts, F. H., '68. P ratt, A., '98. P ressey, W., '90. • Preston, T . S., '43. Prout,]. , ' 77. Purdy, C. E. , '88. *Purdy, J. S., ' 4 9. P y nchon , T . R., ' 41. P ynchon , W. II. C , '90. Ra ftery, 0 . H ., ' 7 3 . * Rand a ll, E. D., ' 9 2. Reineman, R. T ., '82. Remington , C. H ., '89. 9t

Tibbits, C. II , '87. Tibbits, W. B., '61. *Toucey, I (h 1846). *Tremaine, C. H. B., '6G Valentine, W. A, '72. Van Meter, A. R., '99. *Van Nostrand, C. A., '77. Verder, D. II , '99. \ibbert, H. C., '6 . \'ibbert, W. H., '58. • Vinton, F., ( h 1854). Walker, D. B., '61. Warner, D. T., '72 (h 1 96). Warner, M. C., '88. *Warren, S. B., '59. \\'ashburn, L. C., '81. \V a term an, L., '71. Watson, S. N, '82. Webster, L, '80. Weed, C. F., '94. Welles,· H. T., '43. Whitcombe, F. B, 'R7. White, R. A , '81. White, W. C., '97. *\\"biting, S. M., '46. * \\'hitlock, H R , '70. Whitney, H. E , '74. Williams, A. J , '96. Williams, C. C , '71. *Williams, E. W., '53. Williams, F. G., '89. Williams, J., '90. *Williams, J. 11., '54. \\'illiams, J. W., '7 . Winkley, R. L., '79. *Witherspoon, 0., '56. Wolfenden, R. H ., '93. *\\'ood, H. S., '71. \Vood, P.M., '97. \\'oodman , C. E., '73. Worthington, E. \V., '75. Wright, A. H ., '83. Wright, G H , '91. Wright, W. G., '91. Yeomans, E. M., '95. Young, C. I-I., '91. Ziegler, C. G., '97. Ziegler, P ., '72.

Richardson, F. \V., '8-1-. Richardson, L. W., '73. *Rogers, R. C., '45. *Rudder, W., '48. Russell, F. F., '85. Russell, G. W., '34 (h 1851). *Sands, 0. A., '87. *Sanford, D.P., '44. *Sanford, H. S , '36 (h 1861). Scarborough, J., '54. Schulte, H. von W., '97. Schi\tz, W. S., '9+. *Scudder, C. D, '75. Scudder, E :\!., '77. Sct1dder, H., '91. *Scudder, H. J., '+6 (h 1 50). Scudder, W , '89 . Selden, F. C., (h 1859). Sennett, L. F , 'H9. Seyms, G. H , ' 72. Shepard, C. N., '9 1. •:•shipman, W. D. (h 1871). *Short, D. H , '33 (h 1856). Short, W., '69. Small, E. F., '74. Smith, C. B., '54. Smith, G. \V. (h 18. 5). Smith, H. ~I , '93. * Smith, H, '62. Smith , J. S., '63. Smith, S. E., '75. Smyth, J.D., '74. *Somers, J. B. Y. (h 1 57). Spencer, U. H ., '90. *Spencer, W. G., '53. *Stevens, S., '65 . Stocking, C. H. W., '60. Stone, M., 'RO. Stotsen burg, J. H ., '50 . Street, C. H ., '96. " Studley, W. H ., '50. Sturtevant, A. M., '98. Tate, W. J., '86. Taylor, E. Fl., '73. *Taylor.]. B., '49. *Taylor, W. F., '44 (h 1851). *Terry, C. E., '51 (h 1856). Thorne, R., '85. *Deceased.

h

\)2

Honorary.

Good Old Trinity AIR-" Annie Laurie."

\Vords by jAMBS BUCDANAN, '53.

Come, let us laugh and sing, And let us merry be; And loudly let our voices ring Through good old Trinity. CHORus-Through good old Trinity, Through good old Trinity, And loudly let our voices ring Through good old Trinity. 'Twill not be long ere we must leave These good old College halls, And take our places in the world, Wherever duty calls. CHORUs-Wherever duty calls, Wherever duty calls, And take our places in the world, Wherever duty calls. And when at length old age shall come, And eyes begin to glaze, With trembling voice we'll sadly hum The songs of college days. CHORUs-The songs of college days, The ,songs of college days, With trembling voice we'll sadly hum The songs of college days.

94.

The Year OW LIKE the inrolling surf the college year is! As it breaks upon these shores it carries up its bits of stone and wood, only to be drawn back upon the receding tide by the undertow. Some of us, like the stones on the sea beach, by a process of rubbing and grinding, come out smooth and well r ounded. T oo m a ny of us manage to float, cork-like, upon the surface, now lifted high upon the crest, now submerged, until we reach the water line. Resting here, we are satisfied with the "experience." Soon some flood tide '"ill draw us into the great current of the graduates. Each year is a receding tide, and it bears someone whom we have grown to like far from this happy haven of our thoughts. There is something so substantial about these solid brown walls of Old Trinity, one almost feels that the laws of nature are inoperative here; and when one h as stretched out his length on the soft spring grass, made cool and comfortable by the extended shadows of Jarvis, Northam and Seabury, he begins to feel that his college course h as been one long sunshiny day. He thinks of what has transpired during the past months : that day in September, when he "fell into line" outside the chapel to add his gentle pressure to urge the Freshman on his course-路was it so long ago? He realizes that the fall, with its renewed acquaintances, had receded before winterwinter fitfully melted into spring, and now summer's "ducks" and heat are here.

H

95

ln an age when specialization is the root and base of everything it is a pleasure to generalize, and it is right to do so, for it i contrary to the policy of expansionists to particularize. In this review we shall touch on the events of the year only in a general way, but we respectfully commend the Tablet to the attention of all lovers of statistics. We concede it has a longer reach than any man on the baseball team; but we lament the' fact that it does not make more home runs among the alumni. College traditions are still clinging fondly about the Rocks. How this thought must call up fancies. Who dares say, "Remember not past years." The Freshmen won the push-rush, and we imbibed new pleasures in" Germania Hall" thereby. Trinity played football last fall under the guidance of a coach who had been at Princeton. While they didn't defeat everything that came their way, the men as a whole did excellent work, and, as nearly every member may be back, next year's Ivy will chronicle the victories of the team. We recall the fact that men were seen playing basketball in the gymnasium last winter with a great deal of agility. Much brilliancy and charm marked this year's Trinity week. House parties and afternoon teas, under the auspices of the various Chapters, made the Junior ball all the more attractive to the many Joyal Trinity girls. We, recall with pleasure the increased number of out-of-town friends who made merry with us then . "After the ball" came the dinner at Farmington Inn. Who shall say it was not a pleasant time ? We regret not being able to narrate, or to give snap shots of these events, "before and after taking." Newspapers detailed the Freshman-Sophomore fight, but the winds blew and the snow fell and covered up the "rivers of blood." Owing to the all-'round excellent work of Brinley, the Indoor-meet was practically a Junior event; and, of course, a success. While speaking of successes-" lest we forget "-as a matter of course 'Ol's Track Team took the Leffingwell cup. Under a professional coach, baseball has developed well. We showed Amherst that she was in for something more than a 'practice game," and West Point was defeated two to five. The usual high standing of our musical and dramatic diversions has been maintained during the past season. Bonfires and cheerful refreshments are still the proper thing, and we hope they will be so long as "the Bishop" holds out an approving band. While on this train of thought-Nineteen hundred, which has been a most model class throughout its college ccurse, ga \路e a smoker this spring, which was certainly a howling success; and although as the evening wore on there developed a certain h aziness peculiarly its own, it will always be kept in mind by at least two or t]lree men who were in it. * * * * * * And so the great surf of young manhood dashes up the shores of college life. Classes are like wa,路es, they vary so; one comes dashing in, smashing all previous records for strength and size; another comes with long, easy sweeps, seething, boiling, grinding all before it, and leaving its mark far above the average "on the sands of time." But they both recede; they both fall back like the surf to become, in the to-morrow, only an unrecognizable part in the ocean of humanity.

96

TRINITY COLL E CE, HARTFORD. 1860 .

College A thletics in Early T imes .;1.

.;1.

N TilE SECOND H ALF of the sixties college athletics meant baseball a n d ro wing. An epidemic of ba seball ent husiasm swept the country just after t he Civil War, an d at about the sa me time i be smaller college began to establish boating clubs. Trinity ha d no gy mn asium un t il after 1870, bu t her students played ball with considerable success fro m 18 65 on. The fi rst crew was pr obably that which was organized in the ea rly mo nths of 1870. The present scribe h a d t he pleasure of playing in Tri nity's first intercollegiate baseball match, and recalls with satisfaction t h at t he game resulted in t he defeat of Wesleyan. The return game ended differently, but we have forgot t en a ll about th a t . These beginnings of intercolleg ia te athletics were p r obably n ot taken very seriously by the Faculties of those days. At all events, an a pplicatio n for excuse from one ch apel service, that the "team" might catch the b oat for Middleto wn, w as denied with an emphasis that left the committee of inquiry in a state bordering on collapse. In fact, such sports were looked upon as diversions not deserving of serious consideratio n by anybody. There were certain compensations, however, in this condition of things. The spiri t of "play" dominated our sports as it does not now. A very large percentag e of the students took part in the games. There were no boa rd fences, no gate m o ney, no "managers," very few subscription papers. The students who went a w a y to play paid their own expenses, owned their uniforms (or played without uniforms), and felt at liberty to go or stay, as they might please. Most of us would have felt it quite infra dig. to play within an enclosure for admission to which a fee was charged. This, of

I

97

course, was merely a matter of custom. There were few such enclosures, if we had wanted one. \Ve were glad enough to collect fees at the doors of the halls where we gave concerts and dramatic entertainments. The members of a visiting team were distinctly regarded as guests. They were entcrtaincu during the day of the game, and usually dismissed with hearty cheers, particularly if the home team bad won. Under these primitive conditions there was lots of fun, even if we did not play as good ball as can be seen now. We did not have to play as good ball. No one was tormented about the guarantee when the attendance was small. It would perhaps have astonished the modern Trinity man, if by some prevision, or if by some dream of the past, be could have seen a crowd of us walking down Washington street of a pleasant Saturday morning to play ball on what we called th~ Baker Street Grounds. These "grounds" were in a pasture situated somewhere near the present Jefferson street, west of Washington. Perhaps forty students would go there in a body. Two players of recognized prowess would "choose up," the sides would be selected, and the disappointed ones would lie down on the grass with the quick instinct of a modern student of surveying-. Then the fortunate ones would play. That was a ll. The game was simply a lot o f healthy young fellows at play. In spite of the absence of late improvements, there was a certain natural joy in these old ways that makes the memory of them a very precious possession. As to the effect of sport so conducted, it may be claimed that it was healthful and in every way beneficial. Did we have field events? Bless you, yes-about every day. There was no measuring, however, and there were no records. I recall that a certain bald-headed physician of my acquaintance was, in college, a phenomenal performer in "the running broad jump." Probably his jumps were never measured. We knew that he could beat the rest of us, and he was respected accordingly; but his name was never blazoned on the scrolls of fame. It is my belief that modern methods have not, so far, produced a general physical effectiveness among young men superior to that which resulted from the spontaneous exercise of older times. Modern "measurements" indicate improvement and modern champions probably out-do their fathers. That is as it should be and is encouraging. But such facts do not necessarily imply an advance in average good health and endurance of physical strain. It would be interesting to compare the records fo r this present year, for example, \\"ith records thirty years old. Has the average health of the average young man improved?

F. S. L.

98

A Song of Summer ~

~

Oh! for the dawn of the summer days, The birth of the breezes light, The days that breathe of the fragrant meads Kissed by the dews of night, Caressed by the winds of night Till the day awakes the world, And the spears of gold across the sky From the eastern hills are hurled .

Oh! for the song of the summer sea, The voice of the restless surge, The curling waves where the great white steeds Out of the deep emerge, Covered with foam emerge, While the black rocks bar their way, Oh! for the joys of the summer路 tide, And I see them toss their snowy manes, The bliss of the dreamy hours, And I hear them champ and neigh. The songs of birds when the night is o'er Waking the sleeping flowers, Calling the dreaming flowers Till their incense fills the morn, For the world with joy and gladness thrills When the summer day is born. -WILLIAM TYLER OLCOTT. U9

The Screech Owl The poet can sing of the linnet's lilt, Of lark, or of whippoorwill's wail, (lf the love-sick ache in the wood dove's coo Or the plaint of the nightingale; But 0! 'tis the little ~crecch owl for me Who hoots at the night so mournfully 1 There is never a breathless depth of dark Where his thick voice does not speak, With an oily chuckle and purr of sound Torn off in a shrill ghost-shriek; And 0! 'tis the little screech owl for me Who rattles the echoes so hollowly! When the sky throbs white with its crystal dust And the wind drags tired and slo\\', When men are asleep in the earth above And asleep 'neath the fox-fire's glow; 0! ghoulishly happy you'll find us three, The dead, and the Ii ttle screech ow I and me:

-J. c.

100

K.

News Items from the Future

By means of a 8cie ntific process, too complicated to be described here, The Ivy is enabled to presen t to i ts readers a few paragraphs plucked, so to speak, from the dist a nt future. The following quotations are taken from The Trinity Tablet of 1950.

*

A good deal of dissatisfaction has been expressed of late regarding the tendency of the Faculty to cut 1·ecitations. It i rumored that the undergraduates will soon take a ction in the matter unless a T"Oluntnry reform is begun at once by the professors.

*

A large incoming class is confidently predicted. Old Adams, who is beginning to show his age, says that be has b~ard the same optimistic prophecy every Spring since 1840, n1ore than a century ago. Three members of the Freshman class ha\•e been taking Greek this year.

They look it!

*

The course in ElectricRl Painless Dentistry b as been wen attended this term. The Committee on the Revival of Ancient Customs contemplates a reproduction of an oldfashioned 11 College German." Fifty years ago, n the German " 'vas still in ,·ague, after a long lease of popularity. The best authorities describe this 11 cotillon," as it is called in learned trea. Uses, as a kind of terps ichorean tnadness lasting an entire evening, and enlivened by a series of bribes, callerl 11 fayors." This year's debutantes have promised the committee that they 'vill wear their grandmothers' dancing costumes upon this interesting occasion. How they may n1anage to dance the new "one-step" in skirts is a tnatter of conjecture. They 'vill haYe a harder taRk than t.be men, who will find the antique '' d1·ess suit, " as it was cal!ed, fairly well adapted t o a ntodern ball roon1. But a black coat with long tails is a melancholy garment. Natu1·e dre~ses the male bird i n a gorgeous plumage. 0~1r ancestors reversed this process a t their d a nces, and the co11egian of fifty years ago went to his" German'' in a son11Jre, funereal costume t h a t will cau~e our ge neration to mingle smiles with tears. \Ve wish the committee all success. On with t be dance !

*

We h a ve b een !lu t hor ized to !lnnounce t h a t the Q. E. D. Fraternity, whose Chapter at Trinity is in a m os t fl o uri s hing co n d i tio n, has YO t ed i n fayor of the establishment of a chapter at the Universi t y o f Gu a m .

*

A mos t am a zing scene w a8 witnessed r ecently at th e rear of J arv is Hall. A Senior, something of an antiqu a rian in a s mall w a y, r o d e b y th e co llege astrid e a ho•·se. Where he obtained the hors e is a mystery .

*

We can n o t refrain from ca lling s pecia l n. ttc ntion t o o ur co lored s up p lemen t, this; week. We also m ention, with p a rdonable pride, th e fact t h a t w e h ave o ri gi n ated a n ahsolutely new jokethe first witticism without a p edi gree since 1 9 4 0. Miscellaneous s t a tistics o f the Seni o r Cl ass h a v e b een sent t o The T ab let . Selections t h erefr o m follow : Number o f Se ni o r~, 9 0 . Imperialists , 35; Reactio ni s t s, 20: S ocialists, 6; Ana rchis ts, 2; Belta tnyites, 10 ; Anti-\V o m a nis ts, 7; No P o litical C o n victi o n s, 1 0. Professions, etc. : L a w, 4 ; Diplomacy, 5 ; ~l e dicine , 8; Electricity, G ; journ a lism , 4 ; ).1 inis try, 3; Hail101

roading, 7 ; rE rial Navigation, 1; ture, 1 (uncertain) ; the Stage, 6; Professional Athletics, 8; Arctic Music, 1; Government Positional

Scientific Farming, 2; Banking, 3; A1·cbitecture, 2; Literal\1ining, 5; Poker, 1; Travel, 4; Historical Research, 2; Exploration, 1; Hygienic Plumbing, 1; Asiatic Trade, 3; Manila, 1; Army, 3; Navy, 2; Undecided, 6.

*

A sedes of articles is in preparation for The Tablet dealing \Vilh Trinity tnen "·lto have won =-~putalions as historians. The first group of our imtnortals flourished half a century ago, and includes th e names of Sydney G. Fishet·, of the Class of 1879; Ernest F. Henderson , 1882; Charles MeL. Andrews, 1884; William D. McCrackan, 1885.

Professor Conant flitted to Wethersfield in his new flying machine one afternoon last week. He hent back against the \Yind , but is now out o f danger, and able to walk around his room occasionally. An esteemed contemporary wishes to know \vhether hazing has been abolished at Trinity. \Ve are pleased to answer that hazing has been abolished here almost every year since the estab-

lishment of the college.

Yale's leading daily is evidently running short of inspiration. It printed the following paragraph, recently: 11 A two-seated automobil e " ' hee led by, containing Trinity's Senior Class." Our grandfathers smiled at this identical sarcasm long before the automobile had displaced the horse and carriage. However, it is pleasant to note that Yale displays a conservative tendency now and then.

*

Speaking of conset·vative tendencies , Trinity holds a place unique among New England colleges. lt r emains the only institution of its kind in this part of the world that has not surrendered to the demand of women for admitta nce. Thus has the historic u Trinity type of man" been preserv~d, despite the iconoclastic tendencies of the twentieth century. As he 'vas fifty years a go, so is the Trinity undergraduate to-d~y. shy, retiring, absorbed in his studies, bold of mind and hard of heart. While he bas not been wholly safe from the wiles of the gentler sex, he has remained for more than a century a fine specimen of the de'\"'oted scholar, eschewing frivolity for the sake of erudition, and prefen-ing the wisdom of books to the folly of bright eyes and stui lin g lips.

*

*

The engagement of Brown, '5 1, to Miss Ne\vcombe, of Hartford , has been announced. Bmwn has been engaged to four different girls since he entered college. He hopes to bold the rec o rd by the end of his Senior year. ALl.l'MNUS.

l02

One dav built I a castle, Fair-and good to see ; Ambition was its corner-stone, My lady-' twas for thee. The g olden sunset's glimmer Shone on its turrets fa ir ; And the pennons fl oated in the light Of purest thoughts laid b are. A g oodly m oat of tru stfulness Ran 'round it s lofty walls; The warden watched well o'er t he ga te, Where my heart's portcullis falls. Love ruled throughout its spa cio us h a lls, Of his warri o rs proud was he, Ten thousand lies and evil words Could not harm thee or me. The castle lies in ruins, Its brightness a ll ha s fled , And battlements crumhle into dust , F or its master love is dead. Can a ny cunning b uilder Rear again its walls of lig ht ; Can h eart' s decay be swept a side, And life a gain b e bright? -JAM ES ).1. H UDSON. 10~1

March To-day in a moment of madness The boisterous March-wind blew The curtain of rain from Earth's window-pane, And I saw Spring's face shine through. -H. R. R.

Mother Earth She blames the foolish Children of Men: Her bounty is meant for all; But the greedy have sworn to have their fill, So the poor and weak must fall. She hopes to teach them justice first, Then bid thern do the right. God grant them perfect Brotherhood, And eyes to see the light ! -W. D. McCRACKAN.

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Building a Fire ~

~

"'ttbe firc=~ogs, sbo\>el, an~ tbe tongs, 'ttbe bello1"s witb their lcatbcrn lungs, 'Cbc smohe, tbat 's alll'al1S mounting bigbcr; !Do all to righteousness inspire."

O WROTE a versifier of the sixteenth century, and his Jines were quaintly carved on the mantel of a house built in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. Some learned persons say that the inscription must have been written later than the building of the house, because people did not have lungs in the sixteenth century, or rather they did not use the word till the seventeenth century However this m ay be, the old fellow was right, for a cheerful fire does conduce to right thinking, to serious reflection, a nd so indirectly to honorable conduct. It "inspires to righteousness. " No one can sit before a lively wood fire and evolve a plan to cheat his instructors or even to rob his friend . You must have a steam radiator if you wish to construct a conspiracy. You will find no wood fires in \\'all street, only vile imitations made with gas and terra.cotta makebelieve log-s which do not "inspire to righteousness" but to deep and dark machinations. lndin路ct radialion sugg~sts indirect and crooked cond uct, but before a wood fire one not only teels good. but for the time being he is good. The old poet noticed this-I call him a poet not from the excellence of his verses-" lungs" and "tongs" for instance do not rhyme well-but because he hit on the great truth that an open wood fire is a moral agent or factor, a source of virtue, an inspirer of righteousness. But building a fire in one of the fireplaces in Trinity College does not inspire to righteousness ; on the contrary, the effect of the preliminary operation is disquieting and

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105

irritating in the extreme. It suggests rebellion, and even inspires blasphemy and makes a man fit for "treasons, stratagems and spoils." Unmindful of the fact that modern paper is nearly incombustible, y ou tear up a World or Journal and place the fragments on the cold, gray bed of ashes, then you "bring out the old cigar box'' and smash it under your heel. The pieces you lay crisscross on the paper and then some kindling. On top of this you place the larger wood, skilfully allowing room for the circulation of air between them. Then you touch a lighted match to the paper. While the match lasts there is a little flame, then the paper blackens along the edge and suddenly stops, after filling the room with smoke of a peculiar pungency. The gruesome features of Lydia Pinkham and of the extraordinary creatures who certifY that they "regained their health entirely " -more's the pity if the statement be true-after taking "three pink pills," and of the man who "bad lost all interest in life and all sensation in his lower limbs for years," and was able to "win the foot race against all comers at Marcellus Crossroads after using a bottle of your invaluable liniment, price 50 cents, for sale by all druggists," come o ut on the charred surface with a more diabolical expression even than that they had in the unburnt paper. Little sneering wrinkles run over their countenances, they seem to wink in fiendish glee, then they break up into blackened flakes and are gone. Failure number one. You take the carefully built struclure apart and "rearrange the material" as the professor advises you to clo with your theme. After several matches have failed the paper seems to catch. The whole business then devotes itself to producing smoke which goes up the flue for the present. If only the cigar box would catch! Nobody understands the construction of the flues in Trinity College, not even the architect who is probably now engaged in planning flues on a larger scale than any in this mundane sphere. They run mysteriously along the walls, and your smoke may come out in the room of the second section east and a story below you, and rice versa. However, that does not trouble you, but suddenly the flue reverses, the smoke pours out-a thick cloud-' 路darkness visible"-from under the brass screen warranted to "prevent the chimney from smoking." What an immense quantity there is of it; "who would have thought the old man to have bad so much blood in him?" Now, a ll this does not "inspire to righteousness" very much, but on a sudden a little sheet of flame about as big as a maple leaf appears in the smoke. It disappears and appears again multiplied and reduplicated. It seems to eat up the smoke. The old cigar box bas caught on. Little spires shoot up among the kindling and attack the large sticks. All at once everything is burning bri~kly. Even the paper helps in " conflagration pale to light the gloom." The smoke in the room is rapidly sucked into the fireplace and up the chimney. How beautiful the fire is, not only in color and form, but in motion! Like a livin g thing it has grace and character and it will soon die. But it can soon be reillumined; it is only the first bnngin.g to life that is so bard. Let us sit before it and be inspired to righteousness if only temporarily. After building a fire we need some inspiration and moral uplift. THE FIRE-WORSHIPPER IN No. 0.

C. F.J.

106

Two Wise Little Owls

The fields are d im with night, The stars in the heavens are few , Two little owls in the trees Are si nging of love, t u-wboo ! The owls make love by night Instead of by garish day. They never can see tu-whoo! tu-whoo ! Which is far the wisest w a y. We bother and pick and choose 'T wi xt eyes and lips and hair, 'Twixt pride and purses and powrr, Till we're all too old to care. But did we make love blind As the owls do, I repeat It makes no difference tu-whoo! tu-whoo ! We 'd find love just as sweet.

-J.

107

C. K.

On the Campus ~

~

How the night ai r brings memory back, The same dark towers against the sky, An organ note, a college cry, The same faint rustle of the breeze, The same discussions you and I Made seriot1s under these same trees When you were Dick and I was Jack. The days when all the world was young, The world was wrong , we'd put it rightIn oratory, over night. Life was a football game and we Could tell a glorious victory. Dick, ca n you sing the songs then sung? Wisdom of youth in days bygone, Sweet youth which sings in every heart And builds on hope with artless art, Live, live! we know the world laughs back, No matter how we play our part, Laughs at the dreams of Dick and Jack, Laughs at the deeds of Richard-} ohn . -RuEL CROMPTON TuTTLE . l.O R

A College Capitalist May lOth .

23,

HOLTON HALL.

MY DEAR GORDEN :

When you were here last fall, y o u were as much interested and mystified as I was myself over a certain letter which I had received. As considerable time has passed, and as you may have forgotten some of the details, I have decided to begin the yarn by giving you a copy of the letter itself. NEw YoRK CITY, Nov. 27 , 1899. DEAR AusTIN:

I have been waiting to hear from you again regarding the inten·iew I desired you to have with my friend, Mr. Watson. He is going away, \\'ednesday, to pass Thanksgiving at his father's, and will not return until the end of the week, but after that I should like very much to have you meet him, either at his place of business here, or at the hotel in the Catskills. I know you will be extremely pleased to meet Mr. Watson, whether you and he come together on business m atters or not. You will at least do me a very great favor if you will appoint a time a nd place at which you will see him. He has im,ited you to ~·isit him at the Lodge, and it would be most desirable lor you to meet him there. But you might meet at some other place and make his acquaintance. I am, with best regards, Your friend,. }ACK.

10!)

The italicizing is my own, and these were the passages, as you will remember, which puzzled us most. To begin with, I had only the most casual acquaintance with the young man ; not even eating at the same table, or having any of those trivial connections, which serve to form friendships in hotel life. We had simply taken a few long tramps together; on several of which he had regaled me with his experiences in the late Cuban war, in a most graphic and interesting manner, and this letter was the first I had received since "\Ye parted. Who Mr. W. was, or why in the dickens I should meet him, I couldn't in the least imagine. Well, after all sorts of ideas about confidence games, I decided to write, explaining that no doubt he bad written before, but that the letter was not received; telling him I should be very pleased to meet Mr. W., or any friend whom he might recommend , at any time or place. Well, do you know, three days a fterwards I received a letter requesting me to telegraph for him to come and see me at once. There was such a tinge of Sherlock Holmes in the whole proceeding that I did as he asked. l-Ie came, and there was unfolded to me about the coolest piece of confidence business I ever heard of, and certainly the coolest I ever expect to take part in. To be very brief, Mr. W. had bought a hotel and a large tract of land, and proposed to form a stock company. He asked my young friend if he knew of any one who would feel like investing twenty-five or thirty thousand in such a scheme. This interesting youth had long planned to go on a hunting trip for a few days; gave him my name, and proposed going up to Hartford, and talking me into the scheme. He got his holiday and expenses, and from some out of the way town on Chesapeake Bay had entertained Mr. W. over the long-distance wire on my enthusiasm. Then, having attained his object, namely, his vacation, he returned to New York, and dropped the whole matter. But Mr. W. did not see it in that light, and hence the letter. So far, it was all very amusing. But when he explained that he must bring Mr. W. up the following week, that I must manifest the greatest interest in a hotel scheme, a nd plan to flood New York's residences with bottled drinking water, I objected; but it was useless-either Mr. W. must come up or be would lose his positi-on. In due time they arrived. Mr. W. was a stout man, somewhat under medium height, with a round bead, closely cropped gray hair and beard. There was nothing re路 markable about his face or form which would impress one favorably or otherwise. However, be did not look like a man who could be taken in or be easily deceived. I ~oon saw that be bad come fully prepared to talk up his hobby, a mountain hotel. Moreover (thanks to that rascally Jack), he bad come with the fixed opinion that I bad wealth to command, and was disposed o be "in it," and for two hours I heard of nothing but pure air and mountain spring water. My role was a simple one-I bad but to look and listen like a man with thirty thousand in his pocket. At last be thanked me for the opportunity I had given him of seeing me, and begged me to come up and see the place whether I invested or not. Ah! Mr. W., bow my conscience thanks you for that saving clause, "or not." Poor Jack, he bad fled, and was seeking to quiet his nerves with cigarettes, across the hall. Mr. W. hoped I might come up the next Saturday, but I wrote that I was not sufficiently interested to waste time 110

â&#x20AC;˘'

or money in going. But, as Jack arrived on Friday evening from New York with round trip tickets, the following Saturday two young men were seen leaving the train at a certain pre-revolutionary town on the Hudson, where, with all the attention that is heaped on men of means, a handsome turnout was waiting to carry them to the Lodge, a cozy hotel, located on the mountain side overlooking the great Hudson river. During those days and on my subsequent visit I could not but think what a vast amount of business was conducted on faith. Here was a man who had bought a hotel, who was himself the chief owner in a la rge manufacturing business, who made up his mind that I could, if I would, lay out thirty thousand dollars on his scheme, if he could only get me sufficiently interested ; and yet I had never mentioned money matters to him. Before luncheon we walked about the place, and all the time I was conscious of an absurd desire to say: Man! do I look like a person with thirty thousand dollars to fool away? You know my fondness for plain water-think of me-standing there in the bleak March wind at an altitude of twenty-eight hundred feet above the Hudson, drinking three pints of cold spring water just to please that old gentleman's vanity, while with chattering teeth I assented to the absence of a ll germs and mineral matter therein. We t a lked business that evening-the old gentleman and I ; and I began to be afraid that I should really be persua ded into purchasing at least a third interest in the hotel ; there was, however, a certain sense of security in the consciousness that my entire worldly possessions were less in value than one-tenth the amount he wanted. Of course I could not rush hastily into such a scheme; I must t a ke time to think it over. We w ere both desirous of impressing our good characters on each o ther, so we went to church. He h ad a pew in the village church, but, as I afterwards learned, it was the first time he had ever occupied it. I must say my ride church ward was somewhat disturbed by the th o ught that the o nly money I had was a bill which in itself would be a worthy offering for any capitalist, but I did not care to make the sacrifice for mere show. When we were comfortably seated I recognized the rector as a gentleman of my acquaintance, and was somewhat discomforted thereby. He in his turn recognized mt', an d asked me to assist him by reading the lessons, which I was only too glad to do , as it offered a way of escape in regard to my contribution; needless to say this did not injure my character in the eyes of Mr. W. Two long drives and two well served meals with sparkling liquid accompaniments and with many references to my future connection as junior partner in the company completed the day. In this visit I experienced all the delightful patronage which is showered on men who have wealth which others are anxious to control, without the anxiety of feeling that I might lose anything by an unwise investn.ent. We parted the next morning, for I found the role was tiresome to me. I preferred rather to be a poor student than to be wearied with plans and side elevations and the investigation of deeds and of title rights. I must have more time, and I took it. Before giving my final decision I had the pleasure of accepting an invitation to attend a dinner given by Mr. W. to a few intimate friends on his fifty-sixth birthday. I shall always look back upon this occasion as one of the most unique of my college days' experiences. 111

â&#x20AC;˘

At last, ~s I promised him I would, I gave him a decided answer. He thanked me for my promptness, and there was nothing which betrayed disappointment in the letter which my note called forth. And in a subsequent letter from my young acquaintance I learned that the old gentleman had formed a great regard for my business sagacity, and that his only regret was, "that I felt I could not put money into the scheme without seriously discommoding the interest of others," which last statement was absolute truth. I will conclude by saying the whole affair is like one of those examples in which you remove the unknown quantities from one side to the other of the equation. Reminiscently yours, AUGUSTINE H. W. ANDERSON.

112

Evening ~

~

Pale cameo-colored fires across the west, Dun pastures, bushed; a rim of darkling trees, One star that flickering hangs, a s if the breeze Swung it, a white-lit censer, and deep rest Muffled across Day' s struggling, teeming breast, The very brook that sang its bubbly glees Now draws its sleek length, quiet, And like black seas The twilight flo ods sweep down with Star-foamed crest. Hark ! I have heard the brown owl softly boot, Whom calls he through the dimness? An d again! Surely I b ear a crysta l-dripping flute Answer his cry, a s fro m dark da le and plain Mist-shapes unloose. Beat low my heart, beat low, Lest thy red drummings bid the wood gods go! -J. c. K. 113

The Last Reach [The America's Cup Race in the Fall of '9fl .]

She had won her way on the windward reach, With half a minute or more to spare; She has handily rounded the windward mark, And now the wind's on our quarter fair.

The spinnaker boom outboard is swung, With reef-knots loosed and main-sail free; With jibs and club-topsails bellying wide We're homeward bound o'erthe flying sea. We hold our course though 'tis hard to steer For the driving foam and the flying spray,We've passed the mark, and the race is done, Our Cup Defender has w on the day. -F. E. WATERMAN.

11-1-

The Caliph and the Bicycle Repairer ~

~

T came to pass that the Caliph Haroun Alraschid, being Wearied of the Ordinary Diversions of Life, Decided to try the NewFangled Stunt known as the Bicycle. And lo! After many Bumps and Bruises from Hard Practice in the Royal Bicycle Academy, the great and good Caliph acquired such Dexterity in the 1anagement of the Steed of Steel that he was Able to Ride even one Whole Block without Putt ing more than Seven Faithful Subjects on the Bum and the Pension List. The Caliph soon Wearied of Paying large Sums to the Repairers, for he Began to Realize that he was being Used for a Good Thing and a Gazabo. He decided to Invest in no more Prisms of Gilded Brick. A Happy Thought struck the Commander of the Faithful. He Resolved to find an Honest Repairman and make him Official Bicycle Repairer to the Court. His next Move was to artfully Arrange the Buckles of his Tool-Bag so that they rattled against the Frame to Beat the Band. Then he Started off to Find an Honest Repairman. At the fir st Shop he cam e to, the Caliph left the Wheel, and told the Jay in Charge that There Must be Something t he Matter with the Chain, since he Heard a Strange Rattling Noise when he Ro de. The Repairman Smole an Oily Smile and Gave the Caliph a Repair Check. The next Day the Repairman a ppea red Before the Ca li ph an d Spoke in this Wise: "0 most Noble, Exalted and Outofsig ht Ruler of the Faith ful , I have carefully examined your Bicycle a t Great Expense, and I H ave Fixed the Chain by a Secret and Ingenious Process, of which I am the Sole Patentee-" "Thou Conglomerate and Farinaceous Descenda nt of a L obster !" interrupted the Caliph, with that Delica te Oriental Courtesy which h as E xcited the Ad miratio n of a ll Ages. "Ho, Guards ! Toke this Miserable Frea k and Pla ce him o n th e F loor of the Royal Bike Academy; then let the Royal Track Tea m Scorch over him till his Head be Severed from his Body." And the Caliph Pressed the But t on fo r a nother jinfizz. The next Repairman visited by the Caliph was Ali Mustapha O'Lea r y. And on t h e Day Following Ali Appeared Before the Caliph and Spake Thusly: 115

"0 Most utterly Slick and Serene Ruler of the Faithful, I h ave Carefully Examined your Bicycle at Great Expense, and I find that the Chain is of no Earthly Use. Wherefore, I wish to Recommend to you a Patent Flush-Joint, Internal Expanding, FiveSprocket Chainless, of my Own Invention. Price, 20 Shekels, or Easy Payments, if Desired. I-" "Contemptible Son-of-an-Unbeliever!" Roared the Caliph, Quoting from the Court Book of Etiquette, "Tc;> the Bicycle Track with him ! Pump him Full of Goo and Pound him Full of Tacks." (Wo uldn't it Jar you?) The next Experiment of the Caliph's was named Ben Thare. (They called him that because he had Ben Thare rumself.) Ben was Onto the Little Game by this Time, having noted the Closing of his Rivals' Shops, so he Resolved to give His Nibs a Square Deal for Once. In due Time, Ben the Bike-Butcher appeared Before the Potentate, and be Chewed the Rag to this Effect: '' 0 most Superb and All-right Peach, I Announce that I ha\'e Carefully Examined your Bicycle, and Find that the Rattle does not Proceed from the Chain, but from the Buckles of the Tool-Bag. There will be No Charge." After a Profound Salaam, He started to Leave, whistling Softly to himself, "Don't you Wish you Were the Repairman?" But the Caliph Called him Back, and Ordered the Royal Body-guard to Fire Bouquets at Him. And he gave him a Square Meal, also. And thus it came to Pass that Ben Thare became the Official Bicycle Repairer to the Court of the Caliph Haroun Al-raschid-may Allah rest his Soul! To-day Ben is President of the Bagdad Bicycle and Automobile Trust. For, lo! when he Found a Good Thing, he Froze Onto it. Bully Chee! MORAL.

Owing to the present scarcity of morals, the moral will be omitted.

J.

11()

A. W.

A Host in Blue J864- J900 ~

~

Across the marsh-land, rank on rank I found the iris growing; And o'er the marsh-land's low expanse I saw their pennants blowing, Ten thousand knights of the fleur-de-lis Their b rave blue banners s howing. While wide a nd far fleet heralds flew To tell of the hosts' advancing, The azure-winged lithe dragon flies, The sun on their a rmor glancing, And they whispered the news of a knightly quest That set the daisies dancing. Down the southland in the sun I saw an army going, And over the host in blue, I thought I saw our banner blowingAnd their knighlly quest came home to me And set my whole hea r t glowing. HEKRV RuTGERS RE~ISEN.

Somewhere and Sometime (A SONG)

There's a brave bonnie harkie a-sailing the sea, Somewhere, my darling, somewhere, 'Tis laden with good things for you and for me, Somewhere, my darling, somewhere, And it's breasting the billows and tossing the spray Like a dolphin that sports with the surge in its play, And where it will anchor I 'd rather not say, But it's somewhere, my darling, somewhere. There's a ship that will come into harbor at last, Sometime, my darling, sometime; We scarcely will wait till the anchor is cast, Sometime, my darling, sometime, For o ur craft will have come that we've waited for long, What? you ask me to tell when it comes, in my song? I'll own I'm indefinite, still I'm not wrong; 'Twill come sometime, my darling, sometime. -\VJLLJAM TYLER OLCOTT.

11 8

Colinette (A

SOLILOQUY)

[Afl er the French of P a ul Ve rlaine]

Desolate, gray, Drear gloomy day Chilling my heart, Why are you come? Song birds are dumb Till you depart. Dark is the sky, Ah! I know why, Colinette frowned, Whose that? I vqw There she goes now Charmingly gowned . Why! the sun's out, Clouds in full rout, Was I beguiled ? Breezes are light, All the world's bright, Colinette smiled. -\VILUA;\1 TYLER OLCOTT,

119

'96.

The Trinity Tablet Published e•·ery three 1reeks during term time by the Students of Trinity College

Board of Editors 1899- 1900 JAMES ALBERT WALES, 1901, llianagmg Editor.

THEOPHILUS MINTON SYPHAX, 1902, · Business llianager.

AUGUSTUS TALCOTT WYNKOOP, 1901, Literary Editor.

THOMAS PROSSOR BROWNE, ]R., 1900. JAMES MOSGROVE HUDSON, 1901.

120

A. T. WYNKOOP .

T. P. BROWNE, jR.

T. ]. M. SYPUAX .

]. M. HUDSON.

]. A. WALBS.

121

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The Trinity Ivy Founded by the Class of 1874

Editors '74. '75. '76. ' 77. '78. '79.

P. H . Whaley, G. M . Dubois, S. H. Hewlett, H . E. Whitney. W. D. Sartwelle, H. M. Hooper, C. D. Scudder, G. W. Lincoln, E. W. Worthington. I. Hiester, E . N. Burke, H. V. Rutherford, W. W. Gillette, W. C. Skinner. A. M. Clarke, R. H. Coleman, W. E. Rogers, J. E. Kurtz, G. H. Norton. W. C. Blackmer, R. M. Campbell, G. H. Moffett, J. C. Duell, H . B. Scott. W. N. Elbert, Managing Editor; Orr Buffington, A. Harding, J. S. Carpenter, S. G. Fisher. '80. G. Kneeland, W. R. Leaken, W. L. Crosby, C. G. Williams, J. C. Barrows. '81. G. B. Pattison, Managing Editor ; L. C. Washburne, A. W. Reineman, W. T . Elmer, G. S. Huntington. 122

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] . D . EYANS.

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M . H U DSON .

WATJ!RJ.t A N .

C. Carpenter, Managing Editor; C. H . Carter, C. E. Hotchkiss, D. M. Bohlem, R. T. Reineman. '83. F. Rossevelt, l\1anaging Editor; H. L. Golden, H. W. Thompson, A. H. Wright, J. R. Carter. '84. E. L. Purdy, Managing Editor; W. R. Sedgwick, W. S. Barrows, F. D. Bulkley, E. S. VanZile, E. S. llills. '85. S. T. 11iller, l\1anaging Editor; H. Nelson, Jr., H B. Loomis, A. Cod man, J. R. Cunningham. '86. H. R. Heydecker, Managing Editor; G. E. Beers, E. C. Niles, E. B. Hatch, A. H. Anderson, '87, \V. J. Tate. '87. A. H. Anderson, Managing Editor; G. C. Carter, G. S. Waters, C. \V. Bowman, F. B. Whitcombe, 0. A. Sand s. â&#x20AC;˘gs. M. C. Warner, Managing Editor; J. P. Elton, L. \V. Downes, A. McConihe, R. C. Eastman, II. M. Belden. '89. C. II. Remington, 1\fanagingEditor; R. H. Schiitz, S. F. Jarvis, Jr., A. E. Wright, A. Millard, R. C. Tuttle. '90. G. P. Coleman and G. \V. Miner, Managing Editors; G. T. Macauley, LiteraJy Editor; G. T. Warner, C. S. Griswold, R. McC. Brady, R. H. Hutchins. '9 1. E. B. Finch, Managing Editor; J. B. Burnham, Literary Editor; A. C. Gra\""es, I. W. Hughes, J. F. Plumb, E. F. Pressey. '92. H. S. Gra ves and W. 0. Orton, 1\:Janaging Editors; T. II. Yardley, Literarx Editor; R. F. Humphries, C. A. Johnson, Ernest Randall. '93. Reginald Pearce, Managing Editor; R. P. Bates, Literarx Editor; W. F. Collins, W. E. Conklin, james Cullen, Jr., J. W. Lewis, W. P. Niles. '94. W. W. Vibbert and C. F. Weed, Managing Editors; P.R. Wesley, Literarx Editor; G. W. Ellis, H. T. Greenley, N. T. Pratt. '95. R. H. Macauley :tnd F. S. Burrage, Managing Editors; David Willard, Literary Editor; E. P . Hamlin, W. \Y. Reese, S. K. Evans, A. F. Miller, E. l\1. Yeomans. '96. L. Potter and E. Parsons, 111anaging Editors; P. T. Custer, Literary Editor; l\1. H . Coggeshall, W. F. Dyett, W. T. Olcott, C. H . Street, S. K. Zook. '97. H. W. Allen and G. S. McCook, Managing Ediwrs; W. S. Danker. Literarx Editor; G. E. Cogswell, G. T. Hendrie, H. W. Hayward, P. M. Wood, H. T . Sherriff, M. F. Chase. '98. M. R. Cartwright and Philip Cook, Managing Editors; H. R. Remsen, Literarx Editor; W. M. Austin, H. J. Blakeslee, D. C. Graves, T. H. Parker, Alexander Pratt, Jr., P. S. Smithe. '99. C. B. Hedrick and J. W. Nichols, 1\:Janaging Editors; R. A. Benson, Literary Editor; Aubrey Vibbert, F. A. McElwain, J. B. Bunn, F. S. Bacon, C. A. Smith. 1900. W. C. I-I ill and F. W. Prince, Managing Editors; H A. Hornor, Literary Editor; T . G. Case, E. P. Taylor, A. S. Titus, E. M. Tracy. 1901. F. E. Waterman and J. 1. Hudson,ll.fanaging Editors; A. T. Wynkoop,Literaq Editor; J. A. Wales, Art Editor; A. H. W. Anderson, J.D. Evans, A. P. K elley, W. A. Mitchell, R. E. Peck. '82.

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THE LIBRARY.

1.2 5

Library Committee ~

~

THE PRESIDEN1' OF THE COLLEG E. CHARLES]. HOADLV, LL.D. PROFESSOR W. R. MARTIN. Librarian WJLLIA~I

N. CARLTON.

Assistant

The Library is open from 10 A . M . to 1 2 AI ., and from 2 P . M. to 5 P . .M. on t:ach week day.

The number of volumes received during the year, exclusive of some 700 pamphlets and unbound catalogues and journals, is 1, 162. Of this number 102 were pu rchased and 1 ,060 were added by gift. The whole number of volumes in the Library is now entered as 39,682, besides about 3,400 duplicate volumes, about 26,000 pamphlets, and about 6,000 duplicate pamphlets. In accordance with the provisions of the will of the Rt. Rev. John Williams, D.D., LL.D., of the class of 1835, formerly President, and at his death Chancellor of the College, 327 volumes from his library, for i.hc most part works on Theology, have been presented to the College and added to our Library. The late Horace Burr, M.D., ofWilmington,Del., provided in his will that his library of works in the literature and philology of modern languages should be presented to the College. This collection, which is in some ways of special interest, including 246 v olumes, has been added to our Library. The Rev. Charles M . Mead , D.D., recently Professor in the H a rtford Theological Seminary, besides giving to the Alumni Fund the privilege of purchasing from his library fifteen volumes of works in Hebrew and Ara bic lexicography at a moderate price, has presented to the Library the most v a luable gift which it has ever received in the depa rtments of Biblical Literature a nd Shemitic Theology, amounting to 168 volumes. The Rev. Robert A. Benton, of the class of 1864, has presented to the Li brary two valuable manuscripts of portions of the New Testament in Greek, written in the XI. or XII. century, and brought to this country by his father, the late Rev. George Benton, of the class of 1 33. Charles J. Hoadly, LL.D, of the class of 18 51, has made v a luable additions to his former generous gifts to the Library. The h a ndsome set of Larousse's Gra nd Dictionnaire Universe! du dix-neuvieme Si(\cle, in seventeen quarto volumes, ackn o wledged la st 126

year, appears among this year's accessions; and special mention should be further made of his gifts of the superb facsimiles of the Laurentian manuscript of Aeschylus and the Oxford manuscript (Codex Oxoniensis Clarkianus) of Plato, the Arabic Grammar of Peter Kirstenins (1608-1610), Philostratus's Life of Apollonius of Tyana (1501), Davis's The New England States, in four volumes, and other philological and historical publications. The most notable of the books purchased this year are the facsimiles of the Codex Sarravianus-Colbertinus of the Old Testament in Greek, and of the Codex Bern en sis 363 of various authors in Latin. STATISTICS OF GROWTH.

Volumes in

Library, M ay3 1 , 1 9 8 .

General Works, Philosophy, Theology, . . . . Social and Political Science, Philology and Classics, Science and Art, Literary Periodicals, Modern Literature, History, Travel, Biography, Totals,

I

Added, 1898-9.

Totals.

1,305 774 7,490 8,085 3,155 5,442 2,261 3,540 6,46

6 7 417 166 149 50 4 205 158

1,311 781 7,907 8, 251 3,304 5,492 2,265 3,745 6,626

38,520

1 ,162

39,682

1 8!l 6-7.

189 7-8.

18!)8-!l.

6 140 157 164 114 153 173 7 81 229

2 94 143 124 162 87 71 101 35 202

1,304

1,021

STATISTICS OF CIRC ULATION.

General Works, . . . Philosophy and Sociology, Theology, . . . Philology a nd Classics, Science and Art, Periodicals, English Fiction, English Essays, Poetry, and Drama, Other Literature, History, Biography, and Travel,

2 22 47 54 63 15 25 66 15 86 ---

Totals,

---

I

395

CIRCULATION BY MONTHS, 1898-9.

June, September, October, November, December,

13 8 42 46 34

January, February, March, April, M ay, 127

49 59 82 24 38 395

Evening Hours .,&

.,&

[By a Member of '65.]

Am-" Sparkling and Bright." The twilight haze, with its gentle rays, O'er Trinity's campus stealing, Veils the ivied walls of the college halls With a mantle half concealing. The echoing song trips merrily along To the notes of her musical laughterIn pleasure roves through classic groves, And sings of the bright hereafter. With its liquid rhymes the river chimes Bright songs of the evening hours, While the music-breeze of the campus trees Breathes sweetly through these bowers. Through the azure cloud that seems to shroud The face of Luna smiling, The moonlight gleams in silvery beams, Life's college hours beguiling.

Shining afar, each diamond star Of night's bright-jeweled crown, Each precious gem of the diadem In beauty-light looks down. But these evening hours, like the fairy flowers That float on the sparkling river, In their silent flight soon fade from sight And are lost to us forever.

128

The New England Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association

Officers, '99- 1900 H. L. SwETT, Bowdoin.

President, Vice-President,

C. A. IvEs, Wesleyan.

Secretary,

E. S. CHACE, Brown.

Treasurer,

R. MURRAY, M. I. T.

Executive Committee Chairman, H. L. SwETT, Bowdoin.

C. BILLINGTON, Wesleyan.

E. S. CHACE, Brown. V. W. GoocH, Dartmouth .

S. B. Wooo, Will iams. R. MURRAY, M. I. T.

The Association Amherst College.

Trinity Colleg e.

Bowdoin College.

Tufts College.

Brown University.

Wesleyan University .

Dartmouth College.

Williams College.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

University of Maine.

130

The Fourteenth Annual Championship Meeting Worcester, Mass., May 20th, 1900.

Programme of Events Two-mile Run.

16-pound Hammer.

J.

G. MELANDY, Bro w n, 115ft. 11 in .

D. C. HALL, Brown, 10 min . 39 sec.

F. CoRSON, Dartmouth.

JoHN BRAY, Williams.

N. JoH NSON, Brown.

E. C. HAWLEY, Amherst. :!20-_vard Hurdle.

16-pound Shot.

J.

G. MELAND짜, Brown, 38ft.

8~

in .

R. S. EDWARDS, Bo w doi n, 26k sec.

F. CORSON, Dartmouth.

E. S. L ITTLE, Brown.

T. B. JoHNSON, Williams.

P. POTTER, Williams.

Thro1Ving Discus .

Mile Run.

A. L. GRO\'ER, University of M e., 108ft. Sin. JoHN BRAY, Williams, 4 min. 43} sec. A. M. W AT ON, University of Maine.

R. L. FROST, M. I. T .

G. MELANDY, Brown.

E. C. HAWLEY, Amherst.

Half-mile Run. D. C. HALL, Brown, 2 min.

4i

100-yard Dash. sec.

H. H. CLO UDMAN, Bowdoin, 10} sec.

F. H. KLA ER, Amherst.

R. S. EDWARDs, Bowdoin .

H. L. TRULL, Dartmouth.

C. G. McDE\'ITT, Dartmouth.

4-J.O-yard Dash.

220-yard Dash.

II. H. CLOUmiAN, Bowdoin,

22~

sec.

L. R. HILL, Dartmouth,

C. G. McDEVITT, Dartmouth.

C. F. PARK, Williams.

A. C. PATTERSON, Williams.

D. F. SNow, Bowdoin.

120-yard Hurdle.

52~

sec.

Running High Jump.

P. PoTTER, Williams, 16/; sec.

L. G. BLACJOIER, Williams,

P. P. EDSON, Dartmouth.

F. K . BAXTER, M. I. T .,

II. J. H uNT, Bowdoin.

R. M. SHAYNE, Willi a ms, 1 31

}

Tie at 5ft.9in.

Running Broad Jump.

Pole Vault.

H. H. C LOUDMAN, Bowdoin, 22ft. 8 in.

F. SQUIRES, Williams, 10 ft. A. T. HoLTON, Brown. T. S. CLINE, Wesleyan.

C. N. BROWN, Brown. HuBBARD, Dartmouth.

Two-mile Bicycle. R. MURRAY, 1\f. I. T ., 4 min. B. S. WELLS, Williams. H. E. BROWN, Brown.

36~

sec.

Records Established Two-mile Bicycle-R. MuRRAY, M. I. T., 4 min. 36~ sec. 220-yard Dash-H. H. CLOUDMAN, Bowdoin, 22i sec. Throwing Discus-A. L . GROVER, University of Maine, lOS ft. 8 in.

Summary of Points Williams, Brown,

20~

UniYersity of Maine, Amherst, . Wesley a n, Trinity,

11~

Tufts,

33i29~

Bowdoin, Dartmouth,

25

M. I. T. , . W. P.l.,

~

3

0 0

0

132

8 5j-

Trinity College Athletic Association t899-t900 Preside n t,

D. L.

S C H\\' ART Z,

Vice-President, TAYLOR, '00.

'00 .

E. P .

Secretary,

F.

w.

PRINCE ,

Treasurer, T. G. CASE, '00.

'00.

Executive Committee D. L. SCHWARTZ, '00. J. G. 1\fclr, \ ' AISE, '00. l\1. G. HA IGUT, '00. H . McK. GLAZEnROOK, '00. IJ. S.

F. \V .

PRI NCE,

w.

BR O W N,

'00. '01. G . BRI NL EY, '0 1. W. J. 1\lcN EH, , '01.

BRADFIELD,

P.

'02.

Trophy Room Committee F.

w. PRINCE, '00.

T . G.

CASE ,

'00.

)

Graduate Athletic Committee Chairman, Prof. F. S. LuTHER.

1\fembcrs. Prof. F. S. LuTHER, '70, term expires in 1900. PERCY S. BRYANT, '70, term expires in 1901. EDWIN S. ALLEN, '94, term expires in 1900. HE chief duties of the Committee are to act as-advisers to the undergraduates on all important athletic matters, to endorse such appeals to the alumni for the support of athletics as may meet with their approval, to take entire charge of and manage the Athletic Field, and to act through its Secretary-Treasurer as auditors of the accounts of the various athletic treasurers of the College. They also have power to demand the resignation of any athletic officer who, in their judgment, is incompetent to fulfill the duties of his position.

T

Undergraduate Athletic Committee Chairman, PRESIDENT OF T. C. A. A.

ll!fembers.

D. L. ScHWARTZ, '00, President of the Athletic Association. R. E. PECK, '01, Manager of Football Team. W. P. BROWN, '01, Captain of Football Team. H. S. BRADFIELD, '02, Acting Manager of Baseball Team. H. 'lcK. GLAZEBROOK, '00, Captain of Baseball Team. GoDFREY BRINLEY, '01, Captain of Track Team. HE duties of the Committee are to elect the Graduate Athletic Committee (such election to be ratified by the College), to consult the Graduate Committee on all important athletic matters, to determine the amount each athletic organization shall contribute for the support of the Athletic Field, and to decide all questions as to the use of the Athletic Field on any particular date.

T

134

UN DERWO OD C UP. RELAY TEAM CUP.

LEFFINGWELL C UP.

MCCRACKAN CuP.

GYMNASJU:\l C u r . RECORD C UP .

The College Athletic Cups ~~

THE LEFFINGWELL CuP.-Preseuted by E. DeK. Leffingwell, '95. T o be competed for at each field meeting. Held by Class of 1901 during 189, -1899-1900. THE McCRACKAN CuP.-Presented by W. D. McCrackan, '85. To be competed for at each indoor meet. Held by Sturtevant, '01, in 1 99, and by Brinley, '01, in 1900. THE GvMNA. IDl CuP.-To be competed for at each indoor meet. Held by Class of 1901 in 1900. Trm UNDERWOOD CuP.-Presented by J. C. Underwood, '96. To be competed for at each Fall underclass meet. Held by Class of 1901 in 1898, and by 1902 in 1899. THE RECORD CuP.-Presented by E. Brainerd Bulkeley, '90 . TilE RELAY TEAM CuP.-Won at the First Regiment C. N. G. games, April 18,1895, by Sparks, '97, Beecroft, '97, Lecour, '98, Coggeshall, '96. 13G

)

Inter-Collegiate Athletic Team-l900

Captain, GODFREY BRINLEY,

'00;

'01.

'02;

100 and 220-yard Dash,

SCHWARTZ,

440-yard Dash,

Ruoo ,

'01;

Ha lf-mile Run,

RUJJD,

'01; " ' ATER~IAN, '01;

One-mile }

Run,

MITCHELL,

TUKE,

SYPHAX ,

'01;

'02;

SYPHAX,

' 03.

SHORT,

WATERMAN,

'02.

SYPHAX,

'01;

'02.

LORENZ,

'02.

Two-mile

120-yard ) >Hurdles, 220-yard J

BRINLEY,

'01;

High jump,

BRINLEY,

'01;

WALKER,

STURTEVANT,

WHEELER,

Broad Jump , .

BRINLEY,

'01;

STURTEVANT,

Shot and Hammer,

BRINLEY,

'01;

WALES,

Discus,

TITUS,

'01; '00;

'00;

'01;

'01.

TuKE,

MERRIAlll,

'02.

STURTEVANT,

'01;

'02;

HILL,

EVANS,

'01;

BRINLEY,

HENDERSON,

136

CLE ~! ENT,

'01;

COCHRANE,

'02;

SYPI-IAX,

'02;

'03 .

'01;

SYPHAX,

Bicycle,

'01;

ScnwARTz,

TR U MBULL,

Pole Vault,

'02.

'02;

BROWN,

'01;

'02. MERRIAM,

'01;

' 02 ; MERRIAM, '02; '02; TR UMBULL, '03.

HILL,

SYI'I-IAX ,

'02.

WALES.

~

MEYER.

SHORT . SYPHAX.

CRAI G.

R UDD. ToKE.

CLEMENT.

MERRU.M.

HILL. COCHRANE.

MITCH E LL .

SCHWARTZ. THOMAS. MciLVAINE (Mgr .) TRUMB U LL , BRINLE Y ( C a pt.)

.E VANS.

Annual Indoor Meet of the Trinity College Athletic Association MARCH 23, 1900. ~

Pole Vault, Rope ClimiJing, 20-yard Dash, Standing High jump, Putting 16-pound Shot, Parallel Bars, Running High jump, Fence Vault, Horizontal Bar, High Kick , Potato Race,

DAnS, '99.

~

(1st, \.2d, {1st, \2rl, {1st, \2d, {1st, 2d, f1st, '\2d, J1st, \2d, {1st, \2d,

8 ft. 6 in. STURTE\'ANT, '01, MERRIAM, '02, 7 sec. BRINLEY, '01 (eq ualingCollegerecord ), MERRIAM, '02. 3 sec. T o KE, ' 02 (equaling College record), BRINLEY, '01. 4ft. 7 in. STURTEVANT, '01, TRUMBULL, ' 03. 36ft. 7 in. BRINLEY, '01, TRUMBULL, '03. MEilRIAM, '02. TOKE, '02. 5 ft. 4 in. BlllNLEY, '01, CLEMENT, '01. BRINLEY, '01, 6 ft. 6i in. IHUDSON,'01, lt路 l2cl, \,\VALKER,'02.j !C. {1st, MERRIAM, '02. \2d, ToKE, '02. . 8ft. 5~ in. {1st, LANE, '02, fHuosoN, '01, \ . 2d, \.CLEMENT, '01, {tie. /1st, WALKER, '02. \.2d, SHORT, '03. Referee, P . s. BRYANT, '70.

pst,

judges, MORRIS, '96.

BLAKESLEE, '9 . judges o{ Parallel Bars, Mr. A. C. MELBY. Mr. W. WINKLEMAN. of the Hartford Turnerbuncl. Committee o{ Arrangements, MciLVAINE, '00. BRINLEY, '01. SCHWARTZ, '00. Announcer, Scorers, BRINES, '00. HAIGHT, '00; FISKE, '01. Starter, Mr. G. B. VELTE. McCrackan Cup won by Brinley, '01. Points won by '00, 0 " " " '01, 161/2 11y2 " " '02, " '03, 2 The Gymnasium Cup \\'On by the Class ofl901. 138

Eighteenth Annual Field Meet OF THE

Trinity College Athletic Association MAY

12, 1900.

100-yard Dash,

/1st, \2d,

BRINLEY '01 TUKE, ' 02 . â&#x20AC;˘

(No time taken.)

220-y~Lrd

Dash,

{1st, 2d,

BRINLEY, '01, TuKE, '02.

231} sec.

440-yard Dash,

/1st, \2d,

TuKE, '02, SYPHAX, '02.

57~

One-11alfmile Run,

{1st, Runn, '01, 2d, THOMAS, '03.

One-mile Run,

/1st, \2d,

LORENZ, '02, WATERMAN, '01.

Two-mile Run,

flst, \.2d,

LORENZ, '02, l\11"l'Cll ELL, '01.

220-yard Hurdle,

est, 2d,

BRINLEY, '01, SYPIIAX, '02.

~39

sec.

2.18} sec.

5.10~

sec.

12.58~

sec.

26~

sec.

Field Events Running Iligh]ump,

flst, \_2d,

CLEMENT, '01, CocHRANE, '01.

5 ft. 1% in.

Hroad]ump, .

{1st, \_2d,

BRINLEY, '01, TR UMBULL, '03 .

21 ft. 10 in.

Pole Vault,

flst, \2d,

MERRIA)l, '02, BRINLEY, '01.

Putting 16-po und Shot,

flst , '\2d,

BRINLEY, '01 , SYPHAX, '02.

flst, '\2d,

BRINLEY , '01, liiLL, '02.

Throwing Discus, .

flst, \_2d,

BR INL EY, '01, TR UM BULL, '03.

Two-mile Bicycle, .

1st, . { 2d,

1'hrOH' ing 16-po und Hammer,

.

8 ft. 9 in.

. ::14ft. 3!1:! in

. 82 ft . 7 ¥2 in .

98 ft .

MER RIAM, '02, \VALES, '01.

5.41! sec.

Records by Classes F IR STS.

SECONDS.

'00

0

0

0

'0 1

8 5 0

5 6

21 16

' 02 '03

POINTS.

3

TliE LEFFINGWELL CUP WON BY THE CLASS OF

3 1901.

Officials Referee,

GEORGE B. VELTE.

Timers,

G . B. VELTE, T. P. BROWNE,

Starter,

V. DAVO UD.

Scorers, Announcer,

J. K. CLE~IENT, F. w. PRINCE .

Clerk ofCourse,

F.

w.

PRINCE.

1 40

F.

w.

J.

PRINCE.

G. MciLVA INE.

Trinity Athletic Records INDOOR RECORDS. BV.EN'1'.

RECORD.

NAMI!.

Rope Climbing.

7 s.

Applegate, '87. M c Cook, '90. Davis '94 BrinleJ~ , 'Oi.

DATI!.

Standing high jump.

4ft. 8V,. in.

Ba.x t er, '99.

March , 1896.

Running high jump.

5 ft. 11 14 in.

Baxter, '99.

March, 1 89 7.

High kick.

9 ft.

Baxter, '99 .

March, 1897.

Fence Yault.

6ft. 8 in .

Applegate, '87.

Putting 16-lb. shot.

37ft. 6 in.

Ingalls, '99 .

Pole vault.

9ft. 8 in.

F. R. Sturtevant, '01.

April, 1885. March, 1899. Ma•·ch, 1899.

OUTDOOR RECORDS. I

EVENT.

RRCORD.

NAME.

DATR .

100-yard dash.

10'4 s.

A. W. Strong, '94 .

M ay , 1892.

220-yard dash.

22')4 s.

H. S. Graves, '9 2.

May, 1892.

44-0-yard dash.

51 s.

W. A. Sparks, '97.

May, 1897.

'h-mile run .

2 min . 8'h s.

R. H. Hutchins , '90.

M ay, 18\lO.

1-mile run.

4 tnin. 54 s.

E. S . Allen, '93.

May, 1892.

W. C. White, '97.

May, 1897.

2-mile run.

10 min. 39!_s_. _J I

120-yard hurdle.

17 ~

220-yard hurdle.

27-A- s.

Running high jump.

I

s.

I. K. Baxter, '99.

May, 1896 .

E. DeK. Leffingwell, '95 .

May, 1895.

5 ft. 9'h in. -21 ft. 6 in.

I. K. Baxter, '99.

9 ft . 7'h in.

I. }(. Baxter, '99.

39ft. 7'h in.

S. Carter, '94.

May, 1893.

Throwing 16-lb. hammer.

126ft. 'h in.

F. C. Ingalls, '99.

May, 1 1<99.

2-mile bicycle race.

5 min . 8if s .

S. R . Fuller, ' 00.

October, 1 898 .

Throwing the Discus.

98ft.

G . Brinley, '0 1.

May, 1900.

Running broad jump. Pole vault. Putting 16-lb. shot.

-----G. Brinley, ' 01.

--

October, 1895.

---

May, 1900. May, 1896.

----

Best total strength record held by E. S. Meniam, '02, scoring 1274.00 points , and breaking his previous record ofl202.7 points established in 1899. 141

Football Captains

' 3, S. H. Gmsv.

'9 2, G. D.

HARTLEY.

'84, S. T.

'93, j. \ V.

EDGERTON.

MILLER.

'85, \V. \V.

BARBER.

'94, j.

'86, W. \V.

BARnER.

'95, \V. S.

LANGFORD,

'87, W. W.

BARBER.

'96, A. l\1.

LANGFORD.

STRAWBRIDGE.

'88, E. McP. McCooK.

'97, A.

S . WOODLE.

'89, E. hlcP. McCooK.

'9R, W.

B. SUTTON.

'90,

'99, \V. P.

BROWN.

w. P.

BROWN.

'91

T.

P.

THURSTON.

w. c. HILL. { ' H. s. GRA YES.

'00,

142

Jr.

Trinity's Football Record

Following is a record of the history of Trinity in footb a ll fro m 1878 to 1900.

GAMES WON.

Amherst,

LOST.

GAMES WON.

Amherst Aggies,

5 8

ew Jersey Athletic Club,

Boston Technology, Brown,

2 2

0 5 1

Columbia,

3

0

St J ohn 's, St. Steven's,

Cornell,

0

1

University of Pennsylvania,

6

I

New York University, Stevens,

Dartmouth,

0

2

University of Rochester,

Hamilton ,

3 0

1

University of Syracuse,

4

1

0

Vermont University, Wesleyan,

0

1

West Point,

0

1

Willia ms,

Laureates, . 1 hlass. Institute Technology, 1

0 2

Worcester Technology,

Naval Academy,

1

Harva rd, Haverford, Holy Cross, Lafayette,

0

Yale,

143

LOST.

1

0

4

0

3 1

0 0

1

0

0 1

1

0 1

2 1 0 4 0 45

0 0 0 10 4 3 3 13 59

Directors G. HAIGHT, l'l!fanager . lhcHARD E. PECK, Assistant Manager.

M.

Coach

Captain w . P. BROWN, '01.

ALBERT C. FULTON , P rin ceton,

'98.

The Team

a IJAMES HENDERSON, '02. uar '\.J. B . CRANE, '02 . Right Tackle, W. P. B n o w N, '01. R"uht E 11 d fR. L. McKEON, '03. 1 ' <> ' \M . W . CLEMENT, '01 .

R"aht G 1

{J . M . HUDSON, ' 01. l W . 8. TRUMBULL, '03. Left T ackle, D. BROWNE, '03. L rt 0 a /C. H . HILL, •o2. e uar ' )H. L. MEYER, '03.

Left End,

Center ,

{C. H. HILL, '02. MeA. JoHNSON,

J.

"'

'03.

Quarter-back T. P. BROWN,

'00.

C.

T. M.

SYPHAX,

TI . WHEELER , '01. Right Half-back

Full-back

Left H alf-back R.

B. BELLAMY, '01. GODFREY B HINLEY, '01.

'02.

GODF REY BH INL EY, C. E. T uKE, '02.

'0 1.

Captain for l900 W.

'01.

P. BROWN,

~

~

~

The Consolidated J.

Manager

Captain K. CLEMEN'!'.

Left end, Left tackle, Left guard, Center,

The Line Right end, Right tackle, Right guard, Quarter back,

BARTON, '02. MEHRIAM, '02. GARVIN, '03. W ILSON, '01.

'00.

BRUCE,

CooKE, '02. FoTH ERG ILL, (sp.) W YN K OOP, '01. M l'r CH E LL, '0 1.

Full Back

Right Hall-Back

Ldt Half-Back CLEMENT,

R. E. PECK, '01.

'03.

PR INCE,

'00.

Substitutes BRINES,

'00.

HAIGHT,

'00.

DERBY,

144

' 01.

BRIGHAM,

' 0 3.

McKEON.

BRINLEY.

TRUMBULL.

CLRURNT.

~IEYER.

TUKE.

HAIGHT (Mgr.) JOHNSON.

SYPHAX.

BELLAMY. W. P. BROWN (Capt.) T. P. BROWNE.

\

WIIEELEl!. HILl'"

II EN Dll.RSON.

HUDSON.

CRANE.

Trinity's Baseball Captains ' 67, E. R.

J. W. SHANNON. J. W. SHANNON. '87, J. W. SHANNON. '88, G. w. BRINLEY.

BREVOORT.

'85,

' 68, E.

R. BREVOOR 'l'.

'86,

'69, A.

BROCKLESBY.

'70, A.

8ROCKLESBY.

'71, E.

B. WATTS.

' 72, E. B. '73, E. ' 74,

WATTS.

B. WATTS.

C. E. CRAJ[(.

'75, F. T.

'89, T.

L. CllERITREE.

'90, R.

McC. BRADY.

'91,

H.

8.

GRA\'I:S .

'92,

H.

s.

GRAVES.

'93,

G. D. HARTLEY.

'76,

G.

HEWITT.

'94,

J. J.

'77,

W. E. ROGERS.

'95,

s.

LINCOLN.

'78, F . \V. '79,

.

w.

0, W.

'8 1,

N.

J.

' 83,

ELBERT.

C.

RODGERS.

'96, A.

G. D. HowELL.

'8 2, A. H.

c.

DuB.

D.

'98,

D.

H. McK. GLAZEBROOK.

146

BROUGHTON.

WILLIAMS.

H.

c. c.

' 99, ]. H.

jOHNSON.

1900,

'97,

DINGWALL.

PENROSE.

J.

M .

WRIGHT.

M. Kt•RTZ.

'84, F. E.

R.

H .

J. J.

WHITE.

PENROSE.

COGGESHALL. GRA YES. GRAVES.

K. DAVIS;

Baseball Schedule for l900 April 7,

Holy Cross

11,

Brown

~

$

V'S.

Trinity, at \Vorcester,

" "

16 to 4.

" Providence,

14 to 1.

" New York,

7 to 13.

26,

New York University

"

28,

Amherst

" Amherst,

4 to 3.

May

2,

Columbia

" New York,

5 to 2.

5,

West Point

" West Point,

2 to 5.

12,

Yale Law School

" Hartford,

10 to 5.

19,

Crescent Athletic Club

" Brooklyn,

Cancelled.

22,

Georgetown

" Hartford,

24,

Tufts

" Boston,

26,

New York University

" Hartford,

6 to 10.

30,

Rockville

" Rockville,

Cancelled.

2,

Amherst "Aggies"

" Hartford,

1 to 0.

6,

Fordham

" Hartford,

Cancelled.

9,

Fordham

" Fordham,

13,

Wesleyan

" Hartford,

"

June

147

9 to 4 . Cancelled.

····· ······· ·· ·

Directors A. D.

D. L.

VmnERT,

'99, Senior Directo r.

'00, Manager.

S CHWARTZ,

W.

J.

McNEIL,

Assistant

'99 Team J. SUTTON,

'99,

GLAZEBROOK , G o oDRIDGE, WOODLE, DA\'IS,

H. K.

DA I'IS,

Captain.

C.

'00,}

BRO\\'N, F ISKE,

'01, I. f.

'01 , 3 b.

p.

'02,

B ELLAMY,

'99, 1 b .

'0 1 , 2 b.

HENDERSON ,

'99, c. f.

CLAPP,

'02,

s . s.

'02, r. f.

Substitutes PECK,

'01.

BARTON,

1 48

'02.

B A C K US,

'0 2.

~1\Ianager.

CLAPP,

FISKE.

BROWN.

DAVIS (CAPT.)

SCHWARTZ (Mgr.) BARTON.

GLAZBBROOK.

SUTTON. GOODR!DGB.

WOODLE. PECK.

HENDERSON.

BELLAMY. BACKU8.

BELLAMY.

C L EMENT.

BRIN LEY.

STURTEVANT.

GLAZEBROOK (Capt.) HENDERSON. MRRRlAM.

Trinity College Basket ball T earn ~

~

Captain H.

McK.

GLAZEBROOK,

'00.

Manager G . BRI NLEY,

H. McK.

GLAZEBROOK,

'00.

'01.

Forwards F. R.

STURTEVANT,

'01.

Center } AME!'l HENDERSON.

Left Guard G. BRINLEY, '01. M. W.

Right Guard CLEMENT,

' 01.

R.

Substitutes E. 150

s.

MERR IAM ,

B. BELLAMY.

'02.

WATERMA>L FISKE.

C. C. PECK (Mgr.) COOKE .

BROWN.

BRINLEY.

WHEELER.

BELLAMY (Capt.)

POWBL.

WYNKOOP .

NICUOLS.

VAN DBWATER.

MCNEIL.

1901 Football Team Captain R.

B. BELLAMY.

Manager c. C. PECK . Left end,

W.

J.

S.

w.

Me

Center, Right guard, Right tackle, Right end,

ElL.

COOKE.

Left tackle, \V. P. BROWN. Left guard, R. FISKE.

E. F.

PoWEL.

A. T.

WYNKOOP.

C. H. WHE ELEH. F. E . \VATERMAN.

Quarter-back A. R.

!-eft Half-back GonFREY BRINLEY .

VAN DEWATER .

Full-back

w. F.

NICHOLS.

1Gl

Right Half-back R.

B . BELLAMY .

BELLAMY.

BROWN.

\Vll.BEI~H H. NlCHOLS. R. E. PEcK. VAN DI!WATER.

CLKMBNT,

\VATERMAN.

FJSKII (Capt.) C. C. PI!CK.

McNEIL.

COOKE.

l90l Baseball Team Captain R.

F ISKE.

Manag-er J. McNEIL.

W.

The Team C. C. PECK, c. M . NICHOLS, 1 b. R. B. BELLAMY, ) r 2 b. W. J. McNEIL, J R. FISKE, 3 b.

R. E. PECK, } p. W. ] . McNEIL, A. R. VANDEWATER, s. s. W. P. BROWN, r. f.

W.

s. w . COOKE, M.

W. CLEMENT,

1 52

C. H . F. E. } l. f.

WHEELER, WATERMAN,

}

c. f.

FIS KH . BELLAM Y . .B R I N LEY MIT C HELL . WATE RM A N . C L E MENT .

(Cap t .)

B R OWN. H UD SON. COCHRANE.

E V A N S.

l90l Track Team Captain GO DFREY BR I NLEY.

R.

I

w. P .

CLE ME NT .

H. H .

COCHRAN E .

D.

H . H . R uoo.

J.

EVA NS .

F . E.

W ATERMA N.

153

F ISKE.

J. M. HUDSON. w. A. MJTC II ELL.

BROWN.

M. W.

J.

R.

B . BELLAM Y.

A.

WA L ES.

C. C. PECK . WHEELER. McNEIL. COOKE (Capt.) R. E. PECK. BELLAMY. F ISKE.

l90 l Pin Hockey T earn Captain

s. w.

COOKE .

R. E.

PECK.

R. F ISKE .

C. C.

PECK.

J.

C. H.

WHEELER.

R.

W.

B. BELLA ~1Y .

McNEIL.

15 4

Other Class T earns 1900 Football Team D. W. ARNOTT. J. K. CLEMENT. D. L. ScHWARTZ.

T. !I.

L. ScHWARTZ,

Captain. M. G. HAIGHT.

J.

W. BRADIN. E. P. TAYLOR. M. J~ RJNES. F. W. PR INCE.

P. BROWNE. McK. GLAZEBROOK.

1900 Track T earn M.

J.

BRINES,

Captain.

D. L. ScHWARTZ. F. W. PRINCE.

J.

E.

H.

W.

BRADIN.

P. TAYLOR.

McK. GLAZEUROOK.

1900 Baseball T earn H.

II.

F.

J.

Fox,

s.

A.

McK. GLAZEBROOK, c.

R. H. M.

J. G. MciLVAINE,

Captain.

McK. GLAZEBROOK,

1 b.

TITUS,

A . ARNOTT,

2 b. \V. PRINCE, 3 b.

D.

BRINEs,

s. s.

P. TAYLOR,

1. f. c. f.

L. ScHWARTZ,

J. K. CLEMENT,

E.

Manager.

p.

r.f.

Substitutes II.

J.

A. IloRNOn.

W.

BnADIN.

1902 Football Team SYPIIAX,

Afanager. J. t. GooDR ICH, I e.

Captain. e.

CLEVELAND, WEIBEL,

CooKE, r.

liENDEHSON, CnANE,

r. t.

q. b. I. h. BAnTON, r. h.

MERR IAM,

r. g.

TUKE,

BRADFIELD, C. R ILL,

I. g. SYPHAX,

f. b.

Substitutes S.

COLE.

}J IGG I N BOTH AM. 155

LAUDENSTEIN.

1902 Baseball T earn }AMES HENDERSON, Captain. GoooniDGE, p. C. PECK, c. liENOERSON, 1 b. l-I IGGINllOTHAl\! 1 2

WILLlAl\1

b.

H.

WHEELER , BARTON, S. s. SYPHAX, 3 b. HowE, I. f. WEIBEL, c. f .

1\Iamtger.

r. f.

WH ITE,

Substitutes TUKE.

LORENZ.

CRANE.

WHEELER.

1902 Track Team TuKE, Captain. LORENZ. WALKER . SYPHAX.

!I ILL. LAUBENSTEIN. LANE.

l-IENDEUSON. GooDRIDGE . MEUR IAl\1.

1903 Baseball T earn RANKIN, Captain. VEITCH, c. BRlGHAlll, 1 b. HENRY, s. s. GAR\'IN, I. f.

SHORT, Ma nager. RANKIN, p. TR UMBULL, 2 b. }OHNSON, 3 b. BRUCE, c. f. SIIORT,

r . f.

Substitutes CARPENTER.

TUCKER .

1903 Basketball T earn Bil iG II AM,

Captain.

MORGAN,

1\fanager .

PENNING.

SHORT.

VAN WEELDEN .

MEYER.

VE!TCII.

THOMAS.

1903 Football Team TIWMBULL,

Captain.

jOHNSON,

BRIGH~M: 1. g. FOTHERGILL,

Manager.

GARVIN, I. e. VAN WEELDEN,'\ McLEAN, BRUCE, r. b. TRUMBULL, 1. h. SHORT, f. b.

VEI'l'Cll, r. e. THOMAS, r. t . :\IEYER, r . g. HENRY c

b

fq. 路

J. t.

1903 Track T earn TnoMAS,

Captain.

TIWMllULL. VAN \VEELDEN. SHORT.

RANKIN. MEYER. GARV IN. CnAIG.

156

New England Intercollegiate Lawn Tennis Association TECHNOLOGY,

BOWDOIN,

BROWN,

DARTMOUTH,

WESLEYAN,

AMHERST,

BATES,

VERMONT,

TUF TS,

TRINITY.

President, E . G. THATCHER, Technology. Vice-President, A. L. DANA, Bowdoin. Secretary-Treasurer, E. T. GROSS, Brown.

Trinity College Tennis Association President, HASLETT McKIM GLAZEBROOK . Vice-President, THOMAS PROSSOR BROWNE. Secretary-Treasurer, FREDERICK 'VELLES PRINCE.

Members 1900.

Mr. Carleton. Dr. Babbitt. Dr. Riggs. Dr. Robb.

Brines. Case. Clement,]. K. Coons. Fox. Glazebrook. Haight. Hill, W. C. Hornor. Mcilvaine. Prince. Simonds. Tracy.

1901.

Anderson. Bella my. Brinley. Browne, T . P. Brown, W. P. Clement, M. W. Derby. Fiske. Foss. IIi lis. Hudson. Rudd. Wales. Waterman. Wheeler, C. H. Wilson. Wy nk oop. 157

1902.

Barton. Cole, J. Henderson. Hill, C. H . Holden. IcCook. Merriam. Peck, C. C. Quaile. Syphax. Taylor, W. Walker. W heeler, W. H . White.

1003.

B rig ham. Bruce. Crane. John so n . Morgan. Rankin. Short. Stuart. Van Weelden.

College Tournament, held May 7th-10th. Rankin ............. ......

l R a nkin ........

Henders o n ............. . ) T. P. Bro\vne ......... W a les ... ...... ............ F o ss .... ....... ... ... . ..... Wilson.. ...... .... ........ M. W. Clement, ......

! l l

!

Rankin ......... 1

6-1, 6-3.

6-t, 6-:i-.- /

Browne.. ..... 6-4, 6-3-.-

Foss ............

l

6-4, 6 -2.

Rankin ......... ) 6-1, 6-3.

F oss .. .. ..... ... .

!

Holden .. ..... . , 7-5, 6-1<, 7 -5 .

Hold e n .. .................

6-2, 8-6.

I

l D e rby ...... ... Derby ....... .... .......... l 6-.0, 6-±. Hudson ...... ... . .. . ...

G-3, 6-3 .

_G_l_a_ze_b_r_o_o_k_·_ ..

Pn~ce .. .. ....... .. ···· ~ Gla~ebrook . .

Glazebrook... ... .....

Glazebrook ... ) ~----

~

6-0, 6-1.

.

6 -3, 6-3

johnson .......... .. . - ~Johnson . ...... I Brinley. ...

...... .. ....

Fiske ................ ......

.

Glazebrook ...

J

6-4, 4-6, 6-3.

!

by default .. .. /j o hnson .. . ..... /

Fiske ... ....... . [

W. P. Brown .. ........

J

6-2, 6-0.

6 -4, ±-6, 6-3. ~

W. C. Bill ............... ( McCook ...... ) McCook .. .. .. .... ... ... )6-3 ,

6-±-.-1 Brigham .... ... ]

Bruce ......................

l Brigh am ......

,

Brigham .. .. ... ........ ..

J

J

Waterm a n .......... .... Morgan ............. ..... C. H. Hill ... ... ... ...... S1monds .......... .. ..... Hills ..... .. ... ..... .... ..

l l l

by default .... ~Morgan .......

Simond~ /

I

6-3, 6-4.

5-7,6-4,6-2.

J

6-±.

Clement.:=

by default .... I

Cra~~ ..... ... .. ..... .... .. l Merriam ... ...

.

c . Peck. ............ ... ...

l

Brigham ...... . ~--- -

6-1, 5-7, 6-3.

l .

/ Sh o rt .......... .

1+-6,

Sho~~

I

6-3, 9-7.

J

Short ........... ,

-------

I

~6-:1-.-

6-0, 6-0.

7-5, 6-3.

J

Barton ......... ]

Fox························~

Short ......................

6-0, 6-0 .

1

!l-7, 7-5.

Barton ........ ) 6-3,

r

/ Brigh a m ......

Morgan .... ... ]

J . K. Clement.... .. ..

M er JJam .. ... ............

6-2, 6-0.

II

Barton ...... ... ........ .

Glazebrook. 6-2, 3-6, 6-4.

6-3, 6 -.J..

J

)

Trinity's Representatives at The New England Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament, J900. HASLETT

MCKIM

GLAZEBROOK ,

HENRY DAY BRIGBA~f,

1 58

'03.

' 00.

3路!!

~~~- .::.oo=,路 路c--路 _____ __.

<-C;;

l0lV£li(CI~t ~

~"" ~IRl~~I~llZl~TTI©N~

1 60

Officers of Musical Organizations

President. MOSES jA~IES BRINES.

Assistant Manager. ·

Alanager.

CHARLES HATHERN WHEELER .

HER BERT STANLEY BRADFIELD.

Season 1899-1900 CONCERTS AT

Cathedral Lyceum, Alumni Hall, West Hartford, Bridgeport, Conn. East Hartford. 161

Trinity College Glee Club Leader lOSES

j.

BRINES.

First Tenors

-M. J.

BRINES,

w.

'00. E.

s.

CAllSON,

A.

M!TC!!ELL,

'01.

'02.

Second T enors R.

B . GOODEN,

'02. H. 1\lcK. GLAZEBROOK,

hl . B '00.

. STEWART,

'02.

First Basses

D. L.

SCHWARTZ,

]. M.

WALKER,

'01.

H. A.

HORNOR,

'00.

'00.

H.

D.

C. E.

WILSON, TUKE,

'01.

'02.

Second Basses G. G. BURTIANCK, H .

S.

BRADFIELD,

162

'02.

'01.

TOKE.

MlTCHELL.

TUCKER.

GOODEN.

HORNOR .

CARSON.

STEWART.

C. H. WI!BELER .

WALKER.

PRINCE .

BURBANCK . BRINES. BRADFlBLD.

\V. H . WHEELER .

COCI!RAI<E. c. H. HlLL. MACLEAN. LARCI!ER. CLEMENT. SCHWARTZ.

\V.,LES .

SIMONDS .

W. C. HILL.

McCooK.

WILSON .

" "'-..

"'-

Trinity College Mandolin Club Leader '00.

DAVID LOUIS SCI!WARTZ,

First Mandolins F. W.

PRINCE,

'00.

\V .. C. HrLL, '00.

C. H .

W HEELER ;

E. L.

SIM ONDS,

'0 1.

'00.

Second Mandolins II. 1-1.

CocHRANE,

'01 .

R. C.

W. W.

McKEAN,

'03.

'03.

TUCKER,

Man dol a j. 1..: . CLEMENT, '00 .

Violin D. L.

'00.

SCHWARTZ,

Cello A. T .

McCooK,

'02.

Guitars W. A.

M ITCHELL,

'01.

C. H.

WILLIAM LARCflEil,

lG.J.

' 03.

HILL,

'02.

__,

M ITCHELL. C. H. H ILL . W. H. WHIIELER. MACLII AN. WALES. LARCHER. ,V. C. HILL. CLII '111NT. SCHWARTZ. C. H. WHBELIIR. COC [[ RANB. PRINC II . TUCKIIR.

S IMONDS.

McCooK.

-+

Trinity College Banjo Club

Leader C . Tl.

WHEELER,

'01.

Manager

J. D.

EVANS,

'01 .

Banjeaurioes C.

l-1 .

WHEELER,

\V . A.

'01.

MITCHELL,

'01.

F irst Banjos E.

c.

.J .

D.

STONE,

W.

'01.

LARCHE R,

'03.

Second Banjos E \ "ANS,

E. J.

'01.

DIB 3LE,

'03 .

Guitars C . H.

H . H. Ruon, '01.

H ILL,

'02.

Mandolins

F . \\' .

PRINCE,

H . H.

'00.

COCHRANE ,

'01.

• 1 66

~

c:

""

Royal Egyptian String Octette Organized A. D. 1879.

Honorary Mem hers Hoffman Miller. H. R. Thompson. G. P. Ingersoll. A. P. Burgwin. J . R. BReon. T. H. Yardley. J. W. Lewis. E. F. Burke. DeF. Hicks. G. S. McCook. J. S. Carter. W. H. Eaton.

S. B. P. Trowbridge. H. S. Martindale. W. D. McCrackan. R. E. Burton. H. Parrish. C. C. Trowbridge. W. C. D. Willson. E. DeK. Leffingwell. 0. T. Paine. G. E. Cogswell. M. R. Cartwright. J. H. K. Davis.

R. H. Nelson. E. B. Bulkeley. R. S. Saltus. H. T. Greenley. C. A. Lewis. W. W. Vibbert. P. J. McCook. E. Parsons. II. G. Barbour. J. H. Page, Jr. H. D. Plimpton. J. w. ichols.

W. H. Boardman. C. A. Appleton. C. W. Bowman. G. H. Hills. C. H. Talcott. F. P. Johnson. F. M. Vermilye. R. H. Macauley. M. M. Sibley. E. C. Beecroft. L. G. Reynolds. W. B. Sutton .

Banjos ]. K. A. R.

CLEMENT,

'00.

VANDEWATER,

R. H. Fox, '00. '01. Dulcimer R. FISKE, '01.

THEO. CASE,

Sackbut i\1. W.

CLEMENT,

'01.

G. Cornet A. T.

WYNKOOP,

'01.

Freshmen m'ay come and Seniors m ay go But yet there remains the R. E. S. 0. 168

'00.

Psbawms '01.

BRINLEY,

• I

16\l

The Medusa Senior Honorary Society Active M embers President, M. J. BRINES. Secretary and Treasurer, IT. A. HORNOR. F. W. PRLNCE. J. G. MciLVAINE. D. L. ScHWARTZ. H. McK. GLAZEBROOK . Graduate Members Lewis, John William, '93. Littell, Elton Gardi ner, '99. Lord, James Watson, '98. Lockwood, Luke Vincent, '93. Macauley, Richard Henry, '95. 1\lcCook, George Sheldon, '97. Morse, Bryan Killikelly, '99. Nichols, John Williams, '99. iles, 路william Porter, '93. Olcott, William Tyler, '96. Paine, Ogle Tayloe, '96. Page, John Henry, '97. Parsons, Edgerton, '86. Pearce, Reginald, '93 . Pelton, Henry H ubbard, '93. Penrose, John Jesse, Jr., '95. Remsen, Henry Rutgers, '98. Reynolds, Lloyd Gilson, '9 . Rich, Earnest Albert, '99. Schiitz, Walter Stanley, '94. Sparks, William Albert, '97. Strawbridge, John, '95. Taylor, Charles E dward, '94. Vibbert, Aubrey Darrell, '99. Vibbert, William Welsh , '94. Wainwright, Jonathan Mayhew, '95. Weed, Charles Frederick, '94. \\' illson, William Croswell Doane, '93. \\'ilson, George Hewson, '93. Wolfenden, Richard Henry, '93. Woodle, Allan Sheldon, ' 99 .

Allen, Edwin Stanton, '94. Austin, William Morris, '98. Bacon, Frederick Stanley, '99. Barbour, Henry Grosvenou r , '96. Barton, Charles Clarence, '93. Bates, Robert Peck, '93. Beecroft, Edgar Charles, '97. Broughton, Charles DuBois, '95. Bull,eJey, John Charle.s, '93. Carter, Julian Stuart, '98. Carter, Lawson Averell, '93. Carter, Shirley, '94. Churchman , Clarke, '93. Coggeshall, Murray Hart, '96. Cogswell, George Edward, '97. Collins, William French, '93. Cullen, James, Jr., '93. Danker, Walton Stoutenburgh, '97. Davis, John Henry Kelso, '99. Davis, Cameron Josiah, '94. Dingwall, Barrie Renz, '95. Edgerton, Francis Cruger, '94. Edgerton, John Warren, '94. Ellis, George William, '94. Graves, Dudley Chase, '98. Greenley, Howard Trescott, '94. Hamlin, Edward Percy, '95. Hartley, George Derwent, '93. Hubbard, Louis DeKoven, '93. Langford, Archibald Morrison, '97. Langford, William Spaigbt, Jr., '9~.

170

-r, 1 ,1

-r-Il

,_. f

----

I

..-

---~ 'rr 路

/

/

r

-r

'路

171

\

The Lemon Squeezer

• • • •••

'57 Presenter, W. H .

BENJAMIN,

Receiver, G. R.

'57.

HALLAM,

'59.

'59 In veniam vwm aut faciam. Presenter, G. R.

HALLAM,

Receiver, W. S. CoGSWELL, '61 .

'59.

'l'l Per aspera ad astra. Receiver, N. B. DA Y'l' ON, '63.

Presenter, W. H . WEBSTER, '61.

'Li 3 ,

Ne tentes aut per/ice. Receiver, C. W. M

Presenter, R. F. GooowrN , '63 . 1 72

NRO,

'65.

'135 Facta non l'erba. Receiver, RonERT SHAW, '68.

Presenter, H . G. GARD!I:ER, '65.

'138 Semper crescens. Presenter, P. L .

Receiver, E. V. B. KISSAM, '69.

ORTON, '68.

'13 9 Nunquam non paratus. Receiver, D. P. Co'l"l'ON, ' 71.

Presenter, JACOB LERov, ' 69.

'71 Nulla vestigja retrorsum. Receiver, F. 0. GRANNISS, ' 73.

Presenter, WILLIAM DRAYTON, '71.

,, ' , A LEV AayEs-. Presenter, C. E .

\Vooo~IAN,

Receiver, C. E. CRAIK, '74.

'73.

'74 Ov 7rapa <TXo7T<5v. Receiver, H . V. R UTHERFORD , '76.

Presenter, R. M. EDWA.Ros, '74.

'7 Li

Inservit honori. Receiver, vV. C. BLACKMER, '78.

Presenter, C. E. MooRE, '76.

'78 Av8p£,w-8E. Presenter,

J.

Receiver, D. L. FLAMING, '80.

D. HILLS, '78.

'80 Ov A.oy([J dAA.' ipy([J. Receiver, A. P. BuRGWIN, '82.

Presenter, W. R. LEAKEN, '80.

'82 Respice finem. Receiver, S. H. GIESY, '85.

Presenter, A. P. BuRGWIN, ' 82.

'85 Duris non fi-angi. Receiver, G. S. WATERS, '87.

Presenter, A. D. NEELEY, '85. 173

'87 Multa m dies addiscentes. Receiver, E. C. JoHNSON, 2d, '88.

Presenter, A. H. ANDERSON, '87.

'88 Per angusta ad augusta. Receiver, E. McP. McCooK, '90.

Presenter, E. C. jOHNSON, 2d, '88.

'90 Semper agens aliquid. Receiver, I. D. RussELL, '92.

Presenter, T. A. CoNOVER, '90.

'92 To KaAov cp[A.ov. Receiver, F. F. JoHNSON, '94.

Presenter, G. HALL, '92.

'94 Agere pro viribus. Presenter,

J.

Receiver, J. STRAWBRIDGE, ' 95.

W. EDGERTON, '94.

'95 En avant! Receiver, E. PARSONS, '96 .

Presenter, E . P. HAMLIN, ' 95.

'96 Receiver, - - · - - - - -

Presenter,--------

'99 Fortiter, fideliter, feliciter. Receiver,--- - - - - -

Presenter,-- ·- - - - -

'01 Novus ordo saeclontm. KEEPERS OF THE LEMON SQUEEZER.

174

Honor-Men for the Year l898-l899 $

$

Honors in the Class of 1899 Valedictory, Harold Loomis Cleasby (Optimus). Salutatory, Charles William Henry. Honor Oration in the Course in Science, Cranston Brenton. Other Speakers at Commencement Reuel Allan Benson. Elton Gardiner Littell. Charles Baker Hedrick. Adrian Holmes Onderdonk.

*THE CHEMICAL PRIZE ESSAY. First Prize, Second Prize, TuTTLE PRIZE EssAY, PRIZE VERSION DECLAMATION, MATHE:IIATICAL PRIZE, GOODWIN GREEK PRIZES. First Prize,

Percy Leon Bryant. Charles Thomas Smart. Victor Forrest Morgan. [1 ot awarded.] [Not awarded.] Robert Burton Gooden. j Edmund Sawyer Merriam. 1 Karl Philip Morba

Second Prize, Pn iZES IN HISTOllY AND POLITICAL SCIF.NCE. First Prize, Second Prize, HOLLAND PRIZE SCHOLAllSHIPS. In the Class of 1900, In the Class of 1901, In the Class of 1902, HAllTFORD ADMITTI'ÂŁUR PRIZE, MODERN LANGUAGE PRIZES. First Prize, Second Prize, ALU~lNI PRIZES IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION. In the Class of 1899,

[Not awarded.] John Williams Nichols. Simon Lewis Tomlinson. Francis Raymond Sturtevant. Anson Theodore McCook. Anson Theodore McCook. Harold Loomis Cleasby. [Not awarded.]

Cranston Brenton. Charles William Henry. Victor Forrest Morgan. In the Class of 1900, Theodore Grafton Case. Denison Richmond. The winners of the Alumni Prizes were competitors for the FRANK W. WrnTLOCK PniZES. First Prize, Cranston Brenton. Victor Forrest Morgan. Second Prize, THE DouGLAS PniZE, [Not awarded.] Alphonso De Salvia. THE METAPHYSICAL PmzE, THE MACKAY-SMITH PmzEs. Harold Huntington Rudd. First Prize, [ rot awarded.] Second Prize, *The prizes are a rranged in the order of their foundation. 175

Trinity College German Club

President,

HASLETT McKIM GLAZEBROOK.

Vice President,

JOHN G ILBERT MclLYAINE.

Seeretar_,, and Treasurer,

GODFREY BRINLEY.

M embers

J.

K. CLEMENT, '00.

H.

G. BRINLEY,

W.

P. BROWN,

'01.

1\1. G . HAIGHT, '00.

J. M. HuDSON,

'01.

W. C.

R. E.

PECK,

J. [.

\V ALKE!! 1 '01.

F. \V. PRINCE, '00.

F . E.

WATERMAN,

D. L .

A.

T . WYNKOOP,

E.

GoODRIDGE, Jr.,

J.

'00.

'01.

McK. GLAZEBROOK,

HILL,

'00.

G. MciLVAINE,

E.

SCEIWAR'l'Z,

'00.

'00.

P. TAYLoR, Jr.,

'00.

c. c.

PECK,

'01.

'01.

'01. ' 02.

'02.

Leaders

First German,

J.

Secon d German,

D. L .

Third German,

A.

1\1. \V ALKE!l, '01. ScnwAwrz,

T. "WYNKOOP,

'00. '0 1.

R. E.

Peck,

'01.

J. G. MclLYAfNE,

WATERMAN,

C. C.

PECK,

Fourth German,

W. P.

Fifth German,

J.

M. HUDSON, '01.

M. G. HAIGHT,

Sixth German,

J.

K. CLEMENT, '00.

W. C.

BnowN,

1.77

'01.

'00.

F. E.

IllLL,

'0 1.

'02. '00.

'00.

Tuesday, February 1 3th, THIIW TRINITY GERMAN. Leaders

.\. T.

WYNKOOP.

F. E.

WATERMAN .

Wednesday, February 14th, COLLEGE TEA, in Alumni Hall, fmm 4 to 6 P. M., given by Mrs. George Williamson Smith. Held under the management of the Junior Hall Committee.

Thursday, February 15th, "EH, WHAT IS IT?" given by the Jesters, assisted by the Glee, Mandolin and Banjo Clubs. The play was followed by dancing.

liS

Junior Ball GIVE~

BY TilE CLASS OF 1901.

Committee JAMES MOSGROVE HUDSON,

Chairman.

JOHN DA ULI3Y E\"ANS,

Sec. and Treas.

GODFREY BRINLEY.

RICHARD EUGENE PECIC

JAMES MERRYMAN WALKER.

CHARLES HATHERN WHEELER .

P atronesses Mrs. F . ll. Adriance.

Mrs. Francis Goodwin.

Mrs E . S. Pollock.

Mrs. F. B. Allen .

Mrs. J a mes Goodwin .

Mrs. F. W. Prince.

Mrs. C. C. Beach.

Mrs. J. H. Greene.

Mr~.

Mrs. T . B. Beach.

Mrs.

J. S. Greene.

H . S. Redfield.

Mrs. R. B. Riggs.

Mrs . J. W. Brad in.

Mrs. J. H . Hall.

Mrs. W . L. Robb.

Mrs. Robert Buell.

Mrs.]. P. Harbison .

Mrs. George Roberts.

Mrs. R. H. Chapman.

Mrs. E. B. Hatch.

Mrs. H. C. Robinson .

Miss Mary Clark.

Mrs. E. C. Hilliard.

Mrs.]. H. Rose.

Mrs. F. R. Cooley.

Mrs. F. S. Howard.

Mrs. F. W. Russell.

M rs. G. II. Day.

l\lrs. W. W. Hyde.

Mrs . ]. E. Sage.

Mrs. G. W. Ellis.

hlrs. C. II. Lawrence.

Mrs. G. R. Shepherd.

Mrs. Thomas Evans.

Mrs. F. S. Luther.

Mrs. W. C. Skinner.

Mrs. Henry Ferguson.

Mrs. W. R. Matson .

Mrs. G. vV. Smith.

Mrs. G.

1cC. Fiske.

Mrs. C. C. Goodrich.

Mrs. C. W. Mixter.

Mrs. P . S. Starr.

Miss Phelps.

Mrs. E. P. Taylor.

Mrs. T. D. Walker.

Mrs. A. W. Wynkoop .

17!l

Trinity College Missionary Society Founded 1 832

"Pro Christo et Ecclesia .''

Chdstmas Term, !899 President, J. G.

Vice-President, F . S. Secretary,

G.

H.

HOLDEN

'00.

MciLVAINE,

MO REHOUSE ,

' 02.

'01.

T reasurer, R. B.

Chaplain, Rev. T. R.

PYNCHON,

GOODEN,

'02.

'41.

Trinity Term, !900 President,

J.

G. MciL\'A INE,

Vice-President, F . S. ecretary, H. L . G.

MEYEn,

'00 .

MoREHOUSE,

'03.

'01.

Treasurer, R. B.

Chaplain, Rev. T. R.

PYNCHON,

GOODEN,

'02.

'41.

180

\

Trinity College Chapel ~

~

Chaplain, THE PRESIDENT OF TILE COLLEGE.

Order of Services OBL IGATORY.

D{lily: Morning P rayer, 8.30

A. ~L

Ash Wednesday and Good Friday: 9.15 A. M . Sunday: 9.15

A.M.

A!!K.路ension Day: 8 30

A.M.

VOLU~TARY.

unday: Holy Communion, 8 Hoi)' Week: 11.55 Lent: Daily, 11.55

A.M.,

A.M.

9

A.M.

P.M.

(Litany).

Thanksgiving Day: 10.30

A.M.

Daily: Morning or Evening Prayer.

Chapel Choir Leader, 11. A. llonNOR. BRADFIELD, BRINES,

'00.

HILLS,

'00.

CLEMENT,

'00.

SCHWARTZ,

Fox, '00. GLAZEBROOK,

'01.

'00.

MciLVA I NE,

WALKER,

'00.

WILSON,

Organist, A. B.

QvALLE,

'00.

'01.

'01.

'02.

Chapel Monitors: T. P . Browne, '00; E. M. Tracy, '00. 181

The H all of Natural History $

$

HE COMPLETION of the long talked of Hall of Natural History marks au epoch in the development of the College. The great interest which has everywhere been taken in the natura l sciences during the last few :years has made it necessary that the space set aside for this work at Trinity College be commensu rate with the importam~e of the subject. The new building is intended to accomplish this an d more,-it is not only to provide suitable quarters for the present, but it is to meet the growth of the future. With this broad purpose in view, the different portions of the building have not been constructed for certain special uses , but th e endeavor ha s been to provide rooms of such general excellence and adap tability that they shall be equally well fitted for the work now carried on at Trinity, a nd for such new branches of natural history as may be developed in the coming century. That this is so will be seen from a brief inspection of the plans of the building. The Hall of Natural History is a rectangular building with a frontage of 122 feet and a depth of 72 ft'et, standiPg to the w est of the Jarvis Hall of Science and facing north upon the campus. It is of brick with brown stone trimmings and contai ns three working flo o rs. In addition to these the slope of the land allows the development of the easter n end of the basement into what may be practically regarded as a fourth working floor . The m a in floors of th e building may be said to be divided longitudinally into two portions, the rear or southern portion being g iven up t o the Museum. The front, or nort her n portion , contains the working room~ , situated about the central staircase hall. On the lower floor, immedia tely to the right of this hall a nd filling the entire

T

â&#x20AC;˘

northwest corner·, is a large laboratory finished in light bricl< and having windows on the northern and western sides. Immediately behind this and connecting with it is a smaller laboratory, whil<! behind this and filling the southwest corner of the floor are the private rooms assigned to the professor in charge of this portion of the building. The northeast corner of this floor is occupied b_v several smaller rooms, one of which is to be equipped as a library. The remaining space is included in the Museum, the door of which is imnwdiately opposit<! the main entrance of the building. The second floor is divided in much the same manner, except that the portion which on the fir-st floor is occupied by the smaller laboratory and the profes,or's rooms is here thr-own into the 1useum, which on this and the top floor runs the whole length of the bu ilding with windows on the east, south and west sides. On the third floor the working space is chiefly divided between two large laboratories occupying the northeast and northwest corners. Smaller rooms for special research are conveniently located throughout the building. The basement, providing several good working rooms, has abundant space for the unpacking rooms; the aquarium and cold-storage plant will be located there eventually. The1 building is both heated and ventilated by a blast of steam-heated air which is kept in motion by an electric fan. Additional heat is furnished, when needed, by direct radiation. The boilers supplying both these systems are located under the Jarvis Hall of Science. The building is also equipped with both gas and electric light, with electric bells, and with all other modern improvements. A large lift, traveling in a brick well, runs from the basement to the third floor. Special attention has been given to the Museum. It occupies three floors, as already stated, all being connected by a large well in the center. Large windows furnish an abundance of light, so that the valuable collection which the college possesses will be exhibited to the best advantage. The entire floor space of the :Museum is 4,650 feet . The building is clesigned by William C. Brocklesby of the class of 1869, and its cost is in the neighborhood of $50,000. \V. H. C. PYNCHON .

• 1"\U.::>E...UM

EJ

• 1'"'\.U::;;;,E.U.M.

View of the former Trinity College Grounds, near Trumbull Street, by the Park River.

185

EAST

ELEVA T ION

CH-APEL

The Burges Plans of the Chapel and Library Buildings for Trinity College $

$

HEN TRINITY COLLEGE was moved from its old site on the grounds now occupied by the State Capitol, plans for the new buildings were drawn up by the English a rchitect, Burges. The original plans for these buildings exhibited a perfect unity of arrangement and detail, while the separate structures, distinct in themselves, were homogeneous and symmetrical parts of a single design.

W

1 87

There were to be three quadrangles, the present main buildings occupying the western side of the middle or great "quml." At right angles from the northern end of these builtlings there were to extend the dining hall and chapel, with a great tower, two hunt! red and forty feet high, between. Extending from the south end, and at right angles to the present buildings, were to be the library and museum. The chapel and library, therefore, were to form the northern and southern boundaries, re~pectively, of the present campus. The completed design for the college provided for a second and third quadrangle, one situated north, and the other south, of the middle "quad." The buildings forming these smaller quadrangles were to be the president's and professors' houses, an auditorium, au observatory, lecture rooms , students' living rooms , and servants' quarters. The accompanying plans of the chapel and library are exact copies of the original Burges plans, made by that architect, in London, in 1 8 74. They show a remarkable beauty and symmetry, both in detail and general design. All the buildings are designed in early French Gothic, a style devoid of excessive ornamentation, and depending for its effect upon simplicity and boldness of detail, and the harmonious grouping of windows and other prominent features. The disposition of broad masses of stone is a characteristic, as well as the very pleasing introduction of objective points of emblematic sculpture. A color contrast in the material of the buildings is obtained, as in the present buildings, by the use of brown stone-cut with rock face-which is lightened up by the sandstone from Ohio, used for string courses, and for work about the doors and windows. The chapel is entered through the archway of the tower (which has a finely groined ceiling in stone) by means of two doorways, whose heads are ornamented with sculpture in bas-relief, illustrative of scenes in the life of the Sa...-iour. The ante-chapel, in which memorial tablets could be erected, is divided from the chapel proper by a superb oaken screen. The seats are arranged facing the aisle of the nave, and behind them, at a slight elevation, are the stalls for college officers and other dignitaries. The sacrarium, at the eastern end of the building, is elevated to a height eqttal to that o f the stall~, and the altar is reached by seven steps from the floor of the 11ave, the general effect of the chapel being not unlike that of the college chapels of Oxford University. The ceiling is groined, and is designed to afford ample space for decorative paintings. Around the three sides of the building, and at the le\路el of the window sills, is an ambulatory, by the introduction of which the appearance of a double wall is produced. The chapel is fortyfive feet wide, and one hundred and forty-five feet long. When completed, according to the present design, the library would be entered through an archerl doorway of a middle tower. On either side of the entrance within, is a room set apart for the librarian and a cloak room for visitors, while beyond these is the reading room, provided with ample light from four large windows. The main reference room of the library includes the rem a ining space in the building. It is about eighty feet long, and is fully provided with wall and floor shelving. Beautifully designed windows at the eastern end, in addition to those on both sides, shed a softened light through the room. The ceiling is designed to be finished in oak. The library building is forty-five feet wide, and one hundred and twenty-five feet long. Although it may never be possible to follow out the rest of Burges' great scheme for all the college buildings, yet it seems that the very nature of a chapel and a library 189

EAST

END

[L[VATION

"'

LIBRN~Y

demands such plans as the London architect bas made. At all events, it is to be hoped that in the future the buildings of Trinity College will be built as nearly as possible with reference to a pre-arranged plan , and with some unity or correspondence of design. Trinity needs a library building and a chapel more than anything else at present, and it is therefore our earnest hope that in the near future we will see these uuildings become a real part of the present college, and Trinity thus grow more in usefulness and power each succeeding year of the new century.

1\!1

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1 93

The Jesters

Staff Stage Manager liAr<I!Y Az!CIJE L! IIOHNon.

Assistant Stage ManagÂŁr

J.

?lfEl!l!HIA N \VALKER.

Business Manager .fOHN D .H TLlJ\' E \ ' ANS.

Assistant Business Manager ALFrmo BonNETT QuATLE.

Executive Committee

Clwirman, ll. A .

] . D.

HoRNOLl .

E \' AKS.

J.

Secretary, 1\I. ] . G. Mcl r. vArNE.

J.

ME RRYMAN WALKER.

Members l\1.

J.

H.

A . HoRNOR ,

BRINES ,

'00. '00 .

J.

J. M.

WALKER,

A. S.

T rTus,

G. Mc iL vA INE, '00.

] \).j,

'00.

'01.

BurNES.

tD

.,"z

t'l 0

:z

Casts ~~

Eh? What Is it ? " A Farce in One Act

Cast MR. BROADHEAD, BARNABY,

M. J. BRINES, '00. H. A. HORNOR, '00.

CHARLES,

]. G. MciLVAINE, '00. A. B. QUAILE, ' 02. J. M. WALKER, '01.

JACK, JEN ETTE,.

SCENE.-Parlor in Broadhead 's residence. 1 '

Browne, the Martyr " Cast

ED.WARD BROWNE ( the Martyr), TEREBINTH TOPPER TON (an Artist), MRs. BROWNE (the Martyr's wife),

]. G. MciLvAINE, '00.

W. S. TRUMBULL, '03. M. B. STEWART, '02 .

SCENE.-An Artist's Studio. H

A Happy Pair" Cast

MR. HONEl! TON, MRs. HONEYTO

H . A. HORNOR, '00. ] . M. WALKER, '01. ScENE.-A Breakfast Room .

Performances ALUMNI l-IALL, .

May 14, 1900.

SIMSB URY, CoNN. ,

May 15, 1900.

TRINITY WEEK,

Feb. 15, 1900.

FARliiiNGTO:>~, CoNN.,

May 17, 1900.

WEST HARTFORD,

May 7, 1900.

EAST HARTFORu, CoNN.,

May 18, 1900.

196

The Honorary Fraternity of

~

Kappa Beta Phi ~ Founded in 1776 I

At Mary and Williams College

Roll of United Chapters ALPUA OF GREAT BRITAIN,

Trinity College, Cambridge.

ALPHA OF IR ELAND,

Trinity College. Dublin.

ALPHA OF FRANCE,

Ecole de Beaux Arts, Paris.

BETA OF FRANCE,

Emynxt Uni,' ersity.

.

ALPHA OF JI.1ASSACILUSETTS, .

Smith College.

BETA OF MASSACHUSETTS,

Wellesley College.

GAMMA OF MASSACHUSETTS,

Harvard Annex .

ALPHA OF Co:>mECTICU'I',

Trinity.

BE'l'A OF CONNECTICUT, .

Wesleyan University.

ALPHA OF NEW YORK,

Wells College.

BETA OF NEW YORK,

Vassar.

GAMMA OF NEW YORK,

Sage College, Cornell University.

DELTA OF NEW YORK,

Xymtba College.

EPSILON OF NEW YORK,

Blypqksm University.

ZETA OF NEW YORK,

Dnjlucix Institute.

ETA OF NEW YORK,

Qvltjmin.

THETA OF NEW YORK,

Lylnqbmp Atljo.

IOTA OF

Combinojint.

EW YORK,

ALPHA OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Bryn Mawr.

BE'l'A OF PENNSYLV.~NIA,

Nowhereatal.

BETA OF GERMANY,

Heidelberg.

ALPHA OF R usSIA,

University of Mskovitchjski.

ETA OF CHINA,

University of Shanghai.

OMEGA OF jAPAN,

University o.f Tokio. 1!:.17

Alpha of Connecticut Chartered 1 k~!l

Officers President, R. 11. Fox. ['ice-President, TT. Mer<.

GLAZE:DROOK.

Secretary and Treasurer, \\' . C. H1u'"

Class of !900 T. G.

CASE.

D. L. ScnwAwrz.

1D8

~

t69 Club

I President, A. S.

TITUS ,

' 00.

Vice- President, R. II. Fux, '00. Secretary and Treasurer,

J.

l\1. H u usoN, '01.

Graduate Members A . C. Hall, ' 8. C. I. Maury, '91. G. T. Macauley, '90. G. P . Coleman , '90. D. Van Schaack, '91 . A. H. Sibley, '92 . S. F. Jarvis, '89. M. R. Wright, ' 91. \V. E. A. Bulkeley, '90. R. H. I-Iutchin~, '90. E. B. Finch, '91. F. B. Fuller, '92 . R. S. Saltus, '92 . W. P. Niles, ' 93 . J. C. Bulkeley, ' 93 . C. L. Bowie, '93. J. w. LC\\'iS, '93. J. Cullen , Jr., '93 . B. Parker, ' 93. \V . C. D. Wilson, '93 . R. P. Bate~ , '93 . G. W. Elli~, '94. \V . W. Vibbert, '94.

R. S. Graves, '9+. C . F. Weed. '9 4-. F. C. Edgerton, '94. J. W. Edgerton, '94. R. P. Parker, '9+. E. C. Wagner, '94. E. F. Burl<e, '95. D. Willard, '95. R. F . \Vebh , '95. F. S . Burrnge, '95. H. R. Dingwall, '95. R. H . Macauley, '95. John Strawbridge, '9 .J . F . R. Young, '95. E. P . Hamlin, '95. F . l\1acd. Goddard, '96. C. S. Morris, '96. E. Parsons, '96. L. L. Leonarrl, '96. P. Co ok, '9 . A. S . Woodle, '98. D. C. Gra,路es, '98. M. R. Cart\night, '9

J. S. Carter, '98 . F . A. Balch , '9 . A. L. Ellis, '9 8. L. G. Reynnlds, '9 W. H . Eato n, '99 . B . K. Morse, '99 . C. S111ith, ' !J 9 . A. D. Vib bert, '99 .

Active M embers A. Arnott, '00. P . L. Bryant, '00. S. W. Coons, '00. H. McK. Glazebrook, '00.

\V. C. Hill, '00. A. C. Hall, '00. J. G. 1\Icllvaine, ' 00.

1 U9

C. H. Whct:lcr, '0 1. i\1. \\'. Clement . '0 1. \V . A. Mitchell , '01 .

Trinity College. HA R TFOR D , CO N N., ..

JR 1'9,

March .29,

- -0E xt.roct. from t"he Rules ot t.he F a.cuh.y. ·• Whe11 I st<.odant retums to eoll111 afltr I suspe,.sio,.., he s ll• ll et Otlce r.sutT\1 attenda"';' 1,1po11 all w ith in a waelt aft e r hos retvr'l for Mlktnl up 111 worl< omrtt..t on h11 abtef'IC:I.

h11

eotlea• a.o.11ciaM, and tne ptofiJ$011 shall

appoon~ l"l'el

If hot sutpeneion M due to fal lwr. et eu.f'Nnations, tuch euminat ..::.rt

shell be held wothl11 tl'u ee d.ys atler h.- ' ' '"'"· at\d fatlure at the.,. eu.m1natio,.a -.hell s~o~bj ec-t him to further tuspeN;on."

·'IU'.

Sir:At a meeting of' t.he "e.oulty held Yarch 28th, it was voted that

ro~

acknowledged complicity 1n Hazing you are suspended

!he period

o~

suspens1on is

~de brie~

~ntil

on account of the

voluntary action of the olaes in acknowledging the offense. Attention is called to the

:para~h

on page 61 of the

ca,alogue in regar d to the holding of SOholarsh1pe, and the forfeiture of the right to compete ror College Honora or ?ri?.es. Re 8ll e~tf'll1 1Y f

J4.,./~/L.;_~ ~L_ President.

200

From the Charter, Statutes, and Standing Rules of Trinity College, Title X, Section 2: "The officers and students shall attend the regular daily services in the Chapel. " Following is a list of the attendance of the Faculty at Chapel during two weeks in February. ( X signifies absence; no mark signifies present.)

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)(

X J=

X

- -

- -

--

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

- - - - - - -- -- - - -

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

- - --

---- --

- - - - - - - - -- - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - -- -- -- -- -

X

- -- ---- -Babbitt ...... X X X X X X X X X - - - - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - - - - - - - Simonds .... . X X X X - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Mixter ...... .. X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ----------- -

Pynchon .... . X

X

X

X

X

X

-xt x-

X

X

X

This table is authentic. It is evident that while the students have but one cut, the Faculty seem to require several cuts each week. The burning question at present seems to be, therefore : Do the students, or the Faculty, or the Rules require reform ?

20 1

Nee te poeniteat ea/amo triFisse labellum.

J856 Keepe rs of the Pipe of Peace whose names are cut on the box.

H. M. Gregory, '56. S. McConihe, '5 6. H . W. Kloppenburg, '58. J. E. Mears, '58. 'f. B. Sexton , ' 60. W. H. Tibbits, '6 1. L. K. Storrs, '63. N. B. Dayton, '63. G. M. Stanley, '68. H. S . Carter, '69. H. Van B. Kissam, '69. B. E. Dackus, '70 . J. K. Stout, ' 70. W . Drayton, ' 71. D. P. Cotton, ' 71. G. C. Burgwin, '72. J. T. Do\\'ditch, '73. C. E. Craik, '74.

T. L. Stedman, '7+. II. E. Whitney, '74. \V. R. Blair, '75 . W. J. Roberts, '75. E. N. Burke, '76. B. E. Wa rner, '76. W. E. Rogers, '77. B. F. H. Shreve, '78. 0. Buffington, '79. 0. Holway,' 0. C. Carpenter, '82. J . R. Cunningham, '85. C . G. Child, ' 6. C. H. Tibl.Jits, '87. F. B. Whitcomh, '87. J. W . R. Crawford , 'SR. L. H . Paddock , '88.

E. N. Scott, '89. E. B. Bulkeley, '90. G. W. Sargent, '9 0. T. L. Elwyn, '92. T. H. Yardley路, '92. L. D. Huhbard, '93. G. D. Hartley, '93. F. C. Edgerton, '94 . H. T. Greenley, '94. F. S . Burrage, ' 95. C. DuB . Broughton, '95. DeF. Hicks , '96. E. W. Robinson , '9G. E. F. Waterman, '98. H. R. Remsen, '98. J. W. Nichols, '99. J. H. K. Davis, '99.

Present Keepers, J . G. Mcilvaine, '00 ; E. P. Taylor, Jr., '00. 202

Trinity College Coon Club [As eve ry me m ber voted for himself, no officers were elected .]

Members C. H .

WHEELER,

P. L .

BARTON,

'01.

'02. Honora ry Member 0MAR KuAvvA"M.

203

M. G.

HAIGHT,

'00,

] . i\1.

HUDSON,

'0 1.

Sophomore Dining Club Founded by the Class o f '99

February lS, l897 .tf.

.tf.

Graduate Members

w. I-I. J. W.

D. S. CoRsoN, '99. J. H. K. DA \"IS, '99. c. B. 1-lEDfliCK, '99. G. T. KENDAL, '99. E . G. LITTELL, '99. B. K . MORSE, '99. A. D. VmBERT, '!:!9. H. D. GRERN, '99. W. C. HILL, '00. H. A. HORNOR, '00. D. B. JEWETT, '00. J. G . MclLVAJNE, '00. F. w. PRINCE, '00.

EATON, '99. ICHOLS, '99. A. H. ONDERDONK, '99. H. OWEN, '99. E. A. RICH, '99. E. K. STERLING, '99. W. B. SUTTON, '99. J. W . BRADIN, '00. T. P. BROWNE, Jr., '00. R. H. Fox, '00. S. R. FuLLER, Jr., '00. H . .McK. GLAZEBROOK, '00. M. G. HAIGHT, '00.

c.

D. L. SCHWARTZ, '00.

Active Members p. H.

L. BARTON. S. BRADFIELD. E. B. GOOIJRICH. E. GooDRIUGE, Jr. C. H. HILL.

H. C. C.

J.

MAGINNIS. PECK. J. P. W. TAYLOR. R. N. WEIDEL. H. R. WHITE.

Dinners 1st. May 28th,

.

At Merrill's Hotel. 204

l90 l Graduate Members of the Sophomore Dining Club

WALKER.

VAN DE \VATER.

\V . P.

M.

w.

J. D. R.

BROWN,

CLEMHNT .

EVANS. McNEIL.

HUDSON.

WHEELER.

FISKE.

Ruoo.

WILSON.

R. E.

BROWN.

PECK.

H. H. Ruoo.

CLEMENT.

EVANS.

FISKE.

J. M. HUDSON. W. J. McNEIL.

205

I

A. R.

VAN DE wATER.

J. J\1.

WALKER.

C. H.

WHEELER.

H. D.

WILSON, JR.

PECIC

Banquet l90l from l903 February the 17th, 1900 $

$

Supper at the Elm Tree Inn Farmington, Conn. $

$

Toasts Toastmaster, 1901, A. thletics, The Ladies, The College, The Sophs, "1903," H. D.

BRIGHAM.

HENRY L. G. MEYER, '03. S. ST. J oHN MoRGA..'! , ' 03. RICHARD E. PECK, '01. JA~ms M . HuDSON, '01. WILLIAM P. BROWN, '01. FRANK E. WATERMAN, '01. CHARLI>S H . WHEELER, '01.

Committee of Arrangements H. L. G. MEYER.

ADKINS HENRY.

206

S. ST.].

MO R GAN.

Theta Nu Epsilon ]AMES WATSON BRADIN, jR. 路 THOMAS PROSSOR BROWNE,

ROBERT BAYARD BELLAMY.

]R.

GODFREY BRINLEY.

MOSES ] AMES BRINES.

AUBREY HENRY DERO\' .

RODERICK HARRISON Fox.

JOHN DAULBY EVANS.

HASLET'l' McKIM GLAZEOROOK.

REGINALD FISKE.

HARRY ARCHER HORNOR.

WILLIAM ]OHN Me

FREDERICK WELLES PRINCE.

ElL.

RICHARD EUGENE PECK.

DAVID LOUIS SCHWARTZ.

ARTHUR REGINALD VAN DE WATER.

ALLEN STERLING TITUS.

]AMES MERRYMAN WALKER.

1. Y. A-0, 6. ? o8D 4 & It

+

J w iII

v 4! 0 5 JD.IEY Va; 9H 95Yeto 6Xol1M?

207

College Marshals .;!.

.;!.

1868. Joseph B. Cheshire.

1836. Pliny A. Jewett. 1837. 1838. 1 39. 1840. 1841. 18 42. 184-3. 1844. 1845. 1846. 1847. 1848. 1849. 1850. 1851. 1852. 1853. 1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. 185 . 1859. 1860. 1861. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1865. 1866. 1867.

1 69. George E. Elwell. 1870. D. Page Cotton.

Albert Dodd. George W. Beers. Thomas T. Guion. C. B. Varley. George R. Hall. Francis J. Clerc. John G. Sterling. Samuel Flower. JJmes B. Wakefield. David F. Lumsden. William C. Peters. Edward H . Brinley. Samuel Sherman. Charles E. Terry. James W. Smyth. A. Hamilton Polk. J. Gardiner White. W. Butler Krumbhaar. Jared Starr. Sidney Hall. John H. S. Quick. Samuel B. Warren. Wm. G. Davies. Wm. B. Tibbits. G W. Hugg. John J. McCook . Thomas R. Ash. C. T. Olmsted. Charles Wanzer. Henry K. Huntington.

1871. Jno. W. Gray. 1872. Russell Murray. 1873. L. M. Plumer. 1874.

Charles D. Scudder.

1875. Henry H. Brigham . 1876.

J. Ellis Kurtz.

1877. R. B. Brundage. 1 78. Wm. N. Elbert. 1 79.

Henry C. Lovebridge.

1880. Wm. B. Nelson. 1881. Charles H . Carter. 1 8 2. J. Eldred Brown. 11~83.

E. S. Van Zile.

1884. S. S. Mitchell. 1885. E. B. Hatch. 18 6. W. B. Olmsted. 1887. W. F. Morgan, Jr. 1888. E. N. Scott. 1889. E. McP. McCook. 1890. T. P. Thurston. j 891. William Joseph Miller. 1 892. William French Collins. 1893. Robert Prescott Parker. 1894. John Moore McGann. 1895. Wm. Speaight Langford, Jr. 1896. James Watson Lord. 1 897. James Watson Lord. 1898. Elton Gardiner Littell .

Howard C. Vibbert.

1899. 20

Harry Archer Hornor.

Valedictorians and Salutatorians in Trinity College ~

v. S.

v. S. V. S.

V. S.

1827. Isaac E. Crar y. Samuel C. Goldsborough. 1828. Henry G. Smith. \ ,.lliam H . Walter. 1829. Joshua G. Wright. SamuelS. Lewis. 1830. Augustus F. Lyde. Isaac W. Hallam.

1831. Nat haniel E. Cornwall. S. Joseph R. Eccleston. 1832. v. E. Edwards Beardsley. s. John W. French. 18 33. v. Hugh L. Mor rison. S. Ed ward Hardyear. 1834. v. William Payne. s. Solomon G. Hitchcock. 1835. v. Rober t Tomes. s. Edward VanDeusen. 1836. V. James H. Elliott. S. I saac H. Tuttle.

v.

~

1837. v. Abner Jackson. s. John T. Cushing. 1838. v. Charles Gillette. s. Cyrus Munson. 1839. v. Isaac G. Hubbard. s. Nathaniel 0. Cornwall. 1 840. v. Robert B. Fairbairn. s. Vandervoort Bruce. 1 841. V. {William H . Frisbie. Henry D. Noble. s. Thomas R. Pynchon. 1842. v. George Rossiter. s. Henry C. Preston. 1 43. v. Thomas S. Preston. s. George Ker. 1 44. v. David P. Sanford. s. Tilton E. Doolittle. 1 8 45. v. Rober t C. Rogers. s. John A. Paddock. 1846. v. John W. Bacon. s. Samuel M. Whiting. 209

1847. Samuel Benedict. s. George S. Gilman. 1848. v. Benj . H. Paddock. S . Nath. N. Belden. 1849. v. John M. Atwood. s. George W. Giddings. 1850. v. John T. Huntington. s. Daniel E. Loveridge. 1851. v. Charles]. Hoadly. . S. Alex. G. Cummings . 1852. v. Lucius H. Jones. s. Francis Chase.

v.

v. s.

v.

s.

v.

s.

v.

s.

1853. Alfred L. Brewer. William G. Spencer. 1854. George D. Johnson. James H . Williams. 1855. Luke A. Lockwo od. Edwin C. Bolles. 1856. Daniel E. Holcomb. Samuel F. Hotchkin .

1872. 1857. V. Paul Zeigler. Samuel Herman. s. James H. George. S. George B. Hopson . 1 73. 1858. v. Leonard \V. Richardson. v. GeorgeS. Mallory. s. Oliver H. Raftery. s. William H . Vibbert. 1 74. 1859. v. Edward N. Dickerson. v. Samud B. \楼arren. S. James D. Smyth. S. Edwin E. Johnson. 1875. 1860. \'. Charles H. W . Stocking. v. George M. Hubbard. s. Edward W.Worthington. S. Augustus Jackson. 1876. 1861. v. Isaac Heister. Arthur W. Allen. s. Charles E. Moore. s. A. B. Jennings. 1877. 1862. v. Charles C. Edmunds, Jr. v. James B. Murray. s. John Prout. S. George W. Hugg. 1878. 1863. V. John D. Hills. v. JohnS. Smith . S. John G. Williams. s. W. N. Ackley. 1879. 1864. v. Alfred Harding. v. Robert A. Benton. s. James S. Carpenter. R Joseph F . Ely. 1880 . 1865. v. T. M. N. George. v. Charles T. Olmsted . s. S. Lorin Webster. s. Ed ward S. Johnson. 1881. 1866. v. ]. Russell Parsons. v. Samuel Hart. s. Charles W. Jones. s. Henry A. Metcalf. 1882. 1867. v. Seaver M. Holden . v. William R. Mackay. S. John H. McCrackan. s. George G. Nichols. 18 3. 1868. v. R. T. Reineman. v. Frank L. Norton. s. ]. E. Brown. s. Frank H. Potts. 1 884. 1869. v. George 0. Holbrooke. v. Henry R. Neely. s. William S. Barrows. s. Arthur McConkey. 1 8 85. 1870. V. H. B. Loomis. v. George McC. Fiske. s. Robert路Thorn. S. Harlow R. Whitlock. 18 86. 1871. v. I-Ierman Lilienthal. v. George W. Douglass. s. Chauncey C. Williams. s. William]. Tate.

v.

4

21 0

1 887. Orrin A. Sands. s. William A. Beardsley. 1888. v. Lewis H. Paddock. s. Charles E . Purdy. 1889. V. Willard Scudder. S. Joseph W. Fell. 1890. v. Clifford S. Griswold. S. William H. C. Pynchon. 1 91. v. Harry Howard . s. Charles Herbert Yo ung. 1892. v. Albert Crabtree. s. Romily F . Humphries. 1893. v. March Chase Mayo. s. Robert Peck Bates. 1894. v. athan Tolles Pratt. s. Cameron Josiah Davis. 1895. v. Edward Myron Yeomans. s. Sydney Key Evans. 1896. v. George Nahum Holcombe. s. George Blodgett Gilbert. 1897. v. Hermann von W. Schulte. S. John Robert Benton. 1898. V. WoolseyMcAlpineJohnson s. Albert Morey Sturtevant. 1899. v. Harold Loomis Cleasby. s. Charles William Henry. 1900. v. Simon Lewis Tomlinson . s. Harry Archer Hornor.

v.

Class Day of the Class of 1900 June 25, f 900 FREDER I CK WELLES PlliNCE , President. L UTHER HAROLD B URT , Hist orian. PERCY LEON BRYANT, P oet. JoHN KAY CLEMENT, Orat or. MOSES jAMES BR INES, Presenter. jOHN G ILBERT MciLVA I NE, Sta tisticia n.

Committees Class Day CLE~IENT.

PRINCE.

CA SE.

TAYLOR .

HtLL.

TIT s.

Reception TitLL.

HAIGHT.

TAYLOR.

PRINCE.

MciLVAINE .

Invitations CLEMENT.

NJC[LYAINE .

CooNs.

ARNOTT.

Photographs

Music HILL.

BRINES.

SiMONDS.

SIMONDS.

PRlNCE.

BURT.

TOMLINSON .

SIMOND .

TRACY.

SMART .

ARNOTT.

Dramatics

Finance TAYLO R.

BRYA NT .

2 11

BRINES.

TITUS.

MciLVAINE.

Hartford High School Club ~

~

O fficers President, H. L. E. L. Vice-President, Secretary and Tre~1surer, F. W.

CLEASBY,

PnlNCE,

'99.

'00.

SIMONDS,

'00.

Members L. H. F.

E. E. E.

s.

'00. W. PRINCE, '00. L. SIMONDS, '00. L. SMAHT, '00. P. TAYLOH, '00. L . TO!\ILINSON, '00. BunT,

W. A.

'01.

MITCHELL,

E. C. STONE, '01. F. R. STURTEVANT, '01. w. L. CARTER, '02. E. J. CLE\"ELAND, Jn., '02. W. S. IlYDE, '02. E . H.

LORENZ

'02. '02. K. P. MORDA, '02. J. MeA. ]OIINSON, '03. S. S路r. j. MORGAN, '03. J. D. EvAxs (special) . A. T. McCOOK,

E.

s.

MEHRIAM,

(special).

St. Lukets School Club v.,c President, H .

J.

M. HUDSON,

'01.

~

McKIM GLAZEBROOK.

\V. P. BROWN, '01. 212

R. N.

WEIBEL,

'02.

+ RT. RRV. HENRY A. NEELY, D . D. ( Visitor of Trinity College, 1867- 1899.) Died October 31, 1899. GEORGE BEACH. (T rustee of Trinity College, 1 870-1899.) Died July 1 6, 1 899 . Rnv. ROBERT BRINCKERBOFF FAIRBAIRN, D. D., '40. Died January 27, 1 99. REv. DR. THOMAS LEVERING FRANKLIN, '41. Died October 29, 1 899. GEORGE ROGERS BALL, M. D, '42 . Died December 24, 1899. REV . DR. ALFRED LEE BREWER, '53. Died February 16, 1S99. BoN. ASHBEL SMITH KITTREDGE, '5 7 . Died August 25, 1 899. JOHN PECK CASE SHAW, '71-. Died December 15, 1 899. DR. WILLIAM WELSH VIBBERT, '94. Died March 26, 1900. FREDERICK MAcDONALD GODDARD, '96. Died January 10, 1899. GEORGE SHELDON McCOOK, '97. Died January 8, 1 ' 99. HENRY STUART MARTINDALE, ' 79. Died April 2 , 1900. REV . JOHN HUMPHREY BARBOUR, D. D., '73. Died April 29, 1900.

+

214

JE~war~

jfranklin tPowei,

Class of 1901-, IDietl :tune 23, 1699.

TRINITY COLLEGE. ~r HIS

ILLUSTRATION shows the principal building of Trinity C ollege, 653 feet long, in the English Secular Gothic style. At right angles with it, on the south, are the Observatory, the new Hall of atural History, and the J a rvis Laboratories for C hemistry a nd for Ph ysics. To the north of it are the Gymnasium, houses of the President and Professors, and Chapter Houses of the Fraternities. Below the College C a mpus to the east, and within three minutes' walk, is the spacious Athletic Field. In beauty of situation, healthful co nditiens of life, and equipment for its special work, the College is not surpassed. The College has distinct courses in Arts, in Science, in Letters a nd Science, and in Letters. The Faculty includes eleven professors, seven instructors, a nd five lecturers. Among the Elective studies within the res pective co urses, there is scarcely a single important subject for which adequate pro vision is not made. Properly qualified candidates, not desiring to pursue the whole studies of any course, are allowed as Specia l Students to pursue certain subjects, receiving certificates of satisfactory work. The Library contains 40,000 volumes. T he Jarvis Chemical a nd Physical Laboratories have every equipment for the most thorou gh practical work. Similar Laboratories in Biology, Botany, and in Geology and Mineralogy, are in preparation in the new Hall of Natura l Hi story . There are about fifty Scholarships for the aid of necessitous students. The three Holland Scholarships, yielding each S6oo per annum, are awa rded to the three best students in the three lower classes respectively. The Russell Graduate Fellowship of $400 is a warded biennia lly in the interest of higher graduate study. Prizes to the amount of 500 are also awarded to undergraduates for success in the work of the various departments. Two examinations for admission are held at the C ollege in each year, the first in the week preceding the Annual C ommencement, viz.: June 21 - 23, and the second in September, immediately before the beginning of the Christmas Term, September 17-20 . For Catalogues, Examinatio n Papers, or information, apply to the President or to the Secretary of the Faculty.

'

217

â&#x20AC;˘

The Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company 1846--1900

u

n tb~ fiftY=four y~ars Of its work almost

of tbt pr~miums paid by poticv= bold~r·s b4\l~ bt~n paid ootr to tb~ir b~n~= fldarlu or r~turn~d to tb~m. What bas b~~n so r~turn~d and what is bdd for tb~ prouction of prutnt poHcv=bold~rs as n~t or l~dgtr ass~ts aggr~= gatu $263,~02,899.67; 127.57 p~r c~nt. of tb~ total 98 p~r c~nt.

pr~miums r~cdo~d.

tbu~ ruutts bao~ b~~n accomptisbtd at an ao~r= agt ~xp~ns~ rat~ of only 8.9 p~r c~nt. 1t is an unmatcb~d r~cord ; and The Connecticut Mutual is as thoroughly pr~par~d for tb~ good work of tb~ futur~ as it bas at anv tim~ b~tn for that of its un~qual~d past.

~~ JACOB L. GREENE, President. OHN M. TAYLOR, Vicc-Prest.

HERBERT H. WHITE, Sec' y. DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary.

ALFRED T. RICHARDS, General Agent, ROOM J6, COMPANY'S BUILDING. 218

P. &

~

J. BESSE,

~

,f CATERERS FOR •

College Germans, ~ College Teas, fit Fraternity Receptions, Dinners, ~ Weddings.

&

Telephone number 1124.

~ ADVERTISEMENTS.~

The firms which advertise in this book are those which support Trinity College. They have, therefore, a right to expect that the College will support them. ~ Remember this Fact. . Jurors Award for Beauty of Workmanship, Design and Distinguished Ex cellency in the Manufacture of Shirts.

_

,~

~

<;.'

-~Y. . ·:;.~_

t

0 '

'"

JHIRT J TO ORDE~ For Business W ear; Negligee for Traveling; for Dress Occasions .

:;:

~ -~{.~ ~G ""-'

•:

""

"J .if 0

~.....

,' I

0

0

·'-

0

~

OUR JTANDARD R..JO JTOCK. JHIRT is t he best value possible for the price.

0 0

) /

A

BUSINEH AND DREH JHIRT J, $z.oo , $z.so, $ 3.00 and upwards.

All made in

NOYES BROS . F ACTORY. FANCY SHIRTS I N S TOC K. OR. TO ORD E R..

' ~ ·:~

0

,

NOYEJ BROJ. CO., No. 905 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 219

"TRE LE11.DING FIRE INSURllNeE eeMVllNY 0P 1\MERiell."

Incorporated 1819.

Charter Perpetual.

Cash Capital,

$ 4,000,000.00 13,019,411.20

Cash Assets, Total Liabilities,

3,861,796.13

Net Surplus,

5,157,615.07 9,157,615.07

Surplus as to Policy Holders, Losses Paid in 81 Years,

85,641,084.50

WM. B. CLARK, President. W. H. KING, Secretary.

E. 0. WEEKS, Vice President.

A. C. ADAMS, } A . t t S t . HENRY E. REES, ss1s an ecre anes.

WESTERN BRANCH, { KEELER & GALLAGHER, 4J3 Vine St., Cincinnati, 0 . General Agents. NORTHWESTERN BRANCH, { WM. H. WYMAN, General Agent, Omaha, Neb. W. P. HARFORD, Ass't General Agent. PACIFIC BRANCH,

San Francisco, Cal.

INLAND MARlNE DEPARTMENT.

BOARDMAN & SPENCER, General Agents. CHICAGO, Ills., l45 La Salle St. NEW YORK, 52 William St. { BOSTON, 95 Kilby St. PHILADELPHIA, 229 Walnut St. {

220

HAVE

THE-~

HARTFORD DECORATING Co.~ ~ ~ J. ALEX. rlcCLUNIE, Proprietor, ..• DO YOUR ••.

CoLLEGE DEcORA TINO,

f LAOS,

BuNTING, ETc.

I77 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn.

C. B. BOARDMAN, Hack, Livery, Boarding

~

and Sale Stables. Carriages may be Ordered by Tel ephone.

Bills Payable Monthly.

356 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 221

Plimpton Mfg. Co., HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT.

High Grade Printing, Embossing and Half-tone work a specialty. Plate Printing and Engraving. Envelopes and Blank Books of every description.

Printers of The Trinity lTy. 222

Dental Rooms 1

HARTFORD, CONN.

753 Main Street

Picture Frames, E:ngravinos,

E:tcllings,

Woter Colors. l ine Pic tu re 1=-ra rn ing a Specialtu.

A Tale from Shakespeare .;!.

.;!.

"Comedy of Errors." "Much Ado About Nothing." . "As You Like It. " "All's Well That Ends Well. "

FRESHMAN YEAU, SOPHO~JORE YEAR ,

JUNIOR YEAR , . SENIOR YEAR, .

THE WM. H. POST 路cAR.PET CO., 219

ASYLU~.I

STREET,

Carpetings and Upholstery. Rugs from Mats to Carpet Sizes. Standard Qualities at Guaranteed Prices. 2 23

Connecticut T rust and~

~

Co.

Safe Deposit

Corner of Main and Pea rl Streets.

Capital, $;soo,ooo.

Surplus, $2oo,ooo.

Banking Business.

Conducts a general ban~ing bu.siness . .Accounts opened and depos1ts recelVed subject to check at sight . Accounts solicited . ALSO,

Safe Deposit Vault.

The most capacious and impregnable in the city. One thousand safe boxes for rent at from $10 to $100 per annum, according to size.

?-::

Trust De'partment.

Is authoriz~d its charter to ac~ as trustee for tnd1V1duals and corporatwns, executor or administrator of estates, guardian of minors, etc.

M . H. WHAPLES, President.

J. P. WHEELER, Treasurer. H. P. REDFIELD, Assistant Treasurer. H. S. ROBI SO , Secretary and Manager of Trust Department. 224

J\1:EN LE_A _VING COLLEGE

'1-,l~INI'l-,Y

AT THE BEGINNING OF

t

Christmas Vac a tion, East er V aca ti o n, or afte r C o mmencement ,

Should send to G. F. SPENCER & CO., a nd have their trun',s taken to the depot. PHICES:

40c:- per tru11k ; reduced rate of25c. each for several sent together.

Office, 7l Asylum Street.

Telephone No. 1133.

J.

G. MARCH,

Hair Cutting Parlors, 9 AsYLU ~r

STREET, H ARTFORD, C oNN.

I. & N. CHAESE, 753

Brtistic Main StreeJ,

~hotograpbers,

Hartford, Conn. .;J.

.;J.

S pecia l R ates to C o llege

~ ~

OLARI( & SMI1.,H,

('\("\.~

Fine

Stud ents .

won~.

Fair Prices. \J0\..J\._)\___A._V

~ ~

BOOK

AND JOB PRINTERS. 225

4 9 Pearl Street, (Phrenix Mutual Life Building,)

HARTFORD, CONN.

flhjte JndttJtcuzce C?J~nytany "/ .9'&"'{(/>"'c? ClDonn. STATEMENT, JANUARY 1, 1900.

CAPITAL STOCK, all Cash. Funds reserved to meet all Liabilities, Re-insurance Reserve, Legal Standard, Unsettled Losses and other Claims, . Net Surplus over Capital and Liabilities,

$1,000,000.00

Total Assets, January 1, 1900 , .

$4,551,283.55

1,784,168.02 294,160 .56 1,472,954.97

JAI1ES NICHOLS, President. B. R.. STILLI1AN, Secretary. H. A. SMITH , Assistant Secretary.

HOME OFFICE ," 95 PEARL ST.

..·······..

~·······················:•

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jElectrz'c Power. a

! ! : :

! : :

I

r vou ar¢ cont¢mplating installing a rdrig¢rating plant, do :

not fail to consult us on pricu for botb d¢ttric motors ! and I'OW¢r. Our pricu for pown for tbis continu¢d ! summ¢r us¢ ar¢ low¢r tban can b~ produc¢d bV anv otb¢r • m¢ans. tb¢ d¢ctric motor r¢quiru onv littl¢ att¢ntion, as ! tb¢ burings ar¢ all sdf=oiling. tb¢ labor r¢quir¢d bV otb¢r : m¢tbods of pow¢r is oft¢n oo¢rlook¢d. .;~- .;~- .J~. .J~. .J~. .J~. .J~. .J~. .J~. :

•: GET :

.! •

OUR PRICES ON VENT!LATING ELECTRIC APPLIANCES..JC.JC :

! The

i

•i

Hartford Electric Light Company, OFFICE, 266 PEARL STREET.

i

........................................................ '

2 26

THE

HARTfORD LifE INJUR._ANCE CoMPANY, HARTFORD, CONN.

Thirty=three Years Successful Business. Issues every desirable form of policy contract. All rates and values guaranteed. Ordinary Life, participating and non-participating. Limited Payment, participating and non-participating. Endowments of various periods. Term contracts with exclusive features.

Eighteen

and

One=half Million Dollars

PAID IN BE:l'\TEFITS.

Ratio of Assets to Liabilities, $l42 to $l 00. CHAS. H. BACALL, Secretary.

GEO. E. KEENEY, President. 227

The Ivy Dictionary of College Slang .;;&

.;;&

BLUFF-To recite on your face. CIKCH-See Ethics and Elementary French. CLASS SMOKER-Sec Roughhouse. CLIQUE-All the fellows who don't agree with you. FL U ~K-One who is careful not to impair his health by overwork. GoosE-EGG-See Athletic Record, Class of 1900. GRIND-One who ruins body and brain by cxce~si,·e study. "HEADS OuT "-Sec RuiJberncck. HECK-A euphemism for the infernal regions. l\lucKER-Any one who doesn't go to Trinity-and a f.:w who do . PIETY-So-callcrl relig-ious in~tructi o n, but in t"t'ality an institution for the encouragement of dm·k and terrible profanity. PI~CH- T o acquire without previous ethica l deliberation. See Shag and SIVipe. PR~:xv-.\ man wi t h a gray moustache who is seen on Vernon street several times during the yt·nr, but is more oft.- n off on a trip somewhere. Is generally accompanied by a hu ge and ferocious mon~tet· known as ·• Trusty" or'' Trustee." ROUGIJHOUSE-A larg-e timt·. RuBBERNECK-Disappointed curi osity. See Strctcherra.ce. SHAG- To appropriate fo r puq>oses of celebration, ns "to shag- wood. " -Shakespeare.

SHARK-A bright g rind. (The species is ran!). SIJORTY. SALLIE", lloo-Hoo, jonN~Y. ETC.- Terms of endearment, disgust, or hatred , accorrling t o the inclination o f the u~t·r. Sometimes expressing phy~ical peculiarity. SocKEYE-See Fisheye ami Rubberneck . STUNT-A convenient substantiYc which means a ny old thing. Generally something which is no cinch. SWIPE-To freeze onto.

HABENJTEIN HABENSTEIN, the Caterer of Hartford,

I

'

A{lt'1'

is known from one end of Connecticut to the other, and in fact his reputation has extended even into the neighboring states. He is to that section of the country what Sherry is to New York, the caterer par excellence. MASONIC TEnPLE. A II(Jit8t

T .~t,

will1 ·ewore to th e

l'Jfill1V JX J; ANJ( BUILNING, No. 805 lJinin St. 221!'

THE ERNST SCHALL CO., s ASYLUM STREET,

COLLEGE PI NS AND DEVISES A JPECIALTY.

DEMPSEY & CARROLL'S

fine Engraving and Society Stationery.

"Jtr "'tr eLITe CONFeCTIONeRY DEPAR-TMENT, CO I~NE:r~

..·····

:··············

N\AIN :r\ND ASYLLI 1.

............................~··:

IGolfers, This Way! • :

! i • • :

!

~

:

.lJ

I •

You can save y ourself time, annoyance and expense by coming here for your ~ golf supplies. The Harry Vardon a nd other golf clubs. . The Craigpark Golf Balls are now $4.00 a dozen, notwithstanding the recent ri se in the wholesale market; but we can' t guarantee this price for long. : We also have the Henley, Ocobo, Spalding, Silvertown and other golf balls. + See the new " Ave hor" Golf Tee. You can't lose it. : Golf clubs oi all kinds repa ired. ~

:

I

.lJ

GILLETTE BROS..

Bicycles,

Athleti~EA~E~~d" Sporting Goods~

Corue1· Pea.1·l wul Hay11es Streets.

:

I :

:......................................................: 2:!9

路~ John M. Gallup & Co., Pianos and Organs, Sheet Music, Banjos, Guitars, Mandolins and Strings a Specialty.

20 l, 203, 205 Asylum Street,

~

INSTRUMENTS TO RENT.

HARTFORD.

DR. vV. S. YOUNGBLOOD. DENTTST, GS PRATT S'l'REET. HARTF ORD , CoN ~.

UNl'l'Y BUILDING.

INTERCOLLEG IATE:

13URE:A"U

OF

A"CA"DE:1'1IC

COSTUME:.

<2E)TRELL & LEE)N1\RD, 472-4-6=8 Broadway, 1\LB1\NY, N. Y., MAKERS OF

<2aps, Gowns and Hoods TO

Trinity, Vale, Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, University of Penn., l?rown, Weslc~Jan, Wllllo~ns, Hobart, Cornell ancl the others. Class Contracts a Specialty. Rich Gowns for the PULPIT and the BENCH.

A A A A

l

Stylish Shoe, Simmons & <to.'s Co1nfortable Shoe, ~J ~~ 0 W ell-n1ade Shoe, ( Popul ar Shoe, ) "Special" Shoe for Men. W. 0. JIMMONJ {搂. CO.,

90 1 M ain Street,

Co rner Pratt. 2 30

â&#x20AC;˘~oo ~

THE

ICNJX PH \....l..:t

Mutual Life .:1- .:1- .JJ. Insurance Company,

OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT,

after a successful business experience of alm ost half a century, is stronger, safer and more progressive than ever. All its policies are incontestable after two years, a nd have Extended Insura nce, Loan, Cash and Paid-up Val ues endorsed thereon. We invite the inspection of our new

EXCHANGEABLE LIFE and .:1- .JJ. RETURN PREMIUri CONTRACTS, a lso our 5% 20-YEAR INCOME BOND, under which contract a stated income is guaranteed for twenty years, a nd we then pay the face valu e of the policy. If you are contemplating insurance, we suggest co mparison of our contracts with those offered by any other company . For sample policies, terms, etc., address the Home Office, Hartford , Conn. JONATHAN B. BUNCE, President. JOHN M. HOLCOMBE, Vice-President. CHARLES H. LAWRENCE, Secretary.

Summary of Events May, l899- June, l900

1\llay 25. june 10. " 11. II

12.

" " "

13. 14. 23.

"

24.

"

26-2

July

1.

September 21. 22. 2J.. 30. October 1. 4. 7. 10. 11. 12. 14. 2 1. 25.

28.

Fifth cotillon. jesters elect officers. Election of officers of athletic association. The vice-president makes his maiden spe~ch and conducts a dignified( ?) meeting. Tablet elections. Medusa elect ions. National anthem, "Bring the Wagon ll orne, John, " reaches Trinity. Rixth cotillon. Senior dramatics. Commencement week. Reception in Monday-Class day exercises o n the campus. Alumni hall. Tuesday-Breaking of ground for a tum.! History building. Unveiling of Memorial Tablet to Clarke Churchma n, '93, U. S. A. Prc;id<On t 's receptio n . Reunions. Wednesday-Commencement. Ingalls and Woodle receive degrees! Dilig"ncc re\\'arded. Faculty make a raid on College rooms. Posters and placards are appropriated. College opens with fifty new men, thirty-five in Freshman class. First loot ball practice. Push-rush won by class of 1903. Drt路adful news. ln future every man must take examinations in "Piety." nderclass meet. nderwood cup awarded to Sopho mores. The Janitors start to work. Yale, 46; Trinity, 0. Holy Cross, 39; Trinity, 0. Hazing formally abolished. The '路 Progressive" Discipline Committee appointed. Thejanitcrs, worn out by their exertions, decide to rest for the remainder of the year. Amherst, 0; Trinity, 0. Trinity, 16 ; Amherst Aggies, 5. Williams, 12; Trinit_l', 0. German Club elections. 232

(b~

f. j.

Emm~ricb

£ompany,

29, 3t, 33, East t9th Street, New York. PARIS .

LONDON .

For Artistic Finish ,

For Novel and Durable Colorings,

for

~~Jisk

Emm~ricb Pap~rs~~

O n sale. with all F irst-cfass Decorators.

GEORGE F. WARFJELD.

LEVERETT BELKNAP.

BELKNAP & WARFIELDt Publisb~rs,

Booksdl~rs ana

Station~rs. 77 and 79 ASYLUM STREET,

HARTFORD, CONN.

1\llyn House Reopened Octobu J2th, ROBERT

J.

ALLY , Proprietor. ~

JOHN J. DAH ILL, Manager. ~

~

.;1. American and European Plans . .;J. Cor. Asylum anrl Trumbull Sts.,

H ARTFORD.

CONN. 233

C ENTRALLY LOCATED, corner Asylum and Trumbull streets, in business center of the city. T\vO b locks from railroad statio n . Ellctric cars pass the door to the depot every three minutes. Hoo1ns Single, with Bath, or en Suite. Elevator and all modern improvements. }O'ine new Cafe attached. Best Sample Roonts iu the city for con1mercial men .

NoT路ember 4. 11 . 13. 1 8. 22. December 15 . 2 1. january 11 . 29. February 1. 3. 8. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

lYiarcb

April

May

june

1 8. 20. 28. 29. 9. 17. 22. 23. 24. 10. 7. 11. 23. 26. .28. 2. 5. 12. 22. 26. 2.

Trinity, 28; New York University, 0. U. S. Naval Academy, 35; Trinity, 0. Trinity,11; Haverford, 5. Banjo club formed. Hamilton , 18; Trinity, 6 . First cotillon. Second Cotillon. Home again-" genuine Philadelphia turk ~ys." Christm as recess en ds. Reviews. Examinations begin. Robert a ttempts to call chapel at 8:1 5, but the F a cultydoes notappear. Examinations ended. Koch is gla d . Senior smoker-it has been pronounced a T'ery great success. Third cotillo n . Trinity week begins. College tea in the aftern oon. M u sical and Dramatic entertainments. Junio r Ball. Freshman-Junior b a nquet at Farmington. Blizzard. "We won't get h o me till the m o rning." Sleep. The chapel choir distinguishes itself even more than usual. Ash Wednesday-sackcloth and ashes-we start in to mourn our sins. We get tired of mourning. Oratorical contest for Whitlock pri ze. St. Pat's Day. Sophomores purity themselves wi th sulphur in Alumni Hall. J a nitors combine to rest. Annual Indoo r Meet won by class of 190 1. Tennis Association r eorganized . Professor McCook dismisses French class twenty-fi\路e minutes early!! H oly Cross, 16 ; Trinity, 4. Brown, 14 ; Trinity, 1. Easter recess begins. Back again for a little more work. Trinity, 13; New York University, 7 . Amherst, 4; Trinity, 3. Columbia, 5: Trinity, 2. Trinity , 5; West Point, 2. Yale Law School, 10 ; Ttinity, 5. Interclass Athletic Meet, Leffingwell cup is still held by 1 901. Geo rgetown, 9 ; Trinity, 4. Trinity, 10; New York Un iversity, 6. Trinity, 1 ; Amherst A. C., 0.

234

~~~~~~~~~~~~~lr~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~

~

. . . ESTABLIJHED

~ "t

1010...

~

~ BR-OOK_S BR-OTHER._S,

"t .,.,,..

+ ~

~

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~

....

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+

+ •J. +

:t.,.

4 + + + + + .,j. + + +

BROADWAY, CoR. llo JTREET,

-

NEW YORK. CITY.

CLOTHINO AND~~ FURNIJHINO OOODJ READY MADE AND MADE TO MEASURE.

+ ~

~

"""'

+ ~

~

~

+ ~

...~ ....

-

~

~

Garments for all seasons and every occasion- work or playindoors and out.

t J:

Flannels for Golf, Tennis and all outing purposes. for Riding, Polo or the Hunt.

•1-..

Equipments

Covert Coats, Raglans, Sandowns, Riding Breeches, Red Coats, Shetland Waistcoats and Jweaters. Valises, Kit Bags, Shirt Cases, Caddy Bags, Luncheon and Tea Baskets, Holster Cases, Riding Whips, Crops, Twigs, etc. Liveries for Carriage, House or Club- Special designs for private Automobiles. Everything usual in Furnishings- much unusual. These are simply seledions- our booklet mentions all and illustrates much. We have added to our department of Ready-made clothing a line of clerical garments subject to the usual discount to clergymen.

+

4-.. •1-..

j:

+ + •J. •J.

+ + .,).

•1-.. •1-..

+ + +++++++++++++~+++++++++++++

.:...

1Jit. 235

~enjl;y ~ QJhJl?UJft~ FOREIGN

C o rres pondent of

KIDDER, PEABODY & CO. Su ccesso r t o H O WE &

COLLINS .

EXCHANGE, INVESTMENT SECURITIES, LETTERS OF CREDIT.

Phrenix Bank Building, Hartford, Conn. A wARDS oF HONOR . Med al a t Ch icago, Phot . Ass. of America, '87 . 1st Prize, Bu ffa lo, Phot. Ass . of Ame rica, '91. 1st Pri zo, Edward L . W ilson. N. V. City , '92. E astman Co., Rochester, N . Y. , '93 World's Fair, '93. Paris, '95. :Mu nich, '95. Londo n, '9:i, M ichigan State A ssociation, 'tn- '98.

PUBLISHeR OF RANDALL' S REPRODUCTIONS. P ictures hung J>£rmanently in art galleries of Munich, P aris and L ondon, J 895.

~

STUDIOS: Hartford, Conn.;

~

New Haven, Conn.;

Ann Arbor, Mich.

DREKA Fine Stotioneru and Engraving House, 1121 ehestnut Street, Vhiladelphia, C O LLEGE I N VITATIONS.

B AN QUET ME NUS .

R EC EPTION CARDS.

STATIONERY.

F RAT E RNIT Y

COATS OF A R MS .

PRO G RAM MES.

.

I

E NG RAVING.

AD D R ESS DIES.

WEDDIN G 1N V IT A T ION S . H E R A LDRY AND GH N EALOGY.

V IS ITI N G CARDS.

Have your Frei g ht S hi p pe d

in c are of

BILL BROTHERS, CARMEN AND GENERAL FORWARDERS, FURNITURE PACKERS AND MOVERS .

Office and Storage Warehouse,

46 Ann Street. 2 36

Hartford &New York Transportation Co. HHARTFORD LINE." NEW YORK OFFICE , Pier 24, East River.

HARTFORD OFFICE, Foot of Stat e Street .

TWO

NEW

TWIN·SCREW

STEEL S 'rEAMERS .

''MIDDLETOWN '' Mo~~~Y~~~~~~~~a~ct::e~ ~~~~ay, LEAVES HARTFORD

'

Captain, R. H. HILLS .

S teward , J , P. MURPHY.

''HARTFORD "

HARTFORD, Tuesday,LEAVES Thursday and Saturday. Captain, FRED H. BEEBE .

S teward , J . W . S MITH.

'

Leave New York each Alternate Day, from Pier 24, East River, at 5 P.M. From October 15th t o close o f navi gation, leave Har tford at 4 P.M.; New York at5 P.M. PA SSENGER FAR ES .

One way. ....... .... ..... . ........... .. .. .. ...... $ 1. 50 Round Tri p, good for season........ .. 2.50 Round T rip, good for six days........ 2.25

I State Deck F a re.. ........ ....... ..... ...... ..... ...... Room , one w ay.. .. .... .... .. .... ...

$1. 15 1.00 Children, 6 to 12 y r s . of a ge, Half Price.

E. S. GOODRICH, President. E DGAR L. SMITH , Secretary and Assis tant Treasurer. C. C. GOODRICH, General Manager. E. B. \VI LLIAMS, Superintendent. GEO. C. HILLS, Ge n enLI Freight a nd Passeng<r Agent, Pier 2.J., Ea"t River, N.Y . W. B. SMITH, New York Agent, Pie1· 2.J., East R iver, N.Y.

R. F. GOODRICH, Local Agent,

No. 285 State Street, Hartford, Conn. 2 37

HARVEY & LEWIS,

~

Opticians.

~

PRESCRIPTION SPECTACLES ANn

EYE GLASSES. KODAKS, CAMERAS, FILMS, PLATES, AND PHOTOGRAPII!C SUPPLIES.

No. 865

1\1:AIN STREET.'

HENRY ANTZ,

~ir~-so; H AIR DRESSING

RooM,

27 PEARL STREET, HARTl!"""'ORD, CONN .

P. L. REILLY,

City Hotel Sale and Feed Stable, 19 GOLD STREET, An assortment of Tel. 802-4. New an d Second-hand Wagons for sale. HARTFORD,

CONN.

FINE ASSORTMENT of all kinds of the Latest Printed BOOKS, MAGAZINES and NEWSPAPERS is kept constantly in stock by

A

EMILIE M. SILL,

at her store, No. 89 Trumbull Street, in Hartford, just north of Mr. Allyn's Tavern. Please notice that she also offers for sale many Theosophical, Metaphysical, Spiritual and Occult !looks, also Letter Paper and Pencils, Blank Books and Pens and Ink. She also has a stock of Needles and Thread, and a great quantity of Yankee Notions very ingenious and useful. In the rear of her store there is a large CIRC UL ATIN G LIBRARY containing the latest printed BOOKS, very useful and entertaining, and which are offered for the amusement and instruction of her customers . 23 ~

The etub eocktails MANHATTAN, MARTINI , WIDSKEY, HOLLAND GIN, TOM GIN, VERMOUTH and YORK. We guarantee these Cocktails to b e made of absolutely pure and wellmatured liquors and the mi xi ng equal to the best Cocktails served over any bar in th e 路world; hei ng compounded in accu rate p rop o rti ons, t hey 'vill always be found of uniform quality, and, b lending thoroughly, are superior to

tbo~e

m i xed as wan ted.

Connois-

eurs agree that of two Cocktails made of the same material a n d proportion~. t he one which is aged must be the better.

G. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., Sole Proprietors, 2 9 Broadway, New York; Hartford, C o nn. , and 20 Piccadilly, W. London, En gland .

The Particular Man ts just a little bit more particular about his Evening Dress than other matters. W e' re pleasing particular men rig ht along with our

FULL DRESS SUITS

(to order) $30,

(full satin lined). WE

CAN

PLEASE YO U .

253 Asylum Street ,

H artford , Conn. 239

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company OF HARTFORD.

Cash Capital, Total Assets,

Cash Capital, . . Reserve for Reinsurance, All Outstanding Losses, Net Surplus,

$1,000,000.00 3,869,451.75

SUMM ARY.

~

$1,000,000.00 1,599,897.14 200,714.90 1,068,839. 71

Total Assets,

$3,869,451 .75

J. D. BROWNE, President.

CHARLES R. BURT, Secretary. L . W. CLARKE, Ass' t Secretary.

W. E. BAKER & SON, Local Agents, 700 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 2-!0

The latest developments are effectively shown in this line of artistic papers. The superiority of stock and manufacture is unquestioned; every sheet is watermarked to insure genuineness, and the scheme of color blending is artistic in the e xtreme. ASK YOUR STATIONER FOR THE LATEST SHAPES IN THIS PAPER.

E ATON-HURLBUT PAPE R CO .,

. Y. SALE SROOM, 3 39

BROAD\>;' AY .

PIT"l'SFIELD , MASS.

Dealer in BARBERS' SUPPLIES. Cups Decorated. Razors Ground, Concaved and Honed. Skates, Scissors, Shears, Cutlery, and Lawn Mowers Ground and Repaired. Locksmithing.

HENRY COWLISHAW, Razor Manufacturer and Cutler, Dealer in all kinds of

Fm'e Cutlery.

Factory and Store,

l76 PEARL STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 241

ROBERT GARVIE, (Successor to

WI L LIAM

A.

G A RVIE,)

Practical Plumber and Gas Fitter, GAS FIXTURES A SPECIALTY. .;Jf..;Jf..;J..;!.

No. 12 flULBERRY STREET,

HARTFORD, CONN.

The gj}fna Hair~ Dressing~

Parlor,

226 Asylum Street, ]. M. MUZIO, Prop.

HARTFORD, CONN.

Collateral Loan Company, 71 1\sylum Street, Room 10. e!f.

e!f.

Monew Loaned on watche.s and Diamoncls and all or Valuable Personal

l~incls

Propert~J.

SALOMON U DELEEUW, Cigors, Pipes and SIT\ORers' Articles, PIPE:

RE:P~IRI

IG

~ SPE:CI~LTY.

WILL'S ENGLISH TOBACCOS. 7 PiSVLUM STRE:tT (near Main),

HARTFORD, CONN.

r ~~~ &?;

a6 ~~

:;::,..~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~, ·~ ·t\~ ·Z?·Z? •z::::' •z::::'•z::::'•c? •c7 •Z7 •Z7 •27 •c7•C7•27 •27 •27 •Z7•27•27•z::::'•Z?•e7•z::::'•z:;7 •27 =-

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\;

E-XAMINE. THE. R.E..CORD Of $"

THE

~OP

$"

I TRAVELERJ I ~~~ ~~

® ·~·

a~ INSU~ANCE COMPANY, ~ ~0~ m .. ~Vv ~~~ @~ ~~~

a~ a~

~~~ ~~ ~~

~OP

Of HARTFORD, CONN.

~p

~Op

JAMES G . BATTERSON, PRESIDENT .

~P

~OP

LARGEST ACCIDENT COMPANY IN THE WORLD and A LEADING LIFE COMPANY.

~~~ ~~

---

~~

lJ JUEJ THE BUT

~~~ Life and Endowment, Accident and Health, ~ ~o~ also Liability Contracts. ~OP ~~~

~~~

a~~ a~

a~

~~~

~-~-· ~~

..

~~~ ~~ ~~

d~~ ~0~ • •

0~~

~Qp

JECUR..ITY.

A.HET S, . LIABILITIEJ, Exct.H o~ PERCE

1l7,760,.)11..)6

~

4,olo,6fi.J.~j

~OP

l3,73~,fil7.61

T. BAJij)

~~ ~Qp

EQUITY.

RETURNED TO POLICY HOLDERJ, 13~,7 34,~l0.fi~ 1l,7.)0,3~4.40 Of IT IN lfi~~-

~~·

~11n ~~ ~

~~~ ~~

EX PERI ENCE.

It has lived and prospered for over a THIRD OF A CENTURY, and pays all j ust claims on recei pt of satisfactory proofs.

~~

~Op

JYLVEJTER C. DUNHAM, Vice-President. JOHN E. MORRIS, Jecretary. EDWARD V. PRESTON , Jup't of Agencies. H. J. M ESSENGER, Actuary. J. B. LEWIS, M. D., Surgeon and Adjuster.

·o·

~ ip

A9Vt?

-~.::2·£2•.::2•£2•£2•£2• £2•£2•£2· .c?·..CZ·..CZ·..CZ·..CZ·kZ·kZ·.?7·.::2· c7· .C:Z·.C:Z· P· kZ· .c7·~

\\·~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 243

CoLT'J ~

~EVOLVERJ. Adopted by the United States Army and Navy.

COLT'S NEW POCKET

32 CALIBRE.

CoL T'J AuTOMATIC OuNJ. CoLT' J AuTOMATIC P1JTOLJ. GATLING GlJNJ. LIGHTNING MAGAZINE R.IFLEJ.

COL T'J PATENT fiRE ARMJ MFG. CO., H A RTFORD, CONN . 244

GO TO JOHNSTONE If you have been thinking that a fine

PHOTOGRAPH OF YOURSELF would be a nice gift to some one, this is a good time to sit for that photograph. If there is any virtue in taking time with so delicate a piece of art as a fine portrait, that virtue is added to the valuable picture Johnstone w1ll make. Valuable is the right word, for Johnstone's work is not only perfect; it is permanent, hence valuable.

45 PRATT STREET.

Piano;) and Or!},an;). Knabe, Kranich & Bach, Blasius, Ludwig & Co., Capen, and other makes.

Sole Agents for Washburn BAN~~~路 ~~~~~~INS. SEDGWICK & CASEY, 163 Asylum Street.

Allyn House Barber

Shop. A. G. PERKINS,

Proprietor.

ALL THE E N 0 R._A VI N 0 J IN THIJ BOOK_ WERE MADE BY THE

ELECTR_IC CITY EN ORA VI NO Co.~ jQ7 TO .Jlj

w AJHINOTON JTREET,

BUffALO, NEW YORK.

~

LAR.OEST ENOR.A VI NO HOUSE FOR COLLEOE PLATES IN THE STATES. WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. •

• 246

D. VA N NOSTRAND CO M PANY, PUBLISHERS and IMPORT ERS,

School and College T ext B ooks a Specialty . Catalogues on ELECTRICITY, 80 pp. ; STEAM and MECH AN ICS, 80 pp.; CHEMISTRY and PHYSICS , liZ pp.

SENT GRATIS ON APPLICATION . 23 Murray and 27 Warren Streets, - - - New York.

Have you tried

the -~---.

Main Offic& . 32 Pra tt Street. Wo rks, 286, 288, 290 and 292 Sheldon Street.

T hey are up to date- then, too, they comply with your wishes .

.JJ. .JJ. N0 EXTR1l (2H1\RGE F0R QUieK W0RK • .JJ. .JJ. TAILOR-~I..ADE

T HE FINEST

CLOT I-IING

IN HARTFO RD CAN BE FOUND AT

2 7 A RYLU1\I

STl~ET.

+H a ir~~

JOHN McGEE, +Dressing +Saloon~

No. 3 ASYLUM STREET, One door from Main Street,

HARTFORD , CON • 247

LIFE, ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURA.NCE.

ltna Life Insurance Co., HARTFORD, CONN . M OHGA N

G. B U L KE L EY, Pres i d e nt.

HOME OFF I CE.

THE LARGEST COMPANY IN THE WORLD WRITING LIFE , ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE . TOTAL PAID POLICY - HOLDERS SINCE

ORGANIZATION, OVER

$1 1 4,593,000.00 EVERY DESIRABLE FORM OF

LIFE, TERM , ENDOWMENT, ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE. Students about to enter active Business Life should investigate the merits of the A::TNA LIFE . 2-1-8

We're n . I ~ ~arttcu ar .

1

Dress Suit Cases, Trunks.

I I

E'RE never satisfied until our customers are satisfied W with what they purchase here-perfectly satisfied . Our obligations do not end with a mere sale of something. It must be right in every particular before it leaves our ha nds. The service that that something gives you, must be as represented. That's why people buy at our store with confidence. Our present stock of Men's Tailor-made, PerfectFitting Clothing offers everything that's wished for and more too.

.:1-

Knox, Youmans and Christy Hats.

~

Clothiers,

H-orsfall & Rothschild,

O~tfitteJS.·

ASYLUM STREET, HARTFORD.

It Pays to Buy our Kind.

T. SISSON & CO.t

DRUGGISTS, Chemical and Physical Apparatus, Sponges, Chamois, Feather Dusters,

SECURITY OIL. HEADQUARTERS FOR

Griswold's Family Salve.

729

etc., etc.

Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 249

ORGANIZED

1866.

Thorough Inspection. Insurance Against Loss or Damage to Property and Loss of Life and

In~ry

to Persons caused by

STEAM BoiLER ExPLOSIONS. J. M. ALLEN, President. WM. B. FRANKLIN, Vice-President. F. B. ALLEN, Seco nd Vice-President.

J. B. PIERCE, Secretary. L. B. BRAINERD, Treasurer. L. F. MIDDLEBROOK, Asst. Secretary. 250

EIMER &

AMEND.

205-211 THIRD AVE., NEw YoRK .

C. P.

CHEMICALs

AND

CHEMICAL

AciDS , APPARATUS,

SciENTIFIC

Sole. Agents ror

INSTRUMENTS.

JENA NORMAL GLASS. BEST

LABORA "! ORY GLASS

EVE" MADE.

F. E. GRAVES,

~PHARMACIST,,~~~ Main Street, cor. P ark,

HARTFORD , CONN.

163<7~r:v ยง Ucruu~ L4l erNUlยง~ โ€ข

FRANK P. DOUGLASS, Proprietor, WORCESTER, MASS.

GRADUATED PRICES.

E LEVATOR.

F IRST-CLASS I N EVERY RESPECT.

STEAM HEATED THROUGHOUT.

HEUBLEIN'S

ii

OPERA HousE (AFE, I

I

F. BARBY, MANAGER . 251

931

Main Stree t, HartFord, conn.

E~q~~Yl~.Q

A~D p~1$~T~~q.

Our Printing commands tl1e attention of all wllO are interested in high class arti tic work. -<::::::::::=-.~

Your needs in printing will be faithfully looked after here.

R. S. PECK & CO., 26-28 HIGH STREE'l-,. 1039

MAIN

STREET .

STUDIO.

~-'

d0.>9

._&,;, Q'l.,

~ea~liug ~h.ohlgta:ph.er. "Our light for Group Work is unequalled." " The new Carbon and Platinum work our specialty." This Studio produces First-Class Work only.

~ÂŁ1-ny

_/{).f.9 252

._Lam_ [.7kd,

HEUBLEIN~

A.

GOULET,

Mulberry Street.

Six Fir t-Cla

8

Workmen .

THE BEST QUALITY OF

and

Wood

MAY BE lil\.D AT

746 Main Street.

W. C. MASON & CO. (Successors to J. J. PooLE & Co.)

"AMERICAN路路 D IAR Y PU B L ICATIO

j

1~36-1~00

" P E.E. RLE...S..S '' DA I LY CALE.NDAR..S

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. Printing Electrotyping

Bookbinding Papermaking

BLANK BOOKS

PAPER RULING

Histor ical, Genealogical, Biographical and Poeti cal Work Comm erci al, L aw, and Mi scellan eous Business P 1路inting .;1- 路 ILLUSTR.A._ TED

CATALOGUES FOR MANUFACTURERS

.;I-

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. Corner Pearl and Trumbull Sts.

HARTFORD, CONN. 2 53

~OOE~J~

PEET

a CO.~J

CLOTH INO is made in a variety of sizes that insures an accurate fit. It costs about half as much as first-class merchant tailors have to charge for equally good results. We are sole Hartford agents for RoGERS, PEET & Co.'s Dress Suits, Tuxedos, Double Breasted Frock Suits, Business Suits, Fine Trousers, Rainf Day Garments, etc. Special Golf and Bicycle Trousers, Flannel Trousers, Caps, Sweaters, Golf Hose, Gloves, Shirt and Collar Novelties, etc. Any special design in Caps or Sweaters furnished.

'~U!l路ehurch fP~ ST. ~ 34. 36 & 38 ASYLUM

DENT's GLOVES.

MONARCH SHIRTS. 254

WILSON'S HATS.

Date Due

NOT TQ SET~

'IBPARY

FR i

I AN

1

'64

·- -t It

,..

t'

).

~

I Ic

I

I "LIHO !QUif'wuT •ult:'Al

Cat. No. 1090A }

1n:i ty

NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM LIBRARY

Iv;y


1901 Trinity Yearbook