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FREE s Friday, July 19, 2013

PNW PREVIEW

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WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIGHT WITH TACOMA

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MAP COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

65;/,)36*2 City officials are asking develPHOTOS BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

:7905.)(*2 Jeremy Simler, foreground, manages NW Furniture Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new mattress recycling venture, where Devin Christianson is a lead member of the crew that breaks down old mattresses. By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

The fate of a forsaken mattress can rank with the nastiest of breakups. Dumped, it festers forever, wasting space, leaking toxic memories. It deserves better. We deserve better. And now NW Furniture Bank is giving us better. Bill and Joelene Lemke have added the Spring Back Mattress Recycling business plan to the non-profit they founded in 2007. The first version of the furniture bank was, and is, a model of sustainability. It accepts usable furniture from businesses and individuals, then passes it to people who need it. Clients referred by social services can, for a $50 fee, furnish their household from spoons to sofas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and beds. Beds are key, the Lemkes believe. No one should have to sleep on the floor for lack of one. Mattresses are the mainstay of the good they do, and they accept those in good condition to sanitize and send to a new home. They also have rejected thousands too worn and stained to be used again. The fate of those mattresses troubled them. NW Furniture bank succeeds, in

NW Furniture Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring Back Mattress Recycling s $ROP OFF FEE IS  PER PIECE KING SETS ARE THREE PIECES s -ONDAY &RIDAY  AM TO  PM s 3ATURDAY  AM TO  PM s  $OCK 3T 4ACOMA  s 4ELEPHONE    s WWW.7FURNITUREBANKORG AND WWWSPRINGBACKRECYCLINGCOM part, because the Lemkes focus on the highest and best use for the goods it receives. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why they founded Hope Furnishings at 117 Puyallup Ave. to sell high-end furniture donations that do the best good when they are converted into money. Proceeds help pay the rent and expenses for the furniture bank downstairs. There had to be a way, the Lemkes figured, to turn old mattresses into a cash stream. Last year, they found it. John Gonas, a professor at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn., developed it when he challenged his students to come up with a business plan to deal with an unmet need. The students started with the need:

Americans lug some 30 million mattresses to landfills each year, and those mattresses donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t decompose. They just bulk up landfill space. Then they hit on the plan: About 90 percent of a mattress can be recycled and sold. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solid, dirty work with good supervision, a reasonable job for a person trying to rebuild a life after time in prison. Gonas and the students put the elements together into the detailed business plan NW Furniture Bank purchased after the Lemkes visited the original Spring Back site. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the time they met Jeremy Simler, who worked for non-profits including Young Life, before a stint as a mortgage broker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bill Lemke asked me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How do you feel about recycling mattresses?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;That sounds disgusting,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Simler said. He was on. When the factory space across the parking lot from the store went vacant, NW Furniture Bank acquired it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got the keys June 1 and started to clean it up,â&#x20AC;? Simler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We put in a loading dock and got our heavy equipment.â&#x20AC;? That would be the three vertical X See FURNITURE / page A4

opers for proposals on a two-paracel site of land in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery District. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The last large grassy patch of land in downtown is set for big changes, with Tacoma officials asking developersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; thoughts on the spot in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery District. City officials released a Request For Proposals for a 6.4-acre vacant spot at the corner of South 21st and Tacoma Avenue that the city had bought in 2000 as a potential site for a new Police Department headquarters. The city, however, opted instead for the former Costco site off 38th and Pine streets, leaving the downtown site unused and unneeded. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Recessionâ&#x20AC;? then hit and officials mothballed plans to sell the site. The economy is now improving, especially with State Farm set to move into the former Russell Investment building, developments in the works for the waterfront and the Link expansion set to run near the site. The final green light to sell the site came in January, when an environmental study of the site found no need for further cleanup. The fear of costly cleanup is a plague on local developments after a century of arsenic-laced smoke poured from the Asarco smelter and settled into the soils around Puget Sound. The request for concepts from developers seeks proposals for office, light industrial, mixed-use or highdensity residential sites as high as 10 stories. Concepts would vary greatly since the land is located by University of Washington-Tacoma, St. Joseph Hospital and the 21st Street bridge to the waterfront and Interstate 5. A third parcel nearby could be added to the mix if developers need a bit more land as well.

X See DOWNTOWN / page A4

5PHNYHKLHSHWWYV]LK ^OPSLÂşTPZZPUNSPURÂťHSVUN ^H[LY^H`NL[ZM\UKLK By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official. Tacoma City Council has approved, at least in a first reading, a deal to provide Niagra Bottling LLC with surplus water at a discount that would add $800,000 to Tacoma Waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balance sheet and put local drinking water in plastic bottles for retail around the region as soon as early next year. Niagra now becomes the third largest Tacoma Water consumer, behind Simpson Kraft and the City of Fife. The five-year deal sets a discounted wholesale rate but also outlines a minimum amount for the planned facility in the works in Fredrickson. Initial plans call for Niagra to use up to a million gallons of water per day with little risk of water shortages. Tacoma Water pipes handle demand for about 50 million gallons of water a day, but the system has capacity to handle about twice that. While current customers shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect a rate drop because of the new revenue stream, the deal helps control future rate RENDERING BY VIA ARCHITECTURE increases, officials said. >(;,996<;, Work is now underway on the last half mile of walkway for the Esplanade X See NIAGRA / page A10 to link downtown Tacoma to Point Defiance Park thanks to state grants.

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FUNDRAISER FOR SCHOOLS: Unique fundraiser aims to raise money for defibrillators in schools PAGE A10

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City Briefs ................A2 Pothole Pig ...............A3

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Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages

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City Briefs -034:*9,,505.05*3<+,:8 ( >0;/5:(>/0:;3,)36>,9 â&#x20AC;&#x153;War on Whistleblowers,â&#x20AC;? a Robert Greenwald film, will be shown in Tacoma once only on July 24. Following the film, there will be a live question and answer discussion via Skype with Thomas Drake, a former National Security Agency (NSA) senior executive and decorated Air Force and Navy veteran who became an NSA whistleblower in 2005 and was charged under the Espionage Act in 2010. Whistleblowers featured in the film include Thomas Drake, Daniel Ellsberg (Pentagon Papers), Michael DeKort (Lockheed Martin project manager), Franz Gayl (science advisor to the Marine Corps), and Thomas Tamm (former attorney to the United States Department of Justice). The Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rick Perlstein says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sin of being correct is the theme of the piece,â&#x20AC;? and during the film, New York Times writer James Risen says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the government claims the publication of certain information will harm national security, when in reality, the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real concern is about covering up its own wrongdoing.â&#x20AC;? A recent survey from the Polling Institute at Quinnipiac University shows that more Americans believe Edward Snowden, who publically released previously-unknown information about NSA activities in June, is considered a whistleblower (55 percent) than a traitor (34 percent). This screening is a benefit for the Bradley Manning Defense Fund. Manning is the Army private who was a major source to Wikileaks and currently is being court-martialed with the possibility of a life sentence; see www.BradleyManning.org for more information. The cost is $10. Advance tickets are available at http://waronwhistleblowers.brownpapertickets.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;War on Whistleblowersâ&#x20AC;? will be shown once only on Wednesday, July 24 at 7 p.m. at the Grand Cinema, 606 S. Fawcett Ave. The event is sponsored by United for Peace of Pierce County. Visit www.ufppc.org for more information.

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Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful needs paint crews now. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your chance to help low-income home-

owners in need. Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful is still looking for groups to form volunteer crews to paint houses in Tacoma and in Lakewood. Church groups, civic and service organizations, families and businesses are all groups that can form paint crews. No experience is necessary. They provide paint and basic supplies, and the advice of a skilled painter to guide crews through the job. Register your crew today, and become a reason for hope this summer! Visit www.paintbeautiful.org to register. Crew leaders can attend orientation by appointment. Since 1985, Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful has painted more than 2,000 houses for low-income, elderly and disabled homeowners during the summer months. Homeowners pay nothing because they supply the paint and volunteers provide the labor. Each house painted is a chance to transform neighborhoods and lives. Paint Tacoma-Pierce Beautiful is a program of Associated Ministries, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that unites people of faith to build stronger communities. Since its founding in 1883, Associated Ministries has become a web of interfaith, congregational and community partnerships working for the common good of the people of Pierce County. Today, we fulfill our mission through more than 25 programs and services. For more information about Associated Ministries, please visit www.associatedministries.org.

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Looking for something affordable to do with your children this summer? Come to Job Carr Cabin Museum any Wednesday, 1-2 p.m., through Aug. 21 for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summertime Storytime at the Cabin.â&#x20AC;? Sit in front of Jobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fireplace as you hear one of these wonderful tales and go home with something your child will make: July 24: NW Native American Tales; activity: design a totem pole July 31: Early American Singing Games; activity: rainstick craft Aug. 7: Summertime in the Big Woods; activity: button activity Aug. 14: Blueberries for Sal; activity: berry painting Aug. 21: My Great Aunt Arizona; activity: patchwork quilt square Storytellers Bonnie Beaudoin and Debbie Birkey have selected a variety of stories to share that will appeal to children ages 3-8. Each week, a different story will be paired with a hands-on craft activity that children can take home. The series is free, but donations to defray costs are gladly accepted.

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Senator Jeannie Darneille, Rep. Jake Fey and Rep. Laurie Jinkins have planned seven coffee hours throughout the district. Mark your calendar for the one nearest you, and come share your thoughts and questions about this last legislative session. July 30 at Bertolinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CafĂŠ (2421 S. Union Ave.), 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 6 at Cavanaughâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coffee House (3928 N. Cheyenne St.), 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 27 at Corina Bakery (602 Fawcett Ave.), 10 a.m. to noon Sept. 10 at On the Greens (4101 North Shore Blvd. NE), 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 8 at Fergieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Ave (3504 McKinley Ave.), 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 29 at Antique Sandwich Co. (5102 N. Pearl), 10 a.m. to noon Nov. 12 at Vuelve A La Vida (5310 Pacific Ave.), noon to 2 p.m.

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Tacoma Arts Commission is currently accepting nominations for the 2013 AMOCAT Arts Awards. Since 2004, the AMOCAT Arts Awards recognize those in our community who provide distinctive contributions to the arts. The honorees work hard to support and build our community by innovating in artistic excellence. Each exhibits vision, dedication, and action in creating a lively arts community in Tacoma. The three award categories are: 1. Community Outreach by an Individual â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Community outreach, engagement, and involvement in the arts in Tacoma by an individual. 2. Community Outreach by an Organization â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Community outreach, engagement, and involvement in the arts in Tacoma by an organization. 3. Arts Patron â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A community partner who significantly supports or contributes to the arts in Tacoma. To make a nomination, simply fill out the online nomination form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ AMOCAT13. Nominations are due by Aug. 30, 2013. The Tacoma Arts Commission will review all nominations and select one finalist in each award category based on the breadth and depth of the nomineeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community impact as well as the quality of the work being done by the nominee, not by the number of times the nominee was nominated. Mayor Strickland will present the 2013 AMOCAT Arts Awards at the Art at Work Month Opening Party in late October. In the category of Community Outreach by an Individual, past win-

ners include: Lynn Di Nino, Jared Pappas-Kelley & Michael S. Lent, Laura and Matt Eklund, Lance Kagey & Tom Llewellyn, Linda Danforth, William Kupinse, Oliver Doriss, Stella Haioulani, and Katy Evans. In the category of Community Outreach by an Organization, past winners include: Tacoma Art Museum & Museum of Glass Education Programs, Arts Impact, Tacoma School of the Arts, Barefoot Studios, Victory Music, Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books, Hilltop Artists, Fab-5, D.A.S.H. Center for the Arts, and The Grand Cinema. In the category of Arts Patron, past winners include: Sound Transit Art Program, Pierce Transit, 6th Avenue Business District, The Weekly Volcano, Hotel Murano, City Arts, Urban Grace Church, The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation, and Key Bank. Information about the AMOCAT Arts Awards can be found at www. cityoftacoma.org. (TacomaArts)

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is moving closer to full implementation. Washington State has chosen to establish a Health Benefit Exchange, a marketplace where individuals and businesses (with less than 50 employees) can shop for insurance plans. A free workshop will be held on Aug. 5, 9-11 a.m., at Environmental Services Building, 9850 64th St. W., University Place, WA 98467. Take this opportunity to learn about significant changes to health care delivery and what they mean for your business and your employees. Even if you have more than 50 employees, this seminar can provide information useful to your employees as they make health care choices. Small Business/Agent Representative Mike Jackling, with the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, will provide an overview of the Exchange and its role in the ACA. There is no charge to attend this seminar, however registration is required due to the limited seating capacity. Register online at http:// www.co.pierce.wa.us or call Hans Kueck at (253) 798-2335. MORE CITY BRIEFS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

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In last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover story â&#x20AC;&#x153;County, cities block pot industry until rules are ready,â&#x20AC;? the photo of Tacoma cannabis activist Cat Jeter was incorrectly credited. The photo was taken by Daniel Berman/Northwest Leaf. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

Police Blotter 4(5.,;:@,(9:-69 :,?*904,: Alexander Walls was sentenced last week to 23 years in federal prison and five years of parole on charges of conspiracy to transport a juvenile for prostitution, interstate transportation of a child for the purposes of prostitution, conspiracy to engage in sex trafficking through the use of force, fraud or coercion and three counts of sex trafficking by force, fraud or coercion. He had been found guilty in November following a 13-day trial. At sentencing U.S. District Judge Robert J. Bryan said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The defendant has a long-term showing of a lack of respect for the law, and this calls out for a severe sentence...he gives no indication that he will not continue the lifestyle that he has adopted.â&#x20AC;? According to records filed in the case, Walls controlled as many as four women involved in sex trafficking. Three of them were teenagers at the time he had recruited them to work for him as prostitutes. Walls controlled their activities and took all the money they earned. He had them work as prostitutes along the â&#x20AC;&#x153;trackâ&#x20AC;? in Pierce and King counties, and several of them were advertised on Backpage.com, Craigslist, and TNABoard.com.

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#1 THE FAME RIOT

BRINGS THEIR BRASSY INDIEDANCE-POP TO ART ON THE AVE

#2 WORKPLACE GARDEN CHALLENGE:

GARDENER SEES SPROUTS, AND WILD POSSIBILITIES, IN TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CONCRETE CORE

#3 COUNTY, CITIES BLOCK POT INDUSTRY UNTIL RULES ARE READY #4 MAKE A SCENE:

NEW THINGS ARE AT STORE FOR OLD TOWN RHYTHM AND BLUES FESTIVAL

#5 DAILY MASHUP- AUDIO:

OZZY OSBOURNE DISCUSSES ESTRANGED BLACK SABBATH BAND MATE BILL WARD

Local Restaurants If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happy hour, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Yacht Club has a lot of enticing offerings during its happy hours, which run from  SP 0RQGD\ WKURXJK )ULGD\ &RPH DQG Ă&#x20AC;QG yourself a cozy spot in the outdoor seating area and take in scenic views while enjoying food and drinks that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t empty your wallet. Drink specials: cocktails $3.25; domestic beer $3.25; margaritas $3.25; Pabst Blue Ribbon $1.99; wine by the glass $3.25. Food specials: Asian spring rolls $5.99; calamari $5.99; Dungeness crab cakes $12.95; fries $3.95; oyster shooters $3.99 for 3; shrimp cocktails $5.99. Located on the Thea Foss Waterway, across from the Museum of Glass, Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant and Marina has been serving up delicious and delightful food for over 50 years. Since 1956 Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fine Foods has produced a full line of salad dressings and chef-blended seasonings, including Jamaica Mistake Salad Dressing, Salad Elegance, and Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seasoning salt, right here in Tacoma, that are available in retail markets throughout the U.S., Canada and worldwide. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dock Restaurant and Marina is located at 1900 E. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. Phone (253) 627-3186 or visit www.johnnysdock.com.

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PHOTOS COURTESY JOHNNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DOCK

HAPPY HOUR: 3-7PM & 9-11:30PM

Sunday All Day Happy Hour!

7 Days a Week!

GO MARINERS! 8 Hi Def Flat Screens

New 9 foot Pool Table!

GREAT BAR FOOD SPIRITS & ROTATING MICRO HANDLES

Extended Happy Hour Drinks & Appetizers

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Pothole pigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Alongside the design and features of a car is the market it seeks to target. And that target is often overseas, so deals are made to keep the cars profitable. Such was the case with the 1923 agreement between General Motors Corp. and Adelaideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holden Motor Body Builders of Australia. GM would provide pre-assembled chassis models for GM vehicles that would then become the base for Holden designed bodies. GM got a foothold into a market by avoiding import taxes on â&#x20AC;&#x153;finished cars,â&#x20AC;? while Holden got a reliable base for its cars. The marriage proved popular in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;land down under.â&#x20AC;? Holden built the vast majority of the bodies for Olds in the 1920s, while the lower-volume models such as specialty roadsters and sedans were imported until the global crash of 1929. With Australia feeling the Great Depression, GM ceased exports of Oldsmobiles to Australia until the market improved in 1934. The 1926 Oldsmobile Holden 30D comes from the era before the crash and has a story to tell outside of the model

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

and styling it offers. Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Car Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holden was restored by Peter Gifford of Dunlop, Australia before the car found its way to America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I bought the Olds in 1975 as a pile of rubbish in a backyard for $100, and it was certainly not a complete car,â&#x20AC;? he wrote for the LeMay collection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After six years of restoration and countless miles of chasing parts (there was no eBay back then), it was complete. I still

think it was a great achievement to do this restoration in my shed.â&#x20AC;? His 1926 was the only one he could find during his countless hours of research for parts, making the care a rarity among rarities. The car itself is a touring model, with only 1,660 miles on its odometer. Its six-cylinder engine brought 61 horsepower through a three-speed transmission.

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5VY[O[OHUK5VY[OÂş*Âť Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;pothole initiative.â&#x20AC;? And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church - ELCA Mark E. Woldseth, Pastor 3315 South 19th St. Tacoma, WA 98405 (253) 383-5515 lutheransonline.com/gloriadeilutherantacoma

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come and see!â&#x20AC;?

Sunday Worship - 10:45am

:;,7<7;6:,9=0*, Jeff Brennan volunteers for PCMARVETS, which helped

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

him get the VA benefits he earned. By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Jeff Brennan went all the usual places â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Okinawa, Korea, The Philippines, Thailand â&#x20AC;&#x201C; during his 10 years with the U. S. Marine Corps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also been some places that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily show up in the military record book,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a Marine cadre with Fast Company, a 24-hour reaction team for extractions and things like that.â&#x20AC;? He was injured first in a training accident. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a rappel master, and I had an accident on the rappel tower, a broken nose, fractured cheekbone and a severe concussion that led to traumatic brain injury,â&#x20AC;? he said. The Persian Gulf War complicated that injury, starting with the preparations, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going overseas, we took a lot of vaccinations for things like botulism, anthrax and nerve agents,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I went to the Gulf War, there were several times we were hit with chemicals. We had alarms going off frequently.â&#x20AC;? The alarms detected evidence of biological or chemical agents â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tear gas, burnt powder, sulfa, fumes of burning oil, even portable toilet waste â&#x20AC;&#x201C; generated by both sides in the war. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all had this stuff happen to us,â&#x20AC;? Brennan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fibromyalgia, chronic pain, extreme levels of PTSD. I have meds to go to sleep so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have nightmares about things that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done. You get yourself caught in not being able to wake up. I wake up in a puddle of sweat, lots of times not knowing where I am. Daily life is a real struggle.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gulf War Syndrome,â&#x20AC;?

said veteran service officer Erica Westling of PCMARVETS. Her job with the nonprofit group is to connect veterans to the benefits they earned serving their country. The combination of the injury and the exposure blew up when Brennan had corrective nasal surgery after he got out of the military. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ended up with toxic shock syndrome,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had several strokes, and was left with complete left field vision loss. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called hemianopsia.â&#x20AC;? With the vision problems come the migraines. All together, the symptoms made it impossible to keep the consistent hours most jobs require, and Brennan was teetering on homelessness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;About six years ago I wandered into AMVETS, and filled out a claim, finally,â&#x20AC;? he said. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d filed a first claim in 1992, but nothing ever came of it, he said. When he tried again, he listed post-traumatic stress syndrome. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most vets donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like to claim PTSD,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It puts a label on you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to get a job. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather give up the benefits than have the label.â&#x20AC;? Brennan ran into George Hight, a retired Marine who in a couple of years would help found and become vice chairman of the PCMARVETS board of directors. Hight saw a fellow Marine in trouble, and acted immediately to stabilize him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome aboard,â&#x20AC;? Hight said to Brennan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I need your dues for AMVETS. Tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting is at 1700 hours. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re back working for the Corps.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was something

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about him I recognized, and I felt very comfortable,â&#x20AC;? Brennan said. He followed Hight into volunteer work with The Marine Corps League, Toys for Tots and Crime Stoppers. As a volunteer, he can bow out when his disabilities overtake him. When Westling signed on with PCMARVETS she pushed Brennanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claim, filed years earlier. He has a disability rating of 90 percent, and free health care and prescriptions, and he was due disability pay retroactive to his first claim, in 1992. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just purchased a home with a VA loan and my back pay,â&#x20AC;? Brennan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has changed my life dramatically.â&#x20AC;? He has stability, now, and a place to live. He is settled enough to make and keep friends, and to serve again. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has allowed me to give back to service organizations,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s allowed me to do things like Toys for Tots when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m having my good days.â&#x20AC;? Doing right by Jeff Brennan, the VA has freed him to do right by his community.

Derby Prizes: 1st Place - $2500 Titus-Will 2nd Place - $1000 Titus-Will 3rd Place - $750 Titus-Will/Columbia Bank 4th Place - $500 Columbia Bank 5th - 20th Place Choice of Merchandise

Ladies and Youth Prizes: Ladies Largest Salmon - $250 Columbia Bank 1st Place Boys & Girls -$100 Southworth Marine 2nd Place Boys & Girls -$75 Southworth Marine 3rd Place Boys & Girls - $50 Southworth Marine 4th Place Boys & Girls - $25 Southworth Marine

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:;(9*LU[LY[VOVZ[ [O(UU\HS>VTLU VM*VSVY/LHS[O(^HYLULZZ*VUMLYLUJL :PNU\W[VKH`MVYMYLLTHTTVNYHT A free health event will take place on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the STAR Center, Metro Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; beautiful new recreation facility located at 3873 S. 66th St., Tacoma, WA 98409. Women, men and children attending the â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Family of Healthâ&#x20AC;? will find captivating activities, presentations and information from a host of venues focusing on family and healthy lifestyles. The event includes an opportunity to get a mammogram at no cost to participants at Carol Milgard Breast Center. First Family of Health is sponsored by Women of Color Health Awareness Committee of Pierce County, (WOC) with the support of many community partners. The WOC is a nonprofit organization with a goal to empower women to become the role model for healthy lifestyles in their family. This annual event is the largest health conference in Washington State that focuses on the needs and concerns of women of color. To pre-register, call Karol Brown, event chairperson, at (855) 280-5577 or register online at www. WOChealthawareness.com. On-site registration begins at 8 a.m. Activities kick-off is at 8:30 a.m. with health screenings for diabetes and high blood pressure and dental cleaning for children. Early comers will enjoy a healthy continental breakfast and a stimulating aerobic walk with Paula Battle and the 911 team. Come early to hear honored morning keynote speaker, retired Senator Rosa Franklin, share her vision of a

WFurniture

From page A1

balers that compact mattress components into materials for which recyclers pay good money. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one for foam, one for plastic and one for mattress toppers. The materials could come back as soda bottles, carpets and padding or fleeces. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a container for metal, from frames to springs. Last week, Simler watched a recycler haul off the first lot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our first revenue check right there,â&#x20AC;? he said. Devin Christianson, who found his job at NW Furniture Bank through job training at Goodwill, has been helping set up the operation and deconstruct the first of the mattresses. Spring Back should be ready to bounce by August. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At full capacity weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be processing 2,000 a month with four employees and a foreman, six people, including me,â&#x20AC;? Simler said. Most of them will come from Progress House, the Tacoma work release program that helps people coming out of prison settle back into productive lives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can create jobs for people who are hard to employ,â&#x20AC;? Simler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great back story here. I got a call from a guy who said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I heard

healthy community. Participants can choose from a variety of dynamic presentations throughout the day: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eating Well and Cooking on a Budget,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Well with Chronic Disease,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding the Affordable Care Act,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adults and Children Living with Diabetes Conversation Map,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Red Woman Heart Disease,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;HIV/AIDS Awareness,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Domestic Violence Prevention,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mental Health Resources,â&#x20AC;? and visit over 30 community service and retail exhibitors with door prizes. New this year are resources to support young mothers, information on raising toddlers, and a families reading program. Back by popular demand, the day includes the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teen Girls Onlyâ&#x20AC;? Planned Parenthood conversation. Children will learn about being healthy through fun activities with Hope Heart Instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youth Take Heartâ&#x20AC;? and MultiCareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;5-2-1-0â&#x20AC;? campaign and can explore the fitness wall at the STAR Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Discovery space. Everyone will have fun dancing with the 911 Dancers, skipping rope with Nathanial Jackson, hula hooping with Hoopsmiles, or moving with the Zumba class. In the morning, members of Sisters of Hope, a breast cancer support group, will share moving stories of being survivors. At the noon Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon, enjoy a delicious lunch, entertainment and learn from Patricia Talton and the African American Women Leaders Task Force about the importance of women of color practicing regular breast screenings. Also during

you need to hire me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done what you are about to do.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? He was a prisoner at Monroe Correctional Complex, which has a mattress-recycling program. He knew the work, and he was due for release. Like Christianson, he can take a mattress apart in about 10 minutes with one pound of nonrecyclable waste left over. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got his work stacked up for him. The Pan Pacific Hotel in Seattle is refurbishing its beds, and those box springs and mattresses are lined up on their ends against the outer wall of the building. Hotels and individuals can bring their worn and stained mattresses for recycling for $10 per piece. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $20 for a queen set. A king set is three pieces and costs $30. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bargain, monetarily and ecologically, said Joelene Lemke. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The dump charges $11 a piece,â&#x20AC;? she said. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an advertising and ethical win for mattress retailers who are concerned about the back end of their business, too, Simler said â&#x20AC;&#x153;The other source of mattresses is a large commercial retailer that advertises that it will take away your old mattress,â&#x20AC;? Simler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They pay us to take their used mattresses. If there is a recoverable mattress, we use it next door and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t charge them for it.â&#x20AC;? Next door, those mattresses go home with the

this annual luncheon WOC will take time to honor cancer survivors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters Supporting Sistersâ&#x20AC;? Women of Color Breast Cancer Screening Day at the Carol Milgard Breast Center is an exclusive opportunity for women to support each other in an action that may save lives. Women are invited to hop aboard the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters Party Busâ&#x20AC;? from the STAR Center during the First Family of Health event to and from the Carol Milgard Breast Center. Fifty women ages 40 and over, who have pre-registered for a mammogram, will have the support of other women before, during and after their mammogram. This service is provided at no cost to qualified patients. Pre-registration for a mammogram is required by Aug. 1. Call Breast Cancer Navigator Doris Harris at (253) 448-0328 or (206) 261-0132. Event is sponsored by: WOC Health Awareness Committee of Pierce County, Bethlehem Baptist Church Health Ministry, Carol Milgard Breast Center, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Molina Healthcare, Franciscan Health System Plan, MultiCare Health Care, United Healthcare Community Plan, African American Women Leaders Task Force and other local businesses. For more information contact Karol Brown at karol@ wochealthawareness.com or (855) 280-5577. Press release courtesy of Women of Color Health Awareness Committee of Pierce County.

WDowntown From page A1

100-plus families each month who furnish their fresh start with the help of NW Furniture Bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a huge blessing,â&#x20AC;? Simler said of the business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope this thing is transformative for people, I think about systemic change in the lives we touch. A good nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep on a mattress we were able to rescue. Or the creation of a job. It is good stuff.â&#x20AC;? It is the stuff of sweet dreams - and sustainable realities.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is extremely rare to find a site that is cleared, ready to go and is of that size,â&#x20AC;? Economic Development Department specialist Ellie Walkowiak said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really is well positioned.â&#x20AC;? All totaled, 7.3 acres could be involved in the sale. Proposals will be given scores on the overall concept, the plan to finance the proposal and the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to deliver on the plan. The site will then be sold for more than the appraised value of $2.9 million. It canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be sold for less no matter what the proposal offers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those proposals wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even be considered,â&#x20AC;? Walkowiak said, noting that since the land was used as collateral for city bonds, it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell for less than the appraised value. All proceeds from the sale will go to pay off the bonds and not just go into the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Fund. Since the request involves two parcels, developers can submit concepts for each or both of the adjoining locations. The current assessed value for all lots is about $5 million. One site is $2.9 million and the other is $2.1 million, so those numbers give a scope of the dollars involved. Proposals are due Aug. 20 and will be reviewed in the fall. A developer will be selected by Oct. 1. Actual construction would depend on the plans. This is not the first time developers have looked at the site. Via Architecture completed the Brewery District Development Concept Study in 2010, which outlined general development concepts for that end of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s move to shed this unwanted property and return it to the tax rolls will have siblings soon enough. A handful of other city-owned sites, including parcels on Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Holgate and near the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center, are set to be on the sales floor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More may become available,â&#x20AC;? said Walkowiak.

6705065

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Our View

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EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorials

6IHTHJHYLPUULLKVMHYLTHRL By Don C. Brunell Summer is blockbuster movie season, a time when Hollywood releases its biggest productions. In our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital, the political version of a blockbuster, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Affordable Care Act: Obamacare,â&#x20AC;? is now making its debut. But early previews suggest itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not quite ready for the big screen. Case in point: In regulations quietly released on Friday during the July 4 holiday, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) informed 16 state exchanges and the District of Columbia that they need not confirm that people seeking taxpayer subsidies for health insurance premiums actually qualify. This only serves to undermine the financial integrity of the Affordable Care Act. The rules say state exchanges may do only random income checks. In fact, comprehensive income eligibility checks are prohibited â&#x20AC;&#x201D; banned â&#x20AC;&#x201D; until 2015. In addition, states are not allowed to determine whether applicants already have coverage through their employer until 2015. Critics say the rule is designed to bring large numbers of people into the program without confirming their eligibility and, once onboard, it becomes politically difficult to later remove them. Unfortunately, by not confirming eligibility, HHS is opening the door to rampant fraud and abuse that will greatly increase costs for

U.S. taxpayers. It also means those most in need of health care may come up empty-handed if the system is overloaded with requests from unqualified applicants. The questionable HHS rule comes on the heels of a decision by the Obama administration to delay until 2015 implementation of the employer mandate, a central feature of Obamacare. The law requires that employers with 50 or more employees must provide government-approved health coverage by Jan. 1, 2014. However, implementing the mandate promised to cause widespread confusion and disrupt the health plans of approximately 85 percent of Americans covered by their employer. The delay is widely seen as an attempt to avert a voter backlash in the 2014 mid-term elections. Some in Congress say the administration doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the legal right to change the law, but what Congress can â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or will â&#x20AC;&#x201C; do about that remains to be seen. As things stand, individuals will still be required to enroll by Jan. 1 or pay a penalty. But even that may be difficult. UnitedHealth Group, the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest health insurer, announced it is leaving the individual insurance market in California â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the second major insurer to exit the market in advance of Obamacare. Last month, Aetna Inc.., the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thirdlargest health insurer, made a similar move affecting about 50,000 existing policyholders in California. Some insurers are having a difficult

time getting individual coverage to â&#x20AC;&#x153;pencil outâ&#x20AC;? because the bulk of new enrollees are expected to be people with pre-existing conditions who could not previously obtain coverage. The cost of their care was supposed to be subsidized by premiums from younger, healthier enrollees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that logic may be flawed. The Wall Street Journal found that premiums for healthy individuals could double or triple under Obamacare, making it unlikely that younger, healthier people will sign up. For example, the Journal reports that a 40-year-old male nonsmoker in Richmond, Virginia can currently get a bare-bones plan online for $63 a month. But Obamacare outlaws such plans, replacing them with more comprehensive â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and costly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; coverage. The least-expensive plan under Obamacare for a 40-year-old nonsmoker in Richmond will likely cost $193 a month, according to filings submitted by carriers. Analysts think that younger, healthier people will opt to pay a small penalty rather than sign up for what they view as expensive, unnecessary coverage. As the inherent weaknesses of the Affordable Care Act become increasingly clear, Congress needs to revisit the legislation. Either fix it or replace it. Because as things look now, this blockbuster is in need of a remake. Don Brunell is the president of the Association of Washington Business.

;VY[\YLPZ[VY[\YLP[ÂťZPSSLNHSHUK^YVUN By David P. Gushee and William S. Sessions Twenty-five years ago, President Ronald Reagan vigorously championed U.S. ratification of the international Convention Against Torture, which he signed on April 18, 1988. Reagan acclaimed it as having marked a significant step in the development of international measures against torture and other inhuman treatment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ratification of the Convention by the United States,â&#x20AC;? Reagan wrote, â&#x20AC;&#x153;will clearly express United States opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately prevalent in the world today.â&#x20AC;? Little could he have known that the United States would itself soon engage in this â&#x20AC;&#x153;abhorrent practice.â&#x20AC;? That our government authorized and permitted the torture of a number of suspected terrorists and other detainees in its custody is one of the key conclusions reached in a comprehensive report released earlier this month by The Constitution Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Task Force on Detainee Treatment, an independent bipartisan group charged with examining the treatment of people captured in response to the global terrorist threat during the last three administrations. Without a doubt, the terrorist attacks of September 11 were among the most heinous acts ever visited upon this nation, a clear violation of the laws of war and any kind of civilized moral code. Nevertheless, the torture of suspected terrorists, no matter how monstrous their alleged crimes or connections, is expressly proscribed by American and international law. The legal prohibition against torture is rooted

in our Bill of Rights; the explicit rejection of torture, even in the middle of national emergencies, dates back at least to Abraham Lincoln and the American Civil War. Torture is not a concept whose definition exists in the eye of the beholder. The U.S. government has historically condemned many of the same interrogation practices used by U.S. personnel against terror suspects in the wake of 9/11. Waterboarding, stress positions, extended sleep deprivation, nudity and prolonged solitary confinement have all been deplored by the U.S. State Department when practiced by other countries, by U.S. civilian courts in cases other than those dealing with terrorism, and by respected global humanitarian organizations such as the International Committee for the Red Cross. If these techniques are torture when others in engage in them, how can they be anything less when we use them ourselves? We are troubled that so many high-ranking former political and military leaders continue to suggest that there is a legal or moral justification for torture. They argue that lawyers in the Office of Legal Counsel approved the use of certain interrogation techniques because they defined them as not being torture. Those opinions, since repudiated by legal experts and the OLC itself, relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture but also on factual representations about how the techniques would be implemented that later proved inaccurate. Those who sincerely believe that the ends justify the means when it comes to coercive interrogations are free to try to change national and international laws. But they are not free to ignore those laws.

Much of the torture that occurred in Iraq and Afghanistan was never explicitly authorized. However, once the Bush administration declared that the Geneva Conventions, a venerable instrument for ensuring humane treatment of prisoners in time of war, did not apply to captives in Afghanistan or Guantanamo, many lower-level troops said they believed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the gloves were off â&#x20AC;? regarding treatment of prisoners. Loosening restrictions on physical and mental cruelty dehumanizes not just detainees but also their captors. In the heat of military conflict, amidst a climate of fear and loathing of the enemy, what may be intended as carefully calibrated interrogation techniques to be used on a few â&#x20AC;&#x153;high-valueâ&#x20AC;? detainees can quickly devolve into the infliction of pain for the sheer fun of it. The attitude among the higher-ups that allowed the setting aside of traditional legal rules that protected captives in a few instances quickly dropped down the chain of command, and led directly to the abuses at Abu Ghraib and elsewhere. Regardless of political party, the leaders of this country should acknowledge that the authorization and practice of torture and cruelty after September 11 was a grave error and take the steps necessary to ensure that it cannot be repeated. As a nation, we must recognize that our government is not exempt from the rule of law. Only then can we reclaim a role of moral leadership in the world. David P. Gushee is Distinguished University Professor at Mercer University and Director of the Center for Theology and Public Life. William S. Sessions served three U.S. presidents as Director of the FBI.

Downtown Tacoma was awash last weekend with all things Gay Pride, including block parties and the flying of the signature rainbow flag atop City Hall. The annual event had a lot to celebrate with the passage of equality issues in a handful of states, including ours, and the recent repeal of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). It was also a perfect occasion for all Tacomans to feel pride as well in their city where there is room for everyone. It appears that Pride events, and those forwarding the cause of other discriminated classes of people, will continue on until there comes a day when all people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; gay or straight, dark-skinned or lightskinned or any-skinned â&#x20AC;&#x201C; can be treated for their character and moral fiber rather than be judged by stereotypes. But for a moment, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imagine a world where a woman is not barraged with insults for holding the hand of her uniformed wife as they quietly walk home to their children after a year apart courtesy of a military deployment. Or a man is not punched for kissing his husband while they share a picnic lunch in a city park. Imagine a time when all teens can walk home from getting tea and Skittles from a convenience store without being shot because someone is â&#x20AC;&#x153;suspicious.â&#x20AC;? With each few steps of the march for a perfectly equal world, there will be stumbles. But the march continues. And it must. Even in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;enlightened West Coastâ&#x20AC;? those viewed a certain way because of their sexual orientation, race or cultural affiliation routinely find themselves profiled by government officials and neighbors or are outright fired or discriminated against by bigots and their ilk. According to the national LGBT advocacy organization Human Rights Campaign, there are no laws in 29 states that explicitly prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, and in 33 states that do so based on gender identity. While those on the religious right might see equality marches as contributing to the crumbling of society, and they are well within their rights to follow their hearts on such issues, maybe there will be a day when they accept that others in the world think otherwise. And that those views are just as valid as their own, particularly in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;religiously blindâ&#x20AC;? legal system. The freedom to express oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith also requires the acknowledgement that others can do the same on equal footing. Imagine a day when someone can love who they want to love, look as they wish to look, pray to a higher entity of their choosing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or not pray at all â&#x20AC;&#x201C; without threat of violence or discrimination from their government and neighbors. This full-equality future, however, is not likely to come very soon, truth be told. Humanity always creates â&#x20AC;&#x153;usâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;themâ&#x20AC;? groups simply out of an effort to manage the complexities of life, and that is not always a bad thing. But it should be kept in mind that divisions such as those that define nations, states, counties, neighborhoods and cultures are not made up of â&#x20AC;&#x153;themâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are made up of â&#x20AC;&#x153;us.â&#x20AC;? Every single person on this planet defines himself or herself in ways that are as varied as the people themselves, and thank goodness for that. Imagine how boring the world would be if this werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the case. There would be no cultures to explore or issues to debate or people to find fascinating. No, equality is not about everyone thinking or acting the same. Equality is about celebrating â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if not at least respecting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the fact that people are different, and it is because of this that humanity will never fail to be a mysterious curiosity for everyone to explore and, hopefully, become better people from it. The above opinion represents the view of Tacoma Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s editorial board.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JULY 19, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

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9(050,9:36:, :;,(4/,(+05. 05;6)9,(2 ,HYS`OVSLHNHPUZ[(JLZSLHKZ[VZ[HY[ VMMV\YNHTLZ^LLW By Steve Mullen Correspondent

Living with reality in Triple-A baseball means finding ways to win when the parent club calls up players to the big leagues. The Tacoma Rainiers are struggling with that reality right now, with the recent call up of shortstop Brad Miller – who had been swinging a hot bat with Tacoma and is off to a hot start with the Mariners – taking a little bit of the sting out of the lineup. That offensive decline began to show itself in the opener of a four-game series against the last-place team in the division on July 11. Reno starter Mark Serrano masterfully scattered four hits over seven innings, and the Aces topped the Rainiers 6-1 to kick off the fourgame sweep. Brandon Maurer would last but six hitters into the game, and would depart after not retiring a hitter and giving up four runs on three hits and two walks. Tacoma’s only run in the game came on a solo homer by Carlos Triunfel in the bottom of the fifth inning. “Maurer was a little dehydrated tonight. He tried to go and was a gamer, but he could not establish anything on the mound,” said Rainiers manager John Stearns. “Our bullpen did all they could to keep us in the game, but Serrano was PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS just too tough tonight.” ;6<./:;9,;*/. (Top) Rainiers infielder Ty Kelly swings at a high pitch in the Forrest Snow, Josh 6-1 loss to Reno on July 11. (Bottom) Starter Brandon Maurer delivers in the X See RAINIERS / page A8 first inning, as he failed to retire a batter and surrendered four earned runs.

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

366205.-69469,Dasha Ivanova, a

16-year-old from Portland, Ore., should again make noise in the women’s bracket after advancing to the finals last year. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Top tennis players from around the region are again converging on Tacoma for the start of the 122nd Pacific Northwest Open Championships, set to take place at the Tacoma Lawn Tennis Club from July 23-28. Recent tournament results and other factors will still have an impact on how the field shapes up for the week, but the early outlook seems to point to another entertaining group. Defending men’s champion Clement Reix, ranked the 404th singles player in the world, should be among the headliners of the tournament and looks to defend his crown. Also returning to the men’s field is 2011 quarterfinalist Oren Motevassel, who has been strong in tournaments lately, and Brian Battistone, who was one of the more entertaining players in last year’s field after displaying his two-handled racket and unique serve. “I’m expecting the older guys to come through,” said Tacoma Lawn Tennis Club head pro Nick Moxley, who took over the position in January. But Moxley noted that a strong contingent from Boise State University will again make the trek to Tacoma, including number-one player Andy Bettles, who hails from England. Also making the trip are seasoned participants Clancy and Luke Shields, who have had solid showings in recent years, and Garrett Patton. Moxley also said that 31-year-old Adrian Bohane, a former Ohio State player who has a victory over Andy Roddick on his resume, could also be a part of the field. He added that some younger players, including University of New Mexico freshman Riaan Du Toit – who originally hails from South Africa – and Olympia High grad John Stormans, could have “the possibility of coming up with upsets.” While the women’s field is also not solidified, there are a number of probable participants that should catch the eye. The field could include a pair of former winners, including 2009 champion Kelcy McKenna and local standout Suzanne Matzenauer, who took the title in 2010. Two-time defending champion Gail Brodsky will not be returning to the field, but 16-year-old Dasha Ivanova should return after an impressive run to claim second place last year. Former University of Washington standout Denise Dy is another probable participant after placing second in 2011 and advancing to the quarterfinals last year, while Arizona State University senior Jacqueline Cako will also make some noise. The tournament begins with the open qualifying tournaments on July 23 at 10 a.m., and the round of 32 for the men’s and women’s singles tournaments begins on July 24 at noon. The women’s singles final is set for July 28 at 11 a.m., while the men’s final follows it at 12:30 p.m. and the doubles finals are set for later in the day. For more info on the tournament visit http://www.tltc.us/page6.html.

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PHOTOS BY JEREMY HELLING

:/6>05.:2033: Local kids had several chances to practice skills learned at the Sounders FC Youth Camps from July 15-19 at Cirque Park in University Place. By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubt that the Northwest, and the Puget Sound area in particular, has become a hotbed of soccer. The Seattle Sounders have become a centerpiece of that culture, and their fingerprints are continuing to spread throughout the region. One of the more popular outreach programs the club has offered has become the Sounders FC Youth Camps, and 55 local kids took part in one such weeklong camp from July 15-19 at Cirque Park in University Place. Running throughout the summer months, the program is tailored for kids ages 4 to 15, and camps are held in all different areas of the state, from Spo-

kane to the Tri-Cities to Bellingham, among others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unusual camp when we come down here to Tacoma because we end up with more kids that are at a higher age group,â&#x20AC;? said camp director Ryan Ringdahl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It actually makes it a really fun camp to deal with because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got kids that are a little more mature and you can do more fun stuff with them over the course of the week.â&#x20AC;? The program, which has been running for six years, is also aided by a roster of 130 assistant coaches, many of which are former or current college players or players on Sounders Academy teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really lucky with how many really quality young coaches we get out here,â&#x20AC;? Ringdahl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really good with the kids.â&#x20AC;?

In addition, a highlight of the camps is an appearance by a Sounders player, who normally stresses life values such as dealing with losing games and maintaining a healthy diet. Players were taught a wide variety of skills and lessons throughout the first four days of camp, including sessions dedicated to passing, dribbling, shooting and one-versus-one situations on the pitch. Campers were frequently divided into groups based on their age, where they could then actively practice the skills in a smaller setting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a really well-designed curriculum,â&#x20AC;? Ringdahl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For each age group we have a different set of games that deal with the topic at a level that the kids at that age can engage with.â&#x20AC;?

In addition, each day players received a different giveaway from the camp â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including T-shirts and lunchboxes stuffed with accessories â&#x20AC;&#x201C; courtesy of a growing number of sponsors. Ringdahl noted that while the turnout in Tacoma was good, camps in Seattle can go upwards of 200 players. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part of that is the way the Sounders do things,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They knew they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t support an MLS franchise without having a community thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excited about soccerâ&#x20AC;Śyou need stuff like this to keep people engaged.â&#x20AC;? The five-day camp will return to Cirque Park later this summer, from Aug. 12-16. To sign up or for more info visit www.soundersfc.com/youth/campprograms/camp-programs.aspx.

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WRainiers From page A6

Kinney, and Jonathan Arias limited Reno to just two runs and seven hits over nine innings following Maurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s departure, but Serrano â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a 1.80 earned run average going into the game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was just too much for the Rainiers. The four-game losing streak has cut Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-time four-game lead in the division to a mere game over Salt Lake in the division, while Colorado Springs sits three games back.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have undergone some major changes here since the start of the season, but those are the reasons for our existence as we have to overcome the losses of (Miller and Mike Zunino, among others) and get production from the players that are here. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a part of life in Triple-A.â&#x20AC;? John Stearns Rainiers manager Stearns, who has seen everything imaginable in both his major league career behind the plate for the Mets and in his early tenure as a PCL manager, is looking on the PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

>/(;(9,30,-Rainiers pitcher Forrest Snow was solid in four innings of relief against Reno, allowing just one run on one hit.

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bright side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have undergone some major changes here since the start of the season, but those are the reasons for our existence as we have to overcome the losses of (Miller and Mike Zunino, among others) and get production from the players that are here. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a part of life in Triple-A.â&#x20AC;? One of the recent bright spots for Tacoma, young righthander Taijuan Walker â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who was just promoted from Double-A Jackson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; missed his recent turn in the rotation

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as he journeyed to New York City for the Futures Game. In his two starts with the Rainiers, the 6-foot-4 right hander has posted a 2-0 record with a 1.50 ERA, showing an assortment of pitches that should have Mariners fans salivating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fastball, curveball, changeup and slider, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been impressive early and should only get better,â&#x20AC;? were the words of Rainiers play-by-play man Mike Curto. With the offense being a big question mark entering the second half, Stearns remains optimistic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We still have good talent here. Abraham Almonte, Stefan Romero, Carlos Peguero, and Carlos Triunfel have been very consistent to this point, and we as a coaching staff see no reason that they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t continue this production into the second half of the seasonâ&#x20AC;Ś(but) weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to get added production from other players if we are to win this division.â&#x20AC;?

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*HU^LNL[PU[YV\ISLMVY[OPZ& By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

The plot of crisp grass outside their door just made everyone at Urban Garden Company sad. With landlord Jori Adkins, they’d transformed their shop, and the tarmac and concrete outside it, into a tasteful display of perennials and ornamentals. But, in a four-foot tall box of urban irony, the one thing on the block that was supposed to be in bloom wasn’t. The big concrete planter, owned by the City of Tacoma, was as dead as if no one had tended to it all year. No one has. Thanks to its budget crisis, the City of Tacoma gave up on maintaining hundreds of its planters. They’re looking sad and sadder all over town, and that one big one was bringing down the corner of Puyallup Avenue and East D Street. The only good it’s doing there, Adkins said, is to stand as a bumper-crushing reminder to truck drivers not to cut that corner short and drive on the sidewalk. It deserves better than that, Sue Goetz decided. She and her business deserve better than what amounts to weedy blight. So Goetz, who owns Urban Garden Company, mustered her daughter, Courtney Goetz, and her employee Kristin Stearns, both 17, to bring that planter up to standards. Sue got TAGRO potting soil for a healthy start, then gathered corn, bean, squash, tomato and cosmos starts and seeds at the site

PHOTOS BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

9(5+64(*;6-*695(5+),(5: Courtney Goetz, Sue Goetz and Kristin Stearns, from left, settle veggies, and a few flowers, into a planter the City of Tacoma let go fallow.

on a mild morning last week. The three were delighted by how easily the grass roots gave up. The soil was that dry and loose. They could have gotten away with straight TAGRO, they agreed. It would have mixed right in with the soil in the planter. “Woo! It’s a golf ball!” Courtney whooped, holding up a green pocked orb. “Who’s huffing golf balls around here?” Sue asked. “It makes me wonder if someone was up on the roof. Hole in one!”

They spread the TAGRO six inches deep on the surface of the planter, which is waist-high and about half the size of the beds in a community garden. “Maybe we need something to help hold the moisture,” Sue said, sending Courtney into the shop to pick up a jar of Soil Moist to ruffle into the mix. Moisture will be their biggest concern, they said. They’ll have to hand-water the vegetables with diligence. Maintenance, maintenance, maintenance is the key to

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a decent garden, especially one in a public space. The good news is that there is a trashcan next to the planter. That should cut down on weeding out the cigarette butts and potato chip packages. They separated the corn starts into a patch of 10 plants in the center then planted seeds around it. The rest, plants, and beans and flower seeds, went in around it. “This is an ornamental corn,” Sue said of her seeds. “It’s going to be gorgeous. I like the height in the middle.”

As for the zucchini, the corner may be the one spot in the city where there won’t be an August squash glut. They, like the Climbing Amazon Jewel nasturtiums, are planted to spill over the side. “Like a picture frame,” Sue told Kristin. “I don’t want to have the plants so close they fail. That’s the designer in me. I don’t plant for now. I plant for what’s going to be.” A passerby had a few smug words for Courtney. “That guy said, ‘How long do you expect that to last with all the bums around?’ I told him, well, at least they’ll be healthy bums,” she said. A Far West Taxi driver heading for the transit station honked at them. “That guy was going the opposite direction, and he yelled out the window ‘Thank you,’” Courtney said. “Look at this garden!” Sue said. “Puyallup Avenue, greenified. So now we’re going to give it a nice drink of water.” Patting a tomato, she hesitated. “Can we get in trouble for this?” she asked. Get in trouble for committing to maintaining a greener, more edible, prettier Tacoma? Get in trouble for showing other people that it’s still possible in a hot summer? Maybe. Tune in next week to read how city rules, concerns and contracts respond to the mini-farm at the D Street bridge to the Tideflats.

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From page A1

In other news around City Hall, Government Relations Officer Randy Lewis debriefed the council at its regular study session Tuesday on the last state legislative session and its impact on the city. The bottom line is that state lawmakers balanced the budget in the last hours of an extended session by largely cutting into money that had been flowing to cities, namely half of the liquor sales tax, and rerouted money, largely capital improvement fund dollars, in other funds to avoid raising taxes or further cutting social services funding. Lawmakers approved 393 bills during the session, of which 110 bills will or could potentially affect Tacoma. That list ranges from rules that now prohibit employers from asking workers for social media passwords, a change of a law that allows beer and wine sampling at farmers markets and a law that now requires hospitals to report gunshot and stabbing incidents to authorities. The city did, however, get $500,000 million to renovate People’s Pool and $400,000 for plans for a future Eastside Community Center. Bates Technical College’s Mohler campus is also set to receive more than $23 million for expansion at the campus to house the school’s award-winning communications programs. Waterfront watchers will be pleased to hear that Metro Parks received some $3 million in state grants to fund the “missing link” of the Esplanade walkway. Once finished, the walkway will run about seven miles along the Foss Waterway from downtown to Ruston Way and end at Point Defiance Park. The state grant covers the last half-mile needed to complete the walkway at Pearl Street that will require a pedestrian bridge. While funding for State Route 167 failed to gain enough lawmakers to make its way into the state budget, there are rumors in the state capital of a third legislative session in November to specifically tackle state and local transportation funding issues. SR 167 would be part of that discussion if that session occurs. “There is certainly pressure to do something,” Lewis said. The City Council is now working on its legislative agenda for the upcoming session. That agenda will be presented in late fall.

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305205.The state funding will pay for a pedestrian bridge over Pine Street to continue the walkway along the waterfront.

<UPX\LM\UKYHPZLYHPTZ[VYHPZL TVUL`MVYKLMPIYPSSH[VYZPUZJOVVSZ By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacaomweekly.com

After their two sons and daughter each tested positive for a rare genetic heart condition, Pat and Angela Taylor knew they had to take action. The condition, called long QT syndrome, often goes undiagnosed but can lead to heart palpitations, fainting and sudden cardiac arrest. “It can be very difficult to diagnose a genetic defect like this, but this condition means the heart can fail to send out an electrical impulse and will eventually stop itself,” said Atlas Brookings, member of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association. CPR may not always revive a person who goes into sudden cardiac arrest, but the use of defibrillators can save lives. Brookings, along with the Taylors, are on a mission to raise enough money to place defibrillators in each high school in Tacoma. Each unit can cost anywhere from $400-$500. Most states, he added, require defibrillators in all schools. Washington state, however, does not. “We had a conversation with Tacoma Public Schools, and they said if we want defibrillators in schools, then we need to provide them as a community,” he said. “This is something we are trying very hard to do.” He insists that these defibrillators are designed for use by virtually anyone. “It is so easy to use, and literally tells you everything you need to know about to use it,” he said. “We’re very hopeful to be able to provide a defibrillator in each high school in Tacoma.” On July 27, Brookings is hosting a unique fundraising event at the Narrows Bridge VFW Hall, to educate

“This event will be an unforgettable experience for an unbelievable cause.” Atlas Brookings the public about this important cause in a fun, entertaining way. Brookings himself will put his own unique mind-reading skills to the test in front of the audience. After many years of practice, he has honed his ability to read people and create “the illusion of a sixth sense,” he said. Admission to this family friendly event is $5, and all proceeds go toward the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation. “Every dime makes a difference,” Brookings added. “This event will be an unforgettable experience for an unbelievable cause.” The event takes place July 27 at 7 p.m. at the Narrows Bridge VFW Hall, located at 4741 N. Baltimore St. in Tacoma. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.atlasmentalism.com/tickets.html.

raising event for the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association July 27 at the Narrows Bridge VFW Hall. Proceeds will help pay for the purchase of defibrillators in high schools throughout Tacoma.

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FRIDAY, JULY 19, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Hit-making T-Town duo is on their way to the bigtime Clemm Rishad and Will Jordan are just two artists drawing attention to South Sound hip-hop. Learn about more buzzworthy acts on B5.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARTISTS

RISE AND SHINE. Clemm Rishad (left) and Will Jordan (above) are a pair of Tacoma rappers on their way to stardom. They comprise a writing partnership called the Writer’s Block that is due to pitch songs to a Los Angeles-based label. One of their songs, Nicki Minaj’s “Fly,” made it onto the Billboard Hot 100 in 2010. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

eattle breakthrough artists Macklemore & Ryan Lewis are well on their way to selling out a three-night stand, set for Dec. 10 to 12 at KeyArena. Meanwhile, a lesser-known hit-making duo is blazing its own trail to superstardom in Tacoma. Providing inspiration for Curtis High School alumni Clemm Rishad and Will Jordan is their view from Platinum Reign, the Hilltop studio where they write pop hits. “We look at the Tacoma Dome from our studio every day with dreams of filling it up,” said Rishad, 25, a rapper who cut his teeth performing at defunct, all-ages hip-hop spot Club Friday. His words might sound like pipe dreams coming from someone else; but Rishad will be in Atlanta this weekend winning over new fans on the Dub Show Tour, a traveling hip-hop and custom car show that features the likes of Rocko and Yo Gotti. It’s just the latest development from the hot streak he and Jordan have been on since they formed a writing partnership, called the Writers Block, in 2010. Rishad and Jordan pitch songs to their Los Angelesbased label, Beluga Heights, which in turn shops them around to some of today’s biggest recording artists. The duo’s stock started to rise with the placement of “Pretty

Girls,” a track Iyaz and Travis McCoy recorded and rode to No. 43 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2011. “We didn’t think it would happen as quick as it did,” said Jordan. “There were months and months of hard work during that process; but the fact that the first song we sent ended up being a placement was more than we ever imagined.” That initial success inspired confidence in label head J.R. Rotem, a producer who has shaped hits for Britney Spears, Rihanna and Rick Ross, among others. Rotem sent Rishad and Jordan a beat the duo used to compose breakthrough hit, “Fly.” They wrote it with Justin Bieber in mind. Instead, rapper Nicki Minaj picked it up for her debut album, “Pink Friday.” The single – which also features pop singer Rihanna – went on to be certified platinum with more than a million sales. “That was her favorite song on the album,” said Rishad, something he said learned when he got to meet Minaj in person. “It’s always a reality check. There’ll be times when we’re going through so much; bad stuff, negative stuff, the day-to-day regular life stuff. You’ll think, ‘Man, we’re not making too many moves’ or ‘Man, my day’s not too good.’ Then you’ll walk into a place and they’ll be singing your song on the radio.” “When you make that song and you hear people’s responses to your music, it encourages you to keep on doing it,” Jordan said, “and it helps you to stay confident

and focused.” The two continue to shop songs, but they’ve spent the better part of 2013 trying to emerge from the shadows. Rishad released a new mix tape, called “Supaflyness,” that can be downloaded for free at www.clemmrishad.com. Jordan’s lush, R&B-oriented debut, “In Case It Rains,” is available through iTunes. They say they feel better equipped to navigate music industry pitfalls, thanks to their experience working behind the scenes as ghostwriters; and they draw further inspiration from Macklemore’s ability to become a household name while sticking to his independent ideals. “It’s crazy to know that, that somebody from our area can be independent and still become this big,” Jordan said. “I tell people only legends make it out of here. To grow up in Washington and to do music here you have to be phenomenal for people down in LA and people in Miami and New York to hear you; so that’s what we’re trying to get to. … So we have to work hard and we have to do everything it takes to make it. But it’s worth it at the end.” Will Jordan’s next local performance will be at Wright Park’s Seymour Conservatory on Aug. 17. The show is a fundraiser for local music web site Post Defiance with more details available at www.postdefiance.com. Turn to B5 to learn about more buzzworthy hip-hop acts from Tacoma, and what they may need to take their music to the next level.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE PEARL JAM Pearl Jam released details for the band’s next album last week. “Lightning Bolt” will be in stores on Oct. 14, but anxious fans can already reserve a copy through the band’s fan site (www.pearljam.com) or iTunes. The band also released its tour itinerary, which includes a Dec. 6 stop at KeyArena. Tickets will be available through Ticketmaster beginning 10 a.m. on July 27, with most going for $65.50.

the afternoon for kids ages 9-15 with some dance skills. The camp will be held Aug. 59 at Sprinker Recreation Center, 14825 S. C St. in Parkland. The fee for the beginner morning session is $60 and the afternoon session for a fee of $75. For more information or to register call Pierce County Parks and Recreation at (253) 798-4000 or www.piercecountywa.org/parks

THREE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

TWO

FOUR

DANCE CAMPS

Pierce County Parks and Recreation is offering weeklong morning camps for beginning dancers ages 6-11 and during

and the Samoan Haka dance), sword fights and loads of laughs. A pirate ship with shooting cannons makes a grand entrance at the top of the show and is supplemented by a beautifully painted set, costumes and humor appropriate for the whole family. This production directed by Erin Guinup includes a live orchestra of superb musicians and features 40 actors from throughout the Puget Sound area. Admission is free and seating is on a first-come basis. Performances will be held on July 26, 27 and Aug. 1, 2, 3 at 7 p.m. and on July 27 and Aug. 3 at 3 p.m. WALKING MEDITATION

“Pirates of Penzance” will be presented July 26-Aug. 3 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints at 1102 S. Pearl St. This timeless and hysterical family-friendly comedy by Gilbert & Sullivan features singing, dancing (including tap

Wo m e n ’ s walking meditation seeks to create selfawareness and self-love through connection with the Earth and each other. Walks happen every

Saturday beginning June 22 from 8-9 a.m. at a nature area in Tacoma. Info: www. sacredgroundpsychotherapy.net or call (253) 973-2218.

FIVE

LATIN NIGHTS Studio 6 Ballroom is heating up for Latin Nights. Grab a partner or come stag for 8:30 p.m. drop-in lessons in Merengue, Bachata and Salsa, then open dancing starts at 9:30 p.m. DJ music (requests taken), full club lights and disco balls, Bose sound system. Dance is $5, add the lesson for only $5 more! Studio 6 is located at 2608 6th Ave. Visit www. Studio6Ballroom.com or Facebook.com/ MyStudio6Ballroom or (253) 905-5301.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, July 19, 2013

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT TRIBAL IMPACT

SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

Over the years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has transformed itself and its role in the community. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s determined protection of its natural resources, its pivotal role in development of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port area, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major donations to other governments and to charitable organizations, the new-concept Tahoma Market gas station and convenience store, and the development and expansion of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emerald Queen Casinos are examples of the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic progress. Through its two Emerald Queen Casino locations, Administration, Health Authority, Housing Authority, economic development corporation and school, the Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County with a payroll of more than 3,500 people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and total spending in 2011 of nearly $430 million. This spending supports the community by paying good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and by purchasing goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors and construction companies. Assistance provided to the broader Native American community and the Puyallup Tribal membership also has a far-reaching impact in the community as most of these dollars are in turn spent in the local economy. The Puyallup Tribe is continuously living up to its name, which means, â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous and welcoming behavior to all people.â&#x20AC;? As such, the Tribe is a key sponsor of countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tight economy. Despite economic uncertainties across the country, the South Sound is doing well, and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians plays a key role in keeping that a reality. From funding education, jobs, healthcare, city improvement projects, crime prevention and environmental efforts, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous peopleâ&#x20AC;? is as strong today as it ever was.

Millions in Funding for Local Governments Each year the Puyallup Tribe distributes 2 percent of its gaming revenue from its two Emerald Queen Casino locations to local governments. Over the years the Tribe has provided millions of dollars to fund vital projects and services, and in these current times of economic uncertainty and struggle, funding from the Tribe is most welcome as state and municipal governments slash their budgets and lay off workers to help make ends meet. Decisions on how to distribute this money is made by the Community Contribution Committee, which consists of representatives of the Puyallup Tribe, the Cities of Tacoma, Puyallup, and Fife, Pierce County, and the Washington State Gambling Commission. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approved distribution was for $1.9 million and was awarded as follows: The City of Fife was approved to receive $850,000, an amount determined by an interlocal agreement between the City and the Tribe. These funds go toward a host of community improvement projects that have ranged from police and fire protection to road improvements such as implementing high-occupancy vehicle lanes along Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stretch of Interstate 5. The City of Puyallup was approved to receive $38,500 for automatic vehicle locators for Puyallup Police Department. Beginning in January, these will be installed in all of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

police cars, which will allow officers to have a moving map on their computers and transmit their locations to the dispatch center. When dispatchers receive 911 calls, they will be able to send the patrol car that is closest to the location of the emergency. The City of Tacoma was approved to receive $798,237. Of this amount, $188,454 will go to law enforcement costs related to the Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma. Another $541,783 goes to Tacoma Fire Department, which in 2011 provided fire and medical response 525 times to the casinos. And $68,000 goes to the City Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office to pay for prosecuting crimes related to casino operations. Pierce County was approved to receive $85,431 for emergency management services. This covers the cost of assigning county employees to assist the Tribe in preparing to deal with natural disasters. The Tribe agreed to fully fund the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $148,051 request as there were not enough 2% funds available. An additional $62,620 will thus be paid from the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund. Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $150,000 for costs associated with mitigating traffic safety issues on state highways impacted by casino patrons.

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Partnering to Improve Local Transportation The Tribe has recognized the need to partner with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation. In the past five years, the Tribe has spent more than $27 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting & safety improvements, bridges, to reconstruction projects. These projects provide hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like.

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RECENT PROJECTS INCLUDE: Huckleberry Bridge: Replacement of a 90ft span bridge, including an access road to the bridge. The project was done under agreement with the Forest Service; the Tribe met the requirements of federal environmental law (NEPA) and will be responsible for bridge maintenance after the project is completed. The project went out to bid in 2011 and construction began

in August 2011. The project is now finished and operational. The Tribe recently received a best project management award for this project by the Regional Bureau of Indian Affairs for completing the project under budget and coordinating with non-tribal jurisdictions for fish restoration. Grandview Avenue & R Street: Reconstruction projects that include adding sidewalk, curbs, gutters, lighting, and stormwater drainage. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. Paving was completed in September 2012. Pacific Highway, Fife: Development of civil engineering, right of way identification and planning for the installation of storm water and utilities in a three lane road between Pacific Highway South and 12th Avenue. The development of the roadway and utilities is to enhance traffic circulation and thus traffic safety of the general public and to provide an alternative access point for ingress/egress to the 54th Street interchange with I-5 where the service level is below standard. Project design began in 2009. The first phase of the project was completed and opened to traffic in March 2012.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, July 19, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

A treasure trove of Northwest art transforms TAM into a hallowed hall

“Karako Ue,” ceramic sculpture by Akio Takamori

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TACOMA ART MUSEUM

LEVIATHAN. “Big Fish – Small Pond,” by Fay Jones is one of many works from the Pruzan collection currently on view at Tacoma Art Museum.

It is difficult to go through the gallery in any sort of methodical manner since radiant objects from every part of the space are constantly beckoning for the viewer’s attention. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

A

n excursion to Tacoma Art Museum’s newest show is like stepping into an Aladdin’s vault or an enchanted cave where pirates hide their precious treasure. The eye is immediately delighted – drawn hither and yon as this or that fantastic object calls out for attention. Titled “Creating the New Northwest: Selections from the Herb and Lucy Pruzan Collection,” the show is a scintillating treasure trove. The works in the show represent a who’s who of some of the finest Northwest artists of the last half-century. There are paintings, prints, sculpture, ceramics and glass. Works in the show trace an art historical arch from the 1930s and through the abstract expressionism of the 50s and 60s. There are examples of pop art and funk ceramics of the 60s and 70s. Works from the 80s mark a return to figuration and point toward the liberation of post-modernism in which artists are loosed from the fetters of prescribed styles and are free to draw inspiration from the vast well of art history and knowledge of other cultures in time and place. The Pruzans, a Seattle couple, began their auspicious collection on the heels of their marriage in 1958. Legend has it that their apartment did not feel like a home until there was art on the walls. Unable to afford works by the East Coast leaders of the New York School (to say nothing of the European masters), the Pruzans focused their attention on Northwest artists. Over the past 50 years, their collection has grown in sync with the rise of the Northwest as an economic and cultural

center. Indeed, it was the Pruzans and others like them whose patronage nurtured Northwest artists and allowed them to remain in the region. The resulting pool of dynamic artists has become a verdant cultural ecosystem in which artists, art schools, galleries and museums mesh together to generate a local cultural tapestry of ever increasing richness that attracts yet more artists, gallery owners and collectors in a virtuous, upward spiral. It is collectors like the Pruzans that are the generators providing the financial energy to keep the whole thing going. After all, even artists need to eat and pay the light bill in order to root deeply and bring forth their fruits. The Pruzans have been dynamic collectors – open to self-education and self confident enough to buy the work of emerging artists. The Pruzans have followed many of these artists and purchased work from all phases of the artist’s career. They have been open to new trends and new media. Beginning with painting, the Pruzans expanded their tastes to encompass ceramics when the Northwest became a center of innovation in the ceramic arts. They collected works from the likes of Howard Kottler, Patti Warashina, Jeffry Mitchell and Akio Takamori. When Dale Chihuly’s Pilchuck School helped to make the region into a major center of the studio glass movement, the Pruzans were there, crystallizing their collection with exquisite examples of that medium. All it took was a willingness to learn about the artists (helped by gallery owners), and the courage to stay open to new ideas and the Pruzans were on their way to building this historic repository of amazing Northwest art. The collection charts the evolution of a discernable Northwest

“Skagit Valley” by Alden Mason

identity captured by and cultivated by the artists of this unique part of the world. Because we are all grounded in a particular time and place, artists who express themselves are also reflective of the time and place in which they exist. Thus, the climate and ecology of the Northwest has as much potential to have an influence on our artists as social and cultural conditions do. “Creating the New Northwest” is so rich in quantity and quality that it is no small feat to get through the whole show in one visit. It is difficult to go through the gallery in any sort of methodical manner since radiant objects from every part of the space are constantly beckoning for the viewer’s attention. Firm self-discipline is required lest one begin to dart from one thing to the next as haphazardly as a kid in a shop full of candy-coated toys. Claudia Fitch’s “Chinoiserie #3,” a pair of headless, ceramic harpies glazed in marvelous motley of blue, black and white (with golden accents on nipples and claws), flank the entry like Chinese lions. Rudy Autio’s “Beltane Bull and Yellow Horse,” a large, porcelain, slabbuilt vessel covered in colorful nudes and animals draws one past the guardians and further into the treasure vault. From there one can visit such sweets as Jeffry Mitchell’s “Panda with a Honey Tree,” a whimsical ceramic diorama of a blue and white panda beside a de-limbed tree surmounted by a storybook squirrel. On the walls one can have a close

encounter with the big and brilliant “Big Fish – Small Pond” by Fay Jones. Here a standing figure reaches out to touch a huge, red fish that has emerged from a small blue oval. An elephant head seems to rise from the ground and a pair of daft ducks drift in an upper corner. There are big, abstract canvases like William Ivey’s untitled 1966 painting that is thick and lush and tactile. Gaylen Hansen’s “Four Fish and a Girl on a Blanket” from 1977 shows that artist’s independence from the trends of the times in its depiction of a quartet of trout possibly spawning near an Egyptian-styled, nude sunbather. Of particular charm is Louis Bunce’s “Nude with Seated Woman,” of 1934. This oil painting is as captivating as a work by a young, pre-cubist Pablo Picasso. Everywhere one looks there is something fascinating or even fascinatingly funny like Alden Mason’s “Fire One!” Here the iconic Northwest painter goes protopop with a garish and comical gumball machine with big yellow feet. The Pruzans bought glass by Benjamin Moore, William Morris, Ginny Ruffner, and Preston Singletary, the latter of whom has tapped his Tlingit heritage as a source of designs to convert into glass. “Creating the New Northwest” is sure to linger as a fond touchstone in the memory banks of those fortunate enough to see it. The show runs though Oct. 6. Go and see it. You’d be crazy not to. For further information visit www.TacomaArtMuseum.org.

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, July 19, 2013

RANDY TRAVIS SHOW CANCELLED

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

The Fat Tones bring smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hot rhythm and blues to Tacoma Cabana By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

A

TRAVIS

Ailing country legend Randy Travisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; upcoming appearance at the Emerald Queen Casino, scheduled for Aug. 18, has been called off. Ticket refunds are available at point of purchase. The singer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; known for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forever and Ever, Amen,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the Other Handâ&#x20AC;? and other hits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was admitted to Baylor Medical Center at McKinney, Texas on July 7, as he suffered complications from a viral heart ailment. While undergoing treatment he suffered a stroke, but his condition has since stabilized. The root cause of his condition is idiopathic cardiomyopathy, a weakening of the heart caused by scarring, according to a video update posted on the singerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fan site (www. randytravis.com). â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Travis does have a family history of cardiomyopathy, and (complications are) likely related to that,â&#x20AC;? said Dr. Michael Mack, a cardiac surgeon from Baylor Medical Center who is featured in the video â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ernest Jasmin

s their passionate fans already know, and as many new ones are continuing to discover, The Fat Tones are a great bunch of guys. Not only do the band mates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bobby Patterson (guitar), Bob Ehrgott (bass) and Zach Cooper (drums) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; play some of the most rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; blues party jams around, on June 20 this Spokane-based trio will be using their power of attraction to fill Tacoma Cabana for a live show and thus help support a fresh T-Town business. The Fat Tones never fail to put on a fantastic, high-energy performance and given that the band is a Maurice the Fish Records artist, the Tones have a strong kinship with our fair city and this Tacoma label. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot happening in The Fat Tonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives these days, including the writing of new songs for their upcoming seventh CD. Cooper said the band has two to three songs completed and two to three in the works, so things are moving along nicely for an anticipated release in spring of next year. One of their new songs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hot Mess,â&#x20AC;? will be on the playlist for their Tacoma Cabana show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really want to get the crowd in there,â&#x20AC;? Cooper said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do a couple of newer songs and some from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sounds Like a Partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; albumâ&#x20AC;Ś We really focus on our originals and sprinkle in a couple of covers.â&#x20AC;? He named â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sultans of Swingâ&#x20AC;? and Jimi Hendrixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Houseâ&#x20AC;? as examples, but at a Fat Tones show you never know what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to pull out. Tacoma Cabana opened this past fall at 728 Pacific Ave. and has very successfully brought a good dose of South Pacific island life to the Pacific Northwest, along with a new live music venue to the downtown core. This tiki-themed bar and grill is the place where patrons can kick back in their own, personal â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margaritavilleâ&#x20AC;? and wrap their lips around authentic and exotic tropical drinks with freshly squeezed

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD/BILLBUNGARD.COM

SHARP DRESSED MAN. The Fat Tones are stylinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; swanky threads these days thanks to

Leroy Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wear in Seattle. The upscale look goes well with the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s increasing elevation in the music scene as they prepare to release their first concert DVD and a new album.

juices, hand crafted flavorings and secret ingredients that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be rivaled anywhere else in these parts. On the menu, complete with vegetarian and gluten free options, is a wide selection of appetizers, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;pupusâ&#x20AC;? in the Island vernacular, and entrees made with hand picked and locally sourced ingredients. As for entertainment at the Cabana, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s becoming a venue of choice for performers and audiences alike. The Fat Tones will fit right in to the Cabanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;leave your cares at the doorâ&#x20AC;? vibe. Their music is so much fun and always with the right amount of harmonies, guitar riffs and instrumental jams to get feet tapping and spirits high. There is world-class talent in this trio all wrapped up in a tight and professional package. Even their look has been elevated thanks to razor sharp duds courtesy of Leroy Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wear in Seattle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been fun scaling

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up our wardrobe,â&#x20AC;? Cooper said, dropping suit-n-tie label names like Stacy Adams and Armani. Looking good is part of the image the Tones want to project to match their A+ music, which is now receiving the expertise of Fame Walk Productions and top-echelon engineer and sound technician Dan Humann. Humann has worked with greats like virtuoso guitarist Allan Holdsworth, American jazz musician and guitarist Stanley Clark and fusion, funk and rock keyboard legend George Duke, along with having contributed to movie soundtracks for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boyz in the Hoodâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Romeo Must Die,â&#x20AC;? among others. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re using him for several of our larger shows weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got an incredible ear and has been a real shot in the arm for us in our live shows,â&#x20AC;? Cooper said. The Fat Tonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first concert DVD is just about to be released as well, just in time for the Mount Baker Blues Fest on Aug. 2.

0

Filmed during a show last May in Sandpoint, Idaho, Cooper said the band is excited about this latest project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In our mind, this is going to be a real cornerstone product for us, something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll send to all the major labels and help put The Fat Tones more on the world stage. It will be a very professional looking and sounding product. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone to great lengths to capture and encapsulate how band looks and sounds today.â&#x20AC;? The Tones have been working with sax master Dewey Dorough who played for many years with the Oak Ridge Boys and Charlie Daniels Band, and he will appear on the DVD as well. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no place to go but up for The Fat Tones â&#x20AC;&#x201C; see for yourself on June 20 at Tacoma Cabana, 9 p.m. The band has a lot of concerts scheduled in the coming months. Find details on their Facebook page and at www. thefattones.com.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

ARTISTS WEIGH IN ON THE STATE OF HIP-HOP IN TACOMA

Friday, July 19, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: HAMILTON LOOMIS WILL SHOWCASE THE RICH ROCK N’ SOUL SOUNDS OF HIS FORTHCOMING CD, “GIVE IT BACK,” ON JULY 21 AT JAZZBONES. IT’S AN EARLY, ALL-AGES SHOW WITH A 6 P.M. START. TICKETS ARE $15; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM.

PHOTO COURTESY ILLFIGHTYOU

TACOMA BUZZ BAND. Since ILLFIGHTYOU released its self-titled

debut album as a free download this spring (find it at www.illfightyou.com) the trio has emerged as one of Tacoma’s most promising hip-hop acts. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

eattle hip-hop act Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ new album “The Heist” is perched at No. 8 on the Billboard 200. More people are paying attention to Seattle hip-hop than at any time since Sir MixA-Lot declared his love of gluteus extra-maximus. At the same time, we wondered what the potential was for some of Tacoma’s buzzworthy hiphop acts to get swept up in Macklemore-mania, and what our local hiphop scene needed to build synergy. We asked a few local insiders to share their thoughts: Eddie Sumlin (executive director, Fab 5): There is incredible talent that is right in your own back yard, and I think people choose to ignore it. Once people stop letting MTV, BET, KUBE 93 set what’s in their iPod, that’s when I think this area will be known for its music. It’s not a matter of us being a smaller market. If you go into Oakland or San Francisco, there are artists who are living off of their work who make decent money just by performing in the Bay Area, because that community is very supportive. (In Washington) we don’t really love and take care of our own. People would rather hit such and such up to get on the guest list than to pay 5 bucks or 10 bucks to see their friend perform. Quincy “Q Dot” Henry (hip-hop artist): You’ve got the School of the Arts, you’ve got the colleges down here; you’ve got UPS, you’ve got UW Tacoma, you’ve got PLU. So there’s a whole youth center that could be exploited if done right. (In Seattle) a lot of youth involvement helps propel them to where they’re at. And that’s something I think Tacoma might be missing. Louie G’s does some all-ages stuff, but that’s really it. There’s not really a venue dedicated to break

in all-ages acts. And we don’t get too many of the B-level touring acts that always go through Seattle and Portland coming to Tacoma for guys to kind of open up for and maybe get exposed to a bigger audience. John McCrae (hiphop artist, a member of the Breaklites): In Tacoma, there’s a big all-ages problem, which is really important for hip-hop. We don’t really have dedicated all-ages venues that are down to do that regularly at prime time slots. It seems like there’s just a lack of venues with the right capacity and the right quality of sound gear and the dedication to run it as a music venue, not just like a bar with a stage. In Seattle, obviously, there’s tons. The Crocodile, Neumo’s, all those places are down to do allages shows if they think it’s going to be possible; and they have it set up to where you can have an allages show and still have a bar with ID, so it doesn’t hit ‘em too hard. Zach Powers, a.k.a. Rockwell Powers (hiphop artist): For the first time since I’ve moved here, in the Breaklites and Illfightyou we have two groups that are really rapidly building fan bases in Tacoma and all over the country. Then Writers Block is doing what they’re doing. I think that if you take those three groups, it sort of puts us in a different place than we’ve been in quite some time in terms of the quality of the music. The biggest thing that we fight is that so many fans of independent music in Tacoma are so used to just going to Seattle that people don’t necessarily look for it here. Even when I was at PLU, so many people were going up to shows on Capitol Hill or the U-District and weren’t even thinking about if there were shows in downtown Tacoma. I’ve often said that Tacoma would have a better music scene if we were farther away from Seattle.

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HIP-HOP’S TOP FIVE Here are five Tacoma hiphop acts worth checking out this summer: ILLFIGHTYOU: This swaggering Tacoma supergroup unites Ugly Frank and Khris P from the Sandlot and City Hall’s EvergreenOne. The trio has been generating big buzz with a grimy, swaggering, self-titled debut album, which you can download for free at www.illfightyou.com. Or catch the trio live next during Seattle’s Capitol Hill Block Party; they’ll be on the Barboza stage at 4:45 p.m. on July 28, with more details available at CapitolHillBlockParty. com. THE BREAKLITES: Many of you saw this crew tear it up at the Mix’s Tacoma Pride block party last weekend. The followup to last year’s rowdy “In the Trunk” album is in the works. Meanwhile, you can download a free, new protest track, called “I y America,” at www. thebreaklites.com. THE WRITERS BLOCK: The Tacoma writing team comprised of Clemm Rishad and Will Jordan already has a big hit under its belt, having co-written the Nicki Minaj/Rihanna collaboration, “Fly.” With the release of Rishad’s new mix tape, “Supaflyness” and Jordan’s debut EP, “In Case It Rains,” the two are emerging from behind the scenes to showcase their own sounds this year. BRUCE LEROY: With a name inspired by Barry Gordy’s campy cult kung-fu flick, “The Last Dragon,” you know the music’s got to be fun, right? His new summer jam “Coolin’” recalls Ice Cube’s laid back classic “It Was a Good Day,” and you can download it free at bruceleroymusic.bandcamp.com. TODD SYKES: Between City Hall – his group with EvergreenOne and DJ Hanibal – his solo beat CDs and production work he does for other local hiphop groups, he’s easily one of Tacoma’s most prolific hip-hop artists. Find tons of free tunes by searching Bandcamp.com for all of the above.

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FRIDAY, JULY 19 LOUIE G’S: Island Trybe, The Approach, Two Story Zori, (reggae, hip-hop) AA

EMERALD QUEEN: Ted Nugent (classic rock) 8:30 p.m., $35-$65 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk Orchestra (funk) 9 p.m., NC HARMON TAP ROOM: Death By Stars, Battersea, etc. (rock) 9 p.m., $5 JAZZBONES: John Nemeth (blues) 8 p.m., $13 LAKEWOOD MOOSE LODGE: Country dance (country DJ) 4:30 p.m., $5 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC SWISS: Just Dirt (covers) 9 p.m., $5 women, $10 men TRIPLE PLAY: Accidental Heroes (rock) UNCLE THURM’S: Urban Rhapsody (jazz, funk), NC, AA

STAR CENTER: Ballroom dancing, 1 p.m., $5, AA SWISS: Blenis-Ely Band (blues, jazz) 9 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, JULY 23 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 JAZZBONES: Ralph Porter hosts Ha Ha Tuesday (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC LOCHS: Open turntables (DJ) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24

SATURDAY, JULY 20

DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Stay Grounded (Reggae) 8 p.m., $10

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Amos Mack, Jesse Wayrick, etc. (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 EMERALD QUEEN: Ted Nugent (rock) 8:30 p.m., $35-$65 HOTEL MURANO: Kareem Kandi Band (Jazz) 8:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese pop, 9 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Karaoke, 9 p.m., NC SPAR: Blue Rocket Music, 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Linda Myers (jazz) 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5 women, $10 men UNCLE SAM’S: Southern Justice Band (southern rock covers) 8 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: The Rubber Band (jam night) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Humpster Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC SWISS: Neil Andersson (“The Guitarists” recording) 8 p.m., NC TED BROWN MUSIC: Ukulele jam/lessons, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA

THURSDAY, JULY 25 SWISS: Barley Wine Revue (country) 9 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, JULY 21 DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

ANTHEM: Taxi Driver (Jazz) 7 p.m. DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open mic karaoke, 9 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 3 p.m., NC SPAR: Live blues, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Sunday jam, 8 p.m., NC SWISS: Music for Youth (19 and up jam) 2 p.m., NC

MONDAY, JULY 22 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC HOTEL MURANO: Kareem Kandi (Jazz) 8:30 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Kry, DJ Switch (rock covers, DJ) 11 p.m., $7, ladies free NEW FRONTIER: Cairo (rock) 9 p.m., $5 PLU: Stephanie Porter (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open mic) 9 p.m., NC TED BROWN MUSIC: Drum circle, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m. URBAN GRACE: T-town Swing (swing dancing), 8:30 p.m., $5, AA

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 19, 2013

SAT., JULY 20 DOG-A-THON ETC – The Dog-A-Thon provides vital support for adoption programs at the Humane Society. Last year, participants raised a record $200,000 for homeless animals, which helped find loving, forever homes for more than 6,000 pets. The event takes place at 9 a.m. at Fort Steilacoom Park, located at 8714 87th Ave. SW in Lakewood. Info: www.thehumanesociety.org/get-involved/ dog-a-thon/.

COMING EVENTS

COMPASS ROSE OPENING HAPPENINGS – After 13 years of growing Compass Rose into one of the most successful locally owned stores in downtown Olympia, owner Paul Shepherd and his staff have decided to open expand their unique gift store model to the heart of the Proctor District. Offering artisan jewelry, colorful kitchen essentials, ecofriendly baby gear, locally made lovelies, cards, books, and a vast assortment of eclectic surprises, Compass Rose has become a regional favorite for shoppers throughout Puget Sound. Compass Rose carries lines such as Le Creuset, Voluspa, Wry Baby, Bunnies by the Bay, Crabtree and Evelyn as well as local favorites like Nikki McClure, Feeling Smitten, OCD Candy Company and Queen Bee Creations. Van Dyke and Shepherd have planned for lots of door prizes, gift certificates for the first 50 people through the door and many other treats are in store for their grand opening celebration. The festivities begin at 11 a.m. at Compass Rose, located at 3815 26th Ave. in Tacoma. Info: www.facebook. com/CompassRoseTacoma

WED., JULY 24 SUMMER STORYTIME AT THE CABIN ETC – Come to the Job Carr Cabin for Summer Storytime every Wednesday in Old Town Park from July 10 to Aug. 21, 1-2 p.m. On July 24, Debbie Birkey will share NW Native American Tales followed by an opportunity for kids to design their own totem pole. Storytime is designed for children ages 3 to 8 and their families. All ages are welcome. Admission is always free, but donations are gratefully accepted. Event details are available on Facebook at https:// www.facebook.com/Job.Carr. Cabin.Museum. The event starts at 1 p.m. at Olde Town Park’s Job Carr Museum, located at 2305 N. 30th St. in Tacoma. CLAW OPEN SWIM ETC – Join the Cartoonist’s

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

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THE CHAMBERS BAY CHALLENGE IS A 5K/1-MILE FUN RUN FOR ALL AGES AND ABILITIES. IT WILL TAKE RUNNERS ALONG THE SOUNDVIEW TRAIL ON SAT., JULY 20, WHICH BOASTS SOME OF THE MOST AMAZING VIEWS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. THE TRAIL WILL TAKE YOU ALONGSIDE THE CHAMBERS BAY GOLF COURSE AND UP THE INFAMOUS “SWITCHBACKS,” WHICH ARE GUARANTEED TO CHALLENGE THE BEST OF THE BEST. ONCE YOU CONQUER THE HILLS, THE COURSE WILL CONTINUE ONTO THE GRANDVIEW TRAIL, WHICH OFFERS SWEEPING VIEWS OF THE GOLF COURSE, PUGET SOUND AND THE SURROUNDING ISLANDS. THE RUN STARTS AT 8:30 A.M. INFO: WWW.PIERCECOUNTYWA.ORG/INDEX. ASPX?NID=1259

BEAUTIFY THE BEACH ETC – Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay July 20 for the sixth annual shoreline cleanup along Marine View Drive in Tacoma. Volunteer from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. to pick up plastic bags, Styrofoam, abandoned fishing nets and other debris on the shoreline and in the water between Tyee Marina and the Hylebos Bridge. Volunteers are welcome to walk, kayak or paddleboard. Last year, 15 cubic yards of material was removed. Snacks and lunch will be provided. Register by contacting Jeanine Riss at jriss@healthybay.org or (253) 383-2429. RED, WHITE AND BLUE RALLY HAPPENINGS – Veteran’s Allegiance MC, Marine’s MC, & Rock The Dock Pub gang up again to raise some cash for Fisher House! There will be a poker run at Rock the Dock, a $6 breakfast buffet special; ride registration open at 10 a.m. and kickstands up at 11 a.m. Hit three great bars on the ride starting with The Hard Luck, then The Firehouse, off to Wayne’s, and finish up back at Rock the Dock, where Sleepy Pilot & Exit 88 will be rockin! Rock the Dock is located at 535 Dock St. Info: fortlewisfisherhouse.org.

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test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventure-seeking adults. Info: www.pdza.org/ zoom. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org. MUSIC –

League of Absurd Washingtonians for their monthly Open Swim. Participants will draw a word from the fez and incorporate that into their drawing. CLAW meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at King’s Books. King’s Books is located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., JULY 27 NINA SCHUYLER BOOK TALK ETC – Join Tacoma native Nina Schuyler as she talks about her new novel, “The Translator.” When renowned translator Hanne Schubert falls down a flight of stairs, she suffers from an unusual but real condition — the loss of her native language. In elegant and understated prose, Nina Schuyler offers a deeply moving and mesmerizing story about language, love, and the transcendence of family. Nina Schuyler’s first novel, “The Painting,” was nominated for the Northern California Book Award, and named a “Best Book of the Year” by the San Francisco Chronicle. The event starts at 3 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. in Tacoma. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

MON., JULY 29 COOKIES FOR GROWN-UPS ETC – Come and meet Kelly Cooper, author of “Cookies for Grown-Ups,” and enjoy both a sweet and savory cookie! Cookies for grown-ups are savory and sweet recipes in a cookbook created to intrigue and satisfy the adult palette. More than 90 recipes with fun and unique flavor combinations, as well as drink pairings, encourage great conversation with friends and family. The event takes place at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www. kingsbookstore.com.

BULLETIN BOARD BOOK ARTISTS EXHIBITION HAPPENINGS – This exhibition at the Collins Memorial Library on the University of Puget Sound campus located in Tacoma marks the third annual membership

show of the Puget Sound Book Artists. It features a wide variety of handmade books by 30 artists from the Puget Sound area and beyond. The exhibit has grown in popularity over the last three years, and this year new members from Oregon, New Mexico and Indiana are featured. These talented artists interpret the book in exciting and original ways that push the boundaries of tradition. The exhibition runs through July 31. Info: www.pugetsound.edu/ news-and-events/campus-news/ details/1185/. EXPLORE THE SHORE HAPPENINGS – Explore the Shore will provide hands-on learning about sea creatures and train participants how to be citizen scientists. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium staff will teach children, adults and families more about Puget Sound’s beaches and the creatures that live there. The zoo’s Explore the Shore programs are set for July 22 and Aug. 20 at Owen Beach in Point Defiance Park. All are timed to take best advantage of the low minus tides that reveal many of Puget Sound’s most interesting shoreline creatures. The events and programs are free and open to the public and reservations are not required. Bring sunscreen and wear shoes and clothing appropriate for walking on rough beach terrain. Zoo naturalists accompany participants on low tide beach walks, where kids and adults will learn to identify tide pool animals and record their presence and location for addition to the scientific Nature Mapping database (www.naturemappingfoundation.org). Participants will learn about the biological diversity of local beaches and better understand how to protect them. Info: www.PDZA.org or call (253) 404-3665. T-TOWN SWING – Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laid-back and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music HAPPENINGS

from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long! In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE HAPPENINGS – The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: www.pointsnortheast. org or (253) 927-2536. BALLROOM DANCING – The STAR Center hosts ballroom dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/star or (253) 4043939. HAPPENINGS

ZIP LINE NOW OPEN HAPPENINGS – Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium

HOT HULA FITNESS ETC – Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. CHARITY BOOT CAMP Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday morning at 8:15 a.m., benefiting Campfire USA. These drop-in classes are $10 apiece, with all proceeds going to charity. Info: www.tacomabootcamps.com. ETC –

FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. ETC –

UKULELE CIRCLE MUSIC – Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www. tedbrownmusic.com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com

Friday, July 19, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

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ADVERTISING SALES

is seeking an

Experienced

Representative

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

Percent. All Products Guaranteed and FREE Shipping. Call (253) 847-0105

(253) 752-8105

Drivers

If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv. com/careers. EOE.

Also .25¢ Slot Machine

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

Hostess Wanted. Part-time, weekends. Also need part-time waitress. Come in and fill out application. Tower Lanes, 6323 6th Ave.

Warehouse Manager

Old Cameras for sale.

ANTIQUES WANTED

www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

New Overstuffed 0LFURĂ&#x20AC;EHU 6RID Loveseat. Still in plastic Can have for $750 (253) 539-1600

Cameras, Cameras, Cameras!

BUY HERE. PAY HERE. NO CREDIT CHECK!

City of ma o Tac Jobs

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SERVICE DIRECTORY Find the right business for your home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! PAINTING

PAINTING

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

CASH FOR CARS

ELECTRICAL

The Happy Hooker

Allied Electric Service

Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawn Care Âş Handyman Âş Clean-up

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013 LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

ALEXâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Landscaping Painting, Weeding, Spring Clean-up, Pruning, Gutter Cleaning. Residential. Pressure Washing. Trees. Rototilling. Contact Alex 253-564-5743 Free Estimates

ROOFING Your Local Roof Experts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Repairs or Replacementâ&#x20AC;?

TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

ROOFING

PAYS YOU! FOR YOUR Junk Cars

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

253-606-1647

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. NOW Free Junk Car Removal!

1901 Center St. Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

CONTACT US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES

Phone: Mail:

Classified Display - Mondays @ 12 noon Classified Line Ads - Tuesdays @ 12 noon

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma WA, 98417

CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: â&#x20AC;˘ Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com

Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 19, 2012

NOTICES

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PETS Lost Pied Cockatiel, Male Missing in Fife area since June, 2012. I just want to know that he is safe and be part of his life. He has medical & nutrition needs. Contact Susan (253) 517-3809. We Really Miss Him!

Pet of the Week

“Peaches” If you’re looking for a companion to join you in your quiet and peaceful home, then Peaches is the girl for you. This beautiful white and brown tabby with stunning green eyes will bring tranquility and love to any home. She is as sweet as her name suggests and would love to snuggle up next to you any chance she gets. Peaches is ideally suited for a household with older adults, as she has not spent much time around children. If you have dogs, Peaches doesn’t mind. She has had good experiences with pooches, but not so much with other cats. Don’t let this beauty slip away, take her home with you today. Reference #A264947

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Exotic Pet Week!

Rango Rango is a laid back lizard who likes to sunbathe. He is looking for a warm Forever Family.

Brighten the day of a senior with Alzheimer’s! 9ROXQWHHU DQ KRXU RU WZR YLVLWLQJ ZLWK D UHVLGHQW DW +HDUWKVLGH 0DQRU LQ 8QLYHUVLW\ 3ODFH 3OHDVH FRQWDFW 7DVKLD &UHVV DW   EDGEWOOD COMMUNITY FOOD BANK 6HHNLQJ YROXQWHHUV WR VWDII 7KXUVGD\V IURP SP  SP DQGRU 6DWXUGD\V IURP DP SP  7KRVH LQWHUHVWHG FRQWDFW &RPPXQLW\ &RRUGLQDWRU.DWH:ULJKWDW   $GGUHVV QG$YH((GJHZRRG Tacoma/Pierce County Chamber of Commerce QHHGVYROXQWHHUVWRKHOS ZLWKVSHFLDOPDLOLQJV&DOO -DQLFH +XWFKLQV DW  

Sweety & Petey

Sweety and her brother Petey are adorable and social little bunnies both patiently waiting for their Forever Family to take them home. www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Friday, July 19, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV FEATURED LISTINGS

Doug Arbogast

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

LAKE STEILACOOM WATERFRONT

(253) 307-4055

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

/PEN (OUSE s 3UNDAY     s -,3   $EKOVEN $R 37

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

CHARMING ORTING HOME

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I promise to follow through and follow up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll discuss with you exactly how I work and what you can expect. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll communicate regularly and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know the process each step of the way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here to work hard for you and make the transaction as smooth as possible. Call me today for your personal consultation.â&#x20AC;?

Stephanie Lynch

4OP 0RODUCING "ROKER Â?Â?  Â?Â?

www.stephanielynch.com

 HOMES FOR SALE

2914 N 30th St $419,000

Loan products subject to credit approval

HOMES FOR SALE

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

 "ED  BATH s 'REAT YARD   s -,3   2IDDELL !VE .% /RTING

HOMES FOR SALE

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

For qualifications contact Jen HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

WATERFRONT 1RUWK6DOPRQ%HDFK&RPPXQLW\ on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet RYHUZDWHUIURQWDJHOHDVHKROG SURSHUW\'HFNZ SDUNLQJORW rights. $25,000 &RQWDFW6DOPRQ%HDFK1RUWK Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

3 bed 1.75 bath 2,340 sf. Majestic views. Move in ready mid-century modern. Near Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. Minutes from I-5 for easy commuting. 6WXQQLQJ Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFH JOHDPLQJ KDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  EDFN\DUGGHFNZYLHZ0/6

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

North End Charmer!

PRICE SLASHED! Now $369,000! 2726 Pioneer Way E, Tacoma, WA 98404 This MUST SEE property is like nothing else on the market! You will love the private, woodsy feel and convenient location near easy freeway access.

Q

Main home features:

3310 N. 30th

Coldwell Banker Bain

R 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Approx. 1,902 sq ft R Granite kitchen with built-in dining nook R Spacious great room with Atrium window R Den, easy-care floors, skylights R Huge master suite with his/hers walk-in closets, private bath & gas fireplace R Terrific main bath with beautiful tile details, futuristic shower & storage

(253) 279-9949

Q

Margo Hass Klein

Second 3 BR home is perfect for aging parents, adult children, nanny, caregiver or office

margohassklein@cbbain.com www.margohassklein.com

Q

Enormous workshop (separate from the homes) great for any trade, craft, hobby or tons of storage

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I act in your best interest, not mine. You deserve respect from the first time we shake hands to the last.â&#x20AC;?

Q

Plenty of parking in the 2-car garage, additional single-car garage & 2-car carport

Q

Gorgeous, yet easily maintained grounds with 2 Koi ponds, gardens, walking paths, sauna & so much more

$369,000

)DEXORXVORFDWLRQFORVHWR3URFWRU UPS, the waterfront and freeways. EHGVEDWKVKDUGZRRGĂ RRUV DQGFRYHGFHLOLQJV2QHFDUJDUDJH oversized two car garage with heated VKRS DPHFKDQLFZRRGZRUNHU RUDUWLVWVGUHDP ([FHSWLRQDO VTIWORWSRVVLEOHVXEGLYLGH EX\HU to verify). Newer roof, windows DQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FKRPH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;F ORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ &DOO3DP   IRUPRUHGHWDLOVRUDSULYDWHVKRZLQJ 0/6 %HWWHU3URSHUWLHV1RUWK3URFWRU

FOR RENT

I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES REIS

For Sale

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Lease Also 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

For Rent

Mixed Use REO $350,000 4141 6th Ave 1 Comm. unit; 8 res 253-752-9742

Newly Remodeled $1275 7034 S Junett St 3br 2 bath 1250 sf 253.752.9742

www.REISinvest.com

FOR RENT

Summertree Apartments 2 Bedroom, Well located close to Parks, Schools, Colleges and Jobs. Wonderful large courtyard. Terrific Value! (W/S/G included) 1801 S. 15th Call (253) 272.1722

Call Margo today to schedule a private showing.

REAL ESTATE

$375,000

Sound Views!

REALTORS

REALTORS

If I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sell it to you and if I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t live in it, I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t list it.

For Lease

University Place Stratford Heights Apt 1, 2 or 3 bd w/ Garage On Site 253-565-0343 253-752-9742

Office/Warehouse 3875 Steilacoom Blvd, Lakewood From 2500 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com www.REISinvest.com

Office/Retail 7609 Steilacoom Blvd SW Lakewood 1340 sq ft. $12.95 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Shannon

Agent Extraordinaire

7OVUL!  -H_! ,THPS!ZOHUUVUZLSSZ'OV[THPSJVT 2 Condos $295,000 6319 19th, #s 9 & 11 1921 sq ft In UP across from TCC 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Waterview Crossing $13,900,000 1600 Unit Dev.Des Moines. Currently 3 Mobil Parks. GI $563,168 253-752-9742

Tacoma (253) 752-9742

u

Beckenridge Rambler $1,450 9051 Ridgeview Circle W 3br 2 bath, 1557 sqft 253-752-9742

Professional Office 4412 6th Ave Tacoma For Sale or Lease 253-752-9742

Newly Priced $1500 2429 163rd St CT E 3br 2.5 bath 2256 sqft. 253-752-9742 www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

u

Downtown Office Condos 705 S 9th. Tacoma for Sale & Lease 253-752-9742

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Advertise Your 5HDO(VWDWH /LVWLQJLQWKH Pierce County Community Classifieds &$// 253-922-5317

Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, July 19, 2013

Ted Nugent

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July 19 & 20, 8:30pm

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Moonwalker Jackson Tribute

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August 29, 8pm

September 7, 8:30pm

September 21, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $10, $20, $35, $40

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You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Twa 7 19 13 p01