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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

Patriotism, gratitude mark Celebrating Military Service Parade

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

TROUBLING. Tribal Natural Resource Director Bill Sullivan (above, left) talks about the troubles fish face along

the White River. The downstream dam is aging and needs to be replaced. Fish gathered from the dam site are trucked up stream, but they are often too tired and battered to spawn.

TRIBES SEEK REPLACEMENT OF AGING DAM Thousands of salmon die along the White River before they can spawn because they can’t pass the dams in their way By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

N

ative American elders talk about a time when they would walk from riverbank to riverbank on the backs of salmon swimming in the rivers. People still can on the White River – but the fish are dead. The Pinks and Coho can’t pass the generations-old dam, and the effort to catch and haul the fish to the spawning sites further up river can’t keep up with the flood of fish. So the salmon simply get tired of ramming the dam with their heads. They die and float down river without spawning. “They only have a fixed amount of energy,” Puyallup Tribal Resource Protection Manager Russ Ladley said. “They can’t get through and just give up.” The Muckleshoot and Puyallup tribes want to change that. They want the Corps of Engineers to speed up the replacement of White River dam near Buck-

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

DESERVING (Top) Considering the

solemn responsibility they bear for our country, it was touching to see marching soldiers smile from the appreciation shown to them. (Middle) Even the littlest ones watching the parade stepped out to give high-fives. (Bottom) The Royal Westminster Regiment from Canada traveled to Tacoma just for the occasion. By Matt Nagle mnagle@tacomaweekly.com

A genuine sense of community and patriotism filled the air in downtown Tacoma the evening of Aug. 24 for the Daffodil Festival’s first annual Celebrating Military Service Parade and X See PARADE / page A9

ley, which has languished for five Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions on the aging dam. Please e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. years in design and redesign. “They say they don’t have the money,” Ladley said. “We have to WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA figure out a way to get them the money.” Pinks, for example, begin their lives as eggs laid in the 100 miles of water upstream from the Mud Mountain dam. They grow to fingerlings and make their way to Commencement Bay and the By Kathleen Merryman Pacific Ocean, where they spend two years maturing to between Tacoma’s Dominthree and five pounds. They then icans were, for nearly reverse their trip and head back a century, all teachup the White River only to hit a ers. 100-year-old dam. Crews from the Now they are firm, but gentle, Corps of Engineers catch some of warriors for social justice, fighting them in the ladder and truck them to end human trafficking, workfive miles past the Buckley Mud ing for comprehensive immigraMountain dams and release them tion reform and supporting Cathback into the river so they can erine Place, a spiritual refuge for swim to their spawning grounds. women. But that effort isn’t enough. The Sisters of Saint Dominic Latest counts had some 250,000 of Tacoma are celebrating their salmon spawning in 2009 and just 125th year in the Northwest, and PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN 100,000 in 2011. Countless thouwith it the transformation of how IN SERVICE. Dominican Sisters, left to right, Ann sands die along the lower river they serve. Marie Lustig, Philomena McCarthy, Sharon Casey and banks after attempting to navigate Since last October 28, they have Esther P. Aherne celebrate 125 years of their order’s X See DAM / page A4 See SISTERS / page A10 X service in the Northwest.

House Flipping A4 UTILITY TAX: Proposition 1 would tax utility companies 2 percent, which would likely mean higher gas and electric bills for customers. PAGE A5

ų TACOMA DOMINICANS MARK QUASQUICENTENNIAL

Marcus Chambers A6

Pothole Pig ...............A3 City News.................A5

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Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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2nd and ‘I’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.” And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The 1947 Packard Clipper Deluxe Eight sedan at LeMay-America’s Car Museum Collection was donated by Club Auto member Christopher Bayley of Seattle. “To me, the Dutch Darrin-designed Clipper is the most beautiful ‘modern’ Packard,” Bayley said. “Some of us even think the Silver Cloud I Rolls Royce and comparable Bentley mimicked the look of these cars.” The design team led by Dutch Darrin was a driving force behind the styling of the Clipper between 1941 and 1947. Packard’s Clipper had at least as many pioneering features in an even more integrated package. One of those features was the introduction of the use of a single piece of seamless steel to form the roofline from windshield header to deck lid. Another feature is that the floor pan was comprised of only two separate

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

pieces welded longitudinally. Instead of the traditional three-side-window format, Clipper was innovative for its time because it used pivoting ventipanes built into the rear doors. Concealed door hinges, rotary door latches, a low-slung double-drop frame, broad areas of glass and the banishment of the running boards were also landmarks Clipper features.

Some 23,855 Deluxe Clipper Eights were produced in 1947. The car is powered by an in-line L head, eight-cylinder engine that produced 165 horsepower. The car is finished in two-tone grey, which was one of the few options available in 1947. 1947 Packard Clipper sells for around $12,000 to $18,000 in collectors’ markets.

SCHOOL IS STARTING SO 3,;»:/(=,(7(9(+, By Kathleen Merryman

Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

First Creek Middle School will greet the new school year with prizes, presents, performers, physicals and, of course, a parade. The East Side Families Back To School Parade and Festival will mark the last Friday of summer vacation with the promise of an exciting school year of hard study, good play, exploration and dental health. The parade of faculty, students, mascots, LeMay classic cars, the Lincoln High School Drum Line, the Electronettes Drill team and East Side local hero JD Davis as Rodney Raccoon, will take off from First Creek at 11 a.m. Aug. 30 and make its way through the neighborhood, leaving a trail of school supply prizes. It will arrive back at the school at 1801 E. 56th St. at 12:30, to kick off a festival that runs until 5 p.m. “Last year we did it on our own,” said First Creek Principal Brad Brown. “We wanted to try it out, and we thought ‘What a great way to start the year.’” This year, they enlisted partners including the

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

*,3,)9(;, First Creek Middle School will begin the new school year with

a parade and festival, plus stuffed backpacks. Staff working on the fun are, from left to right, Jason Ihde, dean of students; Kim Hildebrandt, assistant principal; Fahren Johnson, Eagle Center director; Jackie Balatbat, counselor; Brad Brown, principal, and Russell Phillips, counselor.

YMCA, MultiCare, Molina Health Care, Community Health Care’s Milgard Dental Clinic, Tacoma Housing Authority, MDC, Tacoma Community College, PROYECTO Mole and Greater Tacoma Community Foundation. All those partners will make for a more resourcefull, and free, carnival. There will, of course, be game booths, entertainment, a free barbecue and the Taste of First Creek Garden. Students will be able to get free sports physi-

cals and dental and vision screenings, and their families will find information on how to access health care resources. Because Tacomans love to buy school supplies and stuff backpacks for kids they don’t know, every students will get a backpack, and a readable treat from the book give-away. The five hours of main stage entertainment will begin with DJ Rocka Romie and include dancers, poets, music, a raffle and introductions to school resources, includ-

ing the Eagle Center. For the lineup, check www. facebook.com/FriendsoftheEastside. All of this is a clever plan aimed at getting families involved in their children’s school life, and connecting to the services they need to build a happy, healthy home, which builds happy, healthy communities. Fahren Johnson, YWCA director of First Creek’s Eagle Center explained. “We’re trying to create a community schools model,” she said. “Our superintendant, Carla Santorno, has put a mandate to be innovative in our engagement of parents and communities. Our school board has made partnerships and engagement with our families our priority this year.” Each year, the school picks a theme, she said, and this year’s will be “Families.” The school will invite families in to special events, it will welcome them as volunteers and engage them in programs from stopping bullying to budgeting, cooking healthy meals, learning English and earning a GED. The more they participate, Johnson said, the easier it will be for their children to soar as students. It all starts Friday, with a parade.

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City News BOEING AWARDS $75,000 TO TACOMA GOODWILL The Boeing Company has awarded Tacoma Goodwill $75,000 to support Operation: GoodJobs, assisting 145 transitioning veterans and their families this year with job training, job placement and career planning. “The intent of this investment is to support transitioning military members, veterans and their families to receive wrap-around services to aid in the transition to civilian employment and economic self-sufficiency,” said Gina Breukelman, Community Investor for Boeing’s Global Corporate Citizenship Division. Operation: GoodJobs provides a variety of services to empower military veterans with the tools they need to find employment, succeed in the workplace and permanently support their families. To date the Tacoma-based program has helped more than 300 transitioning veterans, including 50 servicewomen. Each participant in Operation: GoodJobs receives a complete career assessment and an individualized development plan that will encompass a range of family needs, from

basics like nutrition, shelter and child care, to specific job training identified in the assessment. Veterans are encouraged to include their spouses and other family members in the process, so Goodwill can holistically support their personal and financial goals. “This year 6,000 service members will transition out of the military through Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and 2,400 will settle mostly in Pierce, Thurston and King Counties,” said Robin Baker, Transition Services Manager forJBLM. “The drawdown of our military, along with emerging impacts to social services and the economy point to the need to support these veterans in gaining employment in the region.” Tacoma Goodwill and its 15-county area of operations stand on the front lines for this issue in Washington State.

THE FAIR HONORS SERVICEMEMBERS The Washington State Fair honors the men and women of the military community by hosting Military Monday both Mondays of the Fair, Sept. 9 and 16. As a token of gratitude for their service, each appreciation day offers free admission to all active, reserve and retired military and National Guard and their dependents, plus disabled veterans when each shows valid

military ID. The Washington State Fair runs Sept. 6-22, 2013. Military families and guests are invited to enjoy the latest additions to the grounds. This year the Fair offers the Luminasia exhibit, a modernized display of Chinese lanterns. Also debuting this year is Rainier Rush, a looping inversion roller coaster that is sure to leave guests exhilarated and lining up for more. Members of the military are welcome to also take advantage of the Comcast Dizzy Pass Ride Bracelet on both Military Appreciation Days. Purchasers receive unlimited Funtastic Rides (excluding Extreme Scream and Rainier Rush) and one free carnival game for only $27.50. Earlybirds can save by ordering it online at thefair.com before 9/5/13 for $22.50. The Comcast Dizzy Pass is offered Sept. 9-12 and Sept. 16-19. Boot-stomping music from Little Big Town will be heard from the Grandstand stage on Monday, Sept. 9 at 7:30 p.m. The following Monday, Sept. 16 at 7:30 p.m., guests should be prepared to rock with the country band, Alabama. Tickets for reserved seats are available at www.thefair.com or call (888) 559-FAIR (3247). FIND MORE AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

SHERIFF’S LOG

The Obligations of the Sheriff and the Obligations of Citizens By Paul Pastor Pierce County Sheriff

What should you expect from an elected Sheriff? And what should I, as your Sheriff, expect from you in the PAUL PASTOR community? Let’s start with my obligations to you. My obligations to you include lots of things, but three things in particular: attention to safety and security; attention to rights; and advocacy for resources and legal remedies so that I can provide safety and security while protecting rights. I cannot guarantee your safety but I can make every effort to do so. First of all, this means being effective. It means using available resources effectively. It also means using those resources efficiently. Effectiveness and efficiency. We do both of these things. Not perfectly. But, nonetheless we do them very well as reflected in our clearance rate for major violent crimes and the fact that we keep a safe, secure jail. In addition, the cost of our

services is very low: we deliver law enforcement services for less than half what most other agencies charge per year per citizen. Again, less than half the cost. I also have an obligation to uphold rights while I am working to keep things safe and secure. I swore an oath to uphold the Constitution as well as statue law. To provide safety and security while upholding rights is difficult and expensive. Safety and security come with costs. Upholding rights comes with costs. Both are important. I regard both as my obligation. Finally, I also have the obligation to be an advocate for you: to advocate for the means to provide for safety and security and rights. This means advocating for changes in law and resources so that I can deliver strong effective public safety services. Under our form of government, even as your elected Sheriff, I do not control the size of my budget. That is the job of other branches of government. It is my duty to clearly indicate what the Department needs to function effectively in order to successfully provide services to you. The duty of other branches

Tacoma Police detectives need your help in solving a homicide. At 2:35 a.m. on Sunday August 27th, 2006, an unidentified suspect shot and killed a woman in the 1900 block of the Fawcett Ave. alleyway in downtown Tacoma. Witness heard multiple gunshots and saw a woman lying in the street, deceased from the wounds. A 1980’s to 1990’s, medium blue- gray, smaller pickup truck was seen fleeing the area of the shooting. The victim, Velma Tirado, was a 45 year old Native American female, 5’5”, 150 lbs, with black

is to evaluate the requests and then prioritize them. I believe that I need to work in close co-operation with other branches of government, and to advocate for resources to provide needed public safety services. I owe you that advocacy. And, I intend to continue to advocate even when that message may be difficult for others to hear. Those are my most important obligations as your Sheriff. But you have obligations too. The concept of being a citizen, being a member of a community, is not just about advantages and entitlements and things you get from government. The concept of citizenship and community involves citizens being willing to shoulder their own set of obligations. Citizenship is a two way street. So, what are your most important obligations if you want to live in a safe and secure community? The first obligation is to be a law-abiding person. The second obligation is to be informed: to know how your government works and to be aware of the issues facing it. You should know how much we spend – or how little – on ser-

vices to you. You should know about our abilities and our and limitations and how well we perform. People want government to be accountable. And they should. But the first step toward government accountability is an informed citizenry. The third obligation for citizens is to be clear about their expectations. And then to be willing to step forward and get involved by volunteering, by pushing for positive solutions and by advocating for community safety. What is it that you expect from your Sheriff’s Department? What do you expect in terms of effective public safety services? And what is it that you are willing to do to support us in meeting those expectations? I have obligations. You have obligations. We both have obligations. Citizenship is a two way street. And public safety is not a spectator sport. We need to work together to meet our obligations. We need to reinforce one another if we are going to succeed. We need to assist each other if we want a safe community.

Police Blotter There have been a series of bank robberies in Tacoma and local jurisdictions since June 2013. The weekend of Aug. 17-18, Tacoma detectives arrested a person of interest in the nine bank robberies and four attempted bank robberies in Tacoma, University Place and Fircrest. The subject was arrested on an unrelated warrant. A search warrant was served in the Upper Tacoma area related to this case. The investigation regarding the bank robberies is ongoing. Two officers were dispatched to a residence on the 5000 block of McBride Street on Aug. 23 to respond to an emergency call about someone damaging property. A boy had thrown a phone at his 15-year-old girlfriend, hitting her in the face. He then wrestled her to the ground. The boy tried to flee the scene when he noticed police outside, but was caught and handcuffed. The victim became uncooperative once she realized her boyfriend was going to be booked into Remann Hall. Officers responded to a call of a homeless drug addict trying to break into an abandoned house on the 400 block of 72nd Street on Aug. 19. The man was trying to pry open a glass door when police arrived. The man had a loaded handgun and drug needles in his backpack when he was arrested. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

CORRECTION

In the Aug. 23 edition of Tacoma Weekly’s “The Things We Like,” it was incorrectly stated that Busch’s Drive-In was originally located on Sixth Avenue. It was in fact on South Tacoma Way. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for this error.

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hair. She was wearing a blue zippered sweatshirt, a white t-shirt, black pants and black shoes. Detectives fear Velma Tirado may have become the victim of foul play through her involvement with drugs and illegal activity.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

-307705. Tacoma Code officials have about 200 derelict houses on their roster of problem properties, with 23 targeted as possible sites for a program that

would have the city buy them, repair them and sell them to qualified buyers. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma is one of the top cities in the state for home foreclosures brought by the Great Recession of recent years, leaving more than 200 derelict homes with unkempt lawns, boarded up windows and unofficial dump sites dotting its neighborhoods. Faced with that landscape, the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community and Economic Development Department is championing a program that would have the city getting into the real estate business known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;house flipping.â&#x20AC;? The city would essentially buy the derelict properties, renovate them to meet current

WDam From page A1

past the White River dam, quite literally bashing their heads against the concrete structure in hopes of getting to calmer waters to lay their eggs. The spawning season runs through Octo-

building codes and sell them to qualified buyers. This Single-Family Blight Abatement Program would provide a way to address run-down, single-family homes around Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and generate income from the sale of each renovated home. That income could offset the longterm decline of federal funding for affordable housing, the city report stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a real economic development twist to all of this,â&#x20AC;? CEDD Director Richardo Noguera said during a City Council committee presentation last month. The program would boost employment opportunities by hiring local building contractors and

ber, with the big push coming in the next few weeks. The banks then will be littered with rotting salmon carcasses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need a gas mask, the dead fish smell is so bad,â&#x20AC;? Ladley said. The cost for replacing the dam, which was installed in 1910 and upgraded with a fish ladder

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real estate professionals such as realtors, appraisers and title companies to facilitate the purchase and quick sale of the properties some six months later, the report stated. The program would also return the properties to the tax rolls and remove troubled properties from the surrounding communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oftentimes, these properties sit idle for months without the benefit of occupants. This tends to create other negative effects such as deteriorating and poorly maintained structures, refuse dumping, graffiti and other unwanted criminal activities,â&#x20AC;? the staff report stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Targeting this standing inventory of homes will reduce

in 1941, hovers at about $80 million. It has been under review since it became part of the federal rehabilitation plan for salmon recovery in 2007. The current plans for replacing the dam donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include a fish ladder to let the salmon migrate upriver naturally. The Corps plans to continue the catch-andhaul method, although adding a fish ladder would just cost an additional $5 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The contingency money would cover that,â&#x20AC;? Muckleshoot Fish Commissioner Donnie Jerry said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make sense.â&#x20AC;? Not only is the catchand-haul method expensive and laborious, it also hurts the fish since the salmon beat themselves up before finding the collection pool on one side of the White River dam. About one in five fish gathered and trucked upriver still die before they can spawn,

the number of police, fire and code enforcement service calls thereby reducing further financial and staffing burdens on city resources.â&#x20AC;? A roster of 23 â&#x20AC;&#x153;flippableâ&#x20AC;? houses has been targeted in a pilot effort if the program moves forward. About $800,000 in federal affordable housing grant dollars from the Community Development Block Grant system and HOME Investment Partnership Program would be used to buy, rehab and sell these previously abandoned properties to eligible home buyers through partnerships with Habitat for Humanity, Tacoma Housing Authority and The Home Ownership Center.

Jerry said. The years of passing inaction to replace the dam has created a coalition of tribal and environmental groups to raise awareness of the dam. A documentary film is in the works as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually worse than I thought,â&#x20AC;? said American Riversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Washington State Conservation Director Michael Garrity, noting that salmon recovery efforts around the South Sound really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter much if the fish canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to the spawning grounds on the White River, which is the only river in the South Sound to have a spring Chinook run. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is actually a very small dam. You would think that it would be the first to be fixed. This minimizes everything we are doing. Every year we see this sort of tragedy. Clearly it needs to become a higher priority.â&#x20AC;?

These contractors have already been tasked with acquiring eligible properties in targeted locations throughout the city as part of their programs. The new abatement effort would have the city entering the house flipping business directly rather than just facilitating funding. City officials fear that expanding that effort would overwhelm those programs, however. Habitat for Humanity is rehabbing five houses with grant money this year, for example, and would partner with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts to connect Tacoma officials with qualified, low-income buyers, CEO Maureen Fife said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a whole pipeline of qualified buyers,â&#x20AC;? she said.

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

;9(.0*Fish butt their heads against the dam until they tire and die before spawning.

Not only are Chinook and Coho listed as federal endangered species; they are the lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood of tribal members. The fish are eaten and sold to support families, and they provide

dollars to local bait and tackle shops during the fishing season. And the salmon are, as they always have been, revered for those reasons.

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TACOMA QUIRK

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

City officials and residents can agree on one thing: Tacoma needs better roads. The debate now is how to pay for those pothole repairs and other fixes. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s option is Proposition 1, working its way through a set of public forums prior to a Nov. 5 vote on the plan that would add a 2 percent tax on gross earnings of utility companies within Tacoma. The expected $11 million a year gained from the tax would be spent on a roster of street, bridge and sidewalk repairs around the city. If approved, the proposition would be the first time in more than 40 years that Tacoma voters approved a tax to fund roads. A 2006 measure that would have raised $8 million a year in added property taxes for residential street maintenance failed by a slim margin. While the tax would directly affect electrical, gas and phone companies, it will likely simply be passed on to customers alongside the other taxes tacked onto utility bills customers pay every month. Utility companies already pass through a 6 percent tax, so the addition would bring the total tax to 8 percent. City documents state the tax would cost about $4.70 a month if the tax hike were passed along to them. But since Tacoma Power rates are already lower than rates found in surrounding cities, overall utility rates would still be about 30 percent lower than the regional average. With the added dollars for street repairs through the tax, the city proposes a five-year work plan that would have crews improve intersections around 46 schools, repair some 18,000 potholes and repave 510 blocks of neighborhood streets around the city. The money would also boost funding for 12 backlogged neighborhood Local Improvement District projects, where residents have already agreed to partner with the city and pay a significant portion of the cost, and provide matching

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

:7(9,: Totem Ocean Trailer Express marks its entrance with two blue surplus anchors.

Anchored in Tacoma, bound for Anchorage MAP COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

:;9,,;: Proposition 1 would tax utility companies 2 percent,

which would likely mean higher gas and electric bills for customers, as a way to fund road work around the city.

funds for utility projects so water and sewer improvements can coordinate for street improvements at the same time. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fix Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s streets fully, but it will help. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will at least make a dent,â&#x20AC;? interim Public Works Director Kurtis Kingsolver said. The money could be used to leverage state and federal grants, which only require a 15 percent match of local dollars, for example. Some grants even allow grant money from other sources to be used, so the city wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to pay any money for roadwork if the projects are cobbled together with other work. Cities similar to Tacoma around the nation spend about $26 per person on road and infrastructure improvements each year. Tacoma averages

just $7. While the issue of road repairs ranked high on citizen surveys, the plan has its opponents. The Stop Higher Utility Taxes group, led by Simpson Tacoma Kraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobbyist, filed an injunction in Pierce County Superior Court challenging the measure on the grounds that the ballotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wording doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t specifically articulate that the tax on earnings will essentially mean higher rates for customers. The added tax would reportedly cost Simpson $500,000 a year. But some residents also worry about how the added tax will cut into low-income residents, who are already struggling to make ends meet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is a lot for some people,â&#x20AC;? Eastside community activist Lynnette Scheidt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel really bad for those low-income people.â&#x20AC;?

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City officials are holding information sessions around the city at 6 p.m. on various Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings through Oct. 30. Sept. 4 Wheelock Library, 3722 N. 26th St. Council District 1 Sept. 11 Fern Hill Library, 765 S. 84th St. Council District 5 Sept. 16 Meeker Middle School, 4402 Nassau Ave. NE Council District 2 Sept. 23 Truman Middle School, 5801 N. 35th St. Council District 1 Oct. 2 Tacoma Main Library, 1102 Tacoma Avenue S. Council District 3 Oct. 9 Moore Library, 215 S. 56th St. Council District 4 Oct. 10 Jason Lee Middle School, 602 N. Sprague Ave. Council District 2 Oct. 14 Gray Middle School, 6229 S. Tyler St. Council District 5 Oct. 30 Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler St. Council District 3

By Kathleen Merryman Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE to its pals) runs its roll-on-roll-off (RO/RO to its pals) shipping trade between the ports of Tacoma and Anchorage. The containers on its two Orca Class ships sail stuffed with everything from sofas to steaks to shoes. Built to brave the ice and storms off Alaska, the M.V. Midnight Sun and M.V. North Star are diesel electric powered. When oil brought the boom to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 1975, Sun Company of Philadelphia established a RO/RO trade route between Seattle and Anchorage with one ship. The next year, company leaders awoke to their senses, moved to Tacoma and added another ship. Business was good, and they upgraded to a $10 million facility on the Blair Waterway in 1984. They added a third ship to their fleet the same year. All three of TOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steamships were Ponce class vessels that thrived on hard duty. One broke from its regular route to carry heavy farm equipment to Russia. Another served during Operation Enduring/Iraqi Freedom in 2003, carrying Marine Corps rolling stock to and from the war. That same year, TOTE took delivery of the North Star and Midnight Sun. The anchors at the company gates were spares for the three Ponce Class vessels. One would be lowered on the port side, the other starboard. The anchors weigh 24,000 pounds each and catch the sea bed when their flukes dig into the bottom. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your Tacoma Quirk question: What were the names of TOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three Ponce Class steamships? You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get extra goodies if you name them in the order they were acquired, but you will impress the heck out of us. Be the first to e-mail the correct answer to kathleen@ tacomaweekly, and you will win four fabulous tickets to a Tacoma Rainiers game at Cheney Stadium, a pack of sidewalk chalk and a map to Frost Park. Those baseball tickets include parking, pop, peanuts and beer.

In addition to the facts and information sessions, City officials are available to make presentations to interested community groups. To arrange a presentation, groups may contact the City Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office at (253) 591-5100.

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

CHAMBERS PART OF GOLD MEDAL RELAY AT PAN AM GAMES

Tacoma Weekly 2013 High School Football Preview

Foss grad also takes fourth in 400-meter dash

BELLARMINE PREP RELOADS Lincoln looks like 3A contender

Y

ou know that football season is close once the end of August rolls around. And with it, the optimism abounds once again for local high school squads as they get their season started on Sept. 6. We begin our two-part high school football preview with a look at the six Narrows League teams within Tacoma.

BELLARMINE PREP LIONS

Trips to the 4A semifinals, quarterfinals and finals the previous three seasons usually signal a rebuilding year on the horizon. Not so “on the hill,” as the two-time defending Narrows League 4A champion Lions reload for a run at more postseason success. “We have good players at several positions to replace some outstanding departed players,” said veteran head coach Tom Larsen, now in his 11th year. The biggest question will be who will fill the large shoes of the recently departed Sefo Liufau. Lou Millie will attempt to move over from his running back position to move the Lions’ offense. “He’s done a great job so far of picking up the offense,” said Larsen. To fill Millie’s spot in the backfield, juniors Jamal Ervin and Nate Goltermann will get the first shots. Despite the depletion of three outstanding seniors on the offensive and defensive lines going into this year, Zach Ota, Matthew Hallis and Elijah Klein stand ready to fill those shoes. Gig Harbor transfer Erik Glueck has Larsen excited, as he is a true middle linebacker with a ton of ability. By Steve Mullen

STADIUM TIGERS

The Tigers return a solid core of last year’s squad, and will look to emphasize playing quicker to take a step forward this season. “We’ve just really been preaching uptempo, playing fast,” said Dan Coen, the Tigers’ passing game coordinator. “If you’re going to make a mistake, let’s make that mistake at full speed.” Senior quarterback Tre Scott and senior running back Nick Loftin – who ran for nearly 1,000 yards last season – will pace the Tigers’ Wing-T attack. Also returning are senior running back Tarak Jedidi, junior running back Dylan Rychtarik and senior wide receiver Dallas Gaddy, while junior center Mohktar Mohamed should anchor the line for the Tigers. X See FOOTBALL / page A8

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

NEW POSITIONS. (Top) Bellarmine Prep’s Lou Millie will look to lead the Lions’

offense after switching from running back to quarterback. (Middle) Stadium’s Tarak Jedidi (32) is one of several returners on offense for the Tigers. (Bottom) Lincoln’s J’Maka Love will switch from quarterback to wide receiver, and should continue to be a big playmaker for the Abes.

PHOTO BY JOY KAMANI NATIONAL SCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS FOUNDATION

PATRIOTIC ATTIRE. Clad in his

USA uniform, Marcus Chambers preps for a race at the Pan Am Games in Medellin, Colombia. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

This summer has been anything but a vacation for Marcus Chambers. The recently graduated Foss athlete – fresh off wins in the 200- and 400meter dashes at the 3A state track meet last spring – has taken his talents to the national level in recent months. He capped it off by taking part in the United States’ gold medal 4X400-meter relay at the Pan Am Junior Championships on Aug. 23-25 in Medellin, Colombia. “It was something to always remember,” said Chambers, who will compete for the University of Oregon this year. “That’s what I wanted, to race against the best.” Chambers, who was one of just 41 male athletes from the United States in the competition, began by taking fourth place in the 400-meter dash, finishing in 46.75 seconds. “The outcome wasn’t what I wanted,” Chambers said. “Overall, I’m still blessed to be able to run in the finals and say I’m one of the best in the country. I can’t complain.” He responded in a big way on Aug. 25, teaming with Juan Paul Green of Illinois, Lamar Bruton of Delaware and Alexis Robinson of California to win the 4X400 in three minutes and 6.57 seconds – less than 0.4 seconds ahead of Brazil. “Since I didn’t race the way I wanted to run in the (400-meter dash), I wanted to get the gold in the (4X400),” said Chambers, who unofficially ran the opening leg of the relay in 45.8 seconds. “I wanted to get us off to a big lead.” Earlier this summer, Chambers won the 400-meter dash at the U.S. Junior Outdoor Track & Field Championships on June 21-23 in Des Moines, Iowa to punch his ticket to Colombia. He had then taken second in the 200 and sixth in the 400 at the USA Track and Field Junior Olympics on July 22-28 at North Carolina A&T University in Greensboro, N.C. Not only were the Pan Am Junior Championships his first trip outside the United States, Chambers was joined by his coach at the Seatown Express Track Club, former NFL player Eric Metcalf, who served as the jumps coach for the United States. So for Chambers, who will move down to Eugene in mid-September to start his college career, what’s next? “I’m taking some time off,” he said quickly. “I’m just going to be hanging out, eat a lot, have some fun. Chill. I’ve been training all summer. It’s one of my times to relax.”

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1(4,:7(?;65»:-09:;@,(9>0;/ 9(050,9:0:(4,469()3,65, By Karen Westeen Correspondent

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eft-hander James Paxton is one of the Mariners system’s outstanding prospects. Drafted in the fourth round of the 2010 draft, he spent 2011 with Single-A Clinton and Double-A Jackson then returned to Jackson for all of 2012. Paxton, 24, has been part of Tacoma’s starting rotation for the entire 2013 season. He is first on the team with two complete games, 135.2 innings pitched, 121 strikeouts and 56 walks, and second in wins with a 7-11 record after 25 starts. He was named the Pacific Coast League’s Pitcher of the Week from June 17-23. Paxton recently sat down with Tacoma Weekly’s baseball correspondent Karen Westeen to talk about his astounding career.

KW: You’re a British Columbia native. Do you still make your home there? JP: I visit, but I don’t spend a lot of time there anymore. I’ll go for about two weeks when the season ends, then spend some time with my girlfriend in Minneapolis. She goes to school at the University of Minnesota. KW: Where were you on draft day? JP: I was at home with my parents sitting on our deck, listening and watching on the computer, and we saw my name go by. My mom was screaming because she was happy that I was drafted by the Mariners so I’d be closer to home. KW: Were you expecting them to take you? JP: No. I really didn’t know what would happen at all so that was a great surprise. KW: Because you’d been playing with an independent league team you didn’t sign and

Tacoma weekly Sports Online [HJVTH^LLRS`JVTZWVY[Z

play right away with the Mariners’ team? JP: I didn’t have a deadline when I had to sign, so we negotiated for a while and then I ended up going to spring training the next year.

KW: In 2011 you split the season between Clinton and Jackson, and you were in Jackson all of last season. That year Baseball America named you as the pitcher who had the best curveball in the Mariners’ organization. That sounds pretty good. Did you know that? JP: I think I had been told that at some point but I hadn’t really looked into it. KW: I wonder how they measure that? How many curveballs can someone look at and say “Would you throw that one again? I think it looked better than the other one.” JP: Those scouts watch a lot of baseball games and they compare us all and have a pretty good idea of what’s going on. KW: When you were with Clinton you were named to the Midwest League All-Star Team, just before you got called up to Jackson in 2011? Did you get to play in the All-Star game? JP: I did. I pitched an inning. KW: And you also pitched one inning in the All-Star Futures Game in Phoenix that year. What was that like? JP: It was awesome. I had never pitched in front of that many people before. The electricity was just different. I was pretty pumped up. KW: You attended the University of Kentucky for three years. Why did you go to a school so far away from your home? JP: Out of high school that was my only offer from a Divi-

sion I school. I had played on the Junior National Team in Canada and I think that some of the coaches on that team knew the coach in Kentucky and hooked us up. The coach from Kentucky came out and watched me pitch and that was my best offer, so I figured why not go there? I knew that the SEC was a really good hitters’ league and I would be challenged as a pitcher, and I thought it would be a good place for me.

KW: You were a long way from home going there. Was that really hard for you? How old were you? JP: I was 17 my freshman year and it was really tough to uproot and go that far. KW: How large a family do you come from? JP: I have one younger brother, but my dad has a lot of brothers and sisters so I have a lot of aunts and uncles and cousins. There’s a lot of family there. KW: You finished three years of college. Do you think you might ever get your degree? JP: It’s definitely a possibility. My parents would like to hear me say yes. I don’t really have plans right now but I know at some point it’s something I’d like to do. KW: Did you play other sports or positions while you were in high school or college? JP: When I was real young I played first base and right field, but when I hit 13 it was strictly pitching for me. KW: No other sports? JP: I swam a little bit in life guard classes through high school and I played soccer when I was really young, but I didn’t like that because it was too much running. So I went to pitching.

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PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

+<9()3,:;(9;,9 As of Aug. 29, Rainiers starter James

Paxton led the team with 135.2 innings pitched and 121 strikeouts in 25 starts, and earned the PCL Pitcher of the Week from June 17-23.

KW: What are your earliest memories of playing baseball? JP: We have a park right behind our house and my dad would take me there and I’d throw wiffle balls to him. I can’t tell you how many hours we’d spend there. KW: How old were you then? JP: About 11 or 12. KW: Has your family gotten down here? JP: They get down as often

as they can. When I’m pitching on a weekend they can come down, but it’s tough with work to come during the week.

KW: How about your girlfriend? JP: She’s made it out a couple of times, and she’s actually coming out for five days at the end of the season. KW: Terry Clark came in about a month ago to replace Dwight Bernard as pitching X See RAINIERS / page A8

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WFootball

From page A6

like North Thurston and Timberline looming in the Narrows 3A, Kitna knows his work is cut out for his squad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can learn from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mistakes and execute, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be in good shape for the postseason.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen

Defensively, Scott should lead the secondary after earning firstteam honors as a defensive back last season, and Loftin is a versatile defender that will contribute at outside linebacker and safety. Senior linebacker Brandon Hamilton should provide a solid presence in the middle, and former defensive end Kevin Gross will bolster the linebacker corps as well. The key, according to head coach Jess Nelson, will be how the Tigers are able to handle the rigors of the physically demanding Narrows 4A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We may be undersized, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re quick and shifty,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to take advantage of how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re built overall.â&#x20AC;? By Jeremy Helling

FOSS FALCONS

The Falcons have doubled their numbers since the start of fall camp last year, as 55 players came out in the first few days this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have depth,â&#x20AC;? said secondyear head coach Pat Johnson of his squad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to tell the guys in the number-one huddle that if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do their job, someone else will step inâ&#x20AC;Ślast year I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that opportunity.â&#x20AC;? The depth has allowed the Falcons to introduce more of a prostyle offense, as Lakes transfer Isaiah Littlejohn looks to take hold of the quarterback position. John Moore is also in the mix at quarterback, and a stable of running backs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including seniors Eric Sugi and Malik Smith and junior Keyon Lowery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; will get extensive playing time. Slot receiver BaaCari Kiner is shifty, while 6-foot-4 receiver Chris Reynolds provides size and Michel Cockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shows playmaking ability outside as well. Sophomores Riley Potts and Maleik Lucious should continue to improve on the offensive line after playing extensively as freshmen. Leading the defensive effort is 6-foot-2, 290-pound senior lineman Patiole Pesefea â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one of two Falcons to bench press over 300 pounds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who will double as a bruising fullback on offense. Senior Felix Atoa should help the Falcons at defensive end, and Moore was Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; leading tackler last season as a linebacker. Senior cornerback Alonzo Jones is athletic and should head the Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; secondary. The Falconsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; schedule is highlighted by a trip to Juneau, Alaska

LINCOLN ABES

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a buzz in the air these days at Lincoln High School. Coming off of a successful first season and making the playoffs, head coach Jon Kitna is looking forward to more success for the black and gold. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We laid a great foundation last year and we are looking forward to bigger and better things in the future,â&#x20AC;? said the former 16-year veteran of the National Football League. Bigger and better things include all league offensive line candidates Ben King and Ben Puapuaga. The Abes also have speed to burn with wide receiver Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Maka Love, who won the Narrows 3A MVP award at quarterback last year. Filling the void at quarterback is a player that coach Kitna is very familiar with, son Jordan Kitna. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He loves the game and puts his work in on and off the field, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real competitor,â&#x20AC;? Jon Kitna said of his son. On the defensive side of the ball, Lincoln can turn to linebacker Rayshaun Miller and cornerback Tavon Murray to make plays and keep them in every game. With big and physical teams

WRainiers coach. Had you worked with him at all before he got here? JP: Yes, in spring training. This is his first year

From page A6

with the Mariners and we worked together for about two weeks.

KW: What was it like

PHOTO BY JEREMY HELLING

2,@73(@,9 Senior running back Eric Sugi (35) is one of several returning players that

should see time in the backfield for Foss this season.

to take on Juneau-Douglas High School on Sept. 14. By Jeremy Helling

WILSON RAMS

Entering his 27th season as head coach at Wilson, Don Clegg will field one of his youngest teams ever, with only four returning starters on both sides of the ball. Leading the way on offense will be junior quarterback Julius YatesBrown and senior wide receiver Brandon Montgomery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need a lot of (speed) with our lack of size on the offensive line,â&#x20AC;? said Clegg. On the defensive side Wilson will be led by senior cornerback Isaiah Simpson, who Clegg says â&#x20AC;&#x153;has a great chance to play at the Division I (college) level. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tremendous talent.â&#x20AC;? Another standout on defense for the Rams will be defensive end Billy Greer, who runs a 4.6-second 40-yard dash. With the lack of size on both sides of the ball and a tough Nar-

when he came in? Did he make any changes in your pitching? JP: Terry just kept on doing the same things I was working on with Dwight. He just added a few small things that he noticed about my mechanics.

rows 3A division, Wilson will have to do one thing exceptionally well: get to the corners before their opponents do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to get production from some of our younger players and hope that we can steal a win or two somewhere along the way,â&#x20AC;? said Clegg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can, then it will be a productive season.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen

MOUNT TAHOMA THUNDERBIRDS

The Thunderbirds will look to make strides in their second season in the Narrows 3A, and have a good group of returning starters to lead the way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been in the fire before, you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen a lot of things,â&#x20AC;? noted head coach Kevin Hanis of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relatively young squad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen a lot of it. We should see improvement on both sides of the ball.â&#x20AC;? Sophomores Adrian Allen and Shawn Tatum â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who doubles as a

KW: What do you consider to be your out-pitch? JP: I feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my fast ball and my curveball, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not afraid to throw any of my pitches to get an out. KW: Was this year the first time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ever been to Cheney Stadium? JP: Yes. KW: If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not pitching the first night of a series, do you watch the first games to see what the battersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tendencies are? JP: Yes. The pitchers sit in the stands charting pitches, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also watching

tight end â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are battling for the quarterback spot, and a number of players should see time at running back. Among that group is sophomore Keenan Wade-Herrera, a powerful runner who should also contribute at linebacker. Senior DayJun Turner, at 6-foot-3, provides the height and playmaking ability on the outside at wide receiver. Senior Nehemiah Barr should provide stability at offensive tackle, while sophomore Alex Ratke returns to man the center position after playing extensively last year. The linebacker corps should be solid, as Wade-Herrera will be joined by Isaiah Hudson and Sua Liufau â&#x20AC;&#x201C; cousin of graduated Bellarmine Prep quarterback Sefo Liufau. While the roster is short on numbers so far, Hanis noted that the lack of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;superstarâ&#x20AC;? athlete has led to a greater team concept, and hopes that will help his squad be more competitive this season. By Jeremy Helling

the hitters to see what their swings are like and what we can throw to them.

KW: How would you describe your pitching style? JP: I just go after hitters. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a power fastball pitcher. KW: What do you like to do when you have some time off? JP: I like to do yoga in the offseason. And I like to fish, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an opportunity very often. Whenever I can I like to go to my grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cabin to fish.

KW: Have you given any thought to what you might do when your playing days are through? JP: Not really. Right now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just focused on playing ball and getting to the big leagues. KW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the highlight of your career so far? JP: That would probably be pitching in the playoffs with Jackson last year. That was a lot of fun. It was my first time being in the playoffs in my professional career, and was really exciting getting all the way to the championship (even though we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win.)

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WParade

From page A1

Concert. The weather couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been nicer for this inaugural event that brought out men and women in uniform along with appreciative civilians there to say thank you to them and their families for serving and defending the United States of America. As parade contingents milled around near the starting point, a gigantic American flag flew above Pacific Avenue from the tops of two Tacoma Fire Department truck ladders. Parade watchers and soldiers in uniform gathered in Tollefson Plaza to enjoy the 56th Army Band from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and its subgroup the Sockeye Salmon Dixieland Band. The concert started out with the National Anthem, which brought a salute from all the service members present. Civilians put their hands over their hearts, and others removed their caps in respect. Even travelers staying in the Courtyard by Marriott Hotel overlooking the plaza were seen coming to their windows to take part in the moment. Various branches of the military had informational and recruiting booths along the sidewalk, and young people wandered among the crowd handing out little paper flags for spectators to wave. The McDonalds on Hilltop purchased 13,000 of these flags and eight employees were there to give them away. Also handing out the flags and mingling with the crowd were about 20 Daffodil Princesses and a group of young women from Puyallup interested in learning from the Princesses to perhaps become Daffodil royalty one day themselves. When the time arrived to start the parade, appreciative people lined Pacific Avenue, cheering for those who now serve, or have served, our country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each part about it went exactly as we wanted it to,â&#x20AC;? Daffodil Festival Executive Director Steve James said of the parade component of the celebration. He noted that, unlike other military parades, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was made up of past and present service members rather than the usual high school bands and such. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was unique in this fashion.â&#x20AC;? The joint forces Honor Guard led the parade with flags representing the Army, Marines, Coast Guard and other branches of the military. The paradeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Army V.I.P. Major Michael Bundt followed it. He serves as the Chief of Future Operations and is the Fire Support Officer in the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade at JBLM. Medal of Honor recipient Joe Madison Jackson, who is 90, was the paradeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grand Marshal. Jackson served as a career officer in the U.S. Air Force and was presented with the Medal of Honor by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1969. Among the approximately 65 contingents, individuals and organizations that marched were some of the City of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than 260 veterans on staff; veterans from the Puyallup Tribe of Indians; Patriot Guard Riders on motorcycles; Gold Star Mothers carrying banners with photos

of some of Washington Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fallen soldiers; U.S. Submarine Veterans with a model of the USS Bonefish, which our state adopted after it was lost in WWII; veterans and families from the National Alliance to End Veteran Suicide; 56 soldiers marching with state and territorial flags from the 16th Combat Aviation Brigade; Wild West Post 91 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Veterans of Foreign Wars in Tacoma; and Colonel Anthony J. Davit, the Deputy Joint Base Commander and Commander of the 627th Air Base Group, which marched behind him. Tactical vehicles and equipment rolled, by, including an M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System missile, a High Mobility MultiWheeled Vehicle (more commonly known as a HMMWV), and the 10-wheel drive Washington Army National Guard Palletized Load System that serves as the backbone of the 1161 Washington Army National Guard stationed in Ephrata. James gave credit to Mayor Marilyn Strickland for having the vision to bring back a military parade to Tacoma after more than 50 years. Strickland said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to honor these members of the community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The return of this parade to Tacoma is our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way of saying thank you to our military personnel, veterans and their families,â&#x20AC;? Strickland told the Tacoma Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event was a success for many reasons. It was fun, the weather was fantastic, people of all ages and backgrounds attended, and we had the opportunity to publicly honor our military community in downtown Tacoma,â&#x20AC;? she continued. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I spoke with many attendees who expressed their gratitude to the City of Tacoma and their desire to see this parade take place every year. I also want to thank Steve James, the Daffodil Festival and their volunteers for all their hard work to make this happen.â&#x20AC;? Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Simonson of the Washington National Guard helped lead a big participation of local National Guard men and women. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought it was fabulous,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had all afternoon to wander around the staging area and it was really, really cool getting to interact with all the other armed forces, some older veteransâ&#x20AC;Ś It was just rewarding to walk around and talk to everybody â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a surprise and unexpected benefit.â&#x20AC;? Simonson said he was impressed by the diversity within the parade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was current military equipment from almost every branch of service, vintage equipment representing WWII and Korea, the Buffalo Soldiers on horseback representing the frontier period of the armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then you had the Royal Westminster Regiment from Canadaâ&#x20AC;Ś I loved the rich fabric of the variety of all the participants.â&#x20AC;? James said he was most surprised by the reaction service members had at having this big event done just for them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the staging area there was a celebration, there was camaraderie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just so many components you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t explain. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compare it to anything.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

CELEBRATION. (Top) Parade watchers cheered and waved as the

Puyallup Tribal Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; float passed by, one of the best looking floats in the parade. (Middle) All along the parade route, people spontaneously gave hugs and handshakes to passing servicemembers. (Bottom) Parade watchers and soldiers in uniform gathered in Tollefson Plaza to enjoy the 56th Army Band from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, and its sub-group the Sockeye Salmon Dixieland Band.

Local Restaurants DINNER AND A SHOW

EYf\gdafKmk`aYf\Kl]Yc`gmk]kkcadd]\[`]^k cook up memorable meals By Kate Burrows kburrows@ tacomaweekly.com

After more than a year of sitting vacant, local restaurateurs Jenney and Doo Pyo Song have breathed new life into the space that formerly housed the beloved coffee shop Mandolin Cafe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; now re-opening its doors as a top-notch sushi and steakhouse. The Mandolin Sushi and Steakhouse boasts sleek, sophisticated interiors, complete with a sushi bar, as well as tables situated in front of iron grills where skilled chefs prepare Teppanyakistyle food right in front of your eyes. This live cooking show is sure to make for a memorable experience. The restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu features a full roster of Teppanyaki-style dishes with a variety of ingredients such as chicken, shrimp and scallops (owner Jenney Songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite dish), Ă&#x20AC;OHW PLJQRQ VWHDN DQG calamari, and more â&#x20AC;&#x201C; far too many to list. In addition, the menu also features a variety of classic and exotic sushi rolls, as well as sashimi and Teriyaki entrees. The restaurant has only been open since early August and for a limited time, visitors

can take advantage of a special introductory price of 30 percent off the entire menu, while the restaurant continues to pick up speed. The husband-and-wife team also own and operate I Sushi Teriyaki in DuPont and are looking forward to getting to know the community in Tacoma. Jenney Song hopes SHRSOHĂ&#x20AC;QG0DQGROLQ6XVKL and Steakhouse as a place to relax, unwind and enjoy

some delicious food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people come here after a day of working hard, so I want them to enjoy the food and feel happy when they leave,â&#x20AC;? she said. Mandolin Sushi and Steakhouse, located at 3923 S. 12th St., is open Monday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for lunch, and 4-10 p.m. for dinner; and Sunday from 4-10 p.m. Info: (253) 3014969.

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WSisters returned to the schools where they taught and reunited with students, many of whom last saw them in black and white habits. They dress in sweaters and slacks now, wear sensible shoes and pretty jewelry, drive their own cars and live in shared homes. If there is a public statement on human rights and dignity to be made, they are in the crowd, holding signs, encouraging us to summon the truest elements of our faith and conscience to guide our actions. But, they make it clear, their community is aging. The 54 Tacoma Dominican sisters have a median age of 78, so there is a tinge of urgency to their 125th year fundraiser. They hope to raise $250,000 during the year and at their supper and auction Sept. 21, at the Marymount Event Center. The money will help keep them secure as they grow older, and it will support their work in the community. “Although we are small and aging, this has not stopped us from continuing our mission,” the sisters’ leadership team wrote in last winter’s edition of “Seekers of Truth,” their twiceyearly publication. “Sisters and Associates are engaged in working against Human Trafficking, working for Immigration Reform, tutoring in literacy programs, and working with the homeless. Ministries such as Catherine Place and Marymount Manor continue to have sisters and associates connected by serving on boards or volunteering in various capacities.” It’s that spirit and interpretation of God’s work that brought them and the 20 other communities of the Dominican Sisters Conference in the United States under investigation during Benedict XVI’s papacy. It is that same spirit that has earned the respect and affection of Tacomans. The Dominicans date back to the founding of Holy Cross Convent in Regensburg, Germany in 1233. In 1853, four sisters were sent to the United States to teach, and in 1888 three sisters boarded a train bound for Portland, where they thought they were to teach the children of German immigrants. Their plans were changed mid-trip, and

From page A1

they and the piano they brought with them were set off the train in Pomeroy. It was with relief bordering on joy that they transferred to Tacoma, where they founded St. Patrick School in 1893. “We still have three sisters who periodically work at St. Patrick’s, so that’s an unbroken connection,” said Sister Philomena McCarthy, O.P. “From 1888 to 1960, we staffed 29 schools in Washington and California.” One of them was Marymount Military Academy for boys, founded in 1922, with a Motherhouse and novitiate, on 90 acres in Spanaway. Like Sisters Esther Aherne, O.P, Ann Marie Lustig, O.P. and Sharon Casey, O.P., when she joined the order, Sister Philomena anticipated a lifetime of teaching, living in a dedicated residence, going wherever she was assigned, and wearing a habit. Everything in the order was of a pattern, then, and they were expected to fit that pattern. “Pope John XXIII opened a few windows and gave us a breath of fresh air,” Sister Philomena said. In 1963 they began an organized discussion of their role, said Sister Sharon. In 1967, they switched away from habits. By 1970, they had broadened their options beyond teaching to parish ministry, counseling and

caring for the elderly and the poor. “A couple of people went to South America, Nicaragua,” said Sister Ann Marie. “There were a few college professors.” “The decade of the ‘80s was the land use study,” said Sister Sharon. They had closed the military academy at Marymount in 1976, and discussed its possible uses. In 1988, their centennial year, they built Marymount Manor, 40 units of housing for low-income seniors. In 1990, they sold the rest of the property to Harold LeMay. “One of the things that attracted us to him was that he had a real sense of preserving history,” said Sister Sharon, a mistress of understatement. They set up Tacoma Dominican Center at 935 Fawcett Avenue S., and focused their considerable energies on urban problems. It amuses them that the building was once a gun shop, and that they have a firing range walled off in the basement. “The 1990s was really the beginning of our formal collaborations,” Sister Sharon said. They partnered with Mercy Housing, Sound Alliance, Intercommunity Peace and Justice, Catholic Community Services, Tacoma Police Department, L’Arche and others. They collaborate on

building low-income housing, providing services for the homeless and the addicted. They tutor and teach. They work against human trafficking and for comprehensive immigration reform, educating the public in forums and standing in protest. They helped found and still support Catherine Place, a spiritual retreat for women. “What’s needed sometimes are smaller actions to create greater awareness,” said Sister Ann Marie. What’s needed, too, are committed partners. The Tacoma Dominicans have, with deliberation and intention, changed to meet the needs of their home. They know their work, and the need for that work, will outlive them. Collaborations are the best insurance that the work will live on. And a celebration of how they have changed and all they have done, is due in their 125th year of serving Tacoma.

Mission Statement of the Tacoma Dominican Community

“Inspired by the spirit of Dominic and our foundresses, Sisters Thomasina, de Chantal and Aloysia. The Tacoma Dominicans respond to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. “Our Dominican tradition of contemplation impels us to collaborate in networks of spiritual, educational and political commitment to create a just society that addresses the basic human needs and ends the violence that erodes our planet.”

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City Life

Bumbershoot

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 30, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Northwest ’s own Spud Goodman The

o returnsvt s e a w r i a the

By Sean Contris Contributing Writer

T

o date, few people in the entertainment industry are anything like Spud Goodman. The host of the retired late night “The Spud Goodman Show,” Goodman was somewhat of an unusual figure. He was the polar opposite of the snarky Jay Leno, or the smiling David Letterman. Goodman had his own brand of off-the-rails, bizzaro humor that made his show one worth remembering. Joined by an oddball cast of characters, “The Spud Goodman Show” acted as more of a humorous sketch comedy program rather than a late night talk show. It ran for several years on various channels before calling it quits in the late 90s. Now, Goodman has taken his signature spatula back up, and is once again taking sips from his handy bottle of Pepto Bismol as he begins work on rebuilding his identity.

Tacoma Weekly caught up with Spud in some basement far away for a quick interview and, more importantly, to ask him where he’s been. Tacoma Weekly: We’re here with Spud Goodman, and Spud’s been MIA for a number of years now, so I gotta ask…where you been, Spud? Spud Goodman: Well you know, I was in retirement. Kind of a clichéd term, but I decided to hang up my spatula 10 years ago. Gosh, has it really been 10 years? My producer, Lori Madson, was on my butt and wanted me to come back and do a project or two and she talked me into it and here I am now. TW: Where have your friends been? Joe? Chick? Your parents? SG: Accordion Joe is in Spokane now. He’s had some health issues, but he’s doing okay. He calls in on our new radio show from time to time. My mom is

doing well, my father has passed away – he passed away about five years ago. My sister is still up in Seattle, my uncle’s up in Gig Harbor. TW: We are in a basement now, and you said yourself that you got your start working in a basement. In fact, you still do a lot of your work out of basements, so is it somewhat nostalgic, or do you have stories from that time? SG: Well, we did start in February in 1985 in Tacoma in the basement of an apartment building. Yeah, about 16th and Union? We started there but the showers running and the toilets flushing caused innumerable delays in taping, so we ended up moving to the Eagles abandoned building. We were in that basement for a couple of years in Tacoma before we went off the air and moved our operations up to Seattle. TW: So “The Spud Goodman Show” has always been a bit of an oddball on the air. But in your opinion, what was the thing that truly set you apart from others? What was your most defining characteristic? SG: The show was actually conceived as kind of an antidote to all the happy talk shows of that era. Frankly, it was launched with a

u See GOODMAN/ page B4 Spud Goodman sat and had a chat with Tacoma Weekly contributing writer Sean Contris, which you can see at www.youtube.com/watch?v =LBhPs1XsJhs&feature=youtube_ gdata_player. Listen to Goodman live every Thursday from 7-8 p.m. at www.nwcz.com.

GOODMAN

PHOTO BY SETH WHEELER

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE TAYLORGATE

When superstar Taylor Swift brings her “Red” tour to town on Aug. 31, the official tailgate – or make that TAYLORgate – party will be happening just a few steps away from the Tacoma Dome at Ammar’s Mediterranean Grill, 409 E. 26th St. Running from noon to 7 p.m. and for all ages, there will be a beer garden, games, raffles, prizes, karaoke and live music by The Mural Project, Courtney Strickland and Anthony Disparte. $5 entry fee goes to the American Red Cross. Visit www. taylorgate.com.

TWO THE FAIR The Washington State Fair is one of the biggest fairs in the world, and the largest in the Pacific Northwest. It started in 1900 in Puyallup, and welcomes over one million guests to the single largest

attended event in the state. Star-studded entertainment, the PRCA Rodeo, rides, exhibits, food, flowers and animals are mainstays of the 17-day event that runs from Sept. 6-22. Visit www.thefair.com or text “FAIR” to 87767.

THREE

SHAKESPEARE AT TLT Tacoma Little Theatre begins its 95th season with a special encore presentation of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)

[revised].” This fast-paced comedy, starring Luke Amundson, Coleman Hagerman and Blake York, is a gag-a-second delight that deconstructs all 37 of the Bard’s plays – plus the sonnets – into a single two-hour whirlwind. WARNING: There are strobe effects in this production. Runs Sept. 6-22, 2013. Friday and Saturday showings are at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 online at www.tacomalittletheatre.com or (253) 272-2281.

FOUR OLD TOWN CONCERT Come4 and enjoy a concert in Old Town Park to celebrate the park’s newly constructed stage, Sept. 10 at 5:30 p.m. Bring chairs and blankets to sit on, and neighboring eateries offer beverages and light meals that can be enjoyed on the lawn. This event features the fabulous Thione Diop and the Yeke Yeke West African drum ensemble.

FIVE JAZZ LIVE Jazz LIVE at Marine View kicks off its fall season Sept. 8 with “Jazzaganza,” an anthology of jazz, with a look at how jazz has changed and grown from its humble beginnings. Concert starts at 5 p.m. featuring Buckshot Jazz – Buck Chandler on percussion, Eugene Bien on keyboards and Cliff Colon on saxophone – and gospel, R & B and jazz vocalist Josephine Howell. In addition, modern dance instructor Monica McEthyBallet will add a theatrical element to the evening. Admission is free. Marine View Church, 8469 Eastside Dr. N.E. Phone (253) 2299206 or visit www.marineviewpc.org.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 30, 2013

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT TRIBAL IMPACT

SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

Over the years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has transformed itself and its role in the community. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s determined protection of its natural resources, its pivotal role in development of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port area, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major donations to other governments and to charitable organizations, the new-concept Tahoma Market gas station and convenience store, and the development and expansion of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emerald Queen Casinos are examples of the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic progress. Through its two Emerald Queen Casino locations, Administration, Health Authority, Housing Authority, economic development corporation and school, the Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County with a payroll of more than 3,500 people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and total spending in 2011 of nearly $430 million. This spending supports the community by paying good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and by purchasing goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors and construction companies. Assistance provided to the broader Native American community and the Puyallup Tribal membership also has a far-reaching impact in the community as most of these dollars are in turn spent in the local economy. The Puyallup Tribe is continuously living up to its name, which means, â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous and welcoming behavior to all people.â&#x20AC;? As such, the Tribe is a key sponsor of countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tight economy. Despite economic uncertainties across the country, the South Sound is doing well, and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians plays a key role in keeping that a reality. From funding education, jobs, healthcare, city improvement projects, crime prevention and environmental efforts, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous peopleâ&#x20AC;? is as strong today as it ever was.

Support For Our Native Community With more than 4,400 Puyallup tribal members locally and across the country, and an Indian community of 22,000 in the tricounty area, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians takes great pride in continuing its ancestral ways by caring for all of its membership. The Tribe stays united and strong by ensuring every member has the opportunity for good health, a safe and clean home, educational advancement and financial security. When it comes to social services for its membership, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for all governments. During 2012, the Tribe spent more than $100 million on social service programs such as funeral assistance, energy and crisis assistance, small business start-up grants, assistance to members who are veterans, and per capita distributions. The majority of these funds are subsequently spent in the local economy. Caring for its elders is a top priority for the Tribe, with $3.6 million spent last year on elder care services. A major way the Puyallups treasure their elders is through the Elders Center House of Respect. The beautifully constructed center opened in 2009 to offer a variety of health and recreational options for Puyallup elders over 45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a dining hall, stateof-the-art kitchen, relaxation areas, workout facility, spa, massage room, activity rooms for classes such as quilting and crafting, and a tranquil outdoor â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spirit Garden.â&#x20AC;? Youth are a top priority for the Tribe as well. The Tribe works in many ways to proactively instill positive values in its youth as early as possible, and a focal point of this effort is the Puyallup Tribal Community Center. During the past year, the Center underwent a $7 million renovation. This nearly completed facility is approximately 34,000 square feet, including a 15,000-square-foot gymnasium and other areas for youth activities. The facility will also accommodate gatherings for meetings, weddings, funerals, and cultural activities. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chief Leschi School offers a Native-focused academic environment for children in pre-kindergarten through high school. In 2011, approximately 770 students were enrolled in grades K-12 and 130 in preschool classes. The school was founded in 1976 with the mission to â&#x20AC;&#x153;educate students in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect,â&#x20AC;? to promote a lifelong love of learning, and to

inspire in them a commitment to being valuable, contributing citizens of both their tribal and civic communities. The Tribe recently invested more than $8 million for athletic fields accommodating football, soccer, track and field events, with synthetic grass on the infield and natural grass on the outfield. The Puyallup Tribe also ensures that higher education funding is available for its membership. In 2011, the Tribe assisted more than 285 Tribal members with tuition assistance, books, and tutoringâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;many of these members attended local colleges and universities. Educational incentives are also available for members with good grades and attendance. Everyone deserves a comfortable home to live in, and the Puyallup Tribe and the Puyallup Nation Housing Authority strive to provide decent, safe and sanitary housing for qualified low-income tribal members and other Indians. During 2011, the Housing Authority spent more than $7 million on providing housing assistance to 150 households, which included nearly $4 million in construction costs for the Northeast Gym/Commons building, which is part of the recently completed Phase 1 Longhouse project in Northeast Tacoma. This Longhouse project provided 10 new townhomes built in an energy efficient manner (LEED Platinum status) and culturally relevant to the community. This visionary project has received national and international recognition. Phase II will be complete in May, to house another 10 families. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grandview Early Learning Center provides quality and culturally appropriate early childhood care for Native children in the community and during 2011 served more than 100 families and 200 children. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Authority opened in 1974 and today offers a wide variety of services annually to a patient population of more than 9,000 from more than 200 tribes. Services provided include medical, dental, pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, mental health and counseling, tobacco cessation programs, problem gambling programs, and alcohol and drug treatment programs, In a time of reduced federal, state, and local government spending, the Puyallup Tribe has created a self-sustaining model for its government, its people and the future of the larger community throughout the reservation and beyond.

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For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, August 30, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

STEP OFF THE BEATEN PATH AT BUMBERSHOOT THIS WEEKEND Here are seven buzz-worthy acts worth adding to your festival plans By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

B

umbershoot, the granddaddy of Northwest music festivals, will invade Seattle Center this Labor Day weekend with its usual army of chart-topping rockers, hipsterapproved comedians and, hopefully, that lady who wears a fairy costume and breakdances near the International Fountain ever year.

4. DEERHUNTER (9 P.M. MONDAY, FOUNTAIN LAWN STAGE): Some describe this Georgia indie band’s music as “ambient punk,” a sound that’s often skewed toward the hazy, pastoral end of the spectrum. But their live shows can get pretty bonkers, a la their opening slot for Spoon at the Paramount Theatre in 2010, which featured all sorts of weird shenanigans before peaking with an awesomely unhinged cover of the Stooge’s “I Wanna Be Your Dog.”

By now, just about anyone who plans on going already knows about Death Cab for Cutie, Kendrick Lamar, Heart and all the other big shots playing the main stage at Memorial Stadium. But a big part of the fun at Bumbershoot is digging a little deeper, discovering awesome, new bands and cult acts you might not have thought about seeing otherwise. Along those lines, here are seven buzz-worthy acts worth adding to your festival plans this weekend.

1. VICCI MARTINEZ (10 P.M. SUNDAY, STARBUCKS STAGE): PHOTO BY ROBERT SEMMER

Okay, this one is a no-brainer if you’ve watched this Tacomagirl-done-good blossom into a budding rock star over the last decade. Already a veteran of several Bumbershoots, Martinez is sure to draw a more frenzied crowd than usual as she rides high on her major label debut, “Vicci,” and her CeeLo duet, “Come Along.”

5. KINKY (4:30 P.M. MONDAY, TUNEIN STAGE):

FILE PHOTO

2. GARY NUMAN (8 P.M. SATURDAY, TUNEIN STAGE):

If you grew up in the Reagan era you should be well acquainted with this Brit pop star’s hooky ode to alienation, “Cars.” What gets less mention – in the States, at least – is the imprint he left on a generation of synth-rockers and electronic musicians that followed, the likes of Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson and Basement Jaxx. Newbies, do yourselves a favor and start with his psychotropic 1979 masterpiece, “The Pleasure Principle.” Then work backward to his punkier material with Tubeway Army. You’re welcome.

PHOTO COURTESY ONE REEL

This funky dance-rock outfit hails from Monterrey, Mexico; and while it’s no household name north of the border, you may have heard “Mas,” “Presidente” and other cult hits that have shown up in a

variety of U.S. TV shows, car ads and video games. But Sounders fans, try not to hold it against them that they wrote “We Are the Galaxy,” the L.A. Galaxy’s theme song.

6. MACEO PARKER (9:45 P.M. SATURDAY, STARBUCKS STAGE):

PHOTO COURTESY ONE REEL

3. REGGIE WATTS (2:45 P.M. MONDAY, SEATTLE CENTER PLAYHOUSE): PHOTO COURTESY ONE REEL

Nobody at Bumbershoot will have better funk credentials than this sax man, who’s played with the likes of James Brown, Parliament-Funkadelic and Prince. Expect him to put his spin on the hits of Brown, Stevie Wonder and more, as captured in last year’s “Soul Classics” album.

7. ZOMBIES:

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST PHOTO COURTESY ONE REEL

Watts was the charismatic frontman of Seattle rock n’ soul outfit Maktub a decade ago. These days, he’s known for his epic afro, his absurd take on talk show music directors, on IFC’s “Comedy Bang Bang,” and for having one of the most original, witty musical comedy acts in America. Armed with a sampler, effects box and mind-blowing beat-boxing skills, Watts creates hilarious post-modern jams right on the spot. He’ll be joined by “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” writer Mike Drucker and Joe Mande (“Parks and Recreation,” “Kroll Show.”)

Yeah, yeah, we know. The Zombie Apocalypse is coming, as foretold by “28 Days Later,” “World War Z” and a gang of other horror flicks. But leave your nailstudded bat and blunderbuss at home, as these will get you quickly arrested. The zombies in question are actually living, breathing performers who were consider-

ate enough to schedule their attacks so you can see them coming. The undead masses will swarm at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. daily. Their 4:30 p.m. “Thriller” flash mobs are sure to be a hoot. Plus, we’re guessing they’ll do something kooky around the time ‘60s pop act the Zombies takes the Starbucks Stage, at 8:15 p.m. on Sunday.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 30, 2013

P Goodman “we don’t really care” – you know, it was a like it/don’t like it. We didn’t have any money invested in the program so there were no risks! So we threw it out there, if people liked it fine, if they didn’t fine. It’s not really the IDEAL way to start a show. Just in case you’re listening out there kids, don’t follow in my footsteps. TW: So, you’ve been with the local Tacoma radio station NWCZ for how long now? SG: Just started actually. Did the third show last night. I just have the best to say about the people at NWCZ. They’re amazing people. They’ve pulled off this operation with no financial help from the community and they made it a success. You know, it’s just really amazing. So it’s pretty cool to have been asked to be involved. TW: Can you give us a bit of a story on how you got involved in the radio station? SG: Well, part of the reason I came out of retirement is to get involved in the local music scene. It’s always been a major part of the program. I’ve always built my show around my musical guests, so I wanted to get involved with something with connections to the local music scene. So we decided to do a video podcast. I think today they released our second one, which features the Seattle band Seeing Blind. Now, we’re on to the next video podcast, hope to get that out in the middle of September. But the idea was to kind of team it up with a companion project, which is why we decided to go with radio and we were graciously invited by NWCZ host Darrell Fortune to be a part. Even if it doesn’t work out, it’s fun you know. TW: Since you are getting more and more involved with the local music scene, how do you feel about music from back when the show was at its peak to now? What do you think we can expect from the future? SG: Since we do date way back, prior to the explosion of the so-called Seattle scene, it was something to see as a spectator, you know seeing a band that hasn’t even played a gig being wined and dined, and asked to sign deals. Those days are over. You just don’t see that now… The record industry has changed and those days are never going to come back and it’s probably for the best. TW: You’ve been talking a lot about the Seattle scene. Following that wave

From page B1

of hype, it really gave Seattle its own identity and affected Washington’s image overall. How do you think the view of Washington has changed around the world? SG: With music and pop culture everything is circular. Before Seattle it was Athens, Georgia and I can go on and on and on and there’s the “Hot Spot,” but you know, Seattle had some legs. To this day it still does. It’s a big part of tourism for the city of Seattle. The tourist trade supports it and I think that it isn’t the sports teams or anything like that that bring people to Seattle – it’s going to be that scene, that history, the essence of the city. TW: One of the most important aspects of the show was always the musical guests. As you get bigger, who are you looking forward to having? And as the show grows in popularity, do you want to get bigger acts on? SG: What I would prefer to do and my plan is to book upcoming bands. Yeah, back when I was on the show we did national touring bands but they don’t really need a whole lot of help selling their products. We’re kind of irrelevant to them but I think we can be a bit of help to the bands that are working their ways up. And that’s it, that’s all we want to book, upcoming Northwest bands. TW: You’ve been writing a lot recently. Can you tell us what you’ve been working on? SG: As far as writing goes, I am probably just focusing on the blog. I’m probably not going to work on plays or anything. That was for fun, and we didn’t make a whole lot of money off it. We did some stuff for the fringe festival (and) we drew a small audience, but nope I’m going to focus on the radio show and the podcast and hopefully find an audience to really help those upcoming bands that we try to support with the show. Learn everything there is to know about Spud Goodman, his podcasts, blog and more at www. spudgoodman.com. Sean Contris is a newly enrolled student at Tacoma Community College. Oftentimes he comes too close to embodying the classical, and often times stereotypical, persona of a young male writer. Sean enjoys listening to a wide range of music and locking himself in his room to read sad Russian novels.

65

HD channels

Black Sabbath remain the masters of metal

PHOTOS BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

METAL GODFATHERS. Black Sabbath, featuring Geezer Butler (top left) and Ozzy Osbourne, rocked the Gorge with “War Pigs,” “N.I.B.” and other classic cuts. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

F

ans had to wonder what kind of Black Sabbath would show up Saturday night at Grant County’s Gorge Amphitheatre. The ways that front man Ozzy Osbourne has beat himself up over the years have been well-documented, and his voice didn’t last very long during the

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band’s last local stop with Ozzfest in 2005. More recently, guitarist Tony Iommi has been worse for wear as he’s battled life-threatening lymphoma. And who knows how Bill Ward is? Sabbath’s original drummer has been A.W.O.L. since 2011, a casualty of an ongoing contract dispute. But any apprehension about the battle-scarred Sabbath could still deliver the goods vanished during the band’s bombastic opening salvo, “War Pigs.” Ozzy may not have the vocal range he once possessed during the band’s ‘70s heyday, but he hit his marks when it counted, and he seemed to be having the time of his life as he shuffled around stage with a huge, maniacal grin.

Bassist Geezer Butler was similarly on point, shining brightest with his funky, wah-wah riffing on “N.I.B.” And touring drummer Tommy Clufetos proved himself a worthy fill-in during an epic solo that followed “Rat Salad.” But the real true MVP was guitar hero Tony Iommi. His prosthetically enhanced digits danced across the fretboard as he delivered some of the heaviest riffs in rock history. “Iron Man,” indeed. The set contained most of the iconic cuts fans expected, a couple of disappointing omissions aside. (What? No “Sweat Leaf ”?) Deep album cut “Under the Sun/Every Day Comes and Goes,” from 1972’s “Black Sabbath, vol. 4,” was a welcome surprise. And “Age of

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Reason,” “God Is Dead?” and the apocalyptic “End of the Beginning” fit seamlessly into the mix. That snakebitten set Sabbath delivered at White River is a fading memory. Now here’s hoping they make it back on the road again, maybe with Bill Ward next time. Set list: War Pigs; Into the Void; Under the Sun/ Every Day Comes and Goes; Snowblind; Age of Reason; Black Sabbath; Behind the Wall of Sleep; N.I.B.; End of the Beginning; Fairies Wear Boots; Rat Salad; Tommy Clufetos drum solo; Iron Man; God Is Dead?; Dirty Women; Children of the Grave; Paranoid Check out more images on our multi-media page www.tacomaweekly. com/beyondwords.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

MUSIC ABOUNDS IN TACOMA ALL LABOR DAY WEEKEND

Friday, August 30, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: COUNTRY HIT MAKER TAYLOR SWIFT WILL TAKE OVER THE TACOMA DOME ON AUG. 31. ED SHEERAN WILL OPEN AT 7 P.M. TICKETS ARE $31.50 TO $86.50 AND AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER, WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BAND

ECLECTIC BLEND. Enumclaw’s Palmer Junction will be belting out their blend of blues, rock, funk and jazz Saturday at the Spar Tavern.

FRIDAY, AUG. 30

SUNDAY, SEPT. 1

NEW FRONTIER: Bath Party, Night Beats (garage rock) 9 p.m., $5

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (blues) 9 p.m., NC ENCORE: Ladies night (hip-hop, top 40 DJs) 10 p.m., $1 women, $7 men GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (top 40) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Marc Yaffee (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Too Slim & the Taildraggers (blues) 8 p.m., $12 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman (blues) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Space Band (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Slade Ham (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Decimate the Ruins, Hot Death, Thou Shalt Kill (metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, AUG. 31 SPAR: Palmer Junction (blues) 8 p.m., NC PHOTO BY JAKE CLIFFORD

HOT SHOW. Seattle’s Night Beats will preview songs from their forthcoming new album, “Sonic Bloom,” this weekend at the New Frontier Lounge. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

I

t’s Labor Day weekend, a time when local music fans leave town, en masse, and head north for Bumbershoot festival and east to catch Dave Matthews Band at the Gorge. Still, there are plenty of promising options for those of you who don’t want to brave those festival crowds or spend a fortune on gas. Here’s one way you can spend your four-day weekend without leaving town. CLOSED CIRCUIT (96 MIN, R) Fri 8/30: 2:00, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05 Sat 8/31-Mon 9/2: 11:50am, 2:00, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05 Tue 9/3-Thu 9/5: 2:00, 4:25, 6:45, 9:05 BLUE JASMINE (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/30: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Sat 8/31-Mon 9/2: 11:40am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Tue 9/3-Thu 9/5: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 THE SPECTACULAR NOW (95 MIN, R) Fri 8/30: 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 Sat 8/31-Mon 9/2: 12:05, 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 Tue 9/3: 9:15 Wed 9/4: 2:20, 9:15 Thu 9/5: 2:20 LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/30: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 8/31-Mon 9/2: 12:00, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Tue 9/3-Thu 9/5: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 THE WAY, WAY BACK (113 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/30-Thu 9/5: 4:40 THE ATTACK (102 MIN, R) Tue 9/3: 2:15, 7:05 THE LIGHT IN HER EYES (87 MIN, NR) Wed 9/4: 7:00 TOWN OF RUNNERS (80 MIN, NR) Thu 9/5: 7:30

Night Beats (Friday, The New Frontier Lounge) This Seattle trio – singer-guitarist Danny Lee Blackwell, bassist Tarek Wegner and drummer James Traeger – has been building a hefty buzz of late with its reverb-drenched psychedelic garage. The band’s sophomore album, “Sonic Bloom,” was recorded here in Tacoma and is due from Reverberation Appreciation Society on Sept. 24. But fans can get a preview at this show, which also features Bath Party. Music starts at 9 p.m., cover is $5 and you can check out www.thenewfrontierlounge.com for more details. Palmer Junction (Saturday, The Spar Tavern) This Enumclaw-based outfit is a rising star on the local blues scene, having recently made it to the finals of South Sound Blues Association’s Back to Beale Street Blues competition. The band’s eclectic sound – which occasionally strays into rock, funk and jazz territory – is captured on their recently released debut album, “At the Shed,” which you can preview

online at palmerjct.bandcamp.com. Music starts at 8 p.m and there’s no cover charge; www.thespar.com. Merrilee Rush (Sunday, The Swiss Tavern) Rush is best known for her 1968 hit “Angel in the Morning,” a song that landed in the top 10 and earned her a Grammy nomination for female vocalist of the year. She’ll team up with Gabriel, the popular Tacoma rock band that built a large regional fan base in the ‘70s before signing four separate deals with major labels. Music will start at 8 p.m. and admission is $10; www.theswisspub. com. Rafael Tranquilino (Monday, Stonegate Pizza) Tranquilino is a Tacoma guitar hero and last year, Tacoma Weekly readers voted his Rafael Tranquilino Band the best blues band in our annual Best of Tacoma poll. See him team up with special guests during his weekly jam night, which kicks off at 8 p.m. There’s no cover charge; www.stonegaterocks.com.

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BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Sei Hexe, Vanguard, Balsa, Tummler & Solomon (metal, punk) 9 p.m., $5 D.A.S.H. CENTER: Z53 Back to School Jam (DJs, breakdancing) noon, NC, AA DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (blues) 9 p.m., NC DOYLE’S: Industrial Revolution (jazz) 9:30 p.m., NC ENCORE: Celebrate Your Saturday (DJs) 10 p.m., $10 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN (STADIUM FARE): T-Town Swing, George Jetson (drummer), Josh Rizeberg (hip-hop) 10 a.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (top 40) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Marc Yaffee (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HARMON TAPROOM: Autumn Electric, Cloud Chowder, Past Impending (rock) 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: E. Pruitt Band, Shyan Selah, Klyntel (R&B, hiphop, rock) 8 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Crosswalk (rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Slade Ham (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Distinction, Helles (rock) 8 p.m.

SPAR: Bex Marshall (blues) 7 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open mic karaoke, 9 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Foam Fest 6 (DJs, foam party) 9 p.m., $10-$15 NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass open jam, 3 p.m., NC SWISS: Gabriel, Merrilee Rush (rock, pop) 8 p.m., $10 TACOMA COMEDY: Theatre Sports (improv comedy) 7 p.m., $10, 18+

MONDAY, SEPT. 2

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (karaoke band) 11 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 3

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC LOCH’S: Open turntables (DJ) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (open jam) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4

DAWSON’S: Clubhouse Jazz Series, 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 7 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, SEPT. 5 TACOMA COMEDY: Matt Fulchiron (comedy) 8 p.m., $10

502: Kim Archer (blues, soul) 5:30 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. ENCORE: Latin Fusion Thurs.(DJs) 10 p.m., $5 women, $7 men JAZZBONES: Kry, DJ Switch (top 40) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 30, 2013

FRI., AUG. 30 SUMMER BASH AND CLICK! MOBILE MOVIES Movie: “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” (rated PG). Free movies in Tacoma’s parks— You bring the popcorn, we’ll bring the stars! Summer Bash featuring Click! Mobile Movies is a summertime tradition in Tacoma. Enjoy family-friendly fun and a movie presented by Click! Network. Games, food, activities and entertainment begin at 5 p.m. The movie begins at dusk. Admission is free. Seating is on the lawn so attendees are encouraged to bring a blanket or a folding chair. 5 p.m.: games, food, activities and entertainment. Dusk: outdoor CLICK Mobile Movie. Admission is free. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/bash.

COMING EVENTS

OVER THE NARROWS RUN Aug. 31 is a day of fitness and fun for running enthusiasts and their entire families. It starts with Over the Narrows, a chip-timed, 10mile run offering spectacular views across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and back; and recognition to top finishers. Families can enjoy a leisurely 5K Fun Run/Walk across the bridge, and there’s a Kid’s Dash course, too. Info: www. OverTheNarrows.com TAYLORGATE 2013 Taylor-Gate is the official tailgate party for Taylor Swift’s Red Tour! Fun for all ages, and all proceeds go to charity. Steps away from the Tacoma Dome. Beer garden, karaoke and live music, games, raffle and prizes. Taylor-Gate 2013 is helping people affected by disasters like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, and wildfires, as well as countless crises at home and across the country by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Info: taylorgate.com. LEMAY CAR SHOW, AUCTION & SWAP MEET The LeMay Car Show has been an annual tradition for more than 35 years. The show features an amazing assortment of more than 1,000 vintage vehicles with additional collections of dolls, antiques, and other nostalgic memorabilia. This is a two-location event, with bus transportation provided between the two locations: The LeMay Family Collection at Marymount Event Center as well as the private LeMay home grounds approximately 1.5 miles away. This is the one day a year that the LeMay home grounds are open to the public. More than 500 vintage vehicles from the LeMay Family Collection are on view at Marymount, plus hundreds more at the LeMay home grounds and local owners of vintage cars bring those vehicles for display on the Marymount show fields. Other show features include: a Car Club Corral, a vintage car auction held in the afternoon, and an automotive swap meet! Event goes from

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: ROCK THE RIM

ROCK THE RIM IS A NOT-TO-BE-MISSED BACK TO SCHOOL EVENT THAT WILL OFFER A LITTLE BIT OF SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE, FROM A FAST-PACED BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT TO FREE GIVEAWAYS TO HELP STUDENTS START THE SCHOOL YEAR OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT. ORGANIZERS WILL BE GIVING AWAY FREE BACKPACKS, SCHOOL SUPPLIES, RAFFLE PRIZES, FREE HAIRCUTS, MANICURES, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES THROUGHOUT THE DAY. THE EVENT TAKES PLACE AT LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL FROM 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

SAT., AUG. 31 VETERANS DAY AT CHENEY STADIUM Announcing the First Annual Veterans Appreciation Day at Cheney Stadium, as the Tacoma Rainiers take on the Sacramento River Cats. This event has been organized by a team of volunteers to show appreciation for all veterans, returning warriors and their families. Each ticket purchased benefits the NA2EVS. Family activities, food, music and raffles are planned, as well as a veterans tailgate event prior to the 7 p.m. game. Info: www.na2evs.org/ rainiers.

Promote your community event,

9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Auction Preview 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., Auction starts at 1 p.m., Collector car entry at 8 a.m. Info: www. lemaymarymount.org/lemayat-marymount-events.php

SAT., SEPT. 7 CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL Tacoma’s most popular brew fest may be moving to a minor league ball park this year, but everything about it is strictly major league. From noon until 9 p.m., 6,000 to 7,000 beero-philes will celebrate the hoppy wares of more than 70 regional breweries, the likes of Tacoma’s Harmon Brewing Company, Gig Harbor’s 7 Seas Brewing and Graham’s M.T. Head Brewing Company at this year’s fest and its winter counterpart, the Big Beer Festival. That is not to mention all the music and grub. Info: www.tacomacraftbeerfest.com

FRI., SEPT. 20 BRIAN REGAN AT PANTAGES Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. Brian’s non-stop theater tour has visited more than 80 cities each year since 2005 and continues through 2013. It is the quality of his material, relatable to a wide audience and revered by his peers, which continues to grow Brian’s fan base. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Brian Regan consistently fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations. The performance takes place at 7:30 p.m. at the Pantages. Tickets: $49.50. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org.

SUN., SEPT. 22 RICK STEVES AT THE PANTAGES Join travel guru Rick Steves as he leads a discussion on travel as a spiritual act. Steves is the author of more than 50 European travel guidebooks and host of the public television series, Rick Steves’ Europe. He believes that thoughtful travel expands our worldview and shapes how we address the challenges confronting our nation. Having spent four months each year overseas for the last 30 years, Rick believes that travel helps us “challenge truths

we were raised to think were self-evident and God-given.” Travel also helps us appreciate the spiritual diversity of the planet while nourishing the soul of the traveler as he/she encounters the beautiful and the unique in new and unfamiliar places. His classes have helped millions of Americans not only enjoy maximum travel thrills per kilometer, minute and euro, but become better citizens of our planet. Rick shares how the other 96 percent of humanity sees our nation and explores how his social activism has grown naturally out of his travel experiences. The $75 ticket prices include a post-show meet and greet, as well as a 2014 version of his popular guidebook “Europe Through the Back Door.” The performance takes place at 5 p.m. at the Pantages. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

BULLETIN BOARD “CHICAGO” Don’t miss the national tour’s kick-off at Tacoma’s Pantages Theater, starring John O’Hurley from “Dancing with the Stars” and “Seinfeld!” The sensational tale of sin, corruption and all that jazz has everything that makes Broadway great: knockout dancing, a ripped-from-theheadlines story about fame and scandal, and one showstopping song after another. No wonder “Chicago” has been honored with six Tony Awards, two Olivier Awards, a Grammy and thousands of standing ovations. And now, “Chicago” is the longest-running American musical in Broadway history! Performances take place Aug. 31 at 7:30 p.m. and Sept. 1 at 3 p.m. Tickets: $59-$150. Info: www.broadwaycenter.com. PARENTS NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs.

T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance

was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. HOT HULA FITNESS Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. FREE FIRST WEEKENDS Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 8481134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. UKULELE CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, August 30, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL

A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas $449,000 ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\ PHWHUHG&DOOIRUSULYDWHVKRZLQJWRGD\Linda Brandfors 253-229-8331 or Lynn Rhone 253223-4421 Better Properties 6223 Mt. Tacoma Dr. SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 MLS#502568

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $175,000 w/terms. NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms price reduced

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill.

RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./ Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, laundromat.price d reduce

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms are avail. price reduced

GREEN PUP SPORTSprice BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, Terms av. UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ price SPORTS BAR, reduced Doing over $700,000 annual food & drink sales, great food. Asking price is now $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE price $99,000 High trafic Count location. reduced VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for price $109,000. Cash/terms. reduced

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. price Same location 15 years in Lakewood. reduced Excellent lease with contract terms. $36,000 PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash. ice

pr reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

WATERFRONT

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St.

WATERFRONT

FURNITURE

FURNITURE Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056 3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056 Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600 Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Duplex. 3 bd, 2 bath. Double car garage. Fenced yard. No Pets. $1,150 per month. (425) 417-7477 House for rent in beautiful Proctor area. 2 bedroom 1 bath with partial water view. $1,600.00 monthly. Contact Kim 253-752-7213.

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056

MOVING SALE

New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600 New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600 Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

MOVING SALE

TOOLS, TOOLS, FURNITURE AND LOTS MORE. Wood Lathe, Band Saw etc. 1054 S. 88th, Tacoma 253-441-7827 ANTIQUES WANTED

ANTIQUES WANTED

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

Crescent Park Apartments Lakewood $450 per month, $100 Dep. Quiet area. 1 Bed Apt. Laundry on site. Most units no stairs. Water, sewer, garbage included in rent. Call (253) 228-2173

Apprentice Wanted learn how Realistically to earn $10,000 a month. (253) 517-8698

Help Wanted. Delivery Person. Fife. 2 hours: 11 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (253) 878-4097

City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600

Queen-size Simmons BeautyRest Mattress. $250 OBO. The Mattress set is 9 months old and was cleaned professionally (Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Cleaners). Call Edward 1-575-921-5244

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage Available. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant on D Street across from the Glass Museum. 25 feet to 55 feet, $9.50 per foot per month.

EMPLOYMENT

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

WATERFRONT North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, w & parking lot rights. $25,000 Contact Salmon Beach North: Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

MOORAGE

CALL 253.922.5317

DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Lacey:

Field Supervisor If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv. com/careers. EOE.

Business Intelligence Senior Developer TrueBlue, Inc. [Tacoma, Washington] has multiple openings for a Business Intelligence â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Senior Developer: Plan, design, & enhance data warehousing relating to business intelligence strategies. Extract Transform & Load (ETL) data warehousing design, development, & utilizing star-schema (dimensional) data models. Facilitate all aspects of architecting, designing, developing, testing & implementing ETL solutions. Design & implement data staging, including staging database design & staging logic. Design ETL processes in SSIS, including data read/write, filtering & merging, data transformations, error handling, process design & logging. Build data warehouses for business intelligence solutions. Change dimensions & data archiving utilizing specific transformations. Develop & organize high-quality documentation. Perform analysis and provides insight into potential process improvements (performance tuning). Must have a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in Comp. Sci., Mgmt. Info. Sys., or Engg. & 5 years of experience in Datawarehousing, business intelligence, ETL design & development & technical tools such as Cognos, Microstrategy and SSRS. Telecommuting benefits offered. Email resumes to cflorez@trueblue.com or apply directly at www.trueblueinc.com. EOE.

SERVICE DIRECTORY APPLIANCES

APPLIANCES

Reconditioned Appliances Quality Guaranteed

5042 Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408

(253) 267-1673

PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Fall Clean-up, Gutter Cleaning, Weeding, Pruning, Trees. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

253-606-1647

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com

Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 30, 2013

NOTICES

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PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

Need safe farms or barns IRULQGRRURXWGRRU VHPLIHUDOFDWV 7KH\DUHÀ[HG YDFFLQDWHGDQG GHZRUPHG$JHV PR XS/HDYH PHVVDJHDW   

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED +HOS DGXOWV OHDUQ WR VSHDN (QJOLVK 0RUQLQJV QR H[SHULHQFHRUIRUHLJQODQJXDJHVNLOOV QHHGHG 6RXWK 7DFRPD &RQWDFW/HH6OHGG0DGLVRQ)DPLO\/LWHUDF\ EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ,I \RX HQMR\ KHOSLQJ WRGGOHUV OHDUQ \RX FDQ KHOS XV 6HHNLQJUHWLUHGRUH[SHULHQFHGYROXQWHHUV WR DVVLVW LQ H[SDQGLQJ RXU FDSDFLW\ DQG SURYLGH TXDOLW\ OHDUQLQJ IRU EXV\ OLWWOH SHRSOH 1R GLDSHU FKDQJLQJ  %DFNJURXQG FKHFN UHTXLUHG &RQWDFW /HH 6OHGG 0DGLVRQ )DPLO\/LWHUDF\ Meals on Wheels DW)HGHUDO:D\6HQLRU&HQWHU VHHNVPRUQLQJYROXQWHHUV2QH &RFRRUGLQDWRU )ULGD\ DQG 0RQGD\WZR&DOOHUV0RQGD\ WKUHH 3DFNHUV :HGQHVGD\ WZR'ULYHUV7KXUVGD\7ROHDUQ PRUHFDOO Be a Big Brother! %HFRPLQJ D %LJ LV D IXQ DQG HDV\ ZD\ WR YROXQWHHU LQ \RXU FRPPXQLW\ DQG PDNH D %,* GLIIHUHQFHLQWKHOLIHRIDFKLOG 7KHUHDUHVHYHUDOSURJUDPRSWLRQV WR ÀW \RXU VFKHGXOH DQG LQWHUHVWV VXFK DV PHHWLQJ \RXU/LWWOHDWVFKRROJRLQJRQ DQRXWLQJRUDWWHQGLQJDQDJHQF\SODQQHG DFWLYLW\ )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWZZZEEEVSV RUJRUFDOO INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITY” :KDW ,W ,V :H DUH 0HPRU\ &RPPXQLW\ D QRQSURÀW FRUSRUDWLRQ  7KH 0HPRU\ &RPPXQLW\ 3URMHFW LV D FUHDWLYH VHUYLFHWRVHQLRUV2XU*RDOV  2EMHFWLYHV7RFUHDWHDQDFFHVVLEOHUHVRXUFHWKDW‡KHOSVRXU VHQLRUFLWL]HQVWHOOWKHLUVWRULHV ‡ FRQQHFWV WKH \RXQJ DQG WKH ROG‡LQFUHDVHVRXUXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIWKRVHEHIRUHXVZKRKHOS XVEHZKRZHDUH‡KRQRUVWKH JHQHUDWLRQV EHIRUH XV DQG VKRZRXUDSSUHFLDWLRQE\SUHVHUYLQJWKHLUPHPRULHV‡$OOVHQLRUVDUHZHOFRPHWRYROXQWHHU IRUÀOPLQJWKHLUVWRU\‡$WPRVW WZR GD\V RI ZRUN GXULQJ GD\WLPH ² 'D\  SUHSURGXFWLRQ PHHWLQJ DQG 5HOHDVH )RUP VLJQLQJ'D\ÀOPLQJLGHDOO\ ZUDSSHGZLWKLQKDOIDGD\:KDW ZH·G OLNH \RX WR WDON DERXW LQ WKHÀOP8VHPLQXWHVRUVRWR WHOO WKH PRVW PHPRUDEOH VWRU\ IURP\RXUOLIHWKHOHVVRQVWKDW ZHUH OHDUQHG DQG WKH ZLVH ZRUGV\RXZDQWWRSDVVDORQJ WR\RXUFKLOGUHQJUDQGFKLOGUHQ &RPSHQVDWLRQD'9'LQZKLFK \RXDUHWKHOHDGLQJFKDUDFWHU DQGDIUHHXSORDGWRRXUZHEVLWH KWWSPHPRU\FRPPXQLW\ RUJ&RQWDFWVHQG\RXUHPDLOV WR GH\XQJ#PHPRU\FRPPXQLW\RUJ  2U FDOO 'H\XQJ DW  IRU VFKHGXOLQJ DPHHWLQJ 7KHÀOPLQJLVIUHH EXW GRQDWLRQV DUH DSSUHFLDWHG WRKHOSWKHSURMHFWFRQWLQXH

“Zuzu” Zuzu is a very special kitty, in need of a very special home. This gorgeous 8 year old Calico came to the shelter after her owner decided she would be best suited for a home with less motion. Zuzu tends to get overwhelmed easily and can soil unintentionally. Her future forever family will need to be understanding of her stressed induced condition and give her the time she needs to adjust to her new living situation. Zuzu QHHGVWRÀQGDFDOPORYLQJVLQJOHSHWKRXVHKROGZLWKRXWVPDOO children present. This pretty girl loves to cuddle and will enjoy snuggling up in your arms for hours! Don’t miss out on your chance to love this amazing kitty! Reference #A477671

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Petey

Petey is a modest guy with a sleek look! He’s gonna go quick so don’t miss out on this one!

Cobalt Cobalt is an active little boy, searching for a Forever Family to complete him. Stop by today! www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, August 30, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

253.203.8985

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards 2914 N 30th St $399,950

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Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

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HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

Better Properties â&#x20AC;˘ Heather Redal â&#x20AC;˘ 253.363.5920

TWO 3-BR Homes for the Price of ONE! 2726 Pioneer Way E, Tacoma, WA 98404 Gated Wonderland with TWO fantastic homes priced at $369,000!

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Main home features:

R 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Approx. 1,902 sq ft R Granite kitchen with built-in dining nook R Spacious great room with Atrium window R Den, easy-care floors, skylights R Huge master suite with his/hers walk-in closets, private bath & gas fireplace R Terrific main bath with beautiful tile details, futuristic shower & storage

Coldwell Banker Bain

HOMES FOR SALE

Beautiful Victorian 4-plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, GRZQWRZQSDUNV0DLQĂ RRUXQLWKDVRQHEHGURRPSOXV attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

Margo Hass Klein

For qualifications contact Jen

936 S Sheridan, Tacoma, WA 98405 $229,000

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Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

www.stephanielynch.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Let me help! Call today.

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

5007 S Alaska St Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

North End Charmer!

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(253) 279-9949

Second 3 BR home is perfect for aging parents, adult children, nanny, caregiver or office

margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

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Enormous workshop (separate from the homes) great for any trade, craft, hobby or tons of storage

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

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Plenty of parking in the 2-car garage, additional single-car garage & 2-car carport

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Gorgeous, yet easily maintained grounds with 2 Koi ponds, gardens, walking paths, sauna & so much more

$369,000 Call Margo today to schedule a private showing.

3310 N. 30th

$375,000

Sound Views! Fabulous location close to Proctor, UPS, the waterfront and freeways. 4beds/1.5 baths... KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHGFHLOLQJV2QHFDUJDUDJH + oversized two car garage with heated shop (a mechanic, wood worker, or artists dream!) Exceptional 9000 sq. ft. lot possible sub-divide (buyer to verify). 1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FKRPH 7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ Call Pam (253) 691-0461 for more details or a private showing! MLS# 482872 Better Properties North Proctor

33 N Salmon Beach MLS # 477936

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com

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Lakewood Move In Special $850 4820 Yew Lane SW 2br 1 bath w/garage 253.752.9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

University Place 4 Plex $850 1100 sqft 3731 S. Orchard St #4 2br 1 3/4 bath 253-752-9742

Center St Apt $450-$475 3872 Center St Studio & 1br 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

For Lease

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Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more.

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

15 Salmon Beach MLS # 493836

Fantastic No-Bank Waterfront Home W/Gorgeous Sw Exposure - Perfect For Summer Fun! Absolutely Awesome Quality in this Rebuilt 3-Story Home. Lavish Use of Granite, Limestone, Travertine. 3 Expansive Decks Cover Over 1500 Sq Ft of Amazing Outdoor Space for Entertaining & Relaxing! Convectair Heating & Commercial Grade Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen, Too. Soak in your jetted tub in the UGĂ RRU0DVWHU6XLWHDV\RXZDWFKVHDOLRQV eagles, sailboats & tugs drift by. Spectacular setting!

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 30, 2013

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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