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FREE s Friday, September 20, 2013

FOOTBALL RECAPS A6

DREAMFEST ‘13 B1

FAIR ROUNDUP B2

Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

POT SALES COMING TO A CORNER STORE NEAR YOU COUNTY TO HAVE 31 SHOPS, EIGHT IN TACOMA

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

While marijuana retail stores will appear around the state next fall, illegal “street sales� won’t likely disappear because of the overlapping layers of laws and

jurisdictions. The Washington State Liquor Control Board released its draft rules on licensing and locating retail marijuana stores around the state, following the passage of Initiative 502 that legalized recreational use of marijuana.

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

PRICES EXPECTED TO MATCH ‘STREET SALES’

The draft rules are set to be approved Oct. 16, with the board starting to accept license applications on Nov. 18. “These rules fulfill the public expectation of creating a tightly-regulated and controlled system while providing reason-

able access to participation in the market,� said Liquor Control Board Chair Sharon Foster. Some 334 retail stores will be allowed around the state, with cities and counties being allotted set numbers based on their population and projected cus-

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tomer bases. “We wanted to give the most populated cities the largest share,� liquor board spokesman Brian Smith said. Pierce County will have 31 retail marijuana stores X See POT / page A5

FAIR PIE CONTEST

Winner’s confection tastes good and does good, too

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

PIE AND REVOLUTION. Bob PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CITY OF TACOMA

RESCUE TEST. Tacoma Police tested for Child Abduction Response Team certification Sept. 12. Team members

searched for evidence at the mock-kidnapping site in Heritage Park, then followed AMBER Alert responses to Julia’s Gulch and the department’s firing range.

A CHILD’S BEST HOPE‌ Tacoma police Child Abduction Response Team responds well in life and in national certification test

By Kathleen Merryman Tacoma Police Department activated its Child Abduction Response (CART) Team in Northeast Tacoma Sept. 12 in pursuit of national certification with the United States Department of Justice. If it wins that certification, it will be the 20th in the nation to do so. For just over five hours, while evaluators graded them, they worked through a mock kidnapping, activating every task and resource they have coordinated over the past six years. Pattie Bastian was thrilled. “I’m excited. This is fabulous. I’m so proud of Tacoma,� she said as she watched officers turn information into action at the command post set up at Norpoint Centre. She was observing tools, resources and procedures that did not exist

Jail cuts A3

LIFELONG GOALS: Danica Sterud Miller receives doctorate. PAGE A4

when her daughter, Jennifer, was snatched from her bicycle in Point Defiance and murdered in August 1986. Though officers have DNA evidence that indicates the man who killed Jennifer also murdered Michella Welch in March 1986, they have not caught him. Those murders are two of 16 reasons that Tacoma Police officers, led by Det. Lindsey Wade and Lt . Rob Jepson, developed CART. “We have had 16 child abductions since 1961,� Wade said. “That’s a lot. Most police agencies will never have a child abduction. Studies show that there will be one to 200 child abductions a year across all of the U.S.A., and 60 to 150 victims are murdered.� Statistics also show that a rapid response is the child’s best hope. “There’s a three to four hour window,� said Loretta Cool, police public information officer. “This is the big stat: 76 percent X See ABDUCTION / page A5

TACOMA POLICE HAVE INVESTIGATED 16 CHILD ABDUCTIONS SINCE 1961 Â&#x2039;(UUL4HYPL)\YY(\N\Z[ <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;.H`3`UU:[L^HY[(\N\Z[ :VS]LK Â&#x2039;*OHYSLZ/`KL0005V]LTILY :VS]LK Â&#x2039;*HYVS`U3LU[P(\N\Z[ :VS]LK Â&#x2039;4HYPH*VYZP5V]LTILY :VS]LK Â&#x2039;(UNLSH4LLRLY1\S`  <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;*HYSH>YPNO[1HU\HY` <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;5H[HZOH>PSZVU4HYJO :VS]LK Â&#x2039;>HSSHJL.\PKYVa1HU\HY` :VS]LK Â&#x2039;4PJOLSSH>LSJO4HYJO <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;1LUUPMLY)HZ[PHU(\N\Z[ <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;9`HU/HKL4H`  :VS]LK Â&#x2039;3LUVYPH1VULZ1\S` <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;;LLRHO3L^PZ1HU\HY` <UZVS]LK Â&#x2039;:HIYPUH9HZT\ZZLU4H`:VS]LK Â&#x2039;APUH3PUUPR1\S`:VS]LK

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Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

First night B4

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal of the Sons of the Revolution congratulated Lois Forbes of Silverdale on her redribbon-winning pie. By Kathleen Merryman Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Lois Forbesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pies do not merely taste good. They do good, too. That they taste wonderful is a matter of record, and that record is framed in her kitchen. It is a corkboard on which she displays the ribbons sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s won in baking contests over the years. It is a big corkboard, and it will get more crowded when Forbes adds the red ribbon she won at Washington State Fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fruit pie competition Sept. 16. The contest is a marvel of deliciousness, innovation and precision. Crusts must be tender, flaky, golden-to-brown, not too chunky around the edges and just an eighth of an inch thick. And the bottoms canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be soggy, either. The fruit must be plump, hold its shape and nestle in juices that are not too thick and not too runny. Though the classics delight judges, a bit of invention earns extra points. Dried cherries putting the crunch in a raspberry pie. Cointreau and peaches with blackberries, or rhubarb with blueberries. Almonds with three types of berries. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re magic you might not be able to identify without reading the recipe. That recipe, of course, must conform to proper style, just as the pie itself must conform to the proper size. It must be eight inches across, or it

X See PIES / page A10 Facebook: facebook.com/tacomaweekly Twitter: @Tacomaweekly Tumblr: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly Flickr:Ă LFNUFRPWDFRPDZHHNO\

Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages

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POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

2nd and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Bookkeeping Services for Small Businesses

Laura Winkelman H: 253.858.3779 C: 253.514.0309 lw7707@comcast.net

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re invited to join us at a Novartis MS Education Link Event Hear James Bowen, MD share information about multiple sclerosis (MS), learn about a prescription treatment option, and connect with people in your community living with MS. 10/10/13 at 6:30pm C.I. Shenanigans 3017 Ruston Way Tacoma, WA 98402 Tell or bring a friend! Accessible to people with disabilities. Light meal served. Parking will be validated. Space is limited.

Please RSVP by calling 1-866-682-7491 1-866-682-7491 Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation ,-(). + / +, 0 

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By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Some cars are just beautiful and inspired. One of those cars is the 1958 Ford Skyliner Retractable that the LeMay Collection took on donation from Barbara Birt. She called the car â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poptop.â&#x20AC;? The vehicle was assessed by Collection Management volunteers and restored to working condition before it was sold to fund future acquisitions. Ford crafted the Skyliner from 1957 through 1959, making it the first retractable hardtop to be mass produced. The top was driven by electric motors that included gears that opened the trunk lid so the hardtop could fold into a package in the trunk. The top sequences through each motion controlled by solenoids, micro-switches, and motors, and is operated with one switch located at the left side of the steering column. It electrical engineering was a marvel of the time.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION/MICHAEL CRAFT PHOTOGRAPHY

The Skyliner had a complex mechanism which folded the front of the roof and retracted it under the rear deck lid. It had three roof motors driving four lift jacks, four door-lock motors, 10 solenoids, four locking mechanisms for the roof and a total of 610 feet of wiring. The large top took up vast amounts

City News :<7769;,9:9(33@-69 ;(*64(7(0+:0*2+(@:3(> Supporters of a proposed â&#x20AC;&#x153;paid sick and safe daysâ&#x20AC;? ordinance gathered for a town hall Thursday evening, Sept. 12, to hear from community members about the need for a citywide standard to protect health and safety, and prevent the spread of disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have paid sick days,â&#x20AC;? shared Alma Gutierrez, a local waitress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one should be forced to choose between their health and their paycheck â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially the people handling your food. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just common sense.â&#x20AC;? Nearly 41,000 Tacoma workers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or 41 percent of the workforce â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have no access to paid sick leave. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the national average. Childcare workers, restaurant staff and elderly caregivers are the least likely to receive paid sick days. Andrew Wright, co-director of GI-Voice and an Iraq war veteran, shared how paid sick days profoundly impacts local veterans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paid sick days are about getting better â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as an Iraq veteran I understand how hard that is to do. After returning from the war, I was faced with trying to manage treatment for PTSD while holding down a civilian job. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nearly impossible to manage doctors and VA appointments when your employer provides no paid sick leave. For our service men and women, paid sick days can literally save lives.â&#x20AC;? Local business owner Terry Hayes says he already provides paid sick time for his employees, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually helped his bottom line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I fully support a citywide ordinance on paid leave,â&#x20AC;? said Hayes, who owns Dowdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BBQ. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paid sick leave betters my business with higher employee productivity, lower turnover, less absenteeism and higher employee morale.â&#x20AC;? State Representative David Sawyer pointed out that Tacoma voters overwhelmingly support the proposed ordinance: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for City Council to stand with the two-thirds of Tacoma voters that support paid sick days and take action on a paid leave ordinance that supports Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workers and strengthens our economy.â&#x20AC;? Healthy Tacoma is a coalition of more than 30 groups representing communities of color, labor, small business, civic, and faith organizations working to pass a citywide ordinance on Paid Sick Days and Safe Time for Tacoma workers and their families. Learn more at HealthyTacoma.net. *,3,)9(;,30./;(;;/, 6*,(50*3<405:-,:;0=<: Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festivus celebrates our Northwest character and community culture from Salmon Beach to the Dome District and beyond with a lighted sculptural procession that takes place with music in the streets every autumn. The date of the 2013 Festivus is Sept. 28, and you can learn more about it at http://www.tacomasoutsidersguide. com/the-2013-lumins-festivus.html. A video of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festivus and examples of lighted sculpture (â&#x20AC;&#x153;luminariaâ&#x20AC;? is one word to describe them) can be found under the Gallery tab at the top of the page. Organizers are currently introducing families and artists to the event and how to make luminaria sculptures every Wednesday evening at Good Karmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art Space, at 711 St. Helens, 6-8 p.m. They will also be at the Thursday Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Markets up until the day of the event: on Tues-

*UHHN)HVWLYDO October 4, 5, & 6, 2013 2FWREHU  FREE ADMISSION 2FWREHU  Chicken or Fish Dinner-Lamb Dinner (Sun. Only) &KLFNHQRU)LVK'LQQHUÂł/DPE'LQQHU 6XQ2QO\

Church&KXUFK7RXUVÂł5HOLJLRXV6KRSÂł3DVWU\6KRS Tours-Religious Shop-Pastry Shop-Import Shop

WDNHRXWDYDLODEOH Greek Deli Raffle Tickets We are proud to donate a portion of our 2008 Festival proceeds to: McCarver Park Renovation

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)ULGD\DPSP Friday: 11a.m.-9p.m.

Greek Fries Coffee Shop Greek Salad Beverages Greek Beer & Wine Loukoumades Loukoumades Monastery Goods Greek Deli Raffle Tickets ChildrenÂ&#x2019;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corner )HVWLYDO+RXUV Loukoumades Monastery Goodsa portion of our We are proud to donate

Business 11 a.m.-2:00 BusinessLunch & Senior Luncheon:p.m. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner served until 8 p.m.

Saturday: 11a.m.-9p.m. 6DWXUGD\DPSP Dinner served until 8 p.m.

6DWXUGD\DPSP Sunday: Sunday: 11a.m.-6p.m. 7 p.m. Performances by our Greek Folk Dancers Throughout the Festival 3HUIRUPDQFHVE\RXU*UHHN)RON'DQFHUV

Dinner served until 86 p.m.

Free pastry with Dinner purchase in Dining Room ONLY Saturday 2p.m.-4p.m.

8QGHUWKH7HQW 8QGHUWKH7HQW Calamari Greek Fries Coffee Shop Calamari Gyros Souvlaki Imports

2013 Festival proceeds to our local Fish Food Bank.

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of trunk space, limiting the carâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales. Production totaled 20,766 cars in 1957, declining to 14,713 in 1958 and to 12,915 in 1959. The car had a 200-horsepower or 300-horsepower engine and got about 14 miles per gallon. Skyliners are valuable collectible cars, topping out at about $75,000.

day, Sept. 24, at the 6th Avenue Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market Harvest Fest, and Thursday, Sept. 26, at First Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Le Diner en Blanc at Wright Park. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festivus is two days later, Sept 28, at 7:30 p.m. Meet at the Wright Park Conservatory, and proceed through downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theater District. There will be music and hoola and an after party at Tacoma Cabana, with a very special surprise. All are welcome, oldest to youngest, youngest to oldest.

/<5+9,+:9,.0:;,9-69 Âş+6>5;6>5;6+,-0(5*,Âť,=,5; Excitement is building as Tacoma prepares for the Downtown to Defiance Sunday Parkways event on Sept. 22, featuring open streets from 8 a.m. to noon and celebration in the Point Defiance bowl from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The City of Tacoma, Metro Parks Tacoma and the Tacoma Pierce County Health Department have joined forces to host the human-powered transportation event, which will designate nearly seven miles of waterfront streets for use by cyclists and pedestrians only between 8 a.m. and noon, on Sunday, Sept. 22. More than 500 participants have already pre-registered at Downtowntodefiance.com for the event, which is sponsored in part by US Bank. The event marks the opening of Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new interim trail that links Ruston Way to Point Defiance Park. The interim trail will serve as a temporary connection for non-motorized access to the park, as Metro Parks develops a permanent Point Defiance trailhead and pedestrian-friendly entry from the waterfront to the park over the next two years. The connection, even in temporary form, is a big step for the community. Trail users will be able to access nationally renowned Point Defiance Park via a waterfront trail network for the first time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma has an amazing but somewhat underutilized waterfront so I encourage all of our residents to get active, take part in this event and see this incredible asset for themselvesâ&#x20AC;?, said Mayor Marilyn Strickland. Participants are encouraged to gather at the Tacoma Dome plaza at 7:30 a.m. for the inaugural parkways ride kickoff beginning at 8 a.m. Active rest stops at Theaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Park, Dickman Mill Park and Marine Park feature opportunities along the route for participants to get creative, get in touch nature, get physical and have their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Passport to the Pointâ&#x20AC;? stamped to receive special offers at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Fort Nisqually Living History Museum and the Point Defiance Marina Complex. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cycling shops will also offer repair services at each stop. In celebration of the opening of the Point Defiance interim trail, participants are invited to a festive celebration in the bowl from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. featuring live music, games, food vendors and the Point to Point kids ride which begins at 11 a.m. The first 1,500 participants to register for the event will receive a complimentary cinch pack. Register at Dometodefiance.com. Tacoma Wheelmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bike Club (TWBC) will host two long distance Club rides, which will depart through the Dome to Defiance footprint at 8 a.m. and continue on for 25 and 45-mile rides along the Scott Pierson Trail and across the Narrows Bridge to Gig Harbor. Participants in the distance rides must sign up with TWBC. For more information, visit: twbc.org. -05+469,*0;@5,>:(;;(*64(>,,23@*64

TACOMAWEEKLY

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC

2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  Â&#x2039;-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Monica Rice 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Colleen McDonald / cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com, Marlene Carrillo / sales@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.

1523 South Yakima, Tacoma, WA (253) 272-0466 6DLQW1LFKRODV*UHHN2UWKRGR[&KXUFK 1523 South Yakima, Tacoma, WA (253) 272-0466 :HEVLWHZZZVWQLFKRODVWDFRPDRUJ 3HUIRUPDQFHVE\RXU*UHHN)RON'DQFHUV :HEVLWHZZZVWQLFKRODVWDFRPDRUJ

Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

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¸/HYK;PTLZ/HYK*OVPJLZ/HYK>VYR¹ By Paul Pastor Pierce County Sheriff

We are in a period of hard times and this demands hard choices and hard work. The eco- PAUL PASTOR nomic recovery is very slow and this has prompted on-going cutbacks in the public sector. Pierce County government and the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department are certainly experiencing the impact. So what have we done in the Sheriff ’s Department? We have made staffing cuts and we have prioritized services, and we have consolidated efforts. We have dealt with hard times by making hard choices and doing hard work. Let me be clear. We are not doing more with less. But I am

proud to say that we work to do all we can with what we have. In the midst of hard times, we are showing some strong results despite real challenges in our highest priority areas. We continued to keep a handle on the county’s “Methademic.” We have a high clearance rate for difficult major crimes. We have reduced gang violence in the county. We have reduced drunk driving. We have used Crime Stoppers to arrest many violent criminals. We have introduced programs to stop abuse of the elderly and recover missing children. Another indicator of our hard work and hard choices is the dollar amount spent per person, per year on law enforcement services in unincorporated Pierce County. You can calculate this indicator by doing some long division. Take the total amount spent to provide police services in unin-

corporated areas in the course of a year: the costs of salaries and training and cars and equipment and insurance and everything else. Now divide that total cost figure by the total population residing in unincorporated County. And what is the cost of Pierce County Sheriff ’s Department services to the over 395,000 residents of unincorporated Pierce County? Over the past several years, it has varied between $129 and $141 per resident per year for law enforcement services. All of the other agencies in this area spend between $287 and $358 per resident per year. Again, $129 - $141 versus $287 - $358. This is one indicator of hard choices and hard work. It is a straightforward measure of relative efficiency that shows how we operate. Let me be clear. I am not

saying that we are doing all that I would prefer to do to prevent crime and arrest criminals. I would prefer to work more burglary and theft and fraud cases and provide more traffic enforcement and more community policing. I want to do more. But in the face of hard economic times, we make hard choices because resources are limited. Now, I am not saying that we have achieved perfect efficiency. But we really are doing a great deal with the resources we are given. And we have been doing this for some time. So, when you compare the cost of services, we are delivering a lot of product and we are showing some very solid results at a very low cost. I am proud of the hard work our people do and their willingness to step up to hard choices. I know and you know that resources are very limited.

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By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The trickledown of the decision by Tacoma and Lakewood officials to shift smalltime criminal suspects from Pierce County Jail to the lessexpensive Fife jail system has jumped from empty jail cells to budget sheets. Jail operations are $5 million over budget this year, and it will likely get worse next year. Budget projections put that gap at about $6.5 million. The county budget was approved on Tuesday. It trims the jail’s budget by 5.7 percent, from $52.5 million. About $2 million of the cut will be covered by reserve accounts and sales tax revenue. About $3 million in cuts and the layoffs of 16 corrections officers and the demoting of four others covers the rest. How next year’s $6.5 million projected shortfall will be backfilled remains unknown. But the direction

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

=(*(5*@ Pierce County Jail opened in 2003 with a capacity for 1,700 inmates. It now has about 1,100. It was staffed for 1,400 and will be downsized for about 1,200 inmates with the layoffs of about 16 corrections officers. seems clear. “We need to resize the operation,” Pierce County Executive Pat McCarthy said. To understand the issue, some history is in order.

The 1,700-bed jail opened in 2003 and was funded by a 1999 voter-approved bond. It was built because the existing county jail was overcrowded and under a federal order to

improve living conditions for inmates. The jail had 400 corrections officers and other workers around its peak in 2008 and has shrunk to 364 on its payroll in 2013. The 10-year-old federal decree that set staffing and living conditions concerning everything from medical care and sleeping conditions ended last year. The jail’s average inmate population, down from about 1,400 to about 1,100 this year, is due largely to the loss of misdemeanor inmates from Tacoma and Lakewood, as well as a 30-percent drop in crime rates in Pierce County since 2010. Those factors mean bookings at the Pierce County facility have dropped by about half. Staffing changes haven’t kept up with that shrinkage, however, McCarthy said. The staffing level after the layoff is set at an inmate population of about 1,200. The loss of the jail’s biggest X See JAIL / page A4

The theme this week involves the tips about what not to do when running from police. The first tip is to not commit a crime to start with, but that goes without saying. The second tip is to not run. This week’s offerings of stupid criminal didn’t follow either of those tips. Two officers were patrolling in their roller around East 66th Street on Sept. 13 and spotted two men apparently working on the engine of a car that had stopped along the side of the road. The officers pulled over to offer assistance. One of the men got into the passenger’s seat when the officers arrived. The remaining man said he had the car repair under control, so the officers drove off. They then returned after realizing the passenger had an outstanding warrant. When the officers returned, the man flew from the passenger’s seat and jumped a fence. “It appeared to me that he was intentionally attempting to avoid arrest and contact by police,” the officer wrote in the incident report. The man eluded police, even a police tracking dog. The officers then continued their patrol, only to see the same two men in the same car driving a few blocks away. They pulled the car over and arrested the man with outstanding warrants. The driver turned out to be the man’s brother, who said he wanted his brother arrested and booked into jail so he could get some sort of treatment for his drug addiction. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

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#1 TW 2013 HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOCCER PREVIEW

LOCAL SQUADS DEVELOPING YOUTH, RETURNING KEY SENIORS

#2 DAILY MASHUP

COMEDIANS KILL IT AT JAZZBONES FILMING

#3 DAILY MASHUP

CEELO GREEN CALLING IN SICK TO WASHINGTON STATE FAIR

#4 LIONS’ PASSING ATTACK STILL STRONG IN WIN OVER PENINSULA BIG PLAYS LIFT LINCOLN PAST BONNEY LAKE

#5 SHELL STATION ROBBERY SUSPECT SOUGHT

UNSOLVED HOMICIDE

Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for the murder of 55-year-old Douglas Erhardt of Graham.

VICTIM

Douglas “Joe” Erhardt

fire, the victim’s vehicle was found abandoned and on fire along Highway 410 in the Greenwater area.

Douglas Erhardt was active in At approximately 4:30 online dating and often used the a.m. on Wednesday July 24th, name “Joe” when meeting dates 2013, firefighters and Sheriff’s on the internet. deputies responded to a house Detectives are looking for fire at a residence in the 19300 information on anyone who block of 89th Ave. E. in Graham. may have been in contact with Inside the house investigators Erhardt, or information on any found the body of victim Douglas suspicious persons or vehicles Erhardt, deceased from homicidal at or near Erhardt’s residence on violence. the night of July23rd or the early On the morning of the house morning of July 24th,2013. Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case. Callers will remain anonymous Call 253-591-5959 All

www.TPCrimestoppers.com

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

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Danica Sterud Miller is fulfilling her lifelong goal of teaching literature at the college level By Kate Burrows kate@tacomaweekly.com

For as long as she can remember, Danica Sterud Miller has wanted to be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;teacher of booksâ&#x20AC;? at the university level. In fact, the voracious reader knew little of what it meant to become a professor when she first set the goal in fourth grade. But she kept her eyes on the prize and after more than 10 years pursuing her Masters degree and doctorate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all while raising a family and teaching at East Coast colleges â&#x20AC;&#x201C; she has officially made her dream a reality, and then some. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do not even know where the idea came from,â&#x20AC;? she laughed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know anything about teaching at the college level, but I guess it was always a love of reading that kept me on the right path.â&#x20AC;? Danica earned her Ph.D. in English Literature in July from Fordham University in Bronx, NY. After teaching at private language schools throughout Europe for several years, she dove full speed ahead into her academic career, teaching courses in literature, composition and rhetoric and film. Many courses feature Native American authors, filmmakers and more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Empowering Communities Changing Lives

Native American literature field is expanding, but there is still a lot of work to be done,â&#x20AC;? she noted. Sterud Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department chair even asked her to design a new course focused on Pacific Northwest tribes and their traditions. Although she was skeptical at first about how the course would be received by students on the East Coast, so far removed from the northwest, she was pleasantly surprised by the amount of interest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The class was completely full, and students were eager to learn more about northwest tribes,â&#x20AC;? she said. She has taught at the University of Connecticut and Fordham University, as well as Western Washington University as a teaching assistant. Sterud Miller especially thanks the Puyallup Tribal Council as well as its Higher Education Department for supporting her throughout her 14 years of higher education to get to where she is today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tribe is always there for me, and I know there are so many amazing things they have done in the past and this is only one small thing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but it has been an incredible, life-changing experience for me,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope to one day give back to the Tribe in some way.â&#x20AC;?

Urban League of Tacoma

Assistance to Wells Fargo

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PHOTO COURTESY OF DANICA STERUD MILLER

ACHEIVEMENT. Sterud Miller thanks the Puyallup Tribe for supporting her

dreams.

WJail From page A3

â&#x20AC;&#x153;customersâ&#x20AC;? to nearby Fife has prompted county officials to seek ways to operate the jail differently, largely by it landing new jail contracts, having it serve a regional role as well as seeking potential legislative shift that could change reimbursement rates from outside agencies. Washington State Patrol, for example, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay anything when its troopers arrest suspects for offenses along Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stretch of Interstate 5. The State Department of Corrections pays a flat $65 a day for housing its inmates at the jail but doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cover any medical treatments the county is required to provide. None of these fixes could avoid cuts, at least this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of those strategies could be implemented in time,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is going to take time to do that.â&#x20AC;? A study of jail options is underway, with a report expected in October.

Pierce County isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone with jailhouse blues either, as King County and Thurston County also have shortfalls. They, too, built new jails and have more beds than inmates to fill them, creating budget shortfalls. Thurston Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new jail has been mothballed without opening, for example, until demand warrants the new space. Counties around the state responded to rising populations and higher crime rates by building new jails. Then everything changed. Crime rates dropped. Home â&#x20AC;&#x153;house arrestâ&#x20AC;? monitoring became more popular and government budgets shrunk. Lakewood stopped sending misdemeanor criminals to Pierce County Jail in 2009. It now uses facilities in Fife and Puyallup and the Nisqually Reservation. Tacoma followed suit earlier this year. Both now send their low-level criminals to Fife because it charges less. Bookings into Fife jail cost just $20 compared to $225 at the county facility. Daily stays cost $65 compared to $85 in Pierce County, although its fees include medical reviews not covered by Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fee. Fife actually doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really house many inmates at all.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are more of a receiving center,â&#x20AC;? Fife Police Chief Brad Blackburn said. The Fife jail opened in 1997, and was first just used as a short-term holding facility for inmates attending Fife Municipal Court until 2001, when it became a fully operational correctional facility. It now has contracts with Algona, Black Diamond, Lakewood, Milton, Des Moines, Pacific, Steilacoom, Bonney Lake, Roy, Ruston, Normandy Park, Tacoma and Eatonville. Since Fife only has 35 beds, it sends inmates to jails across the mountains in Yakima, Sunnyside and Wapato, as well as South Correctional Entity, a jail for low-level inmates in Des Moines that opened in 2011. Washington State Department of Corrections also contracts with Fife for some beds. The jail agreements with small cities and agencies were Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to a $600,000 shortfall in the jail budget last year. Other options even included talk about closing the jail. But the math worked out with a collection of jail contracts. The budget is in the black, but caused red lines in Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jail budget.

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Food forest to be built in Swan Creek Park Picture a network of parks throughout Tacoma and Pierce County where trees, shrubs and perennials produce healthy, nutritious, low-maintenance food for the community. Local gardeners and farmers have examined how forest science can affect how we grow food. Now a coalition of local agencies and citizens is working to create its own â&#x20AC;&#x153;food forestâ&#x20AC;? on one acre in Swan Creek Park that will provide free food to anyone who visits. A successful outcome will lead to more edible food forests with low-maintenance, easily accessible, healthy and nutritious fruits and vegetable. This plan will change our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture around food, much in the way that Community Gardens have

transformed our local landscapes. The Food Forest will be located near the existing Community Garden off Roosevelt Road at East 42nd Street. Participants at the meeting are invited to share ideas with the planning team of what they would like to see in this edible forest garden. Volunteers have multiple options for involvement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; helping to plan the project, designing the space, clearing brush to prepare the space, planting trees and plants, participating in the stewardship of the site, or simply just picking fruits and vegetables to eat. The first community-wide planning meeting will be held at Lister Elementary School (2106 E. 44th St.), on Sept. 24 at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be provided, and the

event planners hope to have translators present in multiple languages. Work on this project is sponsored by the Pierce Conservation District, and includes partners from Metro Parks Tacoma, The Greater Metro Parks Foundation, The Pierce County Gleaning Project, Emergency Food Network, St. Leo Food Connection, members of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Council, Northwest Leadership Foundation, Catholic Community Services, and multiple permaculture experts. Participation from the entire community is welcome. For more information, contact Micaela Cooley at micaelac@piercecountycd.org or call (253) 306-3457. Visit www.facebook.com/friendsofswancreekfoodforest.

WAbduction

The first officer on the scene talked with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;witness,â&#x20AC;? a neighborhood volunteer in a green vest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sounding like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a legitimate deal,â&#x20AC;? he reported to headquarters, and asked that CART be activated. Officers responded to the park, located the girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, began knocking on doors, stringing yellow police tape around the scene and processing evidence, from the backpack to gum, to footprints in the dewy grass. Meanwhile, the command center activated an AMBER Alert and began using all the information coming in on the description of the man and the vehicle to search databases. The department set up the command center at Norpoint Centre, where they interviewed witnesses, took calls and tips and assembled the SWAT team. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where a woman came by to say she was walking in Juliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gulch overlooking Commencement Bay when she saw a man walking with a teen. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look right, she said. Then, driving home, she heard the AMBER Alert and realized the two matched the description. The drill shifted to the steep, wooded gulch, which was shut off until tracking dogs arrived, followed by King County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Officer Kathy Decker. Decker is a certified Man Tracker and is able to read trails in grass, dirt and brush. She identified footsteps that pointed the searchers down a steep path. On it, Ellie, a search dog owned by Bruce Cheshier, sniffed out the kidnapperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s red shirt. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when another AMBER Alert caller reported that the kidnap-

perâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicle had turned onto a side road off Marine View Drive. Team members, including volunteer Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department Explorers stayed at the gulch to look for evidence. The side road led to the police firing range, where the SWAT team members disabled the kidnapperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car, searched the woods and rescued the girl. Taken by ambulance to Mary Bridge Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital for medical evaluation, the teen and her family also were connected to services and counseling at the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Advocacy Center of Pierce County. The suspect came out of the woods on his own and was put in custody. With that, participants headed for the Pierce County Department of Emergency Management for a debriefing called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hot Wash.â&#x20AC;? The assessors liked what they saw, Cool said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They told us, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You guys are head and shoulders above other teams.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The chief assessor, who has been at the previous 19 tests, said weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the best heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to recommend certification,â&#x20AC;? Cool said. Theresa Lewis and John Meeker had spent the day as observers with Bastian. They, too, lost daughters, Teekah Lewis and Angela Meeker, to kidnappers who have never been found. They, too, wished that CART and all the internet and social media resources it employs, had existed for their children. They, too, are grateful, they said, that Tacoma has invested in its CART. Now, they, too, expect it to save lives.

From page A1

of the time they are killed within three hours,â&#x20AC;? Wade said. Without a CART plan, it can take two to three hours just to gather a team. With CART, it took 15 minutes on Sept. 11. The day before the accreditationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mock kidnapping, police responded to a 911 call reporting an abduction. The team was on the job in 15 minutes, just as it was in a previous case, Cool said. They were not waiting for orders. They were doing the jobs they had been assigned and trained to do as part of the mechanics of the team. Some were assessing the scene. Others were using incoming information to research data bases. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are the things we need to do,â&#x20AC;? Cool said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Assign a team from GO, instead of waiting for assignments that may be a different job than the one you trained for. We can shift our search almost instantaneously. With Twitter, Facebook, radio and reader boards, people are plugged in. They look at their phones, and they also look around and see things.â&#x20AC;? In the certification test, a walker in Heritage Park called 911 and said she had seen a teen sitting on a bench, waiting for a school bus with her backpack. A man got out of a blue, late-model SUV, talked with her for a few seconds, then pulled her into the vehicle.

WPot

From page A1

countywide, with eight of them slated for Tacoma, two each for Puyallup and Lakewood and one each for Bonney Lake and University Place. The remaining 17 will be licensed around the rest of county and smaller towns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is nothing in I-502 that says communities can opt out,â&#x20AC;? Smith said, noting that cities with moratoria on marijuana sales and collective farms might face legal challenges if they attempt to outright ban retail shops from their borders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is potential for friction there.â&#x20AC;? Sales from retail stores are projected to make up about 13 percent of the total marijuana market in the state during the first year and up to 25 percent after that, making untaxed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and therefore illegal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sales the bulk of the market. The liquor board has penalties for licensed marijuana growers diverting the plants for illegal street sales of untaxed cannabis products, but private sales from unlicensed grow operations will remain a smoky legal area. The federal government, which still regards marijuana as an illegal drug, has stated it will not enforce federal laws in Washington. But the sale of untaxed marijuana in private, unlicensed sales would remain illegal. It falls under the same sort of laws as untaxed cigarettes or bootlegged liquor. While the liquor board will have enforcement officers, they will spend most of their time on regulating licensed operations. That largely leaves small-time street dealers with an open market of untaxed pot sales in competition with legal retail stores and a hodgepodge of local and state rules few law enforcement agencies are staffed to handle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like this legal limbo,â&#x20AC;? Fife Police Chief Brad Blackburn said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the old alcohol days.â&#x20AC;? State regulators hope the normalization of marijuana use will drive pot buyers to licensed retail stores rather than street-corner purchases, since the license shops will have quality controls not found at â&#x20AC;&#x153;dime bagâ&#x20AC;? dealers. Even with the state tax on marijuana in licensed stores, prices are expected to be about $10 to $12 a gram. That is roughly the street prices on the illegal market, without the tight quality and production oversights.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

WILSON TOPS FOSS IN SHOWCASE OF STATE SWIMMERS Falcons’ Chard adds two more statequalifying times

LIFE CHRISTIAN ROLLS TO WIN OVER SHORTHANDED CRUSADERS Lincoln blasts Stadium, Bellarmine Prep gets late dramatics

W

ith the recent problems of player turnout at Tacoma Baptist, head coach Mark Smith was already at a bit of a disadvantage heading into the Crusaders’ season opener – having cancelled a game against Charles Wright the week before. But in the end the bigger problem was the juggernaut Life Christian offense, which rolled to a 55-8 victory on Sept. 14 at Harry Lang Stadium in Lakewood. “We came back nicely after the La Conner loss (27-7 on Sept. 7) last week, and it gives us a bit of a boost when you look at our next two weeks with Charles Wright and Cascade Christian on the docket,” said first-year Life Christian coach Tim Kuykendall. Following Taylor Roelofs’ 60-yard touchdown run that started the scoring, Tacoma Baptist captured their only lead of the night at 8-7 after Elijah Kazarovich’s six-yard touchdown run. But the Eagles would make short work of the deficit when Roelofs completed a six-yard scoring pass to Chris Haley to give the Eagles the lead for good. Limited to just 30 players themselves, the Eagles took advantage of every opportunity given to them, and the multi-faceted talents of Roelofs took the Eagles to the easy win on the night. Roelofs, who went just 3-for-11 passing on the night, did the real damage with his feet as he carried 10 times for 111 yards and four touchdowns. “I can’t say enough about Taylor’s efforts tonight, he was incredible,” said Kuykendall. Knowing full well the advantage that he would have, Kuykendall decided he would take another approach in preparing his team for the game. “I wanted us to focus on just the strengths of our team and ultimately our own execution tonight,” said Kuykendall. The win for Life was also about the exploits of running back Lionel Hampton, who added a 60-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter. “The defense set the tone right away and after giving up the early score they did a masterful job of shutting down the Baptist offense on the night,” Kuykendall said. Kuyendall’s next challenge will be a large one in the upcoming two weeks, as they will face Charles Wright and Cascade Christian back to back. “It will be tough for sure, but we’ll have to be up for the challenge in consecutive weeks X See FOOTBALL / page A9

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

DIVING IN. (Top) Wilson’s Karli

Stevenson and Foss’ Emma Chard dive in for the start of the 200-yard individual medley. (Middle) Wilson’s Madeleine Dodge swims during her win in the 100-yard butterfly. (Bottom) Wilson’s Hailey Viehmann completes a backflip during the diving competition. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY JIM PALLWITZ

EAGLES FLY. (Top) Life Christian’s Hunter Haley (4), Wyatt Dunlap (3) and Sam

Absten (2) combine for a tackle. (Middle) Eagles quarterback Taylor Roelofs (7) breaks free against the Crusaders, as he tallied four rushing touchdowns in the game. (Bottom) Wyatt Dunlap carries the ball downfield in the win over the Crusaders.

Both Wilson’s depth and Foss’ star power had their chances to shine when the two swim squads squared off at the Falcons’ pool on Sept. 17, as the Rams won seven of 12 events to pull out a 120-54 team win. But Foss’ senior duo of Emma Chard and Sarah Sachs continued to show why they are two of the better swimmers in the city, as they won two events apiece. It was Chard who stole the show most against the Falcons, notching a state qualifying time of 2:11.40 in winning the 200-yard individual medley and winning the 100-yard breaststroke in a state time of 1:09.26. “She’s definitely at another level right now,” said Foss head coach Matt Wood, noting that Chard has been getting plenty of college attention. “For her to be swimming so well right off the bat is fun to see.” It was the fifth and sixth statequalifying times notched by Chard in just two dual meets so far this year, after finishing second in the 100-yard breaststroke and third in the 100-yard freestyle at the 3A state meet last year. She qualified in the 50-, 100-, 200and 500-freestyles in the Falcons’ first dual meet against Mount Tahoma. “She’s way ahead of (where she was) this time last year,” Wood said. “She’s swimming times comparable to

X See SWIMMING / page A9

-YPKH`:LW[LTILY‹tacomaweekly.com‹:LJ[PVU(‹7HNL

30-,*/90:;0(570*2:<7 )0.,(93@3,(.<,>05 Eagles’ veterans lead way against Charles Wright

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

.6;673(@,9: (Left) Life Christian’s Johnnise Moore (right) tries to go up for a block against Charles Wright’s Shelby Fisher (10). (Right) Eagles senior Carly

Normandeau sets up a teammate in the win over the Tarriers, as she collected 23 assists in the match. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

C

oming into the season, the Life Christian volleyball team knew that a repeat of their Nisqually 1A league title was not going to be easy. An early season test against Charles Wright proved that to be true, but the Eagles outlasted the Tarriers in four sets – 25-22, 17-25, 25-19, 25-14 – at home on Sept. 16 to avenge their only league loss last year. “We kind of struggled at the beginning,” said Life Christian senior setter Carly Normandeau, who led the Eagles with 23 assists. “We’re a slow-starting team, sort of. We really picked it up, and kind of proved ourselves from last year.” The Eagles shot out to an early 8-2

Furnit u

lead in the first game, but Charles Wright quickly charged back behind senior middle hitter Shelby Fisher. Fisher’s ace gave the Tarriers a late 18-17 lead, but Life Christian senior Johnnise Moore responded with two straight kills, and later closed out the game with an emphatic slam. The Tarriers fought back to claim the second game, going up 7-4 early on Fisher’s ace before Life Christian fought back for a momentary 9-8 lead on an ace by Kaitlyn Konsmo. But senior middle hitter Vanessa Davis and sophomore outside hitter Kaylee Kim helped the Tarriers regain control along with Fisher, as they built the lead to 19-13 on their way to tying up the match. Charles Wright hung tough throughout the third game, even with Moore, senior middle hitter Ashlee Hamilton and

re cos

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HOT DEALS

junior outside hitter Maddy Long each displaying dominant overhand smashes for the Eagles. The Tarriers tied it 17-17 on a sideout, but the Eagles rattled off seven straight points as senior Jordan Youngblood had two straight aces and Long – who led the Eagles with nine kills – finished it off to regain the advantage. “They’re just much more disciplined this year, just with the way they’re meshing and playing together,” said Life Christian head coach Tracy King of her squad’s maturation. “It starts with my seniors, just with the unity they have.” Normandeau set the tone for the Eagles in the fourth game, collecting three of her team-high six aces in the first four points for an early 4-0 lead. Life Christian continued the momentum from there, as Kylie Burton extended it to 16-6 with

back-to-back kills, and Hamilton closed out the match with her sixth kill. Just as important as the Eagles’ offensive dominance was their defense, as Konsmo led the way with 38 digs, while Long tallied 15 digs and Moore finished with eight kills and 14 digs. Fisher led the Tarriers with 10 kills, six aces and two blocks. The win improved the Eagles to 2-0 in league play in the young season, while Charles Wright dropped to 2-1 in the Nisqually 1A. But Life Christian knows the adventure is just beginning. “It’s a great start to our season for sure,” said Normandeau. “We know we have to play hard no matter what throughout this whole season. It’s not going to be an easy win no matter what it is. We just have to prove ourselves on the court.”

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SPORTSWATCH 3<;,:7<336--96(+ =0*;69@0567,5,9 After controlling much of their football opener at 18th-ranked Cal Lutheran, 12th-ranked Pacific Lutheran rallied for a late touchdown earn a 31-24 win on Sept. 14. The Lutes were led by junior quarterback Dalton Ritchey, who went 13-for-26 for 198 yards and two touchdowns with an interception, while adding 14 carries for 87 yards and two more scores. Ritchey got Pacific Lutheran on the board with a seven-yard touchdown run to tie it 7-7 early in the second quarter, and added a oneyard score early in the third quarter to give the Lutes a 17-7 lead. He connected with wide receiver Kyle Warner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished with six catches for 125 yards â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on a 66-yard touchdown late in the third quarter to make it 24-14, but the Kingsmen stormed back to tie it on Sean Bellottiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 42-yard field goal with 9:19 left in the game. Ritchey responded by driving the Lutes 83 yards in 10 plays, connecting with tight end Lucas Sontra for a sevenyard touchdown that gave Pacific Lutheran the lead for good. Brandon James had six carries for 85 yards for the Lutes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including a 55-yard scamper â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while Niko Madison tallied 10 carries for 42 yards. But the Lutes were lucky in that they fumbled the ball five times in the game, only two of which were recovered by Cal Lutheran. Greg Hibbard and Jordan Patterson tallied eight tackles apiece for Pacific Lutheran, while Patterson added an interception and Joel Anthony had two of the Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; six sacks on the afternoon. The Lutes return to action on Sept. 21 for their home opener, where they will host Redlands at Sparks Stadium in Puyallup at 12:30 p.m.

3<;,:,=,5<79,*69+ ),-69,3,(.<,73(@ As it prepares to enter league play, the Pacific Lutheran volleyball team improved to 4-4 overall on the season with a 20-25, 25-11, 25-18, 22-25, 15-8 win over ConcordiaMoorhead at home on Sept. 14. The 17th-ranked Lutes got a team-high 14 kills from Lucy

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

+<(3;/9,(; Pacific Lutheran junior quarterback Dalton Ritchey (10), seen against University of Puget Sound last year,

passed for two touchdowns and ran for two more in the 12th-ranked Lutesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; season-opening win at Cal Lutheran. Capron, while Haley Urdahl added 10 kills and 21 digs and Samantha North had 44 assists. The Lutes had a few dominant runs in the middle sets, as they scored 21 of the first 27 points in the second set and closed out the third set by scoring 11 of the final 15 points after being tied 14-14. Amber Aguiar had a team-high 25 assists for PLU, while Amy Wooten added a team-best seven block assists. The Lutes begin league play by hosting Pacific (Ore.) on Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. and Linfield on Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. They will host 15thranked University of Puget Sound on Sept. 25 at 7 p.m.

36..,9::;9<..3, 05/64,67,5,9 Looking to rebound from two straight winless seasons, the University of Puget Sound football team struggled from the get-go in their season opener, falling 57-14 at home to Chapman on Sept. 14. The Panthers took control early, scoring on five of six drives in the first half and taking a 34-0 lead at the break. They tallied 505 yards on the day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 259 rushing yards â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and five different players scored a rush-

ing touchdown for Chapman. The Loggers finally struck after Max McGuinn recovered a fumbled punt at the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 34-yard line early in the third quarter, and Braden Foley hit Bryson Calma for a five-yard touchdown seven plays later to make it 34-7. Foley finished 28-for-40 for 198 yards and two touchdowns. His other score capped a 12-play, 74-yard drive late in the third quarter, as he connected with Kevin Miller on a seven-yard strike to cut it to 44-14. Miller led the Loggers with 58 yards receiving on seven catches. But the Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense was busy all day, as Brent McCoy led Puget Sound with 11 tackles in his college debut, while Roy Fuchigami, Connor Savage and Jacob Wuesthoff all added 10 tackles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with Wuesthoff also hauling in an interception. The Loggers hope to tally their first win in 20 games when they travel to California to take on Whittier on Sept. 21 at 1 p.m.

3<;,:(5+36..,9: )(;;3,;6+9(> In both squadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Northwest Conference opener, the Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soc-

BE WELL

cer teams battled to a 1-1 draw on Sept. 14 on the PLU campus. The 13th-ranked Loggers brought most of the offensive pressure on the afternoon, but it was the Lutes that struck first in the 26th minute when Lauren Larson drove in a shot from 25 yards out. The equalizer came in the 45th minute for Puget Sound, as Jordyn McLuen scored to make it 1-1 at halftime. Neither team could break through in the second half â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or the 20 minutes of extra time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; despite the fact that the Loggers outshot the Lutes 28-5 in the game, putting 10 of those shots on target. But PLU keeper Takara Mitsui made five saves, while Marisa Gonzalez added four saves to help the Lutes escape further damage. Puget Sound returns to action when they travel to Linfield on Sept. 21 at noon, while Pacific Lutheran travels to take on Pacific (Ore.) on Sept. 22 at noon.

;0;(5:56;*/:/<;6<; 053,(.<,67,5,9 The Tacoma Community College menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team notched a 3-0 win over South Puget Sound on Sept. 14 to start off their NWAACC

inside & out

schedule on the right foot. It took a little while, but Suwilanji Silozi got the Titans on the board in the 33rd minute off an assist from Daniel Guzman. Joe Snow followed two minutes later with another goal off Luke Loganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assist, and Edgar Zepeda set up Chris Peterson for a goal in the 75th minute to put it away. The Titans could have had more were it not for South Puget Sound keeper Alex Cleary, who was forced to make 11 saves in the match. The Titan women, meanwhile, sit at 1-5 overall and 0-2 in the NWAACC after two losses last weekend. They fell 3-2 against Lane on Sept. 14, despite Laura Deaton and Quinn Bovee-Naini scoring in the second half to pull them back in contention. They were topped 6-1 by Evergreen State on Sept. 16, with Deaton tallying the lone goal for TCC in the 33rd minute. The Titansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; squads were scheduled to take on Pierce College on Sept. 18. They will travel to take on Southwest Oregon on Sept. 21, with the women playing at noon and the men at 2:15 p.m. The Titansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; squads return to face Peninsula on Sept. 25, with the women playing at 2 p.m. and the men at 4:15 p.m.

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DR. KEITH

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WFootball From page A6 against these two fine teams,” Kuykendall said. By Steve Mullen

305*635*9<0:,:7(:;:;(+0<4

In a renewal of the great football tradition that has featured many names from the past – including Dave Williams and Tim McDonough (Lincoln) and Sam Baker (Stadium) – the Lincoln Abes would celebrate their school centennial with a 62-0 win over the Stadium Tigers in a game that was never in doubt from start to finish on Sept. 14 at Lincoln Bowl. “We could not have played better on the defensive side of the ball,” said Abes head coach Jon Kitna. “It was a good win from that standpoint.” Jordan Kitna would ignite the Lincoln offense by throwing for 240 yards and three touchdowns, continuing his steady play on the young season. The Abes rolled up 377 yards of total offense, and got a lot of scoring help from their defense as well. “It was as dominating a defensive performance as I’ve seen in a while,” said Kitna of the performance by the Abe defense, which reached the endzone four times on the afternoon. Foremost among the Abes’ defenders was Rayshaun Miller, who scored on both sides of the ball to continue his stellar early season play for Lincoln. Entering week two of the season and cracking the 3A rankings last week at No. 10, the Abes have their sights set on a higher goal – the Narrows League title and a trip to the state playoffs. “Timberline and North Thurston are the teams to beat, but we cannot look ahead beyond one game at a time,” said Kitna. “That is a good way to lose focus.” Coming out of the locker room at halftime, the Lincoln defense would turn the Tigers back again, leaving Stadium head coach Jess Nelson applauding the Abes as well. “That was as good a defensive effort as I have seen in a while,” Nelson said. The Abes improved to 2-0 on the young season, with a homecoming date against Mount Tahoma on Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at Lincoln Bowl. Stadium will look to rebound in their Narrows 4A opener at Yelm on Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. By Steve Mullen

3(;,-0,3+.6(330-;:3065:7(:; LANCERS

After struggling offensively in the early going against Lakes, Bellarmine Prep turned to the smallest player on the field when it mattered most. And Nathan Goltermann delivered.

The junior running back – standing at just 5-foot-4 and weighing 122 pounds – carried nine times for 38 yards on the Lions’ final drive to set up Matthew Philichi’s game-winning field goal to give Bellarmine Prep a 16-14 win over the Lancers on Sept. 13 at Harry Lang Stadium. “That’s (my) first time being in that situation,” said Goltermann, who finished with 23 carries for 118 yards. “It’s really hard, but if you keep pushing through you’ll come out on top. That’s what I did… my running back coach just tells me to believe in myself and have faith.” Lakes dominated the first half, but held a slim 7-0 lead at the break on Caleb Lyons’ six-yard touchdown run late in the first quarter. The Lancers turned the ball over on downs at the Lions’ 26-yard line on their first drive of the game, and fumbled at Bellarmine’s five-yard line on their next possession. Philichi had a chance to put the Lions on the board midway through the second quarter, but his 43-yard field goal sailed just left. Lakes then stormed 77 yards in seven plays, but were stopped short on fourth-and-goal, denying them a chance to go up by two scores at the break. The Lancers finally added their second touchdown early in the second half, as Xzavier Weston scored on a 26-yard run to cap a 10-play, 86-yard drive. But Goltermann answered with a nine-yard touchdown for the Lions four plays later, after quarterback Lou Millie hit Drew Griffin for a 50-yard completion on 3rd-and-8 to keep the drive alive. Goltermann added a key 29-yard scamper on the Lions’ next possession, setting up Millie’s one-yard touchdown seven plays later. “He’s a tough kid,” said Bellarmine Prep head coach Tom Larsen of Goltermann. “He’s so small and slippery, slick and quick. He gets the job done. I’m proud of him.” But the extra point was botched, leaving the Lions down 14-13. After Lyons – who led Lakes with 16 carries for 89 yards – returned the ensuing kickoff to Bellarmine’s 26-yard line, the Lions’ defense stood firm, as Garrett Letts and Nick Dionas came up with back-to-back clutch tackles to snuff out the Lancers’ threat. That set up the final drive, fueled by Goltermann and finished by Philichi’s game-winning boot from 33 yards out with just over a minute remaining. “I didn’t really expect the game to come down to a kick, because I believe in our team,” Philichi said. “But I was prepared.” Bellarmine quickly ended Lakes’ final chance when Letts intercepted Kemonee Jenkins on the first play of the next drive. By Jeremy Helling

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

)(*205;6-694. Foss’ Sarah Sachs wins the 100-yard backstroke and

is rounding back into form after suffering a stress fracture in her foot.

WSwimming From page A6

what she was swimming going into the championship part of the season.” Sachs – who is still battling back from a stress fracture in her foot – fell just short of a state time in winning the 50-yard freestyle in 26.75 seconds, and added a win in the 100-yard backstroke in a time of 1:06.15. But the senior will certainly continue to improve after placing seventh in the 100-yard backstroke and 13th in the 200-yard freestyle at state last year. “She hasn’t been able to put in a lot early on,” Wood noted of Sachs’ injury. “I’ve been trying to take it really easy with her.” Foss sophomore Nicole Ripley tallied the Falcons’ other event win, finishing the 500-yard freestyle in 6:40.58. But Wilson state-tested sophomore Madeleine Dodge helped lead the way for the Rams, capturing the 200-yard freestyle in 2:07.65 and the 100-yard butterfly in 1:06.40. She also teamed with Kelly Tran, Karli Stevenson and Rachel Duke to win the 200-yard medley relay and the 400-yard freestyle relay. Both relay times – along with Dodge’s two individual wins – easily qualified for the 3A district meet. Duke

ComeWalkWithMe_ad_5.139x10.5.indd 1

“She’s way ahead of (where she was) this time last year. She’s swimming times comparable to what she was swimming going into the championship part of the season.” ¶4H[[>VVK added a district time in winning the 100-yard freestyle in 1:01.76, and Tran and Stevenson narrowly scored a district time in winning the 200-yard freestyle relay along with Hannah Kenfield and Alicia Long. Rams senior Hailey Viehmann – who placed tenth in the diving competition at the state meet last year – scored a 154.75 in the meet against the Falcons as the only diver to take part.

9/16/13 10:26 AM

:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNLÂ&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;-YPKH`:LW[LTILY

PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

70, The annual fruit pie competition in the Home Arts Pavilion at the Washington State Fair always draws a crowd of onlookers jealous of the lucky pie judges.

WPies

From page A1

loses five points. A state fair pie contest is the only event on the planet in which a bigger pie is not a better pie. For 30-plus years, Forbes has been playing by the fruit pie rules, and winning with them, sometimes with apples, sometimes with stone fruits. The contest switches fruits each year. This year, it called for berries. Forbes went wild, picking her own huckleberries and blueberries and buying little wild blackberries from a forager friend. Early on in the pie game, when she was a mom and a nurse and a volunteer and serial baker in Silverdale, she found a source of inspiration at the pie contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One year, an 82-year-old lady won, and I thought,

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wow,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m romancing 90.â&#x20AC;? Actually, she is a mere 86. She bakes pies for friends, pies for family, pies for bands of scouts and hikers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love cooking pies,â&#x20AC;? she said. And she loves doing good for others. She belongs to a nursesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; guild that raises money for Mary Bridge Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital, and bakes pies for auctions. In Silverdale, she donates a pie a month to be auctioned off for the Central Kitsap Food Bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can still have the fun of doing pies, and it goes for a good cause,â&#x20AC;? she said. Pies, after all, are the currency of the gods, and the exchange rate on Lois Forbesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; transforms them into hundreds of dollars of community capital.

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City Life DREAMFEST ’13 Le Dîner en Blanc

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2013

TWO-DAY MUSIC FEST TO SHOWCASE SOME OF SOUTH SOUND’S MOST BUZZ-WORTHY BANDS THIS WEEKEND AT LOUIE G’S

FAME RIOT PHOTO BY ERIN LARUE

JASON KERTSON AND THE IMMORTALS PHOTO BY CAROLYN FRYE

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Since 2010, Louie G’s Pizza in Fife has served as an incubator and proving ground for local rock talent. And, this weekend, owner Louie Galarza will put on his second annual Dreamfest to showcase promising young bands that have cut their teeth at his club, along with a few familiar fixtures of South Sound rock. Based on last year’s attendance, a crowd of 800 to 1,000 is expected to turn out Saturday and Sunday to check out headliners Windowpane and Randy Hansen, along with a supporting cast that includes the Fame Riot, Riot in Rhythm, Amadon, Nolan Garrett and C-Leb & the Kettle Black, among nearly two dozen buzz-worthy acts. “I got the best bands that I knew of, the bands that come in here and that actually do their work and put on a great show,” said Galarza. “If you’ve ever seen my place, it’s set up for these kids to get better, get productive and get to work,” he said. Dreamfest is “a big production. We let them see what a real production is like. They get lanyards. Everything is completely by the book. It’s like playing a big arena show.”

C-LEB & THE KETTLE BLACK PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN HAMILTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Teenage rockers Jason Kertson and the Immortals have been honing their chops at Louie’s since they played their first show there two years ago. The band’s namesake said he’s especially stoked to get onstage Saturday.

“Louie’s is kind of the only place in Washington of its kind,” said singer-guitarist Jason Kertson, 16. “I think it’s mostly because Louie is such a caring guy,” he said. “He actually cares about the people,

FISTFUL OF DOLLARS PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

helps the bands out and gives them advice. Pretty much anyone who wants to develop a fan base or just play a few shows can go to Louie G’s and request a spot on a bill.” Among the more established acts playing this weekend is Tacoma’s Ben Union, a band that will be playing its last show in Washington for the year. Ben Union plays all over the Northwest, and band leader Ben Mira (a.k.a. Ben Union) ranks Louie’s near the top of the venues his band headlines. “I have nothing but good things to say about Louie,” Mira said. “The stage is probably one of the biggest and best we’ve played as far as production goes. (Louie is) very generous. I think that he fills a hole in the Tacoma scene, the South Sound, as far as how he treats bands. But he makes the bands bring it, too. Because there’s not a lot of foot traffic in Fife, you have to work hard (to promote.) But the reward is a lot better.” A portion of Dreamfest proceeds benefit Everett’s Burned Children Recovery Foundation, a group that provides support for children who have been severely injured in fires. “They’re trying to buy a chunk of land up in Bellingham to have a camp, so we’re trying to raise money for them,” Galarza said. Music will start at 11 a.m. both days, and the event is open to all ages. Tickets are $20 per day with two-day VIP packages available for $50 to $60, all of which can be purchased online at www.brownpapertickets.com.

SECTION B, PAGE 1

RANDY HANSEN PHOTO BY CRISTINA ARRIGONI

THE MURAL PROJECT PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Dreamfest schedule » Sept. 21 Clear the Chaos ----------------------- 1 p.m. Insuburban Avenue ---------------1:45 p.m. Atomic Ballroom -------------------2:30 p.m. Mom’s Rocket -----------------------3:25 p.m. Jason Kertson and the Immortals - 4:20 p.m. The Fail Safe Project --------------5:15 p.m. Ben Union ----------------------------6:10 p.m. The Fame Riot -----------------------7:05 p.m. Witchburn ----------------------------- 8 p.m. Amadon ------------------------------9:05 p.m. Mechanism ----------------------------10 p.m. Riot In Rhythm -------------------- 10:55 p.m. Windowpane ---------------------- 11:50 p.m. »Sept. 22 Fistful of Dollars -------------------- 1 p.m. The Mural Project -----------------1:45 p.m. Suspicious By Nature --------------2:30 p.m. Tahoma Souls Alive ----------------3:25 p.m. Lady Justice-------------------------4:20 p.m. The Approach -----------------------5:15 p.m. C-Leb and the Kettle Black ------6:10 p.m. Nolan Garrett----------------------7:10 p.m. Sweet Kiss Momma -----------------8:15 p.m. Randy Hansen ----------------------9:30 p.m.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE POETRY AT KING’S On Sept. 26 at 7 p.m., King’s Books will be hosting two renowned Northwest poets for a reading and book launch. Both writers and literary community leaders, John Sibley Williams WILLIAMS ( Po r t l a n d ) will be launching his latest collection, “Controlled Hallucinations,” alongside poet, singer, and actress Emilie Rommel Shimkus (Tacoma). Admission is free.

TWO RONSTADT GENERATIONS Ronstadt Generations, America’s first family of Southwestern Americana music, will

perform at University of Puget Sound on Sept. 20. Headed by Michael J. Ronstadt, the younger brother of renowned singer Linda Ronstadt, the multitalented trio will perform at 8 p.m. in Kilworth Memorial Chapel as a benefit for those with Parkinson’s Disease. For tickets, order online at http://tickets.pugetsound.edu, or call (253) 879-6013. Admission is $12 for the general public and $4 for Puget Sound campus members with ID. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door.

THREE TACOMA PLAYING CARDS An exhibition of original art from the inaugural deck of Tacoma Playing Cards is now on view at STAR Center (3873

S. 66th St.) through the end of October. Decks of the cards are available for $20. An artist reception will take place Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m., in the lobby. The artworks may be purchased at the opening of the reception, at www.tacomamakes. com or by e-mailing TacomaMakes@ gmail.com.

FOUR FREE FOR ALL Broadway Center’s Tacoma Free For All kicks off Sept. 27 at the Rialto Theater with Linda Tillery and the Cultural Heritage Choir, 7:30 p.m. Tillery is a Grammy nominated vocalist, producer, arranger, speaker and self-taught ethnomusicologist. She and the choir tell the story of slavery and its lingering effects

from the point of view of the slaves for whom music was often their only voice. Tickets free with Free For All registration at www.broadwaycenter.org.

FIVE JASON ALDEAN Country music studmuffin Jason Aldean brings his 2013 Night Train Tour to Tacoma Dome on Sept. 27. With more than seven million records sold and 11 #1 hits under his belt, this seasoned entertainer is sure to put on one helluva show. Tickets at www.ticketmaster.com.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 20, 2013

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

GRANDSTAND REVIEW

T

here are just a few days left for the Washington State Fair, with headliners Carly Rae Jepsen (Sept. 20), Austin Mahone & Brigit Mendler (Sept. 21) and Kid Rock (Sept. 22) coming up this weekend; www.thefair.com/concerts

for ticket info. Tacoma Weekly freelance photographer Bill Bungard has been there documenting all the grandstand action. Here is some of what he saw, with larger galleries online at www.tacomaweekly.com/beyondwords and www.billbungard.com.

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD/WWW.BILLBUNGARD.COM

“Dangerous Man” and “Chrome” singer Trace Adkins charmed fans on Sept. 7.

Little Big Town – featuring Jimi Westbrook, Kimberly Schlapman, Karen Fairchild and Phillip Sweet – delivered sweet vocal harmony, a solid cover of Fleetwood Mac’s “The Chain” and, of course, smash summer jam, “Pontoon.”

Craig Morgan got this year’s concert series started after the rodeo on Sept. 6.

Country star and NFL pitch woman Carrie Underwood’s set included angrygirl anthems “Before He Cheats,” “Good Girl” and “Two Black Cadillacs.”

Grammy Award-winning jazz singer Al Jarreau teamed up with Tacoma Symphony on Sept. 10.

Classic rockers Cheap Trick played all of “At Budokan” and the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready surprised fans when he made a cameo during “Surrender.”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, September 20, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

PLAYHOUSE KILLS Fall equinox heralds IT WITH â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ARSENICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tacoma Moon Festival

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TACOMAMOONFESTIVAL

RICKSHAW RIDES. Rickshaw will return to this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tacoma Moon Festival at the Ruston Waterfront. Last year, David Lay, one of the Moon Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great student volunteers, drove festival-goers around.

PHOTO BY KATE PATERNO-LICK

ARSENIC. (L) Aunt Martha (Diana George) and (R) Aunt Abbey (Rebecca McCarthy) SEATED: Mortimer Brewster (Jacob Tice). By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

L

akewood Playhouseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arsenic and Old Laceâ&#x20AC;? seems to be the odd-play-out of sorts considering that the theater is marking its diamond anniversary with this comedic season opener. The rest of its season includes the allbut-guaranteed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monty Pythonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SPAMALOT,â&#x20AC;? after all. So to stage such a go-to play like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arsenic and Old Laceâ&#x20AC;? is like a community theater staging any of the works of Agatha Christie. It might be a great show, but not something to get the pre-show buzz. The play is returning to the Lakewood Playhouse stage for the first time since 1997, which this reviewer remembers, so I might be a bit biased in that regard. I still have a copy of the review around my office somewhere. A three-act play repackaged in two acts, the first â&#x20AC;&#x153;half â&#x20AC;? logged in at an hour and a half, which caused some tight back muscles even in the theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new comfy chairs. That said, it was a fun show. But it was what it was. Anyone who has gone to stage performances for any length of time has seen the show, so it is a bit like hearing a great joke for the second or third or fourth time. The pack of the punch is mostly lost. But it did add a little something-something for folks who have sat

for the show before. Director Dale Westgaard pulled all the energy from his actors and channeled their efforts into a solidly funny and gag-filled dark comedy that was staged on one of the most extensively effective sets, designed by Amanda Sweger, to ever call Lakewood home. The costumes and props, by Alex Lewington and Virginia Yanoff, finished off the period pieceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authenticity. But as all shows, this one rests on the actors who bring the words on a page to life. And they certainly did that, and they did it well. The reluctant theater critic Mortimer Brewster (played by Jacob Tice) finds himself visiting his aunts Aby and Martha (Diana George and Rebecca Lea McCarthy). They just happen to have the habit of poisoning potential lodgers and visitors with elderberry wine and burying them in their basement. Toss in a brother who thinks he is Teddy Roosevelt (Jeffery Weaver) and a psychotic hitman (Chris Cantrell) with a body in need of burial and the house gets filled with funny bits as well as corpses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arsenic and Old Laceâ&#x20AC;? runs at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 13. Tickets are $25 with student and military discounts. The theatre is located within the Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. Contact (253) 588-0042 or www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

W

ith the Autumnal Equinox happening this weekend (Sept. 22 to be exact), the Tacoma Moon Festival takes place on Sept. 21, noon to 8 p.m., at Chinese Reconciliation Park, 1740 N. Schuster Parkway. Admission is free. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival features music, dance

and theatrical performers from a number of heritage communities, from Asia and the Pacific Islands to Europe and Mexico, who have made their homes in the Tacoma area. The festival includes live entertainment and hands-on activities for adults and children. Festival-goers will also enjoy a variety of ethnic foods in the food court.

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 20, 2013

First Night dares you to wear white after Labor Day Le DĂŽner en Blanc at Wright Park promises fancy-free fun(d)-raising for First Night By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

T

conducting themselves with the greatest decorum, elegance and etiquette all meet for a mass â&#x20AC;&#x153;chic picnicâ&#x20AC;? in a public space.

they eat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with good manners, of course. Then as soon as they appeared â&#x20AC;&#x201C; poof! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gone. The point? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feast for all the senses, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun. Plus, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fundraiser for First Night Tacoma this coming holiday season, our cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual farewell to the old year and hello to the new one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So far, this will be the only fundraiser, although we expect to send out weekly mini-newsletters to keep people informed as to what specific entertainment to expect and to build anticipation,â&#x20AC;? Di Nino said of the coming First Night plans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year I may do

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tion is given to thousands of friends and acquaintances who have been patiently waiting to learn the DĂŽner en Blancâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret place. Thousands of people, dressed all in white, and conducting themselves with the greatest decorum, elegance, and etiquette, all meet for a mass â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;chic picnicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in a public space. Over the course of an evening, the diners enhance the function and value of their cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public space by participating in the unexpected. Beyond the spectacle and refined elegance of the dinner itself, guests are brought together from diverse backgrounds by a

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a feature performance art piece, involving the arts community.â&#x20AC;? Le DĂŽner en Blanc started in Paris in 1988, the dream-madereal of François Pasquier and his close friends. The event now brings together more than 15,000 people each year in some of the most prestigious locations throughout the French capitol and across Europe, in Canada, Mexico, Haiti, Singapore, Australia and throughout the United States in more than a dozen cities. The concept is best described in this excerpt taken from paris. dinerenblanc.info: â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the last minute, the loca-

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Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;EST CHIC. At Le DĂŽner en Blanc gatherings worldwide, people dressed all in white and

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acoma meets Paris on Sept. 26 for Le DĂŽner en Blanc at Wright Park. Hosted by First Night Tacoma organizers, this novel and distinctly European event invites one and all to come dressed in as much white as you dare in the grand tradition of Le DĂŽner en Blanc founded 25 years ago. First Night board member and Tacoma artist Lynn Di Nino has been out and about generating buzz about the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m running into are energized by the idea and planning their wardrobes,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone I know is planning on coming as a white statue. Sure, it can rain, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to the Northwest and can just party-on anyway.â&#x20AC;? Diane Hansen, a First Night board member, glass artist and owner of Bella Balls in downtown Tacoma, presented the idea to the First Night board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were looking for something fun and unusual that Tacomans could get behind,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had been in San Francisco driving around seeing all these people dressed in white and carrying picnic baskets and candlesticks.â&#x20AC;? She turned to the Internet to find out what was going on and was taken with the whole Le DĂŽner en Blanc concept. Hansen and Di Nino called it â&#x20AC;&#x153;a smart mobâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everyone brings a white tablecloth and wears as much white as they wish, maybe even elegant white. They also bring a picnic â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the hosts provide the linens, utensils and place setings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and suddenly appear in a major urban public space where they set up tables with gourmet food, china and cutlery and

love of beauty and good taste. Le DĂŽner en Blanc recalls the elegance and glamour of court society, and diners engage one another knowing they are taking part in a truly magical event. There are no disruptions: no car traffic, no pedestrian traffic, except for the occasional amazed and astonished looks from passersby at the scene unfolding before them. And we, as they, wonder whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all not a dreamâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Here in Tacoma, Le DĂŽner en Blanc revelers will be entertained by the breathtaking fire dancing of L. Lisa Lawrence and special musical guests Benjamin Doerr & Lydia Ramsey of St. Paul de Vence. The Oceanic 2013 Lumins Festivus, organized by Adam Martin, will be previewing their amazing illuminated sculptures while guests picnic. Just two days later, Sept. 28, Lumins Festivus â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a procession of light and luminarias â&#x20AC;&#x201C; happens in Tacoma starting at Wright Park at 6 p.m. Learn more at www. tacomasoutsidersguide.com/the2013-lumins-festivus.html. Your Le DĂŽner en Blanc hosts will also provide a few tasty hints of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to come on First Night this Dec. 31 (such as a Trojan horse to help ring in the Year of the Horse). â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will be putting out calls for (First Night) volunteers and will need many,â&#x20AC;? Di Nino said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naturally weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to get donations to support the presentations weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing this year. This particular board is highly energized and starting the preparations earlier than it has been done in the past. For the first time ever weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re creating a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;fanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; base by collecting email addresses from supporters.â&#x20AC;? Tickets to Le DĂŽner en Blanc are $10 per person and can be purchased at www.brownpapertickets.com/

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

FROM ALTAR BOY TO VOODOO ORGANIST Scott Wexton faced death, chose the dark side

Friday, September 20, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

THE FALL SEASON OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND’S JACOBSEN SERIES KICKS OFF WITH THE FINISTERRA PIANO TRIO PERFORMING AT 7:30 P.M. ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 20, AT SCHNEEBECK CONCERT HALL. TICKETS ARE FREE FOR UPS STUDENTS, $8.50 TO $12.50 FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC; (253) 879-6013 OR WWW.PUGETSOUND.EDU FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 20

MONDAY, SEPT. 23

STONEGATE: Travis Larson Band, Chris Jones 5 p.m. (rock) NC

SWISS: Palmer Junction (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA

PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.VOODOOORGANIST.COM

VOODOO CHILE. Scott Wexton (a.k.a. Voodoo Organist) will headline Jazzbones on Sept. 25. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

he initial catalyst for Scott Wexton becoming the Voodoo Organist was learning to play the organ as a 10-year-old altar boy. Little did his parents know he’d later use his churchly talents on twisted tunes about boozing, sinning and the living dead, many of which he’ll showcase on Wednesday, Sept. 25, at Jazzbones. But the event that ultimately set Wexton on his current musical path was nearly bleeding to death in 2001. “I was massively bleeding internally,” Wexton said, recalling the grisly episode during a call to his pop culture emporium in Joshua Tree, Calif. “By about noon that day, I’d gone to the bathroom AUSTENLAND (97 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/20: 2:25, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10 Sat 9/21-Sun 9/22: 12:10, 2:25, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10 Mon 9/23-Thu 9/26: 2:25, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10

IN A WORLD… (93 MIN, R) Fri 9/20: 2:10, 6:45, 9:00 Sat 9/21-Sun 9/22: 11:50am, 2:10, 6:45, 9:00 Mon 9/23: 2:10, 6:45, 9:00 Tue 9/24: 9:05 Wed 9/25-Thu 9/26: 2:10, 6:45, 9:00

BLUE JASMINE (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/20: 2:00, 4:10, 6:25, 8:45 Sat 9/21-Sun 9/22: 11:40am, 2:00, 4:10, 6:25, 8:45 Mon 9/23-Thu 9/26: 2:00, 4:10, 6:25, 8:45

LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/20: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 9/21-Sun 9/22: 12:00, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Mon 9/23-Thu 9/26: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35

THE SPECTACULAR NOW (95 MIN, R) Fri 9/20-Thu 9/26: 4:25

SHORT FILMS FROM SUNDANCE (100 MIN, NR) Tue 9/24: 2:10, 7:05

about a dozen times, and it was almost pure blood. So I rushed myself to the hospital, almost bit the dust in E.R., and somehow, miraculously, leveled out.” The initial diagnosis was a bacterial infection, but eventually Wexton learned he suffered from Crohn’s Disease, an inflammatory disorder that affects the bowels. Wexton had honed his musical chops in several rock bands over the years, gaining some notoriety in Nemesis, an industrial band that got big enough to open for Nine Inch Nails in his native Detroit. But he’d long soured on the petty conflicts and rivalries that tended to tear groups apart. His neardeath experience was further confirmation that he needed to take control of his creative life, pronto. “It was like, ‘You know what? I just don’t have time to wait any more. I almost died,’” he said, chuckling. “I decided to form a solo act, an act where I didn’t have anybody else to hold me back. I wrote my first Voodoo Organist record, booked two consecutive tours, quit my day job at the print shop, and off I went.” Wexton’s music, however, is not nearly as serious as those roots may suggest. The Voodoo Organist sound is “gospel punk,” creepy, campy organ jams with spooky Theremin flourishes that

RANGO (107 MIN, PG) Tue 9/21: 10:00am

recall shlocky ‘50s sci fi. “The last band that I was in, in Los Angeles, was the Screamin’ Demons, and I was kind of creeping toward the Voodoo Organist sound with that project,” Wexton said. “I was getting back into organ music, discovered Screamin’ Jay Hawkins. I’ve always been a Tom Waits fan. … That was kind of when the whole lounge exotica revival stuff started happening. So it was kind of taking one half lounge exotica, one half dirty blues a la Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and putting it all together.” But, like a George Romero movie, there’s a bit of societal commentary hidden in all that ghoulish fun. The Voodoo Organists’ May release “Vampire Empire,” for example, is about the corporate takeover of America. “It’s kind of my political record,” Wexton said. “I don’t see how people either can’t see it or refuse to see it. But (the corporations are) vampires, and they’re sucking us all dry. And if things continue on this path for another 10 years ... it’s gonna be nothing but Walmart and Amazon. So it’s my take on the events that are happening right now. The music will start at 8 p.m. on Wednesday. Admission is free. Call (253) 396-9196 or see www.jazzbones.com for further details.

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ENCORE: Ladies night (hip-hop, top 40 DJs) 10 p.m., $1-$7 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Drew Barth (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: The Randy Oxford Band (blues, soul) 8 p.m., $10 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NIGHT OWL: Summer-geddon (rock) 2 p.m., $12, AA PANTAGES: Brian Regan (comedy) 7:30 p.m., $49.50, AA SWISS: The Social Network (rock covers) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Alex Reymundo (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (funk jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA UPS- KILWORTH CHAPEL: Ronstadt Generations Trio (country, folk) 8 p.m., $4-$12, AA WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Carly Rae Jepsen, Hot Chelle Rae (pop) 7:30 p.m., $20-$50, AA

SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Duy Manh, Doan Trang, etc. (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: Makaha Sons (Hawaiian) 8:30 p.m., $20-$50 GRIT CITY @ 502: Drew Barth, 8:30 p.m., Rusty, 10:30 p.m. (comedy) $15 JAZZBONES: The Brown Edition, Down North (R&B, soul, jazz) 8 p.m., $7 HARMON: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Jazz Orchestra (big band) 9 p.m., NC LOCH’S: Down2poundDbASS! (DJs) 8 p.m., LOUIE G’S: Dreamfest feat. Windowpane, Witchburn, Fame Riot, etc. (rock) 11 a.m., $20, AA NEW FRONTIER: Girl Trouble, Trees and Timber, Red Hex (rock) 8 p.m., $5 SPAR: High and Lonesome Bluegrass Band, 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Crosswalk (rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (top 40) 9 p.m., $8 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Austin Mahone, Bridgit Mendler (pop) 7 p.m., $25-$60, AA

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (karaoke band) 11 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 JAZZBONES: Rebecca Corry, Ralph Porter, Jones Barnes (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC LOCH’S: Open turntables (DJ) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25 JAZZBONES: The Voodoo Organist (gothic gospel) 8 p.m., NC

HARMON TAPROOM: James Coates (acoustic open mic) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 7 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, SEPT. 26 502: Kim Archer (singersongwriter) 5:30 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 WASINGTON STATE FAIR: Kid Rock (rock) 7:30 p.m., $45-$95, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open mic karaoke, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Dreamfest feat. Randy Hansen, Sweet Kiss Momma, Nolan Garrett, etc. (rock) 11 a.m., $20, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 3 p.m., NC SPAR: Brian Lee & The Orbiters (blues) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Rodney Sherwood, Xung Lam (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Kry, DJ Switch (top 40) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Rebecca Corry (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 20, 2013

FRI., SEPT. 20 BRIAN REGAN AT PANTAGES Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. His non-stop theater tour has visited more than 80 cities each year since 2005 and continues through 2013. The quality of his material, relatable to a wide audience and revered by his peers, continues to grow his fan base. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Regan consistently fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations. The performance is at 7:30 p.m., Fri., Sept. 20, at the Pantages. Tickets: $49.50. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org.

COMING EVENTS

BACK TO BEALE ST. FUNDRAISER The South Sound Blues Association presents Back to Beale Street Blues 2014, a fundraiser, concert and dance to help send The Randy Oxford Band and Arthur Migliazza to the international blues challenge in Memphis in January. The event will be held at The Swiss, and donations of $10 for Blues Society members or $12 for non-members, will be accepted. Children under 12 are free. Six top regional acts will be featured, including the Rafael Tranquilino Band, Blues County Sheriff, Blenis/Ehly Band with special guest Thai Barket, and the Mark Riley Trio. The event takes place from 4-10 p.m. The Swiss is located at 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Info: www. blues.org.

BULLETIN BOARD “SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED) [REVISED]” Tacoma Little Theatre begins its 95th season with a special encore presentation of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) [revised],” directed by Suzy Willhoft and written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer

production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

JOIN TRAVEL GURU RICK STEVES AS HE LEADS A DISCUSSION ON TRAVEL AS A SPIRITUAL ACT ON SEPT. 22 AT THE PANTAGES. STEVES IS THE AUTHOR OF MORE THAN 50 EUROPEAN TRAVEL GUIDEBOOKS AND HOST OF THE PUBLIC TELEVISION SERIES, “RICK STEVES’ EUROPE.” HE BELIEVES THAT THOUGHTFUL TRAVEL EXPANDS OUR WORLDVIEW AND SHAPES HOW WE ADDRESS THE CHALLENGES CONFRONTING OUR NATION. HAVING SPENT FOUR MONTHS EACH YEAR OVERSEAS FOR THE LAST 30 YEARS, HE BELIEVES THAT TRAVEL HELPS US “CHALLENGE TRUTHS WE WERE RAISED TO THINK WERE SELF-EVIDENT AND GOD-GIVEN.” TRAVEL ALSO HELPS US APPRECIATE THE SPIRITUAL DIVERSITY OF THE PLANET WHILE NOURISHING THE SOUL OF THE TRAVELER AS HE/SHE ENCOUNTERS THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE UNIQUE IN NEW AND UNFAMILIAR PLACES. HIS CLASSES HAVE HELPED MILLIONS OF AMERICANS NOT ONLY ENJOY MAXIMUM TRAVEL THRILLS PER KILOMETER, MINUTE AND EURO, BUT BECOME BETTER CITIZENS OF OUR PLANET. STEVES SHARES HOW THE OTHER 96 PERCENT OF HUMANITY SEES OUR NATION AND EXPLORES HOW HIS SOCIAL ACTIVISM HAS GROWN NATURALLY OUT OF HIS TRAVEL EXPERIENCES. THE $75 TICKET INCLUDES A POST-SHOW MEET AND GREET, AND THE 2014 EDITION OF HIS POPULAR GUIDEBOOK “EUROPE THROUGH THE BACK DOOR.” THE EVENT STARTS AT 5 P.M. AT THE PANTAGES. INFO: WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

THE COLOR RUN The Color Run event is a one of a kind experience that is less about speed and more about enjoying a color crazy day with your friends and family. For these events, it is about participants of all different speeds, ages, shapes, and sizes toeing the starting line. Whether you are a casual morning mall walker or an Olympic athlete, the three miles of The Color Run course will be the most enjoyable real estate you’ve traveled in a VERY long time. Info: /thecolorrun.com/tacoma/#race_ info. The race begins at 9 a.m. at the Tacoma Dome.

SUN., SEPT. 29

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater

TW PICK: RICK STEVES AT THE PANTAGES

SAT., SEPT. 21

PUGET PACER The annual Puget Pacer 5k Walk/Run and Silent Auction, hosted by the University of Puget Sound’s Community Involvement and Action Center, is just around the corner. Lace up your running shoes for a pleasant trip around the beautiful campus or place your bids on a number of baskets from local and national donors – or do both! One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit the CIAC’s three youth programs: Kids Can Do!, ETC Tutoring, and Kids4Music.The Pacer begins and ends at the Rotunda in the Wheelock Student Center. $10 registration required for the 5k; registration not required for participation in silent auction. All ages welcome! Info: www.pugetsound. edu/student-life/service/ciac/ puget-pacer.

Promote your community event,

and Jess Winfield. This fastpaced comedy starring Luke Amundson, Coleman Hagerman and Blake York, is a gaga-second, delight that deconstructs all 37 of the Bard’s plays – plus the sonnets – into a single two-hour whirlwind. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) [revised]” will run until Sunday, Sept. 22. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday’s are at 2 p.m. Info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com. “ARSENIC AND OLD LACE” The Lakewood Playhouse is proud to present the first show of its 75th anniversary season – Joseph Kesserling’s wonderful black comedy with a little extra kick: “Arsenic and Old Lace.” Play times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. The show runs through Oct. 13, with special showings at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 26 (Pay What You Can actor’s benefit). This show marks the playhouse’s first presentation with its auditorium’s new chairs. They are built for comfort and include lower back support as well as cup holders for your soft drinks and popcorn. Presented with views from all sides, in the Lakewood Playhouse’s unique “in the round” seating, this production of “Arsenic and Old Lace” will help you feel as if you are inside the show. About the show: A drama critic learns on his wedding day that his beloved maiden aunts are homicidal maniacs, and that insanity runs in his family along with a fondness for serving arsenicspiked elderberry wine. The show returns to the Lakewood Playhouse stage for the first time since 1997. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org/ AL-MUTANABBI STREET STARTS HERE The traveling exhibit of artist books, created to defy

an Iraqi bomb, runs now through Oct. 31 in the Collins Memorial Library of the University of Puget Sound. On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq War, a car bomb devastated the literary and intellectual heart of Baghdad, ripping through booksellers, cafes, and tea shops, killing 30 people and wounding more than 100. San Francisco poet and artist Beau Beausoleil and British scholar Sarah Bodman responded to the devastation by asking artists and poets from around the world to create artists’ books as a show of solidarity with those slain and injured. The result is a remarkable exhibition of some 200 handmade artists’ books and single-sheet broadsides. The co-curators say the display aims to “pay homage to the truth that can rest between any two covers,” and to reflect “the ultimate futility of those who try to erase thought.” Collins Memorial Library at University of Puget Sound is proud to be hosting the national traveling exhibit Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here this fall. (Al-Mutanabbi, the bombed street, was named after Iraqi poet al-Mutanabbi, the Arab world’s equivalent of Shakespeare). The show includes more than 50 works from the original collection. Info: blogs.pugetsound.edu/pugetsoundbookartists/ STADIUM FARE Stadium Fare – Tacoma’s Original Craft Market – has been a big hit since it started July 6. This bi-weekly event in the Stadium District offers great local food, vintage and artistic wares, and entertainment. The Fare takes place in the parking lot of First Presbyterian Church, across from Wright Park on the corner of South 2nd and South G streets. There is just one more Fare this season, on Sept. 28. Info: stadiumfare.com.

HAPPY THURSDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC The Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic is a weekly standup comedy open mic hosted by Comedian Kareem Walters, featuring some of the best rising comics and established headliners. Each week professional and amateur comedians test new material to develop their acts. It is an opportunity to test your new material in a noncomedy club atmosphere. You can catch the action at Triple Play – the newest sports bar on 6th Avenue – every Thursday. Happy Thursday Comedy Open Mic offers a fun, unpredictable show experience you won’t find anywhere else. Enjoy rare and exciting burgers while watching some of the funniest comics in the Northwest. Every Thursday at 9 p.m. Info: www.tripleplaytacoma.com. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laidback and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing swing music from the 1930s and 1940s to keep dancers hopping all night

long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums open every Saturday 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement, including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds, the Boathouse museum houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling (253) 927-2536. Browns Point Lighthouse Park is at 201 Tulalip St. N.E., with limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. DRUM CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134, or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, September 20, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

CALL 253.922.5317

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV EMPLOYMENT

City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

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5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Pierce County:

Satellite Installation Technician If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv. com/careers. EOE.

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253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Colleen McDonald, cmcdonald@tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 20, 2013

NOTICES

72.HOO\)UDQN3LQQH\ ,QWKH0DWWHURI&O\GH3LQQH\YV.HOO\)UDQN Pinney &DVH1XPEHU38<&932'9 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup ,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW (DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ You are summoned to appear for an Initial +HDULQJRQ'HFHPEHUWKDWSP If you have any questions, please contact the FRXUWFOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*(0(17 72&KDUOHV%6DWLDFXP ,QWKH0DWWHURI3X\DOOXS7ULEHYV&KDUOHV% Satiacum &DVH1XPEHU38<)+),6+ <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup ,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW (DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ You are summoned to appear for an Initial +HDULQJRQWKHWKGD\RI-DQXDU\ DWDP If you have any questions, please contact the FRXUWFOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*(0(17 72%UXFH%HUU\ &DVH1DPH*UDFH%HUU\YV%UXFH%HUU\ &DVH1XPEHU38<&9',66 <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRU an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup ,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW (DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on Tuesday the 29th day of October, DWSP If you have any questions, please contact the FRXUWFOHUNVDW   )$,/85(72$33($53/($'25 27+(5:,6('()(1'0$<5(68/7,1$ '()$8/7-8'*0(17

VOLUNTEERS Stand Up for Immigrants Are you looking for an opportunity to make a difference in the community? In your own life? Tacoma Community House is in need of dozens of special event volunteers willing to gift 2-4 hours of time on Thursday, Oct. 24 for a new community-wide event called FLAVOR. Perfect for those short on time, opportunities are available in the morning, afternoon and/or evening. Great for groups, families, and anyone passionate about immigrant issues and social justice. Trainings provided in late-September. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested, more details can be provided by contacting Karen Thomas at kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org or (253) 383-3951. For more information about FLAVOR, visit www.tacomacommunityhouse.org.

Looking for Members White River Valley Lions PaFLĂ&#x20AC;F $OJRQD (GJHZRRG 0LOton Service Areas Looking for 0HPEHUV´:H6HUYHÂľ,QIR93 0-/LRQ*OHQ(PDLOOLRQJOHQ# KRWPDLOFRP0HHWLQJQG:HG 'DYH¡V0LOWRQ30 Meals on Wheels Office Volunteer 'R\RXZDQWWRSXW\RXURIĂ&#x20AC;FH skills to work in a rewarding volunteer opportunity? We are seeking a volunteer with strong customer service and computer VNLOOVWRDVVLVWLQRXU0HDOVRQ :KHHOV 7DFRPD RIĂ&#x20AC;FH RQH PRUQLQJ D ZHHN  0XVW HQMR\ working with seniors, using the telephone and computer, inputWLQJ GDWD DQG VHWWLQJ XS Ă&#x20AC;OHV Food handlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s card required. For more information call Linda at Lutheran Community SerYLFHV

VOLUNTEERS Become a Senior Companion today! Volunteers help frail or disabled seniors stay in their own home and maintain their independence. Activities include running errands, providing transportation or simply being a friend. Hourly stipend and mileage reimbursement provided. RequirePHQWVPXVWEHVHUYHDW least 15 hours a week and be low-income. Drivers are especially needed currently. For PRUHLQIRFDOO-XOLH.HUULJDQ 3URJUDP 'LUHFWRU    H[W Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank VolunWHHUVQHHGHG´1:)%KHOSV restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture WRSHRSOHLQQHHGÂľ7XHVGD\ Saturday Truck Volunteers 1HHGHG  DP SP Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at volunteer@ nwfurniturebank.org or call  Portland Ave Community Center Senior Programs We need a volunteer to host programs Tuesday  7KXUVGD\     SP DW 3RUWODQG $YH Community Center Senior Programs. Volunteer will be calling Bingo and doing some extreme crafting, gardening during spring & summer and into fall. If interested call Bonnie @  0RQGD\ )ULGD\30 Ayusa International SeeksTacoma Host Parents for High School Exchange Students Ayusa International, a \HDUROGQRQSURĂ&#x20AC;WWKDW promotes global learning through the hosting of high school foreign exchange students, is seeking parents/ families in Tacoma to host IRUWKHXSFRPLQJ school year. Ayusa students are 15-18 years old and FRPHIURPPRUHWKDQ countries around the world LQFOXGLQJ%UD]LO-DSDQ *HUPDQ\(FXDGRU)UDQFH 3HUX0RURFFR&KLQDDQG 6SDLQWKH\DUHDOOSURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW LQ(QJOLVK)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHYLVLWRXUZHEVLWH www.ayusa.org AmeriCorps Opportunity Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps memEHUWRDVVLVWLQWKH5HDG0H Program in local elementary VFKRROV5HDG0HLVDRQH on-one adult/student reading SURJUDP IRU VWUXJJOLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UVW second, and third grade readers. Duties include gathering resources for tutor strategies, recruiting new volunteers, leading in tutor recruitment and retention, helping the 5HDG0H &RRUGLQDWRUV LQ assessment, tracking student success, and tutoring. Applicants must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service 6HS  -XO    Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-383-3951 or kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity Employment Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to serve closely with the employ-

VOLUNTEERS

ment staff to develop and conduct work-readiness workshops for youth and adult participants. Duties include assisting adult and youth participants with on-line job search, resumes, and applications, assisting in the planning and execution of workshops, assisting with afterschool tutoring for refugee and immigrant youth, and mentoring youth in the Career Pathways Program. Applicants must be 1825 years of age at the start date RI VHUYLFH 6HS  -XO     &RQWDFW .DUHQ 7KRPDV at (253) 383-3951 or kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

YROXQWHHU RSSRUWXQLWLHV LQFOXGH grounds maintenance and adPLQLVWUDWLYHFOHULFDO ZRUN 0XVW be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information FRQWDFW 9ROXQWHHU &RRUGLQDWRU DW  RU YROXQWHHU# changingrein.org.

difference in the life of a child. There are several program RSWLRQV WR Ă&#x20AC;W \RXU VFKHGXOH and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 

The Tacoma Maritime Institute PHHWV HYHU\ WK 0RQGD\ DW WKH0LGODQG&RPPXQLW\&HQWHUWK6WUHHW(DVW7DFRPD:$3RWOXFNDWDOO DUH ZHOFRPH 0HHWLQJ 6WDUWV DW

Volunteer with Paint TacomaPierce Beautiful! 0DNH \RXU QHLJKERUKRRG PRUH beautiful and help your neighbors in need! Volunteer with Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful! Apply now as an individual or crew to paint houses of low-income homeowners during the VXPPHURI/HDUQPRUHDW KWWSDVVRFLDWHGPLQLVWULHVRUJ community-mobilization/paint-tacoma-pierce-beautiful/volunteer/ &RQWDFW ,QIR  0HJDQ 6KHD DW   RU PHJDQV# associatedministries.org

CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak (QJOLVK0RUQLQJVQRH[SHULence or foreign language skills needed. South Tacoma. ConWDFW/HH6OHGG0DGLVRQ)DPLO\/LWHUDF\

INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT â&#x20AC;&#x153;MEMORY COMMUNITYâ&#x20AC;? :KDW ,W ,V :H DUH 0HPRU\ &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W FRUSRUDWLRQ  7KH 0HPRU\ &RPmunity Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals 2EMHFWLYHV7RFUHDWHDQDFFHVVLEOHUHVRXUFHWKDWÂ&#x2021;KHOSV our senior citizens tell their VWRULHV Â&#x2021; FRQQHFWV WKH \RXQJ DQGWKHROGÂ&#x2021;LQFUHDVHVRXUXQderstanding of those before us ZKRKHOSXVEHZKRZHDUHÂ&#x2021; honors the generations before us and show our appreciation E\SUHVHUYLQJWKHLUPHPRULHVÂ&#x2021; All seniors are welcome to volXQWHHUIRUĂ&#x20AC;OPLQJWKHLUVWRU\Â&#x2021; At most two days of work durLQJGD\WLPH²'D\SUHSURduction meeting, and Release )RUPVLJQLQJ 'D\Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ ideally wrapped within half a day What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to WDON DERXW LQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;OP 8VH  minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. ComSHQVDWLRQD'9'LQZKLFK\RX are the leading character, and a free upload to our website KWWSPHPRU\FRPPXQLW\RUJ &RQWDFW VHQG \RXU HPDLOV WR deyung@memorycommunity. org Or call Deyung at 253858-2445 for scheduling a PHHWLQJ 7KH Ă&#x20AC;OPLQJ LV IUHH but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for WKRVHZKRPDNHRUOHVV To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org. Project Homeless Connect is an annual event where homeless individuals can receive free services. The next event will be held at Tacoma Dome on Oct 23rd. For more information visit www.pchomelessconnect.com or call 253.593.2111. Get involved with Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Citizen Advisory Councils! The Business & Responsive Agency Council helps district leadership with business planQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VXVWDLQDELOLW\ GHcisions, revenue development DQGTXDOLW\DVVXUDQFH0RQWKO\ meetings focus on issues that affect the future of our park system. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/business-volunteer to learn more or call Brett FreshZDWHUV &KLHI )LQDQFLDO 2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU DW    %UHWWI#WDFRmaparks.com. Metro Parks Tacoma Special events bring the community together and provide families ZLWKDIIRUGDEOHIXQ0HWUR3DUNV Tacoma needs volunteers to help produce memorable events. Visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/volXQWHHUDQGVLJQXSWREHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG of special event service opportunities. To learn more, contact 5R[DQQH 0LOHV 9ROXQWHHU 0DQDJHU DW   5R[DQnem@tacomaparks.com.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED If you enjoy helping toddlers learn, you can help us! Seeking retired or experienced volunteers to assist in expanding our capacity and provide quality learning for busy little people. (No diaper changing!) Background check required. &RQWDFW /HH 6OHGG 0DGLVRQ )DPLO\/LWHUDF\ Meals on Wheels at Federal Way Senior Center seeks morning volunWHHUV 2QH &RFRRUGLQDWRU )ULGD\DQG0RQGD\WZR&DOOHUV 0RQGD\ WKUHH 3DFNHUV Wednesday; two Drivers, Thursday. To learn more, call  Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG

PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

PETS Come to our Open House October 5!

Pawsitive Alliance is excited to announce our 2nd annual Shelter Open House Event on October 5, 2013, taking place STATEWIDE! Join us for a variety of fun activities including: - Face Painting - Spin the Wheel for Prizes - Pumpkin Pull for Kids - Special Prices on Adoptions - Microchipping - Enjoy all this with some Freshly Baked Goods & Hot Beverages!

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 

Rags

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

Rags is much better looking these days with his new do! Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very affectionate and excited about finding his new Forever Family. Are you his, because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waiting for you?

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or  Join us in changing lives! &KDQJLQJ5HLQ(TXLQH$VVLVWHG Activities and Therapies, a nonSURĂ&#x20AC;W RIIHUV HTXLQH DVVLVWHG services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monteâ&#x20AC;?

Ashley

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Featured Pet is a pup with an amazing spirit. Monte is a 2 year old black pit bull who seems to always have a smile on his face. Even after having surgery on his leg, this happy guy still made sure to get plenty of playtime in. Monte is receiving hydro therapy for his hip at Unleashed Doggie Daycare & Wellness Center. By the looks of it, he has no idea this is supposed to be work. Monte makes the best out of his situation and brings a smile to everyone around him. Besides his infectious spirit, Monte is a wonderful companion who loves car rides, responds well to commands, walks well on a leash and is house trained. This wonderful pup would be best suited for a household with older children and adults. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on this amazing dog. Take Monte home today! Reference #A477558

Ashley is the most affectionate and loving polydactyl cat with a charming personality. Help this beautiful tuxedo cat find the Forever Family sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been searching for.

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, September 20, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Stephanie Lynch

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

936 S Sheridan $229,000

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

Let me help! Call today.

253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards

Beautiful Victorian 4plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 WATERFRONT

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, w & parking lot rights. $25,000 Contact Salmon Beach North: Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

Businesses Opportunities HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

5007 S Alaska St

2914 N 30th St $399,950

pe

n

ng

di

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. Move in ready mid-century modern. Near Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHJOHDPLQJKDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  backyard, deck w/ view. MLS# 489114

Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

33 N Salmon Beach MLS # 477936

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St. $449,000 MLS#502568

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQDOO sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more.

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

4 Sale with Owner Contract

HOMES FOR SALE

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG&DOOIRUSULYDWH VKRZLQJWRGD\Linda Brandfors 253-229-8331 or Lynn Rhone 253-223-4421 Better Properties 6223 Mt. Tacoma Dr. SW Lakewood, Wa 98499

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Duplex for Rent. 2 Bed, 1 Bath, Basement. $750/month. Fenced yard.

N. Lakewood. Single Unit Apt. 1 Bed Above Laundry Room. RV Court. No Pets. No Smoking. Screen $45, $600 Rent. $500 Deposit. (253) 627-7830

(253) 831-0044 or (253) 314-4419.

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $175,000 w/terms. NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/ reduced Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled price Home, laundromat. reduced VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 price Terms are avail. reduced

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

TACOMA

3715 N CHEYENNE ST

5001 S ORCHARD ST #D

$1695

$775

4 BED, 2.5 BATH 2328 SF. GORGEOUS HOME HAS HARDWOODS, FAMILY ROOM, AMAZING MASTERS AND WASHER/DRYER.

2 BED, 1 BATH 950 SF. HUGE 2 BED APARTMENT HAS FORMAL DINING, WASHER/DRYER, CARPORT PARKING AND $25 FOR W/S/G.

GRAHAM

PUYALLUP

23503 79TH AVE E

11304 185TH ST E

$1750

$1595

3 BED, 2.5 BATH 2058 SF. HUGE HOME HAS OPEN KITCHEN, FORMAL DINING, LARGE LIVING ROOM, 3 CAR GARAGE AND MORE.

4 BED 2.5 BATH 2430 SF. HUGE 4 BED HOME HAS OPEN FLOOR PLAN, AMAZING MASTERS, FAMILY ROOM, AND MORE.

TACOMA

DUPONT

821 S 43RD ST

1955 HAMMOND AVE

$1150

$1750

3 BED 1 BATH 1082 SF. PERFECT 3 BEDROOM HOME HAS NEW FLOORS, FRESH PAINT, FENCED YARD AND EXTRA STORAGE.

4 BED 2.5 BATH 2425 SF. GORGEOUS HOME HAS FORMAL DINING, FAMILY ROOM, SMALL PETS OK, FENCED YARD AND MORE.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

price

GREEN PUP SPORTS reduced BAR & GRILL (famous for its pizza) $189,000, Terms av. price

UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ reduced SPORTS BAR, Doing over $700,000 annual food & drink sales, great food. Asking price is now $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR e SALE $99,000 ic High trafic Count location. prduced re

VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for $109,000. ice Cash/terms. prduced re

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. Same location 15 years in Lakewood.ic Excellent lease with e pr contract terms. $36,000 reduced PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $40,000. Long-time established & great location. price d reduce

North End Charmer!

3310 N. 30th

$375,000

Sound Views! Fabulous location close to Proctor, UPS, the waterfront and freeways. EHGVEDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHG ceilings. One car garage + oversized two car garage with heated shop (a mechanic, wood worker, or artists dream!) Exceptional 9000 sq. ft. lot possible sub-divide (buyer to verify). Newer URRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FKRPH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;F location...fabulous opportunity!! Call Pam (253) 691-0461 for more details or a private showing! MLS# 482872 Better Properties North Proctor

" " " ""         

  !  

Beauty & Barber Business For Sale

â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash. price

reduced

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;CALLAHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUB & GRILL IN KEY CENTER Business is for sale for $300,000 with $100,000 down, High gros sales.

11634 pacific Hwy Lakewood 253-355-2992

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

253-584-0171

Doug Arbogast Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

(253) 307-4055

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future! Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details! Loan products subject to credit approval

For qualifications contact Jen

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 20, 2013

Makaha Sons

Anthony Hamilton CageSport MMA XXVII

September 21, 8:30pm

September 28, 8:30pm

October 5, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $45, $50

I-5 Showroom $45, $65, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

Loretta Lynn

Tim Allen

Battle at the Boat 93

October 17, 8:30pm

October 19, 8:30pm

November 2, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $40, $70, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 9 20 13 p01