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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

LINCOLN GRADS REMAIN BFFs FOR MORE THAN 80 YEARS By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

FRIENDS. Jim Archer, Len “Swede” Hartsell and Harold

Studholme have been friends since grade school, 80 years ago.

WHAT’S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

Grade-schoolers and teenagers toss around the term BFFs in their tweets and texts to describe their Best Friends Forever as if they actually know what that means. Jim Archer, Len “Swede” Hartsell and Harold Studholme do know what “forever” means, as they have

been friends for 80 years. The story of this trio actually started five years before that. Studholme and Archer were in the same first grade class at Fern Hill Elementary in 1928. Hartsell didn’t enter the scene until fifth grade in 1934, right about the time the boys were preparing to move up to the “big leagues” of Stewart Middle School.

It was an era when everyone in the neighborhood knew each other, a time when doors where left unlocked and bicycles were seen at fishing holes or Andy’s Candy Shop at 84th Street and Park Avenue. Everyone raised rabbits and had gardens, if not full farms, to put food on tables during the tight years of the Great Depression, when X See LINCOLN / page A9

COP TALK

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Police Department reaccreditation moves forward By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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TOP PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN / BOTTOM PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

GREAT OUTDOORS. (Above) Theurt Chhun and his wife, Phalla Chhun, were among the first to sign on for a 50-by-10

-foot plot in the community gardens at Swan Creek Park. (Left, right) Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance is building a $60,000 mountain bike course on 50 acres in the middle of the park.

SWAN CREEK PARK REVEALS ONCE-HIDDEN TREASURES BIKE TRAILS COMING

COMMUNITY GARDENS THRIVING

GATHERING PLACE TO BE MENDED

By Kathleen Merryman

TO READ MORE ABOUT SWAN CREEK PARK, CHECK OUT:

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acoma’s wildest park is beginning to get what it needs most to thrive: People. Swan Creek Park, on the eastern edge of Salishan, is getting the gentle dose of development it needs to attract the legitimate users who are its best protection against misuse. People who are finding it for the first time are discovering a park unlike any other in the Metro Parks Tacoma system. Long, skinny and mostly steep, it follows Swan Creek from Pioneer Way to 64th Street. At its bottom is one of Tacoma’s two salmon-bearing streams. It’s illegal to fish Swan Creek, but when the chum is running in November and

Rainiers A7

MUSTELIDAE IN THE NEWS: Mink invades Franke Tobey Jones Retirement Estates. PAGE A4

PCMARVETS ON PAGE A2 December, there are few better places to observe them. At its flat top are gardens, and the best bike paths in town. In between are native plants, hiking trails and lovely opportunities for bird-watching. “There are so many wonderful things in the park, but it’s been a hidden secret,” X See SWAN CREEK / page A10

Taylor Swift B3

Pothole Pig ...............A3 City News.................A5

TACOMA QUIRK ON PAGE A4 WORKPLACE GARDENS CHALLENGE ON PAGE A5 Tacoma Rapper Awall B5

he Tacoma Police Department is in the “crunch phase” of its efforts to remain accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA). Assessors from CALEA just left Tacoma after visiting with department heads, union representatives and going on ride-alongs with patrol officers. The review and discussions examine all aspects of the Tacoma Police Department’s policies and procedures, management operations, and support services. “They go through everything to make sure we are doing everything by the accepted policies and that those policies are all spelled out,” said Sgt. Jennifer Kramer, the department’s accreditation manager. A community meeting and an opportunity for residents to call in their comments about the department’s procedures created about a dozen comments for the assessors to review as part of the process. The department last went through the process three years ago, so the latest review is to retain that three-year accreditation and update policies. CALEA is an international law enforcement standards agency that sets law enforcement standards and best-practice polices for departments to use. Only 2 percent of police agencies nationwide are CALEA accredited. Washington has eight CALEA accredited agencies out of 237 law enforcement agencies operating in the state. The Tacoma Police Department is the only agency in Pierce County to hold this distinction, although there are similar agencies that provide accreditation. Many agencies, for example, meet the standards set by the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC). Sumner and Lakewood police departments are accredited by WASPC. Tacoma’s CALEA accreditation would make Tacoma Police Department accredited by the state agency as well since the national process addresses the same policies and procedures, although in much more detail, Kramer said, than CALEA’s review process. While the official hearing on Tacoma’s accreditation will be held this fall, the initial review didn’t raise enough concern to threaten approval, Kramer said, since the department continuously reviews and documents all of the 160-points addressed by the accreditation process. Tacoma officials also attend national conferences on police standards and practices to stay abreast of best practices.

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Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages

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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

7th and ‘J’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Not every vehicle at LeMay: America’s Car Museum is on display because of its forward-thinking look or features. Sometimes the car is there because of who sat behind the wheel. Such is the case with the Fabulous Wailer Mobile, a Cadillac Brougham Tacoma’s Fabulous Wailers had crafted for themselves. The car was painted by Teddy Haggerty, the artist credited with the cover artwork from the Wailers’ album “Cadillac to Mexico� as well as various paintings around Tacoma. Band members donated the 1976, four-door Cadillac in 2010. Founding member Kent Merrill died of cancer the following year. The Fabulous Wailers stand along with the Ventures and the Sonics as Tacoma-born bands that made it big during the early days of rock and roll. They reached Top 40 status in June, 1959, receiving national attention from their hit “Tall Cool One.� They are also

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

ICONS Fabulous Wailers founder Kent Morrill (front) and bassist

Buck Ormsby (left) dropped by to see their Wailer Mobile after they donated it to the LeMay Collection in 2010.

one of the first bands to record the iconic “Louie, Louie.� The Wailer Mobile is equipped with a public address system, mounted to the roof, and accompanied by the

sign that advertised the group’s “LouieFest� music festival, well-known for featuring a huge cavalcade of talent that presents the very best in Northwest music.

CONNECTING VETS TO BENEFITS Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?Â?

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By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

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redit veterans with some of the best mountain bike thrills in Tacoma, and much of Metro Parks Tacoma’s first mountain bike trail. Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance is building a system of bike trails and challenges in the 50-acre Douglas Fir Forest at the heart of Swan Creek Park. They have been working on it for two years, expect to spend another year on it, then maintain the trails for the next three years. It’s a phenomenal deal for taxpayers. Metro Parks has contracted with Evergreen to muster the volunteer work parties to build the trails, thrills and training features. The park district has paid about $60,000 for materials, tools and heavy equipment rental. The volunteers have done all the hacking, digging, clearing and building. Phil Hansen has led them. He is out of the Army now, but he served 10 years in the Airborne Infantry.

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

+6569 Phil Hansen shows visitors the map of Swan Creek Park’s mountain bike trail - and supports fellow veterans.

His fiancĂŠe is serving in Afghanistan. Two years into the building, he’s noticed a pattern: Veterans show up for almost every work party. Most of them have served in Iraq or Afghanistan. Active duty soldiers show up as well, with the skills, will and strength to build. “I’ve been a part of a lot of veterans’ groups that use this kind of project as a kind of eco-therapy,â€? Hansen said. The movement is so strong, he said, that Wash-

ington has a veterans’ conservation corps. Hansen’s day job is in conservation. He does the trail work evenings and weekends. The mental and physical commitment to the environment helps keep him healthy, he said. He’s seen that same combination, with a dose of camaraderie, help people with post traumatic stress disorder. “You have a common interest that brings you together,� he said of the veterans who show up to volunteer. “They can talk

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Visit www.pcmarvets.com and click on the “donate� button.

and share stories. For a lot of vets, it’s part of socializing again.� Serving the community after, or while serving the nation, has worked for him. Some vets don’t have that opportunity. Some, especially from older wars, have troubles a day of hard work and good company can’t address. That’s why, when Hansen learned that PCMARVETS is running out of money to keep its mobile field office on the road, connecting veterans to the benefits they’ve earned, he pulled out his wallet. When he learned that the non-profit has brought $4 million in benefits to Pierce County veterans, he opened that wallet and gave every cent in it to keep PCMARVETS rolling. Two years of working on those bike trails have taught him that the best way to lead is by example.

B & I Coin Shop Buy & Sell * Gold * Silver * Coins * Jewelry * Currency Collectibles - Military Welcome Mon - Sat 10 AM - 8 PM * Sun 10 AM - 6 PM

Phone 253-584-5874 Looking for a safe investment in these all too uncertain times? Look to B & I Coin Shop to keep you posted and advised on the excellent opportunities available in precious metals and rare U.S. coins. B & I Coin Shop is located in Tacoma, at 8012 S. Tacoma Way, Suite 12, in the B & I Market Place. This is one investment counselor who won't ask you to put your faith in any company or corporation. Precious metals have always been the financial cornerstone of the world's economy and now YOU have the opportunity to invest in these lasting values. The prices of gold and silver have been climbing steadily for some time now and you may be able to realize immediate return if you act soon. Contact B & I Coin Shop immediately for complete information and current price quotes. The editors of the Consumer Business Review recommend B & I Coin Shop to our readers for the 14th consecutive year! It's indeed a pleasure to list businesses of this quality and reputation.

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City News TACOMA ART MUSEUM WINS $2 MILLION GRANT

Tacoma Art Museum has been awarded $2 million from the State of Washington Building for the Arts program to support the museum’s $15.5 million building expansion project. The addition of the grant, along with many other generous donations, leaves the museum $500,000 left to raise for the project. One of 12 organizations selected to receive funds by the Washington Department of Commerce, the funds will amplify the museum’s economic impact by $1.5 million annually for a total of $5.9 million. Tacoma Art Museum’s major expansion will create a new wing that will feature the Haub Family Collection of Western American Art as well as a newly designed front entrance that will provide improved accessibility, increased visibility, and spaces for outdoor art. The projected increased visitor attendance will translate into a host of local economic impacts such as increased patronage to neighboring businesses, other cultural institutions, transit, and parking, totaling $24.50 per person on average. The funds from Building for the Arts

only adds up to 16 percent of the total cost of the capital projects it supports. The remaining 84 percent is invested by private individuals, businesses, foundations and local governments. Tacoma Art Museum has recently launched the public portion of its campaign and is asking the public to Pause Life and Play Art as they raise funds to enliven Tacoma through thriving arts, help fuel our economy, and create a civic gathering space for the community. To learn more about the campaign, visit www.PauseLifePlayArt.org.

STADIUM FARE, FREE RANGE KITCHEN :<7769;*<305(9@(9;0:;:

If you are a local culinary artist and would like to sell your fare at a market but do not have commercial kitchen space, then the Free Range Kitchen in Tacoma might just be the place for you. The Free Range Kitchen is all about connecting people to resources and opportunities. They can help you learn healthy food prep habits and share booth space at markets such as Stadium Fare. Stadium Fare, Tacoma’s newest bi-weekly market in the Stadium District, is all about local arts, crafts and, of course, fare. The organizers have worked hard to make it a

truly unique experience, providing a wide range of different vendors and entertainers. Working with the Free Range Kitchen to help locals share their fare was a no-brainer for Fare organizers. “Stadium Fare is designed to serve as a venue for all the small and aspiring artists and craftspeople throughout greater Tacoma. That holds true for the culinary arts as well. We’d love to have more small, local, craft food providers, and anything we can do to help them get up and on the road to success is something we’re interested in,” states Ethan Wing, a Stadium Business District Board member who first envisioned the Stadium Fare idea. Fare manager Nadine Larsson adds, “The Fare’s partnership with the Free Range Kitchen has allowed more people to sell at the Fare, people who otherwise would not have had the opportunity.” The Fare runs every other Saturday through Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Fare takes place in the parking lot of the First Presbyterian Church, across from Wright Park and on the corner of South 2nd and South ‘G’ Street. Learn more about the Fare at facebook.com/ stadiumfare and at stadiumfare.com. For more information about Tacoma’s culinary incubator, visit www.freerangekitchentacoma.com.

SHERIFF’S LOG

What is Most Important? By Paul Pastor Pierce County Sheriff

Consider for a moment what you ought to expect from your local law enforcement agency. What, PAUL PASTOR for example, should you expect from the Pierce County Sheriff ’s Department? You should expect three things. Three important things. Safety, effectiveness, and efficiency. The first is safety. We are in the business of public safety. Without safety and order, nothing functions properly. Neighborhoods and schools and roads which are dangerous do not function. Our local economy, jobs and businesses quickly break down if the community is not safe. In the Sheriff ’s Department, safety is a primary focus. This focus determines the way we deploy our personnel, the way we respond to calls, the way we investigate crimes and the way we run the jail. I am called upon to make decisions about the safety of

the community and the safety of my personnel every day. I was elected to do that. The safety of the community concerns me . . . every day. The safety of the men and women in the Sheriff ’s Department concerns me . . . every day. I take the responsibility seriously. Budgets over the last few years have left us with fewer personnel to conduct the business of public safety. At the same time, that business has become more dangerous and more complex. With these two facts before us, I want you to consider three questions. First, how much safety do you want? Next, how safe do you want your first responders to be? Finally, what are you willing to do about that? To fulfill this essential role in delivering public safety services, we in law enforcement need to be effective in our work. And to continue to fulfill the role, we need to be efficient. Effectiveness and efficiency are both necessary to the role. People in our business eagerly focus on the effective-

ness of their work. Taking bad guys off the street, following threads of evidence, solving difficult cases, keeping people in jail who belong in jail: all of these things give us great satisfaction. But it is also important that we work efficiently. The more efficiently we apply our resources, the more resources we can apply to being effective. Based on how much we are allotted, we are really very efficient. We provide police services in unincorporated County for less than half the amount spent in local municipal jurisdictions. You should expect us to do work which yields solid results, enhances safety and is done cost efficiently. You should expect us to be both effective and efficient. Do these things really matter? They do. And, they will matter especially over the next two years. Why? Because we are currently seeing an uptick in property crime and violent crime locally. This is a trend that is being reflected nationwide according to FBI

and Bureau of Justice statistics data. So, it is important, here in Pierce County that we effectively deal with this increase in crime: that we get ahead of the curve and not allow this community and the fragile local economic recovery to be undermined by crime. Our challenge in the Sheriff ’s Department is to strike a solid balance: to work with the community to get necessary resources and then do all that we can with those resources to prevent and to suppress crime. This brings me back to the three questions I posed earlier: How much public safety do you want? How safe do you want your first responders to be as they provide you with services? And what are you willing to do to see that those services are delivered as effectively and as efficiently as possible? Talk with me about this. Contact me at www. piercesheriff.org with your answers to these questions. I would be happy to hear your ideas and your views.

Police Blotter Officers were called to an intoxicated man in a store along the 2400 block of North Proctor Street. The man was stumbling to his car when police arrived. The officers activated their emergency lights and the man stopped trying to back his car out of the parking stall. The man declined a field sobriety test and wouldn’t say if he had been drinking. He refused to step out of the car and was arrested. His car was towed and the man was taken to jail. Officers responded to a shoplifting case at a department store along the 1900 block of Union Avenue to find the suspects were 12 and 15 years old. The older boy had a loaded handgun. The boys had tried to steal a pellet gun by stuffing the item into their backpack. The older boy said he found the gun in some bushes the previous day. The boy already had a police record, making it illegal for him to have a handgun. The semi-automatic handgun and the pellet gun were taken into evidence. A patient fled a Tacoma hospital on Aug. 16 and was found in his underwear at his ex-girlfriend’s house along the 1700 block of South ‘J’ Street. Police knew from previous encounters that the man had been served with a no-contact order by the woman. He was arrested. Officers added the charge of resisting arrest when he struggled with officers, forcing them to slip on the grass and fall to the ground. The man then tried to bite one of the officers. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

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#1 THINK TANKS GIVES DISTRICT FAILING GRADE

DISTRICT CHALLENGES SCORING METHODS, CITES POVERTY RATES

#2 THE THINGS WE LIKE #3 EMPIRE ROCKET MACHINE SET FOR TACOMA #4 CELEBRATING MILITARY SERVICE

TACOMA HOLDS FIRST ALL-MILITARY PARADE IN 50+ YEARS

#5 AUGUST 15TH, 2013 WEEKLY MIXTAPE

DRUNK The Pierce County Sheriff’s Department needs your help to locate suspect Julio Dimas. A felony warrant has been issued for Dimas’ arrest for Felony Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (Four or More Priors within the Previous Ten Years), Driving While License Suspended in the 1st degree, and for Failure to Have Ignition Interlock. On the night of February 23rd, 2013, a vehicle driven by suspect Julio Dimas crossed the center line and drove in the wrong direction on Rhodes Lake Road E. in Bonney Lake. Dimas’ vehicle then struck a truck head on, damaging both vehicles. Dimas showed several signs of being under the influence of alcohol. At the time of the collision, Julio Dimas had a suspended driver’s license and four previous convictions for Driving Under the Influence in 2004, 2005, 2008, and 2011. Julio Dimas is a hispanic male, 37 years old, 5’ tall, 150 lbs., with black hair and brown eyes. Dimas is known to frequent Federal Way and the Bonney Lake area. Fridays at 10:30pm on

DRIVING

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case. Callers will remain anonymous Call 253-591-5959 All

www.TPCrimestoppers.com

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

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TACOMA QUIRK

PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

OASIS. Even stripped of its copper roof and

lamps, The Gathering Place is welcoming.

;OL.H[OLYPUN7SHJLYVZL MYVT;HJVTHÂťZY\IISL HUKZ\Y]P]LK]HUKHSZ By Kathleen Merryman PHOTO COURTESY OF PIERCE COUNTY

05/6569. The Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department formally commissioned its new patrol boat, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kent Mundellâ&#x20AC;? to honor the fallen deputy.

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he Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department formally commissioned its new patrol boat last week. The vessel is named â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kent Mundellâ&#x20AC;? to honor the fallen deputy. Mundell was killed in a gunfight in 2009 with a drunken man at a home outside Eatonville. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just an opportunity to

have a long-lasting memorial for Kent,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Jerry Lawrence. Mundell never worked with the 20-member marine services unit, Lawrence said. But some in that unit are primarily assigned to the Mountain Detachment, where Mundell was based. The 36-foot vessel has been in service since May and already has

two rescues to its credit. It replaces the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reliance,â&#x20AC;? a 22-year-old patrol boat that sank in 2011 and has since been scrapped. Most of the cost of the new, $725,000 boat was covered by Homeland Security grants in partnership with Port of Tacoma and through recreational boat registration fees collected by Washington state.

4\Z[LSPKHLPU[OLUL^Z 4PURPU]HKLZ-YHURL;VIL`1VULZ9L[PYLTLU[,Z[H[LZ By Kathleen Merryman Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been an active few days on Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mink and ferret beat. Like weasels and ermine, mink and ferrets are among the 69 members of the mustelidae family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mustelidae,â&#x20AC;? as you likely know, is Latin for â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to change their cages often if you want to live in the same house with them.â&#x20AC;? Both are big in the animal rights movement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mink in the fur industry, and ferrets in the lab animal arena. Nursing staff at Franke Tobey Jones thought they were dealing with a frightened pet ferret when a slinky critter dashed through the

front doors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We open the front doors to the main entrance in the summer,â&#x20AC;? said registered nurse Deborah Buttorff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just ran in there. It ran all the way to the health care center.â&#x20AC;? Quick on their feet, the nurses moved to contain it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got it into a bathroom,â&#x20AC;? Buttorff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just kind of guided it. Then the maintenance man helped me guide it into a garbage bucket.â&#x20AC;? Buttorff called her friend Charlie Rice and asked him to rush right over with a cat carrier and a can of cat food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We managed to guide it into the carrier, and it immediately started to eat,â&#x20AC;? Buttorff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very scared. Very scared. And lost. And

vulnerable.â&#x20AC;? Rice did not share those tender feelings on the drive from Point Defiance to the Humane Society at 2608 Center Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He bared his teeth and made some terrible noises,â&#x20AC;? said Rice, a retired editor at The News Tribune. Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former job explains the unpleasant newspaper incident at the Humane Society, said executive director Kathleen Olson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We put a piece of newspaper in its cage, and it screamed and tore it up,â&#x20AC;? said Deborah Johnson, who works the front desk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It smelled terrible. He was trying to chew his way out of the cage.â&#x20AC;? They thought they were dealing X See MUSTELIDAE / page A9

BE WELL

inside & out

Kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Salishan was all about punching despair in the nose in 1997. The houses, built in a hurry for World War II shipyard workers, were worn out public housing. Tacoma Housing Authority had tried, and failed, to rehab them. The very name was stained by a legacy of drugs, gangs and violence. But the people who lived there were better than that. When the Rev. Ron Pierre Vignec introduced the idea of organizing around their strengths, not their weaknesses, they embraced it. They worked with police, Tacoma Housing Authority, Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, Tacoma Schools and Washington State University Extension Service and built multi-language phone trees, support groups, a residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; council â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and a garden. You could hear every language spoken in Tacoma there as residents grew their own healthy foods. They came to that spot to work toward better lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The City of Tacoma Arts Commission wanted to do public art in the neighborhoods,â&#x20AC;? said Sue Bernstein, who was running the garden at the time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Michael Sullivan pushed the idea of Salishan.â&#x20AC;? Commission members visited the garden, and wondered how the neighborhood might benefit if residents could come to that spot and relax and visit as well as work. They settled on the idea of a gathering spot. The city contracted with Milenko Matanovic, founder of The Pomegranate Center, which works with residents to design and build gathering places intended to draw communities together. Matanovicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team headed down from Issaquah and enlisted Bernstein as community liaison. She convened conversations with residents, who talked about what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like, and how the finished spot would reflect who they are.

X See QUIRK / page A9

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;YHUZMVYT`V\YSVVRHUKZVT\JO     TVYLH[;V[HS0THNL:VS\[PVUZ Total Image Solutions in University Place lives up to its name in numerous and unique ways. A full-service salon for hair, skin, makeup and overall image, services are given in nine private studios. Each individual studio is privately owned and operated yet together with owner/image coach Peggy Rose Webster, everyone works as a team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to help you have a good experience, feel comfortable, and call us your home salon,â&#x20AC;? she states on the salonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.totalimagesolutions.com. Total Image Solutions held a grand re-opening and open house on Aug. 2 to celebrate its completed remodeling, a new logo and new talent at the salon. There to cut the ribbon and partake in the festivities were University Place (UP) City Council Member Eric Choiniere, Miss Pierce County Hayley Nicholson, UP Economic Development Commissioner Chuck Foster, UP City Council Member Caroline Belleci, UP Mayor Ken Grassi and Mayor Pro Tem Denise McCluskey, along with many community friends and neighbors happy to see the business going into its 14th year with a bright, new look and vision for success. The range of services offered make Total Image Solutions a true one-stop salon for all your styling needs. The friendly and knowledgeable staff includes a Goldwell color expert, a body artist offering full body painting, two wardrobe specialists that provide head-to-toe styling, an LPDJHFRQVXOWDQWDPDVVDJHDQGUHĂ H[RORJ\WKHUDSLVWDQG an ethnic hair specialist who works in weaves and hair replacement. This is in addition to Total Image Solutionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; complete hair, makeup, facial and skin care services including eyelash extensions. Peggy brings more than 30 years of experience as a beauty professional and image coach. A licensed cosmetologist, aesthetic educator and entrepreneur, she has the

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GRAND RE-OPENING. Total Image Solutions held a grand re-opening and open house on Aug.

2. There to cut the ribbon and partake in the festivities were (left to right) University Place (UP) City Council Member Eric Choiniere, Miss Pierce County Hayley Nicholson, UP Economic Development Commissioner Chuck Foster, Total Image Solutions Owner Peggy Rose Webster, UP City Council Member Caroline Belleci, UP Mayor Ken Grassi and Mayor Pro Tem Denise McCluskey.

skills to design hair, make-up, wardrobe and more to suit any womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facial bone structure, lifestyle and body type. Through her website www.DressRichLiveRicher.com, she helps clients take charge of their life by offering consultations in how to be the best you that you can be, whether

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WKDW¡V DQ DOORYHU WUDQVIRUPDWLRQ RU Ă&#x20AC;QHWXQLQJ VSHFLĂ&#x20AC;F WKLQJVIRULQFUHDVHGFRQĂ&#x20AC;GHQFHDQGEHDXW\ Total Image Solutions is located at 7902 27th St. W., University Place, WA 98466. To make an appointment call (253) 566-4159.

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>69273(*,.(9+,5*/(33,5.,

:^HU*YLLR*VTT\UP[`.HYKLUPZH THY]LSVMNSVIHS]LNNPLZHUK[LJOUPX\LZ By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

The garden was the first given at the start of Swan Creek Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s master planning. However the community decided to use the long, lovely swath of green and stream, the Salishan community garden would be part of it. In 1992, it rose from the stony soil just inside the park at South 42nd Street and Roosevelt Avenue. Over two decades it has produced the taste of home for gardeners from all parts of the United States, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, the old Soviet Union, South America and Africa. It also brought people into the park, people who, by their presence alone, discouraged bad behavior. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big part of the Master Plan,â&#x20AC;? said Doug Fraser, Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief planning manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very important as an opportunity to make inroads back into the park.â&#x20AC;? That involved heavy equipment last year. During the demolition and reconstruction of Salishan, the garden shut down but the blackberries didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. â&#x20AC;&#x153;2004 was our last really big year,â&#x20AC;? said Sue Bernstein, who has helped manage it from the start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People were moving out of that upper area.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

65,+,30*06<:(*9,. Swan Creek Community Garden is a treasure map of great gardening ideas. Look, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take the produce.

The garden went fallow in 2005. It reopened last year, ripe with improvements, compliments of voters who approved Metro Parks Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2005 bond. There are water standpipes at both ends of the long rows. There are fresh layers of TAGRO and TAGRO mulch dug into the soil.

Unlike the old galvanized fence, the new powder coated version will not drip dissolved zinc into the soil â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and it has a mesh critter barrier at ground level. Theurt Chhun and his wife, Phalla Chhun, were among the first to sign on for a 50-by-10foot plot on the shy acre. They

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Are you and your employer up for the challenge of a workplace garden? If so, we want to hear from you. Tell us the kind of space you have, the work you do, and why you think a garden is a good fit. Let us know how you decided the size and form. Are you going raised bed or in-ground? What is your planting medium? Will you go with food, flowers or a combination? What will you do with the things you grow? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your position on garden art? Do you fear gnomes? How about clown gnomes? Over the summer, we will share tips and award prizes. Let us know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re growing at work at kathleen@tacomaweekly.com.

rigged a low arbor, and pumpkins and Korean cucumbers climbed all over it. They put up poles, and long beans favored in Cambodian cuisine scampered up them. They made a patch for lemon grass, and another for eggplant, and banana peppers. They grow the herbs for traditional pickles they serve with fish, and the greens for soup. They save seeds for next year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I pull out, cook and eat,â&#x20AC;? Theurt said of the veg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I give to my friends. All the friends come here. We all talk together.â&#x20AC;? Theurt walked 15 feet across one garden and arrived in Russia, rich with potatoes, beets, cabbages and beans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are from Soviet,â&#x20AC;? he said of his neighbor gardener. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They plant different countries. They bring their own countries. Russia, Vietnam, Cambodia, the Middle East.â&#x20AC;? The garden is fully booked, with 57 plots, said Bernstein.

She managed the old version, also perpetually booked, when she worked for Washington State University and partnered with Tahoma Food Systems. The gardens were the draw when she worked with young people who later built their own community garden across Portland Avenue and sold their produce, and honey, at farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets. She has taught canning techniques to adults. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids grew up in the gardens,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The focus was always on building community and family.â&#x20AC;? And on hauling stones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When they were putting in the irrigation, they brought up a lot of rocks,â&#x20AC;? Bernstein said of the new garden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A sea of rocks.â&#x20AC;? That explains the broad pile of smooth river stones outside the gate. Bernstein is leery of sharing the wonders of the Swan Creek garden. In the past, publicity has drawn vegetable thieves who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize, or care, that the produce represents familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; food security. Tacoma Weekly readers are better than that. Tacoma Weekly readers would not steal from the people Bernstein so admires. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I keep thinking of garden stories, such as the grandparents of one garden family who are visiting from the Ukraine, and their joy of also working in the garden, and their anticipation of eating â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;clean potatoes,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ones grown without pesticides. Ukrainian potatoes are especially laden with pesticides,â&#x20AC;? she said. Last year, she met a Kenyan family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were able to continue eating their harvest, taking the final frozen packages to eat just before the start of this garden season,â&#x20AC;? she said. To the people who work it, this garden is as much a part of their budget as their paycheck. It is health, freedom from hunger, and a celebration of the diversity that makes Tacoma work.

Local Restaurants EDISON CITY DINER LIGHTS UP SOUTH TACOMA WAY By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

Located right on the main drag on South Tacoma Way, Edison City Diner has slowly become a favorite among locals and regulars, but for the rest of Tacoma, this classic diner just might be the biggest hidden gem in the city. Run by owner and chef Leian Susee and daughter Mikaela, Edison City Diner opened in August offering fresh, classic diner favorites including the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous Reuben, hand-made chicken fried steak, homemade soup and more. Each item is made from scratch, either from an old family favorite recipe or from the imagination of the chef herself. Susee grew up in the industry watching her parents run their own restaurants, but made a career for herself as a sales executive, allowing her to travel the world. As she climbed the corporate ladder, she never forgot about her foodie ways and regularly attended food expos and industry events. She spent seven years working in Australia, where she became great friends with a renowned French chef who spent time coaching her on the cooking techniques of his home country. After moving back home and settling down, she became a victim of the economy and was displaced from her sales position. Instead of wallowing in her unemployment, she decided to put her classically trained cooking skills to the test by designing an online business selling her homemade pies, cakes and cobblers. The demand for these handcrafted GHVVHUWV ZDV GHĂ&#x20AC;QLWHO\ WKHUH EXW ZLWK RSHUDWLQJ FRVWV WR deal with, she was barely breaking even. But as she learned of a space for lease on South Tacoma Way, she decided to throw her hat in the ring and offer something different â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a classic, old-fashioned diner that refuses to cut any corners.

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Since 1917, that particular space has been home to a diner of some sort â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Susee even estimates that the stools set up right along the counter have been around since the VDFFRUGLQJWRFXVWRPHUV¡VWRULHV´:HWU\WRUHĂ HFW the era of this restaurant,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not a bistro or a coffee shop or a cafĂŠ. We are a diner.â&#x20AC;? And while many bigger restaurants can be seen receiving orders from national food distributors, Susee can be found shopping around local farmers markets and other shops around town to stock the kitchen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing comes out of a can around here,â&#x20AC;? she laughed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We like to stick with the food that a true diner should offer.â&#x20AC;? Some of the tried-and-true diner favorites include corned beef hash and eggs, completely made from scratch VHUYHGZLWK\RXUFKRLFHRIWRDVW(QJOLVKPXIĂ&#x20AC;QRUELVFXLWV and three eggs any style, $10.95), clubhouse (a tripledecker sandwich, served with three layers of toasted bread spread with mayonnaise, piled high with lettuce, cheddar and Monterey jack cheese, ham, turkey, bacon and tomato,

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$10.95) and clam chowder (a fan favorite served only on Fridays, a cup for $2.50 or $3.25 for a bowl). All bread for the sandwiches comes from a local bakery, and she also works with a number of local vendors for dairy products, coffee and more. Edison City Diner is located at 5640 South Tacoma Way. There is ample parking in the back of the restaurant. Regulars can take advantage of a frequent diner card, which gives customers a free entrĂŠe after purchasing 10 meals. Customers can also purchase whole pies, cakes and cobblers from the restaurant, and take-out options are also available for anyone who is on the run. For more information about Edison City Diner, call (253) 473-1517.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

WILSON SMASHES RECORDS AT NATIONAL SENIOR GAMES Fife swimmer wins all three breaststroke races

YOUTH FOOTBALL IS BACK IN ACTION

Tigers squads face off, Hornets and Raiders battle

T

he Greater Puget Sound Youth Football League began its new season on Aug. 17, and with it came the optimism of a championship season for local squads. Both the Upper Tacoma Youth Association Tigers and the North East Tacoma Tigers showed some good things on both sides of the ball as they squared off in five back-to-back contests at Stadium Bowl, broken up by age group. “This is our fourth year of running the (North East Tigers) program and we’re growing rapidly with our five programs,” said Martin Sanelli, who is the president of the North East Tigers. “We have 102 kids total on our five teams, which is up tremendously over the past couple of years.” The Upper Tacoma Youth Association Tigers – from the Hilltop area – is a young program in its second year, and coach Zeke Nelson likes his team’s chances as the program develops. “We had some real growing pains last year,” he said, “but our numbers are up significantly this year to go along with some really talented skill position players.” Those results showed early for UTYA in a 12-0 win in the fourth-grade game, as Emauri Riley and John Nelson scored touchdowns for the Tigers. North East came back in the fifth-grade game, with the help of Reid Shumpert’s three touchdowns, for a win to even the score at one game apiece. “Our current roster is made up of 85 percent of players who have played in North East football the last three years, and their football smarts at this age are pretty incredible,” said fifth-grade coach Tony Shumpert. “We have high hopes of making the playoffs and going far, too.” While both Sanelli and Shumpert talk of the increase of numbers and talent on this year’s teams, there’s also another factor the kids can’t help talking about – playing at historic Stadium Bowl. “They just can’t get enough of the surroundings,” Tony Shumpert said. “And adding to that is the fact that 75 percent of these kids we have will be playing with Stadium (High School) in the near future.” Reid Shumpert may be one such player, as his scoring ability on the day shows strong potential for the future. “Their (UTYA) outside contain wasn’t very good and we took full advantage of it,” Tony Shumpert said. “One of the things that we want to get better at is getting all of our snaps off

X See FOOTBALL / page A8

PHOTO COURTESY OF TAMMY WILSON

GOLDEN YEARS. Fife resi-

dent Tammy Wilson won three gold medals at the National Senior Games on July 19-21 in Cleveland, Ohio. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

BREAKING FREE. (Top) UTYA’s John Nelson (left) crosses the goal line to get

his fourth-grade squad on the board in a 12-0 win over the North East Tigers. (Middle) A UTYA fourth-grader squeezes through a hole in the win. (Bottom) North East fifth-grader Reid Shumpert breaks free for a long touchdown late in the first half in the win over UTYA, one of three touchdowns he scored on the afternoon.

Fife resident Tammy Wilson rediscovered a passion for swimming seven years ago, and it has paid off ever since. Wilson, 55, competed in the National Senior Games on July 19-21 in Cleveland, Ohio and came away with three gold medals, setting three national records in the process. “I was pretty happy with how I did,” said Wilson, who won the 50-, 100- and 200-yard breaststrokes. “I wasn’t expecting a lot. Our age group was the fastest age group out there this year.” Swimming in the 55-59 age group, Wilson won the 50-yard breaststroke in 35.72 seconds, good for the best overall time at the event, regardless of age. Her finish of one minute and 19.60 seconds not only won the 100yard breaststroke, it smashed the previous national record by six seconds. Her record in the 200-yard breaststroke was nearly 10 seconds faster than the old record, and despite finishing fourth in the 200-yard freestyle, Wilson was one of five swimmers to surpass that record as well. Wilson grew up in West Seattle, and picked up swimming at 7 years old. After attending Chief Sealth High School and training with the Seattle Triton Aquatic Club, she earned a scholarship to swim at the University of New Mexico. But she lost the passion for the sport shortly after college, giving it up for an extended period of time. That is, until she began training again with a newfound friend at age 48, and began attending regional and national meets. “It was fun again,” Wilson said. “It wasn’t a grudge match anymore.” Since returning to the sport, Wilson has participated in three straight National Senior Games; in 2009 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. and in 2011 in Houston, Texas, in addition to this summer. She returned from Cleveland this summer to participate in the Washington State Senior Games in Olympia on July 26-28, winning six gold medals and setting six meet records in the process. And despite discovering a newfound love for running as well, it is clear that Wilson is eyeing some more success as a swimmer in the future. “They did a really good job of supporting everyone coming,” she said of the hosts in Cleveland. “You get people that are 100, 90 (years old) still swimming. That’s more inspiration for me.”

-YPKH`(\N\Z[Â&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

RAINIERS GET ANOTHER WALK-OFF WIN Noesi strong, Peguero provides game-winner

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

70;*/05.(5++,-,5:, (Left) Starter Hector Noesi delivers early in the win over Colorado Springs on Aug. 19. (Right) First baseman Ji-Man Choi waits for a

ground ball after being added to the Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roster before the game from Double-A Jackson. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

If the Tacoma Rainiers are to make a late run for the playoffs, they may continue to need the dramatic finishes theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been getting on the current home stand. The Rainiers won in walkoff fashion for the third time in the previous four days on Aug. 19, as Carlos Pegueroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fielderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice grounder scored Abraham Almonte in the bottom of the 11th inning for a 1-0 win over Colorado Springs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk-offs are fun,â&#x20AC;? said Rainiers manager John Stearns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We like to be at home, we like to be tied in extra innings and win the

game. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always fun to get that walk-off.â&#x20AC;? Rainiers starting pitcher Hector Noesi, who has struggled much of the season and came in with a 6.75 earned run average, put up one of his strongest performances in shutting out the Sky Sox over six innings, allowing just one hit and two walks with seven strikeouts. The only jam Noesi faced was in the top of the third, when he walked Lars Davis and Drew Garcia to lead off the inning, and they advanced to second and third with one out after a sacrifice. But left fielder Nate Tenbrink preserved the scoreless tie by ranging into foul territory to snag a fly ball and

fire a strike to catcher Jason Jaramillo to nail Davis at home plate for a double play. Noesi went on to strike out four straight batters at one point from the fourth to fifth innings before Davis ended his no-hitter with a two-out double down the third-base line. But Noesi retired Garcia on a pop out to third to end that threat. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had fastball command,â&#x20AC;? Stearns said of Noesi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a little iffy with him. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a couple of good starts, and tonight was one of his best starts of the year. If he throws like that, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a pitcher there.â&#x20AC;? The Rainiers had similar struggles against Colorado Springs starter Collin McHugh, manag-

ing just two singles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both by Almonte â&#x20AC;&#x201C; through four innings. McHugh struck out five straight batters at one point from the fifth to seventh innings, and collected seven total strikeouts in those frames alone. The journeyman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who has pitched for two different major league clubs and three minor league clubs this season alone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; finished with seven innings pitched, allowing three hits and a walk with nine strikeouts. The Rainiers got strong relief pitching from Jonathan Arias, Bobby LaFromboise and Logan Bawcom, who escaped a secondand-third threat with one out in the top of the tenth by striking out

Hernan Iribarren and Reid Brignac. The offense then mounted its winning rally when Almonte â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who finished 3-for-4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; drew a one-out walk in the bottom of the 11th, Tenbrink followed with a single and Ty Kelly walked to load the bases. Peguero then smashed a chopper to short and beat out the throw at first base to prevent the double play, allowing Almonte to score the winning run. The win put the Rainiers at 69-61 overall on the season, inching them to within five games of the first-place Salt Lake Bees. The Rainiers are set to host the Bees from Aug. 26-29 at Cheney Stadium, with all games taking place at 7 p.m.

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ô ä   ôäää           ä57@ä5>46äjä44B>>ä?? Look for clues on the Tacoma Rainiers Facebook page and follow them to a State Farm agency on the contest dates below to collect all these cool commemorative items. Bring your completed collectors album to State Farm Night at Cheney Stadium to win autographed items including jerseys, bats and balls.

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PHOTOS BY JEREMY HELLING

GROUND GAME. (Left) Parkland fifth-grade quarterback Angel Sanchez III (top, with ball) tries to break the tackle of A&R Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dantea Richardson (10), as

Sanchez scored three touchdowns in the Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; big win. (Right) The Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Joemil Bigham breaks free for a long run, as he tallied over 150 yards rushing and a touchdown in his fourth-grade squadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 13-0 win.

WFootball without penalties.â&#x20AC;? While continuity is a big part of any teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success, Sanelli talked about another important factor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our coaching staff has been together for three straight years, as we continue to implement new players and new coaching concepts into our system. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see how it works as the season plays itself out.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen

From page A6

HORNETS, RAIDERS TAKE TURNS DOMINATING

The A&R Central Hornets and Parkland Raiders took their turns controlling the games at Lincoln Bowl on Aug. 17, as strong rushing performances and stout defenses led to impressive shutouts. The second- and thirdgrade teams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a new addition to the GPSYFL this

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season in order to introduce the game at a younger age â&#x20AC;&#x201C; traded scoring drives throughout, with the Hornets emerging with a 19-13 victory. The fourth-grade Hornets continued that momentum, coming up with some big defensive stops in the first half and earning a 13-0 victory over the Raiders. The offensive star of the day was running back Joemil Bigham, who had runs of 35 and 58 yards on the day, tallied over 150 total rushing yards and helped clinch the

win with a one-yard touchdown run early in the fourth quarter. Daiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shaun Nichols had gotten the Hornets on the board with a five-yard touchdown run midway through the third quarter, moments after teammate Marquis Tremble came up with a tackle for loss on fourth down on the Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10-yard line. Tremble later added a key interception for his squad. Both squads struggled with turnovers in the first half, but it was key fourth-down stops inside the

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red zone that helped gain momentum for the Hornets early in the contest. But the Raiders got revenge in a big way in the fifth-grade contest, cruising to a 39-0 victory behind three rushing touchdowns from quarterback Angel Sanchez III. Parkland got on the board on a seven-yard score from Jay Gray on fourth down early in the first, and Sanchezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50-yard score on a sweep to the right made it 13-0 on the next drive. Sanchez added another short score in the second and Gray scored from 30 yards out to make it 25-0 at the half. Hornets quarterback Joziah Nixon tried to keep his squad in the game with several nice runs in the third quarter, but the Raiders were too much, as Sanchez had a 39-yard score in the third quarter and C.J. Whitson, Jr. closed it out with a 15-yard score in the fourth. The Raiders got a hardfought 7-0 win over the White River Raptors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; filling in for A&R Central â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in the sixth-grade game, as Dennis Yevchev scored on a 78-yard reverse on Park-

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landâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first play to provide the only score. That came after the Raiders recovered a fumble at their own 22-yard line on White Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening drive. The Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense was key all game, as Jeremiah Noaese and Mateo Champion anchored a stout defensive line and Mitchell Skordal made key tackles at linebacker. The seventh-grade Hornets later scored a 14-0 win over Parkland, as Elijah Smith-Johnson set the tone by racing for a 53-yard touchdown on A&R Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first play. Smith-Johnson finished with 102 yards rushing, and quarterback Emanuel Brown added 75 rushing yards and a score to help lead the way. Jonoah Thomas and Isaiah Bradley controlled the interior for the Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense, coming up with key tackles for loss and limiting the Raiders to five first downs. The Hornets later cruised to a 24-0 win in the eighth-grade contest, as Quinn Spalding rushed for 157 yards and two touchdowns to spark the offense, and Kavon Holden added 85 rushing yards and a score. Quarterback Isaiah BurrTaylor connected with Drew Bonds for the Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; other touchdown, and Cerion Hardeman led the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense with 10 tackles and an interception. By Jeremy Helling

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A NEW GENERATION 6-(),:

Following Lincoln High School’s 100th anniversary celebrations the weekend of Aug. 10 and 11, Tacoma Weekly put out a call on our Facebook page asking for photos – and readers responded. This photo, sent in by Tara Scheidt, is of her 8-year-old daughter Lauren Scheidt-Padron who could very well walk the hallowed halls of Lincoln herself one day as new generations of Abes continue to benefit from the school that will forever have a place in the hearts of Tacomans old and young. See the rest of the photos at www.tacomaweekly.com. There is one more event coming up for the Lincoln 100 year celebration. The Turkey Bowl will be held at Lincoln High School on Sept. 14 at 1 p.m., bringing back the old rivalry game that was held every year between Lincoln and Stadium. Tailgating will start at 10:30 a.m. Visit the Lincoln alumni website at www. lhsaatacoma.org.

WLincoln From page A1

seemingly everyone’s father was out of work. Neighbors helped neighbors get by and watched over everyone’s children, as if they were their own. Winters would mean trips to nearby Ward’s Lake. “We used to ice skate there,” Studholme said. “It doesn’t freeze over anymore.” The electric streetcars that used to web around Pierce County also provided endless – albeit extremely dangerous – fun as well. Children would routinely climb on the roof of the car and sit right below the power lines for rides from Tacoma to the suburbs. “You weren’t worth nothing if you couldn’t ride the street car all the way to Spanaway and back,” Hartsell said. The cars also provided endless opportunities to play tricks, something everyone in the neighborhood quickly mastered. Boys would grease the tracks on the hills so the cars couldn’t climb them. The antics didn’t end when school started either. Hartsell has the distinction of being kicked out of three classes in a single day while at Lincoln High School. The final trip to the principal’s office came after his German teacher entered the room and Hartsell immediately began speaking German, not a popular thing at the time. “I said if you do that, I’m not cleaning it up,” Hartsell said, admitting he had no idea what she was actually saying and only wanted to make a joke. “She kicked me out, so off I went … again.” Their Lincoln High years were spent at city league baseball games, particularly rooting for the Olympic Ice Cream team since Studholme was a batboy. Returning foul balls gained free admission, a practice used widely by children unable to pay for

WMustelidae From page A4

with a ticked-off rare black ferret until a staff member saw it after he smelled it. “It’s a mink,” he declared. That explained everything. Long ago, there was a mink farm at Point Defiance, Olson said. The critters occasionally escaped and survived. There’s quite a colony of wild mink out there now, she said. One of them busted into the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium’s puffin exhibit last October and killed five of the birds. Returning it to the wild was the right thing to do. But there was a hitch. It would not be good if anyone saw a Humane Society van stopping by the park and releasing a critter. If someone posted it online without getting the story, it could spiral into viral, though unfounded, outrage. “I’ll take it out,” the mink identifier volunteered. “I’ll pay you mileage,” Olson replied. And the mink went home, tired and furious.

tickets even if they had after-school jobs selling newspapers and magazines or cutting meat at the grocery store. Studholme was living the good life in those days after buying a 1929 Ford Roadster for $30. His grandfather loaned him $20 to match his savings. “I don’t know if I ever paid him back,” he said. The trio graduated from Lincoln in 1941. All found themselves in uniform. Studholme served in the Air Force on a base in Iceland. Archer was a member of an antiaircraft unit of the 26th “Yankee” Division in the Army. The unit saw Belgium, France and Austria as well as endured the Battle of the Bulge, and also has the distinction of shooting down 13 German planes in 17 minutes and the second highest number of anti-aircraft “kills” in the war. Hartsell served in the Navy in the South Pacific, where he was a gunner on Merchant Marine ships. They found careers after the war and they returned home. Studholme worked 35 years at Safeway. Archer served for 35 years with the Tacoma Fire Department. Hartsell had a career with the City of Tacoma’s street maintenance division. The trio has long since retired. They are 91 years old, after all. But their “greatest generation” work ethic has them largely active in their “second careers” as volunteers. Studholme spends a few hours a week at Allenmoore Hospital and Hartsell dedicated the last 40 years as a Bible distributor for the Gideons. They also meet up for lunch and picnics with Fern Hill residents from back in the day to talk about their times on the streetcars and at Andy’s place or about the pranks they would play… Devilish grins always appear when they talk. “I would say that we lived through the best generation,” Archer said.

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Madigan Army Medical Center has discontinued using ferrets to train medical personnel how to intubate an infant in respiratory distress. It now uses a simulator instead of the live animals. Teaching hospitals have used anesthetized ferrets for the training, not because their sharp teeth, pointed faces and long, strong bodies are so like a baby’s, but because their windpipes are about the same size as a newborn’s. PETA campaigned for the switch, marshalling 60,000 e-mails from supporters, including doctors and military personnel. In a statement, PETA noted that “Department of Defense guidelines… require that non-animal training methods be used when available,” and that most military hospitals use the simulators instead of the anesthetized ferrets. Justin Goodman, director of PETA’s Laboratory Investigations Department, said, “PETA applauds Madigan’s leadership for its compassionate, medically sound decision to use superior modern simulation tools instead of shoving tubes down ferrets’ throats. Using animals to teach human anatomy is like trying to get from Seattle to New York using a map of France. Both patients and trainees will benefit from Madigan’s new advanced, effective, and humane intubation training curriculum.”

WQuirk

From page A4

They considered incorporating symbols of their international diversity in the design, then settled on themes common to them all – the flowing shapes of growth and continuity. They talked about materials, and harvested them from Tacoma’s past. “They went to the City of Tacoma storage area,” Bernstein said. “They got copper from the old Union Station roof, and granite from the station, too. They got cobblestones from North Tacoma.” They volunteered on the construction crew with the lead artists and craftsmen. They also got away with an inside joke. One teen had impressed a master stonemason, who shared his passion for pizza. Together, they incorporated pizza slices in the design on one of the pillars. “When you walk into the center area, there’s a small pillar with pizza slices on it,” Bernstein said. “We call it the Pizza Pillar.” Bernstein took down the names of all the volunteers, and put them on a plaque at the entrance, across from the one with all the official partners in the project. The press took note of The Gathering Place and covered it in local, state, national and international media. For years, it worked as planned, suffering only the occasional carved initials. Then Tacoma Housing Authority earned the HOPE VI grant that spurred the demolition and reconstruction of Salishan. That cut off easy access to the garden and Gathering Place at East 42nd Street and Roosevelt Avenue. The one great, sad truth about Swan Creek Park is that, when it is not used, bad people come, and things happen. Metal thieves came to The Gathering Place. They stole the copper roofing, the lights and the wiring. They pried the copper inlay out of the carvings. Metro Parks will repair The Gathering Place, said Doug Fraser, the parks’ chief planning manager. “The cobblestones and the roof are good,” he said. “We will bring it back to life.” It will, he said, still be a place to gather, rest and visit. It may also serve as the park’s trailhead information center. It will not contain copper.

HERE IS YOUR TACOMA QUIRK CHALLENGE FOR THE WEEK:

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WSwan Creek said Sue Bernstein, who has been exploring, and preserving, those wonderful things for a quarter century. Now Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taxpayers are pitching in. In 2005, they passed a Metro Parks bond that included $1 million to invest in Swan Creek Park. The investment began with listening said Doug Fraser, Metro Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chief planning manager. In 2011, planners held dozens of meetings to hear what potential users wanted. With sessions in nearly every language spoken on the East Side, they learned that people, including students at Lister Elementary and First Creek Middle Schools cherish the wild habitat and are willing to volunteer as stewards. They heard from mountain bikers willing to build the first wild course in Taco-

From page A1

ma. They honored the gardeners whose food security depends on the biggest community garden in the city. Parks planners collaborated with natural partners, including Tacoma School District and Tacoma Housing Authority, and Pierce County Parks and Recreation, which owns much of the property on the east side of Swan Creek. They contracted with Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance to build, then maintain the mountain bike course. They rebuilt the Salishan Community Garden that closed in 2005 for housing authority construction. They have set aside money to repair the vandalized Gathering Place. They collaborated on a bike path between Salishan and First Creek Middle

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RULES & REGS. Swan Creek Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best defense

against vandals and crime will be lots of legitimate, protective users, hence this sign erected by Metro Parks.

School. They put up gates at some entrances, and put big rocks at the spots where motorized vehicles were getting in. They mapped out walking trails. They put up signs, which are more powerful than you might think. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realized itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a park,â&#x20AC;? Fraser said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without its presence as a park, people think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just open land. If people understand that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a park, when they go in, they will act like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a park.â&#x20AC;? They will expect others to do the same, and bust them if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Swan Creek Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best defense will be lots of legitimate, protective users. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything we are

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doing to activate the spaces in ways that are in harmony with the park is intentional, to engage the public and to assure the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future,â&#x20AC;? said Metro Parks spokeswoman Nancy Johnson. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a relief to people who have followed its cliffhanger path. During World War II, the Tacoma Housing Authority owned most of the 290 acres and built emergency housing for shipyard workers on the high ground. Many of those houses were rougher than the ones that eventually made way for Salishanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HOPE VI redevelopment. In 1956, the housing authority gave the land to Metro Parks. They demolished the houses, but left the streets in place, leaving a paved grid around which a forest has grown up. There are few better places for leisurely family bike ride in Tacoma. But Swan Creek was a park without a plan, which made it an easy target. If things had gone just wrong in the 1960s, if Mary and Dan Haire had not fought for it, it would be a garbage dump leaching heaven knows what into the Puyallup River and Commencement Bay. If fish and flora zealots like Friends of Swan Creek Watershed and the South Sound Chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society Native Plant Society had ignored it in the 1980s and on, it would be overrun with invasive species from Scotch broom to worn-out recliners. If hikers and cops had just let the bad stuff go on, it would be a crazy hideaway for all manner of criminal activities. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s if a camp fire or meth cookery hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sparked a forest fire. For years, there were few better places for Tacoma police to practice on motorcycles. That was legal. The motorcyclists

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and ATV riders who have damaged the park and terrified legitimate users are not, and face a $250 fine. That motorized vehicle abuse is one of the bad habits Metro Parks hopes to break. Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance is building the best way to bust the bad riders: A $60,000 course on 50 acres in the middle of the park. Member Phil Hansen has been in charge of ordering the supplies, renting heavy equipment and mustering the volunteers for work parties five days a week. Unfinished, it is already a regional attraction. Riders are challenging the steep paths, and honing their skills in practice areas. This week, Hansenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crew is hacking hazel trees out of a drop zone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be an area where people can practice basic skills, like body positioning, while they are riding over obstacles,â&#x20AC;? Hansen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can plan your attack with varying degrees of difficulty.â&#x20AC;? A hundred yards up the trail, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve laid out skinnies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; split cedar trunks that challenge riders to keep their wheels on the wood. Science and Math Academy student Beau Coffin, who came to volunteer, put down his Pulaski and took a break practicing on them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Officially, we open next spring,â&#x20AC;? Hansen said, but word is spreading and ridership is growing. College students come, and soldiers from Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Mountain bikers from all over Western Washington come to ride what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been hearing about. They are packing the course, packing the soil, riding down the weeds. Every time they ride, they are discovering a new turn in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treasure park. Every time they ride, or a family hikes, or a grandmother gardens, they are giving Swan Creek Park what it needs to thrive: People.

City Life

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23, 2013

Handforth Gallery

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com SECTION B, PAGE 1

D.B.

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

FLIGHT PLAN. Washington State History Museum’s

exhibit includes an actual flight schedule from the time of the Cooper skyjacking.

Cooper Search continues at History Museum

Exhibit explores the world’s most notorious unknown skyjacker and the context of his time By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The true-crime mystery of “D.B. Cooper” is all on display for armchair sleuths and historians to view and ponder as they set out to solve the long-unsolved heist. Washington State History Museum’s latest exhibit, “COOPER,” steps back in time to study one of America’s iconic unsolved mysteries and its lasting aftermath. The exhibit includes never-before-seen artifacts, crime scene photos and displays, first-person accounts and FBI documents associated with the events of Nov. 24, 1971. On that day, a passenger known only as “Dan Cooper” boarded a Northwest Orient Airlines flight from Portland International Airport to Seattle. Early news reports would incorrectly name him “D.B. Cooper,” a name that stuck. He had a bomb and wanted cash. He got what he wanted and parachuted from the plane, sparking a search that continues to this day. “Many, many, many pieces in the collection are from private collections,” said curator Gwen Perkins. “It really was a scavenger hunt.” The exhibit chronicles that tale. “The story of Cooper is a complex and fascinating one, with many political and cultural factors that played into the infamous skyjacking,” said Jennifer Kilmer, director of the Washington State Historical Society. “Through this exhibit and the accompanying programs, we hope to give people a 360-degree view of this single event and its enduring mystery and ramifications.” The exhibit takes the “Cooper file” methodically and chronologically with displays of air travel during the 1970s, an age before security screeners, metal detectors and shoe removals. Passengers simply walked from the ticket counter to their seats on the planes. That all changed with the skyjacking. Despite an extensive manhunt for Cooper and an ongoing FBI investigation, the perpetrator has never been located or positively identified. The case remains the only unsolved air piracy in American history. A mockup of the Boeing 727 cabin and cockpit anchor the exhibit that includes piped-in audio of the actual dialog between the pilot and air traffic controllers during the heist. Cooper sits in the back row seat. The same model of the back staircase from where he jumped with a parachute and $250,000 in cash rests nearby.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

GAMES. The skyjacking prompted a cottage industry of games and memorabilia.

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

THE PLANE. This photograph shows the 727

aircraft, number N467US in March, 1967, on the runway at Cleveland-Hopkins International airport. This was the same aircraft that would later serve as Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 305, hijacked by D.B. Cooper on Nov. 24, 1971.

The crime scene turned historical display fleshes out the room. Actual money from the skyjacking is there. Interviews with investigators and witnesses are there too, as is one of four parachutes Cooper was given. But so are artifacts from the pop culture industry that mushroomed up around the case, including a Skyjacking board game and comic books. What visitors won’t find in the exhibit are answers. Only the skyjacker knows those since the crime is unsolved…for now. “I think the potential is there for it to be solved. New information about the case comes up all the time,” said Perkins, noting the FBI made much of the case evidence and notes open to the public. “But I don’t know if I want it to be. There are so few mysteries left.”

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

COOPER. Police sketch of Dan “D.B.” Cooper from the FBI.

DAN COOPER LANDS To unveil the Dan Cooper exhibit, the museum will be hosting a members’ gala and preview on Friday, Aug. 23, and a grand opening public event on Saturday, Aug. 24. The members’ gala will feature an evening of 70sthemed dancing, cocktails, and a sneak preview of the debut exhibit, which opens to the public the following day. Exhibit curators will lead behind-the-scene tours throughout the Saturday morning with Gary Young, a parachute expert and professional stuntman, holding a demonstration and discussion at 11 a.m. on what it’s like to jump out of a Boeing 727 at night. At 2 p.m., citizen sleuth investigator Tom Kaye will present on his notorious search for Cooper. The museum will also host an ongoing educational series on forensic science and history mysteries, interactive shows with a professional Cooper impersonator, and partner on the fall symposium featuring Geoffrey Gray, bestselling-author of “Skyjack: The Hunt for D.B. Cooper.” General admission is $9.50 for adults; $7 for seniors and students; free for children age 5 and below, and History Museum members are always free. Washington State History Museum is located at 1911 Pacific Ave. in downtown Tacoma. For more information, visit www.washingtonhistory.org.

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

MONEY. Money recovered from the Cooper hijacking provided by the FBI.

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY MUSEUM

BOARDING. Boarding pass for Northwest Orient Flight 305 provided by the FBI.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ‘CHICAGO’

Don’t miss the national tour kick-off of “Chicago” starring John O’Hurley from “Dancing with the Stars” and “Seinfeld” – Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 at Pantages Theater. The sensational tale of sin, corruption and all that jazz has everything that makes Broadway great: knockout dancing, a rippedfrom-the-headlines story about fame and scandal, and one show-stopping song after another. No wonder “Chicago” has been honored with six Tony Awards, two Olivier Awards, a Grammy and thousands of standing ovations. Visit www.broadwaycenter.org.

TWO POTTERY SALE The annual ‘D’ Street pottery sale happens Aug. 23, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Aug. 24, 10

a.m. to 4 p.m., at 717 N. ‘D’ St., Stadium District. Featuring the works of 11 local potters, the selection includes their new and past works of finely crafted, one of a kind pottery, and a seconds sale.

contemporary musical genres. The collection will include a number of visual artist interpretations of musicians, photography, vinyl to buy, sell and trade, gallery talks and musical performances. B2 is located at 711 St. Helens Ave.

FOUR

BUSCH’S REUNION

FIVE

CINDY THE MUSICAL

THREE AMERICAN VINYL SPIN is a celebration of American Music at B2 Fine Art Gallery and also commemorates the gallery’s third anniversary. The exhibition is a two-part series: SPIN I is a retrospective of the American album that explores the historical path of American musical genres beginning with gospel, blues, folk and country. SPIN II follows in summer 2014 covering jazz, rock and

cial interest vehicles. Registration is $15 and includes a dash plaque and two ’50s DVDs – “Don’t Knock Rock” and “The James Dean Story.” A special meeting will be held at 10 a.m. at Griot’s concerning a future event that will impact Tacoma and its automobile history. Call Walt Kaplin at (253) 858-8739.

During the Fabulous ’50s, Busch’s DriveIn on Sixth Avenue had the largest public parking lot of any drive-in north of San Francisco. It was the place to be for all ages to hang out as carhops brought the great food and the jukebox played all the favorites of the era. On Aug. 25, a reunion of car enthusiasts from that golden era will take place at Griot’s Garage, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open to the public and all spe-

L a k e w o o d Playhouse presents “Cindy: The Musical” Aug. 23 and 24 at 7 p.m. and Aug. 25 at 2 p.m. Tickets are just $10. A very contemporary re-working of “Cinderella,” Cindy is a downtrodden girl who wants to sing and be onstage, as her school faces closure unless money can be raised to save it. Great songs, humor and fun for the whole family. Visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 23, 2013

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, August 23, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

TAYLOR SWIFT

Old federal building could in concert, with Ed Sheeran become new hub for arts

T

aylor Swift remains one of the hottest names in pop music, and the Tacoma Dome is sure to be packed when her Red Tour drops by on Aug. 31. But how much do you really know about this award-winning artist? Take our quiz and then check your answers on our Daily Mashup blog, www. tacomaweekly.com/dailymashup, to test your fanhood. 1. Swift’s hometown is _______. A) Nashville, Tenn. B) Asheville, N.C. C) Tallahassee, Fla. D) Wyomissing, Pennsylvania

PHOTO BY ERNEST A. JASMIN

GREAT EXPECTATIONS. Promoter Athena Hitson is developing a new multi-purpose arts space called Post Hall in the old federal building at 1102 S. ‘A’ St.

2. She was ____ years old when her eponymous debut album was released in 2006.

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

3. Her inaugural hit is named after country star _______. A) Alan Jackson B) George Jones C) Merle Haggard D) Tim McGraw 4. Her best-selling single is __________ with more than 8 million copies sold. A) That song from the last question B) “Teardrops on My Guitar” C) “Should’ve Said No” D) “Love Story” 5. Swift has branched into acting and recently appeared on the show ___. A) “Breaking Bad” B) “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” C) “Mad Men” D) “New Girl” 6. Songs like “Picture to Burn” and “Should’ve Said No” established her reputation for settling romantic scores in the studio. Along those lines, many assume her ballad “Dear John” is about famous ex ___________. A) John Legend

PHOTO COURTESY OF TAYLOR SWIFT

SWIFT. Taylor Swift is at the Tacoma Dome Aug. 31 at 7 p.m. Ticket prices range from $31.50 to $86.50 via www.ticketmaster.com

B) John Leguizamo C) John Goodman D) John Mayer

11. ___________ infamously interrupted her acceptance speech at ___.

7. Speaking of famous guys she’s dated, there’s, like, a lot of them. Which of these stars has she not been linked to her romantically (yet)?

A) Flavor Flav … the Grammy Awards B) Jay-Z … the People’s Choice Awards C) Toby Keith … the Country Music Awards D) Kanye West … the MTV Video Music Awards

A) Harry Styles B) Joe Jonas C) Jake Gyllenhaal D) Andy Samberg 8. Which homie does she name checked in the song “Fifteen”? A) Becky B) Abigail C) Carmen D) Tomoko 9. Finish the lyric: “You should have thought twice before _________” 10. Swift’s celebrity BFF is … A) Selena Gomez B) Mary-Kate Olsen C) Carly Rae Jepsen D) Helen Mirren

12. But in said interrupter’s defense, he meant no harm. He was just trying to give a shout out to _________. A) … Beyonce Knowles for having “the greatest video of all time.” B) … his therapist for helping him work through his impulse control issues. C) … Ol’ Dirty Bastard for setting the bar high for awards show interruptions. D) … endangered polar bears, which are way more important than vacuous awards show.

T

he old federal building downtown has been getting a makeover since 2010, and with new tenants and phase one of renovation nearly complete, insiders believe it could become a new hub for Tacoma arts by year’s end. The venerable limestone structure opened in 1901 at 1102 S. ‘A’ St. During its first century, it has housed the U.S. Postal Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and U.S. District Court. But in recent years, the Postal Service deemed the building too costly to upgrade; an investment group, led by entrepreneur Patrick Rhodes, was able to pick it up for a mere $1.375 million – about half its listing price – in 2010. The initial idea was to lease the building for office space, according to asset manager John Hunt. But the new owners soon switched their focus to developing a hub for local artists, restaurateurs and non-profit groups. “Something was missing from downtown, in our opinion,” Hunt said. “There are a lot of creative folks and a lot of creative businesses and artists in the downtown area. But we wanted to ... create one roof over the heads of a lot of these folks that are trying to (create) with similar purpose.” Power Property Management’s first big tenant was Tacoma’s School of the Arts, which signed a five-year, $1 million lease in June 2012 and installed classrooms and office space on the old federal building’s second floor. Then the group recruited local designer and event promoter Athena Hitson in March, impressed with what she had done with the Space, a multi-purpose venue she ran on Court C, from 2010 until late last year.

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“What we were trying to find from day one was somebody that would have ownership of the design and also ownership of the operation of the space,” Hunt said. “So Athena hit on both of these because she has a real eye for the design, and she has the experience of operating an events space in Tacoma. We’ve been just ecstatic with working with her on the project.” Hitson jumped at the opportunity to develop a new concept in such a unique space. “There is no way that you would ever rebuild this building – all the trim and all the molding and the 25-foot ceilings,” she said, standing in a cavernous, echoey courtroom she’s turning into a new venue, which will be called Post Hall. Hitson said her new spot will have a capacity of about 350 and allow her to expand on the types of art happenings she hosted at her old business. “It will be a private and public space where I do multiple art and media events,” she said. “Anything you can think of as far as an arts-driven event: theater, dance, fashion shows, music, art shows, nonprofit fundraising. I’ve done it all, so I would do it here.” She said she hoped to be open by October. Meanwhile, building owners have started working on the next phase of their renovation plan, which entails developing a food court. “We’re working with a couple of different restaurant operators to hopefully get some kind of cool concepts going,” Hunt said. “Infinite Soups is planning to open up in the relatively near future. We’ve been testing a couple different concepts with some food carts outside of the building. “JayDogs ... has been operating at the building three days a week, and Gibson’s Frozen Yogurt has had a mobile frozen yogurt truck that’s been operating this summer at various points around the building. That’s gone very well.”

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 23, 2013

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Natural History of the Surrealâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Handforth offers rare chance to see work by master carver Otto Youngers

PHOTOS BY DAVE R. DAVISON

WILD WOOD. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moose Lodge Bibleâ&#x20AC;? (left) and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Incredible Supreme 9â&#x20AC;? (right) are two works in Otto Youngersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lavish show of surreal wood carvings on display at Tacoma Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Handforth Gallery through Oct. 5. Youngers works primarily with found wood to build his 3-D social satires. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

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kulls, shoes, horned beasts, vertebrae, rib cages, swords, battle axes, bulbous fingers, more shoes, monumental horses and skeletal fishâ&#x20AC;Ś Imagine all of this carved out of wood and assembled into a cast of characters and critters like macabre marionettes that inhabit a series of in-the-round dioramas. That is the essence of Tacoma artist Otto Youngersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new show beginning a stint at the Handforth Gallery (which is housed in the main branch of the Tacoma Public Library downtown). The show, called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Natural History of the Surreal,â&#x20AC;? consists of hundreds of individual elements â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mostly carved from recycled wood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that are assembled into foreboding, skeletal figures, animals and a variety of implements, accoutrements and weaponry. The modest space of the Handforth gallery cannot contain Youngerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exuberance and scale and so much of the show spills out into the library.

Youngers describes his work with the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;benevolent malevolence.â&#x20AC;? His themes of war, corporatism and horror of the new security state are presented by creatures that are as comical as they are menacing. By this means, he bursts the bubble of such forces and robs them of their gravitas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;U.S.S. Miss Fitz,â&#x20AC;? for example, is a little boat full of would-be conquistadores. The heavy headed figures are armed with swords and the crusadersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cross. They are made comical, however, by the small size of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;ship,â&#x20AC;? which is more like the tub of the proverbial butcher, baker and candlestick maker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New & Improved Four Horsemen of the Apocalypseâ&#x20AC;? greets visitors to the library. Horned, skull-headed figures sit astride horses with big, barrel-like bodies. The skeletal figures hold swords and battle-axes in their knobby fingers. Claws jut out the tips of their cartoonish shoes. Youngers cites the German woodcut printer Albrecht Durer of the northern renaissance as inspiration for his depiction of the biblical horsemen of doom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quequeâ&#x20AC;?

is a haunting scene of pairs of wooden shoes done in various styles. They are all arranged as if their occupants were â&#x20AC;&#x153;rapturedâ&#x20AC;? while waiting to go through airport security. Only the shoes remain. Youngers is here making a statement on the hoops that we must increasingly jump through as the security apparatus of the state becomes ever more ubiquitous. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Future, Past, Nowâ&#x20AC;? occupies much of the floor space of Handforth Gallery proper. This tableau, laid out on a checkerboard floor, features skeletal figures next to little tables upon which are small, framed panels with intimate and intricate little scenes burned into the wood. The venerable art of wood burning images and designs into wooden surfaces is a new direction for Youngers. The show features a number of wall-mounted panels upon which surreal scenes are done with wood burning tools. Each of the panels started life as the side of a crate. Youngers allows his surfaces to remain true to themselves. Bent nails and blemishes and dings are all still there. One had a workmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

boot prints on it and Youngers used the wood burning tools to burn the boot prints onto the surface permanently. It is upon these rustic surfaces that Youngers burns scenes of scary clowns, fingers, eyeballs, and wobbly vegetative forms. His looseygoosey drawing style comes across as wonderful doodles taken from a sketchbook and burned into the wood. Youngers noted that wood burning allows him to do something akin to drawing or painting while still allowing the rough surfaces to remain testament to what they are and have been: the sides of crates meant to take all the punishment of shipping and handling while protecting the contents inside. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Natural History of the Surrealâ&#x20AC;? is a rare chance to see Youngersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work since he deals in such a large scale that few local galleries are able to contain his shows. Youngers is an important and inspiring local artist. The official artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reception for the show takes place Aug. 24, 2-4 p.m. The show runs through Oct. 5. For further information visit www.tpl.lib.wa.us/Page. aspx?nid=64.

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FUTURE LOOKS BRIGHT FOR HIP-HOP ARTIST AWALL

Friday, August 23, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

MOONWALKER: THE REFLECTION OF MICHAEL JACKSON WILL PAY HOMAGE TO THE LATE KING OF POP AT 8 P.M. ON AUG. 29 AT THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO. TICKETS ARE $10 TO $40 AND ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER, WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.

FRIDAY, AUG. 23 PHOTO BY JACOB BELLAMY

GONE “AWALL”. Tacoma rapper Awall will release a new album, “Supanova” in November. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

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onell Green, a.k.a. Awall, a.k.a. 2Piece, has been a staple of Tacoma’s burgeoning hip-hop scene since the late ‘90s. With a new distribution deal and his fourth solo album, “Supanova,” due on Nov. 12, he’s a local artist to watch as 2013 winds down. Recently, we caught up with the rapper, who will perform some of his new cuts on Aug. 31 at the Loch’s downtown. Tacoma Weekly: Most rappers have one stage name. You actually have two aliases. What’s the story behind your names? Awall: Well, I got the name Awall a long time ago when I was 15. I had run away from home; and BLUE JASMINE (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/23: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Sat 8/24-Sun 8/25: 11:40, 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Mon 8/26-Tue 8/27: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 THE SPECTACULAR NOW (R) Fri 8/23: 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:20 Sat 8/24-Sun 8/25: 12:00, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:20 Mon 8/26: 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:20 Tue 8/27: 2:15, 4:40, 9:20 LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/23: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 8/24-Sun 8/25: 12:05, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Mon 8/26-Tue 8/27: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 THE WAY, WAY BACK (113 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/23: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Sat 8/24-Sun 8/25: 11:35am, 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Mon 8/26: 2:00, 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 Tue 8/27: 4:25, 6:50, 9:10 YOU AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YET (115 MIN, NR) Tue: 8/27: 2:00, 7:00 KING: A FILMED RECORD (185 MIN, NR) Wed 8/28: 8:00

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one of my best friends ... was like, ‘Oh, you went A.W.O.L. on your mom,’ and we started laughing. Then he was like, ‘Oh, that should be your name,’ and it just stuck. Then 2Piece, I had just recently found my father, who passed away. But I met him and went down to Louisiana, and a cousin of mine gave me that name. He was like, ‘What you drinkin’, 2Piece?’ I was like, ‘Why do you call me that?’ And he was like, ‘You ain’t even a whole bird. You’re just two drumsticks.’ It just stuck, so I was Awall, a.k.a. 2Piece. TW: Before I got my hands on some of the new cuts, I knew you from collaborations with Josh Rizeberg and Boombox Massacre. How did you get started in the rap game, and where did you cut your teeth performing? Awall: When I first started, me and my brothers used to do lip-syncing contests in Seattle. After I started getting older, I just wanted to make my own music. So then a partner of mine, Young Crime, was doing a project with Way Out Records. They were doing a release called “It’s Raining Dope,” and he brought me along. That was the first album I was featured on. TW: How would you describe your style? Awall: Well, I call it “diversitle, diversistyle” ‘cause it’s pretty much all cultures and stuff up here. The stuff I rap about, I pretty much try to cover all bases for everybody. TW: What can people expect from the record?

Awall: I’m more talking about what’s going on in my life and how I’ve grown and I’ve got kids now. We’ve got a song called “What’s Goin’ On?” doing something positive for Trayvon; just doing more positive songs, getting away from the clubbin’ and all that stuff and focusing on what’s really going on. TW: Of course, the Trayvon Martin situation has been in the headlines for a while now. How did that inspire you to write a song? Awall: Are you familiar with Zulu Nation (an activist group founded by hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa)? TW: Yeah. Awall: I’m one of the 15 founders. We just started a chapter here in Tacoma with Josh Rizeberg and a couple others – Scooter at the Dash Center. That’s where we hold our meetings and stuff. We were just sittin’ around talkin’, and that’s how that (song) came about. We organize fundraisers, raise awareness of what’s going on the streets – throw block parties, shows. We just started open meetings this month, so every third Saturday of the month at the DASH Center on MLK. TW: What are you doing in preparation for the album release? Are you doing a lot of shows around here? Awall: We’re working on putting a tour together. But right now I’m just doing show around (here.) I’m doing a record release for Young Mister down at the Loch’s on the 31st.

SUNDAY, AUG. 25

NEW FRONTIER: Argonaut, Dead, Towers, Burning Ghats (hard rock) 9 p.m., $5

DAWSON’S: T-Town Aces (blues) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Idol Eyez (top 40) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Meghan Flaherty (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 HARMON TAPROOM: Vaudeville Gallows, Bottlecap Boys, Rusty Cleavers (bluegrass) 9 p.m., $5 JAZZBONES: Brian Lee & the Orbiters (blues) 8 p.m., $6 LOUIE G’S: Larry Mitchell, Mechanism, Late September Dogs (rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: The Hipsters (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Collin Moulton (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Generation Unknown (rock) UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (funk, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC

SPAR: Rod Cook and Toast (blues) 7 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open mic karaoke, 9 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ten Tiny Dances (experimental dance) 6 p.m., $15 NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass open jam, 3 p.m., NC SPOT: Anthony Estrada & the Cold 102s (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Bobby Hoffman & the All-Star Band (jam) 8 p.m., NC

MONDAY, AUG. 26

JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (karaoke band) 11 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Little Bill & the Bluenotes (blues), 9 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, AUG. 27

SATURDAY, AUG. 24

JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC

NEW FRONTIER: Halcion Halo, Ape Machine, Starry Eyed Samurai (rock) 9 p.m., $5

BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Fabulous Downey Bros., Dava Tara, Yevtushenko (rock), 9 p.m., $5 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Powercell (open jam) 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: T-Town Aces (blues) 9 p.m., NC DOYLE’S: Luke Winslow King (blues) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Idol Eyez (top 40) 9 p.m., NC GRIT CITY COMEDY: Meghan Flaherty (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 JAZZBONES: Grand Royale, Boomin’ Grannies (Beastie Boys tribute) 8 p.m., $6 SPAR: Fingertips (funk) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Collin Moulton (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15, 18+ TRIPLE PLAY: Billy Shew (rock) 9 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Justice Creek, Stitch in Time, Hell’s Belles (rock covers) 8 p.m.

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC LOCH’S: Open turntables (DJ) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28

DAWSON’S: Clubhouse Jazz Series, 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, AUG. 29

502: Kim Archer (blues, soul) 5:30 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Kry (top 40) 11 p.m., $7 ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Slade Ham (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 23, 2013

SAT., AUG. 24 CELEBRATION OF MILITARY SERVICE PARADE Daffodil Festival organizers are partnering with the City of Tacoma to pay tribute to Pierce County’s sizable active duty and retired military population. Together, they will host the first Celebration of Military Service Parade in downtown Tacoma on the evening of Aug. 24. The parade will spotlight notable active duty and retired military personnel, and feature marching units, community floats, select high school bands, Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps units, veteran organizations, motorcycle units and veterans groups. “This is a fantastic opportunity for The Daffodil Festival to use its talents and resources to help recognize active duty and retired military personnel,” said Daffodil Festival Executive Director Steve James. “It is important for people in Pierce County to celebrate service. We are thankful that the Tacoma City Council has the confidence in our organization to be responsible for such an important event.” Info: thedaffodilfestival.org/ a-celebration-of-service. YOGA AT THE PAGODA Wake up your mind, body and soul with weekly outdoor Vinyasa flow yoga instruction on the lawn at Point Defiance Pagoda. A complimentary refreshing pomegranate tea or fresh lemonade is included. Instructor Bev Pinkerton has 20 years of yoga instruction under her belt, as well as a life-changing yoga story of her own. Held every Saturday in August at the Point Defiance Pagoda, located at 5400 N. Pearl St. What to bring: Yoga mat, block, strap and water bottle. Classes are held each Saturday in August. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org. PAINTING WITH PASTELS Come try your hand at pastels with an entry-level self-portrait workshop at the Tacoma Art Museum. Learn basic techniques and use a mirror or bring photos of yourself to create a self-portrait. Enjoy a variety of summer teas while you create your pastel masterpiece. Cost: $35 ($25 for members), includes all supplies and admission for one adult with our without child. Cost of admission for each additional child is $10. The museum is located at 1701 Pacific Ave. Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org.

WED., AUG. 28 MILITARY CAREER FAIR Joint Base Lewis McChord estimates they will transition over 100 warriors out of service weekly for the next four years. That is a lot of veterans and military spouses needing civilian jobs. WorkForce Central, partnering with the Tacoma Rainiers Baseball Club, is providing the means for veterans to meet employers with jobs at the Boots2Work Military Career Fair. More than 60 exhibitors will meet and potentially interview many of the 2000 transitioning military, spouses and veterans expected to attend. The entire event is free to jobseekers but the first 500 attendees will also receive a free ticket for the Tacoma Rainiers game that evening. Others will have the option to purchase a ticket at a discounted rate. For more information on the Boots2Work Military Career Fair at the Ballpark, contact

COMING EVENTS

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: TIGER CUBS’ BIRTHDAY

THE WEEKEND OF AUG. 23-24 WILL BE A SPECIAL ONE FOR THE POINT DEFIANCE ZOO AND AQUARIUM AS THEY CELEBRATE THEIR TIGER CUBS’ FIRST BIRTHDAYS. THE TWO MALE CUBS HAVE GROWN UP TOGETHER AT THE ZOO, SO IT IS ONLY FITTING TO HOLD A TWO-DAY CELEBRATION IN HONOR OF THEIR BIRTHDAYS. FESTIVITIES WILL INCLUDE SPECIAL ACTIVITIES FOR VISITORS AND TREATS, TOYS AND ENRICHMENTS FOR THE CUBS. SUMATRAN TIGER CUB DUMAI WAS BORN AUG. 22, 2012 AND MALAYAN TIGER CUB BERANI WAS BORN AUG. 26 OF THE SAME YEAR. THE FOSTER BROTHERS HAVE GOTTEN ALONG FAMOUSLY AND LEARNED TIGER BEHAVIOR FROM EACH OTHER. THEY CAN USUALLY BE SEEN TOGETHER ON EXHIBIT IN THE ZOO’S ASIAN FOREST SANCTUARY. THE POINT DEFIANCE ZOO AND AQUARIUM IS LOCATED AT 5400 N. PEARL ST. IN TACOMA. INFO: WWW.PDZA.ORG.

Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939.

Willis at (253) 208-6979 or boots2work@workforcecentral.org or go to www. boots2work.org. MOVEMENT AND MUSIC WORKSHOP The Children’s Museum of Tacoma is holding a celebration of music and movement in Becka’s Studio at 10 a.m. These dance and movement workshops are led by artist, dancer and choreographer Carla Barragan. Carla Barragán is an Ecuadorian dancer, choreographer and educator working between Seattle, Mexico and Ecuador since 1998. She is co-founder and director of BQdanza. In addition to her work as a choreographer, she also teaches theater fulltime at the Bethel school district, at Elk Plain School of Choice. This workshop is free and intended for children 4-7 years old. Reservations are required and space is limited. Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs.

FRI., AUG. 30 SUMMER BASH AND CLICK! MOBILE MOVIES Movie: “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” (rated PG). Free movies in Tacoma’s parks— You bring the popcorn, we’ll bring the stars! Summer Bash featuring Click! Mobile Movies is a summertime tradition in Tacoma. Enjoy family-friendly fun and a movie presented by Click! Network. Games, food, activities and entertainment begin at 5 pm. The movie begins at dusk. Admission is free. Seating is on the lawn so attendees are encouraged to bring a blanket or a folding chair. 5 p.m.: games, food, activities and entertainment. Dusk: outdoor CLICK Mobile Movie. Admission is free. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/bash.

SAT., AUG. 31 OVER THE NARROWS RUN Aug. 31 is a day of fitness and fun for running enthusiasts and their entire families. It starts with Over the Narrows, a chip-timed, 10 mile run offering spectacular views across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and back; and recognition to top finishers. Families can enjoy a leisurely 5K Fun Run/Walk across the

bridge, and there’s a Kid’s Dash course, too. Info: www. OverTheNarrows.com TAYLORGATE 2013 Taylor Gate is the official tailgate party for Taylor Swift’s Red Tour! Fun for all ages, and all proceeds go to charity. Steps away from the Tacoma Dome. Beer garden, karaoke and live music, games, raffle and prizes. Taylor-Gate 2013 is helping people affected by disasters like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, and wildfires, as well as countless crisis at home and across the country by making a donation to support American Red Cross Disaster Relief. Info: taylorgate.com.

SUN., SEPT. 1 ROCK THE RIM This not-to-be-missed back to school event will offer a little bit of something for everyone, from a fast-paced basketball tournament to free giveaways to help students start the school year off on the right foot. Organizers will be giving away free backpacks, school supplies, raffle prizes, free haircuts, manicures, and other activities throughout the day. The event takes place at Lincoln High School from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

BULLETIN BOARD MARITIME FEST Tacoma has 46 miles of shoreline. We walk along Ruston Way, we boat and fish from Alaska to Olympia, our furnishings, food and toys come to us from Asia to the Port of Tacoma. Our waterfront shapes who we are as a community. 150 years ago Tall Trading ships came to Tacoma to load logs and lumber needed to build cities up and down America’s West Coast. Our people have lived on these shores for generations or have come recently from lands around the world. Tacoma also connects with nations around the world through its eleven Sister Cities. Innovations, customer service, ingenuity and creativity have built Tacoma’s reputation as a great maritime city. We’re here to celebrate that! Last year, for its 20th anniversary, Maritime Fest featured more than 20 ships to explore, hydrofoil demos

and sailboat races, a pirate costume contest and loads of live music, everything from classic rock to hip-hop. Maritime Fest takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 24-25. Admission is free. Info: www. maritimefest.org. PARENTS NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laidback and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored

ZIP LINE NOW OPEN Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom. VALUE VILLAGE DONATION DRIVE Visit the University Place Value Village, 6802 19th St. W. and proceeds from all donations of quality, reusable clothing will benefit The Arc of Washington. The organization helps to empower individuals with disabilities. There will be a drawing for a $50 gift certificate, as well. Info: www.valuevillage.com. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. HOT HULA FITNESS Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE Many more calendar Ted Brown Music Tacoma listings available at hosts a free, all-ages drum

www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, August 23, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $175,000 w/terms. NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? reduced Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./ Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, laundromat.price d reduce

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms are avail. price reduced

GREEN PUP SPORTSprice BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, Terms av. UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ SPORTS BAR, very high annual food & drink sales, great food. Business is for sale, $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. price

designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

www.jeanbonter.com

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, w & parking lot rights. $25,000 Contact Salmon Beach North: Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

MOORAGE

MOORAGE

Boat Moorage Available. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant on D Street across from the Glass Museum. 25 feet to 55 feet, $9.50 per foot per month. FOR RENT

FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

FOR RENT

House for rent in beautiful Proctor area. 2 bedroom 1 bath with partial water view. $1,600.00 monthly. Contact Kim 253-752-7213.

CALL 253.922.5317

EMPLOYMENT

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

NEW!!! 7 Piece Cherry Bedroom Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, 1 Nightstand, Headboard, Rails. Plus New Mattress Set still in plastic $499 (253) 539-1600

Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still in %R[ 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH  (253) 539-1600

Free Mattress Set with Cherry Wood Sleigh Bed Never Used. In Plastic. $380 (253) 537-3056 All New Pillow Top Mattress Set! Queen Size w/ Warranty, Still in Original Plastic. Can 'HOLYHU 6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH $149 (253) 5391600

New Platform Bdrm Set Includes Dresser, Mirror, Nightstand, H e a d b o a r d , Footboard, Rails. Still Boxed. Retails at $2,600. Will Take $850. 253.539.1600

Full or Twin Mattress Set New Factory Sealed. Delivery Available. $120 Will Take. (253) 539-1600

Absolutely New! Memory Foam Mattress Set! Can Deliver. Worth $2,000 Asking $450 (253) 537-3056

APPLIANCES

APPLIANCES

VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for price $109,000. Cash/terms. reduced

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. price Same location 15 years in Lakewood. reduced Excellent lease with contract terms. $36,000 PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash. ice

pr reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

CONDOS & HOMES SPANAWAY

LAKEWOOD

22907 46TH AVE E.

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #21

$1100

$650

3 BED, 1 BATH 1372 SF. BEAUTIFUL HOME HAS UPDATED BATHROOM/KITCHEN, FORMAL DINING, FAMILY ROOM AND MORE.

1 BED 1 BATH 573 SF. GORGEOUS CONDO HAS SS APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS, GRANITE COUNTERS AND PETS WELCOME.

NORTH TACOMA

BONNEY LAKE

1006 N YAKIMA AVE #7

8403 LOCUST AVE E #J-4

$995

$875

2 BED, 1 BATH 824 SF. NORTH END CONDO HAS SS APPLIANCES, JACUZZI TUB, WASHER/DRYER AND COVERED PARKING.

2 BED, 2 BATH 1100 SF. PERFECT CONDO HAS HUGE KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, PATIO W/STORAGE, AND RESERVED PARKING.

LACEY

TACOMA

4608 SANDSTONE AVE SE

6450 S MASON AVE # 1

$1650 4 BED 2.5 BATH 2357 SF. MASSIVE HOME HAS FORMAL DINING, FAMILY ROOM, LOFT, BONUS ROOM AND 5 PIECE MASTERS.

Hair Station for Rent. Davinci Salon and Spa, Lakewood. (253) 588-1719

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

Reconditioned Appliances Quality Guaranteed

5042 Yakima Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408

Apprentice Wanted learn how Realistically to earn $10,000 a month. (253) 517-8698

New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600

reduced

HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE price $99,000 High trafic Count location. reduced

Hostess Wanted. Part-time, weekends. Also need part-time waitress. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes, 6323 6th Ave.

New Adjustable Bed With Memory Foam Mattress. Wall Hugger with Warranty. $2,800 :LOO6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FHIRU 253.539.1600

3 Piece Living Room Set New in plastic. Lifetime Warranty On Frame. $495 (253) 537-3056

$450 per month, $100 Dep. Quiet area. 1 Bed Apt. Laundry on site. Most units no stairs. Water, sewer, garbage included in rent. Call (253) 228-2173

www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

All New King Pillow Top Mattress Box Set 3 Pieces. New & Factory Sealed w/Warranty.. $249. Can Deliver (253) 537 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3056

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056

Crescent Park Apartments Lakewood

City of ma o Tac Jobs

(253) 267-1673

ANTIQUES WANTED

,I\RXWKLQN\RXZRXOGEHDJRRGĂ&#x20AC;WIRURXUFRPSDQ\ ZHZRXOGOLNHWRKHDUIURP\RX3OHDVHVXEPLW\RXU UHVXPHWRHPSOR\PHQW#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques. (253) 752-8105

$765 3 BED 2 BATH 1000 SF. 3 BED APT HAS ALL APPLIANCES, AMPLE SIZED ROOMS, PRIVATE BALCONY W/S/G AND INCLUDED.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

SERVICE DIRECTORY LAWN CARE LAWN CARE Find the right business for your Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care home, garden, pet, Âş Handyman personal service Âş Clean-up needs and more FREE Hauling right here! for Metal (253) 397-7013 PAINTING

PAINTING

LANDSCAPING

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Fall Clean-up, Gutter Cleaning, Weeding, Pruning, Trees. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

253-606-1647

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com

Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 23, 2013

NOTICES

NOTICES PIERCE COUNTY DISTRICT COURT STATE OF WASHINGTON 12=& 127,&(2)+($5,1*)251$0(&+$1*( 5HJDUGLQJWKH1DPH&KDQJHRI'DPLHQ 0ZRQJHOD0LQRU

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PETS

Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

Need safe farms or barns IRULQGRRURXWGRRU VHPLIHUDOFDWV 7KH\DUHÀ[HG YDFFLQDWHGDQG GHZRUPHG$JHV PR XS/HDYH PHVVDJHDW   

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

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“Lovie” This week’s Featured Pet is sure to pull at your heart strings. Lovie is a shy sweetheart who loves to be around people. This 9 year old Jack Russell Terrier will follow you around like a shadow and could stay by your side constantly. Lovie was a puppy mill mom until she was about 7 years old. She needs the security of a home where she is not left alone for an entire work day, as she has some separation anxiety. She would be the ideal companion for someone who is retired or works from home. Lovie needs to be in a single pet household and is not suited to be around young children. Even with this pups unfortunate past, Lovie is itching to share her heart with an owner willing to give her the caring environment that she so deserves! Make Lovie yours today! Reference #A453023

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Petey

Petey is a modest guy with a sleek look! He’s gonna go quick so don’t miss out on this one!

Cobalt Cobalt is an active little boy, searching for a Forever Family to complete him. Stop by today! www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, August 23, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV Stephanie Lynch

Doug Arbogast (253) 307-4055 Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

253.203.8985

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards 2914 N 30th St $399,950

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Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

WATERFRONT North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, w & parking lot rights. $25,000 Contact Salmon Beach North: Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

 EHG  EDWK  VI 0DMHVWLF YLHZV 0RYH LQ UHDG\ PLGFHQWXU\ PRGHUQ 1HDU Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. 0LQXWHV IURP , IRU HDV\ FRPPXWLQJ 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  EDFN\DUGGHFNZYLHZ0/6

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Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

www.stephanielynch.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Let me help! Call today.

HOMES FOR SALE

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

Captivating Puget Sound View! 3011 N 33rd St, Tacoma, WA 98407

For qualifications contact Jen HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

5007 S Alaska St Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

North End Charmer!

Margo Hass Klein Coldwell Banker Bain

(253) 279-9949 margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

3310 N. 30th

P 3 BR, 1.75 BA, Approx. 2,586 sq ft P Huge wrap-around deck perfect for entertaining P Hardwood floors, crown molding, great details P Custom granite & stainless kitchen

P Formal living & dining room w/VIEW P Multi-purpose bonus room on lower level P Fenced backyard, 2-car garage P Located near Ruston Way & Proctor shopping

$375,000

Sound Views! Fabulous location close to Proctor, UPS, the waterfront and freeways. EHGVEDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHG ceilings. One car garage + oversized two car garage with heated shop (a mechanic, wood worker, or artists dream!) Exceptional 9000 sq. ft. lot possible sub-divide (buyer to verify). 1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;F KRPH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ Call Pam (253) 691-0461 for more details or a private showing! 0/6 Better Properties North Proctor

33 N Salmon Beach

$555,000 Call Margo today to schedule a private showing. MLS # 477936

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

For Lease

Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQ all sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including URRIVLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJ boat hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more.

Dave Peterson Better Properties (253) 222-8480

15 Salmon Beach Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Lakewood Move In Special $850 4820 Yew Lane SW 2br 1 bath w/garage 253.752.9742

www.REISinvest.com

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

MLS # 493836 2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

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University Place 4 Plex $850 1100 sqft 3731 S. Orchard St #4 2br 1 3/4 bath 253-752-9742

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Center St Apt $450-$475 3872 Center St Studio & 1br 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

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Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Fantastic No-Bank Waterfront Home W/Gorgeous Sw Exposure - Perfect For Summer Fun! Absolutely Awesome Quality in this Rebuilt 3-Story Home. Lavish Use of Granite, Limestone, Travertine. 3 Expansive Decks Cover Over 1500 Sq Ft of Amazing Outdoor Space for Entertaining & Relaxing! Convectair Heating & Commercial Grade Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen, Too. Soak in your jetted tub in the UGĂ RRU0DVWHU6XLWHDV\RXZDWFKVHDOLRQV eagles, sailboats & tugs drift by. Spectacular setting!

Dave Peterson Better Properties (253) 222-8480

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 23, 2013

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